WorldWideScience

Sample records for pseudoscientific treatment claims

  1. Evaluating Claims to Avoid Pseudoscientific and Unproven Practices in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Jason C.

    2017-01-01

    Special education professionals are charged with using evidence-based practices, but various unproven, disproven, and pseudoscientific interventions continue to proliferate. Unproven and ineffective interventions emerge and are adopted for various reasons. Ineffective interventions are inevitably harmful and require professionals to adopt a…

  2. Brain Gym: Pseudoscientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeze, Kevin; Hyatt, Keith J.; Lambert, M. Chuck

    2016-01-01

    There is an abundance of scams and pseudoscientific practices promising seemingly magical cures for whatever ails a person. A short viewing of late night television will readily reveal a whole host of scams that may be more effective at relieving the viewer of the cash in his or her pocket than alleviating any unwanted symptoms. Unfortunately,…

  3. The Relationship between Exposure to Pseudoscientific Television Programmes and Pseudoscientific Beliefs among Taiwanese University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yuan-Chueh; Tsai, Chun-Yen; Hsieh, Pei-Yu; Hung, Jeng-Fung; Huang, Tai-Chu

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between exposure to pseudoscientific television (TV) programmes and pseudoscientific beliefs among Taiwanese university students. The "scale of attitude toward pseudoscience" instrument was used to measure the attitudes of 380 Taiwanese university students who served as subjects for the study. The…

  4. Effects of Exposure to Pseudoscientific Television Programs upon Taiwanese Citizens' Pseudoscientific Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chun-Yen; Shein, Paichi Pat; Jack, Brady Michael; Wu, Kun-Chang; Chou, Ching-Yang; Wu, Yuh-Yih; Liu, Chia-Ju; Chiu, Houn-Lin; Hung, Jeng-Fung; Chao, David; Huang, Tai-Chu

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of exposure to pseudoscientific television (TV) programs upon Taiwanese citizens' pseudoscientific beliefs. The beliefs and practices of pseudoscience portrayed in the media may misguide the citizens in making life choices that may lead to negative consequences. Participants of this study included 2,024…

  5. Measuring ability to assess claims about treatment effects: the development of the 'Claim Evaluation Tools'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Semakula, Daniel; Nsangi, Allen; Oxman, Andrew David; Chalmers, Iain; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Guttersrud, Øystein

    2017-05-17

    To describe the development of the Claim Evaluation Tools, a set of flexible items to measure people's ability to assess claims about treatment effects. Methodologists and members of the community (including children) in Uganda, Rwanda, Kenya, Norway, the UK and Australia. In the iterative development of the items, we used purposeful sampling of people with training in research methodology, such as teachers of evidence-based medicine, as well as patients and members of the public from low-income and high-income countries. Development consisted of 4 processes: (1) determining the scope of the Claim Evaluation Tools and development of items; (2) expert item review and feedback (n=63); (3) cognitive interviews with children and adult end-users (n=109); and (4) piloting and administrative tests (n=956). The Claim Evaluation Tools database currently includes a battery of multiple-choice items. Each item begins with a scenario which is intended to be relevant across contexts, and which can be used for children (from age 10  and above), adult members of the public and health professionals. People with expertise in research methods judged the items to have face validity, and end-users judged them relevant and acceptable in their settings. In response to feedback from methodologists and end-users, we simplified some text, explained terms where needed, and redesigned formats and instructions. The Claim Evaluation Tools database is a flexible resource from which researchers, teachers and others can design measurement instruments to meet their own requirements. These evaluation tools are being managed and made freely available for non-commercial use (on request) through Testing Treatments interactive (testingtreatments.org). PACTR201606001679337 and PACTR201606001676150; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Pseudo-Scientific Information: Reasons of Spread and Premises of Vitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of pseudo-scientific information, the reasons of its spread and premises of its vitality are discussed in the paper. Pseudo-scientific information is understandable as an attempt to suit a demand, which exists in society, while providing a simple answer to a question, which an individual or society is concerned about, and that answer is not sustained by scientific research. It is showed that the rise and spread of pseudo-scientific information in society are conditioned by objective reasons. Firstly, the lack of information concerning a subject which is significant for society. Secondly, the lack of information for a particular individual (social group concerning a substantial subject. Thirdly, fast spread of scientific and technical inventions and penetration of technological innovations into various spheres of life the understanding of which demands an appropriate informal “processing”, i e it demands provision in an appropriate form, which is partly provided by pseudo-scientific knowledge.The existence of pseudo-scientific information is determined by the fact that it performs important social functions in society. The existence of pseudo-scientific information by official certified scientific information and the fact, that all social groups are affected to a larger or lesser extent, show its ambivalent power and vitality. On the one part, the roots of its vitality lie in the duality of this phenomenon, where opposite things coexist in a strange way – the truth (scientifically verified propositions and speculations which are based on intuition rather than on scientifically verified facts. On the other part, it is maintained by our permanent wish to get an additional and fresher information, though not totally reliable, while seeking to know universally and better the world around us and its phenomena. While meeting this requirement, a pseudo-scientific information stimulates researchers both to enhance their attempts to

  7. Making sense scientific claims in advertising. A study of scientifically aware consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodds, Rachel E; Tseëlon, Efrat; Weitkamp, Emma L C

    2008-04-01

    Evidence that science is becoming increasingly embedded in culture comes from the proliferation of discourses of ethical consumption, sustainability, and environmental awareness. Al Gore's recent award, along with UN's Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) of the Nobel peace prize-- provided a recent high profile linking of consumption and science. It is not clear to what extent the public at large engages in evaluating the scientific merits of the arguments about the link between human consumption and global environmental catastrophes. But on a local scale, we are routinely required to evaluate, scientific and pseudoscientific claims in advertising. Since advertising is used to sell products, the discourse of scientifically framed claims is being used to persuade consumers of the benefits of these products. In the case of functional foods and cosmetics, such statements are deployed to promote the health benefits and effectiveness of their products. This exploratory study examines the views of British consumers about the scientific and pseudoscientific claims made in advertisements for foods, with particular reference to functional foods, and cosmetics. The participants in the study all worked in scientific environments, though they were not all scientists. The study found that scientific arguments that were congruent with existing health knowledge tended to be accepted while pseudoscientific knowledge was regarded skeptically and concerns were raised over the accuracy and believability of the pseudoscientific claims. It appears that scientific awareness may play a part in consumers' ability to critically examine scientifically and pseudoscientifically based advertising claims.

  8. 19 CFR 10.470 - Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification and justification of claim for preferential treatment. 10.470 Section 10.470 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF... identification of the types of machinery used in production, and the number of workers employed in production...

  9. PSEUDO-SCIENTIFIC ECONOMIC POLICIES OF MOLDOVA ASSOCIATION TO THE EU: METHODOLOGY, PROBLEMS, SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe RUSU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic policies and decisions on EU association starting with the begginig of 90’s were pseudo-scientific, contradictory, incoherent because those policies have not based themselves on modern and current economic theories elaborated and promoted by the EU. Actuality. The topic is actual from the perspective of the factors’ analysis which were conducting to delay the association process of Moldova to the EU. At the same time, those were increasing instability, disequilibrium in the national economy and raise of social vulnerability and constraint levels which ultimately increased the gap between the national and EU economic development levels. During the period of 2000-2015, the socio-economic policy of the Republic of Moldova is described more as small and fragmented steps on conceiving economic and financial instruments for the integration into the EU which were reflected in the Neighbourhood Partnership and Association Agreement with the EU. These processes conducted for the state incapacity to define its own objectives and social-economic priorities for the association as well as legitimated a continuous stage of transition to the market economy. The scope of the present article is to propose a real change of the development and social-economic association policies for achieving final objective on integration to EU. The proposals would consist in emphasizing and implementation of the EU economic principles reflected in the neoclassic synthesis and neo-conservative theories; the elaboration and implementation of a new Strategy on economic supervision, coordination and anticipation of the economic disequilibrium; achieve economic stability for diminishing the negative effects of the global and regional crisis on national economy and adaptation of the development policies to the national socio-economic conditions. The methods used for the elaboration and achieving the expected results of the study were analysis and synthesis of the

  10. Development of a novel algorithm to determine adherence to chronic pain treatment guidelines using administrative claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Jay M; Princic, Nicole; Smith, David M; Abraham, Lucy; Cappelleri, Joseph C; Shah, Sonali N; Park, Peter W

    2017-01-01

    To develop a claims-based algorithm for identifying patients who are adherent versus nonadherent to published guidelines for chronic pain management. Using medical and pharmacy health care claims from the MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare Supplemental Databases, patients were selected during July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, with the following chronic pain conditions: osteoarthritis (OA), gout (GT), painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN), post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN), and fibromyalgia (FM). Patients newly diagnosed with 12 months of continuous medical and pharmacy benefits both before and after initial diagnosis (index date) were categorized as adherent, nonadherent, or unsure according to the guidelines-based algorithm using disease-specific pain medication classes grouped as first-line, later-line, or not recommended. Descriptive and multivariate analyses compared patient outcomes with algorithm-derived categorization endpoints. A total of 441,465 OA patients, 76,361 GT patients, 10,645 pDPN, 4,010 PHN patients, and 150,321 FM patients were included in the development of the algorithm. Patients found adherent to guidelines included 51.1% for OA, 25% for GT, 59.5% for pDPN, 54.9% for PHN, and 33.5% for FM. The majority (~90%) of patients adherent to the guidelines initiated therapy with prescriptions for first-line pain medications written for a minimum of 30 days. Patients found nonadherent to guidelines included 30.7% for OA, 6.8% for GT, 34.9% for pDPN, 23.1% for PHN, and 34.7% for FM. This novel algorithm used real-world pharmacotherapy treatment patterns to evaluate adherence to pain management guidelines in five chronic pain conditions. Findings suggest that one-third to one-half of patients are managed according to guidelines. This method may have valuable applications for health care payers and providers analyzing treatment guideline adherence.

