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Sample records for pseudotyped retroviral vector

  1. Improved Coinfection with Amphotropic Pseudotyped Retroviral Vectors

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    Yuehong Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphotropic pseudotyped retroviral vectors have typically been used to infect target cells without prior concentration. Although this can yield high rates of infection, higher rates may be needed where highly efficient coinfection of two or more vectors is needed. In this investigation we used amphotropic retroviral vectors produced by the Plat-A cell line and studied coinfection rates using green and red fluorescent proteins (EGFP and dsRed2. Target cells were primary human fibroblasts (PHF and 3T3 cells. Unconcentrated vector preparations produced a coinfection rate of ∼4% (defined as cells that are both red and green as a percentage of all cells infected. Optimized spinoculation, comprising centrifugation at 1200 g for 2 hours at 15∘C, increased the coinfection rate to ∼10%. Concentration by centrifugation at 10,000 g or by flocculation using Polybrene increased the coinfection rate to ∼25%. Combining the two processes, concentration by Polybrene flocculation and optimized spinoculation, increased the coinfection rate to 35% (3T3 or >50% (PHF. Improved coinfection should be valuable in protocols that require high transduction by combinations of two or more retroviral vectors.

  2. Stability of Retroviral Vectors Against Ultracentrifugation Is Determined by the Viral Internal Core and Envelope Proteins Used for Pseudotyping.

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    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Lim, Kwang-Il

    2017-05-31

    Retroviral and lentiviral vectors are mostly pseudotyped and often purified and concentrated via ultracentrifugation. In this study, we quantified and compared the stabilities of retroviral [murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based] and lentiviral [human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-based] vectors pseudotyped with relatively mechanically stable envelope proteins, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoproteins (VSVGs), and the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins against ultracentrifugation. Lentiviral genomic and functional particles were more stable than the corresponding retroviral particles against ultracentrifugation when pseudotyped with VSVGs. However, both retroviral and lentiviral particles were unstable when pseudotyped with the influenza virus WSN strain envelope proteins. Therefore, the stabilities of pseudotyped retroviral and lentiviral vectors against ultracentrifugation process are a function of not only the type of envelope proteins, but also the type of viral internal core (MLV or HIV-1 core). In addition, the fraction of functional viral particles among genomic viral particles greatly varied at times during packaging, depending on the type of envelope proteins used for pseudotyping and the viral internal core.

  3. Cholesterol Supplementation During Production Increases the Infectivity of Retroviral and Lentiviral Vectors Pseudotyped with the Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Glycoprotein (VSV-G).

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    Chen, Yong; Ott, Christopher J; Townsend, Kay; Subbaiah, Papasani; Aiyar, Ashok; Miller, William M

    2009-05-15

    Cholesterol, a major component of plasma membrane lipid rafts, is important for assembly and budding of enveloped viruses, including influenza and HIV-1. Cholesterol depletion impairs virus assembly and infectivity. This study examined the effects of exogenous cholesterol addition (delivered as a complex with methyl beta cyclodextrin) on the production of Molony murine leukemia virus retroviral vector and HIV-1-based lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G). Cholesterol supplementation before and during vector production enhanced the infectivity of retroviral and lentiviral vectors up to 4-fold and 6-fold, respectively. In contrast, the amount of retroviral vector produced was unchanged, and that of lentiviral vector was increased less than two-fold. Both free cholesterol and cholesterol ester content in 293-gag-pol producer cells increased with cholesterol addition. In contrast, the phospholipids headgroup composition was essentially unchanged by cholesterol supplementation in 293-gag-pol packaging cells. Based on these results, it is proposed that cholesterol supplementation increases the infectivity of VSV-G-pseudotyped retroviral and lentiviral vectors, possibly by altering the composition of the producer cell membrane where the viral vectors are assembled and bud, and/or by changing the lipid composition of the viral vectors.

  4. RNA levels of human retrovirus receptors Pit1 and Pit2 do not correlate with infectibility by three retroviral vector pseudotypes

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    Uckert, Wolfgang; Willimsky, Gerald; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    1998-01-01

    cell line it used Pit1 more efficiently for entry. We conclude that (1) Pit1 and Pit2 mRNA levels in human cells are not indicative of the infectibility by GaLV and A-MuLV pseudotypes, respectively; (2) A-MuLV can infect target cells as efficiently as can GaLV, although Pit2 RNA is less abundant than......The gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) and the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (A-MuLV) infect human cells via specific receptors, Pit1 and Pit2, respectively. mRNA levels of these receptors were determined by Northern analysis and for Pit2 in addition by quantitative RT-PCR. Pit1 and Pit2 were...... expressed in different amounts in human tissues and cell lines; Pit1-specific mRNA was generally more abundant than Pit2 mRNA. No correlation was found between Pit1 and Pit2 RNA levels and infectibility by GaLV and A-MuLV pseudotyped vectors, respectively. GaLV and A-MuLV revealed a partial reciprocal...

  5. Pseudotyping and culture conditions affect efficiency and cytotoxicity of retroviral gene transfer to human corneal endothelial cells.

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    Valtink, Monika; Stanke, Nicole; Knels, Lilla; Engelmann, Katrin; Funk, Richard H W; Lindemann, Dirk

    2011-08-29

    To evaluate retroviral vectors as a tool to transduce normal human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) and to optimize transduction to increase gene transfer efficiency. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) encoding retroviral vectors based on HIV-1 or murine leukemia virus (MLV), pseudotyped with either vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) or a modified foamy virus envelope protein (FV Env), and prototype foamy virus (PFV) were produced. Transduction was performed in four HCEC culture media that were previously described for specific cultivation of HCECs or organ culture of donor corneas, namely enriched HCEC growth medium F99(HCEC), its unsupplemented basal medium F99, MEM + 2% fetal calf serum (FCS) (MEM), and Human Endothelial-SFM (SFM). Transduction efficiency was evaluated by marker gene transfer assay, and cytotoxic effects of virus infection were evaluated by means of resazurin conversion assay. PFV- and HIV-1-based vectors showed superior transduction efficiency compared with MLV-based vectors. Pseudotyping with a modified FV Env increased transduction efficiency compared with pseudotyping with VSV-G. In medium SFM, transduction efficiency of PFV, HIV-1-/FV Env, and MLV-based vectors was markedly reduced compared with the other culture media. When cells were cultured in F99-based media, cell viability was reduced by retroviral transduction compared with uninfected or mock infected controls, but remained unaffected when cells were cultured in SFM and was even increased when cells were cultured in MEM. HIV-1-based vectors pseudotyped with FV Env can efficiently be used to transduce primary HCECs in vitro. However, transduction efficiency is dependent on culture conditions and impairs metabolic activity and viability of HCECs in vitro.

  6. Enhanced protective efficacy of H5 subtype influenza vaccine with modification of the multibasic cleavage site of hemagglutinin in retroviral pseudotypes.

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    Tao, Ling; Chen, Jianjun; Meng, Jin; Chen, Yao; Li, Hongxia; Liu, Yan; Zheng, Zhenhua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2013-06-01

    Traditionally, the multibasic cleavage site (MBCS) of surface protein H5-hemagglutinin (HA) is converted to a monobasic one so as to weaken the virulence of recombinant H5N1 influenza viruses and to produce inactivated and live attenuated vaccines. Whether such modification benefits new candidate vaccines has not been adequately investigated. We previously used retroviral vectors to generate wtH5N1 pseudotypes containing the wild-type HA (wtH5) from A/swine/Anhui/ca/2004 (H5N1) virus. Here, we generated mtH5N1 pseudotypes, which contained a mutant-type HA (mtH5) with a modified monobasic cleavage site. Groups of mice were subcutaneously injected with the two types of influenza pseudotypes. Compared to the group immunized with wtH5N1 pseudotypes, the inoculation of mtH5N1 pseudotypes induced significantly higher levels of HA specific IgG and IFN-γ in immunized mice, and enhanced protection against the challenge of mouse-adapted avian influenza virus A/Chicken/Henan/12/2004 (H5N1). This study suggests modification of the H5-hemagglutinin MBCS in retroviral pseudotypes enhances protection efficacy in mice and this information may be helpful for development of vaccines from mammalian cells to fight against H5N1 influenza viruses.

  7. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Although retroviral vector systems have been found to efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vitro, the use of vectors based on murine leukemia virus in preclinical models of somatic gene therapy has led to the identification of transcriptional silencing in vivo as an important problem...

  8. Biosafety of onco-retroviral vectors.

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    VandenDriessche, Thierry; Collen, Désiré; Chuah, Marinee K L

    2003-12-01

    Extensive gene therapy studies in preclinical models and in clinical trials underscore the relative safety of onco-retroviral vectors. Up until recently, no adverse effects have been reported in nearly 2000 patients that were enrolled in gene therapy clinical trials involving onco-retroviral vectors. However, the main safety concern of using onco-retroviral vectors is related to the risk of malignant transformation following oncogene activation due to random onco-retroviral genomic integration. Based on primate studies, there is an apparent low risk of malignancy that is predominately associated with the occurrence of chronic retroviremia resulting from replication-competent retroviruses (RCR), particularly in immunosuppressed recipient hosts. However, in the latest packaging cell lines and vectors, the risk of RCR-generation has been drastically reduced, primarily by minimizing the homologous overlap between vector and helper sequences. Nevertheless, results from a recent preclinical study in mice and a clinical trial in patients suffering from SCID-X1 strongly suggest that onco-retroviral vectors devoid of RCR can contribute to lymphomagenesis by insertional activation of cellular oncogenes. The risk of inadvertent germline transmission of onco-retroviral vectors appears to be low, especially relative to the endogenous rate of germline insertion, which is known to occur naturally in the human population via transmission of endogenous retro-transposons. The strict dependency of onco-retroviral gene transfer on cell division is an important safety advantage that significantly limits the risks of horizontal transmission. Since improved onco-retroviral vectors or transduction protocols may result in an increased number of retroviral integrations per cell, this may concomitantly increase the risk of malignant transformation. The use of suicide genes, self-inactivating vectors and/or chromosomal insulators is, therefore, warranted to further enhance the safety features

  9. Enhanced gene expression from retroviral vectors

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    Micklem David R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviruses are widely used to transfer genes to mammalian cells efficiently and stably. However, genetic elements required for high-level gene expression are incompatible with standard systems. The retroviral RNA genome is produced by cellular transcription and post-transcriptional processing within packaging cells: Introns present in the retroviral genomic transcript are removed by splicing, while polyadenylation signals lead to the production of ineffective truncated genomes. Furthermore strong enhancer/promoters within the retroviral payload lead to detrimental competition with the retroviral enhancer/promoter. Results By exploiting a new method of producing the retroviral genome in vitro it is possible to produce infectious retroviral particles carrying a high-level expression cassette that completely prohibits production of infectious retroviral particles by conventional methods. We produced an expression cassette comprising a strong enhancer/promoter, an optimised intron, the GFP open reading frame and a strong polyadenylation signal. This cassette was cloned into both a conventional MMLV retroviral vector and a vector designed to allow in vitro transcription of the retroviral genome by T7 RNA polymerase. When the conventional retroviral vector was transfected into packaging cells, the expression cassette drove strong GFP expression, but no infectious retrovirus was produced. Introduction of the in vitro produced uncapped retroviral genomic transcript into the packaging cells did not lead to any detectable GFP expression. However, infectious retrovirus was easily recovered, and when used to infect target primary human cells led to very high GFP expression – up to 3.5 times greater than conventional retroviral LTR-driven expression. Conclusion Retroviral vectors carrying an optimized high-level expression cassette do not produce infectious virions when introduced into packaging cells by transfection of DNA

  10. Assessment of HIV-1 entry inhibitors by MLV/HIV-1 pseudotyped vectors

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    Thaler Sonja

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Murine leukemia virus (MLV vector particles can be pseudotyped with a truncated variant of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope protein (Env and selectively target gene transfer to human cells expressing both CD4 and an appropriate co-receptor. Vector transduction mimics the HIV-1 entry process and is therefore a safe tool to study HIV-1 entry. Results Using FLY cells, which express the MLV gag and pol genes, we generated stable producer cell lines that express the HIV-1 envelope gene and a retroviral vector genome encoding the green fluorescent protein (GFP. The BH10 or 89.6 P HIV-1 Env was expressed from a bicistronic vector which allowed the rapid selection of stable cell lines. A codon-usage-optimized synthetic env gene permitted high, Rev-independent Env expression. Vectors generated by these producer cells displayed different sensitivity to entry inhibitors. Conclusion These data illustrate that MLV/HIV-1 vectors are a valuable screening system for entry inhibitors or neutralizing antisera generated by vaccines.

  11. Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors for Retrograde Gene Delivery into Target Brain Regions

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    Kenta Kobayashi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene transfer through retrograde axonal transport of viral vectors offers a substantial advantage for analyzing roles of specific neuronal pathways or cell types forming complex neural networks. This genetic approach may also be useful in gene therapy trials by enabling delivery of transgenes into a target brain region distant from the injection site of the vectors. Pseudotyping of a lentiviral vector based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 with various fusion envelope glycoproteins composed of different combinations of rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G enhances the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer in both rodent and nonhuman primate brains. The most recently developed lentiviral vector is a pseudotype with fusion glycoprotein type E (FuG-E, which demonstrates highly efficient retrograde gene transfer in the brain. The FuG-E–pseudotyped vector permits powerful experimental strategies for more precisely investigating the mechanisms underlying various brain functions. It also contributes to the development of new gene therapy approaches for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, by delivering genes required for survival and protection into specific neuronal populations. In this review article, we report the properties of the FuG-E–pseudotyped vector, and we describe the application of the vector to neural circuit analysis and the potential use of the FuG-E vector in gene therapy for Parkinson’s disease.

  12. Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors for Retrograde Gene Delivery into Target Brain Regions.

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    Kobayashi, Kenta; Inoue, Ken-Ichi; Tanabe, Soshi; Kato, Shigeki; Takada, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Kazuto

    2017-01-01

    Gene transfer through retrograde axonal transport of viral vectors offers a substantial advantage for analyzing roles of specific neuronal pathways or cell types forming complex neural networks. This genetic approach may also be useful in gene therapy trials by enabling delivery of transgenes into a target brain region distant from the injection site of the vectors. Pseudotyping of a lentiviral vector based on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with various fusion envelope glycoproteins composed of different combinations of rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) enhances the efficiency of retrograde gene transfer in both rodent and nonhuman primate brains. The most recently developed lentiviral vector is a pseudotype with fusion glycoprotein type E (FuG-E), which demonstrates highly efficient retrograde gene transfer in the brain. The FuG-E-pseudotyped vector permits powerful experimental strategies for more precisely investigating the mechanisms underlying various brain functions. It also contributes to the development of new gene therapy approaches for neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, by delivering genes required for survival and protection into specific neuronal populations. In this review article, we report the properties of the FuG-E-pseudotyped vector, and we describe the application of the vector to neural circuit analysis and the potential use of the FuG-E vector in gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

  13. Efficient transduction of neurons using Ross River glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsson, J; Nielsen, T Tolstrup; Staflin, K

    2006-01-01

    and human glial fibrillary acidic protein, we demonstrated cell-specific transgene expression in the desired cell type. Ross River virus glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors also transduced human neural progenitor cells in vitro, showing that receptors for the RRV-G are present on human neural cells....

  14. Identifying Cancer Driver Genes Using Replication-Incompetent Retroviral Vectors

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    Victor M. Bii

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying novel genes that drive tumor metastasis and drug resistance has significant potential to improve patient outcomes. High-throughput sequencing approaches have identified cancer genes, but distinguishing driver genes from passengers remains challenging. Insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have emerged as a powerful tool to identify cancer genes. Unlike replicating retroviruses and transposons, replication-incompetent retroviral vectors lack additional mutagenesis events that can complicate the identification of driver mutations from passenger mutations. They can also be used for almost any human cancer due to the broad tropism of the vectors. Replication-incompetent retroviral vectors have the ability to dysregulate nearby cancer genes via several mechanisms including enhancer-mediated activation of gene promoters. The integrated provirus acts as a unique molecular tag for nearby candidate driver genes which can be rapidly identified using well established methods that utilize next generation sequencing and bioinformatics programs. Recently, retroviral vector screens have been used to efficiently identify candidate driver genes in prostate, breast, liver and pancreatic cancers. Validated driver genes can be potential therapeutic targets and biomarkers. In this review, we describe the emergence of retroviral insertional mutagenesis screens using replication-incompetent retroviral vectors as a novel tool to identify cancer driver genes in different cancer types.

  15. The use of retroviral vectors for gene therapy-what are the risks? A review of retroviral pathogenesis and its relevance to retroviral vector-mediated gene delivery

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    Anson, Donald S

    2004-01-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer has been central to the development of gene therapy. Retroviruses have several distinct advantages over other vectors, especially when permanent gene transfer is the preferred outcome. The most important advantage that retroviral vectors offer is their ability to transform their single stranded RNA genome into a double stranded DNA molecule that stably integrates into the target cell genome. This means that retroviral vectors can be used to permanently modify the host cell nuclear genome. Recently, retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, as well as the broader gene therapy field, has been re-invigorated with the development of a new class of retroviral vectors which are derived from lentiviruses. These have the unique ability amongst retroviruses of being able to infect non-cycling cells. Vectors derived from lentiviruses have provided a quantum leap in technology and seemingly offer the means to achieve significant levels of gene transfer in vivo. The ability of retroviruses to integrate into the host cell chromosome also raises the possibility of insertional mutagenesis and oncogene activation. Both these phenomena are well known in the interactions of certain types of wild-type retroviruses with their hosts. However, until recently they had not been observed in replication defective retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, either in animal models or in clinical trials. This has meant the potential disadvantages of retroviral mediated gene therapy have, until recently, been seen as largely, if not entirely, hypothetical. The recent clinical trial of γc mediated gene therapy for X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID) has proven the potential of retroviral mediated gene transfer for the treatment of inherited metabolic disease. However, it has also illustrated the potential dangers involved, with 2 out of 10 patients developing T cell leukemia as a consequence of the treatment. A considered review of

  16. Pseudotyped Adeno-associated Viral Vector Tropism and Transduction Efficiencies in Murine Wound Healing

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    Keswani, Sundeep G.; Balaji, Swathi; Le, Louis; Leung, Alice; Lim, Foong-Yen; Habli, Mounira; Jones, Helen N.; Wilson, James M.; Crombleholme, Timothy M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell specific gene transfer and sustained transgene expression are goals of cutaneous gene therapy for tissue repair and regeneration. Adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2/2) mediated gene transfer to the skin results in stable transgene expression in the muscle fascicles of the panniculus carnosus in mice, with minimal gene transfer to the dermal or epidermal elements. We hypothesized that pseudotyped AAV vectors may have a unique and characteristic tropism and transduction efficiency pro...

  17. Insulators to Improve the Safety of Retroviral Vectors for HIV Gene Therapy

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    Browning, Diana L.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral vector gene therapy is a promising approach to treating HIV-1. However, integrated vectors are mutagens with the potential to dysregulate nearby genes and cause severe adverse side effects. Leukemia has already been a documented severe adverse event in gene therapy clinical trials for the treatment of primary immunodeficiencies. These side effects will need to be reduced or avoided if retroviral vectors are to be used clinically for HIV-1 treatment. The addition of chromatin insulators to retroviral vectors is a potential strategy for reducing adverse side effects. Insulators have already been effectively used in retroviral vectors to reduce genotoxicity in pre-clinical studies. Here, we will review how insulators function, genotoxicity in gene therapy clinical trials, the design of insulated retroviral vectors, promising results from insulated retroviral vector studies, and considerations for the development of insulated retroviral treatment vectors for HIV-1 gene therapy. PMID:28424756

  18. Retroviral Vectors: Post Entry Events and Genomic Alterations

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    Christof von Kalle

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The curative potential of retroviral vectors for somatic gene therapy has been demonstrated impressively in several clinical trials leading to sustained long-term correction of the underlying genetic defect. Preclinical studies and clinical monitoring of gene modified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells in patients have shown that biologically relevant vector induced side effects, ranging from in vitro immortalization to clonal dominance and oncogenesis in vivo, accompany therapeutic efficiency of integrating retroviral gene transfer systems. Most importantly, it has been demonstrated that the genotoxic potential is not identical among all retroviral vector systems designed for clinical application. Large scale viral integration site determination has uncovered significant differences in the target site selection of retrovirus subfamilies influencing the propensity for inducing genetic alterations in the host genome. In this review we will summarize recent insights gained on the mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis based on intrinsic target site selection of different retrovirus families. We will also discuss examples of side effects occurring in ongoing human gene therapy trials and future prospectives in the field.

  19. Factors that influence VSV-G pseudotyping and transduction efficiency of lentiviral vectors-in vitro and in vivo implications.

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    Farley, Daniel C; Iqball, Sharifah; Smith, Joanne C; Miskin, James E; Kingsman, Susan M; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A

    2007-05-01

    Pseudotyping viral vectors with vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) enables the transduction of an extensive range of cell types from different species. We have discovered two important parameters of the VSV-G-pseudotyping phenomenon that relate directly to the transduction potential of lentiviral vectors: (1) the glycosylation status of VSV-G, and (2) the quantity of glycoprotein associated with virions. We measured production-cell and virion-associated quantities of two isoform variants of VSV-G, which differ in their glycosylation status, VSV-G1 and VSV-G2, and assessed the impact of this difference on the efficiency of mammalian cell transduction by lentiviral vectors. The glycosylation of VSV-G at N336 allowed greater maximal expression of VSV-G in HEK293T cells, thus facilitating vector pseudotyping. The transduction of primate cell lines was substantially affected (up to 50-fold) by the degree of VSV-G1 or VSV-G2 incorporation, whereas other cell lines, such as D17 (canine), were less sensitive to virion-associated VSV-G1/2 quantities. These data indicate that the minimum required concentration of virion-associated VSV-G differs substantially between cell species/types. The implications of these data with regard to VSV-G-pseudotyped vector production, titration, and use in host-cell restriction studies, are discussed. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Human, Pig, and Mouse Interferon-Induced Transmembrane Proteins Partially Restrict Pseudotyped Lentiviral Vectors.

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    Hornick, Andrew L; Li, Ni; Oakland, Mayumi; McCray, Paul B; Sinn, Patrick L

    2016-05-01

    Lentiviral vectors are increasingly used in clinical trials to treat genetic diseases. Our research has focused on strategies to improve lentiviral gene transfer efficiency in the airways. Previously we demonstrated that a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-based lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the baculovirus envelope glycoprotein GP64 (GP64-FIV) efficiently transduced mouse nasal epithelia in vivo but transduced mouse intrapulmonary airways with 10-fold less efficiency. Here, we demonstrate that members of a family of proteins with antiviral activity, interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs), are more highly expressed in mouse intrapulmonary airways as compared with mouse nasal airways. Using GP64- and VSV-G (vesicular stomatitis virus G glycoprotein)-pseudotyped FIV, we show that expression of mouse IFITM1, IFITM2, and IFITM3 restricts gene transfer. Further, we show that both the nasal and intrapulmonary airways of IFITM locus knockout mice are more efficiently transduced with GP64-FIV than their heterozygous littermates. In anticipation of transitioning our studies into pig models of airway disease and clinical trials in humans, we investigated the ability of pig and human IFITMs to restrict lentiviral gene transfer. We observed that both human and pig IFITMs partially restricted both VSV-G-FIV and GP64-FIV transduction in vitro. Previous studies have focused on IFITM-mediated restriction of replication-competent wild-type viruses; however, these results implicate the IFITM proteins as restriction factors that can limit lentivirus-based vector gene transfer to airway epithelia. The findings are relevant to future preclinical and clinical airway gene therapy trials using lentivirus-based vectors.

  1. Adenovirus hexon modifications influence in vitro properties of pseudotyped human adenovirus type 5 vectors.

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    Solanki, Manish; Zhang, Wenli; Jing, Liu; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used human adenovirus (HAdV)-5-based vectors are restricted by their tropism and pre-existing immunity. Here, we characterized novel HAdV-5 vectors pseudotyped with hypervariable regions (HVRs) and surface domains (SDs) of other HAdV types. Hexon-modified HAdV-5 vectors (HV-HVR5, HV-HVR12, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4) could be reconstituted and amplified in human embryonic kidney cells. After infection of various cell lines, we measured transgene expression levels by performing luciferase reporter assays or coagulation factor IX (FIX) ELISA. Dose-dependent studies revealed that luciferase expression levels were comparable for HV-HVR5, HV-SD12 and HV-SD4, whereas HV-HVR12 expression levels were significantly lower. Vector genome copy numbers (VCNs) from genomic DNA and nuclear extracts were then determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Surprisingly, determination of cell- and nuclear fraction-associated VCNs revealed increased VCNs for HV-HVR12 compared with HV-SD12 and HV-HVR5. Increased nuclear fraction-associated HV-HVR12 DNA molecules and decreased transgene expression levels were independent of the cell line used, and we observed the same effect for a hexon-modified high-capacity adenoviral vector encoding canine FIX. In conclusion, studying hexon-modified adenoviruses in vitro demonstrated that HVRs but also flanking hexon regions influence uptake and transgene expression of adenoviral vectors.

  2. Enhanced gene transfer efficiency in the murine striatum and an orthotopic glioblastoma tumor model, using AAV-7- and AAV-8-pseudotyped vectors.

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    Harding, Thomas C; Dickinson, Peter J; Roberts, Byron N; Yendluri, Satya; Gonzalez-Edick, Melissa; Lecouteur, Richard A; Jooss, Karin U

    2006-08-01

    In this study, recombinant AAV vectors pseudotyped with viral capsids derived from AAV serotypes 7 and 8 were evaluated for gene transfer in the murine striatum relative to vectors pseudotyped with AAV serotypes 2, 5, and 6. In comparison with rAAV serotype 2, pseudotyped vectors derived from AAV-7 and AAV-8 have increased transduction efficiency in the murine CNS, with the rank order rAAV-7 > rAAV-8 > rAAV-5 > rAAV-2 = rAAV-6, with all vectors demonstrating a marked tropism for neuronal transduction. Pseudotyped rAAV vector gene transfer in the brain after preimplantation of a murine 4C8 glioblastoma tumor was also evaluated. Efficiency of gene transfer to the orthotopic tumor was increased when using AAV-6, -7, and -8 capsid proteins in comparison with serotype 2, with the order rAAV-8 = rAAV-7 > rAAV-6 > rAAV-2 > rAAV-5. The increased gene transfer efficiency of rAAV vectors pseudotyped with the rAAV-8 capsid also provided enhanced therapeutic efficacy in a mouse model of glioblastoma multiforme, using vectors encoding an inhibitor of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway. These studies demonstrate that rAAV vectors pseudotyped with capsids derived from AAV serotypes 7 and 8 provide enhanced gene transfer in the murine CNS and may offer increased therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of neurological disease.

  3. Delivery of Short Hairpin RNA Sequences by Using a Replication-Competent Avian Retroviral Vector

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    Bromberg-White, Jennifer L.; Webb, Craig P; Patacsil, Veronique S.; Miranti, Cindy K.; Williams, Bart O.; Holmen, Sheri L.

    2004-01-01

    While recent studies have demonstrated that retroviral vectors can be used to stably express short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit gene expression, these studies have utilized replication-defective retroviruses. We describe the creation of a replication-competent, Gateway-compatible retroviral vector capable of expressing shRNA that inhibits the expression of specific genes.

  4. Delivery of short hairpin RNA sequences by using a replication-competent avian retroviral vector.

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    Bromberg-White, Jennifer L; Webb, Craig P; Patacsil, Veronique S; Miranti, Cindy K; Williams, Bart O; Holmen, Sheri L

    2004-05-01

    While recent studies have demonstrated that retroviral vectors can be used to stably express short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit gene expression, these studies have utilized replication-defective retroviruses. We describe the creation of a replication-competent, Gateway-compatible retroviral vector capable of expressing shRNA that inhibits the expression of specific genes.

  5. Adeno-associated virus pseudotype 5 vector improves gene transfer in arthritic joints.

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    Apparailly, F; Khoury, M; Vervoordeldonk, M J B; Adriaansen, J; Gicquel, E; Perez, N; Riviere, C; Louis-Plence, P; Noel, D; Danos, O; Douar, A-M; Tak, P P; Jorgensen, C

    2005-04-01

    The potential for gene delivery to joints, using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), has received much attention. Different serotypes have different virion shell proteins and, as a consequence, vary in their tropism for diverse tissues. The aim of this study was to compare the transduction efficiency of different AAV serotypes encoding murine secreted alkaline phosphatase (mSEAP) or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase for intraarticular gene delivery in an experimental model of arthritis. The vectors contained AAV2 terminal repeats flanking the reporter gene in an AAV1, AAV2, or AAV5 capsid, producing the pseudotypes rAAV-2/1, rAAV-2/2, and rAAV-2/5. Left knee joints of mice with collagen-induced arthritis were injected and transgene expression was analyzed by chemiluminescence or direct in situ staining of frozen sections. We show for the first time that intraarticular gene transfer with AAV- 2/5 was far more efficient than with the other serotypes tested. Transgene expression was detectable as early as 7 days after injection, reached a maximum at 21 days, and was stably expressed for at least 130 days, whereas AAV-2/1- and AAV-2/2-mediated expression levels were barely detectable. These findings provide a practical application for future local AAV-mediated gene therapy trials in RA.

  6. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

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    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... cells, and that MLV-A as well as GALV-1 retroviral vectors are suitable for further development of gene therapy in SCLC....

  7. An XMRV Derived Retroviral Vector as a Tool for Gene Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas-Martinez Augusto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retroviral vectors are widely used tools for gene delivery and gene therapy. They are useful for gene expression studies and genetic manipulation in vitro and in vivo. Many retroviral vectors are derived from the mouse gammaretrovirus, murine leukemia virus (MLV. These vectors have been widely used in gene therapy clinical trials. XMRV, initially found in prostate cancer tissue, was the first human gammaretrovirus described. Findings We developed a new retroviral vector based on XMRV called pXC. It was developed for gene transfer to human cells and is produced by transient cotransfection of LNCaP cells with pXC and XMRV-packaging plasmids. Conclusions We demonstrated that pXC mediates expression of inserted transgenes in cell lines. This new vector will be a useful tool for gene transfer in human and non-human cell lines, including gene therapy studies.

  8. In vivo gene marking of rhesus macaque long-term repopulating hematopoietic cells using a VSV-G pseudotyped versus amphotropic oncoretroviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Patricia A; De Angioletti, Maria; Donahue, Robert E; Notaro, Rosario; Luzzatto, Lucio; Dunbar, Cynthia E

    2004-04-01

    Gene transfer efficiency into primitive hematopoietic cells may be limited by their expression of surface receptors allowing vector entry. Vectors pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) envelope do not need receptors to enter cells, and therefore may provide superior transduction efficiency. Using a competitive repopulation model in the rhesus macaque, we examined in vivo gene marking levels of blood cells transduced with two vectors: (i) a VSV-G pseudotyped retrovirus and (ii) a conventional amphotropic retrovirus. The VSV-G vector, containing the human glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) gene, was constructed for treatment of severe hemolytic anemia caused by G6PD deficiency. Three myeloablated animals were transplanted with peripheral blood CD34+ cells, half of which were transduced with the VSV-G vector and the other half with the amphotropic vector. In all animals post-transplantation, levels of in vivo marking in circulating granulocytes and mononuclear cells were similar: 1% or less with both vectors. In one animal, the human G6PD enzyme transferred by the VSV-G vector was expressed in erythrocytes, early after transplantation, at a level of 45% of the endogenous rhesus G6PD protein. In a clinically relevant animal model, we found similar in vivo marking with a VSV-G pseudotyped and a standard amphotropic oncoretroviral vector. Amphotropic receptor expression may not be a limiting factor in transduction efficiency, but VSV-G pseudotypes possess other practical advantages that may make them advantageous for clinical use. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Pseudotype formation of murine leukemia virus with the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Emi, N; Friedmann, T; Yee, J K

    1991-01-01

    Mixed infection of a cell by vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and retroviruses results in the production of progeny virions bearing the genome of one virus encapsidated by the envelope proteins of the other. The mechanism for the phenomenon of pseudotype formation is not clear, although specific recognition of a viral envelope protein by the nucleocapsid of an unrelated virus is presumably involved. In this study, we used Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV)-based retroviral vectors encoding...

  10. Efficient transduction of equine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells by VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Gayle F; Hilbert, Bryan; Trope, Gareth; Kalle, Wouter; Strappe, Padraig

    2014-12-01

    Equine adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (EADMSC) provide a unique cell-based approach for treatment of a variety of equine musculoskeletal injuries, via regeneration of diseased or damaged tissue, or the secretion of immunomodulatory molecules. These capabilities can be further enhanced by genetic modification using lentiviral vectors, which provide a safe and efficient method of gene delivery. We investigated the suitability of lentiviral vector technology for gene delivery into EADMSC, using GFP expressing lentiviral vectors pseudotyped with the G glycoprotein from the vesicular stomatitis virus (V-GFP) or, for the first time, the baculovirus gp64 envelope protein (G-GFP). In this study, we produced similarly high titre V-GFP and G-GFP lentiviral vectors. Flow cytometric analysis showed efficient transduction using V-GFP; however G-GFP exhibited a poor ability to transduce EADMSC. Transduction resulted in sustained GFP expression over four passages, with minimal effects on cell viability and doubling time, and an unaltered chondrogenic differentiation potential. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Integrating retroviral cassette extends gene delivery of HSV-1 expression vectors to dividing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Felipe, P; Izquierdo, M; Wandosell, F; Lim, F

    2001-08-01

    Retroviral vectors have long been used in a wide variety of gene transfer applications but have certain drawbacks, such as small cargo size, limited tropism, and low titers. HSV expression vectors overcome these disadvantages, but, because they persist in target cells as nonreplicative episomes, they are not retained in all the progeny of dividing cells. Chimeric HSV/AAV products that can mediate transgene integration in human mitotic cells have been constructed, but, to date, genetic modification of dividing cells in animal models using HSV products has not been possible. Here, we report the construction of hybrid HSV/retroviral vectors that exhibit up to 50-fold higher transgene integration efficiency compared to vectors containing only HSV-1 components. Efficient integration of a retroviral transgene cassette encoding pac in human cells required expression of the Moloney murine leukemia virus gag-pol genes, but in murine cells, could also be mediated by endogenous activities, albeit at a lower level. Gene delivery was equally efficient in BHK21, a cell line resistant to retroviral infection, and transgene retention and expression were observed to be stable for least one month in Hs683 human glioma cells. These vectors have wide applications for the genetic modification of many cell types.

  12. Queratinocitos humanos modificados genéticamente por medio de un vector retroviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arango M.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Los queratinocitos poseen características ideales para la terapia génica: accesibles, modifi-cables por vectores retrovirales, conservan in vitro sus propiedades de proliferación y diferen-ciación, fácil remoción por efectos adversos. Nuestro objetivo fue evaluar estas células comoblanco de transferencia de genes empleando el vector retroviral Foch-29 NeoR.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Enhancer-Blocking Insulators to Reduce Retroviral Vector Genotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Lovelett, Emilie; Emery, David W.

    2013-01-01

    The chromatin insulator cHS4 can reduce silencing chromosomal position effects and genotoxicity associated with integrating viral vectors. However, the fully active version of this element can also reduce vector titers and is only partially effective. In order to identify alternatives to cHS4, we developed a functional lentiviral vector-based reporter screen for enhancer-blocking insulators. Using this system, we screened candidate sequences that were initially identified by chromatin profiling for binding by CTCF and for DNase hypersensitivity. All 12 analyzed candidates blocked enhancer-promoter activity. The enhancer-blocking activity of the top two candidates was confirmed in two complementary plasmid-based assays. Studies in a gammaretroviral reporter vector indicated these two candidates have little to no effect on vector titers, and do not diminish vector expression in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Subsequent assessment in a mouse in vivo tumor formation model demonstrated that both candidates reduced the rate of gammaretroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity as effectively as the cHS4 insulator. In summary, we have developed a novel lentiviral vector-based method of screening candidate elements for insulator activity, and have used this method to identify two new insulator elements capable of improving the safety of retroviral vectors without diminishing vector titers or expression. These findings expand the limited arsenal of insulators functionally validated to reduce the rate of retroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity. PMID:24098520

  14. Identification and characterization of enhancer-blocking insulators to reduce retroviral vector genotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Groth

    Full Text Available The chromatin insulator cHS4 can reduce silencing chromosomal position effects and genotoxicity associated with integrating viral vectors. However, the fully active version of this element can also reduce vector titers and is only partially effective. In order to identify alternatives to cHS4, we developed a functional lentiviral vector-based reporter screen for enhancer-blocking insulators. Using this system, we screened candidate sequences that were initially identified by chromatin profiling for binding by CTCF and for DNase hypersensitivity. All 12 analyzed candidates blocked enhancer-promoter activity. The enhancer-blocking activity of the top two candidates was confirmed in two complementary plasmid-based assays. Studies in a gammaretroviral reporter vector indicated these two candidates have little to no effect on vector titers, and do not diminish vector expression in primary mouse bone marrow cultures. Subsequent assessment in a mouse in vivo tumor formation model demonstrated that both candidates reduced the rate of gammaretroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity as effectively as the cHS4 insulator. In summary, we have developed a novel lentiviral vector-based method of screening candidate elements for insulator activity, and have used this method to identify two new insulator elements capable of improving the safety of retroviral vectors without diminishing vector titers or expression. These findings expand the limited arsenal of insulators functionally validated to reduce the rate of retroviral vector-mediated genotoxicity.

  15. Large-scale Clinical-grade Retroviral Vector Production in a Fixed-Bed Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; Bartido, Shirley; Hermetet, Gregory; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The successful genetic engineering of patient T cells with γ-retroviral vectors expressing chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors for phase II clinical trials and beyond requires the large-scale manufacture of high-titer vector stocks. The production of retroviral vectors from stable packaging cell lines using roller bottles or 10- to 40-layer cell factories is limited by a narrow harvest window, labor intensity, open-system operations, and the requirement for significant incubator space. To circumvent these shortcomings, we optimized the production of vector stocks in a disposable fixed-bed bioreactor using good manufacturing practice–grade packaging cell lines. High-titer vector stocks were harvested over 10 days, representing a much broader harvest window than the 3-day harvest afforded by cell factories. For PG13 and 293Vec packaging cells, the average vector titer and the vector stocks’ yield in the bioreactor were higher by 3.2- to 7.3-fold, and 5.6- to 13.1-fold, respectively, than those obtained in cell factories. The vector production was 10.4 and 18.6 times more efficient than in cell factories for PG13 and 293Vec cells, respectively. Furthermore, the vectors produced from the fixed-bed bioreactors passed the release test assays for clinical applications. Therefore, a single vector lot derived from 293Vec is suitable to transduce up to 500 patients cell doses in the context of large clinical trials using chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors. These findings demonstrate for the first time that a robust fixed-bed bioreactor process can be used to produce γ-retroviral vector stocks scalable up to the commercialization phase. PMID:25751502

  16. Induction of broadly neutralising HCV antibodies in mice by integration-deficient lentiviral vector-based pseudotyped particles.

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    Yao Deng

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Integration-deficient lentiviral vectors (IDLVs are a promising platform for immunisation to elicit both humoral immunity and cellular mediated immunity (CMI. Here, we compared the specific immunity in mice immunised via different regimens (homologous and cocktail with IDLV-based HCV pseudoparticles (HCVpps carrying pseudotyped glycoproteins E1E2 and bearing the HCV NS3 gene. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were also evaluated after IDLV-HCVpp immunisation combined with heterologous rAd5-CE1E2 priming protocols. Sera from the mice effectively elicited anti-E1, -E2, and -NS3 antibody responses, and neutralised various HCVpp subtypes (1a, 1b, 2a, 3a and 5a. No significant CMI was detected in the groups immunised with IDLV-based HCVpps. In contrast, the combination of rAd5-CE1E2 priming and IDLV-based HCVpp boosting induced significant CMI against multiple antigens (E1, E2, and NS3. CONCLUSION: IDLV-based HCVpps are a promising vaccination platform and the combination of rAd5-CE1E2 and IDLV-based HCVpp prime-boost strategy should be further explored for the development of a cross-protective HCV vaccine.

  17. Susceptibility of domestic animals to a pseudotype virus bearing RD-114 virus envelope protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaho, Rie Nakaoka; Nakagawa, So; Hashimoto-Gotoh, Akira; Nakaya, Yuki; Shimode, Sayumi; Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Takahashi, Mahoko Ueda; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-08-10

    Retroviral vectors are used for gene transduction into cells and have been applied to gene therapy. Retroviral vectors using envelope protein (Env) of RD-114 virus, a feline endogenous retrovirus, have been used for gene transduction. In this study, we investigated the susceptibility to RD-114 Env-pseudotyped virus in twelve domestic animals including cattle, sheep, horse, pig, dog, cat, ferret, mink, rabbit, rat, mouse, and quail. Comparison of nucleotide sequences of ASCT2 (SLC1A5), a receptor of RD-114 virus, in 10 mammalian and 2 avian species revealed that insertion and deletion events at the region C of ASCT2 where RD-114 viral Env interacts occurred independently in the mouse and rat lineage and in the chicken and quail lineage. By the pseudotype virus infection assay, we found that RD-114 Env-pseudotyped virus could efficiently infect all cell lines except those from mouse and rat. Furthermore, we confirmed that bovine ASCT2 (bASCT2) functions as a receptor for RD-114 virus infection. We also investigated bASCT2 mRNA expression in cattle tissues and found that it is expressed in various tissues including lung, spleen and kidney. These results indicate that retrovirus vectors with RD-114 virus Env can be used for gene therapy in large domestic animals in addition to companion animals such as cat and dog. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Spontaneous silencing of humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) gene expression from a retroviral vector by DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, G J; Nielsen, S D; Hansen, J E

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed a functional murine leukemia virus (MLV)-derived retroviral vector transducing two genes encoding the autofluorescent humanized green fluorescent protein (hGFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase (Neo). This was done to determine whether hGFP could function as a marker gene...... in a retroviral vector and to investigate the expression of genes in a retroviral vector. Surprisingly, clonal vector packaging cell lines showed variable levels of hGFP expression, and expression was detected in as few as 49% of the cells in a clonally derived culture. This indicated that hGFP expression...... was silenced in individual cells. This silencing could be diminished by selective culturing of the vector packaging cells with the neomycin analog G418 and was reduced by a 3-day treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. The 5-azacytidine effect was transient, and hGFP expression in the vector...

  19. Adeno-associated virus pseudotype 5 vector improves gene transfer in arthritic joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Apparailly, F.; Khoury, M.; Vervoordeldonk, M. J. B.; Adriaansen, J.; Gicquel, E.; Perez, N.; Riviere, C.; Louis-Plence, P.; Noel, D.; Danos, O.; Douar, A.-M.; Tak, P. P.; Jorgensen, C.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gene delivery to joints, using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis ( RA), has received much attention. Different serotypes have different virion shell proteins and, as a consequence, vary in their tropism for diverse tissues.

  20. Adeno-associated virus Rep-mediated targeting of integrase-defective retroviral vector DNA circles into human chromosome 19

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Shuohao [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kawabe, Yoshinori; Ito, Akira [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kamihira, Masamichi, E-mail: kamihira@chem-eng.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Systems Life Sciences, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is capable of targeted integration in human cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrase-defective retroviral vector (IDRV) enables a circular DNA delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A targeted integration system of IDRV DNA using the AAV integration mechanism. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Targeted IDRV integration ameliorates the safety concerns for retroviral vectors. -- Abstract: Retroviral vectors have been employed in clinical trials for gene therapy owing to their relative large packaging capacity, alterable cell tropism, and chromosomal integration for stable transgene expression. However, uncontrollable integrations of transgenes are likely to cause safety issues, such as insertional mutagenesis. A targeted transgene integration system for retroviral vectors, therefore, is a straightforward way to address the insertional mutagenesis issue. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the only known virus capable of targeted integration in human cells. In the presence of AAV Rep proteins, plasmids possessing the p5 integration efficiency element (p5IEE) can be integrated into the AAV integration site (AAVS1) in the human genome. In this report, we describe a system that can target the circular DNA derived from non-integrating retroviral vectors to the AAVS1 site by utilizing the Rep/p5IEE integration mechanism. Our results showed that after G418 selection 30% of collected clones had retroviral DNA targeted at the AAVS1 site.

  1. Effective in vivo and ex vivo gene transfer to intestinal mucosa by VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasahara Noriyuki

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene transfer to the gastrointestinal (GI mucosa is a therapeutic strategy which could prove particularly advantageous for treatment of various hereditary and acquired intestinal disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, GI infections, and cancer. Methods We evaluated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein envelope (VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors (LV for efficacy of gene transfer to both murine rectosigmoid colon in vivo and human colon explants ex vivo. LV encoding beta-galactosidase (LV-β-Gal or firefly-luciferase (LV-fLuc reporter genes were administered by intrarectal instillation in mice, or applied topically for ex vivo transduction of human colorectal explant tissues from normal individuals. Macroscopic and histological evaluations were performed to assess any tissue damage or inflammation. Transduction efficiency and systemic biodistribution were evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR. LV-fLuc expression was evaluated by ex vivo bioluminescence imaging. LV-β-Gal expression and identity of transduced cell types were examined by histochemical and immunofluorescence staining. Results Imaging studies showed positive fLuc signals in murine distal colon; β-Gal-positive cells were found in both murine and human intestinal tissue. In the murine model, β-Gal-positive epithelial and lamina propria cells were found to express cytokeratin, CD45, and CD4. LV-transduced β-Gal-positive cells were also seen in human colorectal explants, consisting mainly of CD45, CD4, and CD11c-positive cells confined to the LP. Conclusions We have demonstrated the feasibility of LV-mediated gene transfer into colonic mucosa. We also identified differential patterns of mucosal gene transfer dependent on whether murine or human tissue was used. Within the limitations of the study, the LV did not appear to induce mucosal damage and were not distributed beyond the distal colon.

  2. Dual reporter comparative indexing of rAAV pseudotyped vectors in chimpanzee airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, Terence R; Fischer, Anne C; Goetzmann, Jason; Mueller, Christian; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Yan, Ziying; Wang, Lilli; Wilson, James M; Guggino, William B; Engelhardt, John F

    2010-03-01

    Selecting the most efficient recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) serotype for airway gene therapy has been difficult due to cross-specific differences in tropism and immune response between humans and animal models. Chimpanzees--the closest surviving genetic relative of humans--provide a valuable opportunity to select the most effective serotypes for clinical trials in humans. However, designing informative experiments using this protected species is challenging due to limited availability and experimental regulations. We have developed a method using Renilla luciferase (RL) and firefly luciferase (FL) reporters to directly index the relative transduction and immune response of two promising rAAV serotypes following lung coinfection. Analysis of differential luciferase activity in chimpanzee airway brushings demonstrated a 20-fold higher efficiency for rAAV1 over rAAV5 at 90 days, a finding that was similar in polarized human airway epithelia. T-cell responses to AAV5 capsid were stronger than AAV1 capsid. This dual vector indexing approach may be useful in selecting lead vector serotypes for clinical gene therapy and suggests rAAV1 is preferred for cystic fibrosis.

  3. Disclosing the Parameters Leading to High Productivity of Retroviral Producer Cells Lines: Evaluating Random Versus Targeted Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Vanessa S; Tomás, Hélio A; Alici, Evren; Carrondo, Manuel J T; Coroadinha, Ana S

    2017-04-01

    Gammaretrovirus and lentivirus are the preferred viral vectors to genetically modify T and natural killer cells to be used in immune cell therapies. The transduction efficiency of hematopoietic and T cells is more efficient using gibbon ape leukemia virus (GaLV) pseudotyping. In this context gammaretroviral vector producer cells offer competitive higher titers than transient lentiviral vectors productions. The main aim of this work was to identify the key parameters governing GaLV-pseudotyped gammaretroviral vector productivity in stable producer cells, using a retroviral vector expression cassette enabling positive (facilitating cell enrichment) and negative cell selection (allowing cell elimination). The retroviral vector contains a thymidine kinase suicide gene fused with a ouabain-resistant Na + ,K + -ATPase gene, a potential safer and faster marker. The establishment of retroviral vector producer cells is traditionally performed by randomly integrating the retroviral vector expression cassette codifying the transgene. More recently, recombinase-mediated cassette exchange methodologies have been introduced to achieve targeted integration. Herein we compared random and targeted integration of the retroviral vector transgene construct. Two retroviral producer cell lines, 293 OuaS and 293 FlexOuaS, were generated by random and targeted integration, respectively, producing high titers (on the order of 10 7 infectious particles·ml -1 ). Results showed that the retroviral vector transgene cassette is the key retroviral vector component determining the viral titers notwithstanding, single-copy integration is sufficient to provide high titers. The expression levels of the three retroviral constructs (gag-pol, GaLV env, and retroviral vector transgene) were analyzed. Although gag-pol and GaLV env gene expression levels should surpass a minimal threshold, we found that relatively modest expression levels of these two expression cassettes are required. Their levels of

  4. Retroviral hybrid LTR vector strategy: functional analysis of LTR elements and generation of endothelial cell specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, T B; Kaspers, J; Porter, C D

    2004-05-01

    Transcriptional targeting is an important aspect of developing gene therapy vectors in order to restrict transgene expression to selected target cells. One approach, when using retroviral vectors, is to replace viral transcriptional control elements within the long terminal repeat (LTR) with sequences imparting the desired specificity. We have developed such hybrid LTR retroviruses, incorporating sequences from each of the human promoters for flt-1, ICAM-2 and KDR, as part of our antivascular cancer gene therapy strategy targeting tumour endothelial cells. The chosen fragments were used to replace the enhancer or combined enhancer and proximal promoter regions of the viral LTR. All showed activity in primary human breast microvascular endothelial cells, with viruses incorporating ICAM-2 sequences exhibiting the greatest specificity versus nonendothelial cells in vitro and a marked alteration of specificity towards endothelial cells in a subcutaneous xenograft model in vivo. Moreover, our study documents the effect of enhancer and/or proximal promoter deletion on LTR activity and reports that differential dependence in different cell lines can give the false impression of specificity if experiments are not adequately controlled. This finding also has implications for other retroviral vector designs seeking to provide transcriptional specificity and for their safety with respect to prevention of gene activation at sites of proviral integration.

  5. Trophic activity of Rabies G protein-pseudotyped equine infectious anemia viral vector mediated IGF-I motor neuron gene transfer in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Qingshan; Garrity-Moses, Mary; Federici, Thais; Tanase, Diana; Liu, James K; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; Azzouz, Mimoun; Walmsley, Lucy E; Carlton, Erin; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2005-12-01

    The present study examines gene delivery to cultured motor neurons (MNs) with the Rabies G protein (RabG)-pseudotyped lentiviral equine infectious anemia virus (RabG.EIAV) vector. RabG.EIAV-mediated beta-galactosidase (RabG.EIAV-LacZ) gene expression in cultured MNs plateaus 120 h after infection. The rate and percent of gene expression observed are titer-dependent (P vector (RabG.EIAV-IGF-I) and was shown to induce IGF-I expression in HEK 293 cells. MNs infected with RabG.EIAV-IGF-I demonstrate enhanced survival compared to MNs infected with RabG.EIAV-LacZ virus (P control virus (P motor neuron tropism of RabG.EIAV previously demonstrated in vivo, together with the trophic effects of RabG.EIAV-IGF-I MN gene expression may lend this vector to therapeutic application in motor neuron disease.

  6. Interleukin-Encoding Adenoviral Vectors as Genetic Adjuvant for Vaccination against Retroviral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohs, Inga; Windmann, Sonja; Wildner, Oliver; Dittmer, Ulf; Bayer, Wibke

    2013-01-01

    Interleukins (IL) are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV) surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70) in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity. PMID:24349306

  7. Tumor-specific suicide gene therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma by transcriptionally targeted retroviral replicating vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y-H; Lin, C-C; Chen, S-H; Tai, C-K

    2015-02-01

    Replicating virus vectors are attractive tools for anticancer gene therapy, but the potential for adverse events due to uncontrolled spread of the vectors has been a major concern. To design a tumor-specific retroviral replicating vector (RRV), we replaced the U3 region of the RRV ACE-GFP with a regulatory sequence consisting of the hepatitis B virus enhancer II (EII) and human α-fetoprotein (AFP) core promoter to produce ACE-GFP-EIIAFP, a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-targeting RRV. Similar to ACE-GFP, ACE-GFP-EIIAFP exhibited robust green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in HCC cells and, most importantly, it exhibited HCC-specific replication and did not replicate in non-HCC tumor cells or normal liver cells. We sequenced the promoter region of ACE-GFP-EIIAFP collected from serial infection cycles to examine the genomic stability of the vector during its replicative spread, and found that the vector could retain the hybrid promoter in the genome for at least six infection cycles. In vitro studies revealed that ACE-CD-EIIAFP and ACE-PNP-EIIAFP, which express the yeast cytosine deaminase and Escherichia coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase, respectively, exert a highly potent cytotoxic effect on HCC cells in the presence of their respective prodrugs. In vivo, ACE-CD-EIIAFP-mediated suicide gene therapy efficiently suppressed HCC tumor growth and no detectable RRV signal was observed in extratumoral tissues. These results suggest that the tumor-specific, suicide-gene-encoding RRV may fulfill the promise of retroviral gene therapy for cancer.

  8. Interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors as genetic adjuvant for vaccination against retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Ohs

    Full Text Available Interleukins (IL are cytokines with stimulatory and modulatory functions in the immune system. In this study, we have chosen interleukins which are involved in the enhancement of TH2 responses and B cell functions to analyze their potential to improve a prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccine with regard to antibody and virus-specific CD4(+ T cell responses. Mice were vaccinated with an adenoviral vector which encodes and displays the Friend Virus (FV surface envelope protein gp70 (Ad.pIXgp70 in combination with adenoviral vectors encoding the interleukins IL4, IL5, IL6, IL7 or IL23. Co-application of Ad.pIXgp70 with Ad.IL5, Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 resulted in improved protection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. Mice co-immunized with adenoviral vectors encoding IL5 or IL23 showed increased neutralizing antibody responses while mice co-immunized with Ad.IL6 or Ad.IL23 showed improved FV-specific CD4(+ T cell responses compared to mice immunized with Ad.pIXgp70 alone. We show that the co-application of adenoviral vectors encoding specific interleukins is suitable to improve the vaccination efficacy of an anti-retroviral vaccine. Improved protection correlated with improved CD4(+ T cell responses and especially with higher neutralizing antibody titers. The co-application of selected interleukin-encoding adenoviral vectors is a valuable tool for vaccination with regard to enhancement of antibody mediated immunity.

  9. Creation and validation of a ligation-independent cloning (LIC retroviral vector for stable gene transduction in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Asmita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cloning vectors capable of retroviral transduction have enabled stable gene overexpression in numerous mitotic cell lines. However, the relatively small number of feasible restriction enzyme sequences in their cloning sites can hinder successful generation of overexpression constructs if these sequences are also present in the target cDNA insert. Results Utilizing ligation-independent cloning (LIC technology, we have modified the highly efficient retroviral transduction vector, pBABE, to eliminate reliance on restriction enzymes for cloning. Instead, the modified plasmid, pBLIC, utilizes random 12/13-base overhangs generated by T4 DNA polymerase 3' exonuclease activity. PCR-based introduction of the complementary sequence into any cDNA of interest enables universal cloning into pBLIC. Here we describe creation of the pBLIC plasmid, and demonstrate successful cloning and protein overexpression from three different cDNAs, Bax, catalase, and p53 through transduction into the human prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP or the human lung cancer line, H358. Conclusions Our results show that pBLIC vector retains the high transduction efficiency of the original pBABE while eliminating the requirement for checking individual cDNA inserts for internal restriction sites. Thus it comprises an effective retroviral cloning system for laboratory-scale stable gene overexpression or for high-throughput applications such as creation of retroviral cDNA libraries. To our knowledge, pBLIC is the first LIC vector for retroviral transduction-mediated stable gene expression in mammalian cells.

  10. Pseudotyped AAV vector-mediated gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model: implications for in utero gene therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundeep G Keswani

    Full Text Available Lung disease including airway infection and inflammation currently causes the majority of morbidities and mortalities associated with cystic fibrosis (CF, making the airway epithelium and the submucosal glands (SMG novel target cells for gene therapy in CF. These target cells are relatively inaccessible to postnatal gene transfer limiting the success of gene therapy. Our previous work in a human-fetal trachea xenograft model suggests the potential benefit for treating CF in utero. In this study, we aim to validate adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2 gene transfer in a human fetal trachea xenograft model and to compare transduction efficiencies of pseudotyping AAV2 vectors in fetal xenografts and postnatal xenograft controls.Human fetal trachea or postnatal bronchus controls were xenografted onto immunocompromised SCID mice for a four-week engraftment period. After injection of AAV2/2, 2/1, 2/5, 2/7 or 2/8 with a LacZ reporter into both types of xenografts, we analyzed for transgene expression in the respiratory epithelium and SMGs. At 1 month, transduction by AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 in respiratory epithelium and SMG cells was significantly greater than that of AAV2/1, 2/5, and 2/7 in xenograft tracheas. Efficiency in SMG transduction was significantly greater in AAV2/8 than AAV2/2. At 3 months, AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 transgene expression was >99% of respiratory epithelium and SMG. At 1 month, transduction efficiency of AAV2/2 and AAV2/8 was significantly less in adult postnatal bronchial xenografts than in fetal tracheal xenografts.Based on the effectiveness of AAV vectors in SMG transduction, our findings suggest the potential utility of pseudotyped AAV vectors for treatment of cystic fibrosis. The human fetal trachea xenograft model may serve as an effective tool for further development of fetal gene therapy strategies for the in utero treatment of cystic fibrosis.

  11. A simple and efficient procedure for generating stable expression libraries by cDNA cloning in a retroviral vector.

    OpenAIRE

    Rayner, J R; Gonda, T J

    1994-01-01

    cDNA expression cloning is a powerful method for the rescue and identification of genes that are able to confer a readily identifiable phenotype on specific cell types. Retroviral vectors provide several advantages over DNA-mediated gene transfer for the introduction of expression libraries into eukaryotic cells since they can be used to express genes in a wide range of cell types, including those that form important experimental systems such as the hemopoietic system. We describe here a stra...

  12. Neonatal Gene Therapy With a Gamma Retroviral Vector in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI Cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Katherine P; O'Malley, Thomas M; Wang, Ping; O'Donnell, Patricia A; Traas, Anne M; Knox, Van W; Aguirre, Gustavo A; Ellinwood, N Matthew; Metcalf, Jason A; Wang, Bin; Parkinson-Lawrence, Emma J; Sleeper, Meg M; Brooks, Doug A; Hopwood, John J; Haskins, Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) VI is due to a deficiency in the activity of N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase (4S), also known as arylsulfatase B. Previously, retroviral vector (RV)-mediated neonatal gene therapy reduced the clinical manifestations of MPS I and MPS VII in mice and dogs. However, sulfatases require post-translational modification by sulfatase-modifying factors. MPS VI cats were injected intravenously (i.v.) with a gamma RV-expressing feline 4S, resulting in 5 ± 3 copies of RV per 100 cells in liver. Liver and serum 4S activity were 1,450 ± 1,720 U/mg (26-fold normal) and 107 ± 60 U/ml (13-fold normal), respectively, and were directly proportional to the liver 4S protein levels for individual cats. This study suggests that sulfatase-modifying factor (SUMF) activity in liver was sufficient to result in active enzyme despite overexpression of 4S. RV-treated MPS VI cats achieved higher body weights and longer appendicular skeleton lengths, had reduced articular cartilage erosion, and reduced aortic valve thickening and aortic dilatation compared with untreated MPS VI cats, although cervical vertebral bone lengths were not improved. This demonstrates that therapeutic expression of a functional sulfatase protein can be achieved with neonatal gene therapy using a gamma RV, but some aspects of bone disease remain difficult to treat. PMID:22395531

  13. Comparative analysis of the transduction efficiency of five adeno associated virus serotypes and VSV-G pseudotype lentiviral vector in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiachen; Akerstrom, Victoria; Baus, James; Lan, Michael S; Breslin, Mary B

    2013-03-14

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the US. Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentivirus are promising delivery tools for gene therapy due to low toxicity and long term expression. The efficiency of the gene delivery system is one of the most important factors directly related to the success of gene therapy. We infected SCLC cell lines, SHP-77, DMS 53, NCI-H82, NCI-H69, NCI-H727, NCI-H1155, and NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H23, NCI-H661, and NCI-H460 with VSV-G pseudo-typed lentivirus or 5 AAV serotypes, AAV2/1, AAV2/2, AAV2/4, AAV2/5, and AAV2/8 expressing the CMV promoter mCherry or green fluorescent protein transgene (EGFP). The transduction efficiency was analyzed by fluorescent microscopy and flow cytometry. Of all the serotypes of AAV examined, AAV2/1 was the optimal serotype in most of the lung cancer cell lines except for NCI-H69 and NCI-H82. The highest transduction rate achieved with AAV2/1 was between 30-50% at MOI 100. Compared to all AAV serotypes, lentivirus had the highest transduction efficiency of over 50% at MOI 1. Even in NCI-H69 cells resistant to all AAV serotypes, lentivirus had a 10-40% transduction rate. To date, AAV2 is the most widely-used serotype to deliver a transgene. Our results showed the transduction efficiency of AAVs tested was AAV2/1 > AA2/5 = AAV2/2> > AAV2/4 and AAV2/8. This study demonstrated that VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus and AAV2/1 can mediate expression of a transgene for lung cancer gene therapy. Overall, our results showed that lentivirus is the best candidate to deliver a transgene into lung cancer cells for treatment.