  11. 19 CFR 10.583 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RATE, ETC. Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements... an authorized electronic data interchange system. (c) Corrected claim. If, after making the claim... statement either in writing or via an authorized electronic data interchange system to the CBP office where...

  12. Development of a novel algorithm to determine adherence to chronic pain treatment guidelines using administrative claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margolis JM

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jay M Margolis,1 Nicole Princic,2 David M Smith,2 Lucy Abraham,3 Joseph C Cappelleri,4 Sonali N Shah,5 Peter W Park5 1Truven Health Analytics, Bethesda, MD, 2Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3Pfizer Ltd, Tadworth, UK; 4Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, 5Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA Objective: To develop a claims-based algorithm for identifying patients who are adherent versus nonadherent to published guidelines for chronic pain management. Methods: Using medical and pharmacy health care claims from the MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare Supplemental Databases, patients were selected during July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2012, with the following chronic pain conditions: osteoarthritis (OA, gout (GT, painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (pDPN, post-herpetic neuralgia (PHN, and fibromyalgia (FM. Patients newly diagnosed with 12 months of continuous medical and pharmacy benefits both before and after initial diagnosis (index date were categorized as adherent, nonadherent, or unsure according to the guidelines-based algorithm using disease-specific pain medication classes grouped as first-line, later-line, or not recommended. Descriptive and multivariate analyses compared patient outcomes with algorithm-derived categorization endpoints. Results: A total of 441,465 OA patients, 76,361 GT patients, 10,645 pDPN, 4,010 PHN patients, and 150,321 FM patients were included in the development of the algorithm. Patients found adherent to guidelines included 51.1% for OA, 25% for GT, 59.5% for pDPN, 54.9% for PHN, and 33.5% for FM. The majority (~90% of patients adherent to the guidelines initiated therapy with prescriptions for first-line pain medications written for a minimum of 30 days. Patients found nonadherent to guidelines included 30.7% for OA, 6.8% for GT, 34.9% for pDPN, 23.1% for PHN, and 34.7% for FM. Conclusion: This novel algorithm used real-world pharmacotherapy treatment patterns to evaluate adherence to pain management guidelines in five

  13. 19 CFR 10.410 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RATE, ETC. United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.410 Filing of claim for... by the method specified for equivalent reporting via electronic interchange. (b) Corrected... writing or via an authorized electronic data interchange system to the CBP office where the original...

  14. Patient-reported outcome labeling claims and measurement approach for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treatments in the United States and European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Marci J; Harris, Nimanee; Griebsch, Ingolf; Kaschinski, Dagmar; Copley-Merriman, Catherine

    2014-07-04

    Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and its treatment significantly affect health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Our objectives were to evaluate and compare patient-reported outcome (PRO) claims granted by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) for 5 recently approved mCRPC treatments and to examine key characteristics, development, and measurement properties of the PRO measures supporting these claims against current regulatory standards. Five products approved for treatment of mCRPC by the FDA and the EMA (2010-2013) were examined: enzalutamide, abiraterone, sipuleucel-T, cabazitaxel, and radium Ra 223 dichloride. United States (US) drug approval packages and European Public Assessment Reports were reviewed. PRO claims in the US labels and European Summaries of Product Characteristics and supporting measures were identified. For PRO measures supporting claims, a targeted literature review was conducted to identify information on key characteristics and measurement properties; this information was compared against FDA PRO guidance criteria. Nine PRO "claims" were granted across 4 of 5 products reviewed. The EMA granted more claims (7 claims-4 for pain, 3 for HRQOL) than the FDA (2 claims, both for pain). The Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) worst pain item supported most pain claims and was the only measure supporting US claims. EMA pain claims were supported by BPI-SF worst pain (n = 2) and average pain (n = 1) items and the McGill Pain Questionnaire Present Pain Intensity component (n = 1). EMA HRQOL claims were supported by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate Module (n = 2) and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions with visual analogue scale (n = 1). Pain and prostate cancer-specific HRQOL measures supporting claims met US regulatory standards for construct validity, reliability, and responsiveness; these properties were strongest for the BPI-SF worst pain item. Only the BPI-SF worst pain

  15. Development of a novel algorithm to determine adherence to chronic pain treatment guidelines using administrative claims

    OpenAIRE

    Margolis JM; Princic N; Smith DM; Abraham L; Cappelleri JC; Shah SN; Park PW

    2017-01-01

    Jay M Margolis,1 Nicole Princic,2 David M Smith,2 Lucy Abraham,3 Joseph C Cappelleri,4 Sonali N Shah,5 Peter W Park5 1Truven Health Analytics, Bethesda, MD, 2Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, USA; 3Pfizer Ltd, Tadworth, UK; 4Pfizer Inc, Groton, CT, 5Pfizer Inc, New York, NY, USA Objective: To develop a claims-based algorithm for identifying patients who are adherent versus nonadherent to published guidelines for chronic pain management. Methods: Using medical and pharmacy health care cl...

  16. Antisepsis and genital hygiene in scrotal surgery: liability claims in the event of treatment errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühl, Peter

    2007-09-13

    Systematic observance of infection control principles in surgery, whether conducted on an inpatient or outpatient basis, is an indispensable precondition for quality management. In Germany, the introduction of the Protection against Infection Act (IfSG) on 1 January 2001 represented a milestone for regulation of the framework conditions in outpatient surgery. Once again, infection control issues were the main focus of attention. Section 36(1) IfSG stipulates that infection control policies specify in-house procedures for infection prophylaxis in agreement with quality assurance measures. On 1 January 2004 this was further reinforced, inter alia, by means of a new tripartite contract based on Section 115b of Book 5 of the German Code of Social Law (SGB V). Since experience shows that incidents are more likely to result in liability claims the smaller the operation and the more unexpected the complications from a lay person's perspective, surgery carried out on patients who spend the night before and after the operation outside the hospital or clinic is becoming a particularly liability-prone area. In the event of a postoperative infection, often involving a protracted hospital stay and in some cases considerable permanent damage, the patient often cites an infection control error. This paper highlights by way of example some liability aspects whose observance as a matter of principle can reduce the liability risk for the physician.

  17. [Outpatient emergency treatment of nursing home residents : Analysis of insurance claims data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeger, Insa; Luque Ramos, Andres; Hoffmann, Falk

    2017-07-14

    Utilization of outpatient emergency services by nursing home residents is increasing; however, out of hours medical care (OOHC) in Germany has not yet been studied. In Bremen the used billing codes enabled a comparison between the use of outpatient emergency care in the year before and the year after admission to a nursing home stratified by emergency departments and OOHC. In this retrospective cohort study we used insurance claims data of residents in Bremen, who were insured in a large German statutory health insurance (DAK-Gesundheit). We compared the use of emergency care in hospitals or OOHC practices in the year before and the year after admission to a nursing home. The incidence rates of visits, distribution on weekdays and coded diagnoses were investigated. We included 1175 nursing home residents (77% female) with a mean age of 85 years. After admission to a nursing home the incidence rate of visits in the OOHC practices increased from 30.4 up to 63.7 and in emergency departments (ED) from 27.4 up to 50.7 per 100 person years. A total of 59% of all visits in OOHC practices were on weekends. The most common diagnoses in ED were injuries and poisoning (75%) while a wide range of diagnoses were coded in the OOHC practices. There is a significant difference between diagnoses in the ED and OOHC practices. More research is needed to assess the appropriateness of care.

  18. Innovative Methods in Language Intervention: Treatment Outcome Measures--Can the Data Support the Claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo Wankoff, Lorain

    2005-01-01

    This much-needed text presents detailed descriptions of current treatment methodologies for children with language impairments. Professionals in the fields of special education, speech language pathology, psychology, psychiatry, and occupational therapy as well as audiologists who deal with central auditory processing disorders will find this book…

  19. Establishing a library of resources to help people understand key concepts in assessing treatment claims-The "Critical thinking and Appraisal Resource Library" (CARL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, John C; Chalmers, Iain; Atkinson, Patricia; Badenoch, Douglas; Oxman, Andrew D; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Nordheim, Lena; Krause, L Kendall; Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven; Burls, Amanda; Mosconi, Paola; Hoffmann, Tammy; Cusack, Leila; Albarqouni, Loai; Glasziou, Paul

    2017-01-01

    People are frequently confronted with untrustworthy claims about the effects of treatments. Uncritical acceptance of these claims can lead to poor, and sometimes dangerous, treatment decisions, and wasted time and money. Resources to help people learn to think critically about treatment claims are scarce, and they are widely scattered. Furthermore, very few learning-resources have been assessed to see if they improve knowledge and behavior. Our objectives were to develop the Critical thinking and Appraisal Resource Library (CARL). This library was to be in the form of a database containing learning resources for those who are responsible for encouraging critical thinking about treatment claims, and was to be made available online. We wished to include resources for groups we identified as 'intermediaries' of knowledge, i.e. teachers of schoolchildren, undergraduates and graduates, for example those teaching evidence-based medicine, or those communicating treatment claims to the public. In selecting resources, we wished to draw particular attention to those resources that had been formally evaluated, for example, by the creators of the resource or independent research groups. CARL was populated with learning-resources identified from a variety of sources-two previously developed but unmaintained inventories; systematic reviews of learning-interventions; online and database searches; and recommendations by members of the project group and its advisors. The learning-resources in CARL were organised by 'Key Concepts' needed to judge the trustworthiness of treatment claims, and were made available online by the James Lind Initiative in Testing Treatments interactive (TTi) English (www.testingtreatments.org/category/learning-resources).TTi English also incorporated the database of Key Concepts and the Claim Evaluation Tools developed through the Informed Healthcare Choices (IHC) project (informedhealthchoices.org). We have created a database of resources called CARL

  20. Tuberculosis Prevention in the Private Sector: Using Claims-Based Methods to Identify and Evaluate Latent Tuberculosis Infection Treatment With Isoniazid Among the Commercially Insured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Erica L; Miller, Thaddeus L; Carlson, Erin K; Ho, Christine

    2017-10-27

    Targeted identification and treatment of people with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are key components of the US tuberculosis elimination strategy. Because of recent policy changes, some LTBI treatment may shift from public health departments to the private sector. To (1) develop methodology to estimate initiation and completion of treatment with isoniazid for LTBI using claims data, and (2) estimate treatment completion rates for isoniazid regimens from commercial insurance claims. Medical and pharmacy claims data representing insurance-paid services rendered and prescriptions filled between January 2011 and March 2015 were analyzed. Four million commercially insured individuals 0 to 64 years of age. Six-month and 9-month treatment completion rates for isoniazid LTBI regimens. There was an annual isoniazid LTBI treatment initiation rate of 12.5/100 000 insured persons. Of 1074 unique courses of treatment with isoniazid for which treatment completion could be assessed, almost half (46.3%; confidence interval, 43.3-49.3) completed 6 or more months of therapy. Of those, approximately half (48.9%; confidence interval, 44.5-53.3) completed 9 months or more. Claims data can be used to identify and evaluate LTBI treatment with isoniazid occurring in the commercial sector. Completion rates were in the range of those found in public health settings. These findings suggest that the commercial sector may be a valuable adjunct to more traditional venues for tuberculosis prevention. In addition, these newly developed claims-based methods offer a means to gain important insights and open new avenues to monitor, evaluate, and coordinate tuberculosis prevention.

  1. Treatment patterns of biologics in US patients with ankylosing spondylitis: descriptive analyses from a claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jessica A; Adejoro, Oluwakayode; Chastek, Benjamin; Park, Yujin

    2017-11-17

    Examine treatment patterns among patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS) treated with a TNF inhibitor (TNFi). Patients with AS who initiated a TNFi between 1 January 2013, and 31 January 2015, were identified in the Optum Research Database. Outcomes included adherence, persistence, discontinuation and therapy modifications of the index TNFi during 12-month follow-up. Of the 426 patients included, 40.6% persisted on the index TNFi for ≥12 months, 31.0% discontinued, 21.4% switched to a different TNFi, and 7.0% discontinued and then restarted. Of the 333 patients who persisted on their TNFi for >90 days, 44.7% received ≥1 add-on medication. A high proportion of patients with AS switched, discontinued or modified their TNFi therapy.

  2. Utilization of evidence-based treatment in elderly patients with chronic heart failure: using Korean Health Insurance claims database

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    Kim Ju-Young

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure accounts for a great deal of the morbidity and mortality in the aging population. Evidence-based treatments include angiotensin-2 receptor blockers (ARBs, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I, beta-blockers, and aldosterone antagonists. Underutilization of these treatments in heart failure patients were frequently reported, which could lead to increase morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utilization of evidence-based treatments and their related factors for elderly patients with chronic heart failure. Methods This is retrospective observational study using the Korean National Health Insurance claims database. We identified prescription of evidence based treatment to elderly patients who had been hospitalized for chronic heart failure between January 1, 2005, and June 30, 2006. Results Among the 28,922 elderly patients with chronic heart failure, beta-blockers were prescribed to 31.5%, and ACE-I or ARBs were prescribed to 54.7% of the total population. Multivariable logistic regression analyses revealed that the prescription from outpatient clinic (prevalent ratio, 4.02, 95% CI 3.31–4.72, specialty of the healthcare providers (prevalent ratio, 1.26, 95% CI, 1.12–1.54, residence in urban (prevalent ratio, 1.37, 95% CI, 1.23–1.52 and admission to tertiary hospital (prevalent ratio, 2.07, 95% CI, 1.85–2.31 were important factors associated with treatment underutilization. Patients not given evidence-based treatment were more likely to experience dementia, reside in rural areas, and have less-specialized healthcare providers and were less likely to have coexisting cardiovascular diseases or concomitant medications than patients in the evidence-based treatment group. Conclusions Healthcare system factors, such as hospital type, healthcare provider factors, such as specialty, and patient factors, such as comorbid cardiovascular disease, systemic disease with

  3. Treatment patterns and health care resource utilization associated with dalfampridine extended release in multiple sclerosis: a retrospective claims database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy Guo,1 Michael Grabner,2 Swetha Rao Palli,2 Jessica Elder,1 Matthew Sidovar,1 Peter Aupperle,1 Stephen Krieger3 1Acorda Therapeutics Inc., Ardsley, New York, NY, USA; 2HealthCore Inc., Wilmington, DE, USA; 3Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for MS, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated the clinical benefits of dalfampridine extended release (D-ER tablets in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, there are limited real-world data on D-ER utilization and associated outcomes in patients with MS. Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns, budget impact, and health care resource utilization (HRU associated with D-ER use in a real-world setting. Methods: A retrospective claims database analysis was conducted using the HealthCore Integrated Research DatabaseSM. Adherence (measured by medication possession ratio, or [MPR] and persistence (measured by days between initial D-ER claim and discontinuation or end of follow-up were evaluated over 1-year follow-up. Budget impact was calculated as cost per member per month (PMPM over the available follow-up period. D-ER and control cohorts were propensity-score matched on baseline demographics, comorbidities, and MS-related resource utilization to compare walking-impairment-related HRU over follow-up. Results: Of the 2,138 MS patients identified, 1,200 were not treated with D-ER (control and 938 were treated with D-ER. Patients were aged 51 years on average and 74% female. Approximately 82.6% of D-ER patients were adherent (MPR >80%. The estimated budget impact range of D-ER was $0.014–$0.026 PMPM. Propensity-score-matched D-ER and controls yielded 479 patients in each cohort. Postmatching comparison showed that the D-ER cohort was associated with fewer physician (21.5% vs 62.4%, P<0.0001 and other outpatient visits (22.8% vs 51.4%, P<0.0001 over the 12-month follow-up. Changes in HRU from follow

  4. Interventions and assessment tools addressing key concepts people need to know to appraise claims about treatment effects: a systematic mapping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Nsangi, Allen; Semakula, Daniel

    2016-12-29

    People's ability to appraise claims about treatment effects is crucial for informed decision-making. Our objective was to systematically map this area of research in order to (a) provide an overview of interventions targeting key concepts that people need to understand to assess treatment claims and (b) to identify assessment tools used to evaluate people's understanding of these concepts. The findings of this review provide a starting point for decisions about which key concepts to address when developing new interventions, and which assessment tools should be considered. We conducted a systematic mapping review of interventions and assessment tools addressing key concepts important for people to be able to assess treatment claims. A systematic literature search was done by a reserach librarian in relevant databases. Judgement about inclusion of studies and data collection was done by at least two researchers. We included all quantitative study designs targeting one or more of the key concepts, and targeting patients, healthy members of the public, and health professionals. The studies were divided into four categories: risk communication and decision aids, evidence-based medicine and critical appraisal, understanding of controlled trials, and science education. Findings were summarised descriptively. We included 415 studies, of which the interventions and assessment tools we identified included only a handful of the key concepts. The most common key concepts in interventions were "Treatments usually have beneficial and harmful effects," "Treatment comparisons should be fair," "Compare like with like," and "Single studies can be misleading." A variety of assessment tools were identified, but only four assessment tools included 10 or more key concepts. There is great potential for developing learning and assessment tools targeting key concepts that people need to understand to assess claims about treatment effects. There is currently no instrument covering

  5. Analysis of treatment patterns and persistence on branded and generic medications in major depressive disorder using retrospective claims data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solem CT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Caitlyn T Solem,1 Ahmed Shelbaya,2,3 Yin Wan,1 Chinmay G Deshpande,1 Jose Alvir,2 Elizabeth Pappadopulos2 1Pharmerit International, Real World Evidence/Data Analytics, Bethesda, MD, 2Pfizer, Inc., Global Health Outcomes, New York, NY, 3Epidemiology Department of Mailman’s School of Public Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA Background: In major depressive disorder (MDD, treatment persistence is critical to optimize symptom remission, functional recovery, and health care costs. Desvenlafaxine tends to have fewer drug interactions and better tolerability than other MDD drugs; however, its use has not been assessed in the real world.Objective: The aim of the present study is to compare medication persistence and concomitant MDD drug use with branded desvenlafaxine (Pristiq® compared with antidepressant drug groups classified as 1 branded selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; ie, escitalopram [Lexapro™] and selective serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; ie, venlafaxine [Effexor®], duloxetine [Cymbalta®] and 2 generic SSRIs/SNRIs (ie, escitalopram, citalopram, venlafaxine, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, and duloxetine.Patients and methods: MDD patients (ICD-9-CM codes 296.2, 296.3, with ≥2 prescription fills for study drugs and 12-month preindex continuous enrollment from the MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database (2009–2013, were included. Time-to-treatment discontinuation (prescription gap ≥45 days was assessed using the Kaplan–Meier curve and Cox model. Concomitant MDD drug use was compared.Results: Of the 273,514 patients included, 14,379 patients were initiated with branded desvenlafaxine, 50,937 patients with other branded SSRIs/SNRIs, and 208,198 patients with generic SSRIs/SNRIs. The number of weeks for treatment discontinuation for branded desvenlafaxine were longer (40.7 [95% CI: 39.3, 42.0] compared with other branded

  6. Can an educational podcast improve the ability of parents of primary school children to assess the reliability of claims made about the benefits and harms of treatments: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semakula, Daniel; Nsangi, Allen; Oxman, Matt; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Kaseje, Margaret; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Fretheim, Atle; Chalmers, Iain; Oxman, Andrew D; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2017-01-21