  14. Complementation of a primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector by a genetically engineered tRNA-like primer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Lovmand, J

    1997-01-01

    , but not with a noncomplementary tRNA-like molecule. The engineered primer was shown to be involved in both the initiation of first-strand synthesis and second-strand transfer. These results provide an in vivo demonstration that the retroviral replication machinery may recognize sequence complementarity rather than actual primer...... binding site and 3' primer sequences. Use of mutated primer binding site vectors replicating via engineered primers may add additional control features to retroviral gene transfer technology....

  15. Queratinocitos derivados de piel humana modificados por el vector retroviral FOCH 29-NeoR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Marina Restrepo

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available

    En este protocolo se evaluará la eficiencia de la transducción mediada por el vector retroviral FOCH 29-NeoR derivado del virus de Friend; éste ha mostrado una alta eficiencia en la transducción, tanto de células madres hematopoyéticas como de otras líneas celulares. Se medirá su eficiencia de transducción en cultivos primarios de queratinocitos, derivados de biopsias de piel humana o de sobrantes de procedimientos quirúrgicos como circuncisiones, mastectomías y cirugía cosmética de pacientes que consultan el Hospital Universitario San Vicente de Paul, Hospital la María, la Clínica del Rosario y la Clínica León XIII.

    Las muestras de piel se procesarán en un lapso no superior a 12 horas, se eliminará el exceso de dermis y tejido conectivo por digestión con dispasa (0.6-2.4 U/ml a 37°C durante 1 hora. Las muestras serán lavadas con PBS, antibiótico (penicilina + estreptomicina y se cortarán en fragmentos de 1-2 mm; después de 2-3 horas de digestión con tripsina-EDTA (0.25% las células serán resuspendidas en KGM (Medio de crecimiento para queratinocitos y se sembrarán a una concentración de 105 - 3x105 células por plato de 100 mm; se incubarán a 37°C, 5% CO2 con cambios de medio 2-3 veces por semana. Se harán subcultivos con el fin de expandirlos y congelar una parte de las

  16. Multidrug resistance and retroviral transduction potential in human small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theilade, M D; Gram, G J; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) remains a major problem in the successful treatment of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). New treatment strategies are needed, such as gene therapy specifically targeting the MDR cells in the tumor. Retroviral LacZ gene-containing vectors that were either pseudotyped...... for the gibbon ape leukemia virus (GALV-1) receptor or had specificity for the amphotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-A) receptor were used for transduction of five SCLC cell lines differing by a range of MDR mechanisms. Transduction efficiencies in these cell lines were compared by calculating the percentage...

  17. Identification of a high incidence region for retroviral vector integration near exon 1 of the LMO2 locus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakashita Kazuo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Therapeutic retroviral vector integration near the oncogene LMO2 is thought to be a cause of leukemia in X-SCID gene therapy trials. However, no published studies have evaluated the frequency of vector integrations near exon 1 of the LMO2 locus. We identified a high incidence region (HIR of vector integration using PCR techniques in the upstream region close to the LMO2 transcription start site in the TPA-Mat T cell line. The integration frequency of the HIR was one per 4.46 × 104 cells. This HIR was also found in Jurkat T cells but was absent from HeLa cells. Furthermore, using human cord blood-derived CD34+ cells we identified a HIR in a similar region as the TPA-Mat T cell line. One of the X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (X-SCID patients that developed leukemia after gene therapy had a vector integration site in this HIR. Therefore, the descriptions of the location and the integration frequency of the HIR presented here may help us to better understand vector-induced leukemogenesis.

  18. Use of bicistronic retroviral vectors encoding the LacZ gene together with a gene of interest: a method to select producer cells and follow transduced target cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, F. J.; Bakker, A. Q.; Verkuijlen, M.; van Oort, E.; Spits, H.

    1996-01-01

    The coordinate expression of a marker gene and a therapeutic gene in one retroviral vector has considerable advantages. High-titer producer lines can potentially be selected on the basis of marker gene expression, and the expression of transduced genes in target cells can readily be followed.

  19. Immune response after neonatal transfer of a human factor IX-expressing retroviral vector in dogs, cats, and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingfei; Mei, Manxue; Haskins, Mark E; Nichols, Timothy C; O'donnell, Patricia; Cullen, Karyn; Dillow, Aaron; Bellinger, Dwight; Ponder, Katherine P

    2007-01-01

    Gene therapy could prevent bleeding in hemophilia. However, antibodies could inhibit coagulation, while cytotoxic T lymphocytes could destroy modified cells. The immaturity of the newborn immune system might prevent these immune responses from occurring after neonatal gene therapy. Newborn dogs, cats, or mice were injected intravenously with a retroviral vector expressing human Factor IX. Plasma was evaluated for antigen and anti-human Factor IX antibodies. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte responses were evaluated indirectly by analysis of retroviral vector RNA in liver. Lymphocytes were evaluated for cytokine secretion and the ability to suppress an immune response to human Factor IX in mice. Hemophilia B dogs that achieved 942+/-500 ng/ml (19% normal) or 5+/-0.4 ng/ml (0.1% normal) of human Factor IX in plasma only bled 0 or 1.2 times per year, respectively, and were tolerant to infusion of human Factor IX. Normal cats expressed human Factor IX at 118+/-29 ng/ml (2% normal) in plasma without antibody formation. However, plasma human Factor IX disappeared at late times in 1 of 4 cats, which was probably due to a cytotoxic T lymphocyte response that destroyed cells with high expression. C3H mice were tolerant to human Factor IX after neonatal gene therapy, which may involve clonal deletion of human Factor IX-responsive cells. These data demonstrate that neonatal gene therapy does not induce antibodies to human Factor IX in dogs, cats, or mice. The putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte response in one cat requires further study.

  20. APOBEC3-mediated hypermutation of retroviral vectors produced from some retrovirus packaging cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A D; Metzger, M J

    2011-05-01

    APOBEC3 proteins are packaged into retrovirus virions and can hypermutate retroviruses during reverse transcription. We found that HT-1080 human fibrosarcoma cells hypermutate retroviruses, and that the HT-1080 cell-derived FLYA13 retrovirus packaging cells also hypermutate a retrovirus vector produced using these cells. We found no hypermutation of the same vector produced by the mouse cell-derived packaging line PT67 or by human 293 cells transfected with the vector and retrovirus packaging plasmids. We expect that avoidance of vector hypermutation will be particularly important for vectors used in gene therapy, wherein mutant proteins might stimulate deleterious immune responses.

  1. An Efficient Large-Scale Retroviral Transduction Method Involving Preloading the Vector into a RetroNectin-Coated Bag with Low-Temperature Shaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodo, Katsuyuki; Chono, Hideto; Saito, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshinori; Tahara, Kenichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    In retroviral vector-mediated gene transfer, transduction efficiency can be hampered by inhibitory molecules derived from the culture fluid of virus producer cell lines. To remove these inhibitory molecules to enable better gene transduction, we had previously developed a transduction method using a fibronectin fragment-coated vessel (i.e., the RetroNectin-bound virus transduction method). In the present study, we developed a method that combined RetroNectin-bound virus transduction with low-temperature shaking and applied this method in manufacturing autologous retroviral-engineered T cells for adoptive transfer gene therapy in a large-scale closed system. Retroviral vector was preloaded into a RetroNectin-coated bag and incubated at 4°C for 16 h on a reciprocating shaker at 50 rounds per minute. After the supernatant was removed, activated T cells were added to the bag. The bag transduction method has the advantage of increasing transduction efficiency, as simply flipping over the bag during gene transduction facilitates more efficient utilization of the retroviral vector adsorbed on the top and bottom surfaces of the bag. Finally, we performed validation runs of endoribonuclease MazF-modified CD4+ T cell manufacturing for HIV-1 gene therapy and T cell receptor-modified T cell manufacturing for MAGE-A4 antigen-expressing cancer gene therapy and achieved over 200-fold (≥1010) and 100-fold (≥5×109) expansion, respectively. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the large-scale closed transduction system is highly efficient for retroviral vector-based T cell manufacturing for adoptive transfer gene therapy, and this technology is expected to be amenable to automation and improve current clinical gene therapy protocols. PMID:24454964

  2. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment. © 2014 The Authors.

  3. Maintaining therapeutic activity in the operating room: compatibility of a gamma-retroviral replicating vector with clinical materials and biofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Burnett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Toca 511 is a novel retroviral replicating vector, encoding a modified yeast cytosine deaminase, administered to recurrent high grade glioma patients in Phase 1 trials by stereotactic, transcranial injection into the tumor or into the walls of the resection cavity. A key issue, with little published data, is vector biocompatibility with agents likely to be encountered in a neurosurgical setting. We tested biocompatibility of Toca 511 with: delivery devices; MRI contrast agents, including ProHance supporting coinjection for real time MRI-guided intratumoral delivery; hemostatic agents; biofluids (blood and cerebrospinal fluid; potential adjuvants; and a needleless vial adapter that reduces risk of accidental needle sticks. Toca 511 is stable upon thawing at ambient temperature for at least 6 hours, allowing sufficient time for administration, and its viability is not reduced in the presence of: stainless steel and silica-based delivery devices; the potential MRI contrast agent, Feraheme; ProHance at several concentrations; the hemostatic agent SURGIFOAM; blood; cerebrospinal fluid; and the needleless vial adapter. Toca 511 is not compatible with the hemostatic agent SURGICEL or with extended exposures to titanium-based biopsy needles.

  4. Inhibition of histone deacetylation in 293GPG packaging cell line improves the production of self-inactivating MLV-derived retroviral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crosato Milena

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-inactivating retroviral vectors (SIN are often associated with very low titers. Promoter elements embedded within SIN designs may suppress transcription of packageable retroviral RNA which in turn results in titer reduction. We tested whether this dominant-negative effect involves histone acetylation state. We designed an MLV-derived SIN vector using the cytomegalovirus immediate early enhancer-promoter (CMVIE as an embedded internal promoter (SINCMV and transfected the pantropic 293GPG packaging cell line. Results The SINCMV retroviral producer had uniformly very low titers (~10,000 infectious retroparticles per ml. Northern blot showed low levels of expression of retroviral mRNA in producer cells in particular that of packageable RNA transcript. Treatment of the producers with the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors sodium butyrate and trichostatin A reversed transcriptional suppression and resulted in an average 106.3 ± 4.6 – fold (P = 0.002 and 15.5 ± 1.3 – fold increase in titer (P = 0.008, respectively. A histone gel assay confirmed increased histone acetylation in treated producer cells. Conclusion These results show that SIN retrovectors incorporating strong internal promoters such as CMVIE, are susceptible to transcriptional silencing and that treatment of the producer cells with HDAC inhibitors can overcome this blockade suggesting that histone deacetylation is implicated in the mechanism of transcriptional suppression.

  5. Murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector has differential integration patterns in human cell lines used to produce recombinant factor VIII

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Cristina Correa de Freitas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Nowadays recombinant factor VIII is produced in murine cells including in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO and baby hamster kidney cells (BHK. Previous studies, using the murine leukemia virus-derived retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K, modified two recombinant human cell lines, HepG2 and Hek293 to produce recombinant factor VIII. In order to characterize these cells, the present study aimed to analyze the integration pattern of retroviral vector pMFG-FVIII-P140K.METHODS: This study used ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction to locate the site of viral vector integration by sequencing polymerase chain reaction products. The sequences were compared to genomic databases to characterize respective clones.RESULTS: The retroviral vector presented different and non-random profiles of integration between cells lines. A preference of integration for chromosomes 19, 17 and 11 was observed for HepG2FVIIIdB/P140K and chromosome 9 for Hek293FVIIIdB/P140K. In genomic regions such as CpG islands and transcription factor binding sites, there was no difference in the integration profiles for both cell lines. Integration in intronic regions of encoding protein genes (RefSeq genes was also observed in both cell lines. Twenty percent of integrations occurred at fragile sites in the genome of the HepG2 cell line and 17% in Hek293.CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the cell type can affect the profile of chromosomal integration of the retroviral vector used; these differences may interfere in the level of expression of recombinant proteins.

  6. Retroviral vector insertion sites associated with dominant hematopoietic clones mark "stemness" pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.S. Kustikova (Olga); H. Geiger (Hartmut); Z. Li (Zhixiong); M.H. Brugman (Martijn); S.M. Chambers (Stuart); C.A. Shaw (Chad); K. Pike (Karin); D. de Ridder (Dick); F.J.T. Staal (Frank); G. von Keudell (Gottfried); K. Cornils (Kerstin); K.J. Nattamai; U. Modlich (Ute); G. Wagemaker (Gerard); M.A. Goodell (Margaret); B. Fehse (Boris); C. Baum (Christopher)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractEvidence from model organisms and clinical trials reveals that the random insertion of retrovirus-based vectors in the genome of long-term repopulating hematopoietic cells may increase self-renewal or initiate malignant transformation. Clonal dominance of nonmalignant cells is a

  7. Development of a new bicistronic retroviral vector with strong IRES activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boulukos Kim E

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES-based bicistronic vectors are important tools in today's cell biology. Among applications, the expression of two proteins under the control of a unique promoter permits the monitoring of expression of a protein whose biological function is being investigated through the observation of an easily detectable tracer, such as Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP. However, analysis of published results making use of bicistronic vectors indicates that the efficiency of the IRES-controlled expression can vary widely from one vector to another, despite their apparent identical IRES sequences. We investigated the molecular basis for these discrepancies. Results We observed up to a 10 fold difference in IRES-controlled expression from distinct bicistronic expression vectors harboring the same apparent IRES sequences. We show that the insertion of a HindIII site, in place of the initiating AUG codon of the wild type EMCV IRES, is responsible for the dramatic loss of expression from the second cistron, whereas expression from the first cistron remains unaffected. Thus, while the replacement of the authentic viral initiating AUG by a HindIII site results in the theoretical usage of the initiation codon of the HindIII-subcloned cDNA, the subsequent drop of expression dramatically diminishes the interest of the bicistronic structure. Indeed, insertion of the HindIII site has such a negative effect on IRES function that detection of the IRES-controlled product can be difficult, and sometimes even below the levels of detection. It is striking to observe that this deleterious modification is widely found in available IRES-containing vectors, including commercial ones, despite early reports in the literature stating the importance of the integrity of the initiation codon for optimal IRES function. Conclusion From these observations, we engineered a new vector family, pPRIG, which respects the EMCV IRES structure, and

  8. Development of retroviral vectors for tissue-restricted expression in chicken embryonic gonads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke S Lambeth

    Full Text Available The chicken embryo has long been a useful model organism for studying development, including sex determination and gonadal differentiation. However, manipulating gene expression specifically in the embryonic avian gonad has been difficult. The viral vector RCASBP can be readily used for embryo-wide transgene expression; however global mis-expression using this method can cause deleterious off-target effects and embryo-lethality. In an attempt to develop vectors for the over-expression of sequences in chicken embryonic urogenital tissues, the viral vector RCANBP was engineered to contain predicted promoter sequences of gonadal-expressed genes. Several promoters were analysed and it was found that although the SF1 promoter produced a tissue-restricted expression pattern that was highest in the mesonephros and liver, it was also higher in the gonads compared to the rest of the body. The location of EGFP expression from the SF1 promoter overlapped with several key gonad-expressed sex development genes; however expression was generally low-level and was not seen in all gonadal cells. To further validate this sequence the key testis determinant DMRT1 was over-expressed in female embryos, which due to insufficient levels had no effect on gonad development. The female gene aromatase was then over-expressed in male embryos, which disrupted the testis pathway as demonstrated by a reduction in AMH protein. Taken together, although these data showed that the SF1 promoter can be used for functional studies in ovo, a stronger promoter sequence would likely be required for the functional analysis of gonad genes that require high-level expression.

  9. Retroviral DNA Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The integration of a DNA copy of the viral RNA genome into host chromatin is the defining step of retroviral replication. This enzymatic process is catalyzed by the virus-encoded integrase protein, which is conserved among retroviruses and LTR-retrotransposons. Retroviral integration proceeds via two integrase activities: 3′-processing of the viral DNA ends, followed by the strand transfer of the processed ends into host cell chromosomal DNA. Herein we review the molecular mechanism of retroviral DNA integration, with an emphasis on reaction chemistries and architectures of the nucleoprotein complexes involved. We additionally discuss the latest advances on anti-integrase drug development for the treatment of AIDS and the utility of integrating retroviral vectors in gene therapy applications. PMID:27198982

  10. A rapid and efficient polyethylenimine-based transfection method to prepare lentiviral or retroviral vectors: useful for making iPS cells and transduction of primary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaozhe; Shi, Haijun; Chu, Xinran; Zhou, Xiaoling; Sun, Pingnan

    2016-09-01

    To improve the efficiency, reproducibility and consistency of the PEI-based transfection method that is often used in preparation of recombinant lentiviral or retroviral vectors. The contributions to transfection efficiency of multi-factors including concentration of PEI or DNA, dilution buffer for PEI/DNA, manner to prepare PEI/DNA complexes, influence of serum, incubation time for PEI/DNA complexes, and transfection time were studied. Gentle mixing during the preparation of PEI/DNA transfection complexes is critical for a high transfection efficiency. PEI could be stored at room temperature or 4 °C, and most importantly, multigelation should be avoided. The transfection efficiency of the PEI-based new method in different types of cells, such as 293T, Cos-7, HeLa, HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7 and L02, was also higher than that of the previous method. After optimization, the titer of our lentiviral system or retroviral system produced by PEI-based new method was about 10- or 3-times greater than that produced by PEI-based previous method, respectively. We provide a rapid and efficient PEI-based method for preparation of recombinant lentiviral or retroviral vectors which is useful for making iPS cells as well as transduction of primary cell cultures.

  11. Construction and characterization in vitro of a bicistronic retroviral vector coding endostatin and interleukin-2 for use in gene therapy; Construcao e caracterizacao in vitro de um vetor retroviral bicistronico codificando endostatina e interleucina-2 para utilizacao em terapia genica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calvo, Fernanda Bernardes

    2009-07-01

    Gene therapy has been used in preclinical studies and clinical trials in order to alleviate or cure a disease. Retroviral vectors are a tool for gene transfer is widely used. Bicistronic vectors are an attractive alternative for treatment of complex diseases. A variety of options exists to simultaneously express two genes in genetically modified cells. The most common approach relies on bicistronic vectors in which the genes are linked to each other by an internal ribosome entry site allowing co-translational expression of both cistrons. Endostatin, the C-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII, is a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. At present, ES has been widely used in anti-angiogenic in a variety of experimental tumor models, and clinical trials to test it as an anti-tumor agent are already under way. Immunotherapy has been used as adjuvant treatment for tumors and has been used in several preclinical studies and clinical trials. The objective of this project was to construct and characterize 'in vitro' an IRES-based bicistronic retroviral vector encoding endostatin and interleukin-2. The construction of the vector was performed in three stages, the final construction was analyzed by restriction analysis and sequencing. Packaging cells were prepared. The endostatin and interleukin-2 levels were determined by Dot blot. Monocistronic and bicistronic mRNA expression were analyzed by real time RT-PCR. Bicistronic vector showed high levels of virus trites, ranging from 4.20x10{sup 5} to 1.53x10{sup 6}UFC/ml. Secreted levels of endostatin and interleukin-2 ranged from 1.08 to 2.08{mu}g/10{sup 6}cells.24h and 0.66 - 0.89{mu}g/10{sup 6}cells.24h, respectively. The mRNA expression of ES in the NIH3T3 clone pLend-IRES-IL2SN was 2 times higher than the level presented by the NIH3T3 clone pLendSN. The endostatin promoted inhibition (40%) of endothelial cell proliferation. Interleukin-2 promoted a proliferation of 10.6% lymphocytes CD4 and 8.9% of CD8. We conclude that

  12. Cervical spinal cord delivery of a rabies G protein pseudotyped lentiviral vector in the SOD-1 transgenic mouse. Invited submission from the Joint Section Meeting on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves, March 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanase, Kiana; Teng, Qingshan; Krishnaney, Ajit A; Liu, James K; Garrity-Moses, Mary E; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2004-07-01

    Lentiviral vectors may constitute a vehicle for long-term therapeutic gene expression in the spinal cord. In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal cord sclerosis and altered axonal transport pose barriers to therapeutic gene distribution. In the present study the authors characterize gene expression distribution and the behavioral impact of the rabies G (RabG) protein pseudotyped lentiviral vector EIAV.LacZ through cervical spinal cord injection in control and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD-1) transgenic mice. Seven-week-old SOD-1 transgenic mice and their wild-type littermates underwent exposure of the cervicomedullary junction and microinjection of RabG.EIAV.LacZ or vehicle. The Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan locomotor score, grip strength meter, and Rotarod assays were used to assess the effects of disease progression, spinal cord microinjection, and lentiviral gene expression. Spinal cords were removed when the mice were in the terminal stage of the disease. The distribution of LacZ gene expression was histologically evaluated and quantified. Direct cervical spinal cord microinjection of RabG.EIAV.LacZ results in extensive central nervous system uptake in SOD-1 transgenic mice; these findings were statistically similar to those in wild-type mice (p > 0.05). Gene expression lasts for the duration of the animal's survival (132 days). The SOD-1 mutation does not prevent retrograde axonal transport of the vector. Three behavioral assays were used to demonstrate that long-term gene expression does not alter sensorimotor function. In comparison with normative data, vector injection and transgene expression do not accelerate disease progression. Direct spinal cord injection of RabG.EIAV vectors represents a feasible method for delivering therapeutic genes to upper cervical spinal cord and brainstem motor neurons. Distribution is not affected by the SOD-1 mutation or disease phenotype.

  13. A MicroRNA-regulated and GP64-pseudotyped Lentiviral Vector Mediates Stable Expression of FVIII in a Murine Model of Hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideto; Hegadorn, Carol; Ozelo, Margareth; Burnett, Erin; Tuttle, Angie; Labelle, Andrea; McCray, Paul B; Naldini, Luigi; Brown, Brian; Hough, Christine; Lillicrap, David

    2011-01-01

    The objective to use gene therapy to provide sustained, therapeutic levels of factor VIII (FVIII) for hemophilia A is compromised by the emergence of inhibitory antibodies that prevent FVIII from performing its essential function as a cofactor for factor IX (FIX). FVIII appears to be more immunogenic than FIX and an immune response is associated more frequently with FVIII than FIX gene therapy strategies. We have evaluated a modified lentiviral delivery strategy that facilitates liver-restricted transgene expression and prevents off-target expression in hematopoietic cells by incorporating microRNA (miRNA) target sequences. In contrast to outcomes using this strategy to deliver FIX, this modified delivery strategy was in and of itself insufficient to prevent an anti-FVIII immune response in treated hemophilia A mice. However, pseudotyping the lentivirus with the GP64 envelope glycoprotein, in conjunction with a liver-restricted promoter and a miRNA-regulated FVIII transgene resulted in sustained, therapeutic levels of FVIII. These modifications to the lentiviral delivery system effectively restricted FVIII transgene expression to the liver. Plasma levels of FVIII could be increased to around 9% that of normal levels when macrophages were depleted prior to treating the hemophilia A mice with the modified lentiviral FVIII delivery system. PMID:21285959

  14. Use of retroviral-mediated gene transfer to deliver and test function of chimeric antigen receptors in human T-cells

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    Ana C. Parente-Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs are genetically delivered fusion molecules that elicit T-cell activation upon binding of a native cell surface molecule. These molecules can be used to generate a large number of memory and effector T-cells that are capable of recognizing and attacking tumor cells. Most commonly, stable CAR expression is achieved in T-cells using retroviral vectors. In the method described here, retroviral vectors are packaged in a two-step procedure. First, H29D human retroviral packaging cells (a derivative of 293 cells are transfected with the vector of interest, which is packaged transiently in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV G pseudotyped particles. These particles are used to deliver the vector to PG13 cells, which achieve stable packaging of gibbon ape leukaemia virus (GALV-pseudotyped particles that are suitable for infection of human T-cells. The key advantage of the method reported here is that it robustly generates polyclonal PG13 cells that are 100% positive for the vector of interest. This means that efficient gene transfer may be repeatedly achieved without the need to clone individual PG13 cells for experimental pre-clinical testing. To achieve T-cell transduction, cells must first be activated using a non-specific mitogen. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA provides an economic and robust stimulus to achieve this. After 48-72 h, activated T-cells and virus-conditioned medium are mixed in RetroNectin-coated plasticware, which enhances transduction efficiency. Transduced cells are analyzed for gene transfer efficiency by flow cytometry 48 h following transduction and may then be tested in several assays to evaluate CAR function, including target-dependent cytotoxicity, cytokine production and proliferation.

  15. Recombinant AAV viral vectors pseudotyped with viral capsids from serotypes 1, 2, and 5 display differential efficiency and cell tropism after delivery to different regions of the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Corinna; Gorbatyuk, Oleg S; Velardo, Margaret J; Peden, Carmen S; Williams, Philip; Zolotukhin, Sergei; Reier, Paul J; Mandel, Ronald J; Muzyczka, Nicholas

    2004-08-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (rAAV2) has been shown to deliver genes to neurons effectively in the brain, retina, and spinal cord. The characterization of new AAV serotypes has revealed that they have different patterns of transduction in diverse tissues. We have investigated the tropism and transduction frequency in the central nervous system (CNS) of three different rAAV vector serotypes. The vectors contained AAV2 terminal repeats flanking a green fluorescent protein expression cassette under the control of the synthetic CBA promoter, in AAV1, AAV2, or AAV5 capsids, producing the pseudotypes rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, and rAAV2/5. Rats were injected with rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, or rAAV2/5 into selected regions of the CNS, including the hippocampus (HPC), substantia nigra (SN), striatum, globus pallidus, and spinal cord. In all regions injected, the three vectors transduced neurons almost exclusively. All three vectors transduced the SN pars compacta with high efficiency, but rAAV2/1 and rAAV2/5 also transduced the pars reticulata. Moreover, rAAV2/1 showed widespread distribution throughout the entire midbrain. In the HPC, rAAV2/1 and rAAV2/5 targeted the pyramidal cell layers in the CA1-CA3 regions, whereas AAV2/2 primarily transduced the hilar region of the dentate gyrus. In general, rAAV2/1 and rAAV2/5 exhibited higher transduction frequencies than rAAV2/2 in all regions injected, although the differences were marginal in some regions. Retrograde transport of rAAV1 and rAAV5 was also observed in particular CNS areas. These results suggest that vectors based on distinct AAV serotypes can be chosen for specific applications in the nervous system. Copyright The American Society of Gene Therapy

  16. VSV-G pseudotyped, MuLV-based, semi-replication-competent retrovirus for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, J; Moreno, J; Sanchez-Perez, L; Kottke, T; Thompson, J; Caruso, M; Diaz, R M; Vile, R

    2006-10-01

    Low levels of gene delivery in vivo using replication-defective retroviral vectors have severely limited their application for clinical protocols. To overcome this problem, we describe here a semi-replication-competent retrovirus (s-RCR) in which the gag-pol and envelope (VSV-G, vesicular stomatitis virus G protein) genes were split into two vectors. This system offers potential advantages over both replication-defective vectors, in terms of efficiency of in vivo spread through a tumor, and all-in-one replication-competent vectors in terms of the payload of therapeutic genes that can be carried. We achieved a viral titer of s-RCR viruses approximately 70-fold higher than VSV-G pseudotyped, replication-defective vectors. In addition, s-RCR vectors induced tumor killing by the cytotoxicity of VSV-G during viral spread. Inclusion of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk30) gene into vectors significantly improved tumor killing activity followed by ganciclovir (GCV) treatment in vitro under conditions of low-level viral replication. However, at high levels of viral spread, VSV-G-mediated cytotoxicity predominated. Xenografts of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells, preinfected by semi-replicative green fluorescent protein vectors (semi-GFP), were completely non-tumorigenic in nude mice. Implantation of cells preinfected by semi-replicative TK30 vectors (semi-TK30) mixed with parental HT1080 cells at a ratio of 1:1 efficiently prevented tumor growth in mice treated by GCV. Direct intratumoral injection of HT1080 tumors growing in nude mice, or B16 murine melanoma in immunocompetent mice, with semi-TK30 viruses significantly prolonged survival. Injection of autologous cells (B16) producing semi-TK30 vector into B16 tumors prolonged survival only in mice treated with GCV but not with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). In contrast, when xenogeneic cells (293T) producing semi-TK30 vectors were injected into B16 tumors, an optimal survival advantage was obtained in mice

  17. Feline leukemia virus integrase and capsid packaging functions do not change the insertion profile of standard Moloney retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Métais, J-Y; Topp, S; Doty, R T; Borate, B; Nguyen, A-D; Wolfsberg, T G; Abkowitz, J L; Dunbar, C E

    2010-06-01

    Adverse events linked to perturbations of cellular genes by vector insertion reported in gene therapy trials and animal models have prompted attempts to better understand the mechanisms directing viral vector integration. The integration profiles of vectors based on MLV, ASLV, SIV and HIV have all been shown to be non-random, and novel vectors with a safer integration pattern have been sought. Recently, we developed a producer cell line called CatPac that packages standard MoMLV vectors with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) gag, pol and env gene products. We now report the integration profile of this vector, asking if the FeLV integrase and capsid proteins could modify the MoMLV integration profile, potentially resulting in a less genotoxic pattern. We transduced rhesus macaque CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells with CatPac or standard MoMLV vectors, and determined their integration profile by LAM-PCR. We obtained 184 and 175 unique integration sites (ISs) respectively for CatPac and standard MoMLV vectors, and these were compared with 10 000 in silico-generated random IS. The integration profile for CatPac vector was similar to MoMLV and equally non-random, with a propensity for integration near transcription start sites and in highly dense gene regions. We found an IS for CatPac vector localized 715 nucleotides upstream of LMO-2, the gene involved in the acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed by X-SCID patients treated by gene therapy using MoMLV vectors. In conclusion, we found that replacement of MoMLV env, gag and pol gene products with FeLV did not alter the basic integration profile. Thus, there appears to be no safety advantage for this packaging system. However, considering the stability and efficacy of CatPac vectors, further development is warranted, using potentially safer vector backbones, for instance those with a SIN configuration.

  18. The cHS4 Chromatin Insulator Reduces the Rate of Retroviral Vector-Mediated Gene Dysregulation Associated with Aberrant Vector Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xianyao; Liu, Qiujun; Wang, Da; Zhang, Xuemei; Emery, David W; Li, Chang L

    2017-01-01

    Integrating gammaretroviral vectors can dysregulate the expression of cellular genes through a variety of mechanisms, leading to genotoxicity and malignant transformation. Although most attention has focused on the activation of cellular genes by vector enhancers, aberrant fusion transcripts involving cellular gene sequences and vector promoters, vector splice elements, and vector transcription termination sequences have also been mechanistically associated with dysregulated expression of cellular genes. Chromatin insulators have emerged as an effective tool for reducing the frequency of vector-mediated genotoxicity and malignant transformation and have been shown to block the activation of cellular genes by vector enhancers. We report here evidence that flanking a gammaretroviral reporter vector with the cHS4 chromatin insulator also reduces the frequency of vector-mediated cellular gene dysregulation associated with aberrant vector transcripts, including vector transcription run-through and aberrant splicing. We demonstrate that the cHS4 element does not function to terminate transcription directly, implicating other mechanisms for this activity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Cross-packaging of genetically distinct mouse and primate retroviral RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaballah Soumeya

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV is unique from other retroviruses in having multiple viral promoters, which can be regulated by hormones in a tissue specific manner. This unique property has lead to increased interest in studying MMTV replication with the hope of developing MMTV based vectors for human gene therapy. However, it has recently been reported that related as well as unrelated retroviruses can cross-package each other's genome raising safety concerns towards the use of candidate retroviral vectors for human gene therapy. Therefore, using a trans complementation assay, we looked at the ability of MMTV RNA to be cross-packaged and propagated by an unrelated primate Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV that has intracellular assembly process similar to that of MMTV. Results Our results revealed that MMTV and MPMV RNAs could be cross-packaged by the heterologous virus particles reciprocally suggesting that pseudotyping between two genetically distinct retroviruses can take place at the RNA level. However, the cross-packaged RNAs could not be propagated further indicating a block at post-packaging events in the retroviral life cycle. To further confirm that the specificity of cross-packaging was conferred by the packaging sequences (ψ, we cloned the packaging sequences of these viruses on expression plasmids that generated non-viral RNAs. Test of these non-viral RNAs confirmed that the reciprocal cross-packaging was primarily due to the recognition of ψ by the heterologous virus proteins. Conclusion The results presented in this study strongly argue that MPMV and MMTV are promiscuous in their ability to cross-package each other's genome suggesting potential RNA-protein interactions among divergent retroviral RNAs proposing that these interactions are more complicated than originally thought. Furthermore, these observations raise the possibility that MMTV and MPMV genomes could also co-package providing substrates for

  20. Long-term vector integration site analysis following retroviral mediated gene transfer to hematopoietic stem cells for the treatment of HIV infection.

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    Jun Hayakawa

    Full Text Available We previously reported the efficacy of nonmyeloablative allogeneic transplantation in 2 HIV positive recipients, one of whom received retrovirus transduced hematopoietic stem cells to confer resistance to HIV. Here we report an assessment of retroviral integration sites (RISs recovered out to 3 years post-transplantation. We identified 213 unique RISs from the patient's peripheral blood samples by linear amplification-mediated PCR (LAM-PCR. While vector integration patterns were similar to that previously reported, only 3.76% of RISs were common among early (up to 3 months and late samples (beyond 1 year. Additionally, common integration sites were enriched among late samples (14.9% vs. 36.8%, respectively. Three RISs were found near or within known oncogenes, but 2 were limited to early timepoints. Interestingly, an integration site near the MDS1 gene was detected in long-term follow-up samples; however, the overall contribution of MDS1 integrated clone remained stably low during follow-up.

  1. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku, E-mail: nakagawa@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp; Okada, Naoki, E-mail: okada@phs.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells. - Highlights: • We established highly efficient gene transduction protocols for murine T cells. • CD8{sup +} CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity. • CD4{sup +} CAR-T cells secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. • This finding can contribute to the development of T-cell biology and immunotherapy.

  2. Clonal Dominance With Retroviral Vector Insertions Near the ANGPT1 and ANGPT2 Genes in a Human Xenotransplant Mouse Model

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    Reinhard Haemmerle

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertional leukemogenesis represents the major risk factor of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC based gene therapy utilizing integrating viral vectors. To develop a pre-clinical model for the evaluation of vector-related genotoxicity directly in the relevant human target cells, cord blood CD34+ HSCs were transplanted into immunodeficient NOD.SCID.IL2rg−/− (NSG mice after transduction with an LTR-driven gammaretroviral vector (GV. Furthermore, we specifically investigated the effect of prolonged in vitro culture in the presence of cytokines recently described to promote HSC expansion or maintenance. Clonality of human hematopoiesis in NSG mice was assessed by high throughput insertion site analyses and validated by insertion site-specific PCR depicting a GV typical integration profile with insertion sites resembling to 25% those of clinical studies. No overrepresentation of integrations in the vicinity of cancer-related genes was observed, however, several dominant clones were identified including two clones harboring integrations in the ANGPT1 and near the ANGPT2 genes associated with deregulated ANGPT1- and ANGPT2-mRNA levels. While these data underscore the potential value of the NSG model, our studies also identified short-comings such as overall low numbers of engrafted HSCs, limited in vivo observation time, and the challenges of in-depth insertion site analyses by low contribution of gene modified hematopoiesis.

  3. Rabies-virus-glycoprotein-pseudotyped recombinant baculovirus vaccine confers complete protection against lethal rabies virus challenge in a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qunfeng; Yu, Fulai; Xu, Jinfang; Li, Yang; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo; Fu, Zhen F; Fang, Liurong

    2014-06-25

    Rabies virus has been an ongoing threat to humans and animals. Here, we developed a new strategy to generate a rabies virus vaccine based on a pseudotyped baculovirus. The recombinant baculovirus (BV-RVG/RVG) was pseudotyped with the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) and also simultaneously expressed another RVG under the control of the immediate early CMV promoter. In vitro, this RVG-pseudotyped baculovirus vector induced syncytium formation in insect cells and displayed more efficient gene delivery into mammalian cells. Mice immunized with BV-RVG/RVG developed higher levels of virus-neutralizing antibodies, and conferred 100% protection against rabies viral challenge. These data indicate that the RVG-pseudotyped baculovirus BV-RVG/RVG can be used as an alternative strategy to develop a safe and efficacious vaccine against the rabies virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. An internal ribosomal entry signal in the rat VL30 region of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus leader and its use in dicistronic retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlioz, C; Torrent, C; Darlix, J L

    1995-10-01

    The genetic organization of the 5' genomic RNA domain of the highly oncogenic Harvey murine sarcoma virus appears to be unusual in that a multifunctional untranslated leader precedes the v-ras oncogene. This 5' leader is 1,076 nucleotides in length and is formed of independent regions involved in key steps of the viral life cycle: (i) the Moloney murine leukemia virus 5' repeat, untranslated 5' region, and primer binding site sequences necessary for the first steps of proviral DNA synthesis, (ii) the virus-like 30S (VL30)-derived sequence containing a functional dimerization-packaging signal (E/DLS) directing viral RNA dimerization and packaging into MLV virions, and (iii) an Alu-like sequence preceding the 5' untranslated sequence of v-rasH which contains the initiation codon of the p21ras oncoprotein. These functional features, the unusual length of this leader (1,076 nucleotides), and the presence of stable secondary structures between the cap and the v-ras initiation codon might well cause a premature stop of the scanning ribosomes and thus inhibit v-ras translation. In order to understand how Harvey murine sarcoma virus achieves a high level of expression of the ras oncogene, we asked whether the rat VL30 sequence, 5' to v-ras, could contribute to an efficient synthesis of the ras oncoprotein. The implications of the VL30 sequence in the translation initiation of Ha-ras were investigated in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system and in murine cells. Results show that the rat VL30 sequence allows a cap-independent translation of a downstream reporter gene both in vitro and in murine cells. Additional experiments performed with dicistronic neo.VL30.lacZ mRNAs indicate that the 5' VL30 sequence (positions 380 to 794) contains an internal ribosomal entry signal. This finding led us to construct a new dicistronic retroviral vector with which the rat VL30 sequence was able to direct the efficient expression of a 3' cistron and packaging of recombinant dicistronic RNA

  5. Baboon envelope pseudotyped LVs outperform VSV-G-LVs for gene transfer into early-cytokine-stimulated and resting HSCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard-Gagnepain, Anais; Amirache, Fouzia; Costa, Caroline; Lévy, Camille; Frecha, Cecilia; Fusil, Floriane; Nègre, Didier; Lavillette, Dimitri; Cosset, François-Loïc; Verhoeyen, Els

    2014-08-21

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-based gene therapy holds promise for the cure of many diseases. The field is now moving toward the use of lentiviral vectors (LVs) as evidenced by 4 successful clinical trials. These trials used vesicular-stomatitis-virus-G protein (VSV-G)-LVs at high doses combined with strong cytokine-cocktail stimulation to obtain therapeutically relevant transduction levels; however, they might compromise the HSC character. Summarizing all these disadvantages, alternatives to VSV-G-LVs are urgently needed. We generated here high-titer LVs pseudotyped with a baboon retroviral envelope glycoprotein (BaEV-LVs), resistant to human complement. Under mild cytokine prestimulation to preserve the HSC characteristics, a single BaEV-LV application at a low dose, resulted in up to 90% of hCD34(+) cell transduction. Even more striking was that these new BaEV-LVs allowed, at low doses, efficient transduction of up to 30% of quiescent hCD34(+) cells, whereas high-dose VSV-G-LVs were insufficient. Importantly, reconstitution of NOD/Lt-SCID/γc(-/-) (NSG) mice with BaEV-LV-transduced hCD34(+) cells maintained these high transduction levels in all myeloid and lymphoid lineages, including early progenitors. This transduction pattern was confirmed or even increased in secondary NSG recipient mice. This suggests that BaEV-LVs efficiently transduce true HSCs and could improve HSC-based gene therapy, for which high-level HSC correction is needed for life-long cure. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Murine Leukemia Virus (MLV)-based Coronavirus Spike-pseudotyped Particle Production and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millet, Jean Kaoru; Whittaker, Gary R

    2016-12-05

    Viral pseudotyped particles (pp) are enveloped virus particles, typically derived from retroviruses or rhabdoviruses, that harbor heterologous envelope glycoproteins on their surface and a genome lacking essential genes. These synthetic viral particles are safer surrogates of native viruses and acquire the tropism and host entry pathway characteristics governed by the heterologous envelope glycoprotein used. They have proven to be very useful tools used in research with many applications, such as enabling the study of entry pathways of enveloped viruses and to generate effective gene-delivery vectors. The basis for their generation lies in the capacity of some viruses, such as murine leukemia virus (MLV), to incorporate envelope glycoproteins of other viruses into a pseudotyped virus particle. These can be engineered to contain reporter genes such as luciferase, enabling quantification of virus entry events upon pseudotyped particle infection with susceptible cells. Here, we detail a protocol enabling generation of MLV-based pseudotyped particles, using the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) spike (S) as an example of a heterologous envelope glycoprotein to be incorporated. We also describe how these particles are used to infect susceptible cells and to perform a quantitative infectivity readout by a luciferase assay.

  7. Cell-cell transmission of VSV-G pseudotyped lentivector particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Amy M; Chakkaramakkil Verghese, Santhosh; Kurre, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Many replicating viruses, including HIV-1 and HTLV-1, are efficiently transmitted from the cell surface of actively infected cells upon contact with bystander cells. In a previous study, we reported the prolonged cell surface retention of VSV-G replication-deficient pseudotyped lentivector prior to endocytic entry. However, the competing kinetics of cell surface versus dissociation, neutralization or direct transfer to other cells have received comparatively little attention. Here we demonstrate that the relative efficiency of cell-cell surface transmission can outpace "cell-free" transduction at limiting vector input. This coincides with the prolonged half-life of cell bound vector but occurs, unlike HTLV-1, without evidence for particle aggregation. These studies suggest that cell-surface attachment stabilizes particles and alters neutralization kinetics. Our experiments provide novel insight into the underexplored cell-cell transmission of pseudotyped particles.

  8. Cell-cell transmission of VSV-G pseudotyped lentivector particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy M Skinner

    Full Text Available Many replicating viruses, including HIV-1 and HTLV-1, are efficiently transmitted from the cell surface of actively infected cells upon contact with bystander cells. In a previous study, we reported the prolonged cell surface retention of VSV-G replication-deficient pseudotyped lentivector prior to endocytic entry. However, the competing kinetics of cell surface versus dissociation, neutralization or direct transfer to other cells have received comparatively little attention. Here we demonstrate that the relative efficiency of cell-cell surface transmission can outpace "cell-free" transduction at limiting vector input. This coincides with the prolonged half-life of cell bound vector but occurs, unlike HTLV-1, without evidence for particle aggregation. These studies suggest that cell-surface attachment stabilizes particles and alters neutralization kinetics. Our experiments provide novel insight into the underexplored cell-cell transmission of pseudotyped particles.

  9. Mechanisms of retroviral integration and mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, Alessia; Moiani, Arianna; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2013-02-01

    Gene transfer vectors derived from oncoretroviruses or lentiviruses are the most robust and reliable tools to stably integrate therapeutic transgenes in human cells for clinical applications. Integration of these vectors in the genome may, however, have undesired effects caused by insertional deregulation of gene expression at the transcriptional or post-transcriptional level. The occurrence of severe adverse events in several clinical trials involving the transplantation of stem cells genetically corrected with retroviral vectors showed that insertional mutagenesis is not just a theoretical event, and that retroviral transgenesis is associated with a finite risk of genotoxicity. In addressing these issues, the gene therapy community offered a spectacular example of how scientific knowledge and technology can be put to work to understand the causes of unpredicted side effects, design new vectors, and develop tools and models to predict their safety and efficacy. As an added benefit, these efforts brought new basic knowledge on virus-host interactions and on the biology and dynamics of human somatic stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the interactions between retroviruses and the human genome and addresses the impact of target site selection on the safety of retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy.

  10. Complement inhibition enables tumor delivery of LCMV glycoprotein pseudotyped viruses in the presence of antiviral antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Evgin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic delivery of therapeutic viruses, such as oncolytic viruses or vaccines, is limited by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. While pseudotyping of rhabdoviruses with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein has previously allowed for multiple rounds of delivery in mice, this strategy has not translated to other animal models. For the first time, we provide experimental evidence that antibodies generated against the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein mediate robust complement-dependent viral neutralization via activation of the classical pathway. We show that this phenotype can be capitalized upon to deliver maraba virus pseudotyped with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein in a Fischer rat model in the face of neutralizing antibody through the use of complement modulators. This finding changes the understanding of the humoral immune response to arenaviruses, and also describes methodology to deliver viral vectors to their therapeutic sites of action without the interference of neutralizing antibody.

  11. Retroviral superinfection resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nethe, Micha; Berkhout, Ben; van der Kuyl, Antoinette C.

    2005-01-01

    The retroviral phenomenon of superinfection resistance (SIR) defines an interference mechanism that is established after primary infection, preventing the infected cell from being superinfected by a similar type of virus. This review describes our present understanding of the underlying mechanisms

  12. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector

    OpenAIRE

    Vreugdenhil Erno; Garner Keith M; Luijendijk Mieneke CM; Brans Maike AD; Fitzsimons Carlos P; de Backer Marijke WA; Adan Roger AH

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a lentiviral (LV) vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed), to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected...

  13. Special Issue: Retroviral Enzymes

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    Luis Menéndez-Arias

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The retroviral RNA genome encodes for three enzymes essential for virus replication: (i the viral protease (PR, that converts the immature virion into a mature virus through the cleavage of precursor polypeptides; (ii the reverse transcriptase (RT, responsible for the conversion of the single-stranded genomic RNA into double-stranded proviral DNA; and (iii the integrase (IN that inserts the proviral DNA into the host cell genome. All of them are important targets for therapeutic intervention. This Special Issue provides authoritative reviews on the most recent research towards a better understanding of structure-function relationships in retroviral enzymes. The Issue includes three reviews on retroviral PRs, seven on RT and reverse transcription, and four dedicated to viral integration. [...

  14. Effect of hypotonic stress on retroviral transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Hsiang; Peng, Ching-An

    2009-12-25

    Short half-life has long been known as a main barrier for retroviral gene delivery due to quick degradation that seriously limited application of retrovirus-mediated methodology in the clinical use. To circumvent this challenge, many physical and chemical approaches have been developed to maximize contact opportunity of retroviruses and cells before viral vectors decay. However, most of methods are not easy to be followed due to complicated equipment settings and/or long procedures. In this study, we introduced an easy, cost-effective, efficient, and scalable strategy to enhance retroviral transduction by hypo-osmotic stress. It has been demonstrated that under hypotonic exposure, cell membrane is permeabilized to allow numerous exterior molecules accessing to cytoplasm through an intensive endocytosis, yielding high efficiency of cellular uptake. We hypothesized this hypotonic stress-induced internalization may provide a unique opportunity of cell entry for retroviruses without the need of receptor binding, and thus overcome the insufficient transduction rate due to loss of envelope protein. Indeed, our results showed that with assistance of hypotonic stress, retroviral transduction rates dramatically increased about 5.6- and 17.7-fold using fresh and decayed retroviruses, respectively, in comparison with corresponding groups without hypotonic stress. In summary, hypotonic stress was shown as a promising tool for enhancement of retroviral transduction efficiency without limitation of short half-life.

  15. Transduction of pancreatic islets with pseudotyped adeno-associated virus: effect of viral capsid and genome conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Clément, Nathalie; Chen, Dongmei; Fu, Shuang; Zhang, Haojiang; Rebollo, Patricia; Linden, R Michael; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2005-09-15

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors currently show promise for islet gene therapy. In the presence of complementing AAV2 Rep proteins, AAV2 genomes can be packaged with other serotype capsids to assemble infectious virions. During transduction, the ssDNA to dsDNA conversion is one of the major rate-limiting steps that contribute to the slow onset of transgene expression. Using pseudotyping strategy, we produced double-stranded (dsAAV) and single-stranded (ssAAV) rAAV2 genomes carrying the GFP reporter gene packaged into AAV1, AAV2, and AAV5 capsids. The ability of cross-packaged AAV1, AAV2, and AAV5 at the same genome containing particle (gcp) concentration to transduce murine and human pancreatic islets was evaluated by GFP positive cell percentage. Transgenic expression was also determined by transplant transduced human islet into SCID mice. Pseudotyped rAAV2/1 based vectors transduced murine islets at greater efficiency than either rAAV2/2 or rAAV2/5 vectors. For human islets transduction, the rAAV2/2 vector was more efficient than rAAV2/1 or rAAV2/5 vectors. rAAV2/2 transduced human islets more efficiently than murine islets, while rAAV2/1 transducted murine islets more efficiently than human islets. dsAAV, which do not require second strand synthesis and thus are potentially more efficient, evidenced 5 fold higher transduction ability than ssAAV vectors. Pseudotyped rAAV transduced islet grafts maintained normal function, expressed transgenic product persistently in vivo, and reversed diabetes. The transduction efficiency of rAAV vectors was dependent on the cross-packaged capsid. The vector capsids permit species-specific transduction. For human islets, dsAAV2/2 vectors may be the most efficient vector for clinical development.

  16. Kidney-specific expression of GFP by in-utero delivery of pseudotyped adeno-associated virus 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason L Picconi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy targeting of kidneys has been largely unsuccessful. Recently, a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector was used to target adult mouse kidneys. Our hypothesis is that a pseudotyped rAAV 2/9 vector can produce fetal kidney-specific expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP gene following maternal tail vein injection of pregnant mice. Pregnant mice were treated with rAAV2/9 vectors with either the ubiquitous cytomegalovirus promoter or the minimal NPHS1 promoter to drive kidney-specific expression of GFP. Kidneys from dams and pups were analyzed for vector DNA, gene expression, and protein. Vector DNA was identified in kidney tissue out to 12 weeks at low but stable levels, with levels higher in dams than that in pups. Robust GFP expression was identified in the kidneys of both dams and pups treated with the cytomegalovirus (CMV-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP vector. When treated with the NPHS1-eGFP vector, dams and pups showed expression of GFP only in kidneys, localized to the glomeruli. An 80-fold increase in GFP mRNA expression in dams and a nearly 12-fold increase in pups was found out to 12 weeks of life. Selective targeting of the fetal kidney with a gene therapy vector was achieved by utilizing the pseudotyped rAAV 2/9 vector containing the NPHS1 promoter.

  17. Extended minus-strand DNA as template for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer in recombinational rescue of primer binding site-modified retroviral vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Dybkaer, K

    1998-01-01

    -through of the mutated PBS during minus-strand synthesis, and subsequent second-strand transfer mediated by the R-U5 complementarity of the plus strand and the extended minus-strand DNA acceptor template. Mechanisms for R-U5-mediated second-strand transfer and its possible role in retrovirus replication and evolution......We have previously demonstrated recombinational rescue of primer binding site (PBS)-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors involving initial priming on endogenous viral sequences and template switching during cDNA synthesis to obtain PBS complementarity in second-strand transfer...

  18. An automated system for screening retroviral expression constructs in microplate format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Mark D; Di Sera, Leonardo; Rebentisch, Matthew; Endo, Mark; Pierce, Michael; Kamb, Alexander

    2002-06-01

    Retroviruses are useful for genetics studies to deliver genes that express proteins, peptides, and RNAs. Several steps, including DNA preparation, transfection, packaging, transduction, and assay, are required to execute screens using retroviral constructs. Unlike screens with purified components, whole-cell assays using retroviral constructs need a large number of steps with microplate manipulations. The nature of these steps, especially the involvement of cultured mammalian cells, limits the throughput of such screens. To improve the efficiency of genetic experiments with retroviral expression vectors, an automated system for retroviral screening in microplates was devised and tested. The system, called Somata, provides high throughputs and robust, reproducible performance.

  19. Two novel adeno-associated viruses from cynomolgus monkey: pseudotyping characterization of capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Seiichiro; Wang, Lina; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Kanda, Tadahito

    2004-12-20

    We demonstrated the presence of two adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), designated AAV10 and AAV11, in cynomolgus monkeys by isolating and sequencing the entire viral coding regions from the monkey DNA. AAV10 and AAV11 capsid proteins shared 84% and 65%, respectively, of amino acids with AAV2. A phylogenetic analysis of AAV capsid proteins showed that AAV10 and AAV11 resembled most AAV8 and AAV4, respectively. To characterize the capsid protein, we pseudotyped an AAV2 vector with the monkey AAV capsid proteins and examined the resulting pseudotypes AAV2/10 and AAV2/11, in comparison with the AAV2 vector, for their host ranges in cell lines and tissue tropism in mice. AAV2/10 and AAV2/11 transduced primate cells less efficiently than AAV2. Whereas AAV2 transduced undifferentiated C2C12 mouse myoblasts more efficiently than differentiated ones, AAV2/10 and AAV2/11 transduced the undifferentiated myoblasts less efficiently than differentiated ones. Three weeks after injection to the muscle of the hind legs, AAV2/10 and AAV2 induced transgene expression similarly, but AAV2/11 did not transduce the skeletal muscle. Six weeks after systemic administration, transduced vector DNA was detected by PCR in the liver and spleen of mice inoculated with AAV2, in the liver, heart, muscle, lung, kidney, and uterus of mice with AAV2/10, and the muscle, kidney, spleen, lung, heart, and stomach of mice with AAV2/11. Mouse antisera against capsid protein VP2 of the three AAVs neutralized the respective vector particles in a type-specific manner. The results indicate that AAV10 and AAV11 capsid proteins, which are antigenically distinct from each other and AAV2, are likely to determine their host ranges and tissue tropism that are different from AAV2s, suggesting that cynomolgus AAVs could provide a broader choice of pseudotype AAV vectors for gene therapy.

  20. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... on the most salient vectors, and this works well, but many images contain a plethora of vectors, which makes their structure quite different from the linguistic transitivity structures with which Kress and van Leeuwen have compared ‘narrative’ images. It can also be asked whether facial expression vectors...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  1. Retroviral integration profiles: their determinants and implications for gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-il Lim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses have often been used for gene therapy because oftheir capacity for the long-term expression of transgenes via stableintegration into the host genome. However, retroviral integrationcan also result in the transformation of normal cells into cancercells, as demonstrated by the incidence of leukemia in a recentretroviral gene therapy trial in Europe. This unfortunate outcomehas led to the rapid initiation of studies examining variousbiological and pathological aspects of retroviral integration. Thisreview summarizes recent findings from these studies, includingthe global integration patterns of various types of retroviruses,viral and cellular determinants of integration, implications ofintegration for gene therapy and retrovirus-mediated infectiousdiseases, and strategies to shift integration to safe host genomicloci. A more comprehensive and mechanistic understanding ofretroviral integration processes will eventually make it possible togenerate safer retroviral vector platforms in the near future. [BMBreports 2012; 45(4: 207-212

  2. Retroviral integration: Site matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeulemeester, Jonas; De Rijck, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Here, we review genomic target site selection during retroviral integration as a multistep process in which specific biases are introduced at each level. The first asymmetries are introduced when the virus takes a specific route into the nucleus. Next, by co‐opting distinct host cofactors, the integration machinery is guided to particular chromatin contexts. As the viral integrase captures a local target nucleosome, specific contacts introduce fine‐grained biases in the integration site distribution. In vivo, the established population of proviruses is subject to both positive and negative selection, thereby continuously reshaping the integration site distribution. By affecting stochastic proviral expression as well as the mutagenic potential of the virus, integration site choice may be an inherent part of the evolutionary strategies used by different retroviruses to maximise reproductive success. PMID:26293289

  3. Pseudotyping exosomes for enhanced protein delivery in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Conary; Losacco, Joseph; Stickney, Zachary; Li, Lingxuan; Marriott, Gerard; Lu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Exosomes are cell-derived nanovesicles that hold promise as living vehicles for intracellular delivery of therapeutics to mammalian cells. This potential, however, is undermined by the lack of effective methods to load exosomes with therapeutic proteins and to facilitate their uptake by target cells. Here, we demonstrate how a vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVG) can both load protein cargo onto exosomes and increase their delivery ability via a pseudotyping mechanism. By fusing a set of fluorescent and luminescent reporters with VSVG, we show the successful targeting and incorporation of VSVG fusions into exosomes by gene transfection and fluorescence tracking. We subsequently validate our system by live cell imaging of VSVG and its participation in endosomes/exosomes that are ultimately released from transfected HEK293 cells. We show that VSVG pseudotyping of exosomes does not affect the size or distributions of the exosomes, and both the full-length VSVG and the VSVG without the ectodomain are shown to integrate into the exosomal membrane, suggesting that the ectodomain is not required for protein loading. Finally, exosomes pseudotyped with full-length VSVG are internalized by multiple-recipient cell types to a greater degree compared to exosomes loaded with VSVG without the ectodomain, confirming a role of the ectodomain in cell tropism. In summary, our work introduces a new genetically encoded pseudotyping platform to load and enhance the intracellular delivery of therapeutic proteins via exosome-based vehicles to target cells.

  4. Fates of retroviral core components during unrestricted and TRIM5-restricted infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebla B Kutluay

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available TRIM5 proteins can restrict retroviral infection soon after delivery of the viral core into the cytoplasm. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TRIM5α inhibits infection have been elusive, in part due to the difficulty of developing and executing biochemical assays that examine this stage of the retroviral life cycle. Prevailing models suggest that TRIM5α causes premature disassembly of retroviral capsids and/or degradation of capsids by proteasomes, but whether one of these events leads to the other is unclear. Furthermore, how TRIM5α affects the essential components of the viral core, other than capsid, is unknown. To address these questions, we devised a biochemical assay in which the fate of multiple components of retroviral cores during infection can be determined. We utilized cells that can be efficiently infected by VSV-G-pseudotyped retroviruses, and fractionated the cytosolic proteins on linear gradients following synchronized infection. The fates of capsid and integrase proteins, as well as viral genomic RNA and reverse transcription products were then monitored. We found that components of MLV and HIV-1 cores formed a large complex under non-restrictive conditions. In contrast, when MLV infection was restricted by human TRIM5α, the integrase protein and reverse transcription products were lost from infected cells, while capsid and viral RNA were both solubilized. Similarly, when HIV-1 infection was restricted by rhesus TRIM5α or owl monkey TRIMCyp, the integrase protein and reverse transcription products were lost. However, viral RNA was also lost, and high levels of preexisting soluble CA prevented the determination of whether CA was solubilized. Notably, proteasome inhibition blocked all of the aforementioned biochemical consequences of TRIM5α-mediated restriction but had no effect on its antiviral potency. Together, our results show how TRIM5α affects various retroviral core components and indicate that proteasomes are

  5. Retroviral superinfection resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Kuyl Antoinette C

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The retroviral phenomenon of superinfection resistance (SIR defines an interference mechanism that is established after primary infection, preventing the infected cell from being superinfected by a similar type of virus. This review describes our present understanding of the underlying mechanisms of SIR established by three characteristic retroviruses: Murine Leukaemia Virus (MuLV, Foamy Virus (FV, and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV. In addition, SIR is discussed with respect to HIV superinfection of humans. MuLV resistant mice exhibit two genetic resistance traits related to SIR. The cellular Fv4 gene expresses an Env related protein that establishes resistance against MuLV infection. Another mouse gene (Fv1 mediates MuLV resistance by expression of a sequence that is distantly related to Gag and that blocks the viral infection after the reverse transcription step. FVs induce two distinct mechanisms of superinfection resistance. First, expression of the Env protein results in SIR, probably by occupancy of the cellular receptors for FV entry. Second, an increase in the concentration of the viral Bet (Between-env-and-LTR-1-and-2 protein reduces proviral FV gene expression by inhibition of the transcriptional activator protein Tas (Transactivator of spumaviruses. In contrast to SIR in FV and MuLV infection, the underlying mechanism of SIR in HIV-infected cells is poorly understood. CD4 receptor down-modulation, a major characteristic of HIV-infected cells, has been proposed to be the main mechanism of SIR against HIV, but data have been contradictory. Several recent studies report the occurrence of HIV superinfection in humans; an event associated with the generation of recombinant HIV strains and possibly with increased disease progression. The role of SIR in protecting patients from HIV superinfection has not been studied so far. The phenomenon of SIR may also be important in the protection of primates that are vaccinated with live

  6. A Functional Henipavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Pseudotyped Lentivirus Assay System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broder Christopher C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hendra virus (HeV and Nipah virus (NiV are newly emerged zoonotic paramyxoviruses discovered during outbreaks in Queensland, Australia in 1994 and peninsular Malaysia in 1998/9 respectively and classified within the new Henipavirus genus. Both viruses can infect a broad range of mammalian species causing severe and often-lethal disease in humans and animals, and repeated outbreaks continue to occur. Extensive laboratory studies on the host cell infection stage of HeV and NiV and the roles of their envelope glycoproteins have been hampered by their highly pathogenic nature and restriction to biosafety level-4 (BSL-4 containment. To circumvent this problem, we have developed a henipavirus envelope glycoprotein pseudotyped lentivirus assay system using either a luciferase gene or green fluorescent protein (GFP gene encoding human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 genome in conjunction with the HeV and NiV fusion (F and attachment (G glycoproteins. Results Functional retrovirus particles pseudotyped with henipavirus F and G glycoproteins displayed proper target cell tropism and entry and infection was dependent on the presence of the HeV and NiV receptors ephrinB2 or B3 on target cells. The functional specificity of the assay was confirmed by the lack of reporter-gene signals when particles bearing either only the F or only G glycoprotein were prepared and assayed. Virus entry could be specifically blocked when infection was carried out in the presence of a fusion inhibiting C-terminal heptad (HR-2 peptide, a well-characterized, cross-reactive, neutralizing human mAb specific for the henipavirus G glycoprotein, and soluble ephrinB2 and B3 receptors. In addition, the utility of the assay was also demonstrated by an examination of the influence of the cytoplasmic tail of F in its fusion activity and incorporation into pseudotyped virus particles by generating and testing a panel of truncation mutants of NiV and HeV F

  7. Development and Applications of VSV Vectors Based on Cell Tropism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hideki; Morikawa, Shigeru; Matsuura, Yoshiharu

    2011-01-01

    Viral vectors have been available in various fields such as medical and biological research or gene therapy applications. Targeting vectors pseudotyped with distinct viral envelope proteins that influence cell tropism and transfection efficiency are useful tools not only for examining entry mechanisms or cell tropisms but also for vaccine vector development. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is an excellent candidate for development as a pseudotype vector. A recombinant VSV lacking its own envelope (G) gene has been used to produce a pseudotype or recombinant VSV possessing the envelope proteins of heterologous viruses. These viruses possess a reporter gene instead of a VSV G gene in their genome, and therefore it is easy to evaluate their infectivity in the study of viral entry, including identification of viral receptors. Furthermore, advantage can be taken of a property of the pseudotype VSV, which is competence for single-round infection, in handling many different viruses that are either difficult to amplify in cultured cells or animals or that require specialized containment facilities. Here we describe procedures for producing pseudotype or recombinant VSVs and a few of the more prominent examples from envelope viruses, such as hepatitis C virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, baculovirus, and hemorrhagic fever viruses.

  8. The use of pseudotypes to study viruses, virus sero-epidemiology and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Emma M; Mather, Stuart T; Temperton, Nigel J

    2015-06-12

    The globalization of the world's economies, accompanied by increasing international travel, changing climates, altered human behaviour and demographics is leading to the emergence of different viral diseases, many of which are highly pathogenic and hence are considered of great public and animal health importance. To undertake basic research and therapeutic development, many of these viruses require handling by highly trained staff in BSL-3/4 facilities not readily available to the majority of the global R&D community. In order to circumvent the enhanced biosafety requirement, the development of non-pathogenic, replication-defective pseudotyped viruses is an effective and established solution to permit the study of many aspects of virus biology in a low containment biosafety level (BSL)-1/2 laboratory. Under the spectre of the unfolding Ebola crisis, this timely conference (the second to be organised by the Viral Pseudotype Unit, www.viralpseudotypeunit.info*) discusses the recent advances in pseudotype technology and how it is revolutionizing the study of important human and animal pathogens (human and avian influenza viruses, rabies/lyssaviruses, HIV, Marburg and Ebola viruses). Key topics addressed in this conference include the exploitation of pseudotypes for serology and serosurveillance, immunogenicity testing of current and next-generation vaccines and new pseudotype assay formats (multiplexing, kit development). The first pseudotype-focused Euroscicon conference organised by the Viral Pseudotype Unit was recently reviewed [1]. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Diana L.; Collins, Casey P.; Hocum, Jonah D.; Leap, David J.; Rae, Dustin T.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34+ cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  10. [Cell lineage tracing of regenerating cells after partial pancreatectomy using pseudo-type retrovirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lixin; Ju, Xiaofang; Wang, Fa; Guo, Zhiwei; Piao, Shanhua; Teng, Chunbo

    2008-04-01

    Pancreas is an important mixed gland having both endocrine and exocrine functions, and has been proven regeneration after injury. To explore the cell lineage tracing methods in pancreas in vivo and the regenerate cells source, we used pseudo-type retrovirus to transfect adult mouse pancreas which had been partially pancreatectomized by rubbing the kerf using a cotton stick saturated with retrovirus suspension then injecting 100 microL retrovirus suspension into pancreas, injecting 100 microL retrovirus by caudal vein, or interperitoneally injecting retrovirus respectively. The results showed that the method of rubbing the kerf then injection of retrovirus suspension into pancreas could more effectively mark the pancreatic cells than the caudal vein injection and the intraperitoneal injection did in vivo. Furthermore, this study also found that some acinus cells could accept injury stimulus signals to regenerate through resuming mitosis after pancreatic injury. This study establishes a cell lineage tracing method in pancreas in vivo using retrovirus and offers a clue for gene therapy of pancreatic diseases using retrovirus vectors.

  11. Pseudotype-based neutralization assays for influenza: a systematic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George William Carnell

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of vaccination against the influenza virus remains the most effective method of mitigating the significant morbidity and mortality caused by this virus. Antibodies elicited by currently licensed influenza vaccines are predominantly hemagglutination-inhibition (HI-competent antibodies that target the globular head of HA thus inhibiting influenza virus entry into target cells. These antibodies predominantly confer homosubtypic/strain specific protection and only rarely confer heterosubtypic protection. However, recent academia or pharma-led R&D towards the production of a universal vaccine has centered on the elicitation of antibodies directed against the stalk of the influenza HA that has been shown to confer broad protection across a range of different subtypes (H1 to H16. The accurate and sensitive measurement of antibody responses elicited by these next-generation influenza vaccines is however hampered by the lack of sensitivity of the traditional influenza serological assays hemagglutinin inhibition (HI, single radial hemolysis (SRH and microneutralization (MN. Assays utilizing pseudotypes, chimeric viruses bearing influenza glycoproteins, have been shown to be highly efficient for the measurement of homosubtypic and heterosubtypic broadly-neutralizing antibodies, making them ideal serological tools for the study of cross-protective responses against multiple influenza subtypes with pandemic potential. In this review, we will analyze and compare literature involving the production of influenza pseudotypes with particular emphasis on their use in serum antibody neutralization assays. This will enable us to establish the parameters required for optimization and propose a consensus protocol to be employed for the further deployment of these assays in influenza vaccine immunogenicity studies.

  12. Analysis of VSV pseudotype virus infection mediated by rubella virus envelope proteins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Masafumi Sakata; Hideki Tani; Masaki Anraku; Michiyo Kataoka; Noriyo Nagata; Fumio Seki; Maino Tahara; Noriyuki Otsuki; Kiyoko Okamoto; Makoto Takeda; Yoshio Mori

    2017-01-01

    .... To establish an infection the host cells must be susceptible and permissible. To assess the susceptibility of individual cell lines, we generated a pseudotype vesicular stomatitis virus bearing RV envelope proteins (VSV-RV/CE2E1...

  13. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: conservation of carbohydrate epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4...... for pseudotypes to escape neutralization by the immune system in vivo. Previous reports have suggested that carbohydrate structures may be conserved neutralization epitopes on retroviruses. In this study, the neutralizing capacity of lectins and anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies was found to block infection...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  14. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: Conservation of carbohydrate Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4...... for pseudotypes to escape neutralization by the immune system in vivo. Previous reports have suggested that carbohydrate structures may be conserved neutralization epitopes on retroviruses. In this study, the neutralizing capacity of lectins and anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies was found to block infection...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  15. Characterization of retroviral infectivity and superinfection resistance during retrovirus-mediated transduction of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, J; Wei, Q; Fan, J; Zou, Y; Song, D; Liu, J; Liu, F; Ma, C; Hu, X; Li, L; Yu, Y; Qu, X; Chen, L; Yu, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zeng, Z; Zhang, R; Yan, S; Wu, T; Wu, X; Shu, Y; Lei, J; Li, Y; Zhang, W; Wang, J; Reid, R R; Lee, M J; Huang, W; Wolf, J M; He, T-C; Wang, J

    2017-06-01

    Retroviral vectors including lentiviral vectors are commonly used tools to stably express transgenes or RNA molecules in mammalian cells. Their utilities are roughly divided into two categories, stable overexpression of transgenes and RNA molecules, which requires maximal transduction efficiency, or functional selection with retrovirus (RV)-based libraries, which takes advantage of retroviral superinfection resistance. However, the dynamic features of RV-mediated transduction are not well characterized. Here, we engineered two murine stem cell virus-based retroviral vectors expressing dual fluorescence proteins and antibiotic markers, and analyzed virion production efficiency and virion stability, dynamic infectivity and superinfection resistance in different cell types, and strategies to improve transduction efficiency. We found that the highest virion production occurred between 60 and 72 h after transfection. The stability of the collected virion supernatant decreased by >60% after 3 days in storage. We found that RV infectivity varied drastically in the tested human cancer lines, while low transduction efficiency was partially overcome with increased virus titer, prolonged infection duration and/or repeated infections. Furthermore, we demonstrated that RV receptors PIT1 and PIT2 were lowly expressed in the analyzed cells, and that PIT1 and/or PIT2 overexpression significantly improved transduction efficiency in certain cell lines. Thus, our findings provide resourceful information for the optimal conditions of retroviral-mediated gene delivery.

  16. Improved retroviral suicide gene transfer in colon cancer cell lines after cell synchronization with methotrexate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nordlinger Bernard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer gene therapy by retroviral vectors is mainly limited by the level of transduction. Retroviral gene transfer requires target cell division. Cell synchronization, obtained by drugs inducing a reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, could therefore be proposed to precondition target cells to retroviral gene transfer. We tested whether drug-mediated cell synchronization could enhance the transfer efficiency of a retroviral-mediated gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk in two colon cancer cell lines, DHDK12 and HT29. Methods Synchronization was induced by methotrexate (MTX, aracytin (ara-C or aphidicolin. Gene transfer efficiency was assessed by the level of HSV-TK expression. Transduced cells were driven by ganciclovir (GCV towards apoptosis that was assessed using annexin V labeling by quantitative flow cytometry. Results DHDK12 and HT29 cells were synchronized in S phase with MTX but not ara-C or aphidicolin. In synchronized DHDK12 and HT29 cells, the HSV-TK transduction rates were 2 and 1.5-fold higher than those obtained in control cells, respectively. Furthermore, the rate of apoptosis was increased two-fold in MTX-treated DHDK12 cells after treatment with GCV. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MTX-mediated synchronization of target cells allowed a significant improvement of retroviral HSV-tk gene transfer, resulting in an increased cell apoptosis in response to GCV. Pharmacological control of cell cycle may thus be a useful strategy to optimize the efficiency of retroviral-mediated cancer gene therapy.

  17. Bats and Rodents Shape Mammalian Retroviral Phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jie; Tachedjian, Gilda; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2015-11-09

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) represent past retroviral infections and accordingly can provide an ideal framework to infer virus-host interaction over their evolutionary history. In this study, we target high quality Pol sequences from 7,994 Class I and 8,119 Class II ERVs from 69 mammalian genomes and surprisingly find that retroviruses harbored by bats and rodents combined occupy the major phylogenetic diversity of both classes. By analyzing transmission patterns of 30 well-defined ERV clades, we corroborate the previously published observation that rodents are more competent as originators of mammalian retroviruses and reveal that bats are more capable of receiving retroviruses from non-bat mammalian origins. The powerful retroviral hosting ability of bats is further supported by a detailed analysis revealing that the novel bat gammaretrovirus, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum retrovirus, likely originated from tree shrews. Taken together, this study advances our understanding of host-shaped mammalian retroviral evolution in general.

  18. Optimization of adeno-associated viral vector-mediated gene delivery to the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Backer, Marijke W A; Brans, Maike A D; Luijendijk, Mieneke C; Garner, Keith M; Adan, Roger A H

    2010-06-01

    To efficiently deliver genes and short hairpin RNAs to the hypothalamus we aimed to optimize the transduction efficiency of adeno-associated virus (AAV) in the rat hypothalamus. We compared the transduction efficiencies of AAV2 vectors pseudotyped with AAV1, AAV8, and mosaic AAV1/2 and AAV2/8 coats with that of an AAV2 coated vector after injection into the lateral hypothalamus of rats. In addition, we determined the transduction areas and the percentage of neurons infected after injection of various titers and volumes of two AAV1-pseudotyped vectors in the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVN). Successful gene delivery to the hypothalamus was achieved with AAV1-pseudotyped AAV vectors. The optimal approach to transduce an area, with the size of the PVN, was to inject 1 x 10(9) genomic copies of an AAV1-pseudotyped vector in a volume of 1 microl. At a radius of 0.05 mm from the injection site almost all neurons were transduced. In addition, overexpression of AgRP with the optimal approach resulted in an increase in food intake and body weight when compared with AAV-GFP.

  19. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Nalla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV.

  20. Analyses of Entry Mechanisms of Novel Emerging Viruses Using Pseudotype VSV System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Hideki

    2014-06-01

    Emerging infectious diseases include newly identified diseases caused by previously unknown organisms or diseases found in new and expanding geographic areas. Viruses capable of causing clinical disease associated with fever and bleeding are referred to as viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs). Arenaviruses and Bunyaviruses, both belonging to families classified as VHFs are considered major etiologies of hemorrhagic fevers caused by emerging viruses; having significant clinical and public health impact. Because these viruses are categorized as Biosafety Level (BSL) 3 and 4 pathogens, restricting their use, biological studies including therapeutic drug and vaccine development have been impeded. Due to these restrictions and the difficulties in handling such live viruses, pseudotype viruses bearing envelope proteins of VHF viruses have been developed using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) as a surrogate system. Here, we report the successful developments of two pseudotype VSV systems; bearing the envelope proteins of Lujo virus and severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) virus, both recently identified viruses of the family Arenaviridae and Bunyaviridae, respectively. My presentation will summarize the characterization of the envelope proteins of Lujo virus including its cellular receptor use and cell entry mechanisms. In addition, I will also present a brief introduction of SFTS reported in Japan and the diagnostic studies in progress using these newly pseudotype VSV system.

  1. Amplification and chromosomal dispersion of human endogenous retroviral sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, P.E.; Martin, M.A.; Rabson, A.B.; Bryan, T.; O' Brien, S.J.

    1986-09-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences have undergone amplification events involving both viral and flanking cellular sequences. The authors cloned members of an amplified family of full-length endogenous retroviral sequences. Genomic blotting, employing a flanking cellular DNA probe derived from a member of this family, revealed a similar array of reactive bands in both humans and chimpanzees, indicating that an amplification event involving retroviral and associated cellular DNA sequences occurred before the evolutionary separation of these two primates. Southern analyses of restricted somatic cell hybrid DNA preparations suggested that endogenous retroviral segments are widely dispersed in the human genome and that amplification and dispersion events may be linked.

  2. Remission of invasive, cancer stem-like glioblastoma xenografts using lentiviral vector-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Huszthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor with a poor prognosis. The translation of therapeutic strategies for glioblastoma from the experimental phase into the clinic has been limited by insufficient animal models, which lack important features of human tumors. Lentiviral gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic option for human glioblastoma, which we validated in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a rodent xenograft model that recapitulates the invasive and angiogenic features of human glioblastoma to analyze the transduction pattern and therapeutic efficacy of lentiviral pseudotyped vectors. Both, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein (LCMV-GP and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors very efficiently transduced human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, pseudotyped gammaretroviral vectors, similar to those evaluated for clinical therapy of glioblastoma, showed inefficient gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. Both pseudotyped lentiviral vectors transduced cancer stem-like cells characterized by their CD133-, nestin- and SOX2-expression, the ability to form spheroids in neural stem cell medium and to express astrocytic and neuronal differentiation markers under serum conditions. In a therapeutic approach using the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk fused to eGFP, both lentiviral vectors mediated a complete remission of solid tumors as seen on MRI resulting in a highly significant survival benefit (p<0.001 compared to control groups. In all recurrent tumors, surviving eGFP-positive tumor cells were found, advocating prodrug application for several cycles to even enhance and prolong the therapeutic effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, lentiviral pseudotyped vectors are promising candidates for gene therapy of glioma in patients. The inefficient gene delivery

  3. Ancestral capture of syncytin-Car1, a fusogenic endogenous retroviral envelope gene involved in placentation and conserved in Carnivora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelis, Guillaume; Heidmann, Odile; Bernard-Stoecklin, Sibylle; Reynaud, Karine; Véron, Géraldine; Mulot, Baptiste; Dupressoir, Anne; Heidmann, Thierry

    2012-02-14

    Syncytins are envelope protein genes of retroviral origin that have been captured for a function in placentation. Two such genes have already been identified in simians, two distinct, unrelated genes have been identified in Muridae, and a fifth gene has been identified in the rabbit. Here, we searched for similar genes in the Laurasiatheria clade, which diverged from Euarchontoglires--primates, rodents, and lagomorphs--shortly after mammalian radiation (100 Mya). In silico search for envelope protein genes with full-coding capacity within the dog and cat genomes identified several candidate genes, with one common to both species that displayed placenta-specific expression, which was revealed by RT-PCR analysis of a large panel of tissues. This gene belongs to a degenerate endogenous retroviral element, with precise proviral integration at a site common to dog and cat. Cloning of the gene for an ex vivo pseudotype assay showed fusogenicity on both dog and cat cells. In situ hybridization on placenta sections from both species showed specific expression at the level of the invasive fetal villi within the placental junctional zone, where trophoblast cells fuse into a syncytiotrophoblast layer to form the maternofetal interface. Finally, we show that the gene is conserved among a series of 26 Carnivora representatives, with evidence for purifying selection and conservation of fusogenic activity. The gene is not found in the Pholidota order and, therefore, it was captured before Carnivora radiation, between 60 and 85 Mya. This gene is the oldest syncytin gene identified to date, and it is the first in a new major clade of eutherian mammals.

  4. Rapid transcriptional pulsing dynamics of high expressing retroviral transgenes in embryonic stem cells.

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    Mandy Y M Lo

    Full Text Available Single cell imaging studies suggest that transcription is not continuous and occurs as discrete pulses of gene activity. To study mechanisms by which retroviral transgenes can transcribe to high levels, we used the MS2 system to visualize transcriptional dynamics of high expressing proviral integration sites in embryonic stem (ES cells. We established two ES cell lines each bearing a single copy, self-inactivating retroviral vector with a strong ubiquitous human EF1α gene promoter directing expression of mRFP fused to an MS2-stem-loop array. Transfection of MS2-EGFP generated EGFP focal dots bound to the mRFP-MS2 stem loop mRNA. These transcription foci colocalized with the transgene integration site detected by immunoFISH. Live tracking of single cells for 20 minutes detected EGFP focal dots that displayed frequent and rapid fluctuations in transcription over periods as short as 25 seconds. Similarly rapid fluctuations were detected from focal doublet signals that colocalized with replicated proviral integration sites by immunoFISH, consistent with transcriptional pulses from sister chromatids. We concluded that retroviral transgenes experience rapid transcriptional pulses in clonal ES cell lines that exhibit high level expression. These events are directed by a constitutive housekeeping gene promoter and may provide precedence for rapid transcriptional pulsing at endogenous genes in mammalian stem cells.

  5. Retroviral gene transfer into primary human NK cells activated by IL-2 and K562 feeder cells expressing membrane-bound IL-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsova, Maria A; Barsov, Eugene; Erokhina, Sofia A; Kovalenko, Elena I

    2017-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are capable of rapidly recognizing and efficiently killing tumor cells. This makes them a potentially promising agent for cancer immunotherapy. Additional genetic modifications of NK cells may further improve their anti-tumor efficacy. Numerous technical challenges associated with gene delivery into NK cells have significantly tempered this approach. We achieved efficient retroviral vector transduction of primary human NK cells that were stimulated by a combination of IL-2 and engineered K562 cells expressing membrane-bound IL-21. The activated NK cells were in less differentiated state and expressed NK cell activation receptors NKG2D, NKp30, CD16, and were highly HLA-DR-positive. This NK cell population was highly susceptible to the transduction by both GFP- and NGFR-expressing retroviral vectors, with transduction efficiency exceeding 50%. More mature CD57+ NK cell population was generally resistant to retroviral vector transduction because of poor response to the stimulation. Our findings may facilitate retroviral vector-mediated genetic engineering of human primary NK cells for future immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a lentiviral (LV) vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed), to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected into the lateral hypothalamus or into the amygdala of adult rats. The titers that were injected were 1 × 108 or 1 × 109 genomic copies of AAV1-GFP and 1 × 105 transducing units of LV-dsRed. Results Immunostaining for GFP and dsRed showed that AAV1-GFP transduced significantly more cells than LV-dsRed in both the lateral hypothalamus and the amygdala. In addition, the number of LV particles that were injected can not easily be increased, while the number of AAV1 particles can be increased easily with a factor 100 to 1000. Both viral vectors appear to predominantly transduce neurons. Conclusions This study showed that AAV1 vectors are better tools to overexpress or knockdown genes in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala of adult rats, since more cells can be transduced with AAV1 than with LV vectors and the titer of AAV1 vectors can easily be increased to transduce the area of interest. PMID:20626877

  7. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Backer, Marijke W A; Fitzsimons, Carlos P; Brans, Maike A D; Luijendijk, Mieneke C M; Garner, Keith M; Vreugdenhil, Erno; Adan, Roger A H

    2010-07-13

    This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP), with a lentiviral (LV) vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed), to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected into the lateral hypothalamus or into the amygdala of adult rats. The titers that were injected were 1 x 108 or 1 x 109 genomic copies of AAV1-GFP and 1 x 105 transducing units of LV-dsRed. Immunostaining for GFP and dsRed showed that AAV1-GFP transduced significantly more cells than LV-dsRed in both the lateral hypothalamus and the amygdala. In addition, the number of LV particles that were injected can not easily be increased, while the number of AAV1 particles can be increased easily with a factor 100 to 1000. Both viral vectors appear to predominantly transduce neurons. This study showed that AAV1 vectors are better tools to overexpress or knockdown genes in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala of adult rats, since more cells can be transduced with AAV1 than with LV vectors and the titer of AAV1 vectors can easily be increased to transduce the area of interest.

  8. An adeno-associated viral vector transduces the rat hypothalamus and amygdala more efficient than a lentiviral vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vreugdenhil Erno

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared the transduction efficiencies of an adeno-associated viral (AAV vector, which was pseudotyped with an AAV1 capsid and encoded the green fluorescent protein (GFP, with a lentiviral (LV vector, which was pseudotyped with a VSV-G envelop and encoded the discosoma red fluorescent protein (dsRed, to investigate which viral vector transduced the lateral hypothalamus or the amygdala more efficiently. The LV-dsRed and AAV1-GFP vector were mixed and injected into the lateral hypothalamus or into the amygdala of adult rats. The titers that were injected were 1 × 108 or 1 × 109 genomic copies of AAV1-GFP and 1 × 105 transducing units of LV-dsRed. Results Immunostaining for GFP and dsRed showed that AAV1-GFP transduced significantly more cells than LV-dsRed in both the lateral hypothalamus and the amygdala. In addition, the number of LV particles that were injected can not easily be increased, while the number of AAV1 particles can be increased easily with a factor 100 to 1000. Both viral vectors appear to predominantly transduce neurons. Conclusions This study showed that AAV1 vectors are better tools to overexpress or knockdown genes in the lateral hypothalamus and amygdala of adult rats, since more cells can be transduced with AAV1 than with LV vectors and the titer of AAV1 vectors can easily be increased to transduce the area of interest.

  9. THE EVOLUTION OF ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY IN NIGERIA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBMED search by Akanmu et al from Lagos in 2001 to reports in 2013, it is undeniable that HIV scientists in Nigeria have produced a good number of very informative and relevant results in the area of anti-retroviral therapy research in Nigeria. Key words: Medical History, Anti-retroviral therapy, HAART, Nigeria mother to ...

  10. Helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged both in the presence of VSV G protein and in the absence of HSV-1 glycoprotein B support gene transfer into neurons in the rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J; Yang, T; Ghosh, H P; Geller, A I

    2001-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vectors have potential for gene transfer into quiescent cells, but the gene transfer process could be more efficient. In other vector systems, both the titers and the efficiency of gene transfer have been enhanced by pseudotyping the vector particles with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein. In this report, we pseudotyped helper virus-free HSV-1 plasmid vectors with VSV G protein. Packaging was performed in the presence of both VSV G protein and a deletion in an essential HSV-1 glycoprotein, gB. The resulting vector stocks supported gene transfer into both fibroblast and neuronal cell lines. VSV G protein was required for gene transfer because preincubation of these vector stocks with antibodies directed against either VSV G protein or VSV reduced the titer to undetectable levels. Although the titers were lower than those obtained using the unmodified vector system, the titers were not increased by use of chimeric proteins that contain the extracellular domain of VSV G protein and the transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains of specific HSV-1 glycoproteins. Also, the titers were not increased by performing the packaging in the presence of deletions in multiple HSV-1 glycoproteins. Nonetheless, pHSVlac pseudotyped with VSV G protein supported gene transfer into striatal neurons in the rat brain. Thus, HSV-1 vectors pseudotyped with VSV G protein may be useful for specific gene transfer studies.

  11. High-definition mapping of retroviral integration sites defines the fate of allogeneic T cells after donor lymphocyte infusion.

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    Claudia Cattoglio

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The infusion of donor lymphocytes transduced with a retroviral vector expressing the HSV-TK suicide gene in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia/lymphoma promotes immune reconstitution and prevents infections and graft-versus-host disease. Analysis of the clonal dynamics of genetically modified lymphocytes in vivo is of crucial importance to understand the potential genotoxic risk of this therapeutic approach. We used linear amplification-mediated PCR and pyrosequencing to build a genome-wide, high-definition map of retroviral integration sites in the genome of peripheral blood T cells from two different donors and used gene expression profiling and bioinformatics to associate integration clusters to transcriptional activity and to genetic and epigenetic features of the T cell genome. Comparison with matched random controls and with integrations obtained from CD34(+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells showed that integration clusters occur within chromatin regions bearing epigenetic marks associated with active promoters and regulatory elements in a cell-specific fashion. Analysis of integration sites in T cells obtained ex vivo two months after infusion showed no evidence of integration-related clonal expansion or dominance, but rather loss of cells harboring integration events interfering with RNA post-transcriptional processing. The study shows that high-definition maps of retroviral integration sites are a powerful tool to analyze the fate of genetically modified T cells in patients and the biological consequences of retroviral transduction.

  12. Construction and characterization of efficient, stable and safe replication-deficient foamy virus vectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastone, P.; Romen, F.; Liu, W.; Wirtz, R.; Koch, U.; Josephson, N.; Langbein, S.; Löchelt, M.

    2007-01-01

    As serious side effects affected recent virus-mediated gene transfer studies, novel vectors with improved safety profiles are urgently needed. In the present study, replication-deficient retroviral vectors based on feline foamy virus (FFV) were constructed and analyzed. The novel FFV vectors are

  13. Characterization of the Bas-Congo virus glycoprotein and its function in pseudotyped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Imke; Liss, Nathan M; Schneider, Bradley S; Fair, Joseph N; Chiu, Charles Y; Simmons, Graham

    2013-09-01

    Bas-Congo virus (BASV) is a novel rhabdovirus recently identified from a patient with acute hemorrhagic fever in the Bas-Congo province of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Here we show that the BASV glycoprotein (BASV-G) can be successfully used to pseudotype glycoprotein-deficient vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), allowing studies of BASV-G-driven membrane fusion and viral entry into target cells without replication-competent virus. BASV-G displayed broad tissue and species tropism in vitro, and BASV-G-mediated membrane fusion was pH dependent. The conformational changes induced in BASV-G by acidification were fully reversible and did not lead to inactivation of the viral fusion protein. Our data combined with comparative sequence similarity analyses suggest that BASV-G shares structural and functional features with other rhabdovirus glycoproteins and falls into the group of class III viral fusion proteins. However, activation of BASV-G-driven fusion required a lower pH and higher temperatures than did VSV-G-mediated fusion. Moreover, in contrast to VSV-G, mature BASV-G in VSV pseudotypes consists of a mixture of high-mannose and complex glycans that enables it to bind to certain C-type lectins, thereby enhancing its attachment to target cells. Taken together, the results presented in this study will facilitate future investigations of BASV-G-mediated cell entry and its inhibition in the absence of an infectious cell culture assay for BASV and at lower biosafety levels. Moreover, serology testing based on BASV-G pseudotype neutralization can be used to uncover the prevalence and importance of BASV as a potential novel human pathogen in the DRC and throughout Central Africa.

  14. Retrovirus-based vectors for transient and permanent cell modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, Juliane W; Hoffmann, Dirk; Schambach, Axel

    2015-10-01

    Retroviral vectors are commonly employed for long-term transgene expression via integrating vector technology. However, three alternative retrovirus-based platforms are currently available that allow transient cell modification. Gene expression can be mediated from either episomal DNA or RNA templates, or selected proteins can be directly transferred through retroviral nanoparticles. The different technologies are functionally graded with respect to safety, expression magnitude and expression duration. Improvement of the initial technologies, including modification of vector designs, targeted increase in expression strength and duration as well as improved safety characteristics, has allowed maturation of retroviral systems into efficient and promising tools that meet the technological demands of a wide variety of potential application areas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Optimised retroviral infection of human epidermal keratinocytes: long-term expression of transduced integrin gene following grafting on to SCID mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, L; Broad, S; Zhu, A J; Carroll, J M; Khazaal, I; Péault, B; Watt, F M

    1998-07-01

    Previous attempts to achieve long-term gene expression in retrovirally transduced human epidermal keratinocytes in vivo have been largely unsuccessful. This has been variously attributed to a failure to target epidermal stem cells, suboptimal grafting conditions or inactivation of the retroviral vector. In an attempt to overcome these problems we expressed the chick beta 1 integrin subunit in primary human epidermal keratinocytes, which allowed us to monitor retroviral gene expression on a cell-by-cell basis. We describe optimised methods for selecting high-titre amphotropic packaging cells and for infecting keratinocytes in culture. When transduced cells were grafted into mice, graft survival was comparable in nude and SCID mice, but it was essential to combine the keratinocytes with a dermal substrate. Using these methods the majority of keratinocytes expressed the chick beta 1 integrin subunit for at least 16 weeks after grafting. We conclude that epidermal keratinocytes are attractive recipient cells for gene therapy.

  16. Membrane interaction of retroviral Gag proteins

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    Robert Alfred Dick

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Assembly of an infectious retroviral particle relies on multimerization of the Gag polyprotein at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. The three domains of Gag common to all retroviruses-- MA, CA, and NC-- provide the signals for membrane binding, assembly, and viral RNA packaging, respectively. These signals do not function independently of one another. For example, Gag multimerization enhances membrane binding and is more efficient when NC is interacting with RNA. MA binding to the plasma membrane is governed by several principles, including electrostatics, recognition of specific lipid head groups, hydrophobic interactions, and membrane order. HIV-1 uses many of these principles while Rous sarcoma virus (RSV appears to use fewer. This review describes the principles that govern Gag interactions with membranes, focusing on RSV and HIV-1 Gag. The review also defines lipid and membrane behavior, and discusses the complexities in determining how lipid and membrane behavior impact Gag membrane binding.

  17. Biochemical characterization of novel retroviral integrase proteins.

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    Allison Ballandras-Colas

    Full Text Available Integrase is an essential retroviral enzyme, catalyzing the stable integration of reverse transcribed DNA into cellular DNA. Several aspects of the integration mechanism, including the length of host DNA sequence duplication flanking the integrated provirus, which can be from 4 to 6 bp, and the nucleotide preferences at the site of integration, are thought to cluster among the different retroviral genera. To date only the spumavirus prototype foamy virus integrase has provided diffractable crystals of integrase-DNA complexes, revealing unprecedented details on the molecular mechanisms of DNA integration. Here, we characterize five previously unstudied integrase proteins, including those derived from the alpharetrovirus lymphoproliferative disease virus (LPDV, betaretroviruses Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV, and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, epsilonretrovirus walleye dermal sarcoma virus (WDSV, and gammaretrovirus reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A (Rev-A to identify potential novel structural biology candidates. Integrase expressed in bacterial cells was analyzed for solubility, stability during purification, and, once purified, 3' processing and DNA strand transfer activities in vitro. We show that while we were unable to extract or purify accountable amounts of WDSV, JRSV, or LPDV integrase, purified MMTV and Rev-A integrase each preferentially support the concerted integration of two viral DNA ends into target DNA. The sequencing of concerted Rev-A integration products indicates high fidelity cleavage of target DNA strands separated by 5 bp during integration, which contrasts with the 4 bp duplication generated by a separate gammaretrovirus, the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV. By comparing Rev-A in vitro integration sites to those generated by MLV in cells, we concordantly conclude that the spacing of target DNA cleavage is more evolutionarily flexible than are the target DNA base contacts made by integrase during integration

  18. Regulation of human heme oxygenase in endothelial cells by using sense and antisense retroviral constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, S; Yang, L; Abraham, N G; Kappas, A

    2001-10-09

    Our objective was to determine whether overexpression and underexpression of human heme oxygenase (HHO)-1 could be controlled on a long-term basis by introduction of the HO-1 gene in sense (S) and antisense (AS) orientation with an appropriate vector into endothelial cells. Retroviral vector (LXSN) containing viral long terminal repeat promoter-driven human HO-1 S (LSN-HHO-1) and LXSN vectors containing HHO-1 promoter (HOP)-controlled HHO-1 S and AS (LSN-HOP-HHO-1 and LSN-HOP-HHO-1-AS) sequences were constructed and used to transfect rat lung microvessel endothelial cells (RLMV cells) and human dermal microvessel endothelial cells (HMEC-1 cells). RLMV cells transduced with HHO-1 S expressed human HO-1 mRNA and HO-1 protein associated with elevation in total HO activity compared with nontransduced cells. Vector-mediated expression of HHO-1 S or AS under control of HOP resulted in effective production of HO-1 or blocked induction of endogenous human HO-1 in HMEC-1 cells, respectively. Overexpression of HO-1 AS was associated with a long-term decrease (45%) of endogenous HO-1 protein and an increase (167%) in unmetabolized exogenous heme in HMEC-1 cells. Carbon monoxide (CO) production in HO-1 S- or AS-transduced HMEC-1 cells after heme treatment was increased (159%) or decreased (50%), respectively, compared with nontransduced cells. HO-2 protein levels did not change. These findings demonstrate that HHO-1 S and AS retroviral constructs are functional in enhancing and reducing HO activity, respectively, and thus can be used to regulate cellular heme levels, the activity of heme-dependent enzymes, and the rate of heme catabolism to CO and bilirubin.

  19. Stavudine, an anti‑retroviral drug induces reactive astrocytes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stavudine, an anti‑retroviral drug induces reactive astrocytes in motor cortex of albino mice. Agnes A. Nwakanma, Theresa B. Ekanem, Moses B. Ekong, Mokutima A. Eluwa, Eme E. Osim, Terkula Kpela ...

  20. Gene therapy using retrovirus vectors: vector development and biosafety at clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Knayo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Retrovirus vectors (gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors) have been considered as promising tools to transfer therapeutic genes into patient cells because they can permanently integrate into host cellular genome. To treat monogenic, inherited diseases, retroviral vectors have been used to add correct genes into patient cells. Conventional gammaretroviral vectors achieved successful results in clinical trials: treated patients had therapeutic gene expression in target cells and had improved symptoms of diseases. However, serious side-effects of leukemia occurred, caused by retroviral insertional mutagenesis (IM). These incidences stressed the importance of monitoring vector integration sites in patient cells as well as of re-consideration on safer vectors. More recently lentiviral vectors which can deliver genes into non-dividing cells started to be used in clinical trials including neurological disorders, showing their efficacy. Vector integration site analysis revealed that lentiviruses integrate less likely to near promoter regions of oncogenes than gammaretroviruses and no adverse events have been reported in lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy clinical trials. Therefore lentiviral vectors have promises to be applied to a wide range of common diseases in near future. For example, T cells from cancer patients were transduced to express chimeric T cell receptors recognizing their tumour cells enhancing patients' anti-cancer immunity.

  1. Retinal degeneration progression changes lentiviral vector cell targeting in the retina.

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    Maritza Calame

    Full Text Available In normal mice, the lentiviral vector (LV is very efficient to target the RPE cells, but transduces retinal neurons well only during development. In the present study, the tropism of LV has been investigated in the degenerating retina of mice, knowing that the retina structure changes during degeneration. We postulated that the viral transduction would be increased by the alteration of the outer limiting membrane (OLM. Two different LV pseudotypes were tested using the VSVG and the Mokola envelopes, as well as two animal models of retinal degeneration: light-damaged Balb-C and Rhodopsin knockout (Rho-/- mice. After light damage, the OLM is altered and no significant increase of the number of transduced photoreceptors can be obtained with a LV-VSVG-Rhop-GFP vector. In the Rho-/- mice, an alteration of the OLM was also observed, but the possibility of transducing photoreceptors was decreased, probably by ongoing gliosis. The use of a ubiquitous promoter allows better photoreceptor transduction, suggesting that photoreceptor-specific promoter activity changes during late stages of photoreceptor degeneration. However, the number of targeted photoreceptors remains low. In contrast, LV pseudotyped with the Mokola envelope allows a wide dispersion of the vector into the retina (corresponding to the injection bleb with preferential targeting of Müller cells, a situation which does not occur in the wild-type retina. Mokola-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors may serve to engineer these glial cells to deliver secreted therapeutic factors to a diseased area of the retina.

  2. A comparison of foamy and lentiviral vector genotoxicity in SCID-repopulating cells shows foamy vectors are less prone to clonal dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Everson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC gene therapy using retroviral vectors has immense potential, but vector-mediated genotoxicity limits use in the clinic. Lentiviral vectors are less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors and have become the vector of choice in clinical trials. Foamy retroviral vectors have a promising integration profile and are less prone to read-through transcription than gammaretroviral or lentiviral vectors. Here, we directly compared the safety and efficacy of foamy vectors to lentiviral vectors in human CD34+ repopulating cells in immunodeficient mice. To increase their genotoxic potential, foamy and lentiviral vectors with identical transgene cassettes with a known genotoxic spleen focus forming virus promoter were used. Both vectors resulted in efficient marking in vivo and a total of 825 foamy and 460 lentiviral vector unique integration sites were recovered in repopulating cells 19 weeks after transplantation. Foamy vector proviruses were observed less often near RefSeq gene and proto-oncogene transcription start sites than lentiviral vectors. The foamy vector group were also more polyclonal with fewer dominant clones (two out of six mice than the lentiviral vector group (eight out of eight mice, and only lentiviral vectors had integrants near known proto-oncogenes in dominant clones. Our data further support the relative safety of foamy vectors for HSC gene therapy.

  3. Enhanced immunosurveillance for animal morbilliviruses using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) pseudotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nicola; Dundon, William G; Diallo, Adama; Baron, Michael D; James Nyarobi, M; Cleaveland, Sarah; Keyyu, Julius; Fyumagwa, Robert; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-11-11

    The measurement of virus-specific neutralising antibodies represents the "gold-standard" for diagnostic serology. For animal morbilliviruses, such as peste des petits ruminants (PPRV) or rinderpest virus (RPV), live virus-based neutralisation tests require high-level biocontainment to prevent the accidental escape of the infectious agents. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of neutralising antibodies against animal morbilliviruses. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of PPRV on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Serological responses against the four distinct lineages of PPRV could be measured simultaneously and cross-neutralising responses against other morbilliviruses compared. Using this approach, we observed that titres of neutralising antibodies induced by vaccination with live attenuated PPRV were lower than those induced by wild type virus infection and the level of cross-lineage neutralisation varied between vaccinates. By comparing neutralising responses from animals infected with either PPRV or RPV, we found that responses were highest against the homologous virus, indicating that retrospective analyses of serum samples could be used to confirm the nature of the original pathogen to which an animal had been exposed. Accordingly, when screening sera from domestic livestock and wild ruminants in Tanzania, we detected evidence of cross-species infection with PPRV, canine distemper virus (CDV) and a RPV-related bovine morbillivirus, suggesting that exposure to animal morbilliviruses may be more widespread than indicated previously using existing diagnostic techniques. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Cloning, expression, and functional analysis of genomic miRNA using retroviral system in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaeian, Abdol Hossein; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Hui-Kuan

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs have emerged as important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. Identification of cancer-regulated microRNAs or other classes of endogenous small RNAs have advanced our knowledge in cancer progression and metastasis. Among many tools, small RNA cloning is a powerful method to identify new microRNAs (miRNAs) and to profile miRNA expression and function. Retroviral system is also the minimum requirement for the studying of miRNAs in a highly stable population of cancer cells or other primary cell types with high expression. This chapter describes a step-by-step protocol that is optimized to clone directly one of the miRNA miR-145, as an example, from genomic DNA into retroviral vector to yield ultimate overexpression for functional study in prostate cancer cells. The small RNAs cloned by this protocol will have an easy and simple way of cloning from genomic DNA to maintain the necessary motifs of native enhancer for enhancement of mature miRNA expression. Furthermore, the procedure eliminates miRNA extraction and cDNA synthesis before cloning and sequential cloning of more than one miRNA makes this protocol cost- and time-effective to eliminate many frequent cell culturing.

  5. The Host RNAs in Retroviral Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Telesnitsky

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available As they assemble, retroviruses encapsidate both their genomic RNAs and several types of host RNA. Whereas limited amounts of messenger RNA (mRNA are detectable within virion populations, the predominant classes of encapsidated host RNAs do not encode proteins, but instead include endogenous retroelements and several classes of non-coding RNA (ncRNA, some of which are packaged in significant molar excess to the viral genome. Surprisingly, although the most abundant host RNAs in retroviruses are also abundant in cells, unusual forms of these RNAs are packaged preferentially, suggesting that these RNAs are recruited early in their biogenesis: before associating with their cognate protein partners, and/or from transient or rare RNA populations. These RNAs’ packaging determinants differ from the viral genome’s, and several of the abundantly packaged host ncRNAs serve cells as the scaffolds of ribonucleoprotein particles. Because virion assembly is equally efficient whether or not genomic RNA is available, yet RNA appears critical to the structural integrity of retroviral particles, it seems possible that the selectively encapsidated host ncRNAs might play roles in assembly. Indeed, some host ncRNAs appear to act during replication, as some transfer RNA (tRNA species may contribute to nuclear import of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 reverse transcription complexes, and other tRNA interactions with the viral Gag protein aid correct trafficking to plasma membrane assembly sites. However, despite high conservation of packaging for certain host RNAs, replication roles for most of these selectively encapsidated RNAs—if any—have remained elusive.

  6. Generation of VSV pseudotypes using recombinant ΔG-VSV for studies on virus entry, identification of entry inhibitors, and immune responses to vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, Michael A

    2010-11-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic enveloped animal virus that has been used extensively to study virus entry, replication and assembly due to its broad host range and robust replication properties in a wide variety of mammalian and insect cells. Studies on VSV assembly led to the creation of a recombinant VSV in which the glycoprotein (G) gene was deleted. This recombinant (rVSV-ΔG) has been used to produce VSV pseudotypes containing the envelope glycoproteins of heterologous viruses, including viruses that require high-level biocontainment; however, because the infectivity of rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes is restricted to a single round of replication the analysis can be performed using biosafety level 2 (BSL-2) containment. As such, rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes have facilitated the analysis of virus entry for numerous viral pathogens without the need for specialized containment facilities. The pseudotypes also provide a robust platform to screen libraries for entry inhibitors and to evaluate the neutralizing antibody responses following vaccination. This manuscript describes methods to produce and titer rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes. Procedures to generate rVSV-ΔG stocks and to quantify virus infectivity are also described. These protocols should allow any laboratory knowledgeable in general virological and cell culture techniques to produce successfully replication-restricted rVSV-ΔG pseudotypes for subsequent analysis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers for reverse transcription support retroviral infection at low efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, Alexander; Lund, Anders H; Hansen, Anette C

    2002-01-01

    Reverse transcription of a retroviral genome takes place in the cytoplasm of an infected cell by a process primed by a producer-cell-derived tRNA annealed to an 18-nucleotide primer-binding site (PBS). By an assay involving primer complementation of PBS-mutated vectors we analyzed whether tRNA...... primers derived from the target cell can sustain reverse transcription during murine leukemia virus (MLV) infection. Transduction efficiencies were 4-5 orders of magnitude below those of comparable producer-cell complementations. However, successful usage of a target-cell-derived tRNA primer was proven...... by cases of correction of single mismatches between Akv-MLV vectors and complementary tRNA primers toward the primer sequence in the integrated vector. Thus, target-cell-derived tRNA-like primers are able to initiate first-strand cDNA synthesis and plus-strand transfer leading to a complete provirus...

  8. Vital role for CD8+ cells in controlling retroviral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Melissa; Case, Laure K; Golovkina, Tatyana V

    2011-04-01

    Antiviral adaptive immune defenses consist of humoral and cell-mediated responses, which together eliminate extracellular and intracellular virus. As most retrovirus-infected individuals do not raise efficient protective antivirus immune responses, the relative importance of humoral and cell-mediated responses in restraining retroviral infection is not well understood. We utilized retrovirus-resistant I/LnJ mice, which control infection with mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) via an adaptive immune mechanism, to assess the contribution of cellular responses and virus-neutralizing antibodies (Abs) to the control of retroviral infection. We found that in retrovirus-infected CD8-deficient I/LnJ mice, viral titers exceed the neutralizing capability of antiviral Abs, resulting in augmented virus spread and disease induction. Thus, even in the presence of robust neutralizing Ab responses, CD8-mediated responses are essential for full protection against retroviral infection.

  9. A look inside HIV resistance through retroviral protease interaction maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksejs Kontijevskis

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses affect a large number of species, from fish and birds to mammals and humans, with global socioeconomic negative impacts. Here the authors report and experimentally validate a novel approach for the analysis of the molecular networks that are involved in the recognition of substrates by retroviral proteases. Using multivariate analysis of the sequence-based physiochemical descriptions of 61 retroviral proteases comprising wild-type proteases, natural mutants, and drug-resistant forms of proteases from nine different viral species in relation to their ability to cleave 299 substrates, the authors mapped the physicochemical properties and cross-dependencies of the amino acids of the proteases and their substrates, which revealed a complex molecular interaction network of substrate recognition and cleavage. The approach allowed a detailed analysis of the molecular-chemical mechanisms involved in substrate cleavage by retroviral proteases.

  10. Pseudotyping Vesicular Stomatitis Virus with Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Glycoproteins Enhances Infectivity for Glioma Cells and Minimizes Neurotropism▿†

    OpenAIRE

    Muik, Alexander; Kneiske, Inna; Werbizki, Marina; Wilflingseder, Doris; Giroglou, Tsanan; Ebert, Oliver; Kraft, Anna; Dietrich, Ursula; Zimmer, Gert; Momma, Stefan; von Laer, Dorothee

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based oncolytic virotherapy has the potential to significantly improve the prognosis of aggressive malignancies such as brain cancer. However, VSV's inherent neurotoxicity has hindered clinical development so far. Given that this neurotropism is attributed to the glycoprotein VSV-G, VSV was pseudotyped with the nonneurotropic envelope glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV-GP→VSV-GP). Compared to VSV, VSV-GP showed enhanced infectivity fo...

  11. Adherence to anti-retroviral drugs in pregnant and lactating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anti-retroviral drugs reduce morbidity and mortality due to HIV and prevent transmission from mother to child. But compliance on anti-retroviral treatment is an essential element for the success of therapeutic goals. Objective: To assess the level of compliance of anti-retroviral treatment in pregnant and lactating ...

  12. Acute retroviral syndrome in Slovenian patients infected with HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Pirš

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Two to six weeks after primary infection with HIV 50 to 90 percent of patients develop an acute retroviral syndrome which usually presents with mononucleosis or flu-like illness. Due to nonspecific symptoms ARS is frequently misdiagnosed.Patients and methods: Data of Slovenian patients with acute retroviral syndrome is shown, as well as their symptoms, approaches to management and diagnostic particularities of primary HIV infection.Conclusions: The combination of particular symptoms and epidemiological data should lead us to consider the possibility of an early HIV infection.

  13. Forced recombination of psi-modified murine leukaemia virus-based vectors with murine leukaemia-like and VL30 murine endogenous retroviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    1999-01-01

    -impaired Akv-MLV-derived vectors, we here examine putative genetic interactions between vector RNAs and copackaged endogenous retroviral RNAs of the murine leukaemia virus (MLV) and VL30 retroelement families. We show (i) that MLV recombination is not blocked by nonhomology within the 5' untranslated region....... We note that recombination-based rescue of primer binding site knock-out retroviral vectors may constitute a sensitive assay to register putative genetic interactions involving endogenous retroviral RNAs present in cells of various species.......Co-encapsidation of retroviral RNAs into virus particles allows for the generation of recombinant proviruses through events of template switching during reverse transcription. By use of a forced recombination system based on recombinational rescue of replication- defective primer binding site...

  14. Integration Site and Clonal Expansion in Human Chronic Retroviral Infection and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederer, Heather A.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Retroviral vectors have been successfully used therapeutically to restore expression of genes in a range of single-gene diseases, including several primary immunodeficiency disorders. Although clinical trials have shown remarkable results, there have also been a number of severe adverse events involving malignant outgrowth of a transformed clonal population. This clonal expansion is influenced by the integration site profile of the viral integrase, the transgene expressed, and the effect of the viral promoters on the neighbouring host genome. Infection with the pathogenic human retrovirus HTLV-1 also causes clonal expansion of cells containing an integrated HTLV-1 provirus. Although the majority of HTLV-1-infected people remain asymptomatic, up to 5% develop an aggressive T cell malignancy. In this review we discuss recent findings on the role of the genomic integration site in determining the clonality and the potential for malignant transformation of cells carrying integrated HTLV-1 or gene therapy vectors, and how these results have contributed to the understanding of HTLV-1 pathogenesis and to improvements in gene therapy vector safety. PMID:25365582

  15. Analysis of VSV pseudotype virus infection mediated by rubella virus envelope proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Masafumi; Tani, Hideki; Anraku, Masaki; Kataoka, Michiyo; Nagata, Noriyo; Seki, Fumio; Tahara, Maino; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Okamoto, Kiyoko; Takeda, Makoto; Mori, Yoshio

    2017-09-14

    Rubella virus (RV) generally causes a systemic infection in humans. Viral cell tropism is a key determinant of viral pathogenesis, but the tropism of RV is currently poorly understood. We analyzed various human cell lines and determined that RV only establishes an infection efficiently in particular non-immune cell lines. To establish an infection the host cells must be susceptible and permissible. To assess the susceptibility of individual cell lines, we generated a pseudotype vesicular stomatitis virus bearing RV envelope proteins (VSV-RV/CE2E1). VSV-RV/CE2E1 entered cells in an RV envelope protein-dependent manner, and thus the infection was neutralized completely by an RV-specific antibody. The infection was Ca2+-dependent and inhibited by endosomal acidification inhibitors, further confirming the dependency on RV envelope proteins for the VSV-RV/CE2E1 infection. Human non-immune cell lines were mostly susceptible to VSV-RV/CE2E1, while immune cell lines were much less susceptible than non-immune cell lines. However, susceptibility of immune cells to VSV-RV/CE2E1 was increased upon stimulation of these cells. Our data therefore suggest that immune cells are generally less susceptible to RV infection than non-immune cells, but the susceptibility of immune cells is enhanced upon stimulation.

  16. Development of a neutralization assay for Nipah virus using pseudotype particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamin, Azaibi; Harcourt, Brian H; Lo, Michael K; Roth, James A; Wolf, Mike C; Lee, Benhur; Weingartl, Hana; Audonnet, Jean-Christophe; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2009-09-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are zoonotic paramyxoviruses capable of causing severe disease in humans and animals. These viruses require biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) containment. Like other paramyxoviruses, the plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) can be used to detect antibodies to the surface glycoproteins, fusion (F) and attachment (G), and PRNT titers give an indication of protective immunity. Unfortunately, for NiV and HeV, the PRNT must be performed in BSL-4 containment and takes several days to complete. Thus, we have developed a neutralization assay using VSV pseudotype particles expressing the F and G proteins of NiV (pVSV-NiV-F/G) as target antigens. This rapid assay, which can be performed at BSL-2, was evaluated using serum samples from outbreak investigations and more than 300 serum samples from an experimental NiV vaccination study in swine. The results of the neutralization assays with pVSV-NiV-F/G as antigen showed a good correlation with those of standard PRNT. Therefore, this new method has the potential to be a rapid and cost-effective diagnostic method, especially in locations that lack high containment facilities, and will provide a valuable tool for basic research and vaccine development.

  17. The Evolution of Anti-Retroviral Therapy in Nigeria | Michael ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Areas of research highlighted are the Monitoring of ART, adherence to ART, and highly active anti-retroviral therapy in Nigeria. From the first report on the PUBMED search by Akanmuet al from Lagos in 2001 to reports in 2013, it is undeniable that HIV scientists in Nigeria have produced a good number of very informative ...

  18. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-retroviral drugs(ARVs) are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is vital to improve the patient's state of well-being ... weerstand bied teen anti-retrovirale behandeling (ARB). Persone met ARB-weerstandbiedende MIV stamme kan dit versprei na ander mense toe, wat ...

  19. Antiplasmodial Activity of 'Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The anti-plasmodial effect of 'Highly Active Anti Retroviral Therapy (HAART) was investigated. A hundred and twenty healthy Swiss albino mice (20-24 g) were passaged with Chloroquine sensitive P.berghei and randomly assigned into three study groups: prophylactic, suppressive and curative study group. The animals ...

  20. CD4 + CELL RESPONSE TO ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY (ARTs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 90 No. 12 (Supplement) December 2013. CD4 + CELL RESPONSE TO ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY (ARTs) IN ROUTINE CLINICAL CARE OVER ONE YEAR. PERIOD IN A COHORT OF HAART NAIVE, HIV POSITIVE KENYAN PATIENTS. C. F. Otieno, MBChB, MMed (Int. Med), ...

  1. Patients' perceptions of a rural decentralised anti-retroviral therapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' perceptions of a rural decentralised anti-retroviral therapy management and its impact on direct out-of-pocket spending. Monique Lines, Fatima Suleman. Abstract. Background: Geographical and financial barriers hamper accessibility to HIV services for rural communities. The government has introduced the nurse ...

  2. Psychological distress and adherence to highly active anti-retroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mental health related risk factors for non-adherence to highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) have not been investigated in Uganda and yet adherence is critical to the success of the current scale up in the provision of HAART to HIV positive individuals in rural areas of Uganda. Objective: To determine ...

  3. An automated HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped virus production for global HIV vaccine trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Schultz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infections with HIV still represent a major human health problem worldwide and a vaccine is the only long-term option to fight efficiently against this virus. Standardized assessments of HIV-specific immune responses in vaccine trials are essential for prioritizing vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical stages of development. With respect to neutralizing antibodies, assays with HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses are a high priority. To cover the increasing demands of HIV pseudoviruses, a complete cell culture and transfection automation system has been developed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The automation system for HIV pseudovirus production comprises a modified Tecan-based Cellerity system. It covers an area of 5×3 meters and includes a robot platform, a cell counting machine, a CO(2 incubator for cell cultivation and a media refrigerator. The processes for cell handling, transfection and pseudovirus production have been implemented according to manual standard operating procedures and are controlled and scheduled autonomously by the system. The system is housed in a biosafety level II cabinet that guarantees protection of personnel, environment and the product. HIV pseudovirus stocks in a scale from 140 ml to 1000 ml have been produced on the automated system. Parallel manual production of HIV pseudoviruses and comparisons (bridging assays confirmed that the automated produced pseudoviruses were of equivalent quality as those produced manually. In addition, the automated method was fully validated according to Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP guidelines, including the validation parameters accuracy, precision, robustness and specificity. CONCLUSIONS: An automated HIV pseudovirus production system has been successfully established. It allows the high quality production of HIV pseudoviruses under GCLP conditions. In its present form, the installed module enables the production of 1000 ml of virus-containing cell

  4. The host cell sulfonation pathway contributes to retroviral infection at a step coincident with provirus establishment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James W Bruce

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The early steps of retrovirus replication leading up to provirus establishment are highly dependent on cellular processes and represent a time when the virus is particularly vulnerable to antivirals and host defense mechanisms. However, the roles played by cellular factors are only partially understood. To identify cellular processes that participate in these critical steps, we employed a high volume screening of insertionally mutagenized somatic cells using a murine leukemia virus (MLV vector. This approach identified a role for 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate synthase 1 (PAPSS1, one of two enzymes that synthesize PAPS, the high energy sulfate donor used in all sulfonation reactions catalyzed by cellular sulfotransferases. The role of the cellular sulfonation pathway was confirmed using chemical inhibitors of PAPS synthases and cellular sulfotransferases. The requirement for sulfonation was mapped to a stage during or shortly after MLV provirus establishment and influenced subsequent gene expression from the viral long terminal repeat (LTR promoter. Infection of cells by an HIV vector was also shown to be highly dependent on the cellular sulfonation pathway. These studies have uncovered a heretofore unknown regulatory step of retroviral replication, have defined a new biological function for sulfonation in nuclear gene expression, and provide a potentially valuable new target for HIV/AIDS therapy.

  5. Identification of Retroviral Late Domains as Determinants of Particle Size

    OpenAIRE

    Garnier, Laurence; Parent, Leslie J.; Rovinski, Benjamin; Cao, Shi-Xian; Wills, John W.

    1999-01-01

    Retroviral Gag proteins, in the absence of any other viral products, induce budding and release of spherical, virus-like particles from the plasma membrane. Gag-produced particles, like those of authentic retrovirions, are not uniform in diameter but nevertheless fall within a fairly narrow distribution of sizes. For the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein, we recently reported that elements important for controlling particle size are contained within the C-terminal region...

  6. Efficient generation of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-pseudotypes bearing morbilliviral glycoproteins and their use in quantifying virus neutralising antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Nicola; McMonagle, Elizabeth; Drew, Angharad A; Takahashi, Emi; McDonald, Michael; Baron, Michael D; Gilbert, Martin; Cleaveland, Sarah; Haydon, Daniel T; Hosie, Margaret J; Willett, Brian J

    2016-02-03

    Morbillivirus neutralising antibodies are traditionally measured using either plaque reduction neutralisation tests (PRNTs) or live virus microneutralisation tests (micro-NTs). While both test formats provide a reliable assessment of the strength and specificity of the humoral response, they are restricted by the limited number of viral strains that can be studied and often present significant biological safety concerns to the operator. In this study, we describe the adaptation of a replication-defective vesicular stomatitis virus (VSVΔG) based pseudotyping system for the measurement of morbillivirus neutralising antibodies. By expressing the haemagglutinin (H) and fusion (F) proteins of canine distemper virus (CDV) on VSVΔG pseudotypes bearing a luciferase marker gene, neutralising antibody titres could be measured rapidly and with high sensitivity. Further, by exchanging the glycoprotein expression construct, responses against distinct viral strains or species may be measured. Using this technique, we demonstrate cross neutralisation between CDV and peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV). As an example of the value of the technique, we demonstrate that UK dogs vary in the breadth of immunity induced by CDV vaccination; in some dogs the neutralising response is CDV-specific while, in others, the neutralising response extends to the ruminant morbillivirus PPRV. This technique will facilitate a comprehensive comparison of cross-neutralisation to be conducted across the morbilliviruses. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Digital sensing and sizing of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes in complex media: a model for Ebola and Marburg detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daaboul, George G; Lopez, Carlos A; Chinnala, Jyothsna; Goldberg, Bennett B; Connor, John H; Ünlü, M Selim

    2014-06-24

    Rapid, sensitive, and direct label-free capture and characterization of nanoparticles from complex media such as blood or serum will broadly impact medicine and the life sciences. We demonstrate identification of virus particles in complex samples for replication-competent wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), defective VSV, and Ebola- and Marburg-pseudotyped VSV with high sensitivity and specificity. Size discrimination of the imaged nanoparticles (virions) allows differentiation between modified viruses having different genome lengths and facilitates a reduction in the counting of nonspecifically bound particles to achieve a limit-of-detection (LOD) of 5 × 10(3) pfu/mL for the Ebola and Marburg VSV pseudotypes. We demonstrate the simultaneous detection of multiple viruses in a single sample (composed of serum or whole blood) for screening applications and uncompromised detection capabilities in samples contaminated with high levels of bacteria. By employing affinity-based capture, size discrimination, and a "digital" detection scheme to count single virus particles, we show that a robust and sensitive virus/nanoparticle sensing assay can be established for targets in complex samples. The nanoparticle microscopy system is termed the Single Particle Interferometric Reflectance Imaging Sensor (SP-IRIS) and is capable of high-throughput and rapid sizing of large numbers of biological nanoparticles on an antibody microarray for research and diagnostic applications.