    Claims made about the effects of treatments are very common in the media and in the population more generally. The ability of individuals to understand and assess such claims can affect their decisions and health outcomes. Many people in both low- and high-income countries have inadequate aptitude to assess information about the effects of treatments. As part of the Informed Healthcare Choices project, we have prepared a series of podcast episodes to help improve people's ability to assess claims made about treatment effects. We will evaluate the effect of the Informed Healthcare Choices podcast on people's ability to assess claims made about the benefits and harms of treatments. Our study population will be parents of primary school children in schools with limited educational and financial resources in Uganda. This will be a two-arm, parallel-group, individual-randomised trial. We will randomly allocate consenting participants who meet the inclusion criteria for the trial to either listen to nine episodes of the Informed Healthcare Choices podcast (intervention) or to listen to nine typical public service announcements about health issues (control). Each podcast includes a story about a treatment claim, a message about one key concept that we believe is important for people to be able to understand to assess treatment claims, an explanation of how that concept applies to the claim, and a second example illustrating the concept. We designed the Claim Evaluation Tools to measure people's ability to apply key concepts related to assessing claims made about the effects of treatments and making informed health care choices. The Claim Evaluation Tools that we will use include multiple-choice questions addressing each of the nine concepts covered by the podcast. Using the Claim Evaluation Tools, we will measure two primary outcomes: (1) the proportion that 'pass', based on an absolute standard and (2) the average score. As far as we are aware this is the first

  7. A retrospective claims analysis of combination therapy in the treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Gerhardt M; Van Brunt, David L; Ye, Wenyu; Stoops, William W; Johnston, Joseph A

    2009-06-08

    Combination therapy in managing psychiatric disorders is not uncommon. While combination therapy has been documented for depression and schizophrenia, little is known about combination therapy practices in managing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study seeks to quantify the combination use of ADHD medications and to understand predictors of combination therapy. Prescription dispensing events were drawn from a U.S. national claims database including over 80 managed-care plans. Patients studied were age 18 or over with at least 1 medical claim with a diagnosis of ADHD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 314.0), a pharmacy claim for ADHD medication during the study period July 2003 to June 2004, and continuous enrollment 6 months prior to and throughout the study period. Dispensing events were grouped into 6 categories: atomoxetine (ATX), long-acting stimulants (LAS), intermediate-acting stimulants (IAS), short-acting stimulants (SAS), bupropion (BUP), and Alpha-2 Adrenergic Agonists (A2A). Events were assigned to calendar months, and months with combined use from multiple categories within patient were identified. Predictors of combination therapy for LAS and for ATX were modeled for patients covered by commercial plans using logistic regression in a generalized estimating equations framework to adjust for within-patient correlation between months of observation. Factors included age, gender, presence of the hyperactive component of ADHD, prior diagnoses for psychiatric disorders, claims history of recent psychiatric visit, insurance plan type, and geographic region. There were 18,609 patients identified representing a total of 11,886 months of therapy with ATX; 40,949 months with LAS; 13,622 months with IAS; 38,141 months with SAS; 22,087 months with BUP; and 1,916 months with A2A. Combination therapy was present in 19.7% of continuing months (months after the first month of therapy

  8. What does the U.S. Medicare administrative claims database tell us about initial antiepileptic drug treatment for older adults with new-onset epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roy C; Faught, Edward; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Richman, Joshua; Funkhouser, Ellen; Piper, Kendra; Juarez, Lucia; Dai, Chen; Pisu, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Disparities in epilepsy treatment are not uncommon; therefore, we examined population-based estimates of initial antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in new-onset epilepsy among racial/ethnic minority groups of older US Medicare beneficiaries. We conducted retrospective analyses of 2008-2010 Medicare administrative claims for a 5% random sample of beneficiaries augmented for minority representation. New-onset epilepsy cases in 2009 had ≥1 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) 345.x or ≥2 ICD-9 780.3x, and ≥1 AED, AND no seizure/epilepsy claim codes or AEDs in preceding 365 days. We examined AED use and concordance with Quality Indicators of Epilepsy Treatment (QUIET) 6 (monotherapy as initial treatment = ≥30 day first prescription with no other concomitant AEDs), and prompt AED treatment (first AED within 30 days of diagnosis). Logistic regression examined likelihood of prompt treatment by demographic (race/ethnicity, gender, age), clinical (number of comorbid conditions, neurology care, index event occurring in the emergency room (ER)), and economic (Part D coverage phase, eligibility for Part D Low Income Subsidy [LIS], and ZIP code level poverty) factors. Over 1 year of follow-up, 79.6% of 3,706 new epilepsy cases had one AED only (77.89% of whites vs. 89% of American Indian/Alaska Native [AI/AN]). Levetiracetam was the most commonly prescribed AED (45.5%: from 24.6% AI/AN to 55.0% whites). The second most common was phenytoin (30.6%: from 18.8% Asians to 43.1% AI/AN). QUIET 6 concordance was 94.7% (93.9% for whites to 97.3% of AI/AN). Only 50% received prompt AED therapy (49.6% whites to 53.9% AI/AN). Race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with AED patterns, monotherapy use, or prompt treatment. Monotherapy is common across all racial/ethnic groups of older adults with new-onset epilepsy, older AEDs are commonly prescribed, and treatment is frequently delayed. Further studies on reasons for treatment delays are warranted

  9. To what extent do prescribing practices for hypertension in the private sector in Zimbabwe follow the national treatment guidelines? An analysis of insurance medical claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basopo, Victor; Mujasi, Paschal N

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disease in Zimbabwe. The prevalence of Hypertension in the country is above 30% regardless of the cut off used. Currently, majority of patients in Zimbabwe seek health care from the private sector due to limited government funding for the public health sector. However, Standard treatment guidelines for hypertension are only available in the public sector and are optional in the private sector. This study assesses compliance of private sector prescribing to Standard Treatment guidelines for hypertension. We reviewed hypertension prescription claims to a private health insurance company in Zimbabwe for the period Jan 1-Dec 31 2015. We used the last prescription claimed in the year on the assumption that it represented the patient's current treatment. Prescription data was analyzed by comparing medicines prescribed to those recommended in the Zimbabwe 7th Essential Medicines List and Standard Treatment Guidelines 2015. We used Microsoft Excel© 2010 to conduct the analysis. A total of 1019 prescriptions were reviewed. Most patients were either on mono or dual therapy (76%). The mostly prescribed class of antihypertensive as first line were Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors /Angiotensin Receptor Blockers. Regardless of whether they were being used as first, second or third line this class of antihypertensives emerged as the most prescribed (639 times). Only 358 (35%) prescriptions were compliant with standard treatment guidelines; the rest (661) did not meet several criteria. Areas of non-compliance included use of second line medicines as first line, failure to consider patient characteristics when prescribing, use of contraindicated medicines for certain patients, clinically significant interactions among prescribed medicines and illogical combinations that predispose patients to toxicity. The poor compliance to standard treatment guidelines observed in our study indicates need to improve prescription practices

  10. Does the use of the Informed Healthcare Choices (IHC) primary school resources improve the ability of grade-5 children in Uganda to assess the trustworthiness of claims about the effects of treatments: protocol for a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsangi, Allen; Semakula, Daniel; Oxman, Andrew D; Oxman, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Kaseje, Margaret; Chalmers, Iain; Fretheim, Atle; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2017-05-18

    The ability to appraise claims about the benefits and harms of treatments is crucial for informed health care decision-making. This research aims to enable children in East African primary schools (the clusters) to acquire and retain skills that can help them make informed health care choices by improving their ability to obtain, process and understand health information. The trial will evaluate (at the individual participant level) whether specially designed learning resources can teach children some of the key concepts relevant to appraising claims about the benefits and harms of health care interventions (treatments). This is a two-arm, cluster-randomised trial with stratified random allocation. We will recruit 120 primary schools (the clusters) between April and May 2016 in the central region of Uganda. We will stratify participating schools by geographical setting (rural, semi-urban, or urban) and ownership (public or private). The Informed Healthcare Choices (IHC) primary school resources consist of a textbook and a teachers' guide. Each of the students in the intervention arm will receive a textbook and attend nine lessons delivered by their teachers during a school term, with each lesson lasting 80 min. The lessons cover 12 key concepts that are relevant to assessing claims about treatments and making informed health care choices. The second arm will carry on with the current primary school curriculum. We have designed the Claim Evaluation Tools to measure people's ability to apply key concepts related to assessing claims about the effects of treatments and making informed health care choices. The Claim Evaluation Tools use multiple choice questions addressing each of the 12 concepts covered by the IHC school resources. Using the Claim Evaluation Tools we will measure two primary outcomes: (1) the proportion of children who 'pass', based on an absolute standard and (2) their average scores. As far as we are aware this is the first randomised trial to

  11. One-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and associated treatment costs in bipolar disorder treated with atypical antipsychotics: a retrospective claims database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikalov Andrei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared 1-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and treatment costs in commercially insured patients with bipolar disorder, treated with aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone. Methods This was a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study using the Ingenix Lab/Rx integrated insurance claims dataset. Patients with bipolar disorder and 180 days of pre-index enrollment without antipsychotic exposure who received atypical antipsychotic agents were followed for up to 12 months following the initial antipsychotic prescription. The primary analysis used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate time-dependent risk of hospitalization, adjusting for age, sex and pre-index hospitalization. Generalized gamma regression compared post-index costs between treatment groups. Results Compared to aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine and quetiapine had higher risks for hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.96, 1.55 and 1.56, respectively; p Conclusions In commercially insured adults with bipolar disorder followed for 1 year after initiation of atypical antipsychotics, treatment with aripiprazole was associated with a lower risk of psychiatric hospitalization than ziprasidone, quetiapine, olanzapine and risperidone, although this did not reach significance with the latter. Aripiprazole was also associated with significantly lower total healthcare costs than quetiapine, but not the other comparators.

  12. IBO Claim Taking Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — IBO manually tracks all Canadian Claims and DSU claims via this report. It also provides a summary for each region and office of origin that the DSU works with. This...

  13. Workers Compensation Claim Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains DOT employee workers compensation claim data for current and past DOT employees. Types of data include claim data consisting of PII data (SSN,...