  8. Hepatitis C virus quasispecies and pseudotype analysis from acute infection to chronicity in HIV-1 co-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferns, R Bridget; Tarr, Alexander W; Hue, Stephane; Urbanowicz, Richard A; McClure, C Patrick; Gilson, Richard; Ball, Jonathan K; Nastouli, Eleni; Garson, Jeremy A; Pillay, Deenan

    2016-05-01

    HIV-1 infected patients who acquire HCV infection have higher rates of chronicity and liver disease progression than patients with HCV mono-infection. Understanding early events in this pathogenic process is important. We applied single genome sequencing of the E1 to NS3 regions and viral pseudotype neutralization assays to explore the consequences of viral quasispecies evolution from pre-seroconversion to chronicity in four co-infected individuals (mean follow up 566 days). We observed that one to three founder viruses were transmitted. Relatively low viral sequence diversity, possibly related to an impaired immune response, due to HIV infection was observed in three patients. However, the fourth patient, after an early purifying selection displayed increasing E2 sequence evolution, possibly related to being on suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Viral pseudotypes generated from HCV variants showed relative resistance to neutralization by autologous plasma but not to plasma collected from later time points, confirming ongoing virus escape from antibody neutralization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Selection of functional tRNA primers and primer binding site sequences from a retroviral combinatorial library: identification of new functional tRNA primers in murine leukemia virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M; Pedersen, F S

    2000-01-01

    retro-viruses have revealed evidence of molecular adapt-ation towards the specific tRNA isoacceptor used as replication primer. In this study, murine leukemia virus tRNA utilisation is investigated by in vivo screening of a retroviral vector combinatorial library with randomised primer binding sites....... While most of the selected primer binding sites are complementary to the 3'-end of tRNA((Pro)), we also retrieved PBS sequences matching four other tRNA molecules and demonstrate that Akv murine leukemia virus vectors may efficiently replicate using tRNA(Arg(CCU)), tRNA(Phe(GAA))and a hitherto unknown......Retroviral reverse transcription is initiated from a cellular tRNA molecule and all known exogenous isolates of murine leukemia virus utilise a tRNA(Pro)molecule. While several studies suggest flexibility in murine leukemia virus primer utilisation, studies on human immunodeficiency virus and avian...

  10. Inability of rat DPP4 to allow MERS-CoV infection revealed by using a VSV pseudotype bearing truncated MERS-CoV spike protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Aiko; Tani, Hideki; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Shimojima, Masayuki; Saijo, Masayuki; Fukushi, Shuetsu

    2015-09-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus (Co-V) contains a single spike (S) protein, which binds to a receptor molecule, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP4; also known as CD26), and serves as a neutralizing antigen. Pseudotyped viruses are useful for measuring neutralization titers against highly infectious viruses as well as for studying their mechanism of entry. In this study, we constructed a series of cytoplasmic deletion mutants of MERS-CoV S and compared the efficiency with which they formed pseudotypes with vesicular stomatitis virus. A pseudotype bearing an S protein with the C-terminal 16 amino acids deleted (MERSpv-St16) reached a maximum titer that was approximately tenfold higher than that of a pseudotype bearing a non-truncated full-length S protein. Using MERSpv-St16, we demonstrated the inability of rat DPP4 to serve as a functional receptor for MERS-CoV, suggesting that rats are not susceptible to MERS-CoV infection. This study provides novel information that enhances our understanding of the host range of MERS-CoV.

  11. Molecular purging of multiple myeloma cells by ex-vivo culture and retroviral transduction of mobilized-blood CD34+ cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneo Gianmarco

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor cell contamination of the apheresis in multiple myeloma is likely to affect disease-free and overall survival after autografting. Objective To purge myeloma aphereses from tumor contaminants with a novel culture-based purging method. Methods We cultured myeloma-positive CD34+ PB samples in conditions that retained multipotency of hematopoietic stem cells, but were unfavourable to survival of plasma cells. Moreover, we exploited the resistance of myeloma plasma cells to retroviral transduction by targeting the hematopoietic CD34+ cell population with a retroviral vector carrying a selectable marker (the truncated form of the human receptor for nerve growth factor, ΔNGFR. We performed therefore a further myeloma purging step by selecting the transduced cells at the end of the culture. Results Overall recovery of CD34+ cells after culture was 128.5%; ΔNGFR transduction rate was 28.8% for CD34+ cells and 0% for CD138-selected primary myeloma cells, respectively. Recovery of CD34+ cells after ΔNGFR selection was 22.3%. By patient-specific Ig-gene rearrangements, we assessed a decrease of 0.7–1.4 logs in tumor load after the CD34+ cell selection, and up to 2.3 logs after culture and ΔNGFR selection. Conclusion We conclude that ex-vivo culture and retroviral-mediated transduction of myeloma leukaphereses provide an efficient tumor cell purging.

  12. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  13. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  14. Production in yeast of pseudotype virus-like particles harboring functionally active antibody fragments neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pleckaityte Milda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recombinant antibodies can be produced in different formats and different expression systems. Single chain variable fragments (scFvs represent an attractive alternative to full-length antibodies and they can be easily produced in bacteria or yeast. However, the scFvs exhibit monovalent antigen-binding properties and short serum half-lives. The stability and avidity of the scFvs can be improved by their multimerization or fusion with IgG Fc domain. The aim of the current study was to investigate the possibilities to produce in yeast high-affinity scFv-Fc proteins neutralizing the cytolytic activity of vaginolysin (VLY, the main virulence factor of Gardnerella vaginalis. Results The scFv protein derived from hybridoma cell line producing high-affinity neutralizing antibodies against VLY was fused with human IgG1 Fc domain. Four different variants of anti-VLY scFv-Fc fusion proteins were constructed and produced in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The non-tagged scFv-Fc and hexahistidine-tagged scFv-Fc proteins were found predominantly as insoluble aggregates and therefore were not suitable for further purification and activity testing. The addition of yeast α-factor signal sequence did not support secretion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc but increased the amount of its intracellular soluble form. However, the purified protein showed a weak VLY-neutralizing capability. In contrast, the fusion of anti-VLY scFv-Fc molecules with hamster polyomavirus-derived VP2 protein and its co-expression with VP1 protein resulted in an effective production of pseudotype virus-like particles (VLPs that exhibited strong VLY-binding activity. Recombinant scFv-Fc molecules displayed on the surface of VLPs neutralized VLY-mediated lysis of human erythrocytes and HeLa cells with high potency comparable to that of full-length antibody. Conclusions Recombinant scFv-Fc proteins were expressed in yeast with low efficiency. New approach to display the sc

  15. anti-retroviral therapy related liver injury (arli): a series of 11 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... ANTI-RETROVIRAL THERAPY RELATED LIVER INJURY (ARLI): A SERIES OF 11 CASES. A. E. O. Otedo, MBChB, MMed ... Background: HIV Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) related liver injury (ARLI) is associated with elevated liver .... and the patients were given palliative and supportive care as in-patients; ...

  16. FLT3 ligand preserves the uncommitted CD34+CD38- progenitor cells during cytokine prestimulation for retroviral transduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S D; Husemoen, L L; Sørensen, T U

    2000-01-01

    in a higher percentage of cells than the EGFP gene, but there seemed to be a positive correlation between expression of the two genes. The effect of cytokine prestimulation was therefore monitored using EGFP as marker for transduction. When SCF was compared to SCF in combination with more potent cytokines......Before stem cell gene therapy can be considered for clinical applications, problems regarding cytokine prestimulation remain to be solved. In this study, a retroviral vector carrying the genes for the enhanced version of green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and neomycin resistance (neo(r)) was used...... for transduction of CD34+ cells. The effect of cytokine prestimulation on transduction efficiency and the population of uncommitted CD34+CD38- cells was determined. CD34+ cells harvested from umbilical cord blood were kept in suspension cultures and stimulated with combinations of the cytokines stem cell factor...

  17. Avoidance of stimulation improves engraftment of cultured and retrovirally transduced hematopoietic cells in primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatoku, Masaaki; Sellers, Stephanie; Agricola, Brian A.; Metzger, Mark E.; Kato, Ikunoshin; Donahue, Robert E.; Dunbar, Cynthia E.

    2001-01-01

    Recent reports suggest that cells in active cell cycle have an engraftment defect compared with quiescent cells. We used nonhuman primates to investigate this finding, which has direct implications for clinical transplantation and gene therapy applications. Transfer of rhesus CD34+ cells to culture in stem cell factor (SCF) on the CH-296 fibronectin fragment (FN) after 4 days of culture in stimulatory cytokines maintained cell viability but decreased cycling. Using retroviral marking with two different gene transfer vectors, we compared the engraftment potential of cytokine-stimulated cells versus those transferred to nonstimulatory conditions (SCF on FN alone) before reinfusion. In vivo competitive repopulation studies showed that the level of marking originating from the cells continued in culture for 2 days with SCF on FN following a 4-day stimulatory transduction was significantly higher than the level of marking coming from cells transduced for 4 days and reinfused without the 2-day culture under nonstimulatory conditions. We observed stable in vivo overall gene marking levels of up to 29%. This approach may allow more efficient engraftment of transduced or ex vivo expanded cells by avoiding active cell cycling at the time of reinfusion. PMID:11489938

  18. An LASV GPC pseudotyped virus based reporter system enables evaluation of vaccines in mice under non-BSL-4 conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianqian; Liu, Qiang; Huang, Weijin; Wu, Jiajing; Nie, Jianhui; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Chenyan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Youchun

    2017-09-12

    Lassa virus (LASV) causes a severe hemorrhagic fever endemic throughout western Africa. Because of the ability to cause lethal disease in humans, limited treatment options, and potential as a bioweapon, the need for vaccines to prevent LASV epidemic is urgent. However, LASV vaccine development has been hindered by the lack of appropriate small animal models for efficacy evaluation independent of biosafety level four (BSL-4) facilities. Here we generated an LASV-glycoprotein precursor (GPC)-pseudotyped Human immunodeficiency virus containing firefly luciferase (Fluc) reporter gene as surrogate to develop a bioluminescent-imaging-based BALB/c mouse model for one-round infection under non-BSL-4 conditions, in which the bioluminescent intensity of Fluc was utilized as endpoint when evaluating vaccine efficacy. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrated that LASV GPC pseudotyped virus appeared structurally similar to native virion. Meanwhile, we constructed DNA vaccine (pSV1.0-LASVGPC) and pseudoparticle-based vaccine (LASVpp) that displayed conformational GPC protein of LASV strain Josiah to vaccinate BALB/c mice using intramuscular electroporation and by intraperitoneal routes, respectively. Vaccinated mice in LASVpp alone and DNA prime+LASVpp boost schedules were protected against 100 AID50 of LASV pseudovirus challenge, and it was found that in vivo efficiencies correlated with their anti-LASV neutralizing activities and MCP-1 cytokine levels in serum sampled before infection. The bioluminescence pseudovirus infection model can be useful tool for the preliminary evaluation of immunogenicity and efficacy of vaccine candidates against LASV outside of BSL-4 containments, and the results with pseudoparticle-based vaccine provided very helpful information for LASV vaccine design. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Retroviral transcriptional regulation and embryonic stem cells: war and peace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlesinger, Sharon; Goff, Stephen P

    2015-03-01

    Retroviruses have evolved complex transcriptional enhancers and promoters that allow their replication in a wide range of tissue and cell types. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, however, characteristically suppress transcription of proviruses formed after infection by exogenous retroviruses and also of most members of the vast array of endogenous retroviruses in the genome. These cells have unusual profiles of transcribed genes and are poised to make rapid changes in those profiles upon induction of differentiation. Many of the transcription factors in ES cells control both host and retroviral genes coordinately, such that retroviral expression patterns can serve as markers of ES cell pluripotency. This overlap is not coincidental; retrovirus-derived regulatory sequences are often used to control cellular genes important for pluripotency. These sequences specify the temporal control and perhaps "noisy" control of cellular genes that direct proper cell gene expression in primitive cells and their differentiating progeny. The evidence suggests that the viral elements have been domesticated for host needs, reflecting the wide-ranging exploitation of any and all available DNA sequences in assembling regulatory networks. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  1. Accumulation of long-term transcriptionally active integrated retroviral vectors in active promoters and enhancers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šenigl, Filip; Miklík, Dalibor; Auxt, Miroslav; Hejnar, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 22 (2017), s. 12752-12765 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-34873S; GA MŠk LO1419 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : human-immunodeficiency-virus * dna methylation * site selection * human genome * avian-sarcoma * morphological reversion * hiv -1 integration * mlv integration * gene-expression * leukosis virus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 10.162, year: 2016

  2. Coherence analysis discriminates between retroviral integration patterns in CD34+ cells transduced under differing clinical trial conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus V Hallwirth

    Full Text Available Unequivocal demonstration of the therapeutic utility of γ-retroviral vectors for gene therapy applications targeting the hematopoietic system was accompanied by instances of insertional mutagenesis. These events stimulated the ongoing development of putatively safer integrating vector systems and analysis methods to characterize and compare integration site (IS biosafety profiles. Continuing advances in next-generation sequencing technologies are driving the generation of ever-more complex IS datasets. Available bioinformatic tools to compare such datasets focus on the association of integration sites (ISs with selected genomic and epigenetic features, and the choice of these features determines the ability to discriminate between datasets. We describe the scalable application of point-process coherence analysis (CA to compare patterns produced by vector ISs across genomic intervals, uncoupled from association with genomic features. To explore the utility of CA in the context of an unresolved question, we asked whether the differing transduction conditions used in the initial Paris and London SCID-X1 gene therapy trials result in divergent genome-wide integration profiles. We tested a transduction carried out under each condition, and showed that CA could indeed resolve differences in IS distributions. Existence of these differences was confirmed by the application of established methods to compare integration datasets.

  3. Novel Principles of Gamma-Retroviral Insertional Transcription Activation in Murine Leukemia Virus-induced End-stage Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Martin; Wabl, Matthias; Rius Ruiz, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Background Insertional mutagenesis screens of retrovirus-induced mouse tumors have proven valuable in human cancer research and for understanding adverse effects of retroviral-based gene therapies. In previous studies, the assignment of mouse genes to individual retroviral integration sites has b......, and for understanding fundamental cellular regulatory principles and retroviral biology.......Background Insertional mutagenesis screens of retrovirus-induced mouse tumors have proven valuable in human cancer research and for understanding adverse effects of retroviral-based gene therapies. In previous studies, the assignment of mouse genes to individual retroviral integration sites has...

  4. Immunohistochemical localization of retroviral-related antigens expressed in normal baboon placental villous tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langat, D K; Johnson, P M; Rote, N S; Wango, E O; Owiti, G O; Mwenda, J M

    1998-12-01

    Endogenous retroviral particles (ERVs) have been detected in the genome of all eukaryotes. They are generally non-pathogenic except in mice where they have been found to induce tumors and immunological disorders. The ERVs have morphological features consistent with type-C retroviral particles and are commonly expressed in normal placental villous tissues. ERVs may have a role in the regulation of placental gene expression, syncytiotrophoblast formation, or pregnancy-related immunosuppression. In this study, well-characterized antibodies (monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies) raised against retroviral proteins (anti-HIV and anti-SIV) and endogenous retroviral (ERV) particles were assessed for their cross-reactivity (by using immunohistochemistry) with normal baboon placental and other adult tissues. The monoclonal antibodies to exogenous retroviral proteins (anti-HIV-2 gp120, anti-HIV-1 gp41, anti-SIVmac p27, anti-HIV-1 RT, and anti-HIV-2 core protein) showed specific immunohistochemical reactivity with the syncytiotrophoblast. Antibodies to endogenous retroviral gene products (anti-ERV3 env, anti-HERV-K RT, and anti-HERV-K env) also reacted in a similar manner and did not cross-react with other adult tissues. These studies have shown that retroviral-cross-reactive proteins are expressed in baboon placental syncytiotrophoblast and may have a role to play at the feto-maternal interface.

  5. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  6. Mechanisms and factors that influence high frequency retroviral recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista; Galli, Andrea; Nikolaitchik, Olga

    2011-01-01

    With constantly changing environmental selection pressures, retroviruses rely upon recombination to reassort polymorphisms in their genomes and increase genetic diversity, which improves the chances for the survival of their population. Recombination occurs during DNA synthesis, whereby reverse...... transcriptase undergoes template switching events between the two copackaged RNAs, resulting in a viral recombinant with portions of the genetic information from each parental RNA. This review summarizes our current understanding of the factors and mechanisms influencing retroviral recombination, fidelity...... of the recombination process, and evaluates the subsequent viral diversity and fitness of the progeny recombinant. Specifically, the high mutation rates and high recombination frequencies of HIV-1 will be analyzed for their roles in influencing HIV-1 global diversity, as well as HIV-1 diagnosis, drug treatment...

  7. Alteration of blood-brain barrier integrity by retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe V Afonso

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, which forms the interface between the blood and the cerebral parenchyma, has been shown to be disrupted during retroviral-associated neuromyelopathies. Human T Lymphotropic Virus (HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP is a slowly progressive neurodegenerative disease associated with BBB breakdown. The BBB is composed of three cell types: endothelial cells, pericytes and astrocytes. Although astrocytes have been shown to be infected by HTLV-1, until now, little was known about the susceptibility of BBB endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection and the impact of such an infection on BBB function. We first demonstrated that human cerebral endothelial cells express the receptors for HTLV-1 (GLUT-1, Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans, both in vitro, in a human cerebral endothelial cell line, and ex vivo, on spinal cord autopsy sections from HAM/TSP and non-infected control cases. In situ hybridization revealed HTLV-1 transcripts associated with the vasculature in HAM/TSP. We were able to confirm that the endothelial cells could be productively infected in vitro by HTLV-1 and that blocking of either HSPGs, Neuropilin 1 or Glut1 inhibits this process. The expression of the tight-junction proteins within the HTLV-1 infected endothelial cells was altered. These cells were no longer able to form a functional barrier, since BBB permeability and lymphocyte passage through the monolayer of endothelial cells were increased. This work constitutes the first report of susceptibility of human cerebral endothelial cells to HTLV-1 infection, with implications for HTLV-1 passage through the BBB and subsequent deregulation of the central nervous system homeostasis. We propose that the susceptibility of cerebral endothelial cells to retroviral infection and subsequent BBB dysfunction is an important aspect of HAM/TSP pathogenesis and should be considered in the design of future therapeutics strategies.

  8. Generation of VSV Pseudotypes Using Recombinant ΔG-VSV for Studies on Virus Entry, Identification of Entry Inhibitors, and Immune Responses to Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Whitt, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a prototypic enveloped animal virus that has been used extensively to study virus entry, replication and assembly due to its broad host range and robust replication properties in a wide variety of mammalian and insect cells. Studies on VSV assembly led to the creation of a recombinant VSV in which the glycoprotein (G) gene was deleted. This recombinant (rVSV-ΔG) has been used to produce VSV pseudotypes containing the envelope glycoproteins of heterologous v...

  9. Mouse transplant models for evaluating the oncogenic risk of a self-inactivating XSCID lentiviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhou

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy requires the use of integrating retroviral vectors in order to stably transmit a therapeutic gene to mature blood cells. Human clinical trials have shown that some vector integration events lead to disrupted regulation of proto-oncogenes resulting in disordered hematopoiesis including T-cell leukemia. Newer vectors have been designed to decrease the incidence of these adverse events but require appropriate pre-clinical assays to demonstrate safety. We have used two distinct mouse serial transplant assays to evaluate the safety of a self-inactivating lentiviral vector intended for use in X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID gene therapy trials. These experiments entailed 28 months of total follow-up and included 386 mice. There were no cases in which the XSCID lentiviral vector clearly caused hematopoietic malignancies, although a single case of B cell malignancy was observed that contained the lentiviral vector as a likely passenger event. In contrast, a SFFV-DsRed γ-retroviral vector resulted in clonal transformation events in multiple secondary recipients. Non-specific pathology not related to vector insertions was noted including T cell leukemias arising from irradiated recipient cells. Overall, this comprehensive study of mouse transplant safety assays demonstrate the relative safety of the XSCID lentiviral vector but also highlight the limitations of these assays.

  10. Infection of female primary lower genital tract epithelial cells after natural pseudotyping of HIV-1: possible implications for sexual transmission of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuyang Tang

    Full Text Available The global AIDS pandemic continues to expand and in some regions of the world, such as southern Africa, the prevalence of HIV-1 infection exceeds 20%. The devastating spread of the virus in young women in these countries appears disproportional to overall risk of infection. Regions with high prevalence of HIV-1 are often also highly endemic for other pathogenic viruses including HSV, CMV and HTLV. We propose that acquisition by HIV-1 of the envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, in a process we call "natural pseudotyping," expands the cellular tropism of HIV-1, enabling it to infect female genital epithelial cells directly and thereby dramatically increasing risk of infection during sexual intercourse. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that when HIV-1 co-infects T cells along with the gammaretrovirus xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV, progeny HIV-1 particles are produced capable of infecting primary vaginal, ectocervical and endocervical epithelial cells. These cell types are normally resistant to HIV-1 infection. Infection of primary genital cells was neutralized by antisera against the XMRV glycoprotein, confirming that infection was mediated by the XMRV glycoprotein acquired through pseudotyping of HIV. Inhibition by AZT showed that active replication of HIV-1 occurred in these cells and ruled out non-specific endocytic uptake of the virus. These results demonstrate that natural pseudotyping can expand the tropism of HIV-1 to include genital epithelial cells and have potential implications for sexual transmission of the virus.

  11. Infection of Female Primary Lower Genital Tract Epithelial Cells after Natural Pseudotyping of HIV-1: Possible Implications for Sexual Transmission of HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuyang; George, Alvin; Nouvet, Franklin; Sweet, Stephanie; Emeagwali, Nkiruka; Taylor, Harry E.; Simmons, Glenn; Hildreth, James E. K.

    2014-01-01

    The global AIDS pandemic continues to expand and in some regions of the world, such as southern Africa, the prevalence of HIV-1 infection exceeds 20%. The devastating spread of the virus in young women in these countries appears disproportional to overall risk of infection. Regions with high prevalence of HIV-1 are often also highly endemic for other pathogenic viruses including HSV, CMV and HTLV. We propose that acquisition by HIV-1 of the envelope glycoproteins of other viruses, in a process we call “natural pseudotyping,” expands the cellular tropism of HIV-1, enabling it to infect female genital epithelial cells directly and thereby dramatically increasing risk of infection during sexual intercourse. In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that when HIV-1 co-infects T cells along with the gammaretrovirus xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV), progeny HIV-1 particles are produced capable of infecting primary vaginal, ectocervical and endocervical epithelial cells. These cell types are normally resistant to HIV-1 infection. Infection of primary genital cells was neutralized by antisera against the XMRV glycoprotein, confirming that infection was mediated by the XMRV glycoprotein acquired through pseudotyping of HIV. Inhibition by AZT showed that active replication of HIV-1 occurred in these cells and ruled out non-specific endocytic uptake of the virus. These results demonstrate that natural pseudotyping can expand the tropism of HIV-1 to include genital epithelial cells and have potential implications for sexual transmission of the virus. PMID:25010677

  12. Mesenchymal stromal cells retrovirally transduced with prodrug-converting genes are suitable vehicles for cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ďuriniková, E; Kučerová, L; Matúšková, M

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) possess a set of several fairly unique properties which make them ideally suitable both for cellular therapies and regenerative medicine. These include: relative ease of isolation, the ability to differentiate along mesenchymal and non-mesenchymal lineages in vitro and the ability to be extensively expanded in culture without a loss of differentiative capacity. MSC are not only hypoimmunogenic, but they mediate immunosuppression upon transplantation, and possess pronounced anti-inflammatory properties. They are able to home to damaged tissues, tumors, and metastases following systemic administration. The ability of homing holds big promise for tumor-targeted delivery of therapeutic agents. Viruses are naturally evolved vehicles efficiently transferring their genes into host cells. This ability made them suitable for engineering vector systems for the delivery of genes of interest. MSC can be retrovirally transduced with genes encoding prodrug-converting genes (suicide genes), which are not toxic per se, but catalyze the formation of highly toxic metabolites following the application of a nontoxic prodrug. The homing ability of MSC holds advantages compared to virus vehicles which display many shortcomings in effective delivery of the therapeutic agents. Gene therapies mediated by viruses are limited by their restricted ability to track cancer cells infiltrating into the surrounding tissue, and by their low migratory capacity towards tumor. Thus combination of cellular therapy and gene delivery is an attractive option - it protects the vector from immune surveillance, and supports targeted delivery of a therapeutic gene/protein to the tumor site.

  13. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  14. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  15. Viral vectors for cystic fibrosis gene therapy: What does the future hold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Griesenbach

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uta Griesenbach1, Makoto Inoue2, Mamoru Hasegawa2, Eric WFW Alton11Department of Gene Therapy, Imperial College London, UK; The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium; 2DNAVEC Corporation, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Gene transfer to the airway epithelium has been more difficult than originally anticipated, largely because of significant extra- and intracellular barriers in the lung. In general, viral vectors are more adapted to overcoming these barriers than nonviral gene transfer agents and are, therefore, more efficient in transferring genes into recipient cells. Viral vectors derived from adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and Sendai virus, which all have a natural tropism for the airway epithelium, have been evaluated for cystic fibrosis (CF gene therapy. Although these vectors transduce airway epithelial cells efficiently, gene expression is transient and repeated administration is inefficient. They are, therefore, unlikely to be suitable for CF gene therapy. More recently, lentiviruses (LV have been assessed for lung gene transfer. In contrast to retroviruses, they transduce nondividing cells and randomly integrate into the genome. However, LVs do not have a natural tropism for the lung, and a significant amount of effort has been put into pseudotyping these vectors with proteins suitable for airway gene transfer. Several studies have shown that LV-mediated transduction leads to persistent gene expression (for the lifetime of the animal in the airways and, importantly, repeated administration is feasible. Thus, appropriately pseudotyped LV vectors are promising candidates for CF gene therapy. Here, we will review preclinical and clinical research related to viral CF gene therapy.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene therapy, adenovirus, AAV, lentivirus, Sendai virus

  16. Preferential labeling of inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons by endogenous tropism of adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, J L; Yanagawa, Y; Obata, K; Callaway, E M

    2009-06-30

    Despite increasingly widespread use of recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) and lentiviral (LV) vectors for transduction of neurons in a wide range of brain structures and species, the diversity of cell types within a given brain structure is rarely considered. For example, the ability of a vector to transduce neurons within a brain structure is often assumed to indicate that all neuron types within the structure are transduced. We have characterized the transduction of mouse somatosensory cortical neuron types by recombinant AAV pseudotyped with serotype 1 capsid (rAAV2/1) and by recombinant lentivirus pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein. Both vectors used human synapsin (hSyn) promoter driving DsRed-Express. We demonstrate that high titer rAAV2/1-hSyn efficiently transduces both cortical excitatory and inhibitory neuronal populations, but use of lower titers exposes a strong preference for transduction of cortical inhibitory neurons and layer 5 pyramidal neurons. In contrast, we find that VSV-G-LV-hSyn principally labels excitatory cortical neurons at the highest viral titer generated. These findings demonstrate that endogenous tropism of rAAV2/1 and VSV-G-LV can be used to obtain preferential gene expression in mouse somatosensory cortical inhibitory and excitatory neuron populations, respectively.

  17. Nurses' perceptions about Botswana patients' anti-retroviral therapy adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie J. Ehlers

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-retroviral drugs (ARVs are supplied free of charge in Botswana. Lifelong adherence to anti-retroviral therapy (ART is vital to improve the patient’s state of well-being and to prevent the development of strains of the human immunodef ciency virus (HIV that are resistant to ART. Persons with ART-resistant strains of HIV can spread these to other people, requiring more expensive ART with more severe side-effects and poorer health outcomes. The purpose of this exploratory, descriptive, qualitative study was to determine nurses’ perspectives on Botswana patients’ anti-retroviral therapy (ART adherence, and to identify factors which could promote or hinder ART adherence. Four ART sites were randomly selected and all 16 nurses providing ART services at these sites participated in semi-structured interviews. These nurses indicated that patients’ ART adherence was inf uenced by service-related and patient-related factors. Service-related factors included the inaccessibility of ART clinics, limited clinic hours, health workers’ inability to communicate in patients’ local languages, long waiting times at clinics and delays in being informed about their CD4 and viral load results. Nurses could not trace defaulters nor contact them by phone, and also had to work night shifts, disrupting nurse-patient relationships. Patient-related factors included patients’ lack of education, inability to understand the significance of CD4 and viral load results, financial hardships, non-disclosure and non-acceptance of their HIV positive status, alcohol abuse, the utilisation of traditional medicines and side effects of ART. The challenges of lifelong ART adherence are multifaceted involving both patient-related and service-related factors. Supplying free ARVs does not ensure high levels of ART adherence.

    Opsomming

    Anti-retrovirale middels (ARMs word gratis verskaf in Botswana. Lewenslange getroue nakoming van ARM voorskrifte is

  18. Analysis of Prototype Foamy Virus particle-host cell interaction with autofluorescent retroviral particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwille Petra

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The foamy virus (FV replication cycle displays several unique features, which set them apart from orthoretroviruses. First, like other B/D type orthoretroviruses, FV capsids preassemble at the centrosome, but more similar to hepadnaviruses, FV budding is strictly dependent on cognate viral glycoprotein coexpression. Second, the unusually broad host range of FV is thought to be due to use of a very common entry receptor present on host cell plasma membranes, because all cell lines tested in vitro so far are permissive. Results In order to take advantage of modern fluorescent microscopy techniques to study FV replication, we have created FV Gag proteins bearing a variety of protein tags and evaluated these for their ability to support various steps of FV replication. Addition of even small N-terminal HA-tags to FV Gag severely impaired FV particle release. For example, release was completely abrogated by an N-terminal autofluorescent protein (AFP fusion, despite apparently normal intracellular capsid assembly. In contrast, C-terminal Gag-tags had only minor effects on particle assembly, egress and particle morphogenesis. The infectivity of C-terminal capsid-tagged FV vector particles was reduced up to 100-fold in comparison to wild type; however, infectivity was rescued by coexpression of wild type Gag and assembly of mixed particles. Specific dose-dependent binding of fluorescent FV particles to target cells was demonstrated in an Env-dependent manner, but not binding to target cell-extracted- or synthetic- lipids. Screening of target cells of various origins resulted in the identification of two cell lines, a human erythroid precursor- and a zebrafish- cell line, resistant to FV Env-mediated FV- and HIV-vector transduction. Conclusions We have established functional, autofluorescent foamy viral particles as a valuable new tool to study FV - host cell interactions using modern fluorescent imaging techniques. Furthermore, we

  19. Analysis of prototype foamy virus particle-host cell interaction with autofluorescent retroviral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnnagel, Kristin; Lüftenegger, Daniel; Stange, Annett; Swiersy, Anka; Müllers, Erik; Reh, Juliane; Stanke, Nicole; Grosse, Arend; Chiantia, Salvatore; Keller, Heiko; Schwille, Petra; Hanenberg, Helmut; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Lindemann, Dirk

    2010-05-17

    The foamy virus (FV) replication cycle displays several unique features, which set them apart from orthoretroviruses. First, like other B/D type orthoretroviruses, FV capsids preassemble at the centrosome, but more similar to hepadnaviruses, FV budding is strictly dependent on cognate viral glycoprotein coexpression. Second, the unusually broad host range of FV is thought to be due to use of a very common entry receptor present on host cell plasma membranes, because all cell lines tested in vitro so far are permissive. In order to take advantage of modern fluorescent microscopy techniques to study FV replication, we have created FV Gag proteins bearing a variety of protein tags and evaluated these for their ability to support various steps of FV replication. Addition of even small N-terminal HA-tags to FV Gag severely impaired FV particle release. For example, release was completely abrogated by an N-terminal autofluorescent protein (AFP) fusion, despite apparently normal intracellular capsid assembly. In contrast, C-terminal Gag-tags had only minor effects on particle assembly, egress and particle morphogenesis. The infectivity of C-terminal capsid-tagged FV vector particles was reduced up to 100-fold in comparison to wild type; however, infectivity was rescued by coexpression of wild type Gag and assembly of mixed particles. Specific dose-dependent binding of fluorescent FV particles to target cells was demonstrated in an Env-dependent manner, but not binding to target cell-extracted- or synthetic- lipids. Screening of target cells of various origins resulted in the identification of two cell lines, a human erythroid precursor- and a zebrafish- cell line, resistant to FV Env-mediated FV- and HIV-vector transduction. We have established functional, autofluorescent foamy viral particles as a valuable new tool to study FV--host cell interactions using modern fluorescent imaging techniques. Furthermore, we succeeded for the first time in identifying two cell lines

  20. VSV-GP: a potent viral vaccine vector that boosts the immune response upon repeated applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tober, Reinhard; Banki, Zoltan; Egerer, Lisa; Muik, Alexander; Behmüller, Sandra; Kreppel, Florian; Greczmiel, Ute; Oxenius, Annette; von Laer, Dorothee; Kimpel, Janine

    2014-05-01

    Antivector immunity limits the response to homologous boosting for viral vector vaccines. Here, we describe a new, potent vaccine vector based on replication-competent vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with the glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (VSV-GP), which we previously showed to be safe in mice. In mice, VSV and VSV-GP encoding ovalbumin (OVA) as a model antigen (VSV-OVA and VSV-GP-OVA) induced equal levels of OVA-specific humoral and cellular immune responses upon a single immunization. However, boosting with the same vector was possible only for VSV-GP-OVA as neutralizing antibodies to VSV limited the immunogenicity of the VSV-OVA boost. OVA-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses induced by VSV-GP-OVA were at least as potent as those induced by an adenoviral state-of-the-art vaccine vector and completely protected mice in a Listeria monocytogenes challenge model. VSV-GP is so far the only replication-competent vaccine vector that does not lose efficacy upon repeated application. Although there has been great progress in treatment and prevention of infectious diseases in the past several years, effective vaccines against some of the most serious infections, e.g., AIDS, malaria, hepatitis C, or tuberculosis, are urgently needed. Here, several approaches based on viral vector vaccines are under development. However, for all viral vaccine vectors currently in clinical testing, repeated application is limited by neutralizing antibodies to the vector itself. Here, we have exploited the potential of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotyped with the glycoprotein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (VSV-GP) as a vaccine platform. VSV-GP is the first replication-competent viral vector vaccine that does not induce vector-specific humoral immunity, i.e., neutralizing antibodies, and therefore can boost immune responses against a foreign antigen by repeated applications. The vector allows introduction of various antigens and

  1. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  2. Hematologic abnormalities associated with retroviral infections in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, G H; Linenberger, M L

    1995-11-01

    Feline patients with unexplained peripheral blood cytopenias, circulating immature or neoplastic cells, dysplastic or dysmorphic bone marrow abnormalities, and/or lymphoid tumors are likely suffering from an underlying retroviral infection with feline leukemia virus (FeLV) and/or feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Cytopenic hematologic disorders are often caused by the direct or indirect hematosuppressive effects of these retroviruses. Alternatively, secondary infections, nutritional deficiencies, and/or hematopoietic neoplasms may be important cofactors in the development of blood and bone marrow abnormalities in retrovirus-positive patients. Mild to moderate nonregenerative anemia, with or without concurrent granulocytopenia and/or thrombocytopenia, is one of the most frequent hematologic disorders encountered with either infectious agent. Severe, isolated anemia with absent reticulocytes (pure red blood cell aplasia) specifically suggests infection with FeLV subgroup C. Hemolytic (regenerative) anemia, more commonly associated with FeLV infection, may be caused by an autoimmune process and/or coinfection with Haemobartonella felis. Lymphopenia is a hallmark of chronic, symptomatic FIV infection. Neutropenia may accompany a panleukopenia-like syndrome in FeLV-positive cats or it may be associated with acute primary infection or an adverse drug effect in the FIV-infected patient. FeLV and, to a lesser extent, FIV are both causally related to lymphoid neoplasms in domestic cats, but with dissimilar epidemiologic, clinical, and host cell phenotypic features. Clinicians must be cognizant of the wide spectrum of hematologic manifestations of FeLV and FIV infections to recognize and appropriately manage these complications in their feline patients.

  3. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  4. Design of a titering assay for lentiviral vectors utilizing direct extraction of DNA from transduced cells in microtiter plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele E Murphy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using lentiviral vector products in clinical applications requires an accurate method for measuring transduction titer. For vectors lacking a marker gene, quantitative polymerase chain reaction is used to evaluate the number of vector DNA copies in transduced target cells, from which a transduction titer is calculated. Immune Design previously described an integration-deficient lentiviral vector pseudotyped with a modified Sindbis virus envelope for use in cancer immunotherapy (VP02, of the ZVex platform. Standard protocols for titering integration-competent lentiviral vectors employ commercial spin columns to purify vector DNA from transduced cells, but such columns are not optimized for isolation of extrachromosomal (nonintegrated DNA. Here, we describe a 96-well transduction titer assay in which DNA extraction is performed in situ in the transduction plate, yielding quantitative recovery of extrachromosomal DNA. Vector titers measured by this method were higher than when commercial spin columns were used for DNA isolation. Evaluation of the method's specificity, linear range, and precision demonstrate that it is suitable for use as a lot release assay to support clinical trials with VP02. Finally, the method is compatible with titering both integrating and nonintegrating lentiviral vectors, suggesting that it may be used to evaluate the transduction titer for any lentiviral vector.

  5. Vital Role for CD8+ Cells in Controlling Retroviral Infections ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Melissa; Case, Laure K.; Golovkina, Tatyana V.

    2011-01-01

    Antiviral adaptive immune defenses consist of humoral and cell-mediated responses, which together eliminate extracellular and intracellular virus. As most retrovirus-infected individuals do not raise efficient protective antivirus immune responses, the relative importance of humoral and cell-mediated responses in restraining retroviral infection is not well understood. We utilized retrovirus-resistant I/LnJ mice, which control infection with mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) and murine leukemia virus (MuLV) via an adaptive immune mechanism, to assess the contribution of cellular responses and virus-neutralizing antibodies (Abs) to the control of retroviral infection. We found that in retrovirus-infected CD8-deficient I/LnJ mice, viral titers exceed the neutralizing capability of antiviral Abs, resulting in augmented virus spread and disease induction. Thus, even in the presence of robust neutralizing Ab responses, CD8-mediated responses are essential for full protection against retroviral infection. PMID:21248041

  6. Application of Live-Cell RNA Imaging Techniques to the Study of Retroviral RNA Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrin V. Bann

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses produce full-length RNA that serves both as a genomic RNA (gRNA, which is encapsidated into virus particles, and as an mRNA, which directs the synthesis of viral structural proteins. However, we are only beginning to understand the cellular and viral factors that influence trafficking of retroviral RNA and the selection of the RNA for encapsidation or translation. Live cell imaging studies of retroviral RNA trafficking have provided important insight into many aspects of the retrovirus life cycle including transcription dynamics, nuclear export of viral RNA, translational regulation, membrane targeting, and condensation of the gRNA during virion assembly. Here, we review cutting-edge techniques to visualize single RNA molecules in live cells and discuss the application of these systems to studying retroviral RNA trafficking.

  7. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer of the porcine choline acetyltransferase: a model to study the synthesis and secretion of acetylcholine in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, X G; Horellou, P; Leroy, C; Mallet, J

    1993-05-01

    We have constructed a recombinant retrovirus that expresses choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by placing the porcine enzyme cDNA under the control of the 5' long terminal repeat of the retroviral vector pMMuLV. Using retrovirus-mediated gene transfer, we have expressed ChAT in astroglial (STR-SVLT) and neuroendocrine (RIN) cell lines. Both genetically modified cell types synthesize acetylcholine (ACh). ACh is also present in the culture medium at a low concentration relative to that found in the modified cells. This result suggests that the synthesized ACh is retained within the cells and released by these two cell types. Release of ACh is not increased in the presence of the calcium ionophore A23187 or by depolarizing concentrations of potassium in either STR-SVLT or in RIN cells. The implications of these studies for understanding ACh release mechanisms are discussed.

  8. An introduction to vectors, vector operators and vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joag, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students of science and engineering, this book covers fundamental concepts of vectors and their applications in a single volume. The first unit deals with basic formulation, both conceptual and theoretical. It discusses applications of algebraic operations, Levi-Civita notation, and curvilinear coordinate systems like spherical polar and parabolic systems and structures, and analytical geometry of curves and surfaces. The second unit delves into the algebra of operators and their types and also explains the equivalence between the algebra of vector operators and the algebra of matrices. Formulation of eigen vectors and eigen values of a linear vector operator are elaborated using vector algebra. The third unit deals with vector analysis, discussing vector valued functions of a scalar variable and functions of vector argument (both scalar valued and vector valued), thus covering both the scalar vector fields and vector integration.

  9. Reduction of stromal fibroblast-induced mammary tumor growth, by retroviral ribozyme transgenes to hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor and its receptor, c-MET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wen G; Grimshaw, David; Martin, Tracey A; Davies, Gaynor; Parr, Christian; Watkins, Gareth; Lane, Jane; Abounader, Roger; Laterra, John; Mansel, Robert E

    2003-09-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) is known to increase the invasiveness and migration of cancer cells in vitro and induce angiogenesis. This study examined if inhibition of HGF/SF receptor expression by cancer cells and HGF/SF expression by stromal fibroblasts affects the growth of mammary cancer. Transgenes encoding ribozymes to specifically target human HGF/SF receptor (pLXSN-MET) or HGF/SF (pLXSN-HGF) were constructed using a pLXSN retroviral vector. Human mammary cancer cells MDA MB 231 was transduced with pLXSN-MET (MDA(+/+)). A human fibroblast cell line MRC5, which produces bioactive HGF/SF, was transduced with pLXSN-HGF (MRC5(+/+)). These cells were used in a nude mice breast tumor model. HGF receptor in MDA(+/+) cells and HGF in MRC5(+/+)cells were successfully removed with respective ribozymes as shown by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting, respectively. MDA(+/+) was found to have reduced invasiveness when stimulated with HGF/SF. MRC5(+/+) exhibited a significant reduction in HGF/SF production. When injected into athymic nude mice, MDA(+/+) exhibited a slower rate of growth, compared with the wild type (MDA(-/-)), and the cells transduced with control viral vector (MDA(+/-)). The growth of MDA(-/-) tumor was significantly enhanced when coimplanted with wild-type MRC5 (MRC5(-/-)), and the stimulatory effect was reduced when MRC5(+/+) cells were coimplanted instead of MRC5(-/-). The reduction of tumor growth was accompanied by reduction of angiogenesis, as demonstrated by the staining of VE-cadherin in primary tumor tissues. Retroviral ribozyme transgenes targeting HGF/SF in fibroblasts or its receptor cMET in mammary cancer cells can reduce the growth of mammary cancer and associated angiogenesis by inhibiting paracrine stromal-tumor cell interactions.

  10. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    for generation of a reference beam, a detector system comprising a first detector arrangement arranged in such a way that the signal beam and the reference beam are incident upon the first detector arrangement with the reference beam propagating at an angle relative to a signal beam, and wherein the first......The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...... assembly for emission of a measurement beam for illumination of an object in a measurement volume with coherent light whereby a signal beam emanating from the object in the measurement volume is formed in response to illumination of the object by the measurement beam, a reference beam generator...

  11. Alpharetroviral Vectors: From a Cancer-Causing Agent to a Useful Tool for Human Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia D. Suerth

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy using integrating retroviral vectors has proven its effectiveness in several clinical trials for the treatment of inherited diseases and cancer. However, vector-mediated adverse events related to insertional mutagenesis were also observed, emphasizing the need for safer therapeutic vectors. Paradoxically, alpharetroviruses, originally discovered as cancer-causing agents, have a more random and potentially safer integration pattern compared to gammaretro- and lentiviruses. In this review, we provide a short overview of the history of alpharetroviruses and explain how they can be converted into state-of-the-art gene delivery tools with improved safety features. We discuss development of alpharetroviral vectors in compliance with regulatory requirements for clinical translation, and provide an outlook on possible future gene therapy applications. Taken together, this review is a broad overview of alpharetroviral vectors spanning the bridge from their parental virus discovery to their potential applicability in clinical settings.

  12. Tropism-Modification Strategies for Targeted Gene Delivery Using Adenoviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H. Baker

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Achieving high efficiency, targeted gene delivery with adenoviral vectors is a long-standing goal in the field of clinical gene therapy. To achieve this, platform vectors must combine efficient retargeting strategies with detargeting modifications to ablate native receptor binding (i.e. CAR/integrins/heparan sulfate proteoglycans and “bridging” interactions. “Bridging” interactions refer to coagulation factor binding, namely coagulation factor X (FX, which bridges hepatocyte transduction in vivo through engagement with surface expressed heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs. These interactions can contribute to the off-target sequestration of Ad5 in the liver and its characteristic dose-limiting hepatotoxicity, thereby significantly limiting the in vivo targeting efficiency and clinical potential of Ad5-based therapeutics. To date, various approaches to retargeting adenoviruses (Ad have been described. These include genetic modification strategies to incorporate peptide ligands (within fiber knob domain, fiber shaft, penton base, pIX or hexon, pseudotyping of capsid proteins to include whole fiber substitutions or fiber knob chimeras, pseudotyping with non-human Ad species or with capsid proteins derived from other viral families, hexon hypervariable region (HVR substitutions and adapter-based conjugation/crosslinking of scFv, growth factors or monoclonal antibodies directed against surface-expressed target antigens. In order to maximize retargeting, strategies which permit detargeting from undesirable interactions between the Ad capsid and components of the circulatory system (e.g. coagulation factors, erythrocytes, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies, can be employed simultaneously. Detargeting can be achieved by genetic ablation of native receptor-binding determinants, ablation of “bridging interactions” such as those which occur between the hexon of Ad5 and coagulation factor X (FX, or alternatively, through the use of polymer

  13. Reasons for Change of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) Drugs: Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) reduces morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS infected patients. HAART is used indefinitely and the regimens are changed over the course of treatment due to resistance, adverse drug reactions or access to drugs. Few studies have been done in resource constrained ...

  14. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (Art) for HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) means treating retroviral infections like HIV with drugs. These drugs though do not kill the virus but slowed down the growth of the virus. When the virus is slowed down, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease is also slowed down. ART drugs are referred to as ARV and ARV therapy is ...

  15. The effect of interrupted anti-retroviral treatment on the reconstitution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Interrupted anti-retroviral treatment, memory and naive T cells, HIV patients, active pulmonary tuberculosis. ... viral treatment on the reconstitution of memory and naive T cells during tuberculosis treatment in HIV patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. Afri Health ..... In this prospective cohort study of the.

  16. Providing anti-retroviral therapy in the context of self-perceived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adherence to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) has been a significant step towards improving quality of life among people living with HIV. However, stigma has been described to influence adherence to ART. A cross-sectional mixed methods study was conducted to explore factors related to stigma and perceived influence of ...

  17. Pregnancy Outcome of HIV-Infected Women on Anti-Retroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Pregnancy Outcome of HIV-Infected Women on Anti-Retroviral Therapy in a Treatment. Centre in Port Harcourt, .... child transmission are indisputable, monitoring antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy has remained a priority for ... abnormality of the central nervous system, such as neural tube defect with first trimester exposure.

  18. Expansion of HIV-1 screening and anti-retroviral treatment programs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expansion of HIV-1 screening and anti-retroviral treatment programs in a resource-poor setting: results from a faith-based organization in Jos, Plateau State, ... Analysis of 645 patients initiated on ART during the first quarter of the FAFH-PEPFAR ART program revealed that the median CD4+ cell count at baseline was ...

  19. anti-retroviral therapy related liver injury (arli): a series of 11 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... and protease inhibitors, low body mass index, low platelet count and deranged renal functions prior ART initiation are associated with ... Risk factors for liver injury should be evaluated before initiating anti-retroviral therapy .... Event. Number. Haepatomegaly and ascites. 6. Haepatomegaly and gall stones.

  20. CD4 + Cell Response to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ARTS) In Routine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Untreated HIV/AIDS leads to severe immune depletion with opportunistic infections and other co-morbidities. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) enhances immunity by sustained HIV- viral suppression, increase in CD4+ cell count and immune restoration. HAART reduces risk of neutropaenia, ...

  1. Early Mortality among HIV-positive Children Initiated Anti-retroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAGHAVENDRA

    10.4314/star.v4i. ISSN: 2226-7522(Print) and 2305-. Science, Technology and Arts Research Journ. Sci. Technol. Arts Res. J., April-June 2015, 4. Journal Homepage: http://www.starjournal. positive Children Initiated Anti-retroviral Therapy.

  2. Anti-Retroviral Therapy Related Liver Injury (ARLI): A Series of 11 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe anti-retroviral-related liver injury (ARLI) in HIV positive patients, their CD4+ cell counts, biochemical and viral markers and liver ultrasound. Design: Prospective, descriptive, consecutive entry study. Setting: Kisumu District Hospital liver clinic/medical outpatient clinic, Nairobi Rheumatology Clinic and ...

  3. Gaps in the Implementation of Anti-Retroviral Treatment: A Case for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gaps in the Implementation of Anti-Retroviral Treatment: A Case for Addressing Gender and Mental Health Consequences of HIV Positive Individuals. ... Zambia is among the worst affected countries in Sub-Saharan Africa in terms of HIV infection, with a prevalence of 14.3% in the age group of 15-49. Each year about 1.6 ...

  4. anti-retroviral therapy related liver injury (arli): a series of 11 cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-02

    Dec 2, 2013 ... for liver enzyme elevation during highly active anti-retroviral therapy in HIV – HCV co –infected patients: results from the Italian EPOKA – MASTER. COHORT. BMC infection diseases 2005; 9: 58 – 67. 3. Podzammecer D., Fumero E. The role of Nevirapine in the treatment of HIV – 1 disease. Expert. Opin.

  5. Anti retroviral drug prophylaxis in prevention of mother-to-child ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti retroviral drug prophylaxis in prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection in a treatment centre in Jos, Nigeria. ... Of the 135 pregnant mothers' records reviewed, all of them were on triple ARV before delivery with 2 of them on second line regimen. The study revealed that 221 babies were given post ...

  6. The effect of interrupted anti-retroviral treatment on the reconstitution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The reconstitution of cellular immune components contributes to clinical outcome of HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. Interruption of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) could lead to perturbations in reconstitution of T cells in HIV/ tuberculosis (TB) patients. Objectives: To ascertain the effect of ...

  7. Virological failure and drug resistance during first line anti-retroviral treatment in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fibriani, A.; Wisaksana, R.; Indrati, A.; Hartantri, Y.; Vijver, D. van de; Schutten, M.; Alisjahbana, B.; Sudjana, P.; Boucher, C.A.B.; Crevel, R. van; Ven, A. van der

    2013-01-01

    The virological response and development of drug resistance during first-line anti-retroviral treatment (ART) were studied in Indonesia where the majority of patients infected with HIV have a history of injecting drug use, which is often linked with lower treatment adherence and development of

  8. Differentiated neuroprogenitor cells incubated with human or canine adenovirus, or lentiviral vectors have distinct transcriptome profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Several studies have demonstrated the potential for vector-mediated gene transfer to the brain. Helper-dependent (HD human (HAd and canine (CAV-2 adenovirus, and VSV-G-pseudotyped self-inactivating HIV-1 vectors (LV effectively transduce human brain cells and their toxicity has been partly analysed. However, their effect on the brain homeostasis is far from fully defined, especially because of the complexity of the central nervous system (CNS. With the goal of dissecting the toxicogenomic signatures of the three vectors for human neurons, we transduced a bona fide human neuronal system with HD-HAd, HD-CAV-2 and LV. We analysed the transcriptional response of more than 47,000 transcripts using gene chips. Chip data showed that HD-CAV-2 and LV vectors activated the innate arm of the immune response, including Toll-like receptors and hyaluronan circuits. LV vector also induced an IFN response. Moreover, HD-CAV-2 and LV vectors affected DNA damage pathways--but in opposite directions--suggesting a differential response of the p53 and ATM pathways to the vector genomes. As a general response to the vectors, human neurons activated pro-survival genes and neuron morphogenesis, presumably with the goal of re-establishing homeostasis. These data are complementary to in vivo studies on brain vector toxicity and allow a better understanding of the impact of viral vectors on human neurons, and mechanistic approaches to improve the therapeutic impact of brain-directed gene transfer.

  9. High-resolution structure of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilski, Miroslaw [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland); Kazmierczyk, Maciej; Krzywda, Szymon [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Zábranská, Helena [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Cooper, Seth; Popović, Zoran [University of Washington, Box 352350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Khatib, Firas; DiMaio, Frank; Thompson, James; Baker, David [University of Washington, Box 357350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Pichová, Iva [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 166 10 Prague (Czech Republic); Jaskolski, Mariusz, E-mail: mariuszj@amu.edu.pl [A. Mickiewicz University, 60-780 Poznan (Poland); Polish Academy of Sciences, 61-704 Poznan (Poland)

    2011-11-01

    The crystal structure of Mason–Pfizer monkey virus protease folded as a monomer has been solved by molecular replacement using a model generated by players of the online game Foldit. The structure shows at high resolution the details of a retroviral protease folded as a monomer which can guide rational design of protease dimerization inhibitors as retroviral drugs. Mason–Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV), a D-type retrovirus assembling in the cytoplasm, causes simian acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus monkeys. Its pepsin-like aspartic protease (retropepsin) is an integral part of the expressed retroviral polyproteins. As in all retroviral life cycles, release and dimerization of the protease (PR) is strictly required for polyprotein processing and virion maturation. Biophysical and NMR studies have indicated that in the absence of substrates or inhibitors M-PMV PR should fold into a stable monomer, but the crystal structure of this protein could not be solved by molecular replacement despite countless attempts. Ultimately, a solution was obtained in mr-rosetta using a model constructed by players of the online protein-folding game Foldit. The structure indeed shows a monomeric protein, with the N- and C-termini completely disordered. On the other hand, the flap loop, which normally gates access to the active site of homodimeric retropepsins, is clearly traceable in the electron density. The flap has an unusual curled shape and a different orientation from both the open and closed states known from dimeric retropepsins. The overall fold of the protein follows the retropepsin canon, but the C{sup α} deviations are large and the active-site ‘DTG’ loop (here NTG) deviates up to 2.7 Å from the standard conformation. This structure of a monomeric retropepsin determined at high resolution (1.6 Å) provides important extra information for the design of dimerization inhibitors that might be developed as drugs for the treatment of retroviral infections

  10. The effects of N-terminal insertion into VSV-G of an scFv peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreja, Hanna; Piechaczyk, Marc

    2006-09-02

    Recombinant retroviruses, including lentiviruses, are the most widely used vectors for both in vitro and in vivo stable gene transfer. However, the inability to selectively deliver transgenes into cells of interest limits the use of this technology. Due to its wide tropism, stability and ability to pseudotype a range of viral vectors, vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G) is the most commonly used pseudotyping protein. Here, we attempted to engineer this protein for targeting purposes. Chimaeric VSV-G proteins were constructed by linking a cell-directing single-chain antibody (scFv) to its N-terminal. We show that the chimaeric VSV-G molecules can integrate into retroviral and lentiviral particles. HIV-1 particles pseudotyped with VSV-G linked to an scFv against human Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I) bind strongly and specifically to human cells. Also, this novel molecule preferentially drives lentiviral transduction of human cells, although the titre is considerably lower that viruses pseudotyped with VSV-G. This is likely due to the inefficient fusion activity of the modified protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report where VSV-G was successfully engineered to include a large (253 amino acids) exogenous peptide and where attempts were made to change the infection profile of VSV-G pseudotyped vectors.

  11. The effects of N-terminal insertion into VSV-G of an scFv peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piechaczyk Marc

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recombinant retroviruses, including lentiviruses, are the most widely used vectors for both in vitro and in vivo stable gene transfer. However, the inability to selectively deliver transgenes into cells of interest limits the use of this technology. Due to its wide tropism, stability and ability to pseudotype a range of viral vectors, vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G is the most commonly used pseudotyping protein. Here, we attempted to engineer this protein for targeting purposes. Chimaeric VSV-G proteins were constructed by linking a cell-directing single-chain antibody (scFv to its N-terminal. We show that the chimaeric VSV-G molecules can integrate into retroviral and lentiviral particles. HIV-1 particles pseudotyped with VSV-G linked to an scFv against human Major Histocompatibility Complex class I (MHC-I bind strongly and specifically to human cells. Also, this novel molecule preferentially drives lentiviral transduction of human cells, although the titre is considerably lower that viruses pseudotyped with VSV-G. This is likely due to the inefficient fusion activity of the modified protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report where VSV-G was successfully engineered to include a large (253 amino acids exogenous peptide and where attempts were made to change the infection profile of VSV-G pseudotyped vectors.

  12. Gene therapy model of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using a modified foamy virus vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Horino

    Full Text Available X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1 is an inherited genetic immunodeficiency associated with mutations in the common cytokine receptor γ chain (γc gene, and characterized by a complete defect of T and natural killer (NK cells. Gene therapy for SCID-X1 using conventional retroviral (RV vectors carrying the γc gene results in the successful reconstitution of T cell immunity. However, the high incidence of vector-mediated T cell leukemia, caused by vector insertion near or within cancer-related genes has been a serious problem. In this study, we established a gene therapy model of mouse SCID-X1 using a modified foamy virus (FV vector expressing human γc. Analysis of vector integration in a human T cell line demonstrated that the FV vector integration sites were significantly less likely to be located within or near transcriptional start sites than RV vector integration sites. To evaluate the therapeutic efficacy, bone marrow cells from γc-knockout (γc-KO mice were infected with the FV vector and transplanted into γc-KO mice. Transplantation of the FV-treated cells resulted in the successful reconstitution of functionally active T and B cells. These data suggest that FV vectors can be effective and may be safer than conventional RV vectors for gene therapy for SCID-X1.

  13. Multiplex Evaluation of Influenza Neutralizing Antibodies with Potential Applicability to In-Field Serological Studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Molesti, Eleonora; Wright, Edward; Terregino, Calogero; Rahman, Rafat; Cattoli, Giovanni; Temperton, Nigel J

    2014-01-01

    .... Retroviral pseudotypes bearing influenza haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) envelope glycoproteins represent a flexible platform for sensitive, readily standardized influenza serological assays...

  14. Efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors serotypes 1, 2, and 5 for the transduction of pancreatic and colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschendorf, Christian; Emons, Barbara; Muzyczka, Nicholas; Graeven, Ullrich; Schmiegel, Wolff

    2010-06-01

    The development of efficient and specific vector systems remains a central issue in gene therapy. Several different adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes have so far been characterized so far which show different tissue tropisms. The vectors used here contained AAV2 transgene cassette containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in AAV1, AAV2, or AAV5 capsids, producing the recombinant pseudotypes rAAV2/1, rAAV2/2, and rAAV2/5. The transduction efficiency of the different pseudotyped AAV vectors was tested in vitro in pancreatic and colon cancer cells lines (HT-29, BXPC3, and Hs766T). For all three serotypes, the percentage of GFP-positive cells was below 10% at multiplicities of infection (MOI) 100 rAAV vectors when used alone for infection. However, transduction efficiency for rAAV vectors increased dramatically when the cells were co-infected with wild-type adenovirus (wtAd). The percentage of GFP-positive cells ranged from 19.8-65.3% for AAV2/1 and 16.9-70.2% for AAV2/5, respectively. It was highest for rAAV2/2, at 40.9-88.4%. Variation between the cell lines was observed, with BXPC3 scoring the highest transduction rates and HT-29 the lowest. This study indicates that vectors based on distinct AAV serotypes 1, 2, and 5 all transduce pancreatic and colon cell lines poorly when used alone. Co-infection with wtAd increase transduction rates dramatically indicating that slow second-strand synthesis is a reason for the poor transduction efficiency. Due to the poor transduction rates, none of the rAAV serotypes tested here seem to be feasible for the treatment of malignant tumors.

  15. Interferon-alpha Subtype 11 Activates NK Cells and Enables Control of Retroviral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kathrin Gibbert; Jara J Joedicke; Andreas Meryk; Mirko Trilling; Sandra Francois; Janine Duppach; Anke Kraft; Lang, Karl S.; Ulf Dittmer

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune response mediated by cells such as natural killer (NK) cells is critical for the rapid containment of virus replication and spread during acute infection. Here, we show that subtype 11 of the type I interferon (IFN) family greatly potentiates the antiviral activity of NK cells during retroviral infection. Treatment of mice with IFN-α11 during Friend retrovirus infection (FV) significantly reduced viral loads and resulted in long-term protection from virus-induced leukemia. T...

  16. DNA minicircles clarify the specific role of DNA structure on retroviral integration

    OpenAIRE

    Pasi, Marco; Mornico, Damien; Volant, Stevenn; Juchet, Anna; Batisse, Julien; Bouchier, Christiane; Parissi, Vincent; Ruff, Marc; Lavery, Richard; Lavigne, Marc

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Chromatin regulates the selectivity of retroviral integration into the genome of infected cells. At the nucleosome level, both histones and DNA structure are involved in this regulation. We propose a strategy that allows to specifically study a single factor: the DNA distortion induced by the nucleosome. This strategy relies on mimicking this distortion using DNA minicircles (MCs) having a fixed rotational orientation of DNA curvature, coupled with atomic-resolution mo...

  17. Efficient and specific internal cleavage of a retroviral palindromic DNA sequence by tetrameric HIV-1 integrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Delelis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 integrase (IN catalyses the retroviral integration process, removing two nucleotides from each long terminal repeat and inserting the processed viral DNA into the target DNA. It is widely assumed that the strand transfer step has no sequence specificity. However, recently, it has been reported by several groups that integration sites display a preference for palindromic sequences, suggesting that a symmetry in the target DNA may stabilise the tetrameric organisation of IN in the synaptic complex. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed the ability of several palindrome-containing sequences to organise tetrameric IN and investigated the ability of IN to catalyse DNA cleavage at internal positions. Only one palindromic sequence was successfully cleaved by IN. Interestingly, this symmetrical sequence corresponded to the 2-LTR junction of retroviral DNA circles-a palindrome similar but not identical to the consensus sequence found at integration sites. This reaction depended strictly on the cognate retroviral sequence of IN and required a full-length wild-type IN. Furthermore, the oligomeric state of IN responsible for this cleavage differed from that involved in the 3'-processing reaction. Palindromic cleavage strictly required the tetrameric form, whereas 3'-processing was efficiently catalysed by a dimer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings suggest that the restriction-like cleavage of palindromic sequences may be a general physiological activity of retroviral INs and that IN tetramerisation is strongly favoured by DNA symmetry, either at the target site for the concerted integration or when the DNA contains the 2-LTR junction in the case of the palindromic internal cleavage.

  18. Murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients following retroviral gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utpal P Davé

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Five X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency patients (SCID-X1 successfully treated with autologous bone marrow stem cells infected ex vivo with an IL2RG-containing retrovirus subsequently developed T-cell leukemia and four contained insertional mutations at LMO2. Genetic evidence also suggests a role for IL2RG in tumor formation, although this remains controversial. Here, we show that the genes and signaling pathways deregulated in murine leukemias with retroviral insertions at Lmo2 are similar to those deregulated in human leukemias with high LMO2 expression and are highly predictive of the leukemias induced in SCID-X1 patients. We also provide additional evidence supporting the notion that IL2RG and LMO2 cooperate in leukemia induction but are not sufficient and require additional cooperating mutations. The highly concordant nature of the genetic events giving rise to mouse and human leukemias with mutations at Lmo2 are an encouraging sign to those wanting to use mice to model human cancer and may help in designing safer methods for retroviral gene therapy.

  19. Recent updates for designing CCR5 antagonists as anti-retroviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Harshil R; Savjani, Jignasa Ketan

    2018-03-10

    The healthcare system faces various challenges in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy due to resistance to Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) as a consequence of the evolutionary process. Despite the success of antiretroviral drugs like Zidovudine, Zalcitabine, Raltegravir WHO ranks HIV as one of the deadliest diseases with a mortality of one million lives in 2016. Thus, there emerges an urgency of developing a novel anti-retroviral agent that combat resistant HIV strains. The clinical development of ART from a single drug regimen to current triple drug combination is very slow. The progression in the structural biology of the viral envelope prompted the discovery of novel targets, which can be demonstrated a proficient approach for drug design of anti-retroviral agents. The current review enlightens the recent updates in the structural biology of the viral envelope and focuses on CCR5 as a validated target as well as ways to overcome CCR5 resistance. The article also throws light on the SAR studies and most prevalent mutations in the receptor for designing CCR5 antagonists that can combat HIV-1 infection. To conclude, the paper lists diversified scaffolds that are in pipeline by various pharmaceutical companies that could provide an aid for developing novel CCR5 antagonists. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparing the landcapes of common retroviral insertion sites across tumor models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weishaupt, Holger; Čančer, Matko; Engström, Cristopher; Silvestrov, Sergei; Swartling, Fredrik J.

    2017-01-01

    Retroviral tagging represents an important technique, which allows researchers to screen for candidate cancer genes. The technique is based on the integration of retroviral sequences into the genome of a host organism, which might then lead to the artificial inhibition or expression of proximal genetic elements. The identification of potential cancer genes in this framework involves the detection of genomic regions (common insertion sites; CIS) which contain a number of such viral integration sites that is greater than expected by chance. During the last two decades, a number of different methods have been discussed for the identification of such loci and the respective techniques have been applied to a variety of different retroviruses and/or tumor models. We have previously established a retrovirus driven brain tumor model and reported the CISs which were found based on a Monte Carlo statistics derived detection paradigm. In this study, we consider a recently proposed alternative graph theory based method for identifying CISs and compare the resulting CIS landscape in our brain tumor dataset to those obtained when using the Monte Carlo approach. Finally, we also employ the graph-based method to compare the CIS landscape in our brain tumor model with those of other published retroviral tumor models.

  1. Evaluation of quantitative liver function tests in HIV-positive patients under anti-retroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miller M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aims Quantitative tests of liver function (QTLF which are based on the hepatic metabolism or clearance of test substances have been successfully used to predict prognosis of a variety of different liver diseases. Still sufficient data in HIV-patients under anti-retroviral therapy (ART are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this prospective study was to investigate if and to what extent ART influences a broad panel of quantitative tests of liver function in patients with HIV-infection. Patients and methods Nineteen patients (14 males, 5 females, mean age 40 years with HIV-infection underwent QTLF including lidocaine half-life test (LHT, galactose elimination capacity (GEC, and indocyanine green clearance (IGC. These tests were performed before and 3 to 6 months after initiation of anti-retroviral therapy. Twenty age-matched healthy, medication-and virus-free adults served as controls. Results Lidocaine half-life was significantly lower in HIV-patients without ART. Combining anti-retroviral therapies shifted cytochrome p450 activity back into standard ranges. Galactose elimination capacity as a parameter of cytosolic liver function and indocyanine green clearance as a parameter of liver perfusion were not affected by ART. Conclusions QTLF may be a tool to predict prognosis or hepatic complications in HIV-infected patients with liver disease. Early determination of lidocaine half-life seems to be useful - this should be considered during the treatment of HIV-positive individuals.

  2. Positive Selection of Iris, a Retroviral Envelope-Derived Host Gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B. Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana, a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene

  3. Positive selection of Iris, a retroviral envelope-derived host gene in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmit S Malik

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic genomes can usurp enzymatic functions encoded by mobile elements for their own use. A particularly interesting kind of acquisition involves the domestication of retroviral envelope genes, which confer infectious membrane-fusion ability to retroviruses. So far, these examples have been limited to vertebrate genomes, including primates where the domesticated envelope is under purifying selection to assist placental function. Here, we show that in Drosophila genomes, a previously unannotated gene (CG4715, renamed Iris was domesticated from a novel, active Kanga lineage of insect retroviruses at least 25 million years ago, and has since been maintained as a host gene that is expressed in all adult tissues. Iris and the envelope genes from Kanga retroviruses are homologous to those found in insect baculoviruses and gypsy and roo insect retroviruses. Two separate envelope domestications from the Kanga and roo retroviruses have taken place, in fruit fly and mosquito genomes, respectively. Whereas retroviral envelopes are proteolytically cleaved into the ligand-interaction and membrane-fusion domains, Iris appears to lack this cleavage site. In the takahashii/suzukii species groups of Drosophila, we find that Iris has tandemly duplicated to give rise to two genes (Iris-A and Iris-B. Iris-B has significantly diverged from the Iris-A lineage, primarily because of the "invention" of an intron de novo in what was previously exonic sequence. Unlike domesticated retroviral envelope genes in mammals, we find that Iris has been subject to strong positive selection between Drosophila species. The rapid, adaptive evolution of Iris is sufficient to unambiguously distinguish the phylogenies of three closely related sibling species of Drosophila (D. simulans, D. sechellia, and D. mauritiana, a discriminative power previously described only for a putative "speciation gene." Iris represents the first instance of a retroviral envelope-derived host gene

  4. Comparative analysis of adeno-associated viral vector serotypes 1, 2, 5, 7, and 8 in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymans, Jean-Marc; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Haute, Chris Van Den; Thiry, Irina; Deroose, Christophe M; Mortelmans, Luc; Wilson, James M; Debyser, Zeger; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2007-03-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (rAAV2) vectors have been shown to deliver genes effectively to neurons in the brain, retina, and spinal cord. The characterization of new AAV serotypes revealed different patterns of transduction in a diverse array of tissues (Gao, G., Vandenberghe, L.H., and Wilson, J.M. [2005]. Curr. Gene Ther. 5, 285-297). Here, we extensively compare the neural tropism of human-derived rAAVs (types 2/1, 2, and 2/5) with nonhuman primate-derived rAAVs (types 2/7 and 2/8) in adult mouse brain. Mice were injected with rAAV type 2/1, 2, 2/5, 2/7, or 2/8 via the caudate-putamen and substantia nigra. Intrahippocampal injections were also performed for rAAV2/7 and rAAV2/8. In all regions injected, the vectors transduced neurons almost exclusively. Retrograde transduction of all rAAV pseudotypes was also observed in particular CNS areas. At high titers, all rAAV pseudotypes transduced comparable brain volumes in all targeted regions except for rAAV2, which transduced much smaller brain volumes. A dose-range comparison of intrastriatally injected rAAV types 2/5, 2/7, and 2/8 highlighted that the transduction efficiency, as determined by transduced volume and biophotonic imaging of green fluorescent protein expression intensity, was significantly higher for rAAV2/5 and rAAV2/7 compared with rAAV2/8 at low titers, whereas all three serotypes performed equally well at higher doses. These results demonstrate the use and efficiency of both human- and nonhuman primate-derived rAAV vectors for disease modeling and their potential for gene therapy.

  5. Packaging HIV- or FIV-based lentivector expression constructs and transduction of VSV-G pseudotyped viral particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Amy; Lesnik, Jacob; Mukherjee, Chandreyee; Antes, Travis; Sengupta, Ranjita

    2012-04-08

    As with standard plasmid vectors, it is possible to transfect lentivectors in plasmid form into cells with low-to-medium efficiency to obtain transient expression of effectors. Packaging lentiviral expression constructs into pseudoviral particles, however, enables up to 100% transduction, even with difficult-to-transfect cells, such as primary, stem, and differentiated cells. Moreover, the lentiviral delivery does not produce the specific cellular responses typically associated with chemical transfections, such as cell death resulting from toxicity of the transfection reagent. When transduced into target cells, the lentiviral construct integrates into genomic DNA and provides stable expression of the small hairpin RNA (shRNA), cDNA, microRNA or reporter gene. Target cells stably expressing the effector molecule can be isolated using a selectable marker contained in the expression vector construct such as puromycin or GFP. After pseudoviral particles infect target cells, they cannot replicate within target cells because the viral structural genes are absent and the long terminal repeats (LTRs) are designed to be self-inactivating upon transduction. There are three main components necessary for efficient lentiviral packaging. 1. The lentiviral expression vector that contains some of the genetic elements required for packaging, stable integration of the viral expression construct into genomic DNA, and expression of the effector or reporter. 2. The lentiviral packaging plasmids that provide the proteins essential for transcription and packaging of an RNA copy of the expression construct into recombinant pseudoviral particles. This protocol uses the pPACK plasmids (SBI) that encode for gag, pol, and rev from the HIV or FIV genome and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus g protein (VSV-G) for the viral coat protein. 3. 293TN producer cells (derived from HEK293 cells) that express the SV40 large T antigen, which is required for high-titer lentiviral production and a neomycin

  6. Design and generation of recombinant rabies virus vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Callaway, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies viruses, negative-strand RNA viruses, infect neurons through axon terminals and spread transsynaptically in a retrograde direction between neurons. Rabies viruses whose glycoprotein (G) gene is deleted from the genome cannot spread across synapses. Complementation of G in trans, however, enables transsynaptic spreading of G-deleted rabies viruses to directly-connected, presynaptic neurons. Recombinant rabies viruses can encode genes of interest for labeling cells, controlling gene expression, and monitoring or manipulating neural activity. Cre-dependent or bridge-protein-mediated transduction and single-cell electroporation via EnvA/TVA or EnvB/TVB system allow cell-type-specific or single-cell-specific targeting. These rabies virus-based approaches permit the linking of connectivity to cell morphology and circuit function for particular cell types or single cells. Here we describe methods for construction of rabies viral vectors, recovery of G-deleted rabies viruses from cDNA, amplification of the viruses, pseudotyping them with EnvA or EnvB, and concentration and titration of the viruses. The entire protocol takes 6–8 weeks. PMID:23887178

  7. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Escors

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(g-retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and b-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  8. Lentiviral Vectors for Cancer Immunotherapy and Clinical Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liechtenstein, Therese, E-mail: t.liechtenstein.12@ucl.ac.uk [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Perez-Janices, Noemi; Escors, David [University College London, 5 University Street, London, WC1E 6JF (United Kingdom); Navarrabiomed Fundacion Miguel Servet, 3 Irunlarrea St., Hospital Complex of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2013-07-02

    The success of immunotherapy against infectious diseases has shown us the powerful potential that such a treatment offers, and substantial work has been done to apply this strategy in the fight against cancer. Cancer is however a fiercer opponent than pathogen-caused diseases due to natural tolerance towards tumour associated antigens and tumour-induced immunosuppression. Recent gene therapy clinical trials with viral vectors have shown clinical efficacy in the correction of genetic diseases, HIV and cancer. The first successful gene therapy clinical trials were carried out with onco(γ-)retroviral vectors but oncogenesis by insertional mutagenesis appeared as a serious complication. Lentiviral vectors have emerged as a potentially safer strategy, and recently the first clinical trial of patients with advanced leukemia using lentiviral vectors has proven successful. Additionally, therapeutic lentivectors have shown clinical efficacy for the treatment of HIV, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, and β-thalassaemia. This review aims at describing lentivectors and how they can be utilized to boost anti-tumour immune responses by manipulating the effector immune cells.

  9. A single residue substitution in the receptor-binding domain of H5N1 hemagglutinin is critical for packaging into pseudotyped lentiviral particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Jiang Tang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serological studies for influenza infection and vaccine response often involve microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays to evaluate neutralizing antibodies against human and avian influenza viruses, including H5N1. We have previously characterized lentiviral particles pseudotyped with H5-HA (H5pp and validated an H5pp-based assay as a safe alternative for high-throughput serological studies in BSL-2 facilities. Here we show that H5-HAs from different clades do not always give rise to efficient production of H5pp and the underlying mechanisms are addressed. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We have carried out mutational analysis to delineate the molecular determinants responsible for efficient packaging of HA from A/Cambodia/40808/2005 (H5Cam and A/Anhui/1/2005 (H5Anh into H5pp. Our results demonstrate that a single A134V mutation in the 130-loop of the receptor binding domain is sufficient to render H5Anh the ability to generate H5Anh-pp efficiently, whereas the reverse V134A mutation greatly hampers production of H5Cam-pp. Although protein expression in total cell lysates is similar for H5Anh and H5Cam, cell surface expression of H5Cam is detected at a significantly higher level than that of H5Anh. We further demonstrate by several independent lines of evidence that the behaviour of H5Anh can be explained by a stronger binding to sialic acid receptors implicating residue 134. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified a single A134V mutation as the molecular determinant in H5-HA for efficient incorporation into H5pp envelope and delineated the underlying mechanism. The reduced binding to sialic acid receptors as a result of the A134V mutation not only exerts a critical influence in pseudotyping efficiency of H5-HA, but has also an impact at the whole virus level. Because A134V substitution has been reported as a naturally occurring mutation in human host, our results may have implications for the understanding of human host adaptation

  10. Lineage-specific expansions of retroviral insertions within the genomes of African great apes but not humans and orangutans.

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    Chris T Yohn

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral infections of the germline have the potential to episodically alter gene function and genome structure during the course of evolution. Horizontal transmissions between species have been proposed, but little evidence exists for such events in the human/great ape lineage of evolution. Based on analysis of finished BAC chimpanzee genome sequence, we characterize a retroviral element (Pan troglodytes endogenous retrovirus 1 [PTERV1] that has become integrated in the germline of African great ape and Old World monkey species but is absent from humans and Asian ape genomes. We unambiguously map 287 retroviral integration sites and determine that approximately 95.8% of the insertions occur at non-orthologous regions between closely related species. Phylogenetic analysis of the endogenous retrovirus reveals that the gorilla and chimpanzee elements share a monophyletic origin with a subset of the Old World monkey retroviral elements, but that the average sequence divergence exceeds neutral expectation for a strictly nuclear inherited DNA molecule. Within the chimpanzee, there is a significant integration bias against genes, with only 14 of these insertions mapping within intronic regions. Six out of ten of these genes, for which there are expression data, show significant differences in transcript expression between human and chimpanzee. Our data are consistent with a retroviral infection that bombarded the genomes of chimpanzees and gorillas independently and concurrently, 3-4 million years ago. We speculate on the potential impact of such recent events on the evolution of humans and great apes.

  11. Adeno-associated virus and lentivirus vectors mediate efficient and sustained transduction of cultured mouse and human dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J; Ginn, S L; Weinberger, R P; Trahair, T N; Smythe, J A; Alexander, I E

    2001-01-01

    Peripheral nervous system (PNS) sensory neurons are directly involved in the pathophysiology of numerous inherited and acquired neurological conditions. Therefore, efficient and stable gene delivery to these postmitotic cells has significant therapeutic potential. Among contemporary vector systems capable of neuronal transduction, only those based on herpes simplex virus have been extensively evaluated in PNS neurons. We therefore investigated the transduction performance of recombinant adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV) and VSV-G-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in newborn mouse and fetal human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons. In dissociated mouse DRG cultures both vectors achieved efficient transduction of sensory neurons at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs) and sustained transgene expression within a 28-day culture period. Interestingly, the lentivirus vector selectively transduced neurons in murine cultures, in contrast to human cultures, in which Schwann and fibroblast-like cells were also transduced. Recombinant AAV transduced all three cell types in both mouse and human cultures. After direct microinjection of murine DRG explants, maximal transduction efficiencies of 20 and 200 transducing units per neuronal transductant were achieved with AAV and lentivirus vectors, respectively. Most importantly, both vectors achieved efficient and sustained transduction of human sensory neurons in dissociated cultures, thereby directly demonstrating the exciting potential of these vectors for gene therapy applications in the PNS.

  12. Hepatorenal correction in murine glycogen storage disease type I with a double-stranded adeno-associated virus vector.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Luo, Xiaoyan

    2011-11-01

    Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSD-Ia) is caused by the deficiency of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Long-term complications of GSD-Ia include life-threatening hypoglycemia and proteinuria progressing to renal failure. A double-stranded (ds) adeno-associated virus serotype 2 (AAV2) vector encoding human G6Pase was pseudotyped with four serotypes, AAV2, AAV7, AAV8, and AAV9, and we evaluated efficacy in 12-day-old G6pase (-\\/-) mice. Hypoglycemia during fasting (plasma glucose <100 mg\\/dl) was prevented for >6 months by the dsAAV2\\/7, dsAAV2\\/8, and dsAAV2\\/9 vectors. Prolonged fasting for 8 hours revealed normalization of blood glucose following dsAAV2\\/9 vector administration at the higher dose. The glycogen content of kidney was reduced by >65% with both the dsAAV2\\/7 and dsAAV2\\/9 vectors, and renal glycogen content was stably reduced between 7 and 12 months of age for the dsAAV2\\/9 vector-treated mice. Every vector-treated group had significantly reduced glycogen content in the liver, in comparison with untreated G6pase (-\\/-) mice. G6Pase was expressed in many renal epithelial cells of with the dsAAV2\\/9 vector for up to 12 months. Albuminuria and renal fibrosis were reduced by the dsAAV2\\/9 vector. Hepatorenal correction in G6pase (-\\/-) mice demonstrates the potential of AAV vectors for the correction of inherited diseases of metabolism.

  13. Differential activation of NK cells by influenza A pseudotype H5N1 and 1918 and 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ning; Zhou, Jianfang; Lin, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yonghui; Yang, Xiaoxing; Wang, Yue; Shu, Yuelong

    2010-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the effectors of innate immunity and are recruited into the lung 48 h after influenza virus infection. Functional NK cell activation can be triggered by the interaction between viral hemagglutinin (HA) and natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp46 and NKp44 on the cell surface. Recently, novel subtypes of influenza viruses, such as H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1, transmitted directly to the human population, with unusual mortality and morbidity rates. Here, the human NK cell responses to these viruses were studied. Differential activation of heterogeneous NK cells (upregulation of CD69 and CD107a and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma] production as well as downregulation of NKp46) was observed following interactions with H5N1, 1918 H1N1, and 2009 H1N1 pseudotyped particles (pps), respectively, and the responses of the CD56(dim) subset predominated. Much stronger NK activation was triggered by H5N1 and 1918 H1N1 pps than by 2009 H1N1 pps. The interaction of pps with NK cells and subsequent internalization were mediated by NKp46 partially. The NK cell activation by pps showed a dosage-dependent manner, while an increasing viral HA titer attenuated NK activation phenotypes, cytotoxicity, and IFN-gamma production. The various host innate immune responses to different influenza virus subtypes or HA titers may be associated with disease severity.

  14. Differential Activation of NK Cells by Influenza A Pseudotype H5N1 and 1918 and 2009 Pandemic H1N1 Viruses▿ ‡ ‖

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ning; Zhou, Jianfang; Lin, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yonghui; Yang, Xiaoxing; Wang, Yue; Shu, Yuelong

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the effectors of innate immunity and are recruited into the lung 48 h after influenza virus infection. Functional NK cell activation can be triggered by the interaction between viral hemagglutinin (HA) and natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp46 and NKp44 on the cell surface. Recently, novel subtypes of influenza viruses, such as H5N1 and 2009 pandemic H1N1, transmitted directly to the human population, with unusual mortality and morbidity rates. Here, the human NK cell responses to these viruses were studied. Differential activation of heterogeneous NK cells (upregulation of CD69 and CD107a and gamma interferon [IFN-γ] production as well as downregulation of NKp46) was observed following interactions with H5N1, 1918 H1N1, and 2009 H1N1 pseudotyped particles (pps), respectively, and the responses of the CD56dim subset predominated. Much stronger NK activation was triggered by H5N1 and 1918 H1N1 pps than by 2009 H1N1 pps. The interaction of pps with NK cells and subsequent internalization were mediated by NKp46 partially. The NK cell activation by pps showed a dosage-dependent manner, while an increasing viral HA titer attenuated NK activation phenotypes, cytotoxicity, and IFN-γ production. The various host innate immune responses to different influenza virus subtypes or HA titers may be associated with disease severity. PMID:20484512

  15. Characterization of the properties of seven promoters in the motor cortex of rats and monkeys after lentiviral vector-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaguchi, Masae; Ohashi, Yohei; Tsubota, Tadashi; Sato, Ayana; Koyano, Kenji W; Wang, Ningqun; Miyashita, Yasushi

    2013-12-01

    Lentiviral vectors deliver transgenes efficiently to a wide range of neuronal cell types in the mammalian central nervous system. To drive gene expression, internal promoters are essential; however, the in vivo properties of promoters, such as their cell type specificity and gene expression activity, are not well known, especially in the nonhuman primate brain. Here, the properties of five ubiquitous promoters (murine stem cell virus [MSCV], cytomegalovirus [CMV], CMV early enhancer/chicken β-actin [CAG], human elongation factor-1α [EF-1α], and Rous sarcoma virus [RSV]) and two cell type-specific promoters (rat synapsin I and mouse α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II [CaMKIIα]) in rat and monkey motor cortices in vivo were characterized. Vesicular stomatitis virus G (VSV-G)-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the various promoters were prepared and injected into rat and monkey motor cortices. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that all of the VSV-G-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors had strong endogenous neuronal tropisms in rat and monkey brains. Among the seven promoters, the CMV promoter showed modest expression in glial cells (9.4%) of the rat brain, whereas the five ubiquitous promoters (MSCV, CMV, CAG, EF-1α, and RSV) showed expression in glial cells (7.0-14.7%) in the monkey brain. Cell type-specific synapsin I and CaMKIIα promoters showed excitatory neuron-specific expression in the monkey brain (synapsin I, 99.7%; CaMKIIα, 100.0%), but their specificities for excitatory neurons were significantly lower in the rat brain (synapsin I, 94.6%; CaMKIIα, 93.7%). These findings could be useful in basic and clinical neuroscience research for the design of vectors that efficiently deliver and express transgenes into rat and monkey brains.

  16. Lentivirus vector-mediated gene transfer to the developing bronchiolar airway epithelium in the fetal lamb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ze-Yan; McKay, Karen; van Asperen, Peter; Zheng, Maolin; Fleming, Jane; Ginn, Samantha L; Kizana, Eddy; Latham, Margot; Feneley, Michael P; Kirkland, Peter D; Rowe, Peter B; Lumbers, Eugenie R; Alexander, Ian E

    2007-06-01

    Development of effective and durable gene therapy for treatment of the respiratory manifestations of cystic fibrosis remains a formidable challenge. Obstacles include difficulty in achieving efficient gene transfer to mature airway epithelium and the need to stably transduce self-renewing epithelial progenitor cells in order to avoid loss of transgene expression through epithelial turnover. Targeting the developing airway epithelium during fetal life offers the prospect of circumventing these challenges. In the current study we investigated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSVg)-pseudotyped HIV-1-derived lentivirus vector-mediated gene transfer to the airway epithelium of mid-gestation fetal lambs, both in vitro and in vivo. In the in vitro studies epithelial sheet explants and lung organ culture were used to examine transduction of the proximal and more distal airway epithelium, respectively. For the in vivo studies, vector was delivered directly into the proximal airway. We found that even during the early pseudoglandular and canalicular phases of lung development, occurring through mid-gestation, the proximal bronchial airway epithelium was relatively mature and highly resistant to lentivirus-mediated transduction. In contrast, the more distal bronchiolar airway epithelium was relatively permissive for transduction although the absolute levels achieved remained low. This result is promising as the bronchiolar airway epithelium is a major site of pathology in the cystic fibrosis airway, and much higher levels of transduction are likely to be achieved by developing strategies that increase the amount of vector reaching the more distal airway after intratracheal delivery.

  17. Visualization of cortical projection neurons with retrograde TET-off lentiviral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watakabe, Akiya; Kato, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Takaji, Masafumi; Nakagami, Yuki; Sadakane, Osamu; Ohtsuka, Masanari; Hioki, Hiroyuki; Kaneko, Takeshi; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Takashi; Bito, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Yoshihiro; Yamamori, Tetsuo

    2012-01-01

    We are interested in identifying and characterizing various projection neurons that constitute the neocortical circuit. For this purpose, we developed a novel lentiviral vector that carries the tetracycline transactivator (tTA) and the transgene under the TET Responsive Element promoter (TRE) on a single backbone. By pseudotyping such a vector with modified rabies G-protein, we were able to express palmitoylated-GFP (palGFP) or turboFP635 (RFP) in corticothalamic, corticocortical, and corticopontine neurons of mice. The high-level expression of the transgene achieved by the TET-Off system enabled us to observe characteristic elaboration of neuronal processes for each cell type. At higher magnification, we were able to observe fine structures such as boutons and spines as well. We also injected our retrograde TET-Off vector to the marmoset cortex and proved that it can be used to label the long-distance cortical connectivity of millimeter scale. In conclusion, our novel retrograde tracer provides an attractive option to investigate the morphologies of identified cortical projection neurons of various species.

  18. Visualization of cortical projection neurons with retrograde TET-off lentiviral vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiya Watakabe

    Full Text Available We are interested in identifying and characterizing various projection neurons that constitute the neocortical circuit. For this purpose, we developed a novel lentiviral vector that carries the tetracycline transactivator (tTA and the transgene under the TET Responsive Element promoter (TRE on a single backbone. By pseudotyping such a vector with modified rabies G-protein, we were able to express palmitoylated-GFP (palGFP or turboFP635 (RFP in corticothalamic, corticocortical, and corticopontine neurons of mice. The high-level expression of the transgene achieved by the TET-Off system enabled us to observe characteristic elaboration of neuronal processes for each cell type. At higher magnification, we were able to observe fine structures such as boutons and spines as well. We also injected our retrograde TET-Off vector to the marmoset cortex and proved that it can be used to label the long-distance cortical connectivity of millimeter scale. In conclusion, our novel retrograde tracer provides an attractive option to investigate the morphologies of identified cortical projection neurons of various species.

  19. Epidemiologic studies of adverse effects of anti-retroviral drugs: how well is statistical power reported.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Scott D; Barton, Todd D; Gross, Robert; Hennessy, Sean; Berlin, Jesse A; Strom, Brian L

    2005-03-01

    To determine whether there is a difference in average statistical power between pharmacoepidemiologic studies of anti-retroviral adverse drug effects (ADEs) sponsored by for-profit versus non-profit organizations. We studied all published pharmacoepidemiologic studies of ADEs associated with the 15 anti-retroviral drugs approved through the end of 1999. A priori, the primary outcome was the power of each study to detect a clinically important difference in the risk for an adverse effect among patients exposed to the study drug(s). We could not evaluate this outcome because of the infrequent reporting of power calculations. We instead report the distribution of studies across a 5-tiered measure of adequacy of reporting of statistical power, as well as the sponsorship of these studies. Of 48 studies meeting our inclusion criteria, only 1 (2%) reported either a completed, a priori power calculation or sufficient details for readers to calculate the power to detect a pre-defined, clinically important effect. Thirty-five studies (73%) reported the minimum information required for sophisticated readers to determine the power to detect an event rate of interest to them; 6 additional studies (13%) reported confidence intervals around at least one summary effect measure and 6 (13%) provided no indication of power or uncertainty. Of the 41 studies for which sponsorship was determined, only 3 (7%) were sponsored by for-profit organizations. The poor reporting of statistical power in this sample suggests a need for guidelines to improve the reporting of pharmacoepidemiologic studies of ADEs. Future research is needed to determine whether the observed paucity of industry-sponsored observational studies of anti-retroviral ADEs extends to other clinical areas, and if so, to identify the causes of this phenomenon. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Dilshad Manzar

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART.

  1. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems during anti-retroviral therapy: an under-recognized problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, Md Dilshad; Sony, Peter; Salahuddin, Mohammed; Kumalo, Abera; Geneto, Mathewos; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Moscovitch, Adam; BaHammam, Ahmed S

    2017-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, and the anti-retroviral therapy (ART) associated complications necessitate that the medical care system keeps evolving for proper management of this group of patients. Electrolyte imbalance and sleep problems are common in patients on ART. Both of these conditions are associated with increased morbidity (such as acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, low CD4 count, non-adherence and depression) and mortality. Therefore, screening for both sleep problems and electrolytes imbalance may help to decrease the risk of complications in patients on ART.

  2. Modelling of anti-latency treatment in HIV; What is the optimal duration of anti-retroviral-free HIV remission?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cromer, Deborah; Pinkevych, Mykola; Rasmussen, Thomas A

    2017-01-01

    A number of treatment strategies are currently being developed to promote anti-retroviral free HIV cure or remission. While complete elimination of the HIV reservoir would prevent recurrence of infection, it is not clear how different remission lengths would affect viral rebound and transmission......-retroviral-free HIV remission to be targeted. We also investigate the trade-off between increasing the average duration of remission, versus the risk of treatment failure (viral recrudescence) and the need for re-treatment. To minimise drug exposure, we find that the optimal target of anti-latency interventions...... are targeted, there is a real probability of viral transmission occurring in between testing for viral rebound.Importance Current treatment of HIV involves patients taking anti-retroviral therapy to ensure that the level of virus remains at very low, or undetectable levels. Continuous therapy is required...

  3. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  4. Custodial vector model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becciolini, Diego; Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Foadi, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology of heavy vector resonances with a $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R$ spectral global symmetry. This symmetry partially protects the electroweak S-parameter from large contributions of the vector resonances. The resulting custodial vector model spectrum...

  5. Toll-like Receptor 7 Controls the Anti-Retroviral Germinal Center Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Edward P.

    2011-01-01

    The development of vaccines that can enhance immunity to viral pathogens is an important goal. However, the innate molecular pathways that regulate the strength and quality of the immune response remain largely uncharacterized. To define the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in control of a model retroviral pathogen, Friend virus (FV), I generated mice in which the TLR signaling adapter Myd88 was selectively deleted in dendritic cell (DC) or in B cell lineages. Deletion of Myd88 in DCs had little effect on immune control of FV, while B cell specific deletion of Myd88 caused a dramatic increase in viral infectious centers and a significantly reduced antibody response, indicating that B cell-intrinsic TLR signaling plays a crucial role, while TLR signaling in DCs is less important. I then identified the single-stranded RNA sensing protein TLR7 as being required for antibody-mediated control of FV by analyzing mice deficient in TLR7. Remarkably, B cells in infected TLR7-deficient mice upregulated CD69 and CD86 early in infection, but failed to develop into germinal center B cells. CD4 T cell responses were also attenuated in the absence of TLR7, but CD8 responses were TLR7 independent, suggesting the existence of additional pathways for detection of retroviral particles. Together these results demonstrate that the vertebrate immune system detects retroviruses in vivo via TLR7 and that this pathway regulates a key checkpoint controlling development of germinal center B cells. PMID:21998589

  6. The evolution of novel fungal genes from non-retroviral RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruenn Jeremy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endogenous derivatives of non-retroviral RNA viruses are thought to be absent or rare in eukaryotic genomes because integration of RNA viruses in host genomes is impossible without reverse transcription. However, such derivatives have been proposed for animals, plants and fungi, often based on surrogate bioinformatic evidence. At present, there is little known of the evolution and function of integrated non-retroviral RNA virus genes. Here, we provide direct evidence of integration by sequencing across host-virus gene boundaries and carry out phylogenetic analyses of fungal hosts and totivirids (dsRNA viruses of fungi and protozoans. Further, we examine functionality by tests of neutral evolution, comparison of residues that are necessary for viral capsid functioning and assays for transcripts, dsRNA and viral particles. Results Sequencing evidence from gene boundaries was consistent with integration. We detected previously unknown integrated Totivirus-like sequences in three fungi (Candida parapsilosis, Penicillium marneffei and Uromyces appendiculatus. The phylogenetic evidence strongly indicated that the direction of transfer was from Totivirus to fungus. However, there was evidence of transfer of Totivirus-like sequences among fungi. Tests of selection indicated that integrated genes are maintained by purifying selection. Transcripts were apparent for some gene copies, but, in most cases, the endogenous sequences lacked the residues necessary for normal viral functioning. Conclusions Our findings reveal that horizontal gene transfer can result in novel gene formation in eukaryotes despite miniaturized genomic targets and a need for co-option of reverse transcriptase.

  7. Evolution of endogenous non-retroviral genes integrated into plant genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyosub Chu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous comparative genome analyses have revealed the wide extent of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in living organisms, which contributes to their evolution and genetic diversity. Viruses play important roles in HGT. Endogenous viral elements (EVEs are defined as viral DNA sequences present within the genomes of non-viral organisms. In eukaryotic cells, the majority of EVEs are derived from RNA viruses using reverse transcription. In contrast, endogenous non-retroviral elements (ENREs are poorly studied. However, the increasing availability of genomic data and the rapid development of bioinformatics tools have enabled the identification of several ENREs in various eukaryotic organisms. To date, a small number of ENREs integrated into plant genomes have been identified. Of the known non-retroviruses, most identified ENREs are derived from double-strand (ds RNA viruses, followed by single-strand (ss DNA and ssRNA viruses. At least eight virus families have been identified. Of these, viruses in the family Partitiviridae are dominant, followed by viruses of the families Chrysoviridae and Geminiviridae. The identified ENREs have been primarily identified in eudicots, followed by monocots. In this review, we briefly discuss the current view on non-retroviral sequences integrated into plant genomes that are associated with plant-virus evolution and their possible roles in antiviral resistance.

  8. Retrovirus Integration Database (RID): a public database for retroviral insertion sites into host genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Wei; Shan, Jigui; Kearney, Mary F; Wu, Xiaolin; Maldarelli, Frank; Mellors, John W; Luke, Brian; Coffin, John M; Hughes, Stephen H

    2016-07-04

    The NCI Retrovirus Integration Database is a MySql-based relational database created for storing and retrieving comprehensive information about retroviral integration sites, primarily, but not exclusively, HIV-1. The database is accessible to the public for submission or extraction of data originating from experiments aimed at collecting information related to retroviral integration sites including: the site of integration into the host genome, the virus family and subtype, the origin of the sample, gene exons/introns associated with integration, and proviral orientation. Information about the references from which the data were collected is also stored in the database. Tools are built into the website that can be used to map the integration sites to UCSC genome browser, to plot the integration site patterns on a chromosome, and to display provirus LTRs in their inserted genome sequence. The website is robust, user friendly, and allows users to query the database and analyze the data dynamically. https://rid.ncifcrf.gov ; or http://home.ncifcrf.gov/hivdrp/resources.htm .

  9. Detection of retroviral super-infection from non-invasive samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeelia S Goffe

    Full Text Available While much attention has been focused on the molecular epidemiology of retroviruses in wild primate populations, the correlated question of the frequency and nature of super-infection events, i.e., the simultaneous infection of the same individual host with several strains of the same virus, has remained largely neglected. In particular, methods possibly allowing the investigation of super-infection from samples collected non-invasively (such as faeces have never been properly compared. Here, we fill in this gap by assessing the costs and benefits of end-point dilution PCR (EPD-PCR and multiple bulk-PCR cloning, as applied to a case study focusing on simian foamy virus super-infection in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes. We show that, although considered to be the gold standard, EPD-PCR can lead to massive consumption of biological material when only low copy numbers of the target are expected. This constitutes a serious drawback in a field in which rarity of biological material is a fundamental constraint. In addition, we demonstrate that EPD-PCR results (single/multiple infection; founder strains can be well predicted from multiple bulk-PCR clone experiments, by applying simple statistical and network analyses to sequence alignments. We therefore recommend the implementation of the latter method when the focus is put on retroviral super-infection and only low retroviral loads are encountered.

  10. High Expression of Endogenous Retroviral Envelope Gene in the Equine Fetal Part of the Placenta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Stefanetti

    Full Text Available Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs are proviral phases of exogenous retroviruses that have co-evolved with vertebrate genomes for millions of years. Previous studies have identified the envelope (env protein genes of retroviral origin preferentially expressed in the placenta which suggests a role in placentation based on their membrane fusogenic capacity and therefore they have been named syncytins. Until now, all the characterized syncytins have been associated with three invasive placentation types: the endotheliochorial (Carnivora, the synepitheliochorial (Ruminantia, and the hemochorial placentation (human, mouse where they play a role in the syncytiotrophoblast formation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate whether EqERV env RNA is expressed in horse tissues as well and investigate if the horse, possessing an epitheliochorial placenta, has "captured" a common retroviral env gene with syncytin-like properties in placental tissues. Interestingly, although in the equine placenta there is no syncytiotrophoblast layer at the maternal-fetal interface, our results showed that EqERV env RNA is highly expressed at that level, as expected for a candidate syncytin-like gene but with reduced abundance in the other somatic tissues (nearly 30-fold lower thus suggesting a possible role in the placental tissue. Although the horse is one of the few domestic animals with a sequenced genome, few studies have been conducted about the EqERV and their expression in placental tissue has never been investigated.

  11. Passive Immunotherapy for Retroviral Disease: Influence of Major Histocompatibility Complex Type and T-Cell Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Brooks, Diane M.; Chesebro, Bruce

    1995-11-01

    Administration of virus-specific antibodies is known to be an effective early treatment for some viral infections. Such immunotherapy probably acts by antibody-mediated neutralization of viral infectivity and is often thought to function independently of T-cell-mediated immune responses. In the present experiments, we studied passive antibody therapy using Friend murine leukemia virus complex as a model for an immunosuppressive retroviral disease in adult mice. The results showed that antibody therapy could induce recovery from a well-established retroviral infection. However, the success of therapy was dependent on the presence of both CD4^+ and CD8^+ T lymphocytes. Thus, cell-mediated responses were required for recovery from infection even in the presence of therapeutic levels of antibody. The major histocompatibility type of the mice was also an important factor determining the relative success of antibody therapy in this system, but it was less critical for low-dose than for high-dose infections. Our results imply that limited T-cell responsiveness as dictated by major histocompatibility genes and/or stage of disease may have contributed to previous immunotherapy failures in AIDS patients. Possible strategies to improve the efficacy of future therapies are discussed.

  12. Toll-like receptor 7 controls the anti-retroviral germinal center response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward P Browne

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of vaccines that can enhance immunity to viral pathogens is an important goal. However, the innate molecular pathways that regulate the strength and quality of the immune response remain largely uncharacterized. To define the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR signaling in control of a model retroviral pathogen, Friend virus (FV, I generated mice in which the TLR signaling adapter Myd88 was selectively deleted in dendritic cell (DC or in B cell lineages. Deletion of Myd88 in DCs had little effect on immune control of FV, while B cell specific deletion of Myd88 caused a dramatic increase in viral infectious centers and a significantly reduced antibody response, indicating that B cell-intrinsic TLR signaling plays a crucial role, while TLR signaling in DCs is less important. I then identified the single-stranded RNA sensing protein TLR7 as being required for antibody-mediated control of FV by analyzing mice deficient in TLR7. Remarkably, B cells in infected TLR7-deficient mice upregulated CD69 and CD86 early in infection, but failed to develop into germinal center B cells. CD4 T cell responses were also attenuated in the absence of TLR7, but CD8 responses were TLR7 independent, suggesting the existence of additional pathways for detection of retroviral particles. Together these results demonstrate that the vertebrate immune system detects retroviruses in vivo via TLR7 and that this pathway regulates a key checkpoint controlling development of germinal center B cells.

  13. Macro motion vector quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Y.; Woods, John W.

    1995-04-01

    A new algorithm is developed for reducing the bit rate required for motion vectors. This algorithm is a generalization of block matching motion estimation in which the search region is represented as a codebook of motion vectors. The new algorithm, called macro motion vector quantization (MMVQ), generalized our earlier MVQ by coding a group of motion vectors. The codebook is a set of macro motion vectors which represent the block locations of the small neighboring blocks in the previous frame. We develop an interative design algorithm for the codebook. Our experiments show that the variances of displaced frame differences (DFDs) are reduced significantly compared to block matching algorithm (BMA) with the macroblock size.

  14. Improving the ex vivo retroviral-mediated suicide-gene transfer process in T lymphocytes to preserve immune function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robinet, E; Fehse, B; Ebeling, S; Sauce, D; Ferrand, C; Tiberghien, P

    The retroviral-mediated transfer of a suicide gene into donor T cells has been proposed as a method to control alloreactivity after hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. Gene-modified cells (GMC) may be infused into the patient either at the time of transplantation, together with a T-cell

  15. Enhancers Are Major Targets for Murine Leukemia Virus Vector Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ravin, Suk See; Su, Ling; Theobald, Narda; Choi, Uimook; Macpherson, Janet L.; Poidinger, Michael; Symonds, Geoff; Pond, Susan M.; Ferris, Andrea L.; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Retroviral vectors have been used in successful gene therapies. However, in some patients, insertional mutagenesis led to leukemia or myelodysplasia. Both the strong promoter/enhancer elements in the long terminal repeats (LTRs) of murine leukemia virus (MLV)-based vectors and the vector-specific integration site preferences played an important role in these adverse clinical events. MLV integration is known to prefer regions in or near transcription start sites (TSS). Recently, BET family proteins were shown to be the major cellular proteins responsible for targeting MLV integration. Although MLV integration sites are significantly enriched at TSS, only a small fraction of the MLV integration sites (integration map of more than one million integration sites from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a clinically relevant MLV-based vector. The integration sites form ∼60,000 tight clusters. These clusters comprise ∼1.9% of the genome. The vast majority (87%) of the integration sites are located within histone H3K4me1 islands, a hallmark of enhancers. The majority of these clusters also have H3K27ac histone modifications, which mark active enhancers. The enhancers of some oncogenes, including LMO2, are highly preferred targets for integration without in vivo selection. IMPORTANCE We show that active enhancer regions are the major targets for MLV integration; this means that MLV preferentially integrates in regions that are favorable for viral gene expression in a variety of cell types. The results provide insights for MLV integration target site selection and also explain the high risk of insertional mutagenesis that is associated with gene therapy trials using MLV vectors. PMID:24501411

  16. Improved vaccine protection against retrovirus infection after co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding viral antigens and type I interferon subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groitl Peter

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type I interferons (IFNs exhibit direct antiviral effects, but also distinct immunomodulatory properties. In this study, we analyzed type I IFN subtypes for their effect on prophylactic adenovirus-based anti-retroviral vaccination of mice against Friend retrovirus (FV or HIV. Results Mice were vaccinated with adenoviral vectors encoding FV Env and Gag proteins alone or in combination with vectors encoding IFNα1, IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα5, IFNα6, IFNα9 or IFNβ. Only the co-administration of adenoviral vectors encoding IFNα2, IFNα4, IFNα6 and IFNα9 resulted in strongly improved immune protection of vaccinated mice from subsequent FV challenge infection with high control over FV-induced splenomegaly and reduced viral loads. The level of protection correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell responses and enhanced antibody titers. Similar results were obtained when mice were vaccinated against HIV with adenoviral vectors encoding HIV Env and Gag-Pol in combination with various type I IFN encoding vectors. Here mainly CD4+ T cell responses were enhanced by IFNα subtypes. Conclusions Our results indicate that certain IFNα subtypes have the potential to improve the protective effect of adenovirus-based vaccines against retroviruses. This correlated with augmented virus-specific CD4+ T cell and antibody responses. Thus, co-expression of select type I IFNs may be a valuable tool for the development of anti-retroviral vaccines.

  17. Implicit Real Vector Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Degbomont

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the symbolic representation of non-convex real polyhedra, i.e., sets of real vectors satisfying arbitrary Boolean combinations of linear constraints. We develop an original data structure for representing such sets, based on an implicit and concise encoding of a known structure, the Real Vector Automaton. The resulting formalism provides a canonical representation of polyhedra, is closed under Boolean operators, and admits an efficient decision procedure for testing the membership of a vector.

  18. An audit on virological efficacy of anti-retroviral therapy in a specialist infectious disease clinic.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reyad, A

    2009-06-01

    We have assessed the efficacy of anti retroviral therapy (ART) using undetectable viral load (VL) (<50 RNA copies\\/ml) as a marker of virological success, in patients who have Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) attending the Department of Infectious Disease. A cross-sectional review of patients\\' case notes was used to obtain their demographics and treatment details. 79% (253) of the hospital case notes of clinic population was available for analysis, which represents 90% of those receiving ART in the clinic. 166\\/253 of the cohort were receiving treatment at the time of this study and 95% (157\\/166) of these were on treatment for greater than 6 months. The total virological success rate is 93%, which is comparable to other centres and are as good as those from published clinical trials. 56% of those on therapy who have virological failure were Intravenous Drug Users (IVDUs). Case by case investigation for those with treatment failure is warranted.

  19. CD4 expression on EL4 cells as an epiphenomenon of retroviral transduction and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Grant J; Spinoulas, Afroditi; Alexander, Stephen I; Smythe, Jason A; Alexander, Ian E

    2004-04-01

    The EL4 murine tumour cell line, isolated from a chemically induced lymphoma over 50 years ago, has been extensively exploited in immunological research. The conclusions drawn from many of these studies have been based on the presumption that EL4 cells maintain a stable phenotype during experimental manipulation. To the contrary, we have observed 100-fold greater expression of cell surface CD4 (CD4(high)) on a subpopulation of EL4 cells following retroviral transduction and G418 selection when compared with unmodified populations. Although the mechanism responsible for this effect remains to be elucidated, the unexpected expression of CD4, a molecule that functions as both a coreceptor with the T-cell receptor and ligand for the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-16, has the potential to influence experimental outcomes. Upregulation of CD4 should be excluded when EL4 cells are utilized in experiments requiring a consistent immuno-phenotype.

  20. Cell cultures and retroviral particles from a tumor of a moray eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, C; Walsh, C; Davis, R; Toumadje, A; Kusamoto, K; Helmrich, A; Chapline, C; Mericko, P; Barnes, D

    2001-06-01

    Until recently, fish cell culture primarily has been useful only in the propagation and study of epidemic viruses significant to the fishing industry. Such fish cell lines derived were developed by appropriating classical techniques of mammalian cell culture, with serum as the major growth supplement. Using an approach in which culture medium is formulated in a cell-type-specific manner with minimal serum and a variety of synergistic supplements, several fish cell lines have been derived that may serve multiple uses. We established cell lines from a potentially tumorous skin lesion of a green moray eel (Gymnothorax funebris) and control tissues, and identified putative retroviral particles in the medium from the tumor cells that are not present in medium from cultures of normal cells from the same eel. The relationship between the virus and the cause of the tumor is not clear, but the genomic structure of this virus should provide useful information in understanding the evolution of retroviruses in general.

  1. Apoptosis Gene Hunting Using Retroviral Expression Cloning: Identification of Vacuolar ATPase Subunit E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L. Anderson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 10-15 years there has been an explosion of interest in apoptosis. The delayed realisation that cell death is an essential part of life for any multicellular organism has meant that, despite the recent and rapid developments of the last decade, the precise biochemical pathways involved in apoptosis remain incomplete and potentially novel genes may, as yet, remain undiscovered. The hunt is therefore on to bridge the remaining gaps in our knowledge. Our contribution to this research effort utilises a functional cloning approach to isolate important regulatory genes involved in apoptosis. This mini-review focuses on the use and advantages of a retroviral expression cloning strategy and describes the isolation and identification of one such potential apoptosis regulatory gene, namely that encoding vacuolar ATPase subunit E.

  2. Phosphorylation-Dependent Activation of the ESCRT Function of ALIX in Cytokinetic Abscission and Retroviral Budding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Sheng; Sun, Le; Zhou, Xi; Wu, Chuanfen; Wang, Ruoning; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2016-02-08

    The modular adaptor protein ALIX is a key player in multiple ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling processes. ALIX is normally present in a closed conformation due to an intramolecular interaction that renders ALIX unable to perform its ESCRT functions. Here we demonstrate that M phase-specific phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site within the proline-rich domain (PRD) of ALIX transforms cytosolic ALIX from closed to open conformation. Defining the role of this mechanism of ALIX regulation in three classical ESCRT-mediated processes revealed that phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site in the PRD is required for ALIX to function in cytokinetic abscission and retroviral budding, but not in multivesicular body sorting of activated epidermal growth factor receptor. Thus, phosphorylation of the intramolecular interaction site in the PRD is one of the major mechanisms that activates the ESCRT function of ALIX. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Boosting of HIV-1 neutralizing antibody responses by a distally related retroviral envelope protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Schiffner, Torben; Bowles, Emma

    2014-01-01

    glycoprotein (Env). In this article, we report an immunization strategy composed of a trivalent HIV-1 (clade B envs) DNA prime, followed by a SIVmac239 gp140 Env protein boost that aimed to focus the immune response to structurally conserved parts of the HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Envs....... Heterologous NAb titers, primarily to tier 1 HIV-1 isolates, elicited during the trivalent HIV-1 env prime, were significantly increased by the SIVmac239 gp140 protein boost in rabbits. Epitope mapping of Ab-binding reactivity revealed preferential recognition of the C1, C2, V2, V3, and V5 regions....... These results provide a proof of concept that a distally related retroviral SIV Env protein boost can increase pre-existing NAb responses against HIV-1....

  4. Involvement of human endogenous retroviral syncytin-1 in human osteoclast fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Kent; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Hobolt-Pedersen, Anne-Sofie

    2011-01-01

    Generation of osteoclasts through fusion of mono-nucleated precursors is a key event of bone physiology and bone resorption is inefficient without osteoclast fusion. Several factors playing a critical role in the fusion process have already been recognized, but the factors involved in the actual...... fusion of the lipid bilayers of their cell membranes are still unknown. Syncytin-1 is a protein encoded by a human endogenous retroviral gene which was stably integrated into the human ancestor genome more than 24 million years ago. Upon activation, syncytin-1 is able to destabilize the lipid bilayer....... This was documented through Q-PCR, Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. These in vitro findings were confirmed by immunohistochemical stainings in human iliac crest biopsies. A syncytin-1 inhibitory peptide reduced the number of nuclei per osteoclast by 30%, as well as TRACP activity. From a mechanistic...

  5. Multiple sulfatase deficiency: catalytically inactive sulfatases are expressed from retrovirally introduced sulfatase cDNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommerskirch, W; von Figura, K

    1992-04-01

    Multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease characterized by the deficiency of at least seven sulfatases. The basic defect in MSD is thought to be in a post-translational modification common to all sulfatases. In accordance with this concept, RNAs of normal size and amount were detected in MSD fibroblasts for three sulfatases tested. cDNAs encoding arylsulfatase A, arylsulfatase B, or steroid sulfatase were introduced into MSD fibroblasts and fibroblasts with a single sulfatase deficiency by retroviral gene transfer. Infected fibroblasts overexpressed the respective sulfatase polypeptides. While in single-sulfatase-deficiency fibroblasts a concomitant increase of sulfatase activities was observed, MSD fibroblasts expressed sulfatase polypeptides with a severely diminished catalytic activity. From these results we conclude that the mutation in MSD severely decreases the capacity of a co- or post-translational process that renders sulfatases enzymatically active or prevents their premature inactivation.

  6. Vector Integration Sites Identification for Gene-Trap Screening in Mammalian Haploid Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jian; Ciaudo, Constance

    2017-03-17

    Forward genetic screens using retroviral (or transposon) gene-trap vectors in a haploid genome revolutionized the investigation of molecular networks in mammals. However, the sequencing data generated by Phenotypic interrogation followed by Tag sequencing (PhiT-seq) were not well characterized. The analysis of human and mouse haploid screens allowed us to describe PhiT-seq data and to define quality control steps. Moreover, we identified several blind spots in both haploid genomes where gene-trap vectors can hardly integrate. Integration of transcriptomic data improved the performance of candidate gene identification. Furthermore, we experimented with various statistical tests to account for biological replicates in PhiT-seq and investigated the effect of normalization methods and other parameters on the performance. Finally, we developed: VISITs, a dedicated pipeline for analyzing PhiT-seq data (https://sourceforge.net/projects/visits/).

  7. Vectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pettofrezzo, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate students, this text illustrates the use of vectors as a mathematical tool in plane synthetic geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, and analytic geometry of two- and three-dimensional space. Its rigorous development includes a complete treatment of the algebra of vectors in the first two chapters.Among the text's outstanding features are numbered definitions and theorems in the development of vector algebra, which appear in italics for easy reference. Most of the theorems include proofs, and coordinate position vectors receive an in-depth treatment. Key concept

  8. Size distribution of retrovirally marked lineages matches prediction from population measurements of cell cycle behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li; Hayes, Nancy L.; Takahashi, Takao; Caviness, Verne S Jr; Nowakowski, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    Mechanisms that regulate neuron production in the developing mouse neocortex were examined by using a retroviral lineage marking method to determine the sizes of the lineages remaining in the proliferating population of the ventricular zone during the period of neuron production. The distribution of clade sizes obtained experimentally in four different injection-survival paradigms (E11-E13, E11-E14, E11-E15, and E12-E15) from a total of over 500 labeled lineages was compared with that obtained from three models in which the average behavior of the proliferating population [i.e., the proportion of cells remaining in the proliferative population (P) vs. that exiting the proliferative population (Q)] was quantitatively related to lineage size distribution. In model 1, different proportions of asymmetric, symmetric terminal, and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions coexisted during the entire developmental period. In model 2, the developmental period was divided into two epochs: During the first, asymmetric and symmetric nonterminal cell divisions occurred, but, during the second, asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions occurred. In model 3, the shifts in P and Q are accounted for by changes in the proportions of the two types of symmetric cell divisions without the inclusion of any asymmetric cell divisions. The results obtained from the retroviral experiments were well accounted for by model 1 but not by model 2 or 3. These findings demonstrate that: 1) asymmetric and both types of symmetric cell divisions coexist during the entire period of neurogenesis in the mouse, 2) neuron production is regulated in the proliferative population by the independent decisions of the two daughter cells to reenter S phase, and 3) neurons are produced by both asymmetric and symmetric terminal cell divisions. In addition, the findings mean that cell death and/or tangential movements of cells in the proliferative population occur at only a low rate and that there are no

  9. Foxp3 represses retroviral transcription by targeting both NF-kappaB and CREB pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Forkhead box (Fox/winged-helix transcription factors regulate multiple aspects of immune responsiveness and Foxp3 is recognized as an essential functional marker of regulatory T cells. Herein we describe downstream signaling pathways targeted by Foxp3 that may negatively impact retroviral pathogenesis. Overexpression of Foxp3 in HEK 293T and purified CD4+ T cells resulted in a dose-dependent and time-dependent decrease in basal levels of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB activation. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal forkhead (FKH domain, critical for nuclear localization and DNA-binding activity, abrogated the ability of Foxp3 to suppress NF-kappaB activity in HEK 293T cells, but not in Jurkat or primary human CD4+ T cells. We further demonstrate that Foxp3 suppressed the transcription of two human retroviral promoters (HIV-1 and human T cell lymphotropic virus type I [HTLV-I] utilizing NF-kappaB-dependent and NF-kappaB-independent mechanisms. Examination of the latter identified the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB pathway as a target of Foxp3. Finally, comparison of the percent Foxp3+CD4+CD25+ T cells to the HTLV-I proviral load in HTLV-I-infected asymptomatic carriers and patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis suggested that high Foxp3 expression is associated with low proviral load and absence of disease. These results suggest an expanded role for Foxp3 in regulating NF-kappaB- and CREB-dependent cellular and viral gene expression.

  10. Measles virus glycoprotein-based lentiviral targeting vectors that avoid neutralizing antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Kneissl

    Full Text Available Lentiviral vectors (LVs are potent gene transfer vehicles frequently applied in research and recently also in clinical trials. Retargeting LV entry to cell types of interest is a key issue to improve gene transfer safety and efficacy. Recently, we have developed a targeting method for LVs by incorporating engineered measles virus (MV glycoproteins, the hemagglutinin (H, responsible for receptor recognition, and the fusion protein into their envelope. The H protein displays a single-chain antibody (scFv specific for the target receptor and is ablated for recognition of the MV receptors CD46 and SLAM by point mutations in its ectodomain. A potential hindrance to systemic administration in humans is pre-existing MV-specific immunity due to vaccination or natural infection. We compared transduction of targeting vectors and non-targeting vectors pseudotyped with MV glycoproteins unmodified in their ectodomains (MV-LV in presence of α-MV antibody-positive human plasma. At plasma dilution 1:160 MV-LV was almost completely neutralized, whereas targeting vectors showed relative transduction efficiencies from 60% to 90%. Furthermore, at plasma dilution 1:80 an at least 4-times higher multiplicity of infection (MOI of MV-LV had to be applied to obtain similar transduction efficiencies as with targeting vectors. Also when the vectors were normalized to their p24 values, targeting vectors showed partial protection against α-MV antibodies in human plasma. Furthermore, the monoclonal neutralizing antibody K71 with a putative epitope close to the receptor binding sites of H, did not neutralize the targeting vectors, but did neutralize MV-LV. The observed escape from neutralization may be due to the point mutations in the H ectodomain that might have destroyed antibody binding sites. Furthermore, scFv mediated cell entry via the target receptor may proceed in presence of α-MV antibodies interfering with entry via the natural MV receptors. These results are

  11. Vector mesons in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One consequence of the chiral restoration is the mixing of parity partners. We look for a possible signature of the mixing of vector and axial vector mesons in heavy-ion collisions. We suggest an experimental method for its observation. The dynamical evolution of the heavy-ion collision is described by a transport equation of ...

  12. Vector mesons in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    kfki.hu. Abstract. One consequence of the chiral restoration is the mixing of parity partners. We look for a possible signature of the mixing of vector and axial vector mesons in heavy- ion collisions. We suggest an experimental method for its ...