  14. Out of court settlement of malpractice claims relating to the treatment of fractures in children: experience of the arbitration board of the North German Medical Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinz, Heinrich; Neu, Johann

    2009-07-01

    The medical peer-review committees and arbitration boards of the Medical Associations of the individual German federal states assess claims for damages arising from alleged medical malpractice. 189 panel proceedings concerning alleged malpractice in the treatment of fractures in children were evaluated on the basis of the available documentation and decisions. The proceedings were evaluated with respect to the involved medical specialties and treatment facilities, the types of fracture and particular allegations in each case, the actual malpractice found to have been committed (if any), and the harm resulting from malpractice. The cases were derived from the nine German states for which the North German arbitration board is responsible. An actual malpractice was found to have been committed in 64% of cases, or about twice as frequently as the average rate among all cases going before an arbitration board in Germany. Most of the medical errors involved inaccurate diagnostic evaluation, misinterpretation of radiological findings, inappropriate treatment for the particular type of fracture involved (conservative rather than operative, or vice versa), or inadequate follow-up of the fracture (or none at all). The highest rate of a positive finding of malpractice involved fractures in the elbow region (77%). A mild or moderate degree of permanent injury due to malpractice was found in 37 cases (31%) and severe permanent injury in 16 cases (13%). The appropriate treatment of fractures in children requires experience in clinical examination as well as knowledge of radiological anatomy and of the problematic fracture types and localizations. The results reported here should raise consciousness of the possibilities for medical error and thus help prevent future instances of malpractice.

  15. Assessing the Consistency and Microbiological Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment Practices by Urban and Rural Populations Claiming to Treat Their Water at Home: A Case Study in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Huaylinos, Maria L.; Gil, Ana; Lanata, Claudio; Clasen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by vulnerable populations. Over 1.1 billion people report treating their water prior to drinking it. These estimates, however, are based on responses to household surveys that may exaggerate the consistency and microbiological performance of the practice—key factors for reducing pathogen exposure and achieving health benefits. The objective of this study was to examine how HWT practices are actually performed by households identified as HWT users, according to international monitoring standards. Methods and Findings We conducted a 6-month case study in urban (n = 117 households) and rural (n = 115 households) Peru, a country in which 82.8% of households report treating their water at home. We used direct observation, in-depth interviews, surveys, spot-checks, and water sampling to assess water treatment practices among households that claimed to treat their drinking water at home. While consistency of reported practices was high in both urban (94.8%) and rural (85.3%) settings, availability of treated water (based on self-report) at time of collection was low, with 67.1% and 23.0% of urban and rural households having treated water at all three sampling visits. Self-reported consumption of untreated water in the home among adults and children water of self-reported users was significantly better than source water in the urban setting and negligible but significantly better in the rural setting. However, only 46.3% and 31.6% of households had drinking water water quality. The lack of consistency and sub-optimal microbiological effectiveness also raises questions about the potential of HWT to prevent waterborne diseases. PMID:25522371

  16. Assessing the consistency and microbiological effectiveness of household water treatment practices by urban and rural populations claiming to treat their water at home: a case study in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Huaylinos, Maria L; Gil, Ana; Lanata, Claudio; Clasen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by vulnerable populations. Over 1.1 billion people report treating their water prior to drinking it. These estimates, however, are based on responses to household surveys that may exaggerate the consistency and microbiological performance of the practice-key factors for reducing pathogen exposure and achieving health benefits. The objective of this study was to examine how HWT practices are actually performed by households identified as HWT users, according to international monitoring standards. We conducted a 6-month case study in urban (n = 117 households) and rural (n = 115 households) Peru, a country in which 82.8% of households report treating their water at home. We used direct observation, in-depth interviews, surveys, spot-checks, and water sampling to assess water treatment practices among households that claimed to treat their drinking water at home. While consistency of reported practices was high in both urban (94.8%) and rural (85.3%) settings, availability of treated water (based on self-report) at time of collection was low, with 67.1% and 23.0% of urban and rural households having treated water at all three sampling visits. Self-reported consumption of untreated water in the home among adults and children Drinking water of self-reported users was significantly better than source water in the urban setting and negligible but significantly better in the rural setting. However, only 46.3% and 31.6% of households had drinking water drinking water quality. The lack of consistency and sub-optimal microbiological effectiveness also raises questions about the potential of HWT to prevent waterborne diseases.

  17. Formalizing Probabilistic Safety Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Hagen, George E.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    A safety claim for a system is a statement that the system, which is subject to hazardous conditions, satisfies a given set of properties. Following work by John Rushby and Bev Littlewood, this paper presents a mathematical framework that can be used to state and formally prove probabilistic safety claims. It also enables hazardous conditions, their uncertainties, and their interactions to be integrated into the safety claim. This framework provides a formal description of the probabilistic composition of an arbitrary number of hazardous conditions and their effects on system behavior. An example is given of a probabilistic safety claim for a conflict detection algorithm for aircraft in a 2D airspace. The motivation for developing this mathematical framework is that it can be used in an automated theorem prover to formally verify safety claims.

  18. Assessing the consistency and microbiological effectiveness of household water treatment practices by urban and rural populations claiming to treat their water at home: a case study in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislaine Rosa

    Full Text Available Household water treatment (HWT can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by vulnerable populations. Over 1.1 billion people report treating their water prior to drinking it. These estimates, however, are based on responses to household surveys that may exaggerate the consistency and microbiological performance of the practice-key factors for reducing pathogen exposure and achieving health benefits. The objective of this study was to examine how HWT practices are actually performed by households identified as HWT users, according to international monitoring standards.We conducted a 6-month case study in urban (n = 117 households and rural (n = 115 households Peru, a country in which 82.8% of households report treating their water at home. We used direct observation, in-depth interviews, surveys, spot-checks, and water sampling to assess water treatment practices among households that claimed to treat their drinking water at home. While consistency of reported practices was high in both urban (94.8% and rural (85.3% settings, availability of treated water (based on self-report at time of collection was low, with 67.1% and 23.0% of urban and rural households having treated water at all three sampling visits. Self-reported consumption of untreated water in the home among adults and children <5 was common and this was corroborated during home observations. Drinking water of self-reported users was significantly better than source water in the urban setting and negligible but significantly better in the rural setting. However, only 46.3% and 31.6% of households had drinking water <1 CFU/100 mL at all follow-up visits.Our results raise questions about the usefulness of current international monitoring of HWT practices and their usefulness as a proxy indicator for drinking water quality. The lack of consistency and sub-optimal microbiological effectiveness also raises questions about the potential

  19. SSA Disability Claim Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The dataset includes fiscal year data for initial claims for SSA disability benefits that were referred to a state agency for a disability determination. Specific...

  20. Closed Claim Query File

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This file is used to hold information about disability claims that have been closed and have been selected for sampling.Sampling is the process whereby OQR reviews...

  1. Indications from space geodesy, gravimetry and seismology for slow Earth expansion at present - comment on "The Earth expansion theory and its transition from scientific hypothesis to pseudoscientific belief" by Sudiro (2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Matthew R.

    2016-12-01

    In a recent article in this journal, Paolo Sudiro (2014) considered the long history of the expanding Earth theory and its recent descent into what he termed "pseudoscientific belief". The expanding Earth theory contends that the radius of the Earth was once one-half to two-thirds of its current value, with the Earth's continents forming a continuous sialic cover over the Earth. The theory has had two main variants: slow expansion at about 0.5 mm yr-1 radial increase since the time of Earth's formation and fast expansion at about 5 mm yr-1 since the Triassic. Focusing on Maxlow's model, Sudiro thoroughly addresses the possibly insurmountable difficulties of the fast version, such as an improbably high density and surface gravity prior to 200 Ma. He omits, however, any discussion of the slow expansion model, which has a longer history and far fewer theoretical difficulties. Moreover, recent evidence from space geodesy, gravimetry and seismology indicates that the Earth at present may be slowly expanding at 0.1-0.4 mm yr-1. It is concluded that Sudiro's obituary of the expanding Earth theory as a whole must be considered premature at this time.

  2. Health Claims Data Warehouse (HCDW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Health Claims Data Warehouse (HCDW) will receive and analyze health claims data to support management and administrative purposes. The Federal Employee Health...

  3. 37 CFR 1.75 - Claim(s).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim(s). 1.75 Section 1.75... GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Specification § 1.75 Claim(s). (a.... (35 U.S.C. 6; 15 U.S.C. 1113, 1126) ...

  4. Claim reserving with fuzzy regression

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrami, Tahereh; BAHRAMI, Masuod

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Claims reserving plays a key role for the insurance. Therefore, various statistical methods are used to provide for an adequate amount of claim reserves. Since claim reserves are always variable, fuzzy set theory is used to handle this variability. In this paper, non-symmetric fuzzy regression is integrated in the Taylor’s method to develop a new method for claim reserving.

  5. Improving the informational continuity of care in diabetes mellitus treatment with a nationwide Shared EHR system: Estimates from Austrian claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinner, Christoph; Sauter, Simone Katja; Endel, Gottfried; Heinze, Georg; Thurner, Stefan; Klimek, Peter; Duftschmid, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Shared Electronic Health Record (EHR) systems, which provide a health information exchange (HIE) within a community of care, were found to be a key enabler of informational continuity of diabetes mellitus (DM) care. Quantitative analyses of the actual contribution of Shared EHR systems to informational continuity of care are rare. The goal of this study was to quantitatively analyze (i) the degree of fragmentation of DM care in Austria as an indicator for the need for HIE, and (ii) the quantity of information (i.e. number of documents) from Austrian DM patients that would be made available by a nationwide Shared EHR system for HIE. Our analyses are based on social security claims data of 7.9 million Austrians from 2006 and 2007. DM patients were identified through medication data and inpatient diagnoses. The degree of fragmentation was determined by the number of different healthcare providers per patient. The amount of information that would be made available by a nationwide Shared EHR system was estimated by the number of documents that would have been available to a healthcare provider if he had access to information on the patient's visits to any of the other healthcare providers. As a reference value we determined the number of locally available documents that would have originated from the patient's visits to the healthcare provider himself. We performed our analysis for two types of systems: (i) a "comprehensive" Shared EHR system (SEHRS), where each visit of a patient results in a single document (progress note), and (ii) the Austrian ELGA system, which allows four specific document types to be shared. 391,630 DM patients were identified, corresponding to 4.7% of the Austrian population. More than 90% of the patients received health services from more than one healthcare provider in one year. Both, the SEHRS as well as ELGA would have multiplied the available information during a patient visit in comparison to an isolated local EHR system; the median ratio

  6. BenefitClaimWebServiceBean/BenefitClaimWebService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — A formal or informal request for a type of monetary or non-monetary benefit. This service provides benefit claims and benefit claim special issues data, allows the...

  7. Construction Contract Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    owner, contractor, and design professional should be in attendance. Typical - agenda items would include any problems encountered which need the...34Unraveling Construction Claims", Florida Constructor , September/October 19B2. 70. Callahan, Michael T. and H. Murray Hohns, Construction Schedules...Not Lead to Heartburn", Florida Constructor , January/February * 1985. 77. Cummings, Donald J., "Documentation: The Key to Successful Project

  8. Predicting persistence to antidepressant treatment in administrative claims data: Considering the influence of refill delays and prior persistence on other medications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Bushnell (Greta A.); T. Stürmer; A. White (Alice); V. Pate (Virginia); S.A. Swanson (Sonja); D. Azrael (Deborah); M. Miller (Matthew)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground Many patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) who begin antidepressant treatment discontinue use before for six months, the recommended minimum treatment length. This study sought to identify predictors of six-month antidepressant persistence including predictors

  9. When the Claim Hits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard Poulsen, Lauge; Aisbett, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Using the international investment regime as its point of departure, the article applies notions of bounded rationality to the study of economic diplomacy. Through a multimethod approach, it shows that developing countries often ignored the risks of bilateral investment treaties (bits) until...... they themselves became subject to an investment treaty claim. Thus the behavior of developing country governments with regard to the international investment regime is consistent with that routinely observed for individuals in experiments and field studies: they tend to ignore high-impact, low-probability risks...

  10. Cause and Event: Supporting Causal Claims through Logistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Ann A.; Gray, DeLeon L.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to identify and support credible causal claims have received intense interest in the research community, particularly over the past few decades. In this paper, we focus on the use of statistical procedures designed to support causal claims for a treatment or intervention when the response variable of interest is dichotomous. We identify…

  11. 21 CFR 101.74 - Health claims: sodium and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Statistics, the National Institutes of Health, or “Nutrition and Your Health: Dietary Guidelines for...), Government Printing Office. (4) The claim may indicate that it is consistent with “Nutrition and Your Health... physicians for medical advice and treatment. If the claim defines high or normal blood pressure, then the...

  12. Effects of School-Based Educational Interventions for Enhancing Adolescents Abilities in Critical Appraisal of Health Claims: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena V Nordheim

    Full Text Available Adolescents are frequent media users who access health claims from various sources. The plethora of conflicting, pseudo-scientific, and often misleading health claims in popular media makes critical appraisal of health claims an essential ability. Schools play an important role in educating youth to critically appraise health claims. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of school-based educational interventions for enhancing adolescents' abilities in critically appraising health claims.We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, Cinahl, Teachers Reference Centre, LISTA, ERIC, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, and sources of grey literature. Studies that evaluated school-based educational interventions to improve adolescents' critical appraisal ability for health claims through advancing the students' knowledge about science were included. Eligible study designs were randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, and interrupted time series. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in included studies. Due to heterogeneity in interventions and inadequate reporting of results, we performed a descriptive synthesis of studies. We used GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation to assess the certainty of the evidence.Eight studies were included: two compared different teaching modalities, while the others compared educational interventions to instruction as usual. Studies mostly reported positive short-term effects on critical appraisal-related knowledge and skills in favour of the educational interventions. However, the certainty of the evidence for all comparisons and outcomes was very low.Educational interventions in schools may have beneficial short-term effects on knowledge and skills relevant to the critical appraisal of health

  13. Effects of School-Based Educational Interventions for Enhancing Adolescents Abilities in Critical Appraisal of Health Claims: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, Lena V; Gundersen, Malene W; Espehaug, Birgitte; Guttersrud, Øystein; Flottorp, Signe

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents are frequent media users who access health claims from various sources. The plethora of conflicting, pseudo-scientific, and often misleading health claims in popular media makes critical appraisal of health claims an essential ability. Schools play an important role in educating youth to critically appraise health claims. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of school-based educational interventions for enhancing adolescents' abilities in critically appraising health claims. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, Cinahl, Teachers Reference Centre, LISTA, ERIC, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, and sources of grey literature. Studies that evaluated school-based educational interventions to improve adolescents' critical appraisal ability for health claims through advancing the students' knowledge about science were included. Eligible study designs were randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, and interrupted time series. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in included studies. Due to heterogeneity in interventions and inadequate reporting of results, we performed a descriptive synthesis of studies. We used GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to assess the certainty of the evidence. Eight studies were included: two compared different teaching modalities, while the others compared educational interventions to instruction as usual. Studies mostly reported positive short-term effects on critical appraisal-related knowledge and skills in favour of the educational interventions. However, the certainty of the evidence for all comparisons and outcomes was very low. Educational interventions in schools may have beneficial short-term effects on knowledge and skills relevant to the critical appraisal of health claims. The small

  14. Modeling number of claims and prediction of total claim amount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Aslıhan Şentürk; Karabey, Uǧur

    2017-07-01

    In this study we focus on annual number of claims of a private health insurance data set which belongs to a local insurance company in Turkey. In addition to Poisson model and negative binomial model, zero-inflated Poisson model and zero-inflated negative binomial model are used to model the number of claims in order to take into account excess zeros. To investigate the impact of different distributional assumptions for the number of claims on the prediction of total claim amount, predictive performances of candidate models are compared by using root mean square error (RMSE) and mean absolute error (MAE) criteria.

  15. Contested Property Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Property relations are such a common feature of social life that we can sometimes forget the immense complexity of the web of laws, practices, and ideas that allow a property regime to function smoothly. But we are quickly reminded of this complexity when social conflict over property erupts. When...... social actors confront a property regime – for example by squatting – they enact what can be called ‘contested property claims’. These confrontations raise crucial issues of social justice and show the ways in which property conflicts often reflect wider social conflicts. Through a series of case studies...... from across the globe, this multidisciplinary anthology exploring contested property claims brings together works from anthropologists, legal scholars, and geographers, who show how disagreements give us a privileged window onto how property regimes function and illustrates the many ways...

  16. Claims in civil engineering contracts

    CERN Document Server

    Speirs, N A

    1999-01-01

    This paper considers claims arising during civil engineering construction contracts. The meaning of the word 'claim' is considered and its possible implications for additional cost and time to completion. The conditions of the construction contract selected will influence the risk apportionment between contractor and client and the price offered by the contractor for the work. Competitive bidding constraints and profit margins in the construction industry, however, may also influence the price offered. This in turn can influence the likelihood of claims arising. The client from his point of view is concerned to complete the work within an agreed time and budget. The circumstances under which claims may arise are reviewed in relation to typical conditions of contract. These circumstances are then related to the CERN LHC civil works. Ways of avoiding claims, where this is possible, are considered. Finally, the means of evaluation of claims and their settlement are considered.

  17. Claiming health in food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Health-related information is increasingly used on food products to convey their benefits. Health claims as a subcategory of these messages link the beneficial component, functions or health outcomes with specific products. For consumers, health claims seem to carry the message of increased...... healthiness, but not necessarily making the product more appealing. The wording of the claim seems to have little impact on claim perception, yet the health image of carrier products is important. From consumer-related factors the relevance and attitudes towards functional foods play a role, whereas socio......-demographic factors have only minor impact and the impact seems to be case-dependent. Familiarity with claims and functional foods increase perceived healthiness and acceptance of these products. Apparently consumers make rather rational interpretations of claims and their benefits when forced to assess...

  18. Science and Pseudoscience in Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Patrick; Bothe, Anne K.; Bramlett, Robin E.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this tutorial is to describe 10 criteria that may help clinicians distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific treatment claims. The criteria are illustrated, first for considering whether to use a newly developed treatment and second for attempting to understand arguments about controversial treatments. Method:…

  19. Medical treatment methods, medical indication claims and patentability: A quest into the rationale of the exclusion and patentability in the context of the future of personalised medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bostyn, S.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses the thorny issue of the rationale of the exclusion from patentability of medical treatment methods and the patentability of medical indications. This quest is the consequence of our earlier findings that medical indication patents present a real life risk for many players

  20. Chiropractic claims in the English-speaking world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Edzard; Gilbey, Andrew

    2010-04-09

    Some chiropractors and their associations claim that chiropractic is effective for conditions that lack sound supporting evidence or scientific rationale. This study therefore sought to determine the frequency of World Wide Web claims of chiropractors and their associations to treat, asthma, headache/migraine, infant colic, colic, ear infection/earache/otitis media, neck pain, whiplash (not supported by sound evidence), and lower back pain (supported by some evidence). A review of 200 chiropractor websites and 9 chiropractic associations' World Wide Web claims in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States was conducted between 1 October 2008 and 26 November 2008. The outcome measure was claims (either direct or indirect) regarding the eight reviewed conditions, made in the context of chiropractic treatment. We found evidence that 190 (95%) chiropractor websites made unsubstantiated claims regarding at least one of the conditions. When colic and infant colic data were collapsed into one heading, there was evidence that 76 (38%) chiropractor websites made unsubstantiated claims about all the conditions not supported by sound evidence. Fifty-six (28%) websites and 4 of the 9 (44%) associations made claims about lower back pain, whereas 179 (90%) websites and all 9 associations made unsubstantiated claims about headache/migraine. Unsubstantiated claims were made about asthma, ear infection/earache/otitis media, neck pain, The majority of chiropractors and their associations in the English-speaking world seem to make therapeutic claims that are not supported by sound evidence, whilst only 28% of chiropractor websites promote lower back pain, which is supported by some evidence. We suggest the ubiquity of the unsubstantiated claims constitutes an ethical and public health issue.