  13. Manifestações otoneurológicas associadas à terapia anti-retroviral Otoneurological manifestations associated with antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrêza Batista Cheloni Vieira

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Ototoxicidade e terapia anti-retroviral parecem estar associadas. O objetivo desse estudo foi avaliar essa possível correlação. Foram avaliados 779 prontuários médicos de pacientes infectados pelo HIV e regularmente acompanhados, sendo 162 tratados com terapia anti-retroviral e 122 não tratados (controle. Pacientes em tratamento eram mais velhos (média 42 anos, com maior tempo de confirmação sorológica (80 meses e com menor carga viral (p=0,00. CD4+ foi semelhante entre os grupos (P=0,60. No grupo tratado, três (1,8% casos de perda auditiva idiopática e dois (1,3% de perda auditiva relacionada a otosclerose foram observadas e ambas iniciadas após terapia anti-retroviral. Nenhuma diferença estatística relacionada à perda auditiva idiopática foi encontrada entre os grupos. Enquanto estudos descritivos consideram possível ototoxidade associada à terapia anti-retroviral, esse possível efeito adverso não foi relacionado à terapia anti-retroviral neste estudo. Contrariamente, otosclerose poderia estar correlacionada à terapia anti-retroviral. Este assunto merece ser estudado.Ototoxicity and antiretroviral therapy seem to be associated. The aim of this study was to evaluate this possible correlation. Evaluations were carried out on 779 medical records from HIV-infected patients who were being regularly followed up, of whom 162 were being treated with antiretroviral therapy and 122 were untreated (controls. The patients undergoing treatment were older (mean: 42 years, had had serological confirmation for longer times (80 months and had smaller viral loads (P = 0.00. CD4+ was similar between the groups (P = 0.60. In the treated group, three cases (1.8% of idiopathic hearing loss and two (1.3% of otosclerosis-related hearing loss were observed, which both started after antiretroviral therapy. No statistical difference relating to idiopathic hearing loss was found between the groups. While descriptive studies consider possible

  14. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...... or meromorphic (allowing poles as singularities) functions. There already exists a well-developed theory for iterative holomorphic dynamical systems, and successful relations found between iteration theory and flows of vector fields have been one of the main motivations for the recent interest in holomorphic...... vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...

  15. MECP2 isoform-specific vectors with regulated expression for Rett syndrome gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgan Rastegar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rett Syndrome (RTT is an Autism Spectrum Disorder and the leading cause of mental retardation in females. RTT is caused by mutations in the Methyl CpG-Binding Protein-2 (MECP2 gene and has no treatment. Our objective is to develop viral vectors for MECP2 gene transfer into Neural Stem Cells (NSC and neurons suitable for gene therapy of Rett Syndrome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We generated self-inactivating (SIN retroviral vectors with the ubiquitous EF1alpha promoter avoiding known silencer elements to escape stem-cell-specific viral silencing. High efficiency NSC infection resulted in long-term EGFP expression in transduced NSC and after differentiation into neurons. Infection with Myc-tagged MECP2-isoform-specific (E1 and E2 vectors directed MeCP2 to heterochromatin of transduced NSC and neurons. In contrast, vectors with an internal mouse Mecp2 promoter (MeP directed restricted expression only in neurons and glia and not NSC, recapitulating the endogenous expression pattern required to avoid detrimental consequences of MECP2 ectopic expression. In differentiated NSC from adult heterozygous Mecp2(tm1.1Bird+/- female mice, 48% of neurons expressed endogenous MeCP2 due to random inactivation of the X-linked Mecp2 gene. Retroviral MECP2 transduction with EF1alpha and MeP vectors rescued expression in 95-100% of neurons resulting in increased dendrite branching function in vitro. Insulated MECP2 isoform-specific lentiviral vectors show long-term expression in NSC and their differentiated neuronal progeny, and directly infect dissociated murine cortical neurons with high efficiency. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: MeP vectors recapitulate the endogenous expression pattern of MeCP2 in neurons and glia. They have utility to study MeCP2 isoform-specific functions in vitro, and are effective gene therapy vectors for rescuing dendritic maturation of neurons in an ex vivo model of RTT.

  16. Synergic Investigation Of The Self-Assembly Structure And Mechanism Of Retroviral Capsid Proteins By Solid State NMR, Transmission Electron Microscopy And Multiscale simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0074 Synergic investigation of the self-assembly structure and mechanism of retroviral capsid proteins by solid state NMR...assembly structure and mechanism of retroviral capsid proteins by solid state NMR, transmission electron microscopy and multiscale simulation 5a.  CONTRACT...capsid protein (CA). In vitro, tubular assembly can be obtained with the CA with similar underlying structural properties as the authentic RSV capsid

  17. Vector production in an academic environment: a tool to assess production costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeke, Aaron; Doumas, Patrick; Reeves, Lilith; McClurg, Kyle; Bischof, Daniela; Sego, Lina; Auberry, Alisha; Tatikonda, Mohan; Cornetta, Kenneth

    2013-02-01

    Generating gene and cell therapy products under good manufacturing practices is a complex process. When determining the cost of these products, researchers must consider the large number of supplies used for manufacturing and the personnel and facility costs to generate vector and maintain a cleanroom facility. To facilitate cost estimates, the Indiana University Vector Production Facility teamed with the Indiana University Kelley School of Business to develop a costing tool that, in turn, provides pricing. The tool is designed in Microsoft Excel and is customizable to meet the needs of other core facilities. It is available from the National Gene Vector Biorepository. The tool allows cost determinations using three different costing methods and was developed in an effort to meet the A21 circular requirements for U.S. core facilities performing work for federally funded projects. The costing tool analysis reveals that the cost of vector production does not have a linear relationship with batch size. For example, increasing the production from 9 to18 liters of a retroviral vector product increases total costs a modest 1.2-fold rather than doubling in total cost. The analysis discussed in this article will help core facilities and investigators plan a cost-effective strategy for gene and cell therapy production.

  18. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aparajita; Ratner, Daniel M.; Ryan, Christopher M.; Johnson, Patricia J.; O’Keefe, Barry R.; Secor, W. Evan; Anderson, Deborah J.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Samuelson, John

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans), like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL) that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin) and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas. PMID:26252012

  19. Anti-Retroviral Lectins Have Modest Effects on Adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis to Epithelial Cells In Vitro and on Recovery of Tritrichomonas foetus in a Mouse Vaginal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Chatterjee

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis causes vaginitis and increases the risk of HIV transmission by heterosexual sex, while Tritrichomonas foetus causes premature abortion in cattle. Our goals were to determine the effects, if any, of anti-retroviral lectins, which are designed to prevent heterosexual transmission of HIV, on adherence of Trichomonas to ectocervical cells and on Tritrichomonas infections in a mouse model. We show that Trichomonas Asn-linked glycans (N-glycans, like those of HIV, bind the mannose-binding lectin (MBL that is part of the innate immune system. N-glycans of Trichomonas and Tritrichomonas bind anti-retroviral lectins (cyanovirin-N and griffithsin and the 2G12 monoclonal antibody, each of which binds HIV N-glycans. Binding of cyanovirin-N appears to be independent of susceptibility to metronidazole, the major drug used to treat Trichomonas. Anti-retroviral lectins, MBL, and galectin-1 cause Trichomonas to self-aggregate and precipitate. The anti-retroviral lectins also increase adherence of ricin-resistant mutants, which are less adherent than parent cells, to ectocervical cell monolayers and to organotypic EpiVaginal tissue cells. Topical application of either anti-retroviral lectins or yeast N-glycans decreases by 40 to 70% the recovery of Tritrichomonas from the mouse vagina. These results, which are explained by a few simple models, suggest that the anti-retroviral lectins have a modest potential for preventing or treating human infections with Trichomonas.

  20. Establishment of an immortalized human extravillous trophoblast cell line by retroviral infection of E6/E7/hTERT and its transcriptional profile during hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Hiroko; Okamoto, Aikou; Nikaido, Takashi; Urashima, Mitsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Rie; Umehara, Nagayoshi; Sugiura, Kentaro; Saito, Misato; Kiyono, Tohru; Tanaka, Tadao

    2009-02-01

    Investigation into the function of human trophoblasts has been largely restricted by a lack of suitable cell models. We aimed to produce normal human trophoblast cell lines with a long lifespan and to provide an ideal in vitro cell model. Primary human trophoblast cells were derived from a placenta that had undergone elective abortion at the 7th week of gestation. The cells were immortalized by infection with retroviral expression vectors containing the type 16 human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 in combination with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). Characterization of the cell line was performed by immunocytochemistry using a panel of antibodies, Western blotting, real-time RT-PCR, an invasion assay, gelatin zymography, karyotype analysis and a nude mouse assay. Gene expression profiles under hypoxia (1% O2, 1 h) and subsequent reoxygenation (20% O2, 6 h) were analyzed using cDNA microarray. Immunocytochemistry revealed an extravillous trophoblastic phenotype by positive staining for hCGbeta, cytokeratin 7, HLA-G and CD9. A transwell insert invasion assay showed the invasiveness of this cell line and gelatin zymography detected the secretion of MMP-2 and MMP-9. Karyotype analysis exhibited an almost normal chromosomal number which ranged from 46 to 48 and the cells showed no tumorigenecity in a nude mouse assay. Forty-three genes showing reversible up- or down-regulation during hypoxia were detected using an oligonucleotide array. This newly immortalized cell line, HChEpC1b, is a useful model for the study of extravillous trophoblast function.

  1. Vector SIMP dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Lee, Hyun Min; Mambrini, Yann; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierre, Mathias

    2017-10-01

    Strongly Interacting Massive Particles (SIMPs) have recently been proposed as light thermal dark matter relics. Here we consider an explicit realization of the SIMP mechanism in the form of vector SIMPs arising from an SU(2) X hidden gauge theory, where the accidental custodial symmetry protects the stability of the dark matter. We propose several ways of equilibrating the dark and visible sectors in this setup. In particular, we show that a light dark Higgs portal can maintain thermal equilibrium between the two sectors, as can a massive dark vector portal with its generalized Chern-Simons couplings to the vector SIMPs, all while remaining consistent with experimental constraints.

  2. Vector Difference Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalm, W. A.; Schwalm, M. K.; Giona, M.

    1998-03-01

    Space is filled with triangulating graph \\calG to serve as a quadrature grid. A discrete analog of the theory of differential forms is constructed using the associated simplical complex. The role of a basis for Λ^p at a point is played by the set of (p+1) -simplices containing a given vertex. Vector difference operations analogous to div, grad and curl, together with corresponding vector identities and exact difference analogs of the Stokes-type theorems, are obtained in terms of the boundary partial and coboundary d. Difference versions of the full vector Maxwell electromagnetic equations are analyzed on a random structure.

  3. Quantitative analysis of recombination between YFP and CFP genes of FRET biosensors introduced by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsubara, Akira T; Matsuda, Michiyuki; Aoki, Kazuhiro

    2015-08-20

    Biosensors based on the principle of Förster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed to visualize spatio-temporal dynamics of signalling molecules in living cells. Many of them adopt a backbone of intramolecular FRET biosensor with a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) as donor and acceptor, respectively. However, there remains the difficulty of establishing cells stably expressing FRET biosensors with a YFP and CFP pair by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, due to the high incidence of recombination between YFP and CFP genes. To address this, we examined the effects of codon-diversification of YFP on the recombination of FRET biosensors introduced by lentivirus or retrovirus. The YFP gene that was fully codon-optimized to E.coli evaded the recombination in lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer, but the partially codon-diversified YFP did not. Further, the length of spacer between YFP and CFP genes clearly affected recombination efficiency, suggesting that the intramolecular template switching occurred in the reverse-transcription process. The simple mathematical model reproduced the experimental data sufficiently, yielding a recombination rate of 0.002-0.005 per base. Together, these results show that the codon-diversified YFP is a useful tool for expressing FRET biosensors by lentiviral or retroviral gene transfer.

  4. Dose of Retroviral Infection Determines Induction of Antiviral NK Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littwitz-Salomon, Elisabeth; Schimmer, Simone; Dittmer, Ulf

    2017-11-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells are part of the innate immune system and recognize virus-infected cells as well as tumor cells. Conflicting data about the beneficial or even detrimental role of NK cells in different infectious diseases have been described previously. While the type of pathogen strongly influences NK cell functionality, less is known about how the infection dose influences the quality of a NK cell response against retroviruses. In this study, we used the well-established Friend retrovirus (FV) mouse model to investigate the impact of virus dose on the induction of antiviral NK cell functions. High-dose virus inoculation increased initial virus replication compared to that with medium- or low-dose viral challenge and significantly improved NK cell activation. Antiviral NK cell activity, including in vivo cytotoxicity toward infected target cells, was also enhanced by high-dose virus infection. NK cell activation following high-dose viral challenge was likely mediated by activated dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages and the NK cell-stimulating cytokines interleukin 15 (IL-15) and IL-18. Neutralization of these cytokines decreased NK cell functions and increased viral loads, whereas IL-15 and IL-18 therapy improved NK cell activity. Here we demonstrate that virus dose positively correlates with antiviral NK cell activity and function, which are at least partly driven by IL-15 and IL-18. Our results suggest that NK cell activity may be therapeutically enhanced by administering IL-15 and IL-18 in virus infections that inadequately activate NK cells.IMPORTANCE In infections with retroviruses, like HIV and FV infection of mice, NK cells clearly mediate antiviral activities, but they are usually not sufficient to prevent severe pathology. Here we show that the initial infection dose impacts the induction of an antiviral NK cell response during an acute retroviral infection, which had not investigated before. High-dose infection resulted in a strong NK cell

  5. Correction of Murine Diabetic Hyperglycaemia With A Single Systemic Administration of An AAV2/8 Vector Containing A Novel Codon Optimized Human Insulin Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Shu Uin; Notaridou, Maria; Fu, Zhen Ying; Lee, Kok Onn; Sia, Kian Chuan; Nathwani, Amit Chunilal; Della Peruta, Marco; Calne, Roy Yorke

    2016-01-01

    We report the correction of hyperglycemia of STZ induced diabetic mice using one intravenous systemic administration of a single stranded serotype 8 pseudotyped adeno-associated virus (ssAAV2/8) vector encoding the human proinsulin gene under a constitutive liver specific promoter. In vivo dose titration experiments were carried out and we identified an optimal range that achieved maintenance of euglycaemia or a mild diabetic condition for at least 9 months and ongoing to beyond 1 year for some animals, accompanied by human C-peptide secretion and weight gain. Further DNA codon optimization of the insulin gene construct resulted in approximately 3-10 times more human C-peptide secreted in the blood of codon optimized treated animals thereby reducing the number of vector particles required to achieve the same extent of reduction in blood glucose levels as the non-codon optimized vector. The constitutive secretion of insulin achieved with a single administration of the vector could be of therapeutic value for some diabetic patients.

  6. GAP Land Cover - Vector

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This vector dataset is a detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of combined two-season pairs of...

  7. Tagged Vector Contour (TVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Tagged Vector Contour (TVC) dataset consists of digitized contours from the 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps. Coverage for the state is incomplete....

  8. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  9. Vector and axial vector mesons at finite temperature

    OpenAIRE

    mallik, S.; Sarkar, Sourav

    2002-01-01

    We consider the thermal correlation functions of vector and axial-vector currents and evaluate corrections to the vector and axial-vector meson pole terms to one loop in chiral perturbation theory. As expected, the pole positions do not shift to leading order in temperature. But the residues decrease with temperature.

  10. Single molecule DNA interaction kinetics of retroviral nucleic acid chaperone proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are essential for several viral replication processes including specific genomic RNA packaging and reverse transcription. The nucleic acid chaperone activity of NC facilitates the latter process. In this study, we use single molecule biophysical methods to quantify the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) NC and Gag and human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) NC. We find that the nucleic acid interaction properties of these proteins differ significantly, with HIV-1 NC showing rapid protein binding kinetics, significant duplex destabilization, and strong DNA aggregation, all properties that are critical components of nucleic acid chaperone activity. In contrast, HTLV-1 NC exhibits significant destabilization activity but extremely slow DNA interaction kinetics and poor aggregating capability, which explains why HTLV-1 NC is a poor nucleic acid chaperone. To understand these results, we developed a new single molecule method for quantifying protein dissociation kinetics, and applied this method to probe the DNA interactions of wild type and mutant HIV-1 and HTLV-1 NC. We find that mutations to aromatic and charged residues strongly alter the proteins' nucleic acid interaction kinetics. Finally, in contrast to HIV-1 NC, HIV-1 Gag, the nucleic acid packaging protein that contains NC as a domain, exhibits relatively slow binding kinetics, which may negatively impact its ability to act as a nucleic acid chaperone.

  11. Interferon-alpha subtype 11 activates NK cells and enables control of retroviral infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin Gibbert

    Full Text Available The innate immune response mediated by cells such as natural killer (NK cells is critical for the rapid containment of virus replication and spread during acute infection. Here, we show that subtype 11 of the type I interferon (IFN family greatly potentiates the antiviral activity of NK cells during retroviral infection. Treatment of mice with IFN-α11 during Friend retrovirus infection (FV significantly reduced viral loads and resulted in long-term protection from virus-induced leukemia. The effect of IFN-α11 on NK cells was direct and signaled through the type I IFN receptor. Furthermore, IFN-α11-mediated activation of NK cells enabled cytolytic killing of FV-infected target cells via the exocytosis pathway. Depletion and adoptive transfer experiments illustrated that NK cells played a major role in successful IFN-α11 therapy. Additional experiments with Mouse Cytomegalovirus infections demonstrated that the therapeutic effect of IFN-α11 is not restricted to retroviruses. The type I IFN subtypes 2 and 5, which bind the same receptor as IFN-α11, did not elicit similar antiviral effects. These results demonstrate a unique and subtype-specific activation of NK cells by IFN-α11.

  12. Maturation of the Gag core decreases the stability of retroviral lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Candice; Payne, Riley J; Willis, Sharon H; Doranz, Benjamin J; Rucker, Joseph B

    2012-11-25

    To better understand how detergents disrupt enveloped viruses, we monitored the biophysical stability of murine leukemia virus (MLV) virus-like particles (VLPs) against a panel of commonly used detergents using real-time biosensor measurements. Although exposure to many detergents, such as Triton X-100 and Empigen, results in lysis of VLP membranes, VLPs appeared resistant to complete membrane lysis by a significant number of detergents, including Tween 20, Tween 80, Lubrol, and Saponin. VLPs maintained their structural integrity after exposure to Tween 20 at concentrations up to 500-fold above its CMC. Remarkably, VLPs containing immature cores composed of unprocessed (uncleaved) Gag polyprotein were significantly more resistant to detergent lysis than VLPs with mature cores. Although the maturity of retroviral Gag is known to influence the stability of the protein core structure itself, our studies suggest that the maturity of the Gag core also influences the stability of the lipid bilayer surrounding the core. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Structural and Functional Comparisons of Retroviral Envelope Protein C-Terminal Domains: Still Much to Learn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D. Steckbeck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses are a family of viruses that cause a broad range of pathologies in animals and humans, from the apparently harmless, long-term genomic insertion of endogenous retroviruses, to tumors induced by the oncogenic retroviruses and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS resulting from human immunodeficiency virus infection. Disease can be the result of diverse mechanisms, including tumorigenesis induced by viral oncogenes or immune destruction, leading to the gradual loss of CD4 T-cells. Of the virally encoded proteins common to all retroviruses, the envelope (Env displays perhaps the most diverse functionality. Env is primarily responsible for binding the cellular receptor and for effecting the fusion process, with these functions mediated by protein domains localized to the exterior of the virus. The remaining C-terminal domain may have the most variable functionality of all retroviral proteins. The C-terminal domains from three prototypical retroviruses are discussed, focusing on the different structures and functions, which include fusion activation, tumorigenesis and viral assembly and lifecycle influences. Despite these genetic and functional differences, however, the C-terminal domains of these viruses share a common feature in the modulation of Env ectodomain conformation. Despite their differences, perhaps each system still has information to share with the others.

  14. Economic evaluation of task-shifting approaches to the dispensing of anti-retroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster Nicola

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A scarcity of human resources for health has been identified as one of the primary constraints to the scale-up of the provision of Anti-Retroviral Treatment (ART. In South Africa there is a particularly severe lack of pharmacists. The study aims to compare two task-shifting approaches to the dispensing of ART: Indirectly Supervised Pharmacist’s Assistants (ISPA and Nurse-based pharmaceutical care models against the standard of care which involves a pharmacist dispensing ART. Methods A cross-sectional mixed methods study design was used. Patient exit interviews, time and motion studies, expert interviews and staff costs were used to conduct a costing from the societal perspective. Six facilities were sampled in the Western Cape province of South Africa, and 230 patient interviews conducted. Results The ISPA model was found to be the least costly task-shifting pharmaceutical model. However, patients preferred receiving medication from the nurse. This related to a fear of stigma and being identified by virtue of receiving ART at the pharmacy. Conclusions While these models are not mutually exclusive, and a variety of pharmaceutical care models will be necessary for scale up, it is useful to consider the impact of implementing these models on the provider, patient access to treatment and difficulties in implementation.

  15. An Alix fragment potently inhibits HIV-1 budding: characterization of binding to retroviral YPXL late domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Utpal M; Kim, Jaewon; Nagashima, Kunio; Hurley, James H; Freed, Eric O

    2007-02-09

    The retroviral structural protein, Gag, contains small peptide motifs known as late domains that promote efficient virus release from the infected cell. In addition to the well characterized PTAP late domain, the p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains a binding site for the host cell protein Alix. To better understand the functional role of the Gag/Alix interaction, we overexpressed an Alix fragment composed of residues 364-716 (Alix 364-716) and examined the effect on release of wild type (WT) and Alix binding site mutant HIV-1. We observed that Alix 364-716 expression significantly inhibited WT virus release and Gag processing and that mutation of the Alix binding site largely relieved this inhibition. Furthermore, Alix 364-716 expression induced a severe defect on WT but not mutant particle morphology. Intriguingly, the impact of Alix 364-716 expression on HIV-1 release and Gag processing was markedly different from that induced by mutation of the Alix binding site in p6. The association of Alix 364-716 with HIV-1 and equine infectious anemia virus late domains was quantitatively evaluated by isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance techniques, and the effects of mutations in these viral sequences on Alix 364-716 binding was determined. This study identifies a novel Alix-derived dominant negative inhibitor of HIV-1 release and Gag processing and provides quantitative information on the interaction between Alix and viral late domains.

  16. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-11-27

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing.

  17. Fluticasone furoate induced iatrogenic Cushing syndrome in a pediatric patient receiving anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, S A A; van 't Veer, N E; Emmen, J M A; van Beek, R H T

    2017-01-01

    We present a case of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, induced by treatment with fluticasone furoate (1-2 dd, 27.5 µg in each nostril) in a pediatric patient treated for congenital HIV. The pediatric patient described in this case report is a young girl of African descent, treated for congenital HIV with a combination therapy of Lopinavir/Ritonavir (1 dd 320/80 mg), Lamivudine (1 dd 160 mg) and Abacavir (1 dd 320 mg). Our pediatric patient presented with typical Cushingoid features (i.e. striae of the upper legs, full moon face, increased body and facial hair) within weeks after starting fluticasone furoate therapy, which was exacerbated after increasing the dose to 2 dd because of complaints of unresolved rhinitis. Biochemical analysis fitted iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, with a repeatedly low cortisol (iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome in patients treated for HIV due to the strong inhibition of CYP3 enzymes by Ritonavir. Upon discontinuation of fluticasone treatment, the pediatric patient improved both clinically and biochemically with normalisation of cortisol and ACTH within a couple of weeks. Fluticasone therapy may induce iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome in a patient treated with anti-retroviral therapy.Pharmacogenetic analysis, in particular CYP3A genotyping, provides useful information in patients treated for HIV with respect to possible future steroid treatment.Fluticasone furoate is not detected in the Siemens Immulite cortisol binding assay.

  18. Extended Mixed Vector Equilibrium Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijanur Rahaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study extended mixed vector equilibrium problems, namely, extended weak mixed vector equilibrium problem and extended strong mixed vector equilibrium problem in Hausdorff topological vector spaces. Using generalized KKM-Fan theorem (Ben-El-Mechaiekh et al.; 2005, some existence results for both problems are proved in noncompact domain.

  19. Gene Transfer of Heme Oxygenase-1 Using an Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 6 Vector Prolongs Cardiac Allograft Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M. Evans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Allograft survival can be prolonged by overexpression of cytoprotective genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1. Modifications in vector design and delivery have provided new opportunities to safely and effectively administer HO-1 into the heart prior to transplantation to improve long-term graft outcome. Methods. HO-1 was delivered to the donor heart using an adeno-associated virus vector (AAV with a pseudotype 6 capsid and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF to enhance myocardial tropism and microvascular permeability. Survival of mouse cardiac allografts, fully or partially mismatched at the MHC, was determined with and without cyclosporine A. Intragraft cytokine gene expression was examined by PCR. Results. The use of AAV6 to deliver HO-1 to the donor heart, combined with immunosuppression, prolonged allograft survival by 55.3% when donor and recipient were completely mismatched at the MHC and by 94.6% if partially mismatched. The combination of gene therapy and immunosuppression was more beneficial than treatment with either AAV6-HO-1 or CsA alone. IL-17a, b, e and f were induced in the heart at rejection. Conclusions. Pretreatment of cardiac allografts with AAV6-HO-1 plus cyclosporine A prolonged graft survival. HO-1 gene therapy represents a beneficial adjunct to immunosuppressive therapy in cardiac transplantation.

  20. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate McElroy Horne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family.

  1. Free topological vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriyelyan, Saak S.; Morris, Sidney A.

    2016-01-01

    We define and study the free topological vector space $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ over a Tychonoff space $X$. We prove that $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ is a $k_\\omega$-space if and only if $X$ is a $k_\\omega$-space. If $X$ is infinite, then $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ contains a closed vector subspace which is topologically isomorphic to $\\mathbb{V}(\\mathbb{N})$. It is proved that if $X$ is a $k$-space, then $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ is locally convex if and only if $X$ is discrete and countable. If $X$ is a metrizable space it is shown ...

  2. Matrix vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    This outstanding text and reference applies matrix ideas to vector methods, using physical ideas to illustrate and motivate mathematical concepts but employing a mathematical continuity of development rather than a physical approach. The author, who taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy, dispenses with the artificial barrier between vectors and matrices--and more generally, between pure and applied mathematics.Motivated examples introduce each idea, with interpretations of physical, algebraic, and geometric contexts, in addition to generalizations to theorems that reflect the essential structur

  3. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, Postbus 94485, 1090 GL, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Robbins, Daniel [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University,TAMU 4242, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-01-22

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  4. Multithreading in vector processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Kim, Changhoan; Nair, Ravi

    2018-01-16

    In one embodiment, a system includes a processor having a vector processing mode and a multithreading mode. The processor is configured to operate on one thread per cycle in the multithreading mode. The processor includes a program counter register having a plurality of program counters, and the program counter register is vectorized. Each program counter in the program counter register represents a distinct corresponding thread of a plurality of threads. The processor is configured to execute the plurality of threads by activating the plurality of program counters in a round robin cycle.

  5. A preferred region for recombinational patch repair in the 5' untranslated region of primer binding site-impaired murine leukemia virus vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kristensen, K D

    1996-01-01

    Transduction of primer binding site-impaired Akv murine leukemia virus-based retroviral vectors from the murine packaging cell lines psi-2 and omega E was studied. The efficiency of transduction of the neo marker of all mutated constructs was found to decrease by 5 to 6 orders of magnitude compared...... with that of the wild-type vector. Thirty-two of 60 transduced proviruses analyzed harbored a primer binding site sequence matching a glutamine tRNA primer. Sequence analysis of the regions flanking the glutamine tRNA primer binding site revealed a distinct pattern of nucleotide differences from the Akv-based vector......, suggesting the involvement of a specific endogenous virus-like sequence in patch repair rescue of the primer binding site mutants. The putative recombination partner RNA was found in virions from psi-2 cells as detected by analysis of glutamine tRNA-initiated cDNA and by sequence analysis of regions...

  6. Activation and regulation of endogenous retroviral genes in the human pituitary gland and related endocrine tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buslei, Rolf; Strissel, Pamela L; Henke, Christine; Schey, Regina; Lang, Nadine; Ruebner, Matthias; Stolt, Claus C; Fabry, Ben; Buchfelder, Michael; Strick, Reiner

    2015-02-01

    Adenohypophysis (AH) hormone-producing cells represent the origin of diverse groups of pituitary adenomas (PA). Deregulation of hypothalamic hormone receptors, growth factors and cAMP signalling have been implicated in the aetiology of PA. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are derived from past exogenous retroviral infections and represent more than 8% of the human genome. Some ERV genes encode open reading frames and produce functional proteins, for example, the ERVW-1 envelope gene Syncytin-1, essential for placentogenesis, but also deregulated in human tumours. Data concerning ERV expression in the AH and related endocrine tumours are missing. Syncytin-1 protein was analysed in normal AH (n = 15) and compared with five PA subtypes (n = 117) by immunohistochemistry. Absolute gene expression of 20 ERV functional envelope genes and ERVW-5 gag was measured. PA tissues were examined for Syncytin-1 and the cAMP signalling marker phospho-CREB-Ser133 using immunohistochemistry. Isolated primary human PA cells were treated with different hormones. Murine embryonic and adult pituitary gland ERV expressions were compared with human AH. Syncytin-1 protein colocalized with corticotropic cells of AH. In contrast, all PA demonstrated significant Syncytin-1 protein overexpression, supporting deregulation. All other ERV genes showed significant up-regulations in different PA subtypes. Phospho-CREB-Ser133 and Syncytin-1 colocalized in PA cells. Cultivated primary PA cells with ACTH or CRH induced their respective receptors and ERV genes. Syncytin-A/-B, murine orthologues to human Syncytin-1/-2, localized to embryonic and adult pituitary glands demonstrating functional mammalian conservation. Deregulated ERV genes may contribute to PA development via cAMP signalling. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  7. Therapeutic potential of antiviral drugs targeting chemorefractory colorectal adenocarcinoma cells overexpressing endogenous retroviral elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Carballo, David; Acikelli, Ali Haydar; Klein, Jacqueline; Jastrow, Holger; Dammann, Philipp; Wyganowski, Thomas; Guemues, Cihan; Gustmann, Sebastian; Bardenheuer, Walter; Malak, Sascha; Tefett, Nora Sophia; Khosrawipour, Veria; Giger-Pabst, Urs; Tannapfel, Andrea; Strumberg, Dirk

    2015-08-12

    Endoretroviruses account for circa 8 % of all transposable elements found in the genome of humans and other animals. They represent a genetic footprint of ancestral germ-cell infections of exoviruses that is transmittable to the progeny by Mendelian segregation. Traces of human endogenous retroviruses are physiologically expressed in ovarial, testicular and placental tissues as well as in stem cells. In addition, a number of these fossil viral elements have also been related to carcinogenesis. However, a relation between endoretroviruses expression and chemoresistance has not been reported yet. Twenty colorectal carcinoma patient samples were scrutinized for HERV-WE1 and HERV-FRD1 endoretroviruses using immunohistochemical approaches. In order to search for differential expression of these elements in chemotherapy refractory cells, a resistant HCT8 colon carcinoma subline was developed by serial etoposide exposure. Endoretroviral elements were detected by immunocytochemical staining, qPCR and ELISA. IC50-values of antiviral and cytostatic drugs in HCT8 cells were determined by MTT proliferation assay. The antivirals-cytostatics interaction was evaluated by the isobologram method. In this work, we show for the first time that HERV-WE1, HERV-FRD1, HERV-31, and HERV-V1 are a) simultaneously expressed in treatment-naïve colon carcinoma cells and b) upregulated after cytostatic exposure, suggesting that these retroviral elements are intimately related to chemotherapy resistance. We found a number of antiviral drugs to have cytotoxic activity and the ability to force the downregulation of HERV proteins in vitro. We also demonstrate that the use of different antiviral compounds alone or in combination with anticancer agents results in a synergistic antiproliferative effect and downregulation of different endoretroviral elements in highly chemotherapy-resistant colorectal tumor cells. Enhanced HERV-expression is associated with chemoresistance in colon carcinomas which

  8. Foxp3-dependent transformation of human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes by the retroviral protein tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Hua

    2015-10-23

    The retroviral Tax proteins of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are highly homologous viral transactivators. Both viral proteins can immortalize human primary CD4+ memory T cells, but when expressed alone they rarely transform T cells. In the present study, we found that the Tax proteins displayed a differential ability to immortalize human CD4+Foxp3+ T cells with characteristic expression of CTLA-4 and GITR. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was reportedly expressed and activated in a subset of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells, we introduced an activated EGFR into Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We observed that these modified cells were grown independently of exogenous IL-2, correlating with a T cell transformation phenotype. In Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3- T cells, ectopic expression of Foxp3 was a prerequisite for Tax transformation of T cells. Accordingly, treatment of the transformed T cells with erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of EGFR, induced degradation of EGFR in lysosome, consequently causing T cell growth inhibition. Further, we identified autophagy as a crucial cellular survival pathway for the transformed T cells. Silencing key autophagy molecules including Beclin1, Atg5 and PI3 kinase class III (PI3KC3) resulted in drastic impairment of T cell growth. Our data, therefore, unveiled a previously unidentified role of Foxp3 in T cell transformation, providing a molecular basis for HTLV-1 transformation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy at a district hospital in southern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robberstad Bjarne

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the resource implications of expanding anti-retroviral therapy (ART are likely to be large, there is a need to explore its cost-effectiveness. So far, there is no such information available from Ethiopia. Objective To assess the cost-effectiveness of ART for routine clinical practice in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia. Methods We estimated the unit cost of HIV-related care from the 2004/5 fiscal year expenditure of Arba Minch Hospital in southern Ethiopia. We estimated outpatient and inpatient service use from HIV-infected patients who received care and treatment at the hospital between January 2003 and March 2006. We measured the health effect as life years gained (LYG for patients receiving ART compared with those not receiving such treatment. The study adopted a health care provider perspective and included both direct and overhead costs. We used Markov model to estimate the lifetime costs, health benefits and cost-effectiveness of ART. Findings ART yielded an undiscounted 9.4 years expected survival, and resulted in 7.1 extra LYG compared to patients not receiving ART. The lifetime incremental cost is US$2,215 and the undiscounted incremental cost per LYG is US$314. When discounted at 3%, the additional LYG decreases to 5.5 years and the incremental cost per LYG increases to US$325. Conclusion The undiscounted and discounted incremental costs per LYG from introducing ART were less than the per capita GDP threshold at the base year. Thus, ART could be regarded as cost-effective in a district hospital setting in Ethiopia.

  10. Absolute lymphocyte count: A useful surrogate marker to initiate anti retroviral therapy in resource poor settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsewang Chorol1, Shukla Das

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Initiation of anti retroviral therapy (ART is routinely based on the algorithms that combine CD4, HIV load and clinical illness. But their high cost and unavailability at resource poor settings are one of its major limitations. An attempt has been made to find a correlation between CD4 count and Absolute lymphocyte count (ALC so that timely initiation of ART could be done in peripheral areas of developing countries where automation and established technologies have not been reached. Methods: This cross sectional study included 200 patients between 18-60 year of ages who are HIV seropositive with and without clinical evidence of oral candidiasis (100 case; 100 control. ALC was calculated as per the percentage of lymphocyte in total leukocyte count as seen in peripheral smear. CD4 cell count estimation was done by flow cytometry method. Results: A good correlation was found between CD4 count and ALC in both cases (R=0.656 and controls (R=0.642. There was an increase in sensitivity (St and decrease in specificity (Sp of predicting CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 and < 350 cells/ mm3 as the cut off value for ALC increased. ALC cut off value of 1700 cells/mm3 is likely to be the best predictor of CD4 count of < 200 cells/mm3 and ALC cut off value of 1800 cells/mm3 for CD4 count <350 cells/mm3. Conclusions: We recommend the use of ALC as a surrogate marker for or in combination with CD4 count to determine when to start therapy and to enable routine monitoring in resource poor settings .

  11. Support Vector Components Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ree, Michiel; Roerdink, Johannes; Phillips, Christophe; Garraux, Gaetan; Salmon, Eric; Wiering, Marco

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel method for learning a distance metric in the process of training Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with the radial basis function kernel. A transformation matrix is adapted in such a way that the SVM dual objective of a classification problem is optimized. By using a

  12. Sesquilinear uniform vector integral

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bucharest, Bucharest,. Academiei Str., 14, 010014, Romania. 2Technical University of Civil ... an integral of scalar functions with respect to vector measures, Dunford and his school introduced the spectral operators, thus founding the present operator theory (see ...

  13. Orthogonalisation of Vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 3. Orthogonalisation of Vectors - Matrix Decomposition and Approximation Problems. Rajendra Bhatia. General Article Volume 5 ... Author Affiliations. Rajendra Bhatia1. Indian Statistical Institute 7, SJS Sansanwal Marg, New Delhi 110 016, India.

  14. Calculus with vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Treiman, Jay S

    2014-01-01

    Calculus with Vectors grew out of a strong need for a beginning calculus textbook for undergraduates who intend to pursue careers in STEM. fields. The approach introduces vector-valued functions from the start, emphasizing the connections between one-variable and multi-variable calculus. The text includes early vectors and early transcendentals and includes a rigorous but informal approach to vectors. Examples and focused applications are well presented along with an abundance of motivating exercises. All three-dimensional graphs have rotatable versions included as extra source materials and may be freely downloaded and manipulated with Maple Player; a free Maple Player App is available for the iPad on iTunes. The approaches taken to topics such as the derivation of the derivatives of sine and cosine, the approach to limits, and the use of "tables" of integration have been modified from the standards seen in other textbooks in order to maximize the ease with which students may comprehend the material. Additio...

  15. Vector-borne Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-18

    This podcast discusses emerging vector-borne pathogens, their role as prominent contributors to emerging infectious diseases, how they're spread, and the ineffectiveness of mosquito control methods.  Created: 4/18/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2011.

  16. Single-Step Conversion of Cells to Retrovirus Vector Producers with Herpes Simplex Virus–Epstein-Barr Virus Hybrid Amplicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Camp, Sara M.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    1999-01-01

    We report here on the development and characterization of a novel herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon-based vector system which takes advantage of the host range and retention properties of HSV–Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) hybrid amplicons to efficiently convert cells to retrovirus vector producer cells after single-step transduction. The retrovirus genes gag-pol and env (GPE) and retroviral vector sequences were modified to minimize sequence overlap and cloned into an HSV-EBV hybrid amplicon. Retrovirus expression cassettes were used to generate the HSV-EBV-retrovirus hybrid vectors, HERE and HERA, which code for the ecotropic and the amphotropic envelopes, respectively. Retrovirus vector sequences encoding lacZ were cloned downstream from the GPE expression unit. Transfection of 293T/17 cells with amplicon plasmids yielded retrovirus titers between 106 and 107 transducing units/ml, while infection of the same cells with amplicon vectors generated maximum titers 1 order of magnitude lower. Retrovirus titers were dependent on the extent of transduction by amplicon vectors for the same cell line, but different cell lines displayed varying capacities to produce retrovirus vectors even at the same transduction efficiencies. Infection of human and dog primary gliomas with this system resulted in the production of retrovirus vectors for more than 1 week and the long-term retention and increase in transgene activity over time in these cell populations. Although the efficiency of this system still has to be determined in vivo, many applications are foreseeable for this approach to gene delivery. PMID:10559361

  17. Global HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance in the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baxter, J D; Dunn, D; White, E

    2015-01-01

    of resistance testing in START trial participants. METHODS: In the Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment (START) trial, baseline genotypic resistance testing results were collected at study entry and analysed centrally to determine the prevalence of TDR in the study population. Resistance was based...... on a modified 2009 World Health Organization definition to reflect newer resistance mutations. RESULTS: Baseline resistance testing was available in 1946 study participants. Higher rates of testing occurred in Europe (86.7%), the USA (81.3%) and Australia (89.9%) as compared with Asia (22.2%), South America (1...

  18. Quantification of in vitro retroviral replication using a one-tube real-time RT-PCR system incorporating direct RNA preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, L R; Bosbach, S; Tomasik, Z; Lutz, H; Schüpbach, J; Böni, J

    2001-02-01

    The methodological and logistic benefits gained from assessing in vitro antiretroviral replication using one-tube real-time RT-PCR procedures are currently diminished by a continuing need for prior RNA isolation. We now report a simple and inexpensive modification of a commercially available one-tube RT-PCR assay, consisting of detergent-based virus lysis in the presence of a ribonuclease inhibitor, which can be used to directly quantify retroviral RNA levels in culture supernatant. This approach circumvents the potential loss of RNA inherent to RNA-isolation procedures based on prior extraction and demonstrates a dynamic range of at least 4 logs. Using in vitro culture systems incorporating either HIV-1 or FIV, we show that this ability to isolate retroviral RNA directly during the RT-PCR process can provide an equivalent alternative to one of the more time and resource-consuming steps in quantifying in vitro retroviral RNA levels.

  19. Rapid transgene expression in multiple precursor cell types of adult rat subventricular zone mediated by adeno-associated type 1 vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockstael, Olivier; Melas, Catherine; Pythoud, Catherine; Levivier, Marc; McCarty, Douglas; Samulski, R Jude; De Witte, Olivier; Tenenbaum, Liliane

    2012-07-01

    The adult rat brain subventricular zone (SVZ) contains proliferative precursors that migrate to the olfactory bulb (OB) and differentiate into mature neurons. Recruitment of precursors constitutes a potential avenue for brain repair. We have investigated the kinetics and cellular specificity of transgene expression mediated by AAV2/1 vectors (i.e., adeno-associated virus type 2 pseudotyped with AAV1 capsid) in the SVZ. Self-complementary (sc) and single-stranded (ss) AAV2/1 vectors mediated efficient GFP expression, respectively, at 17 and 24 hr postinjection. Transgene expression was efficient in all the rapidly proliferating cells types, that is, Mash1(+) precursors (30% of the GFP(+) cells), Dlx2(+) neuronal progenitors (55%), Olig2(+) oligodendrocyte progenitors (35%), and doublecortin-positive (Dcx(+)) migrating cells (40%), but not in the slowly proliferating glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP(+)) neural stem cell pool (5%). Because cell cycle arrest by wild-type and recombinant AAV has been described in primary cultures, we examined SVZ proliferative activity after vector injection. Indeed, cell proliferation was reduced immediately after vector injection but was normal after 1 month. In contrast, migration and differentiation of GFP(+) precursors were unaltered. Indeed, the proportion of Dcx(+) cells was similar in the injected and contralateral hemispheres. Furthermore, 1 month after vector injection into the SVZ, GFP(+) cells, found, as expected, in the OB granular cell layer, were mature GABAergic neurons. In conclusion, the rapid and efficient transgene expression in SVZ neural precursors mediated by scAAV2/1 vectors underlines their potential usefulness for brain repair via recruitment of immature cells. The observed transient precursor proliferation inhibition, not affecting their migration and differentiation, will likely not compromise this strategy.

  20. Transduction of the central nervous system after intracerebroventricular injection of adeno-associated viral vectors in neonatal and juvenile mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholizadeh, Shervin; Tharmalingam, Sujeenthar; Macaldaz, Margarita E; Hampson, David R

    2013-08-01

    Several neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative disorders affecting the central nervous system are potentially treatable via viral vector-mediated gene transfer. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors have been used in clinical trials because of their desirable properties including a high degree of safety, efficacy, and stability. Major factors affecting tropism, expression level, and cell type specificity of AAV-mediated transgenes include encapsidation of different AAV serotypes, promoter selection, and the timing of vector administration. In this study, we evaluated the ability of single-stranded AAV2 vectors pseudotyped with viral capsids from serotype 9 (AAV2/9) to transduce the brain and target gene expression to specific cell types after intracerebroventricular injection into mice. Titer-matched AAV2/9 vectors encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter, driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, or the neuron-specific synapsin-1 promoter, were injected bilaterally into the lateral ventricles of C57/BL6 mice on postnatal day 5 (neonatal) or 21 (juvenile). Brain sections were analyzed 25 days after injection, using immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. eGFP immunohistochemistry after neonatal and juvenile administration of viral vectors revealed transduction throughout the brain including the striatum, hippocampus, cerebral cortex, and cerebellum, but with different patterns of cell-specific gene expression. eGFP expression was seen in astrocytes after treatment on postnatal day 5 with vectors carrying the CMV promoter, expanding the usefulness of AAVs for modeling and treating diseases involving glial cell pathology. In contrast, injection of AAV2/9-CMV-eGFP on postnatal day 21 resulted in preferential transduction of neurons. Administration of AAV2/9-eGFP with the synapsin-1 promoter on either postnatal day 5 or 21 resulted in widespread neuronal transduction. These results outline efficient methods and tools for gene delivery

  1. A new family of retroviral long terminal repeat elements in the human genome identified by their homologies to an element 5{prime} to the spider monkey haptoglobin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, L.M.; Maeda, N. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1995-06-10

    A new family of retroviral long terminal repeats that we name Spm-LTR has been identified as a result of DNA sequence comparisons between the entire Gen-Bank databank and an element, SPHP, located 5{prime} to the haptoglobin gene of spider monkeys. The 18 human Spm-LTR sequences so identified fall into three subtypes. There is no sequence similarity between Spm-LTR elements and any endogenous retroviral LTR sequences previously reported except for general features that define LTRs. However, a previously described repeated sequence (MER-4) forms a portion of the Spm-LTR sequence. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Immunogene therapy using immunomodulating HVJ-E vector augments anti-tumor effects in murine malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Masahide; Nimura, Keisuke; Shimbo, Takashi; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2011-05-01

    The hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope (HVJ-E) vector derived from inactivated replication-defective Sendai virus enhances anti-tumor immunity through activation of effector T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and inhibition of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Interleukin (IL)-2 enhances T cell proliferation and activates T cells and NK cells. However, recent studies have revealed that the application of IL-2 also has immune suppressive effects through expansion of Tregs. Here, we investigated the efficacy of IL-2 gene therapy using immunomodulating HVJ-E vector in murine malignant glioma models. A single intratumoral injection of HVJ-E containing pVAX-mIL-2 significantly suppressed tumor growth of intracranial gliomas, resulting in prolonged survival. Furthermore, HVJ-E, following intracavitary administration, delivered genes into post-operative residual tumor cells. Consequently, prolonged survival resulted from a single intracavitary administration of HVJ-E containing pVAX-mIL-2 following tumor removal. IL-2 gene therapy delivered via the HVJ-E vector significantly inhibited the expansion of Tregs in tumors compared to IL-2 gene transfer using retroviral vector and resulted in marked infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells into tumors. Through inhibition of Treg-mediated immunosuppression, HVJ-E enhanced effector T cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity induced by IL-2. This combination of an immunomodulating vector and immunostimulating cytokine gene shows promise as an attractive, novel immunogene therapy for malignant glioma.

  3. Scalable purification of adeno-associated virus serotype 1 (AAV1) and AAV8 vectors, using dual ion-exchange adsorptive membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Takashi; Nonaka-Sarukawa, Mutsuko; Uchibori, Ryosuke; Kinoshita, Kazue; Hayashita-Kinoh, Hiromi; Nitahara-Kasahara, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Ozawa, Keiya

    2009-09-01

    In vivo gene transduction with adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors depends on laborious procedures for the production of high-titer vector stocks. Purification steps for efficient clearance of impurities such as host cell proteins and empty vector particles are required to meet end-product specifications. Therefore, the development of alternative, realistic methods to facilitate a scalable virus recovery procedure is critical to promote in vivo investigations. However, the conventional purification procedure with resin-based packed-bed chromatography suffers from a number of limitations, including variations in pressure, slow pore diffusion, and large bed volumes. Here we have employed disposable high-performance anion- and cation-exchange membrane adsorbers to effectively purify recombinant viruses. As a result of isoelectric focusing analysis, the isoelectric point of empty particles was found to be significantly higher than that of packaged virions. Therefore, AAV vector purification with the membrane adsorbers was successful and allowed higher levels of gene transfer in vivo without remarkable signs of toxicity or inflammation. Electron microscopy of the AAV vector stocks obtained revealed highly purified virions with as few as 0.8% empty particles. Furthermore, the membrane adsorbers enabled recovery of AAV vectors in the transduced culture supernatant. Also, the ion-exchange enrichment of retroviral vectors bearing the amphotropic envelope was successful. This rapid and scalable viral purification protocol using disposable membrane adsorbers is particularly promising for in vivo experimentation and clinical investigations.

  4. Helices and vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, A N

    1990-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the use of helices as a method for studying exceptional vector bundles, an important and natural concept in algebraic geometry. The work arises out of a series of seminars organised in Moscow by A. N. Rudakov. The first article sets up the general machinery, and later ones explore its use in various contexts. As to be expected, the approach is concrete; the theory is considered for quadrics, ruled surfaces, K3 surfaces and P3(C).

  5. Anisotropic vector Preisach particle

    CERN Document Server

    Fuezi, J

    2000-01-01

    The static 2D vector magnetic behaviour of an anisotropic silicon iron sheet is modelled by a particle which depicts its space-averaged behaviour. The magnitude of magnetization is governed by a classical Preisach operator with the projection of field strength on the magnetization direction as input. Its orientation is determined by the equilibrium between the field strength orientation and the anisotropy of the sheet.

  6. Anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected travelers to Hajj pilgrimage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Abdulrazaq G; Abdulmumini, Murjanatu; Dalhat, Mahmoud M; Hamza, Muhammad; Iliyasu, Garba

    2010-01-01

    Many countries with high prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection also have substantial Muslim populations. HIV-infected patients who travel to Hajj in Saudi-Arabia may encounter challenges regarding their anti-retroviral therapy (ART). In a cohort study in Nigeria, clinically stable patients on ART who were traveling for the 2008 to 2009 Hajj (Hajj-pilgrims [HP]) were selected and compared with consecutively selected Muslim patients who were clinically stable and traveled to and from distances within the country to access ART (non-pilgrims [NP]). Participants were clinically evaluated and interviewed regarding their adherence to ART pre-travel and post-travel, international border passage with medications and reasons for missing ART doses. Post-travel change in CD4 counts and RNA-PCR viral load were measured. Outcomes were proportion who missed >or=1 dose of ART during Hajj compared with pre-travel or post-travel and failure of ART, defined as decline in CD4 cell counts or high viral load or both. Thirty-one HP and 27 NP had similar characteristics and were away for (median [range]) 36 days (28-43 days) and 84 days (28-84 days), respectively (p or= 1 ART doses among HP and NP while away were 16/31 (51.6%) and 5/27 (18.5%), respectively with risk ratio (95% confidence interval [CI]) 2.79 (1.18-6.60). Among HP, the proportions who missed >or= 1 ART doses pre-travel and post-travel were lower than those who missed it during Hajj. Those who failed ART among HP compared with NP were 15/31 (48.4%) and 5/27 (18.5%), respectively with odds ratio (95% CI) 4.13 (1.10-17.21). Reasons for missing ART included forgetfulness, exhaustion of supplies, stigma, spiritual alternatives, or disinclination; five patients were unable to cross airports with medications. Patients who went on Hajj were more likely to miss medications and to have ART failure due to several reasons including inability to cross borders with medications.

  7. Lack of evidence for retroviral infections formerly related to chronic fatigue in Spanish fibromyalgia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltra, Elisa; García-Escudero, María; Mena-Durán, Armando Vicente; Monsalve, Vicente; Cerdá-Olmedo, Germán

    2013-11-11

    types of retroviral infection formerly associated to chronic fatigue does not rule out the possibility that other viruses are involved in inciting or maintaining fibromyalgia and/or chronic fatigue conditions.

  8. Retroviral insertional mutagenesis identifies Zeb2 activation as a novel leukemogenic collaborating event in CALM-AF10 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudell, David; Harper, David P; Novak, Rachel L; Pierce, Rachel M; Slape, Christopher; Wolff, Linda; Aplan, Peter D

    2010-02-11

    The t(10;11) translocation results in a CALM-AF10 fusion gene in a subset of leukemia patients. Expression of a CALM-AF10 transgene results in leukemia, with prolonged latency and incomplete penetrance, suggesting that additional events are necessary for leukemic transformation. CALM-AF10 mice infected with the MOL4070LTR retrovirus developed acute leukemia, and ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction was used to identify retroviral insertions at 19 common insertion sites, including Zeb2, Nf1, Mn1, Evi1, Ift57, Mpl, Plag1, Kras, Erg, Vav1, and Gata1. A total of 26% (11 of 42) of the mice had retroviral integrations near Zeb2, a transcriptional corepressor leading to overexpression of the Zeb2-transcript. A total of 91% (10 of 11) of mice with Zeb2 insertions developed B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia, suggesting that Zeb2 activation promotes the transformation of CALM-AF10 hematopoietic precursors toward B-lineage leukemias. More than half of the mice with Zeb2 integrations also had Nf1 integrations, suggesting cooperativity among CALM-AF10, Zeb2, and Ras pathway mutations. We searched for Nras, Kras, and Ptpn11 point mutations in the CALM-AF10 leukemic mice. Three mutations were identified, all of which occurred in mice with Zeb2 integrations, consistent with the hypothesis that Zeb2 and Ras pathway activation promotes B-lineage leukemic transformation in concert with CALM-AF10.

  9. Comprehensive profiling of retroviral integration sites using target enrichment methods from historical koala samples without an assembled reference genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Cui

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Retroviral integration into the host germline results in permanent viral colonization of vertebrate genomes. The koala retrovirus (KoRV is currently invading the germline of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus and provides a unique opportunity for studying retroviral endogenization. Previous analysis of KoRV integration patterns in modern koalas demonstrate that they share integration sites primarily if they are related, indicating that the process is currently driven by vertical transmission rather than infection. However, due to methodological challenges, KoRV integrations have not been comprehensively characterized. Results. To overcome these challenges, we applied and compared three target enrichment techniques coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS and a newly customized sequence-clustering based computational pipeline to determine the integration sites for 10 museum Queensland and New South Wales (NSW koala samples collected between the 1870s and late 1980s. A secondary aim of this study sought to identify common integration sites across modern and historical specimens by comparing our dataset to previously published studies. Several million sequences were processed, and the KoRV integration sites in each koala were characterized. Conclusions. Although the three enrichment methods each exhibited bias in integration site retrieval, a combination of two methods, Primer Extension Capture and hybridization capture is recommended for future studies on historical samples. Moreover, identification of integration sites shows that the proportion of integration sites shared between any two koalas is quite small.

  10. Tratamiento antirretroviral en pacientes con sida y micobacteriosis Anti-retroviral treatment in patients with AIDS and mycobacterial diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo E. Corti

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available La tuberculosis y otras micobacteriosis constituyen asociaciones o coinfecciones frecuentes en pacientes con sida y se asocian con una elevada mortalidad. En esta revisión se actualizan los tratamientos de las principales enfermedades micobacterianas asociadas al sida (tuberculosis y micobacteriosis por Mycobacterium avium, con especial énfasis en las interacciones farmacológicas entre antimicobacterianos, principalmente rifampicina y claritromicina, y fármacos antirretrovirales. Se analizan los esquemas de tratamiento, su duración, la quimioprofilaxis primaria y secundaria y el momento óptimo de iniciación del tratamiento antirretroviral. Finalmente se describe el síndrome inflamatorio de reconstitución inmune y su tratamiento.Tuberculosis and other mycobacterial diseases are frequent coinfections in AIDS patients with an increased related mortality. In this review we have updated the treatment of the main mycobacterial diseases (tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium disease, under the scope of pharmacological interactions between antimycobacterial drugs, specially rifampicin and clarithromycin, and anti-retroviral drugs. Antimycobacterial treatment schemes, their duration, primary and secondary chemoprophylaxis and the optimal time to start the anti-retroviral therapy are analized. Finally, the immnune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and its treatment are discussed.

  11. Desenvolvimento de uma escala de auto-eficácia para adesão ao tratamento anti-retroviral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leite José Carlos de Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Uma escala de expectativa de auto-eficácia para seguir prescrição anti-retroviral em situações difíceis (21 itens foi desenvolvida pela análise do conteúdo de entrevistas com pacientes que estavam em tratamento ou que o abandonaram. A consistência interna e a validade de construto foram examinadas em 60 sujeitos que freqüentaram ambulatório para pacientes em estágios avançados da doença (hospital-dia. Um escore de expectativa de auto-eficácia para adesão ao tratamento foi derivado do primeiro componente da análise de componentes principais. A média do escore foi 0,25 para os sujeitos aderentes e -0,33 para os não-aderentes ao tratamento (teste t, p = 0,046. A chance de adesão duplicou quando o escore de expectativa de auto-eficácia era maior em uma unidade (OR = 2,07; IC95% = 1,002 a 4,26. A consistência interna foi alta (alfa de Cronbach = 0.96. A escala demonstrou validade de construto e confiabilidade para medir auto-eficácia para tratamento anti-retroviral nesses pacientes.

  12. What is a vector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Eric René; Booth, Mark; Norman, Rachel; Mideo, Nicole; McCallum, Hamish; Fenton, Andy

    2017-01-01

    Many important and rapidly emerging pathogens of humans, livestock and wildlife are ‘vector-borne’. However, the term ‘vector’ has been applied to diverse agents in a broad range of epidemiological systems. In this perspective, we briefly review some common definitions, identify the strengths and weaknesses of each and consider the functional differences between vectors and other hosts from a range of ecological, evolutionary and public health perspectives. We then consider how the use of designations can afford insights into our understanding of epidemiological and evolutionary processes that are not otherwise apparent. We conclude that from a medical and veterinary perspective, a combination of the ‘haematophagous arthropod’ and ‘mobility’ definitions is most useful because it offers important insights into contact structure and control and emphasizes the opportunities for pathogen shifts among taxonomically similar species with similar feeding modes and internal environments. From a population dynamics and evolutionary perspective, we suggest that a combination of the ‘micropredator’ and ‘sequential’ definition is most appropriate because it captures the key aspects of transmission biology and fitness consequences for the pathogen and vector itself. However, we explicitly recognize that the value of a definition always depends on the research question under study. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission’. PMID:28289253

  13. Lentiviral Vector Mediated Transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Isabelle; Verp, Sonia; Offner, Sandra; Trono, Didier

    2011-03-01

    The genetic manipulation of rodents through the generation of fully transgenic animals or via the modification of selective cells or organs is a procedure of paramount importance for biomedical research, either to address fundamental questions or to develop preclinical models of human diseases. Lentiviral vectors occupy the front stage in this scene, as they can mediate the integration and stable expression of transgenes both in vitro and in vivo. Widely used to modify a variety of cells, including re-implantable somatic and embryonic stem cells, lentiviral vectors can also be directly administered in vivo, for instance in the brain. However, perhaps their most spectacular research application is in the generation of transgenic animals. Compared with the three-decade-old DNA pronuclear injection technique, lentivector-mediated transgenesis is simple, cheap, and highly efficient. Furthermore, it can take full advantage of the great diversity of lentiviral vectors developed for other applications, and thus allows for ubiquitous or tissue-specific or constitutive or externally controllable transgene expression, as well as RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 1:169-184. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Propagating Gateway Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2018-01-02

    Generating stocks of Entry and Destination vectors for use in the Gateway recombinatorial cloning system requires transforming them into Escherichia coli strain DB3.1, where they can replicate because this strain is immune to the effects of the ccdB gene carried in the Gateway cassette. However, mutations in the ccdB gene can arise at low frequency, and these mutant plasmids will consequently allow growth of standard cloning strains of E. coli (e.g., DH5α). Therefore, after making new stocks of Gateway plasmids, their ability to grow in cloning strains of E. coli must be tested. This involves obtaining multiple stocks of vector, each arising from a single plasmid grown in a single DB3.1 bacterial colony, and transforming each stock into both DB3.1 and the preferred cloning strain of E. coli in a controlled fashion. Only vector stocks that effectively kill the standard cloning strain (i.e., no or few colonies are obtained after transformation) should be used in Gateway cloning reactions. The sequence can be performed in 3 d. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Enhanced CAR T-cell engineering using non-viral Sleeping Beauty transposition from minicircle vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monjezi, R; Miskey, C; Gogishvili, T; Schleef, M; Schmeer, M; Einsele, H; Ivics, Z; Hudecek, M

    2017-01-01

    Immunotherapy with T cell modified with gamma-retroviral or lentiviral (LV) vectors to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown remarkable efficacy in clinical trials. However, the potential for insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity of viral vectors is a safety concern, and their cost and regulatory demands a roadblock for rapid and broad clinical translation. Here, we demonstrate that CAR T cells can be engineered through non-viral Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposition of CAR genes from minimalistic DNA vectors called minicircles (MCs). We analyzed genomic distribution of SB and LV integrations and show that a significantly higher proportion of MC-derived CAR transposons compared with LV integrants had occurred outside of highly expressed and cancer-related genes into genomic safe harbor loci that are not expected to cause mutagenesis or genotoxicity. CD19-CAR T cells engineered with our enhanced SB approach conferred potent reactivity in vitro and eradicated lymphoma in a xenograft model in vivo. Intriguingly, electroporation of SB MCs is substantially more effective and less toxic compared with conventional plasmids, and enables cost-effective rapid preparation of therapeutic CAR T-cell doses. This approach sets a new standard in advanced cellular and gene therapy and will accelerate and increase the availability of CAR T-cell therapy to treat hematologic malignancies.

  16. A Study of Toca 511, a Retroviral Replicating Vector, Combined With Toca FC in Patients With Solid Tumors or Lymphoma (Toca 6)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-05

    Colorectal Cancer; Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Ovarian Cancer; Lymphoma; Sarcoma; Bladder Cancer; Melanoma; IDH1 Mutated Solid Tumors; IDH1 Mutated or MGMT Methylated Recurrent HGG (Not Recruiting)

  17. Scalar - vector soliton fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhichao; Li, Lei; Luo, Yiyang; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan; Tang, Ming; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Luming

    2016-01-01

    Rapid progress in passively mode-locked fiber lasers is currently driven by the recent discovery of vector feature of mode-locking pulses, namely, the group velocity-locked vector solitons, the phase locked vector solitons, and the high-order vector solitons. Those vector solitons are fundamentally different from the previously known scalar solitons. Here, we report a fiber laser where the mode-locked pulse evolves as a vector soliton in the strong birefringent segment and is transformed into a regular scalar soliton after the polarizer within the laser cavity. The existence of solutions in a polarization-dependent cavity comprising a periodic combination of two distinct nonlinear waves is novel and likely to be applicable to various other nonlinear systems. For very large local birefringence, our laser approaches the working regime of vector soliton lasers, while it approaches scalar soliton fiber lasers under the conditions of very small birefringence.