  1. 32 CFR 842.119 - Nonassertable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Hospital Recovery Claims (42 U.S.C. 2651-2653) § 842.119 Nonassertable claims. (a) The... member receives prior to his or her discharge and transfer to the VA facility. (3) Claims for care... employee at the time of assertion unless liability insurance will pay the claim. (4) Manufacturers of...

  2. 44 CFR 62.20 - Claims appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... OF CLAIMS Claims Adjustment, Claims Appeals, and Judicial Review § 62.20 Claims appeals. (a... information; clear photographs (exterior and interior) confirming damage resulted from direct physical loss by... wind policies and any claim information submitted to the other companies; Waiver, Letter of Map...

  3. Consistency of Use and Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment Practices among Urban and Rural Populations Claiming to Treat Their Drinking Water at Home: A Case Study in Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Kelly, Paul; Clasen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease, if used correctly and consistently. While international monitoring suggests that 1.8 billion people practice HWT, these estimates are based on household surveys that may overstate the level of consistent use and do not address microbiological effectiveness. We sought to examine how HWT is practiced among households identified as HWT users according to international monitoring standards. Case studies were conducted in urban and rural Zambia. After a baseline survey (urban: 203 households, rural: 276 households) to identify HWT users, 95 urban and 82 rural households were followed up for 6 weeks. Consistency of HWT reporting was low; only 72.6% of urban and 50.0% of rural households reported to be HWT users in the subsequent visit. Similarly, availability of treated water was low, only 23.3% and 4.2% of urban and rural households, respectively, had treated water on all visits. Drinking water was significantly worse than source water in both settings. Only 19.6% of urban and 2.4% of rural households had drinking water free of thermotolerant coliforms on all visits. Our findings raise questions about the value of the data gathered through the international monitoring of HWT practices as predictors of water quality in the home. PMID:26572868

  4. Consumer Health: CAM Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local library. Be cautious about studies in animals, laboratory studies or studies that include only a ... conjunction with standard medical treatment include the following: Acupuncture Aromatherapy Biofeedback Massage Meditation Music therapy Yoga Scammers ...

  5. Health claims made on multivitamin and mineral supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jovičić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Basic purpose of health claims is consumers' benefit by providing information about healthy eating habits. It is necessary for health claims to be scientifically substantiated and truthful. Health claims should not attribute to food the property of preventing, treating or curing a human disease. Use of health claims should be followed by a statement indicating the importance of a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. The objective of this research was to examine the compliance of health claims made on multivitamin and mineral dietary supplements' labels on the Serbian market with national regulation concerning health safety of dietary products.Methods: An assessment of labels of MVMs was done in two privately owned pharmacies in Novi Sad, Serbia in August 2010.Results: In total, 48 MVMs were sampled and 22 health claims were detected. Seven out of 22 health claims were in compliance with the national regulation. The main reason for health claims on foreign MVMs not to be compliant with the regulation in Serbia was inadequate or nonexistent translation of original labels.Conclusion: Detected use of terms such as "prevention", "treatment" and "indications" on vitamin and mineral dietary supplements' labels is both forbidden and misleading to consumers. Coupled with inadequate or nonexistent translation of the labels, it leads to a low level of protection of Serbian consumers. It is necessary to establish an effective monitoring system for dietary supplements' labeling on a national scale in order toprotect consumers and their wellbeing.

  6. Medicare Hospital Spending by Claim

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Also known as Medicare Spending per Beneficiary (MSPB) Spending Breakdowns by Claim Type file. The data displayed here show average spending levels during...

  7. Medicare Part D Claims Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page contains information on Part D claims data for the purposes of research, analysis, reporting, and public health functions. These data will also be used to...

  8. BLM Colorado Mining Claims Active

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Shapefile Format –This data set consists of active mining claim records extracted from BLM’s LR2000 database. These records contain case attributes as well as legal...

  9. 44 CFR 11.76 - Claims procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... claim and the date it will be submitted. Payment may be made on a partial claim if the adjudicating... claimant. (i) Motor vehicles or mobile homes in transit. Claims for damage to motor vehicles or mobile...

  10. REMINDER : deadline for submission of reimbursements claims to UNIQA

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We would like to remind you of the resolution which took effect from 1 June 2010 changing the deadline for submitting a claim from 24 months to 12 months from the invoice date (as opposed to from the time of treatment). As a transitional measure, it is still possible to submit invoices issued prior to 1 June 2010 as long as they do not date back to more than two years (from the invoice date) at the time of submission. The deadline for transitional claims is 31 May 2011. You are advised to check any outstanding submissions that you have since, as from 1 June 2011, no transitional claims will be accepted.  

  11. Swedish consumers' cognitive approaches to nutrition claims and health claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svederberg, Eva; Wendin, Karin

    2011-03-23

    Studies show frequent use of nutrition claims and health claims in consumers' choice of food products. The aim of the present study was to investigate how consumers' thoughts about these claims and food products are affected by various types of food-related experiences. The data collection comprised 30 individual interviews among Swedish consumers aged 25 to 64 years. The results indicated that participants who expressed special concern for their own and their families' health were eager to find out the meaning of concepts and statements made. A lack of understanding and lack of credibility of concepts and expressions often caused suspicion of the product. However, in some cases this was counterbalanced by confidence in manufacturers, retailers, and/or the Swedish food legislation. To achieve effective written communication of food products' health-conducive properties on food labels, there is a need to consider the importance many consumers attach to understanding the meaning of concepts and expressions used and the importance of credibility in certain expressions. Consumers' varying cognitive approaches are suggested as a basis for pre-tests of nutrition claims and health claims.

  12. Characteristics of Orthopaedic Malpractice Claims of Pediatric and Adult Patients in Private Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetgen, Matthew E; Parikh, P Divya

    2016-03-01

    Medical liability exposure varies based on scope of practice, patient demographics, and location of practice. There is a generally held belief that treatment of pediatric patients increases one's medicolegal risk. We examined a large national database of orthopaedic malpractice claims to determine if pediatric malpractice claims were associated with a less favorable medicolegal outcome compared with adults. Physician Insurers Association of America is an association of medical liability insurance carriers providing liability coverage for 60% of private practice physicians in the United States. The Physician Insurers Association of America data registry of closed medical liability claims was examined, including all orthopaedic claims between 1985 and 2012 in this review. Claims were categorized based on the age of the claimant (pediatric: less than 21 y, adult: 21 y or older). These groups were compared based on percentage of claims resulting in payment, indemnity paid, and years between occurrence of incident and filing of claim. In addition, the top 10 most prevalent claims were identified and compared between groups. A total of 25,702 closed orthopaedic claims were included. Pediatric claims accounted for 13% of the data. The average time from incident to claim filing was 1.92 years for pediatrics and 1.59 years for adults. Pediatric claims resulted in a higher percent of payment (33% vs. 30%) and average indemnity paid ($189,732 vs. $180,171) compared with adults. Five of the top 10 conditions resulting in a claim in each group were the same. Comparing these 5 conditions, in general there were minimal differences in the average time to claim filing between the groups, but larger average indemnity paid in the pediatric group. There appear to be moderate differences in outcomes of orthopaedic malpractice claims between adult and pediatric patients. The longer statute of limitations associated with pediatric claims does not appear to portend a less favorable

  13. Determinants of consumer understanding of health claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Scholderer, Joachim; Rogeaux, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The new EU regulation on nutrition and health claims states that claims can be permitted only if they can be expected to be understood by consumers. Investigating determinants of consumer understanding of health claims has therefore become an important topic. Understanding of a health claim...

  14. 40 CFR 716.55 - Confidentiality claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Confidentiality claims. 716.55 Section... ACT HEALTH AND SAFETY DATA REPORTING General Provisions § 716.55 Confidentiality claims. (a)(1... clearly identify the material subject to the claim. (3) Any respondent may assert a confidentiality claim...

  15. Exaggerated Claims for Interactive Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thue, David; Bulitko, Vadim; Spetch, Marcia; Webb, Michael

    As advertising becomes more crucial to video games' success, developers risk promoting their products beyond the features that they can actually include. For features of interactive storytelling, the effects of making such exaggerations are not well known, as reports from industry have been anecdotal at best. In this paper, we explore the effects of making exaggerated claims for interactive stories, in the context of the theory of advertising. Results from a human user study show that female players find linear and branching stories to be significantly less enjoyable when they are advertised with exaggerated claims.

  16. Nordic scepticism towards health claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2008-01-01

    Imagine that you are shopping in a supermarket and find a package of pork chops labelled "omega-3 added" or that the yogurt "contains phosphatidylserine, which can improve your memory"; would you buy these pork chops or this yogurt? Most Nordic consumers would choose products without health claims....

  17. Entrepreneurial Crowdfunding without Private Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreau, Kevin J.; Jeppesen, Lars Bo; Reichstein, Toke

    Today's crowdfunding raises funds for tiny, private entrepreneurial ventures without granting funders private claims to a project's future value. Rather than “investments,” these are “contributions.” This paper argues that for such crowdfunding neither producer nor consumer surplus – i.e., project...