  18. [Construction of mouse VCAM-1 expression vector and establishment of stably transfected MSC line C3H10T1/2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Zhu, Heng; Chu, Ya-Nan; Xu, Fen-Fen; Liu, Yuan-Lin; Tang, Bo; Li, Xi-Mei; Hu, Liang-Ding; Zhang, Yi

    2014-10-01

    This study was aimed to construct the mouse VCAM-1 expression vector, to establish the stably transfected MSC line and to investigate the effect of VCAM-1-modified mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) on the immunological characteristics of MSC. The cDNA of murine VCAM-1 gene was amplified by RT-PCR from the total RNA isolated from the mouse spleen; then the cDNA was inserted into the retrovirus vector PMSCVmigr-1; the recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease experiments and sequencing, then designated as PMSCVmigr-1-mVCAM-1; the recombinant plasmid PMSCVmigr-1-mVCAM-1 was transfected into 293 cells by lipofecamin and the supernatant was collected to transfect MSC cell line (C3H10T1/2). Moreover, VCAM-1 expression on MSC was evaluated by FACS. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of VCAM-1-MSC on lymphocytic transformation was tested by (3)H-TdR incorporation assay. The results indicated that the successful construction of recombinant retroviral expression plasmid of mouse VCAM-1 was confirmed by digesting and sequancing. After transfection of MSC with retroviral supernaptant, the high expression of VCAM-1 on MSC could be detected by flow cytometry. The MSC high expressing VCAM-1 could significantly inhibit the proliferation of Con A-inducing lymphocytes in dose-depentent marrer. It is concluded that recombinant retroviral encoding VCAM-1 (PMSCVmigr-1-mVCAM-1) has been successfully constructed and mouse VCAM-1 has been stably expressed in C3H10T1/2. MSC over-expressing VCAM-1 show more potent immunosuppressive effect on cellular immune reaction in vitro. Our data laid a foundation for the subsequent studying the effect of VCAM-1 transfecting into MSC on immune related disease study.

  19. Cognitive and Behavioural Correlates of Non-Adherence to HIV Anti-Retroviral Therapy: Theoretical and Practical Insight for Clinical Psychology and Health Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begley, Kim; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Ross, Michael W.; Gold, Julian

    2008-01-01

    This cross-sectional study identified variables associated with protease inhibitor (PI) non-adherence in 179 patients taking anti-retroviral therapy. Univariate analyses identified 11 variables associated with PI non-adherence. Multiple logistic regression modelling identified three predictors of PI non-adherence: low adherence self-efficacy and…

  20. A novel borna disease virus vector system that stably expresses foreign proteins from an intercistronic noncoding region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daito, Takuji; Fujino, Kan; Honda, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yohei; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-12-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, infects a wide variety of mammalian species and readily establishes a long-lasting, persistent infection in brain cells. Therefore, this virus could be a promising candidate as a novel RNA virus vector enabling stable gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies demonstrated that the 5' untranslated region of the genome is the only site for insertion and expression of a foreign gene. In this study, we established a novel BDV vector in which an additional transcription cassette has been inserted into an intercistronic noncoding region between the viral phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) genes. The recombinant BDV (rBDV) carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) between the P and M genes, rBDV P/M-GFP, expressed GFP efficiently in cultured cells and rodent brains for a long period of time without attenuation. Furthermore, we generated a nonpropagating rBDV, ΔGLLP/M, which lacks the envelope glycoprotein (G) and a splicing intron within the polymerase gene (L), by the transcomplementation system with either transient or stable expression of the G gene. Interestingly, rBDV ΔGLLP/M established a persistent infection in cultured cells with stable expression of GFP in the absence of the expression of G. Using persistently infected rBDV ΔGLLP/M-infected cells, we determined the amino acid region in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BDV G important for the release of infectious rBDV particles and also demonstrated that the CT region may be critical for the generation of pseudotyped rBDV having vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Our results revealed that the newly established BDV vector constitutes an alternative tool not only for stable expression of foreign genes in the CNS but also for understanding the mechanism of the release of enveloped virions.

  1. A Novel Borna Disease Virus Vector System That Stably Expresses Foreign Proteins from an Intercistronic Noncoding Region▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daito, Takuji; Fujino, Kan; Honda, Tomoyuki; Matsumoto, Yusuke; Watanabe, Yohei; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2011-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV), a nonsegmented, negative-strand RNA virus, infects a wide variety of mammalian species and readily establishes a long-lasting, persistent infection in brain cells. Therefore, this virus could be a promising candidate as a novel RNA virus vector enabling stable gene expression in the central nervous system (CNS). Previous studies demonstrated that the 5′ untranslated region of the genome is the only site for insertion and expression of a foreign gene. In this study, we established a novel BDV vector in which an additional transcription cassette has been inserted into an intercistronic noncoding region between the viral phosphoprotein (P) and matrix (M) genes. The recombinant BDV (rBDV) carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP) between the P and M genes, rBDV P/M-GFP, expressed GFP efficiently in cultured cells and rodent brains for a long period of time without attenuation. Furthermore, we generated a nonpropagating rBDV, ΔGLLP/M, which lacks the envelope glycoprotein (G) and a splicing intron within the polymerase gene (L), by the transcomplementation system with either transient or stable expression of the G gene. Interestingly, rBDV ΔGLLP/M established a persistent infection in cultured cells with stable expression of GFP in the absence of the expression of G. Using persistently infected rBDV ΔGLLP/M-infected cells, we determined the amino acid region in the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of BDV G important for the release of infectious rBDV particles and also demonstrated that the CT region may be critical for the generation of pseudotyped rBDV having vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Our results revealed that the newly established BDV vector constitutes an alternative tool not only for stable expression of foreign genes in the CNS but also for understanding the mechanism of the release of enveloped virions. PMID:21937656

  2. Scalar and vector Galileons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Yeinzon; Navarro, Andrés A.

    2017-03-01

    An alternative for the construction of fundamental theories is the introduction of Galileons. These are fields whose action leads to non higher than second-order equations of motion. As this is a necessary but not sufficient condition to make the Hamiltonian bounded from below, as long as the action is not degenerate, the Galileon construction is a way to avoid pathologies both at the classical and quantum levels. Galileon actions are, therefore, of great interest in many branches of physics, specially in high energy physics and cosmology. This proceedings contribution presents the generalities of the construction of both scalar and vector Galileons following two different but complimentary routes.

  3. Architecture and Vector Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Knols, Bart GJ; Kirby, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    of vector-borne diseases have no access to electricity. Many houses in the hot, humid regions of Asia have adapted to the environment, they are built of porous materials and are elevated on stilts features which allow a comfortable climate even in the presence of bednets and screens. In contrast, many...... buildings in Africa and Asia in respect to their indoor climate characteristics and finally, show how state-of-the-art 3D modelling can predict climate characteristics and help to optimize buildings....

  4. In vitro pharmacodynamic evaluation of antiviral medicinal plants using a vector-based assay technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esimone, C O; Grunwald, T; Wildner, O; Nchinda, G; Tippler, B; Proksch, P; Uberla, K

    2005-01-01

    Medicinal plants are increasingly being projected as suitable alternative sources of antiviral agents. The development of a suitable in vitro pharmacodynamic screening technique could contribute to rapid identification of potential bioactive plants and also to the standardization and/or pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic profiling of the bioactive components. Recombinant viral vectors (lentiviral, retroviral and adenoviral) transferring the firefly luciferase gene were constructed and the inhibition of viral vector infectivity by various concentrations of plant extracts was evaluated in HeLa or Hep2 cells by measuring the changes in luciferase activity. Cytotoxicity of the extracts was evaluated in parallel on HeLa or Hep2 cells stably expressing luciferase. Amongst the 15 extracts screened, only the methanol (ME) and the ethyl acetate (ET) fractions of the lichen, Ramalina farinacea specifically reduced lentiviral and adenoviral infectivity in a dose-dependent manner. Further, chromatographic fractionation of ET into four fractions (ET1-ET4) revealed only ET4 to be selectively antiviral with an IC50 in the 20 microg ml(-1) range. Preliminary mechanistic studies based on the addition of the extracts at different time points in the viral infection cycle (kinetic studies) revealed that the inhibitory activity was highest if extract and vectors were preincubated prior to infection, suggesting that early steps in the lentiviral or adenoviral replication cycle could be the major target of ET4. Inhibition of wild-type HIV-1 was also observed at a 10-fold lower concentration of the extract. The vector-based assay is a suitable in vitro pharmacodynamic evaluation technique for antiviral medicinal plants. The technique has successfully demonstrated the presence of antiviral principles in R. farinacea. Potential anti-HIV medicinal plants could rapidly be evaluated with the reported vector-based technique. The lichen, R. farinacea could represent a lead source of antiviral

  5. HEMO, an ancestral endogenous retroviral envelope protein shed in the blood of pregnant women and expressed in pluripotent stem cells and tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidmann, Odile; Béguin, Anthony; Paternina, Janio; Berthier, Raphaël; Deloger, Marc; Bawa, Olivia; Heidmann, Thierry

    2017-08-08

    Capture of retroviral envelope genes is likely to have played a role in the emergence of placental mammals, with evidence for multiple, reiterated, and independent capture events occurring in mammals, and be responsible for the diversity of present day placental structures. Here, we uncover a full-length endogenous retrovirus envelope protein, dubbed HEMO [human endogenous MER34 (medium-reiteration-frequency-family-34) ORF], with unprecedented characteristics, because it is actively shed in the blood circulation in humans via specific cleavage of the precursor envelope protein upstream of the transmembrane domain. At variance with previously identified retroviral envelope genes, its encoding gene is found to be transcribed from a unique CpG-rich promoter not related to a retroviral LTR, with sites of expression including the placenta as well as other tissues and rather unexpectedly, stem cells as well as reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), where the protein can also be detected. We provide evidence that the associated retroviral capture event most probably occurred >100 Mya before the split of Laurasiatheria and Euarchontoglires, with the identified retroviral envelope gene encoding a full-length protein in all simians under purifying selection and with similar shedding capacity. Finally, a comprehensive screen of the expression of the gene discloses high transcript levels in several tumor tissues, such as germ cell, breast, and ovarian tumors, with in the latter case, evidence for a histotype dependence and specific protein expression in clear-cell carcinoma. Altogether, the identified protein could constitute a "stemness marker" of the normal cell and a possible target for immunotherapeutic approaches in tumors.

  6. In vivo mitochondrial function in HIV-infected persons treated with contemporary anti-retroviral therapy: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan A I Payne

    Full Text Available Modern anti-retroviral therapy is highly effective at suppressing viral replication and restoring immune function in HIV-infected persons. However, such individuals show reduced physiological performance and increased frailty compared with age-matched uninfected persons. Contemporary anti-retroviral therapy is thought to be largely free from neuromuscular complications, whereas several anti-retroviral drugs previously in common usage have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity. It has recently been established that patients with prior exposure to such drugs exhibit irreversible cellular and molecular mitochondrial defects. However the functional significance of such damage remains unknown. Here we use phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS to measure in vivo muscle mitochondrial oxidative function, in patients treated with contemporary anti-retroviral therapy, and compare with biopsy findings (cytochrome c oxidase (COX histochemistry. We show that dynamic oxidative function (post-exertional ATP (adenosine triphosphate resynthesis was largely maintained in the face of mild to moderate COX defects (affecting up to ∼10% of fibers: τ½ ADP (half-life of adenosine diphosphate clearance, HIV-infected 22.1±9.9 s, HIV-uninfected 18.8±4.4 s, p = 0.09. In contrast, HIV-infected patients had a significant derangement of resting state ATP metabolism compared with controls: ADP/ATP ratio, HIV-infected 1.24±0.08×10(-3, HIV-uninfected 1.16±0.05×10(-3, p = 0.001. These observations are broadly reassuring in that they suggest that in vivo mitochondrial function in patients on contemporary anti-retroviral therapy is largely maintained at the whole organ level, despite histochemical (COX defects within individual cells. Basal energy requirements may nevertheless be increased.

  7. Vector wave propagation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, M; Brenner, K-H

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we extend the scalar wave propagation method (WPM) to vector fields. The WPM [Appl. Opt.32, 4984 (1993)] was introduced in order to overcome the major limitations of the beam propagation method (BPM). With the WPM, the range of application can be extended from the simulation of waveguides to simulation of other optical elements like lenses, prisms and gratings. In that reference it was demonstrated that the wave propagation scheme provides valid results for propagation angles up to 85 degrees and that it is not limited to small index variations in the axis of propagation. Here, we extend the WPM to three-dimensional vectorial fields (VWPMs) by considering the polarization dependent Fresnel coefficients for transmission in each propagation step. The continuity of the electric field is maintained in all three dimensions by an enhanced propagation vector and the transfer matrix. We verify the validity of the method by transmission through a prism and by comparison with the focal distribution from vectorial Debye theory. Furthermore, a two-dimensional grating is simulated and compared with the results from three-dimensional RCWA. Especially for 3D problems, the runtime of the VWPM exhibits special advantage over the RCWA.

  8. Deletion of the LTR enhancer/promoter has no impact on the integration profile of MLV vectors in human hematopoietic progenitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Moiani

    Full Text Available Moloney murine leukemia virus (MLV-derived gamma-retroviral vectors integrate preferentially near transcriptional regulatory regions in the human genome, and are associated with a significant risk of insertional gene deregulation. Self-inactivating (SIN vectors carry a deletion of the U3 enhancer and promoter in the long terminal repeat (LTR, and show reduced genotoxicity in pre-clinical assays. We report a high-definition analysis of the integration preferences of a SIN MLV vector compared to a wild-type-LTR MLV vector in the genome of CD34(+ human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs. We sequenced 13,011 unique SIN-MLV integration sites and compared them to 32,574 previously generated MLV sites in human HSPCs. The SIN-MLV vector recapitulates the integration pattern observed for MLV, with the characteristic clustering of integrations around enhancer and promoter regions associated to H3K4me3 and H3K4me1 histone modifications, specialized chromatin configurations (presence of the H2A.Z histone variant and binding of RNA Pol II. SIN-MLV and MLV integration clusters and hot spots overlap in most cases and are generated at a comparable frequency, indicating that the reduced genotoxicity of SIN-MLV vectors in hematopoietic cells is not due to a modified integration profile.

  9. "Analytical" vector-functions I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Vladimir Todorov

    2017-12-01

    In this note we try to give a new (or different) approach to the investigation of analytical vector functions. More precisely a notion of a power xn; n ∈ ℕ+ of a vector x ∈ ℝ3 is introduced which allows to define an "analytical" function f : ℝ3 → ℝ3. Let furthermore f (ξ )= ∑n =0 ∞ anξn be an analytical function of the real variable ξ. Here we replace the power ξn of the number ξ with the power of a vector x ∈ ℝ3 to obtain a vector "power series" f (x )= ∑n =0 ∞ anxn . We research some properties of the vector series as well as some applications of this idea. Note that an "analytical" vector function does not depend of any basis, which may be used in research into some problems in physics.

  10. An Optimized GD2-Targeting Retroviral Cassette for More Potent and Safer Cellular Therapy of Neuroblastoma and Other Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Thomas

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma is the commonest extra cranial solid cancer of childhood. Despite escalation of treatment regimens, a significant minority of patients die of their disease. Disialoganglioside (GD2 is consistently expressed at high-levels in neuroblastoma tumors, which have been targeted with some success using therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. GD2 is also expressed in a range of other cancer but with the exception of some peripheral nerves is largely absent from non-transformed tissues. Chimeric Antigen Receptors (CARs are artificial type I proteins which graft the specificity of a monoclonal antibody onto a T-cell. Clinical data with early CAR designs directed against GD2 have shown some promise in Neuroblastoma. Here, we describe a GD2-targeting CAR retroviral cassette, which has been optimized for CAR T-cell persistence, efficacy and safety.

  11. Genome-wide retroviral insertional tagging of genes involved in cancer in Cdkn2a-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders H; Turner, Geoffrey; Trubetskoy, Alla

    2002-01-01

    We have used large-scale insertional mutagenesis to identify functional landmarks relevant to cancer in the recently completed mouse genome sequence. We infected Cdkn2a(-/-) mice with Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) to screen for loci that can participate in tumorigenesis in collaboration...... retroviral integration sites and mapped them against the mouse genome sequence databases from Celera and Ensembl. In addition to 17 insertions targeting gene loci known to be cancer-related, we identified a total of 37 new common insertion sites (CISs), of which 8 encode components of signaling pathways...... that are involved in cancer. The effectiveness of large-scale insertional mutagenesis in a sensitized genetic background is demonstrated by the preference for activation of MAP kinase signaling, collaborating with Cdkn2a loss in generating the lymphoid and myeloid tumors. Collectively, our results show that large...

  12. Distinct roles of CD4+ T cell subpopulations in retroviral immunity: lessons from the Friend virus mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassiotis George

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well established that CD4+ T cells play an important role in immunity to infections with retroviruses such as HIV. However, in recent years CD4+ T cells have been subdivided into several distinct populations that are differentially regulated and perform widely varying functions. Thus, it is important to delineate the separate roles of these subsets, which range from direct antiviral activities to potent immunosuppression. In this review, we discuss contributions from the major CD4+ T cell subpopulations to retroviral immunity. Fundamental concepts obtained from studies on numerous viral infections are presented along with a more detailed analysis of studies on murine Friend virus. The relevance of these studies to HIV immunology and immunotherapy is reviewed.

  13. Optimality Conditions in Vector Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Manuel Arana; Lizana, Antonio Rufián

    2011-01-01

    Vector optimization is continuously needed in several science fields, particularly in economy, business, engineering, physics and mathematics. The evolution of these fields depends, in part, on the improvements in vector optimization in mathematical programming. The aim of this Ebook is to present the latest developments in vector optimization. The contributions have been written by some of the most eminent researchers in this field of mathematical programming. The Ebook is considered essential for researchers and students in this field.

  14. Identifying activated T cells in reconstituted RAG deficient mice using retrovirally transduced Pax5 deficient pro-B cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadesan Gajendran

    Full Text Available Various methods have been used to identify activated T cells such as binding of MHC tetramers and expression of cell surface markers in addition to cytokine-based assays. In contrast to these published methods, we here describe a strategy to identify T cells that respond to any antigen and track the fate of these activated T cells. We constructed a retroviral double-reporter construct with enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP and a far-red fluorescent protein from Heteractis crispa (HcRed. LTR-driven EGFP expression was used to enrich and identify transduced cells, while HcRed expression is driven by the CD40Ligand (CD40L promoter, which is inducible and enables the identification and cell fate tracing of T cells that have responded to infection/inflammation. Pax5 deficient pro-B cells that can give rise to different hematopoietic cells like T cells, were retrovirally transduced with this double-reporter cassette and were used to reconstitute the T cell pool in RAG1 deficient mice that lack T and B cells. By using flow cytometry and histology, we identified activated T cells that had developed from Pax5 deficient pro-B cells and responded to infection with the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. Microscopic examination of organ sections allowed visual identification of HcRed-expressing cells. To further characterize the immune response to a given stimuli, this strategy can be easily adapted to identify other cells of the hematopoietic system that respond to infection/inflammation. This can be achieved by using an inducible reporter, choosing the appropriate promoter, and reconstituting mice lacking cells of interest by injecting gene-modified Pax5 deficient pro-B cells.

  15. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...... estimator automatically compensates for the axial velocity, when determining the transverse velocity by using fourth order moments rather than second order moments. The estimation is optimized by using a lag different from one in the estimation process, and noise artifacts are reduced by using averaging...... of RF samples. Further, compensation for the axial velocity can be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce spatial velocity dispersion....

  16. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  17. Vector-Tensor and Vector-Vector Decay Amplitude Analysis of B0->phi K*0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, R; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Altenburg, D D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Asgeirsson, D J; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Bechtle, P; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D S; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Bomben, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Briand, H; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Burchat, P R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chia, Y M; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Clarke, C K; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Corwin, L A; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cunha, A; Curry, S; Côté, D; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Del Buono, L; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Denig, A G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, L; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Ebert, M; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fang, F; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gao, Y; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Gaz, A; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Golubev, V B; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Graugès-Pous, E; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Z J; Hadavand, H K; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Höcker, A; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jain, V; Jasper, H; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Judd, D; Kadyk, J A; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kolb, J A; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Latour, E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lee, C L; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, S; Li, X; Lista, L; Liu, H; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; Long, O; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lopez-March, N; Lou, X C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Mclachlin, S E; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Merkel, J; Messner, R; Meyer, N T; Meyer, W T; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mishra, K; Mohanty, G B; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Nagel, M; Naisbit, M T; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; Nugent, I M; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Oyanguren, A; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Pacetti, S; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, B; Pan, Y; Panduro, W; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Pappagallo, M; Park, W; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petrella, A; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Polci, F; Pompili, A; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prencipe, E; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pruvot, S; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rahmat, R; Rama, M; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Regensburger, J J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, A I; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Rodier, S; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Röthel, W; Sacco, R; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Sanders, D A; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schenk, S; Schilling, C J; Schindler, R H; Schofield, K C; Schott, G; Schröder, T; Schröder, H; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Serrano, J; Sharma, V; Shen, B C; Sherwood, D J; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spitznagel, M; Spradlin, P; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stocchi, A; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stängle, H; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, J M; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, Y K; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Ulmer, K A; Uwer, U; Van Bakel, N; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Vazquez, A; Verderi, M; Viaud, F B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Volk, A; Wagner, A P; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walker, D; Walsh, J J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wang, W F; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wren, A C; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yi, J I; Yi, K; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yéche, C; Zain, S B; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Ziegler, V; Zito, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; al, et

    2007-01-01

    We perform an amplitude analysis of the decays B0->phi K^*_2(1430)0, phi K^*(892)0, and phi(K pi)^0_S-wave with a sample of about 384 million BBbar pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. The fractions of longitudinal polarization f_L of the vector-tensor and vector-vector decay modes are measured to be 0.853 +0.061-0.069 +-0.036 and 0.506 +-0.040 +-0.015, respectively. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay and seven parameters for the vector-tensor decay, including the branching fractions and parameters sensitive to CP-violation.

  18. Criteria for effective design, construction, and gene knockdown by shRNA vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lich John D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi technology is a powerful methodology recently developed for the specific knockdown of targeted genes. RNAi is most commonly achieved either transiently by transfection of small interfering (si RNA oligonucleotides, or stably using short hairpin (sh RNA expressed from a DNA vector or virus. Much controversy has surrounded the development of rules for the design of effective siRNA oligonucleotides; and whether these rules apply to shRNA is not well characterized. Results To determine whether published algorithms for siRNA oligonucleotide design apply to shRNA, we constructed 27 shRNAs from 11 human genes expressed stably using retroviral vectors. We demonstrate an efficient method for preparing wild-type and mutant control shRNA vectors simultaneously using oligonucleotide hybrids. We show that sequencing through shRNA vectors can be problematic due to the intrinsic secondary structure of the hairpin, and we determine a strategy for effective sequencing by using a combination of modified BigDye chemistries and DNA relaxing agents. The efficacy of knockdown for the 27 shRNA vectors was evaluated against six published algorithms for siRNA oligonucleotide design. Our results show that none of the scoring algorithms can explain a significant percentage of variance in shRNA knockdown efficacy as assessed by linear regression analysis or ROC curve analysis. Application of a modification based on the stability of the 6 central bases of each shRNA provides fair-to-good predictions of knockdown efficacy for three of the algorithms. Analysis of an independent set of data from 38 shRNAs pooled from previous publications confirms these findings. Conclusion The use of mixed oligonucleotide pairs provides a time and cost efficient method of producing wild type and mutant control shRNA vectors. The addition to sequencing reactions of a combination of mixed dITP/dGTP chemistries and DNA relaxing agents enables read

  19. On the Witt vector Frobenius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Kedlaya, Kiran

    2014-01-01

    We study the kernel and cokernel of the Frobenius map on the p-typical Witt vectors of a commutative ring, not necessarily of characteristic p. We give many equivalent conditions to surjectivity of the Frobenius map on both finite and infinite length Witt vectors. In particular, surjectivity on f...

  20. Estimation of Motion Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the estimation of 2-D motion vector fields from time varying image sequences. We use a piecewise smooth model based on coupled vector/binary Markov random fields. We find the maximum a posteriori solution by simulated annealing. The algorithm generate sample...

  1. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  2. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  3. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  4. Emerging vector borne diseases – incidence through vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eSavic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vector borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowdays, in intercontinetal countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and popultion of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveilance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, erlichiosis, leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fudamental role at primeraly prevention and then treatment of vector borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases.During a four year period, from 2009-2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analysed for vector borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, erlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis in routine laboratory work. The analysis were done by serological tests – ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis and blood smear for babesiosis, erlichiosis and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on avarege more then half of the samples

  5. Stable piecewise polynomial vector fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pessoa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Let $N={y>0}$ and $S={y<0}$ be the semi-planes of $mathbb{R}^2$ having as common boundary the line $D={y=0}$. Let $X$ and $Y$ be polynomial vector fields defined in $N$ and $S$, respectively, leading to a discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector field $Z=(X,Y$. This work pursues the stability and the transition analysis of solutions of $Z$ between $N$ and $S$, started by Filippov (1988 and Kozlova (1984 and reformulated by Sotomayor-Teixeira (1995 in terms of the regularization method. This method consists in analyzing a one parameter family of continuous vector fields $Z_{epsilon}$, defined by averaging $X$ and $Y$. This family approaches $Z$ when the parameter goes to zero. The results of Sotomayor-Teixeira and Sotomayor-Machado (2002 providing conditions on $(X,Y$ for the regularized vector fields to be structurally stable on planar compact connected regions are extended to discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector fields on $mathbb{R}^2$. Pertinent genericity results for vector fields satisfying the above stability conditions are also extended to the present case. A procedure for the study of discontinuous piecewise vector fields at infinity through a compactification is proposed here.

  6. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lark L. Coffey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed.

  7. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  8. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases - Incidence through Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Sara; Vidić, Branka; Grgić, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests - ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples

  9. Mutational analysis of the hepatitis C virus E1 glycoprotein in retroviral pseudoparticles and cell-culture-derived H77/JFH1 chimeric infectious virus particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, R S; Kawaguchi, K; Meunier, J-C

    2009-01-01

    Cell entry by enveloped viruses is mediated by viral glycoproteins, and generally involves a short hydrophobic peptide (fusion peptide) that inserts into the cellular membrane. An internal hydrophobic domain within E1 (aa262-290) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) may function as a fusion peptide....... Retrovirus-based HCV-pseudotyped viruses (HCVpp; genotype 1a) containing Ala or Pro substitutions at conserved amino acid positions within this putative fusion peptide were generated. Mutation of conserved residues significantly reduced efficiency of HCVpp entry into Huh-7 cells. The majority of amino acid...... incorporation into pseudoparticles and normal CD81-binding, and therefore might affect viral fusion. One mutant (S283P) consistently displayed two- to threefold higher infectivity than did wild-type. Three mutations that decreased HCVpp infectivity also reduced levels of HCVcc infectious virus production...

  10. Vector control of induction machines

    CERN Document Server

    Robyns, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    After a brief introduction to the main law of physics and fundamental concepts inherent in electromechanical conversion, ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" introduces the standard mathematical models for induction machines - whichever rotor technology is used - as well as several squirrel-cage induction machine vector-control strategies. The use of causal ordering graphs allows systematization of the design stage, as well as standardization of the structure of control devices. ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" suggests a unique approach aimed at reducing parameter sensitivity for

  11. Vector boson scattering at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Fleper, Christian [Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [DESY Theory Group, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sekulla, Marco [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Linear colliders operating in a range of multiple TeV are able to investigate the details of vector boson scattering and electroweak symmetry breaking. We calculate cross sections with the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD for vector boson scattering processes at the future linear e{sup +} e{sup -} collider CLIC. By finding suitable cuts, the vector boson scattering signal processes are isolated from the background. Finally, we are able to determine exclusion sensitivities on the non-Standard Model parameters of the relevant dimension eight operators.

  12. Vector independent transmission of the vector-borne bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluijs, Mirjam Tineke Willemijn; de Smit, Abraham J; Moormann, Rob J M

    2016-01-01

    Bluetongue is an economically important disease of ruminants. The causative agent, Bluetongue virus (BTV), is mainly transmitted by insect vectors. This review focuses on vector-free BTV transmission, and its epizootic and economic consequences. Vector-free transmission can either be vertical, from dam to fetus, or horizontal via direct contract. For several BTV-serotypes, vertical (transplacental) transmission has been described, resulting in severe congenital malformations. Transplacental transmission had been mainly associated with live vaccine strains. Yet, the European BTV-8 strain demonstrated a high incidence of transplacental transmission in natural circumstances. The relevance of transplacental transmission for the epizootiology is considered limited, especially in enzootic areas. However, transplacental transmission can have a substantial economic impact due to the loss of progeny. Inactivated vaccines have demonstrated to prevent transplacental transmission. Vector-free horizontal transmission has also been demonstrated. Since direct horizontal transmission requires close contact of animals, it is considered only relevant for within-farm spreading of BTV. The genetic determinants which enable vector-free transmission are present in virus strains circulating in the field. More research into the genetic changes which enable vector-free transmission is essential to better evaluate the risks associated with outbreaks of new BTV serotypes and to design more appropriate control measures.

  13. Accelerated generation of human induced pluripotent stem cells with retroviral transduction and chemical inhibitors under physiological hypoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Hidenori [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Hashimoto, Yoshiya [Department of Biomaterials, Osaka Dental University, 8-1, Hanazonocho, Kuzuha, Hirakatashi, Osaka 573-1121 (Japan); Nakada, Akira; Shigeno, Keiji [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Tatsuo, E-mail: nakamura@frontier.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Bioartificial Organs, Institute for Frontier Medical Sciences, Kyoto University, 53 Kawaharacho, Shogoin, Sakyoku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Very rapid generation of human iPS cells under optimized conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Five chemical inhibitors under hypoxia boosted reprogramming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We performed genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. -- Abstract: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of a defined set of pluripotency-associated transcription factors. Human iPS cells can be propagated indefinitely, while maintaining the capacity to differentiate into all cell types in the body except for extra-embryonic tissues. This technology not only represents a new way to use individual-specific stem cells for regenerative medicine but also constitutes a novel method to obtain large amounts of disease-specific cells for biomedical research. Despite their great potential, the long reprogramming process (up to 1 month) remains one of the most significant challenges facing standard virus-mediated methodology. In this study, we report the accelerated generation of human iPS cells from adipose-derived stem (ADS) cells, using a new combination of chemical inhibitors under a setting of physiological hypoxia in conjunction with retroviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and L-Myc. Under optimized conditions, we observed human embryonic stem (ES)-like cells as early as 6 days after the initial retroviral transduction. This was followed by the emergence of fully reprogrammed cells bearing Tra-1-81-positive and DsRed transgene-silencing properties on day 10. The resulting cell lines resembled human ES cells in many respects including proliferation rate, morphology, pluripotency-associated markers, global gene expression patterns, genome-wide DNA methylation states, and the ability to differentiate into all three of the germ layers, both in vitro and in vivo. Our method, when combined with chemical inhibitors under conditions of physiological hypoxia, offers a powerful tool for rapidly

  14. Dental caries prevalence in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients receiving highly active anti-retroviral therapy in kermanshah, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Davoodi, Poorandokht; Abdolsamadi, Hamid Reza; Jazaeri, Mina; Malekzadeh, Hossein

    2014-02-03

    Introduction of new approaches for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection such as anti-retroviral medicines has resulted in an increase in the life expectancy of HIV patient. Evaluating the dental health status as a part of their general health care is needed in order to improve the quality of life in these patients. The aim of this study was to compare the root and crown caries rate in HIV patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with that rate in HIV patients without treatment option. This cross sectional study consisting of 100 individuals of both genders with human immunodeficiency virus were divided into two groups: i. group 1 (treatment group) including 50 patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) receiving HAART and ii. group 2 (control group) including 50 HIV infected patients not receiving HAART. Dental examinations were done by a dentist under suitable light using periodontal probe. For each participant, numbers of decay (D), missed (M), filled (F), Decayed missed and filled teeth (DMFT), decay surface (Ds), missed surface (Ms), filled surface (Fs), Decayed missed and filled surfaces (DMFS), and tooth and root caries were recorded. Data were analyzed using Chi-square test and independent t test using SPSS 13.0, while p-value of <0.05 was considered statistically significant in all analysis. The mean and standard deviation (SD) of decayed, missed and filled teeth of those who were on highly active antiretroviral therapy was 6.86 ± 3.57, 6.39 ± 6.06 and 1.89 ± 1.93, respectively. There was no significant difference between these values regarding to the treatment of patients. The mean and standard deviation of DMFT, DMFS and the number of decayed root surfaces were 15.14 ± 6.09, 56.79 ± 28.56, and 4.96 ± 2.89 in patients treated by anti-retroviral medicine which were not significantly different compared to those without this treatment. According to the results of the present study, highly

  15. Anti-inflammatory and vasoprotective activity of a retroviral-derived peptide, homologous to human endogenous retroviruses: endothelial cell effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George J Cianciolo

    Full Text Available Malignant and inflammatory tissues sometimes express endogenous retroviruses or their proteins. A highly-conserved sequence from retroviral transmembrane (TM proteins, termed the "immunosuppressive domain (ID", is associated with inhibition of immune and inflammatory functions. An octadecapeptide (MN10021 from the ID of retroviral TM protein p15E inhibits in vitro release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and increases synthesis of anti-inflammatory IL-10. We sought to determine if MN10021 has significant in vivo effects. MN10021, prepared by solid-phase synthesis, was dimerized through a naturally-occurring, carboxy-terminal cysteine. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity was determined using a murine model of sodium periodate (NaIO(4-induced peritonitis. In vivo vasoprotective effects were determined using: (1 a carrageenan-induced model of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in mice; (2 a reverse passive Arthus model in guinea pigs; and (3 vasoregulatory effects in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. In vitro studies included: (1 binding/uptake of MN10021 using human monocytes, cultured fibroblasts, and vascular endothelial cells (VEC; (2 gene expression by RT-PCR of MN10021-treated VEC; and (3 apoptosis of MN10021-treated VEC exposed to staurosporine or TNF-α. One-tenth nmol MN10021 inhibits 50 percent of the inflammatory response in the mouse peritonitis model. Furthermore, 73 nmol MN10021 completely protects mice in a lethal model of carrageenan-induced DIC and inhibits vascular leak in both the mouse DIC model and a guinea pig reverse passive Arthus reaction. MN10021 binds to and is taken up in a specific manner by both human monocytes and VEC but not by cultured human fibroblasts. Surprisingly, orally-administered MN10021 lowers blood pressure in SHR rats by 10-15% within 1 h suggesting a direct or indirect effect on the vascular endothelium. MN10021 and derived octapeptides induce iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase mRNA in VEC

  16. Introduction to matrices and vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Jacob T

    2001-01-01

    In this concise undergraduate text, the first three chapters present the basics of matrices - in later chapters the author shows how to use vectors and matrices to solve systems of linear equations. 1961 edition.

  17. All optical vector magnetometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I research project will investigate a novel method of operating an atomic magnetometer to simultaneously measure total magnetic fields and vector magnetic...

  18. GRE Enzymes for Vector Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme data that were collected during the 2004-2006 EMAP-GRE program. These data were then used by Moorhead et al (2016) in their ecoenzyme vector...

  19. A Note on Vector Bimeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    Phrases: N/A ] 19 RCT lontilue on revrm if necozsary and identify by block number) •"SA Fubini type theorem is obtained for vector bimasure integrals...Abstract A Fubini type theorem is obtained for vector bimeasure integrals. AMS (1980) subject classification: Primary 28B05; Secondary 60G12...Ylinen [11]. In the works mentioned above the authors consistently impose, in their definition of integrability. a Fubini type condition which cannot

  20. Glucose signalling pathway controls the programmed ribosomal frameshift efficiency in retroviral-like element Ty3 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkel, Sezai; Kaplan, Güliz; Farabaugh, Philip J

    2011-11-01

    Ty3 elements of S. cerevisiae contain two overlapping coding regions, GAG3 and POL3, which are functional homologues of retroviral gag and pol genes, respectively. Pol3 is translated as a Gag3-Pol3 fusion protein dependent on a +1 programmed frameshift at a site with the overlap between the two genes. We show that the Ty3 frameshift frequency varies up to 10-fold in S. cerevisiae cells depending on carbon source. Frameshift efficiency is significantly lower in cells growing on glucose as carbon source than in cells growing on poor alternative carbon sources (glycerol/lactate or galactose). Our results indicate that Ty3 programmed ribosomal frameshift efficiency in response to glucose signalling requires two protein kinases: Snf1p and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Increased frameshifting on alternative carbon sources also appears to require cytoplasmic localization of Snf1p, mediated by the Sip2p protein. In addition to the two required protein kinases, our results implicate that Stm1p, a ribosome-associated protein involved in nutrient sensing, is essential for the carbon source-dependent regulation of Ty3 frameshifting. These data indicate that Ty3 programmed ribosomal frameshift is not a constitutive process but that it is regulated in response to the glucose-signalling pathway. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Circulating heat shock protein 60 levels are elevated in HIV patients and are reduced by anti-retroviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Anraku

    Full Text Available Circulating heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60 and heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10 have been associated with pro- and anti-inflammatory activity, respectively. To determine whether these heat shock proteins might be associated with the immune activation seen in HIV-infected patients, the plasma levels of Hsp60 and Hsp10 were determined in a cohort of 20 HIV-infected patients before and after effective combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART. We show for the first time that circulating Hsp60 levels are elevated in HIV-infected patients, with levels significantly reduced after cART, but still higher than those in HIV-negative individuals. Hsp60 levels correlated significantly with viral load, CD4 counts, and circulating soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide levels. No differences or correlations were seen for Hsp10 levels. Elevated circulating Hsp60 may contribute to the immune dysfunction and non-AIDS clinical events seen in HIV-infected patients.

  2. Circulating heat shock protein 60 levels are elevated in HIV patients and are reduced by anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anraku, Itaru; Rajasuriar, Reena; Dobbin, Caroline; Brown, Richard; Lewin, Sharon R; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Circulating heat shock protein 60 (Hsp60) and heat shock protein 10 (Hsp10) have been associated with pro- and anti-inflammatory activity, respectively. To determine whether these heat shock proteins might be associated with the immune activation seen in HIV-infected patients, the plasma levels of Hsp60 and Hsp10 were determined in a cohort of 20 HIV-infected patients before and after effective combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART). We show for the first time that circulating Hsp60 levels are elevated in HIV-infected patients, with levels significantly reduced after cART, but still higher than those in HIV-negative individuals. Hsp60 levels correlated significantly with viral load, CD4 counts, and circulating soluble CD14 and lipopolysaccharide levels. No differences or correlations were seen for Hsp10 levels. Elevated circulating Hsp60 may contribute to the immune dysfunction and non-AIDS clinical events seen in HIV-infected patients.

  3. Retroviral oligonucleotide distributions correlate with biased nucleotide compositions of retrovirus sequences, suggesting a duplicative stepwise molecular evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprevotte, I; Brouillet, S; Terzian, C; Hénaut, A

    1997-02-01

    A computer-assisted analysis was made of 24 complete nucleotide sequences selected from the vertebrate retroviruses to represent the ten viral groups. The conclusions of this analysis extend and strengthen the previously made hypothesis on the Moloney murine leukemia virus: The evolution of the nucleotide sequence appears to have occurred mainly through at least three overlapping levels of duplication: (1) The distributions of overrepresented (3-6)-mers are consistent with the universal rule of a trend toward TG/CT excess and with the persistence of a certain degree of symmetry between the two strands of DNA. This suggests one or several original tandemly repeated sequences and some inverted duplications. (2) The existence of two general core consensuses at the level of these (3-6)-mers supports the hypothesis of a common evolutionary origin of vertebrate retroviruses. Consensuses more specific to certain sequences are compatible with phylogenetic trees established independently. The consensuses could correspond to intermediary evolutionary stages. (3) Most of the (3-6)-mers with a significantly higher than average frequency appear to be internally repeated (with monomeric or oligomeric internal iterations) and seem to be at least partly the cause of the bias observed by other researchers at the level of retroviral nucleotide composition. They suggest a third evolutionary stage by slippage-like stepwise local duplications.

  4. Promoter interference mediated by the U3 region in early-generation HIV-1-derived lentivirus vectors can influence detection of transgene expression in a cell-type and species-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Samantha L; Fleming, Jane; Rowe, Peter B; Alexander, Ian E

    2003-08-10

    In a previous study using an early-generation VSV-G-pseudotyped lentivirus vector encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the transcriptional control of a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate-early promoter, we examined transduction efficiency in dissociated dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cultures. In cultures of murine origin, transgene expression was observed solely in the sensory neurons with the stromal cell population failing to show evidence of transduction. In contrast, efficient and sustained transduction of both sensory neurons and the stromal cell population was observed in cultures of human origin. Given the widespread use of murine models in preclinical gene therapy studies, in the current study we investigated the basis of this apparent neuron specificity of lentivirus-mediated transduction in murine DRG cultures. The interspecies differences persisted at high multiplicities of infection, and irrespective of whether lentiviral vector stocks were packaged in the presence or absence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) accessory proteins. Cell-type specificity of CMV promoter expression, tropism of the VSV-G envelope, and blocks to molecular transduction were also precluded as possible mechanisms, thereby implicating transcriptional repression of the internal heterologous promoter. This promoter interference effect was found to be mediated by cis-acting sequences upstream of the core promoter elements located in the U3 region of the proviral long terminal repeats (LTRs). Deletion of this region, as in late-generation self-inactivating (SIN) lentivirus vectors, relieves this effect. This provides a basis for reevaluating data produced using early-generation U3-bearing lentivirus vectors and for reconciling these with results obtained using more contemporary SIN lentivirus vectors carrying a U3 deletion.

  5. Phenotype correction of hemophilia A mice with adeno-associated virus vectors carrying the B domain-deleted canine factor VIII gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiwata, Akira; Mimuro, Jun; Kashiwakura, Yuji; Niimura, Masanori; Takano, Katsuhiro; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Madoiwa, Seiji; Mizukami, Hiroaki; Okada, Takashi; Naka, Hiroyuki; Yoshioka, Akira; Ozawa, Keiya; Sakata, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors carrying the B domain-deleted canine FVIII (BDD cFVIII) gene utilizing the beta-actin minimum promoter (167b) pseudotyped with serotype 1 (AAV1-beta-actin-cFVIII) and serotype 8 (AAV8-beta-actin-cFVIII) were developed to express cFVIII in hemophilia A mice. FVIII clotting activities measured by the APTT method increased in hemophilia A mice with intramuscular injection of AAV1-beta-actin-cFVIII in a dose-dependent manner. Therapeutic FVIII levels (2.9+/-1.0%) in hemophilia A mice with the AAV1-beta-actin-cFVIII dose of 1 x 10(12) gc/body were achieved, suggesting partial correction of the phenotype with AAV1-beta-actin-cFVIII vectors. FVIII clotting activity levels in hemophilia A mice with intravenous injection of AAV8-beta-actin-cFVIII also were increased dose-dependently, achieving therapeutic FVIII levels (5-90%) in hemophilia A mice with the AAV8-beta-actin-cFVIII doses of 1-3 x 10(11) gc/body and supernormal FVIII levels (180-670%) in hemophilia A mice with the AAV8-beta-actin-cFVIII dose of 1 x 10(12) gc/body. Transduction of the liver with AAV8-beta-actin-cFVIII is superior to transduction of skeletal muscles with AAV1cFVIII regarding the FVIII production and antibody formation. These data suggested that both AAV1 and AAV8 vectors carrying the FVIII gene utilizing a minimum promoter have a potential for hemophilia A gene therapy.

  6. VectorBase: a home for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Daniel; Arensburger, Peter; Atkinson, Peter; Besansky, Nora J.; Bruggner, Robert V.; Butler, Ryan; Campbell, Kathryn S.; Christophides, George K.; Christley, Scott; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Emmert, David; Hammond, Martin; Hill, Catherine A.; Kennedy, Ryan C.; Lobo, Neil F.; MacCallum, M. Robert; Madey, Greg; Megy, Karine; Redmond, Seth; Russo, Susan; Severson, David W.; Stinson, Eric O.; Topalis, Pantelis; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Birney, Ewan; Gelbart, William M.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Louis, Christos; Collins, Frank H.

    2007-01-01

    VectorBase () is a web-accessible data repository for information about invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. VectorBase annotates and maintains vector genomes providing an integrated resource for the research community. Currently, VectorBase contains genome information for two organisms: Anopheles gambiae, a vector for the Plasmodium protozoan agent causing malaria, and Aedes aegypti, a vector for the flaviviral agents causing Yellow fever and Dengue fever. PMID:17145709

  7. Decays of the vector glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Sammet, Julia; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2017-06-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons in the framework of a model of QCD. While absolute values of widths cannot be predicted because the corresponding coupling constants are unknown, some interesting branching ratios can be evaluated by setting the mass of the yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by quenched lattice QCD. We find that the decay mode ω π π should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain O →b1π →ω π π and through the direct coupling O →ω π π ). Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into π K K*(892 ) is sizable. Moreover, the decays into ρ π and K*(892 )K are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the ρ π puzzle of the charmonium state ψ (2 S ) thanks to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. If the width is sufficiently small (≲100 MeV ) it should not escape future detection. It should be stressed that the employed model is based on some inputs and simplifying assumptions: the value of glueball mass (at present, the quenched lattice value is used), the lack of mixing of the glueball with other quarkonium states, and the use of few interaction terms. It then represents a first step toward the identification of the main decay channels of the vector glueball, but shall be improved when corresponding experimental candidates and/or new lattice results will be available.

  8. The biological control of disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenichi W; Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2012-09-21

    Vector-borne diseases are common in nature and can have a large impact on humans, livestock and crops. Biological control of vectors using natural enemies or competitors can reduce vector density and hence disease transmission. However, the indirect interactions inherent in host-vector disease systems make it difficult to use traditional pest control theory to guide biological control of disease vectors. This necessitates a conceptual framework that explicitly considers a range of indirect interactions between the host-vector disease system and the vector's biological control agent. Here we conduct a comparative analysis of the efficacy of different types of biological control agents in controlling vector-borne diseases. We report three key findings. First, highly efficient predators and parasitoids of the vector prove to be effective biological control agents, but highly virulent pathogens of the vector also require a high transmission rate to be effective. Second, biocontrol agents can successfully reduce long-term host disease incidence even though they may fail to reduce long-term vector densities. Third, inundating a host-vector disease system with a natural enemy of the vector has little or no effect on reducing disease incidence, but inundating the system with a competitor of the vector has a large effect on reducing disease incidence. The comparative framework yields predictions that are useful in developing biological control strategies for vector-borne diseases. We discuss how these predictions can inform ongoing biological control efforts for host-vector disease systems. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Zika Virus Mosquito Vectors: Competence, Biology, and Vector Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Elizabeth B; Kramer, Laura D

    2017-12-16

    Zika virus (ZIKV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) has become one of the most medically important mosquito-borne viruses because of its ability to cause microcephaly in utero and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. This virus emerged from its sylvatic cycle in Africa to cause an outbreak in Yap, Federated States of Micronesia in 2007, French Polynesia in 2014, and most recently South America in 2015. The rapid expansion of ZIKV in the Americas largely has been due to the biology and behavior of its vector, Aedes aegypti. Other arboviruses transmitted by Ae. aegypti include the 2 flaviviruses dengue virus and yellow fever virus and the alphavirus chikungunya virus, which are also (re)emerging viruses in the Americas. This mosquito vector is highly domesticated, living in close association with humans in urban households. Its eggs are desiccation resistant, and the larvae develop rapidly in subtropical and tropical environments. Climate warming is facilitating range expansion of Ae. aegypti, adding to the threat this mosquito poses to human health, especially in light of the difficulty controlling it. Aedes albopictus, another highly invasive arbovirus vector that has only been implicated in one country (Gabon), is an important vector of ZIKV, but because of its wide geographic distribution may become a more important vector in the future. This article discusses the historical background of ZIKV and the biology and ecology of these 2 vectors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Generalized Selection Weighted Vector Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Lukac

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a class of nonlinear multichannel filters capable of removing impulsive noise in color images. The here-proposed generalized selection weighted vector filter class constitutes a powerful filtering framework for multichannel signal processing. Previously defined multichannel filters such as vector median filter, basic vector directional filter, directional-distance filter, weighted vector median filters, and weighted vector directional filters are treated from a global viewpoint using the proposed framework. Robust order-statistic concepts and increased degree of freedom in filter design make the proposed method attractive for a variety of applications. Introduced multichannel sigmoidal adaptation of the filter parameters and its modifications allow to accommodate the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics. Simulation studies reported in this paper indicate that the proposed filter class is computationally attractive, yields excellent performance, and is able to preserve fine details and color information while efficiently suppressing impulsive noise. This paper is an extended version of the paper by Lukac et al. presented at the 2003 IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03 in Grado, Italy.

  11. A generalized nonlocal vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Bacim; Liu, Kuo; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-10-01

    A nonlocal vector calculus was introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) that has proved useful for the analysis of the peridynamics model of nonlocal mechanics and nonlocal diffusion models. A formulation is developed that provides a more general setting for the nonlocal vector calculus that is independent of particular nonlocal models. It is shown that general nonlocal calculus operators are integral operators with specific integral kernels. General nonlocal calculus properties are developed, including nonlocal integration by parts formula and Green's identities. The nonlocal vector calculus introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) is shown to be recoverable from the general formulation as a special example. This special nonlocal vector calculus is used to reformulate the peridynamics equation of motion in terms of the nonlocal gradient operator and its adjoint. A new example of nonlocal vector calculus operators is introduced, which shows the potential use of the general formulation for general nonlocal models.

  12. A new system for parallel drug screening against multiple-resistant HIV mutants based on lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN vectors and multi-colour analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokofjeva Maria M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite progress in the development of combined antiretroviral therapies (cART, HIV infection remains a significant challenge for human health. Current problems of cART include multi-drug-resistant virus variants, long-term toxicity and enormous treatment costs. Therefore, the identification of novel effective drugs is urgently needed. Methods We developed a straightforward screening approach for simultaneously evaluating the sensitivity of multiple HIV gag-pol mutants to antiviral drugs in one assay. Our technique is based on multi-colour lentiviral self-inactivating (SIN LeGO vector technology. Results We demonstrated the successful use of this approach for screening compounds against up to four HIV gag-pol variants (wild-type and three mutants simultaneously. Importantly, the technique was adapted to Biosafety Level 1 conditions by utilising ecotropic pseudotypes. This allowed upscaling to a large-scale screening protocol exploited by pharmaceutical companies in a successful proof-of-concept experiment. Conclusions The technology developed here facilitates fast screening for anti-HIV activity of individual agents from large compound libraries. Although drugs targeting gag-pol variants were used here, our approach permits screening compounds that target several different, key cellular and viral functions of the HIV life-cycle. The modular principle of the method also allows the easy exchange of various mutations in HIV sequences. In conclusion, the methodology presented here provides a valuable new approach for the identification of novel anti-HIV drugs.

  13. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Chang Albershardt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8 T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1.

  14. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVex(TM)-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; Ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1.

  15. LV305, a dendritic cell-targeting integration-deficient ZVexTM-based lentiviral vector encoding NY-ESO-1, induces potent anti-tumor immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albershardt, Tina Chang; Campbell, David James; Parsons, Andrea Jean; Slough, Megan Merrill; ter Meulen, Jan; Berglund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We have engineered an integration-deficient lentiviral vector, LV305, to deliver the tumor antigen NY-ESO-1 to human dendritic cells in vivo through pseudotyping with a modified Sindbis virus envelop protein. Mice immunized once with LV305 developed strong, dose-dependent, multifunctional, and cytotoxic NY-ESO-1-specific cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8) T cells within 14 days post-immunization and could be boosted with LV305 at least twice to recall peak-level CD8 T-cell responses. Immunization with LV305 protected mice against tumor growth in an NY-ESO-1-expressing CT26 lung metastasis model, with the protective effect abrogated upon depletion of CD8 T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells, alone or together with CD4 T cells or natural killer cells, from LV305-immunized donor mice to tumor-bearing recipient mice conferred significant protection against metastatic tumor growth. Biodistribution of injected LV305 in mice was limited to the site of injection and the draining lymph node, and injected LV305 exhibited minimal excretion. Mice injected with LV305 developed little to no adverse effects, as evaluated by toxicology studies adherent to good laboratory practices. Taken together, these data support the development of LV305 as a clinical candidate for treatment against tumors expressing NY-ESO-1. PMID:27626061

  16. A Promising Vector for TCR Gene Therapy: Differential Effect of siRNA, 2A Peptide, and Disulfide Bond on the Introduced TCR Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Okamoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive immunotherapy using TCR gene-modified T-lymphocytes is an attractive strategy for targeting malignancies. However, TCR mispairings between endogenous and introduced TCR chains are a major concern, as they may induce mixed TCRs with unknown specificities and may reduce the expression of therapeutic TCRs. To overcome these problems, we have recently established a novel retroviral siTCR vector encoding small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs to knockdown endogenous TCR genes for the efficient expression of therapeutic TCRs. In this study, to improve the efficacy of siTCR vectors, we developed 2A peptide-based siTCR vectors that could increase the expression levels of transduced TCRs compared with internal promoter-based siTCR vectors. We also evaluated the efficacy of an siTCR strategy and the addition of a new interchain disulfide bond created by cysteine modification. We found that the effect of the cysteine modification depended on TCR variations, while the siTCR strategy improved the expression of all TCRs tested. Furthermore, the combined effect of the siTCR and cysteine modification strategies was highly significant for certain TCRs. Therefore, our novel siTCR technology, in isolation or in combination with another strategy, may open the door to effective immunotherapy for cancer patients.

  17. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Current ultrasonic blood flow velocity measurement systems are subject to a number of limitations, including limited frame rate, aliasing artifacts, and that only the velocity component along the ultrasound beam is estimated. This dissertation aims at solving some of these problems. The main part...... of the thesis considers a method for estimating the two-dimensional velocity vector within the image plane. This method, called synthetic aperture vector flow imaging, is first shortly reviewed. The main contribution of this work is partly an analysis of the method with respect to focusing effects, motion...... estimation. The method can be used for increasing the frame rate of color flow maps or alternatively for a new imaging modality entitled quadroplex imaging, featuring a color flow map and two independent spectrograms at a high frame rate. The second is an alternative method for ultrasonic vector velocity...

  18. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  19. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon

    ultrasonic vector flow estimation and bring it a step closer to a clinical application. A method for high frame rate 3-D vector flow estimation in a plane using the transverse oscillation method combined with a 1024 channel 2-D matrix array is presented. The proposed method is validated both through phantom......For the last decade, the field of ultrasonic vector flow imaging has gotten an increasingly attention, as the technique offers a variety of new applications for screening and diagnostics of cardiovascular pathologies. The main purpose of this PhD project was therefore to advance the field of 3-D...... hampers the task of real-time processing. In a second study, some of the issue with the 2-D matrix array are solved by introducing a 2-D row-column (RC) addressing array with only 62 + 62 elements. It is investigated both through simulations and via experimental setups in various flow conditions...

  20. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  1. Learning with Support Vector Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Support Vectors Machines have become a well established tool within machine learning. They work well in practice and have now been used across a wide range of applications from recognizing hand-written digits, to face identification, text categorisation, bioinformatics, and database marketing. In this book we give an introductory overview of this subject. We start with a simple Support Vector Machine for performing binary classification before considering multi-class classification and learning in the presence of noise. We show that this framework can be extended to many other scenarios such a

  2. Topological vector spaces and distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, John

    2012-01-01

    ""The most readable introduction to the theory of vector spaces available in English and possibly any other language.""-J. L. B. Cooper, MathSciNet ReviewMathematically rigorous but user-friendly, this classic treatise discusses major modern contributions to the field of topological vector spaces. The self-contained treatment includes complete proofs for all necessary results from algebra and topology. Suitable for undergraduate mathematics majors with a background in advanced calculus, this volume will also assist professional mathematicians, physicists, and engineers.The precise exposition o

  3. VECTOR MAPS IN MOBILE ROBOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ales Jelinek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of vector map techniques used in mobile robotics and to present current state of the research in this field at the Brno University of Technology. Vector maps are described as a part of the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM problem in the environment without artificial landmarks or global navigation system. The paper describes algorithms from data acquisition to map building but particular emphasis is put on segmentation, line extraction and scan matching algorithms. All significant algorithms are illustrated with experimental results.

  4. Dynamical analysis of a multi-strain model of HIV in the presence of anti-retroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharomi, O; Gumel, A B

    2008-07-01

    One major drawback associated with the use of anti-retroviral drugs in curtailing HIV spread in a population is the emergence and transmission of HIV strains that are resistant to these drugs. This paper presents a deterministic HIV treatment model, which incorporates a wild (drug sensitive) and a drug-resistant strain, for gaining insights into the dynamical features of the two strains, and determining effective ways to control HIV spread under this situation. Rigorous qualitative analysis of the model reveals that it has a globally asymptotically stable disease-free equilibrium whenever a certain epidemiological threshold (R t 0) is less than unity and that the disease will persist in the population when this threshold exceeds unity. Further, for the case where R t 0 > 1, it is shown that the model can have two co-existing endemic equilibria, and competitive exclusion phenomenon occurs whenever the associated reproduction number of the resistant strain (R t r) is greater than that of the wild strain (R t w). Unlike in the treatment model, it is shown that the model without treatment can have a family of infinitely many endemic equilibria when its associated epidemiological threshold (R(0)) exceeds unity. For the case when [Formula in text], it is shown that the widespread use of treatment against the wild strain can lead to its elimination from the community if the associated reduction in infectiousness of infected individuals (treated for the wild strain) does not exceed a certain threshold value (in this case, the use of treatment is expected to make R t w < R t r.

  5. Prevalence and distribution of the GBV-C/HGV among HIV-1-infected patients under anti-retroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Rosana; Nishiya, Anna; Casseb, Jorge; Inocêncio, Lilian; Fonseca, Luiz A M; Duarte, Alberto J S

    2010-08-01

    Infection with GB virus C (GBV-C) or hepatitis G virus (HGV) is highly prevalent among HIV/AIDS patients. GBV-C/HGV viremia has not been associated with liver disease and seems to slow HIV disease progression. To study the GBV-C/HGV genotypes prevalence among HIV/AIDS patients and its association with HIV viral load (VL) and CD4+ lymphocyte counts. From February 2003 to February 2004, we analyzed 210 HIV-1-infected subjects who were on anti-retroviral therapy (ART). For 63 of them a PCR-nested to the non-coding 5' (5'NCR) region of the GBV-C/HGV was done, and for 49 a DNA direct sequencing was done. A phylogenetic analysis was performed by PHYLIP program. 63 (30%) of the HIV-1-infected patients were co-infected with GBV-C/HGV. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the following genotypes (and respective relative frequencies): 1 (10%), 2a (41%), 2b (43%), and 3 (6%). Co-infected patients presented lower HIV-1 VL and higher T CD4+ lymphocyte cells counts as compared with patients negative for GBV-C/HGV sequences (log=4.52 vs. 4.71, p=0.036), and T CD4+ lymphocyte counts (cells/mm(3)=322.6 vs. 273.5, p=0.081, respectively). T CD4+ cells counts equal to, or higher than, 200/mm(3) were significantly more common among co-infected patients than among HIV-infected-only patients (p=0.042). The lowest T CD4+ cells counts were associated with genotype 1 and the highest with genotype 2b (p=0.05). The GBV-C/HGV infection prevalence was 30% among HIV-1-infected subjects, and was associated with lower VL and higher CD4+ lymphocyte counts. GBV-C/HGV genotype 2b may be associated with better immunological response. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. [Effect of highly active anti-retroviral therapy on reducing HIV/AIDS related death in Hebei, 1989-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Suliang; Ma, Lin; Lu, Xinli; Li, Yan; Wang, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Zhao, Cuiying; Zhang, Yuqi; Zhao, Hongru

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the effect of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) on reducing HIV/AIDS related death. The analysis was conducted by using the data of 4,148 HIV/AIDS cases reported in Hebei province from 1989 to 2013. Regular follow-up, CD4 detection, registration of death were carried out for them. Free HAART has been provided to people living with HIV/AIDS who met the treatment requirement since 2003. Of 4,148 HIV/AIDS cases, 12,451.48 person years were observed, 968 cases died due to all registered death causes. The death density was 7.77/100 person years. The death density was 2.87/100 person years for the HIV/AIDS cases receiving HAART, and 16.58/100 for the HIV/AIDS cases receiving no HAART. In 1,894 AIDS cases, a total of 4,774.48 person years were observed from onset to death, 581 cases died due to all registered death causes, and the death density was 121.69/100 person years. The death density was 4.77/100 person years for the cases receiving HAART, and 125.92/100 person years for the cases receiving no HAART. In the cases with CD less than 200/mm3, the death density was 22.9/100 person years for those receiving no HAART and 5.3/100 person years for those receiving HAART. The annual analysis found that the death rate due to all registered death causes declined as the increase of HAART coverage in people living with HIV/AIDS. The expanding of HAART coverage in people infected with HIV can reduce death rate among them. Further expanding of HAART can effectively reduce the death among people living with HIV/AIDS.

  7. A novel, Q-PCR based approach to measuring endogenous retroviral clearance by capture protein A chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Lute, Scott; Norling, Lenore; Hong, Connie; Safta, Aurelia; O'Connor, Deborah; Bernstein, Lisa J; Wang, Hua; Blank, Greg; Brorson, Kurt; Chen, Qi

    2009-04-01

    Quantification of virus removal by the purification process during production is required for clinical use of biopharmaceuticals. The current validation approach for virus removal by chromatography steps typically involves time-consuming spiking experiments with expensive model viruses at bench scale. Here we propose a novel, alternative approach that can be applied in at least one instance: evaluating retroviral clearance by protein A chromatography. Our strategy uses a quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) assay that quantifies the endogenous type C retrovirus-like particle genomes directly in production Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell culture harvests and protein A pools. This eliminates the need to perform spiking with model viruses, and measures the real virus from the process. Using this new approach, clearance values were obtained that was comparable to those from the old model-virus spike/removal approach. We tested the concept of design space for CHO retrovirus removal using samples from a protein A characterization study, where a wide range of chromatographic operating conditions were challenged, including load density, flow rate, wash, pooling, temperature, and resin life cycles. Little impact of these variables on CHO retrovirus clearance was found, arguing for implementation of the design space approach for viral clearance to support operational ranges and manufacturing excursions. The viral clearance results from Q-PCR were confirmed by an orthogonal quantitative product-enhanced reverse transcriptase (Q-PERT) assay that quantifies CHO retrovirus by their reverse transcriptase (RT) enzyme activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that protein A chromatography is a robust retrovirus removal step and CHO retrovirus removal can be directly measured at large scale using Q-PCR assays.

  8. Effect of Micronutrient and Probiotic Fortified Yogurt on Immune-Function of Anti-Retroviral Therapy Naive HIV Patients  

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dik F. Habbema

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Micronutrient supplementation has been shown to reduce the progression of HIV but does not have an effect on the intestinal barrier or the intestinal microbiota of HIV patients. Studies have suggested that probiotics could potentially complement micronutrients in preserving the immune-function of HIV patients. Objective: Assess the impact of micronutrient supplemented probiotic yogurt on the immune function of HIV patients. Design: We performed a randomized, double blind, controlled trial with CD4 count as primary outcome among HIV patients naïve to anti-retroviral treatment. Secondary outcomes included hematological parameters, incidence of diarrhea and clinical symptoms. A total of 112 HIV patients were randomized to receive a micronutrient fortified yogurt with (n = 55 or without additional probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 (n = 57 for four weeks. Results: An average decline in CD4 count of −70 cells/μL (95% CI: −154 to −15 was observed in the micronutrient, probiotic group versus a decrease of −63 cells/μL (95% CI: −157 to −30 in the micronutrient control group (p = 0.9. Additional probiotic supplementation was well tolerated and not associated with adverse events. No difference between groups was detected in incidence of diarrhea or clinical symptoms. An improvement of hemoglobin levels was observed for all subjects, based upon a mean difference from baseline of 1.4 g/L (SD = 6 (p = 0.02. Conclusion: The addition of probiotics to a micronutrient fortified yogurt was well tolerated by HIV patients but was not associated with a further increase in CD4 count after one month.

  9. SCALAR AND VECTOR IN COMPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery F. Ochkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with two fundamental data types – scalar and vector (array, without the ability of working with them one cannot solve using computer school or university tasks in mathematics, physics, chemistry and other technical training courses. Some fundamentals of teaching computer science at school and university are covered as well. 

  10. Vector description of nonlinear magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rysak, A. E-mail: rysak@tytan.umcs.lublin.pl; Korczak, S.Z

    2001-06-01

    The definition of the nonlinear magnetization, which is usually applied in investigating superconductors is discussed in this paper. The nonlinear magnetization of the superconductor, as the response to the alternating magnetic field, is a periodic time function and is determined by the sequence of complex numbers {chi}{sub n}={chi}{sub n}'+i{chi}{sub n}'', n=1,2,3,.... The sequence {chi}{sub n} is named harmonic susceptibility. Finding some limits in this definition we propose a new description, substituting the complex sequence {chi}{sub n} with the sequence of real covariant vectors. Such a definition of the nonlinear magnetization, allows to determine function M(t) of an investigated system for an arbitrary initial phase {theta}{sub o} of the inducing magnetic field H{sub ac}=h{sub ac} sin({omega}t+{theta}{sub o}). Vector description, in our opinion, is superior to the complex one in respect of explicitness, simplicity, and universality. Circular diagrams are used to illustrate the new vector description. We also show how the vectors of the harmonic susceptibility can be derived from both numeric calculations and experimental data.

  11. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    species) only during the pupal and adult stages. Formulations of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis are economical, operationally feasible, and...12. Bees , Wasps and Hornets ..................................................................................31 B. Snakes...epidemic proportions. Transmission of the plague bacillus by fleas is species- specific. Not all fleas are competent vectors. Xenopsylla cheopis is the

  12. Parallel Sparse Matrix - Vector Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Dammann, Bernd

    This technical report contains a case study of a sparse matrix-vector product routine, implemented for parallel execution on a compute cluster with both pure MPI and hybrid MPI-OpenMP solutions. C++ classes for sparse data types were developed and the report shows how these class can be used...

  13. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    The main objective of this project was to continue the development of a synthetic aperture vector flow estimator. This type of estimator is capable of overcoming two of the major limitations in conventional ultrasound systems: 1) the inability to scan large region of interest with high temporal r...

  14. The consequences of poor vectorization

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This talk briefly discusses the vectorization problem and how it impacts scientific and engineering systems. A simple cost model of designing such system in context of different phases of software lifetime is considered. Finally a concept for scalable solution is presented.

  15. Constraints in vector meson photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F

    2000-01-31

    Constraints are discussed for spin observables extracted from photoproduction of vector mesons. These constraints originate from positivity of the spin density matrix and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data. Spin observables need to be defined in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame.

  16. Constraints in Vector Meson Photoproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F.

    2000-01-01

    Constraints are discussed for spin observables extracted from photoproduction of vector mesons. These constraints originate from positivity of the spin density matrix and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data. Spin observables need to be defined in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame.

  17. On Weighted Support Vector Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xixuan; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new type of weighted support vector regression (SVR), motivated by modeling local dependencies in time and space in prediction of house prices. The classic weights of the weighted SVR are added to the slack variables in the objective function (OF‐weights). This procedure directly...

  18. Portfolio Analysis for Vector Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Classic stock portfolio analysis provides an applied context for Lagrange multipliers that undergraduate students appreciate. Although modern methods of portfolio analysis are beyond the scope of vector calculus, classic methods reinforce the utility of this material. This paper discusses how to introduce classic stock portfolio analysis in a…

  19. Large N Expansion. Vector Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary version of a contribution to the "Quantum Field Theory. Non-Perturbative QFT" topical area of "Modern Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics" (SELECTA), eds. Aref'eva I, and Sternheimer D, Springer (2007). Consists of two parts - "main article" (Large N Expansion. Vector Models) and a "brief article" (BPHZL Renormalization).

  20. Vector-meson dominance revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terschlüsen Carla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of mesons with electromagnetism is often well described by the concept of vector-meson dominance (VMD. However, there are also examples where VMD fails. A simple chiral Lagrangian for pions, rho and omega mesons is presented which can account for the respective agreement and disagreement between VMD and phenomenology in the sector of light mesons.

  1. Sum rule analysis of vector and axial-vector spectral functions with excited states in vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Hohler, Paul M.; Rapp, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We simultaneously analyze vector and axial-vector spectral functions in vacuum using hadronic models constrained by experimental data and the requirement that Weinberg-type sum rules are satisfied. Upon explicit inclusion of an excited vector state, viz. rho', and the requirement that the perturbative continua are degenerate in vector and axial-vector channels, we deduce the existence of an excited axial-vector resonance state, a1', in order that the Weinberg sum rules are satisfied. The resu...

  2. Mutational library analysis of selected amino acids in the receptor binding domain of envelope of Akv murine leukemia virus by conditionally replication competent bicistronic vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrami, Shervin; Jespersen, Thomas; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2003-01-01

    The envelope protein of retroviruses is responsible for viral entry into host cells. Here, we describe a mutational library approach to dissect functional domains of the envelope protein involving a retroviral vector, which expresses both the envelope protein of Akv murine leukemia virus (MLV...... mutational library of Arg 85 and Asp 86 in the first variable region of Akv envelope protein. Homologous amino acids to Asp 86 in Moloney and Friend murine leukemia viruses are thought to be directly involved in receptor binding. Subsequent selection of mutants capable of infecting murine NIH 3T3 cells...... indicated that the wild type aspartic acid or another hydrophilic residue at position 86 is an important determinant for envelope function....

  3. The First Synthesis and Anti-retroviral Activity of 5',5'-Difluoro-3'-Hydroxy-Apiosyl Nucleoside Cyclomonophosphonic Acid Analogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seyeon; Hong, Joon Hee [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The first synthesis of novel 5',5'-difluoro-30-hydroxy apiose nucleoside cyclomonophosphonic acid analogs was performed as potent anti-retroviral agents. Phosphonation was performed by direct displacement of a triflate intermediate with diethyl(lithiodifluoromethyl) phosphonate to give the corresponding(α, α-difluoroalkyl) phosphonate. Condensation successfully proceeded from a glycosyl donor with persilylated bases to yield the nucleoside phosphonate analogs. Deprotection of diethyl phosphonates provided the target nucleoside cyclomonophosphonic acid analogs. The synthesized nucleoside analogs were subjected to anti-viral screening against the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Cytosine analogs show significant anti-HIV activity.

  4. Vector variational inequalities and their relations with vector optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjeet Kaur Suneja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, K- quasiconvex, K- pseudoconvex and other related functions have been introduced in terms of their Clarke subdifferentials, where is an arbitrary closed convex, pointed cone with nonempty interior. The (strict, weakly -pseudomonotonicity, (strict K- naturally quasimonotonicity and K- quasimonotonicity of Clarke subdifferential maps have also been defined. Further, we introduce Minty weak (MVVIP and Stampacchia weak (SVVIP vector variational inequalities over arbitrary cones. Under regularity assumption, we have proved that a weak minimum solution of vector optimization problem (VOP is a solution of (SVVIP and under the condition of K- pseudoconvexity we have obtained the converse for MVVIP (SVVIP. In the end we study the interrelations between these with the help of strict K-naturally quasimonotonicity of Clarke subdifferential map.

  5. Effective suppression of Dengue fever virus in mosquito cell cultures using retroviral transduction of hammerhead ribozymes targeting the viral genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Ahmed

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Outbreaks of Dengue impose a heavy economic burden on developing countries in terms of vector control and human morbidity. Effective vaccines against all four serotypes of Dengue are in development, but population replacement with transgenic vectors unable to transmit the virus might ultimately prove to be an effective approach to disease suppression, or even eradication. A key element of the refractory transgenic vector approach is the development of transgenes that effectively prohibit viral transmission. In this report we test the effectiveness of several hammerhead ribozymes for suppressing DENV in lentivirus-transduced mosquito cells in an attempt to mimic the transgenic use of these effector molecules in mosquitoes. A lentivirus vector that expresses these ribozymes as a fusion RNA molecule using an Ae. aegypti tRNAval promoter and terminating with a 60A tail insures optimal expression, localization, and activity of the hammerhead ribozyme against the DENV genome. Among the 14 hammerhead ribozymes we designed to attack the DENV-2 NGC genome, several appear to be relatively effective in reducing virus production from transduced cells by as much as 2 logs. Among the sequences targeted are 10 that are conserved among all DENV serotype 2 strains. Our results confirm that hammerhead ribozymes can be effective in suppressing DENV in a transgenic approach, and provide an alternative or supplementary approach to proposed siRNA strategies for DENV suppression in transgenic mosquitoes.

  6. “Marker of Self” CD47 on lentiviral vectors decreases macrophage-mediated clearance and increases delivery to SIRPA-expressing lung carcinoma tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha G Sosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lentiviruses infect many cell types and are now widely used for gene delivery in vitro, but in vivo uptake of these foreign vectors by macrophages is a limitation. Lentivectors are produced here from packaging cells that overexpress “Marker of Self” CD47, which inhibits macrophage uptake of cells when prophagocytic factors are also displayed. Single particle analyses show “hCD47-Lenti” display properly oriented human-CD47 for interactions with the macrophage's inhibitory receptor SIRPA. Macrophages derived from human and NOD/SCID/Il2rg−/− (NSG mice show a SIRPA-dependent decrease in transduction, i.e., transgene expression, by hCD47-Lenti compared to control Lenti. Consistent with known “Self” signaling pathways, macrophage transduction by control Lenti is decreased by drug inhibition of Myosin-II to the same levels as hCD47-Lenti. In contrast, human lung carcinoma cells express SIRPA and use it to enhance transduction by hCD47-Lenti- as illustrated by more efficient gene deletion using CRISPR/Cas9. Intravenous injection of hCD47-Lenti into NSG mice shows hCD47 prolongs circulation, unless a blocking anti-SIRPA is preinjected. In vivo transduction of spleen and liver macrophages also decreases for hCD47-Lenti while transduction of lung carcinoma xenografts increases. hCD47 could be useful when macrophage uptake is limiting on other viral vectors that are emerging in cancer treatments (e.g., Measles glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivectors and also in targeting various SIRPA-expressing tumors such as glioblastomas.

  7. Peptides derived from evolutionarily conserved domains in Beclin-1 and Beclin-2 enhance the entry of lentiviral vectors into human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdoul, Saliha; Cosette, Jeremie; Seye, Ababacar K; Bernard, Eric; Frin, Sophie; Holic, Nathalie; Chazal, Nathalie; Briant, Laurence; Espert, Lucile; Galy, Anne; Fenard, David

    2017-11-10

    Autophagy-related proteins such as Beclin-1 are involved in an array of complex processes, including antiviral responses, and may also modulate the efficiency of gene therapy viral vectors. The Tat-Beclin-1 (TB1) peptide has been reported as an autophagy-inducing factor inhibiting the replication of pathogens such as HIV, type 1 (HIV-1). However, autophagy-related proteins are also essential for the early steps of HIV-1 infection. Therefore, we examined the effects of the Beclin-1 evolutionarily conserved domain in TB1 on viral transduction and autophagy in single-round HIV infection or with nonreplicative HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors. TB1 enhanced transduction with various pseudotypes but without inducing the autophagy process. TB1 augmented the transduction of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells while maintaining their capacity to engraft in vivo into humanized mice. TB1 was as effective as other transduction additives and functioned by enhancing the adhesion and fusion of viral particles with target cells but not their aggregation. We also found that the N-terminal L1 loop was critical for TB1 transduction-enhancing activity. Interestingly, the Tat-Beclin-2 (TB2) peptide, derived from the human Beclin-2 protein, was even more potent than TB1 in promoting viral transduction and infection. Taken together, our findings suggest that the TB1 and TB2 peptides enhance the viral entry step. Tat-Beclin peptides therefore represent a new family of viral transduction enhancers for potential use in gene therapy. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. “Marker of Self” CD47 on lentiviral vectors decreases macrophage-mediated clearance and increases delivery to SIRPA-expressing lung carcinoma tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosale, Nisha G; Ivanovska, Irena I; Tsai, Richard K; Swift, Joe; Hsu, Jake W; Alvey, Cory M; Zoltick, Philip W; Discher, Dennis E

    2016-01-01

    Lentiviruses infect many cell types and are now widely used for gene delivery in vitro, but in vivo uptake of these foreign vectors by macrophages is a limitation. Lentivectors are produced here from packaging cells that overexpress “Marker of Self” CD47, which inhibits macrophage uptake of cells when prophagocytic factors are also displayed. Single particle analyses show “hCD47-Lenti” display properly oriented human-CD47 for interactions with the macrophage’s inhibitory receptor SIRPA. Macrophages derived from human and NOD/SCID/Il2rg−/− (NSG) mice show a SIRPA-dependent decrease in transduction, i.e., transgene expression, by hCD47-Lenti compared to control Lenti. Consistent with known “Self” signaling pathways, macrophage transduction by control Lenti is decreased by drug inhibition of Myosin-II to the same levels as hCD47-Lenti. In contrast, human lung carcinoma cells express SIRPA and use it to enhance transduction by hCD47-Lenti- as illustrated by more efficient gene deletion using CRISPR/Cas9. Intravenous injection of hCD47-Lenti into NSG mice shows hCD47 prolongs circulation, unless a blocking anti-SIRPA is preinjected. In vivo transduction of spleen and liver macrophages also decreases for hCD47-Lenti while transduction of lung carcinoma xenografts increases. hCD47 could be useful when macrophage uptake is limiting on other viral vectors that are emerging in cancer treatments (e.g., Measles glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivectors) and also in targeting various SIRPA-expressing tumors such as glioblastomas. PMID:28053997

  9. Novel Bivalent Viral-Vectored Vaccines Induce Potent Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses Conferring Protection against Stringent Influenza A Virus Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tully, Claire M; Chinnakannan, Senthil; Mullarkey, Caitlin E; Ulaszewska, Marta; Ferrara, Francesca; Temperton, Nigel; Gilbert, Sarah C; Lambe, Teresa

    2017-07-19

    Seasonal influenza viruses are a common cause of acute respiratory illness worldwide and generate a significant socioeconomic burden. Influenza viruses mutate rapidly, necessitating annual vaccine reformulation because traditional vaccines do not typically induce broad-spectrum immunity. In addition to seasonal infections, emerging pandemic influenza viruses present a continued threat to global public health. Pandemic influenza viruses have consistently higher attack rates and are typically associated with greater mortality compared with seasonal strains. Ongoing strategies to improve vaccine efficacy typically focus on providing broad-spectrum immunity; although B and T cells can mediate heterosubtypic responses, typical vaccine development will augment either humoral or cellular immunity. However, multipronged approaches that target several Ags may limit the generation of viral escape mutants. There are few vaccine platforms that can deliver multiple Ags and generate robust cellular and humoral immunity. In this article, we describe a novel vaccination strategy, tested preclinically in mice, for the delivery of novel bivalent viral-vectored vaccines. We show this strategy elicits potent T cell responses toward highly conserved internal Ags while simultaneously inducing high levels of Abs toward hemagglutinin. Importantly, these humoral responses generate long-lived plasma cells and generate Abs capable of neutralizing variant hemagglutinin-expressing pseudotyped lentiviruses. Significantly, these novel viral-vectored vaccines induce strong immune responses capable of conferring protection in a stringent influenza A virus challenge. Thus, this vaccination regimen induces lasting efficacy toward influenza. Importantly, the simultaneous delivery of dual Ags may alleviate the selective pressure that is thought to potentiate antigenic diversity in avian influenza viruses. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. CD4 lymphocyte response following anti-retroviral therapy in HIV/AIDS patients - A study in Osmania General Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa Rao Nanyam

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims serial four year assessment of CD4 cell response after initiation of anti-retroviral therapy (ART in patients with HIV/AIDS attending Osmania General Hospital, Hyderabad. It was a retrospective hospital based observational study. We included 110 HIV/AIDS who were on ART. Data was collected over a period of 04 years from 2005 to 2008 in the ART Centre, Upgraded Department of General Medicine, Osmania General Hospital. Data regarding CD4 cell count over 4 years was assessed for mean CD4 cell count, trends, age and sex wise distribution. All patients were on ART as per National Aids Control Organisation (NACO guidelines. Complete blood picture, serum creatinine, blood urea, serum electrolytes, liver function tests, sputum for acid fast bacilli, chest radiography, CD4 cell count in all patients, fine needle aspiration and biopsy (if necessary, magnetic resonance imaging (if necessary, computerized tomography (if necessary, colonoscopy (if necessary. The present study showed mean CD4 count improvement of 128.78 cells/mm3 after 6 months of initiation of ART, 24.77cells /mm3 after 1 year, additional 67.53 cells/mm3 after 2nd year and after 3rd year 5.59cells/mm3 from base line CD4 cell count. Improvement in CD4 count was almost equal in both male and female and in age group <25 years and above 40 years age group also. Mean CD4 cell count improvement of 240.31 cells/mm3 in females and 220.54 cells/mm3 in males to the baseline after 3 years of treatment with ART. Present study clearly shows definite improvement in CD4 cell count after ART was more than 100% irrespective of age and sex. Regular intake of drugs will improve immunologic response. Therefore strict adherence to ART /regular counseling sessions at ART centres should be stressed upon. [J Med Allied Sci 2016; 6(2.000: 68-71

  11. Sustainability of a community-based anti-retroviral care delivery model - a qualitative research study in Tete, Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasschaert, Freya; Decroo, Tom; Remartinez, Daniel; Telfer, Barbara; Lessitala, Faustino; Biot, Marc; Candrinho, Baltazar; Van Damme, Wim

    2014-01-01

    To overcome patients' reported barriers to accessing anti-retroviral therapy (ART), a community-based delivery model was piloted in Tete, Mozambique. Community ART Groups (CAGs) of maximum six patients stable on ART offered cost- and time-saving benefits and mutual psychosocial support, which resulted in better adherence and retention outcomes. To date, Médecins Sans Frontières has coordinated and supported these community-driven activities. To better understand the sustainability of the CAG model, we developed a conceptual framework on sustainability of community-based programmes. This was used to explore the data retrieved from 16 focus group discussions and 24 in-depth interviews with different stakeholder groups involved in the CAG model and to identify factors influencing the sustainability of the CAG model. We report the findings according to the framework's five components. (1) The CAG model was designed to overcome patients' barriers to ART and was built on a concept of self-management and patient empowerment to reach effective results. (2) Despite the progressive Ministry of Health (MoH) involvement, the daily management of the model is still strongly dependent on external resources, especially the need for a regulatory cadre to form and monitor the groups. These additional resources are in contrast to the limited MoH resources available. (3) The model is strongly embedded in the community, with patients taking a more active role in their own healthcare and that of their peers. They are considered as partners in healthcare, which implies a new healthcare approach. (4) There is a growing enabling environment with political will and general acceptance to support the CAG model. (5) However, contextual factors, such as poverty, illiteracy and the weak health system, influence the community-based model and need to be addressed. The community embeddedness of the model, together with patient empowerment, high acceptability and progressive MoH involvement

  12. Non-adherence to anti-retroviral therapy among HIV infected adults in Mon State of Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Win Lei Aye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The provision of Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART was started in Myanmar in 2005 in collaboration with the National AIDS Program and the private sector. Successful clinical management of HIV-infected patients is subject to optimal adherence. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of adherence to ART and identify factors associated with non-adherence to ART among HIV infected adults registered in a private sector setting in Mon State, Myanmar. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with adults living with HIV receiving ART at an HIV outpatient clinic between April and May 2016. A total of three hundred People Living with HIV(PLHIV were interviewed using a pretested and structured questionnaire. The 30 days Visual Analog Scale (VAS adherence instrument was used to assess the level of adherence. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to determine factors associated with non-adherence to ART. Results Among 300 patients (male 37.7% and female 62.3%, with a mean age of 41.3 years, standard deviation 8.7, 84% reported ≥95% adherence to ART in the past month. Among 16% of those reporting non-adherence, major reasons for skipping the medication were being busy (23%, being away from home (17.7% and being forgetful (12.3%. In multivariable logistic rgeression, low behavioural skills on ART adherence (OR = 0.31, 95% CI: 0.10-0.94, tobacco use (OR = 3.22, 95% CI:1.28-8.12, having disclosed their HIV status (OR = 0.07, 95% CI: 0.01-0.69, having a partner who was not on ART (OR = 4.25, 95% CI: 1.70-10.64 and among men, having erectile dysfunction (OR = 15.14, 95% CI: 1.41-162.66 were significant associated with ART non-adherence. Conclusion Non-adherence to ART was associated with individual moderating factors and behavioral skills. Priority measures such as addressing risk behaviour and behavioural change communication tailored to individual patients’ lifestyles requires comprehensive

  13. Incidence of WHO stage 3 and 4 conditions following initiation of anti-retroviral therapy in resource limited settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea J Curtis

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence of WHO clinical stage 3 and 4 conditions during early anti-retroviral therapy (ART in resource limited settings (RLS. DESIGN/SETTING: A descriptive analysis of routine program data collected prospectively from 25 Médecins Sans Frontières supported HIV treatment programs in eight countries between 2002 and 2010. SUBJECTS/PARTICIPANTS: 35,349 study participants with median follow-up on ART of 1.33 years (IQR 0.51-2.41. OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence in 100 person-years of WHO stage 3 or 4 conditions during 5 periods after ART initiation. Diagnoses of conditions were made according to WHO criteria and relied upon clinical assessments supported by basic laboratory investigations. RESULTS: The incidence of any WHO clinical stage 3 or 4 condition over 3 years was 40.02 per 100 person-years (31.77 for stage 3 and 8.25 for stage 4. The incidence of stage 3 and 4 conditions fell by over 97% between months 0-3 and months 25-36 (77.81 to 2.40 for stage 3 and 28.70 to 0.64 for stage 4. During months 0-3 pulmonary tuberculosis was the most common condition diagnosed in adults (incidence 22.24 per 100 person-years and children aged 5-14 years (25.76 and oral candidiasis was the most common in children <5 years (25.79. Overall incidences were higher in Africa compared with Asia (43.98 versus 12.97 for stage 3 and 8.98 versus 7.05 for stage 4 conditions, p<0.001. Pulmonary tuberculosis, weight loss, oral and oesophageal candidiasis, chronic diarrhoea, HIV wasting syndrome and severe bacterial infections were more common in Africa. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection, cryptococcosis, penicilliosis and toxoplasmosis were more common in Asia. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of WHO stage 3 and 4 conditions during the early period after ART initiation in RLS is high, but greatly reduces over time. This is likely due to both the benefits of ART and deaths of the sickest patients occurring shortly

  14. Screening for Cryptococcal Antigenemia in Anti-Retroviral Naïve AIDS Patients in Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favour Osazuwa

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cryptococcus neoformans is the most incriminated fungal pathogen causing meningitis in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS patients, and is known to constitute a major cause of deaths in AIDS patients. This study thus aimed to determine the baseline sero-prevalence of Cryptococcus neoformans infection in anti-retroviral naïve (ART-naïve AIDS patients using the serum Cryptococcal antigen (crag detection method. Baseline effect of variation in CD4 counts, as well as sex and age with sero-positivity for crag were also determined.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study included 150 (61 males and 89 females ART-naïve AIDS patients attending the Human Immunodeficiency Virus clinic (HIV at the University of Benin Teaching hospital, Benin City, Nigeria, within the period from February 2011- July 2011. Forty (18 males and 22 females HIV positive outpatients with CD4 counts >200 cells/µl who were ART-naive were recruited and used as controls. The sero-prevalence of crag in the patients and the control group was measured using the cryptococcal antigen latex agglutination system (CALAS (Meridian Bioscience, Europe and CD4 counts were measured using flow cytometry (Partec flow cytometer, Germany.Results: Of the 150 ART-naïve AIDS patients with CD4 counts £200 cells/µL; 19 (12.7% were positive for serum Cryptococcal antigen. ART-naïve AIDS patients with CD4 count ≤50 cells/µl had the highest prevalence of serum crag. Lower CD4 counts were significantly associated with positivity for serum crag (p<0.001. Age and sex had no significant effect on the sero-positivity for serum crag. One (2.5% of the controls was sero-positive for crag. Thus, serum crag was significantly associated with AIDS but not with HIV (p<0.001.Conclusion: This study uncovers a high prevalence of crag in ART- naïve AIDS patients in Benin City. The prevalence of crag was higher in ART-naïve AIDS patients with lower CD4 counts. There is an urgent need to

  15. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    over the full region of interest and a real time image at a frame rate of 20 Hz can be displayed. Real time videos have been obtained from both our research systems and from commercial BK Medical scanners. The vector velocity images reveal the full complexity of the human blood flow. It is easy to see...... direction and the correct velocity magnitude for any orientation of the vessels. At complex geometries like bifurcations, branching and for valves the approach reveals how the velocity changes magnitude and direction over the cardiac cycle. Vector velocity reveals a wealth of new information that now...... is accessible to the ultrasound community. The displaying and studying of this information is challenging as complex flow changes rapidly over the cardiac cycle....

  16. Vector Galileon and inflationary magnetogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Debottam; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2018-01-01

    Cosmological inflation provides the initial conditions for the structure formation. However, the origin of large-scale magnetic fields can not be addressed in this framework. The key issue for this long-standing problem is the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic (EM) field in 4-D. While many approaches have been proposed in the literature for breaking conformal invariance of the EM action, here, we provide a completely new way of looking at the modifications to the EM action and generation of primordial magnetic fields during inflation. We explicitly construct a higher derivative EM action that breaks conformal invariance by demanding three conditions—theory be described by vector potential Aμ and its derivatives, Gauge invariance be satisfied, and equations of motion be linear in second derivatives of vector potential. The unique feature of our model is that appreciable magnetic fields are generated at small wavelengths while tiny magnetic fields are generated at large wavelengths that are consistent with current observations.

  17. Clinical applications of power vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph M

    2009-06-01

    The study of infant vision is closely coupled to the study of the refraction, change in refraction over time, and the effect of spectacle correction on visual development. Frequently, reports are limited to descriptions of spherical equivalent or cylinder power without regard to axis, as data are frequently collected in the clinical format of sphere, cylinder, and axis (S, C, A). Conversion from clinical notation to a power vector representation of refraction allows unambiguous description of how refractions change over time and differ between repeated measurements. This article presents a series of examples of Microsoft Excel spreadsheet formulas that make the conversion from clinical notation to power vector format, and provides examples of useful applications of these methods.

  18. Active set support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicant, David R; Feinberg, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents active set support vector regression (ASVR), a new active set strategy to solve a straightforward reformulation of the standard support vector regression problem. This new algorithm is based on the successful ASVM algorithm for classification problems, and consists of solving a finite number of linear equations with a typically large dimensionality equal to the number of points to be approximated. However, by making use of the Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury formula, a much smaller matrix of the order of the original input space is inverted at each step. The algorithm requires no specialized quadratic or linear programming code, but merely a linear equation solver which is publicly available. ASVR is extremely fast, produces comparable generalization error to other popular algorithms, and is available on the web for download.

  19. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Vector fields on singular varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Brasselet, Jean-Paul; Suwa, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    Vector fields on manifolds play a major role in mathematics and other sciences. In particular, the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem gives rise to the theory of Chern classes, key manifold-invariants in geometry and topology. It is natural to ask what is the ‘good’ notion of the index of a vector field, and of Chern classes, if the underlying space becomes singular. The question has been explored by several authors resulting in various answers, starting with the pioneering work of M.-H. Schwartz and R. MacPherson. We present these notions in the framework of the obstruction theory and the Chern-Weil theory. The interplay between these two methods is one of the main features of the monograph.

  1. New Approach to Fractal Approximation of Vector-Functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igudesman, Konstantin; Davletbaev, Marsel; Shabernev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

      This paper introduces new approach to approximation of continuous vector-functions and vector sequences by fractal interpolation vector-functions which are multidimensional generalization of fractal...

  2. IN VITRO INDUCTION OF BLOOD MONONUCLEAR CELL PROLIFERATION BY ENDOGENOUS RETROVIRAL HERV-Eλ4-1 ENVELOPE PEPTIDE IN PATIENTS WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Smagin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative in vitro study of blood mononuclear cells from multiple sclerosis patients and healthy donors was performed, in order to evaluate proliferative response to a retroviral antigen, aiming to determine immunomodulatory properties of synthetic oligopeptide homologous to a highly conserved human endogenous retrovirus HERV-Eλ4-1 envelope protein. It was revealed that this oligopeptide is able to stimulate the in vitro spontaneous and mitogen-induced proliferation of blood mononuclear cells from either donor and multiple sclerosis patients. Intensity of this oligopeptide-induced stimulatory effect depends on the protein concentration, and on initial level of blood immunocompetent cells proliferation. Hence, the endogenous retrovirus HERV-Eλ4-1 envelope region protein is able to increase functional activity of immunocompetent cells from human blood, that suggesting its immunostimulatory properties. It is possible that the mitogenic effects of this protein upon immunocompetent cells of multiple sclerosis patients represent a potential mechanism of retroviral involvement into pathogenesis of the disorder.

  3. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy. PMID:26606454

  4. Combination of nanoparticle-based therapeutic vaccination and transient ablation of regulatory T cells enhances anti-viral immunity during chronic retroviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuschke, Torben; Rotan, Olga; Bayer, Wibke; Sokolova, Viktoriya; Hansen, Wiebke; Sparwasser, Tim; Dittmer, Ulf; Epple, Matthias; Buer, Jan; Westendorf, Astrid M

    2016-04-14

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to limit anti-viral immunity during chronic retroviral infection and to restrict vaccine-induced T cell responses. The objective of the study was to assess whether a combinational therapy of nanoparticle-based therapeutic vaccination and concomitant transient ablation of Tregs augments anti-viral immunity and improves virus control in chronically retrovirus-infected mice. Therefore, chronically Friend retrovirus (FV)-infected mice were immunized with calcium phosphate (CaP) nanoparticles functionalized with TLR9 ligand CpG and CD8(+) or CD4(+) T cell epitope peptides (GagL85-93 or Env gp70123-141) of FV. In addition, Tregs were ablated during the immunization process. Reactivation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) effector T cells was analysed and the viral loads were determined. Therapeutic vaccination of chronically FV-infected mice with functionalized CaP nanoparticles transiently reactivated cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells and significantly reduced the viral loads. Transient ablation of Tregs during nanoparticle-based therapeutic vaccination strongly enhanced anti-viral immunity and further decreased viral burden. Our data illustrate a crucial role for CD4(+) Foxp3(+) Tregs in the suppression of anti-viral T cell responses during therapeutic vaccination against chronic retroviral infection. Thus, the combination of transient Treg ablation and therapeutic nanoparticle-based vaccination confers robust and sustained anti-viral immunity.

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and autoimmune hepatitis during highly active anti-retroviral treatment: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Higgins Martha

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The emergence of hepatic injury in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection during highly active therapy presents a diagnostic dilemma. It may represent treatment side effects or autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hepatitis, emerging during immune restoration. Case presentation We present the case of a 42-year-old African-American woman with human immunodeficiency virus infection who presented to our emergency department with severe abdominal pain and was found to have autoimmune hepatitis. A review of the literature revealed 12 reported cases of autoimmune hepatitis in adults with human immunodeficiency virus infection, only three of whom were diagnosed after highly active anti-retroviral treatment was initiated. All four cases (including our patient were women, and one had a history of other autoimmune disorders. In our patient (the one patient case we are reporting, a liver biopsy revealed interface hepatitis, necrosis with lymphocytes and plasma cell infiltrates and variable degrees of fibrosis. All four cases required treatment with corticosteroids and/or other immune modulating agents and responded well. Conclusion Our review suggests that autoimmune hepatitis is a rare disorder which usually develops in women about six to eight months after commencing highly active anti-retroviral treatment during the recovery of CD4 lymphocytes. It represents either re-emergence of a pre-existing condition that was unrecognized or a de novo manifestation during immune reconstitution.

  6. Angles in Complex Vector Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Scharnhorst, K.

    1999-01-01

    The article reviews some of the (fairly scattered) information available in the mathematical literature on the subject of angles in complex vector spaces. The following angles and their relations are considered: Euclidean, complex, and Hermitian angles, (Kasner's) pseudo-angle, the Kaehler angle (synonyms for the latter used in the literature are: angle of inclination, characteristic deviation, holomorphic deviation, holomorphy angle, Wirtinger angle, slant angle).

  7. GAPS IN SUPPORT VECTOR OPTIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEINWART, INGO [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HUSH, DON [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCOVEL, CLINT [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LIST, NICOLAS [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-29

    We show that the stopping criteria used in many support vector machine (SVM) algorithms working on the dual can be interpreted as primal optimality bounds which in turn are known to be important for the statistical analysis of SVMs. To this end we revisit the duality theory underlying the derivation of the dual and show that in many interesting cases primal optimality bounds are the same as known dual optimality bounds.

  8. Ultrasonic Dynamic Vector Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Froggatt, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Stress inferred from measurements in specimens rather than in bonded gauges. Ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS) measures changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in material or structure at location touched by device when material or structure put under cyclic load. Includes phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe. Useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and evaluation of designs.

  9. A ocean bottom vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Teng, Yuntian; Wang, Chen; Ma, Jiemei

    2017-04-01

    The new development instrument with a compact spherical coil system and Overhauser magnetometer for measuring the total strength of the magnetic field and the vectors of strength, Delta inclination - Delta declination, meanwhile we also use a triaxial fluxgate instrument of the traditional instrument for geomagnetic vector filed measurement. The advantages of this method are be calibrated by each other and get good performances with automatic operation, good stability and high resolution. Firstly, a brief description of the instrument measurement principles and the key technologies are given. The instrument used a spherical coil system with 34 coils to product the homogeneous volume inside the coils which is large enough to accommodate the sensor of Overhauser total field sensor; the rest of the footlocker-sized ocean-bottom vector magnetometer consists of equipment to run the sensors and records its data (batteries and a data logger), weight to sink it to the sea floor, a remote-controlled acoustic release and flotation to bring the instrument back to the surface. Finally, the accuracy of the instrument was tested in the Geomagnetic station, and the measurement accuracies of total strength and components were better than 0.2nT and 1nT respectively. The figure 1 shows the development instrument structure. it includes six thick glass spheres which protect the sensor, data logger and batteries from the pressures of the deep sea, meanwhile they also provide recycling positive buoyancy; To cushion the glass, the spheres then go inside yellow plastic "hardhats". The triaxial fluxgate is inside No.1 glass spheres, data logger and batteries are inside No.2 glass spheres, the new vector sensor is inside No.3 glass spheres, acoustic communication unit is inside No.4 glass spheres, No.5 and No.6 glass spheres are empty which only provide recycling positive buoyancy. The figure 2 shows the development instrument Physical photo.

  10. Olfaction in vector-host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2010-01-01

    This book addresses the topic how blood-feeding arthropods interact with their vertebrate hosts. As the transmission of infectious vector-borne pathogens is much dependent on the contact between vector and host, the efficacy of host location is of profound importance. Interruption of vector-host

  11. Herbivore arthropods benefit from vectoring plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belliure, B.; Janssen, A.; Maris, P.C.; Peters, D.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Plants infected with pathogens often attract the pathogens' vectors, but it is not clear if this is advantageous to the vectors. We therefore quantified the direct and indirect (through the host plant) effects of a pathogen on its vector. A positive direct effect of the plant-pathogenic Tomato

  12. Vector and tensor analysis with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Borisenko, A I; Silverman, Richard A

    1979-01-01

    Concise and readable, this text ranges from definition of vectors and discussion of algebraic operations on vectors to the concept of tensor and algebraic operations on tensors. It also includes a systematic study of the differential and integral calculus of vector and tensor functions of space and time. Worked-out problems and solutions. 1968 edition.

  13. New recombinant serotypes of AAV vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangping; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, James M

    2005-06-01

    AAV based vectors can achieve stable gene transfer with minimal vector related toxicities. AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) is the first AAV that was vectored for gene transfer applications. However, the restricted tissue tropism of AAV and its low transduction efficiency have limited its further development as vector. Recent studies using vectors derived from alternative AAV serotypes such as AAV1, 4, 5 and 6 have shown improved potency and broadened tropism of the AAV vector by packaging the same vector genome with different AAV capsids. In an attempt to search for potent AAV vectors with enhanced performance profiles, molecular techniques were employed for the detection and isolation of endogenous AAVs from a variety of human and non-human primate (NHP) tissues. A family of novel primate AAVs consisting of 110 non-redundant species of proviral sequences was discovered and turned to be prevalent in 18-19% of the tissues evaluated. Phylogenetic and functional analyses revealed that primate AAVs are segregated into clades based on phylogenetic relatedness. The members within a clade share functional and serological properties. Initial evaluation in mouse models of vectors based on these novel AAVs for tissue tropism and gene transfer potency led to the identification of some vector with improved gene transfer to different target tissues. Gene therapy treatment of several mouse and canine models with novel AAV vectors achieved long term phenotypic corrections. Vectors based on new primate AAVs could become the next generation of efficient gene transfer vehicles for various gene therapy applications.

  14. Vectorizing and machine-spanning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroux, E D

    1983-09-22

    Techniques for vectorizing complex logic are shown using a decoupled sliding-surface calculation that is part of a two-dimensional Lagrangian simulation model. The same source coding can be run on many vector, parallel, and multiprocessor computers with very little or no alteration. The vectorizing techniques have been used for a wide range of problems.

  15. Fubini's Theorem for Vector-Valued Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglanov, A. V.

    1991-02-01

    The situation is considered when either the transitional or initial measure is vector-valued (the other is, respectively, scalar-valued; thus the product measure is also vector-valued). The integrable function is vector-valued. In this situation two theorems of Fubini type are proved.

  16. On the Distribution of Norm of Vector Projection and Rejection of Two Complex Normal Random Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Maleki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vector projection and vector rejection are highly common and useful operations in mathematics, information theory, and signal processing. In this paper, we find the distribution of the norm of projection and rejection vectors when the original vectors are standard complex normally distributed.

  17. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J.J.; Constable, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimoda) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  18. Problems and worked solutions in vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Shorter, LR

    2014-01-01

    ""A handy book like this,"" noted The Mathematical Gazette, ""will fill a great want."" Devoted to fully worked out examples, this unique text constitutes a self-contained introductory course in vector analysis for undergraduate and graduate students of applied mathematics.Opening chapters define vector addition and subtraction, show how to resolve and determine the direction of two or more vectors, and explain systems of coordinates, vector equations of a plane and straight line, relative velocity and acceleration, and infinitely small vectors. The following chapters deal with scalar and vect

  19. Integration of vector-valued functions with respect to vector measures defined on δ-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, N. D.; Basu, Santwana

    2011-01-01

    This paper extends the theory of scalar-valued integrable functions with respect to vector measures defined on δ-rings to the case of vector-valued tensor integrable functions with respect to vector measures defined on δ-rings. This paper also generalizes some results of G. F. Stefánsson for tensor integration theory of vector-valued functions with respect to vector measures defined on σ-algebras.

  20. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  1. Rotations with Rodrigues' vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina, E, E-mail: pge@xanum.uam.mx [Prof. Eugenio Mendez Docurro de la, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del IPN, Zacatenco 07738, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2011-09-15

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears to be a fundamental matrix that is used to express the components of the angular velocity, the rotation matrix and the angular momentum vector. The Hamiltonian formalism of rotational dynamics in terms of this vector uses the same matrix. The quantization of the rotational dynamics is performed with simple rules if one uses Rodrigues' vector and similar formal expressions for the quantum operators that mimic the Hamiltonian classical dynamics.

  2. Transversals of Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    Vector fields in the complex plane are defined by assigning the vector determined by the value P(z) to each point z in the complex plane, where P is a polynomial of one complex variable. We consider special families of so-called rotated vector fields that are determined by a polynomial multiplied...... by rotational constants. Transversals are a certain class of curves for such a family of vector fields that represent the bifurcation states for this family of vector fields. More specifically, transversals are curves that coincide with a homoclinic separatrix for some rotation of the vector field. Given...... examples of rotated families to argue this. There will be discussed several open questions concerning the number of transversals that can appear for a certain degree d of a polynomial vector field, and furthermore how transversals are analyzed with respect to bifurcations around multiple equilibrium points....

  3. Deciphering Babesia-Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Antunes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding host-pathogen-tick interactions remains a vitally important issue that might be better understood by basic research focused on each of the dyad interplays. Pathogens gain access to either the vector or host during tick feeding when ticks are confronted with strong hemostatic, inflammatory and immune responses. A prominent example of this is the Babesia spp.—tick—vertebrate host relationship. Babesia spp. are intraerythrocytic apicomplexan organisms spread worldwide, with a complex life cycle. The presence of transovarial transmission in almost all the Babesia species is the main difference between their life cycle and that of other piroplasmida. With more than 100 species described so far, Babesia are the second most commonly found blood parasite of mammals after trypanosomes. The prevalence of Babesia spp. infection is increasing worldwide and is currently classified as an emerging zoonosis. Babesia microti and Babesia divergens are the most frequent etiological agents associated with human babesiosis in North America and Europe, respectively. Although the Babesia-tick system has been extensively researched, the currently available prophylactic and control methods are not efficient, and chemotherapeutic treatment is limited. Studying the molecular changes induced by the presence of Babesia in the vector will not only elucidate the strategies used by the protozoa to overcome mechanical and immune barriers, but will also contribute toward the discovery of important tick molecules that have a role in vector capacity. This review provides an overview of the identified molecules involved in Babesia-tick interactions, with an emphasis on the fundamentally important ones for pathogen acquisition and transmission.

  4. Bridging the Vector Calculus Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne

    2003-05-01

    As with Britain and America, mathematicians and physicists are separated from each other by a common language. In a nutshell, mathematics is about functions, but physics is about things. For the last several years, we have led an NSF-supported effort to "bridge the vector calculus gap" between mathematics and physics. The unifying theme we have discovered is to emphasize geometric reasoning, not (just) algebraic computation. In this talk, we will illustrate the language differences between mathematicians and physicists, and how we are trying reconcile them in the classroom. For further information about the project go to: http://www.physics.orst.edu/bridge

  5. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-12-01

    The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease.Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary.

  6. Capsid Engineering of Adenovirus Vectors: Overcoming Early Vector-Host Interactions for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Kreppel, Florian

    2017-10-01

    Adenovirus-based vectors comprise the most frequently used vector type in clinical studies to date. Both intense lab research and insights from the clinical trials reveal the importance of a comprehensive understanding of vector-host interactions. Especially for systemic intravenous adenovirus vector delivery, it is paramount to develop safe and efficacious vectors. Very early vector-host interactions that take place in blood long before the first cell is being transduced are phenomena triggered by the surface, shape, and size of the adenovirus vector particles. Not surprisingly, a multitude of different technologies ranging from genetics to chemistry has been developed to alter the adenovirus vector surface. In this review, we discuss the most important technologies and evaluate them for their suitability to overcome hurdles imposed by early vector-host interactions.

  7. HIV-1 anti-retroviral drug effect on the C. albicans hyphal growth rate by a Bio-Cell Tracer system Efeito da droga anti-retroviral HIV-1 no crescimento de hifas de C. albicans monitoradas pelo sistema "Bio-Cell Tracer"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja Rodrigues de Melo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Declining incidence of oropharyngeal candidosis and opportunistic infections over recent years can be attributed to the use of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART. Infection with C. albicans generally involves adherence and colonization of superficial tissues. During this process, budding yeasts are able to transform to hyphae and penetrate into the deep tissue. Using the biocell tracer system, C. albicans hyphal growth was dynamically observed at the cellular level. Ritonavir was effective in the inhibition of hyphal growth with growth rate of 0.8 mum/min. This study showed the in vitro effect of HIV anti-retroviral drug on the growth rate of the C. albicans hyphae.O declínio na incidência de candidose orofaríngea e infecções oportunistas associadas a infecção pelo HIV tem sido atribuído a introdução da terapia antiretroviral combinada (HAART. Infecção por C. albicans envolve aderência e colonização da mucosa superficial. Durante este processo leveduras são capazes de transformar-se na forma de hifas e penetrar nos tecidos mais profundos. Usando o sistema "Bio-Cell Tracer", o crescimento de hifas de C. albicans foi observado dinamicamente a nível celular. Ritonavir, inibidor de protease do HIV, foi efetivo na inibição do crescimento de hifas com media de 0.8 mim/min.O presente estudo demonstrou o efeito in vitro de um agente anti-retroviral HIV sobre o crescimento de hifas de C. albicans.

  8. Retroviral and Lentiviral Safety Analysis of Gene-Modified T Cell Products and Infused HIV and Oncology Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Katherine T; Jadlowsky, Julie K; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Suhoski-Davis, Megan; Gonzalez, Vanessa E; Kulikovskaya, Irina; Gupta, Minnal; Lacey, Simon F; Plesa, Gabriela; Chew, Anne; Melenhorst, J Joseph; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H

    2018-01-03

    Replication-competent retrovirus/lentivirus (RCR/L) and insertional oncogenesis are potential safety risks with integrating viruses in gene-modified cell therapies. As such, the Food and Drug Administration guidances outline RCR/L-monitoring methods throughout the entire gene therapy treatment cycle. We present data for 17 vector lots, 375 manufactured T cell products, and 308 patients post-infusion across both HIV and oncology indications, showing no evidence of RCR/L. Given our data, a Poisson probability model estimates that a single patient, or a group of patients, would need to be followed for at least 52.8 years to observe one positive RCR/L event, highlighting the unlikelihood of RCR/L development. Additionally, we estimate the median time for lentivirus-modified T cell products to fall below the 1% vector sequence threshold in peripheral or whole blood that would trigger vector integration site analysis. These estimated times are 1.4 months in hematologic malignancies, 0.66 month in solid tumors, and 0.92 month in HIV. Based on these considerable safety data in HIV and oncology and recent Biologics License Applications filed for lentiviral-modified T cell products for hematologic malignancies, this may be an opportune time to re-evaluate the current guidelines for T cell gene therapy product testing and long-term patient monitoring. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Supporting medical decisions with vector decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprogar, M; Kokol, P; Zorman, M; Podgorelec, V; Yamamoto, R; Masuda, G; Sakamoto, N

    2001-01-01

    The article presents the extension of a common decision tree concept to a multidimensional - vector - decision tree constructed with the help of evolutionary techniques. In contrary to the common decision tree the vector decision tree can make more than just one suggestion per input sample. It has the functionality of many separate decision trees acting on a same set of training data and answering different questions. Vector decision tree is therefore simple in its form, is easy to use and analyse and can express some relationships between decisions not visible before. To explore and test the possibilities of this concept we developed a software tool--DecRain--for building vector decision trees using the ideas of evolutionary computing. Generated vector decision trees showed good results in comparison to classical decision trees. The concept of vector decision trees can be safely and effectively used in any decision making process.

  10. Vector assembly of colloids on monolayer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yang, Shenyu; Tsang, Boyce; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve

    2017-06-01

    The key to spontaneous and directed assembly is to encode the desired assembly information to building blocks in a programmable and efficient way. In computer graphics, raster graphics encodes images on a single-pixel level, conferring fine details at the expense of large file sizes, whereas vector graphics encrypts shape information into vectors that allow small file sizes and operational transformations. Here, we adapt this raster/vector concept to a 2D colloidal system and realize `vector assembly' by manipulating particles on a colloidal monolayer substrate with optical tweezers. In contrast to raster assembly that assigns optical tweezers to each particle, vector assembly requires a minimal number of optical tweezers that allow operations like chain elongation and shortening. This vector approach enables simple uniform particles to form a vast collection of colloidal arenes and colloidenes, the spontaneous dissociation of which is achieved with precision and stage-by-stage complexity by simply removing the optical tweezers.

  11. Long term reference change value of creatinine in HIV-positive patients with anti-retroviral therapy: A new tool in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiou, S; Cournil, A; Toubal, S; Bargnoux, A S; Dupuy, A M; Fernandez, C; Peyriere, H; Reynes, J; Cristol, J P

    2015-06-01

    The use of reference change value (RCV) instead of reference interval emerged as an alternative approach for longitudinal interpretation of biological marker. Follow-up of creatinine variation in HIV-positive adults remains a challenge in order to prevent renal complications. To determine the long term RCV of creatinine in HIV-positive adults receiving anti-retroviral therapy (ART) according to the use of tenofovir or ritonavir. Longitudinal study of 24 months that include 124 HIV-positive patients followed in HIV outpatient unit. Plasma creatinine was measured at 0, 6, 12 and 24 months in order to calculate the RCV. In the whole group, a 24-month RCV of creatinine was 22.5%. Whatever the ART, the index of individuality was serial creatinine results in HIV-positive adults. RCV of creatinine under ART was around 20% but reached 28% in case of association of tenofovir and ritonavir. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. HIV reverse transcriptase gene mutations in anti-retroviral treatment naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Mohanakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is designed to find out the mutational variations of reverse transcriptase (RT gene of HIV, after the traditional drug usage among anti-retroviral therapy naïve rural people living with HIV/AIDS. HIV Reactive patients, who were exposed for indigenous medicines such as Siddha, Ayurveda etc., for a minimum period of 6 months were taken for this study. Among 40 patients, two samples (5.55% demonstrated high-level mutational resistance variations for nucleoside RT inhibitor (NRTI and non-NRTI. The predominant polymorphisms detected were K122E (91.7%, V60I (91.7%, V35T (89%, Q207E (89%, D177E (89%, T200A (86.1%, S48T (83.33%, K173A (80.6%.

  13. Endogenous Retroviral Insertions Indicate a Secondary Introduction of Domestic Sheep Lineages to the Caucasus and Central Asia between the Bronze and Iron Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oskar Schroeder

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sheep were one of the first livestock species domesticated by humans. After initial domestication in the Middle East they were spread across Eurasia. The modern distribution of endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus insertions in domestic sheep breeds suggests that over the course of millennia, successive introductions of improved lineages and selection for wool quality occurred in the Mediterranean region and most of Asia. Here we present a novel ancient DNA approach using data of endogenous retroviral insertions in Bronze and Iron Age domestic sheep from the Caucasus and Pamir mountain areas. Our findings support a secondary introduction of wool sheep from the Middle East between the Late Bronze Age and Iron Age into most areas of Eurasia.

  14. Endogenous Retroviral Insertions Indicate a Secondary Introduction of Domestic Sheep Lineages to the Caucasus and Central Asia between the Bronze and Iron Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Oskar; Benecke, Norbert; Frölich, Kai; Peng, Zuogang; Kaniuth, Kai; Sverchkov, Leonid; Reinhold, Sabine; Belinskiy, Andrey; Ludwig, Arne

    2017-06-20

    Sheep were one of the first livestock species domesticated by humans. After initial domestication in the Middle East they were spread across Eurasia. The modern distribution of endogenous Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus insertions in domestic sheep breeds suggests that over the course of millennia, successive introductions of improved lineages and selection for wool quality occurred in the Mediterranean region and most of Asia. Here we present a novel ancient DNA approach using data of endogenous retroviral insertions in Bronze and Iron Age domestic sheep from the Caucasus and Pamir mountain areas. Our findings support a secondary introduction of wool sheep from the Middle East between the Late Bronze Age and Iron Age into most areas of Eurasia.

  15. [Spatial vector electrocardiography: technique, perspectives of use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakutskiĭ, V N; Volobuev, A N; Kriukov, N N; Romanchuk, P I

    2003-01-01

    Potentials of the use of computer synthesis of integral electrical vector of the heart D0 are described. Calculation of spatial angular vector velocity and linear velocity of its movement along trajectory can be carried out in a framework of biophysical dipole model. Spatial presentation of vector is realized and its behavior in accordance with established pathologies discussed. Possible diagnostic value of obtained results and utility of their introduction into clinical practice are stressed.

  16. Highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) is associated with a lower level of CD4+ T cell apoptosis in HIV-infected patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, P-M; Breittmayer, J-P; Arlotto, C; Pugliese, P; Pradier, C; Bernard-Pomier, G; Dellamonica, P; Bernard, A

    1999-01-01

    HAART may increase CD4+ T cell counts despite a persistently detectable HIV load. The impact of HAART on apoptosis, which may play a role in the disease process in HIV-infected patients, has not been extensively studied. We performed a study to compare the level of spontaneous T cell apoptosis and anti-retroviral treatments in a cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Data were obtained from a computerized medical record. Quantification of apoptotic cells was by cytofluorometric technique. From November 1995 to December 1997 we studied T cell apoptosis in 112 HIV-infected patients. Forty patients were classified A, 36 B and 36 C. Thirty patients were naive and 82 received an anti-retroviral treatment, 49 including a protease inhibitor (PI). The median plasma viraemia determined in 63 patients was 3.6 (range 1.3–5.6) log10. The median apoptotic cell count was 22% (range 2–73%) and 12% (range 2–60%) for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, respectively. We did not observe any correlation between the HIV viraemia and the level of apoptosis of T cell subsets. Patients with HAART showed a lower percentage of apoptotic CD4+ T cells only: 16% (range 2–61%) versus 25% (range 5–73%) for patients receiving two nucleoside analogues (P = 0.02). This effect was significant in stage A patients and remained observable during the whole course of HIV disease. In conclusion, HAART, without any relation to plasma viraemia, is able to reduce apoptosis of CD4+ T cells. PMID:10594560

  17. Genetic manipulation of endosymbionts to control vector and vector borne diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Prakash Gupta

    Full Text Available Vector borne diseases (VBD are on the rise because of failure of the existing methods of control of vector and vector borne diseases and the climate change. A steep rise of VBDs are due to several factors like selection of insecticide resistant vector population, drug resistant parasite population and lack of effective vaccines against the VBDs. Environmental pollution, public health hazard and insecticide resistant vector population indicate that the insecticides are no longer a sustainable control method of vector and vector-borne diseases. Amongst the various alternative control strategies, symbiont based approach utilizing endosymbionts of arthropod vectors could be explored to control the vector and vector borne diseases. The endosymbiont population of arthropod vectors could be exploited in different ways viz., as a chemotherapeutic target, vaccine target for the control of vectors. Expression of molecules with antiparasitic activity by genetically transformed symbiotic bacteria of disease-transmitting arthropods may serve as a powerful approach to control certain arthropod-borne diseases. Genetic transformation of symbiotic bacteria of the arthropod vector to alter the vector’s ability to transmit pathogen is an alternative means of blocking the transmission of VBDs. In Indian scenario, where dengue, chikungunya, malaria and filariosis are prevalent, paratransgenic based approach can be used effectively. [Vet World 2012; 5(9.000: 571-576

  18. VISPA2: a scalable pipeline for high-throughput identification and annotation of vector integration sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinozzi, Giulio; Calabria, Andrea; Brasca, Stefano; Beretta, Stefano; Merelli, Ivan; Milanesi, Luciano; Montini, Eugenio

    2017-11-25

    Bioinformatics tools designed to identify lentiviral or retroviral vector insertion sites in the genome of host cells are used to address the safety and long-term efficacy of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy applications and to study the clonal dynamics of hematopoietic reconstitution. The increasing number of gene therapy clinical trials combined with the increasing amount of Next Generation Sequencing data, aimed at identifying integration sites, require both highly accurate and efficient computational software able to correctly process "big data" in a reasonable computational time. Here we present VISPA2 (Vector Integration Site Parallel Analysis, version 2), the latest optimized computational pipeline for integration site identification and analysis with the following features: (1) the sequence analysis for the integration site processing is fully compliant with paired-end reads and includes a sequence quality filter before and after the alignment on the target genome; (2) an heuristic algorithm to reduce false positive integration sites at nucleotide level to reduce the impact of Polymerase Chain Reaction or trimming/alignment artifacts; (3) a classification and annotation module for integration sites; (4) a user friendly web interface as researcher front-end to perform integration site analyses without computational skills; (5) the time speedup of all steps through parallelization (Hadoop free). We tested VISPA2 performances using simulated and real datasets of lentiviral vector integration sites, previously obtained from patients enrolled in a hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy clinical trial and compared the results with other preexisting tools for integration site analysis. On the computational side, VISPA2 showed a > 6-fold speedup and improved precision and recall metrics (1 and 0.97 respectively) compared to previously developed computational pipelines. These performances indicate that VISPA2 is a fast, reliable and user-friendly tool for

  19. Scalar Calibration of Vector Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Primdahl, Fritz

    2000-01-01

    The calibration parameters of a vector magnetometer are estimated only by the use of a scalar reference magnetometer. The method presented in this paper differs from those previously reported in its linearized parametrization. This allows the determination of three offsets or signals in the absence...... of a magnetic field, three scale factors for normalization of the axes and three non-orthogonality angles which build up an orthogonal system intrinsically in the sensor. The advantage of this method compared with others lies in its linear least squares estimator, which finds independently and uniquely...... the parameters for a given data set. Therefore, a magnetometer may be characterized inexpensively in the Earth's magnetic-field environment. This procedure has been used successfully in the pre-flight calibration of the state-of-the-art magnetometers on board the magnetic mapping satellites Orsted, Astrid-2...

  20. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... Oscillation (TO) method, which estimates both the axial and the lateral velocity components. The first part of the scientific contribution demonstrates that a commercial implementation of the TO method is feasible. Afterwards, the method is expanded to a phased array geometry, and performance metrics based......:1 parallel receive beamforming. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the method. In the final part, an experimental investigation of the 3D TO method is presented. Velocity measurements of steady flow were conducted in a flow-rig system, and the data were acquired using an experimental...