  18. Political liberalism and religious claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of 4 important lacunae in political liberalism and identifies, in a preliminary fashion, some trends in the literature that can come in for support in filling these blind spots, which prevent political liberalism from a correct assessment of the diverse nature of religious claims. Political liberalism operates with implicit assumptions about religious actors being either ‘liberal’ or ‘fundamentalist’ and ignores a third, in-between group, namely traditionalist religious actors and their claims. After having explained what makes traditionalist religious actors different from liberal and fundamentalist religious actors, the author develops 4 areas in which political liberalism should be pushed further theoretically in order to correctly theorize the challenge which traditional religious actors pose to liberal democracy. These 4 areas (blind spots) are: (1) the context of translation; (2) the politics of exemptions; (3) the multivocality of theology; and (4) the transnational nature of norm-contestation. PMID:28344375

  19. 'Electrides': Electrons Claim their Independence

    OpenAIRE

    Torrisi, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    It was about two hundred years ago when Sir Humphrey Davy, a brilliant English scientist and poet whose fame is acknowledged for the discovery of alkaline metals (potassium, sodium, magnesium, barium), observed a surprising phenomenon: potassium metal exposed to ammonia vapours forms gold-blue coloured materials. About one hundred years later the American chemist Charles Kraus claimed, as possible explanation of this phenomenon, that potassium (K) atoms ionise (lose electrons) in liquid ammon...

  20. Causes of successful medico-legal claims following amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toolan, Caroline C; Cartwright-Terry, Matthew; Scurr, James R H; Smout, Jonathan D

    2014-10-01

    The causes of successful medico-legal claims following amputation were reviewed. A retrospective analysis of claims handled by the National Health Service Litigation Authority, from 2005 to August 2010, was performed. Under the Freedom of Information Act, the National Health Service Litigation Authority provided limited details on closed claims, settled with damages, following a search of their database with the term "amputation." No demographic data were provided. During this period, 174 claims were settled by the National Health Service Litigation Authority, who paid out more than £36.3 million. The causes of the claims were the need for a lower limb amputation due to a delay in the diagnosis and or treatment of arterial ischaemia (56), an iatrogenic injury (15), the development of preventable pressure sores (15), the delay and or failure to diagnose a limb malignancy (6) and the delay in the management of an infected pseudo-aneurysm (1). Complications following orthopaedic surgery resulted in 25 successful claims as did the delayed diagnosis or mismanagement of 10 lower limb fractures. Additional claims followed the amputation of the wrong toe (1), a retained foreign body (2), an unnecessary amputation (4), inadequate consent (4), failure to provide thrombo-prophylaxis following amputation resulting in death (2) and a diathermy burn injury during an amputation (1). Delay in the diagnosis of and/or failure to manage an injury or infection resulted in 21 upper limb amputations. There was insufficient information provided in the remaining 11 claims to determine how the claim related to an amputation procedure. The largest single payout for damages (£1.9 million) resulted from the failure to diagnose and treat a femoral artery injury following a road traffic accident leading to an eventual below knee amputation. Delays in the diagnosis and or treatment of arterial ischaemia were the commonest reasons for a settled claim. Lessons can be learnt from potentially

  1. CLAIMS IN INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    c) Quantum Merit claims ("as much as it is worth"): Quantum Meruit claims are claims where work has been done but no contract or price has been agreed. Then it may be claimed .... break tl1e ex'Pressed tenns of general conditions of contract. The study indicates tlmt tl1e causes for tl1e breach of contract include: delay in ...

  2. Claim of Clips to change the World

    OpenAIRE

    鼓, みどり

    2016-01-01

    Does video clip claim for political or social issues? How the artists represent their opinions in their clips? This paper focuses on claims of clips on environmental issues, victims of the war and racism. Firstly we invest clips claiming environmental issues and victims of the war. Their message is quite political even though they were made for promotion. Clips present opinions of artists. Secondly we look into claims for racism in clips, especially of Michel Jackson's. His message is quite s...

  3. 29 CFR 15.41 - Allowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Arising Out of the Operation of the Job Corps § 15.41 Allowable claims. (a)(1) A claim for damage to persons or property arising out of an act or omission of a student enrolled in the Job Corps may be... student enrolled in the Job Corps. (b) A claim for damage to person or property hereunder may not be paid...

  4. 22 CFR 33.8 - Claim procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authenticated English translation. Claims must include: (1) The captain's sworn statement about the exact..., including: (i) The date and cost of acquisition supported by invoices or other acceptable proof of ownership... UNDER SECTION 7 § 33.8 Claim procedures. (a) Where and when to apply. Claims must be submitted to the...

  5. Information on Nutrition and Health Claims

    OpenAIRE

    Food Safety Authority of Ireland

    2015-01-01

    This document is guidance information on the regulation of nutrition and health claims in Ireland. The document provides an overview of the: – Nutrition and health claims legislation – Nutrition labelling requirements for food products bearing authorised nutrition and health claims

  6. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and maintenance of normal defecation during antibiotic treatment pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    that the information submitted from five out of seven human intervention studies is insufficient to allow a full scientific evaluation, and that these studies have important methodological limitations. No conclusions could be drawn from these studies for the scientific substantiation of the claim. The remaining two......Following an application from Fuko Pharma Ltd, submitted pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006 via the Competent Authority of Finland, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) was asked to deliver an opinion on the scientific substantiation of a health...... human intervention studies, from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim, did not show an effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on the incidence of diarrhoea resulting from antibiotic treatment. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been...

  7. P & I clubs & crew claims

    OpenAIRE

    Φωσκόλου, Φρανσουάζ

    2010-01-01

    “Working as a seafarer, either as a wiper, ordinary seaman, able seaman, or an officer, can be described as a peculiar and risky business”, as stated in relevant Greek laws. Above statement demonstrates vividly the reason why claims that arise as a consequence of an injury, illness or even death of a seaman on-board a vessel could very possibly cost an enormous amount of money to both the ship owning company and the relevant P&I Club. The main purpose of this study is to present how the P&I c...

  8. Analysis of Closed Claims in the Clinical Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Otaki

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of malpractice claims associated with RA management, including the high frequency of medication-related allegations, breakdowns in the assessment process, and high claim numbers among patients older than 60 years, suggest the importance of caution exercised by physicians when administering immunosuppressants for the clinical treatment of RA.

  9. CLAIMS OF SUSTAINABLE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of current practices within the emergent management discipline: Sustainable Facilities Management (SFM). Background: To develop a sustainable society, facilities managers must become change agents for sustainability in the built...... environment. Facilities Management (FM) is contributing to the environmental, social and economical problems, but can at the same time also be a part of the solution. However, to integrate sustainability in FM is still an emergent niche within FM, and the examples of SFM so far seems to come out of very......-creating of new socio-technical services and technologies These SFM understandings are concluded to be coexisting claims of SFM definitions. Practical Implications: Facilities managers will be able to identify the mindset behind different services and technologies that are promoted as SFM. But maybe just...

  10. Probiotics and prebiotics: health claim substantiation

    OpenAIRE

    Salminen, Seppo; van Loveren, Henk

    2012-01-01

    ‘Probiotics’ and ‘prebiotics’ by definition should have health benefits. Health claims on microorganisms proposed as probiotics and probiotic stimulating agents (prebiotics) suggest that there is a relationship between the specific food and maintaining good health or that the food can reduce the risk of a disease. The Health Claim Regulation in European Union aims at a level consumer protection. Thereby, health claim assessment focuses on defining the probiotics and prebiotics, assessing the ...

  11. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to Lactobacillus paracasei LPC 01 (CNCM I-1390) and treatment of disease (ID 3055, further assessment) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    paracasei LPC 01 (CNCM I-1390) and treatment of disease. The food constituent, L. paracasei LPC 01 (CNCM I-1390), is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed for further assessment is “relieve symptoms typically associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), especially diarrhoea......-predominant IBS, and to help reduce the daily number of bowel movements as well as improve the consistency of faeces in adult subjects reporting acute diarrhoea”. The proposed target population is “adults suffering either from Irritable Bowel Syndrome, especially diarrhoea-predominant IBS, or from acute diarrhoea...

  12. Oncology patient-reported claims: maximising the chance for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, H; Rofail, D; Caron, M; Emery, M-P

    2011-01-01

    To review Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) labelling claims achieved in oncology in Europe and in the United States and consider the benefits, and challenges faced. PROLabels database was searched to identify oncology products with PRO labelling approved in Europe since 1995 or in the United States since 1998. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) websites and guidance documents were reviewed. PUBMED was searched for articles on PRO claims in oncology. Among all oncology products approved, 22 were identified with PRO claims; 10 in the United States, 7 in Europe, and 5 in both. The language used in the labelling was limited to benefit (e.g. "…resulted in symptom benefits by significantly prolonging time to deterioration in cough, dyspnoea, and pain, versus placebo") and equivalence (e.g. "no statistical differences were observed between treatment groups for global QoL"). Seven products used a validated HRQoL tool; two used symptom tools; two used both; seven used single-item symptom measures (one was unknown). The following emerged as likely reasons for success: ensuring systematic PRO data collection; clear rationale for pre-specified endpoints; adequately powered trials to detect differences and clinically significant changes; adjusting for multiplicity; developing an a priori statistical analysis plan including primary and subgroup analyses, dealing with missing data, pooling multiple-site data; establishing clinical versus statistical significance; interpreting failure to detect change. End-stage patient drop-out rates and cessation of trials due to exceptional therapeutic benefit pose significant challenges to demonstrating treatment PRO improvement. PRO labelling claims demonstrate treatment impact and the trade-off between efficacy and side effects ultimately facilitating product differentiation. Reliable and valid instruments specific to the desired language, claim, and target population are required. Practical

  13. Construction of Patent Claims Using Axiomatic Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusa Petru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patent claims play an important role in every patent case and it is the core for evaluation of infringement, validity or originality. There are two main types of claims: the independent claims (stand on their own, and the dependent claims (depending on a single/several claim/claims. Axiomatic design is a design theory that is based on the axioms. The axiomatic design theory makes use of corollaries and theorems which guide/help designers mapping functional domain to physical domain. The relation between functional requirements and design parameters is assured by so called design matrix. In an ideal design the number of design parameters is equal to the number of functional requirements, and the functional requirements are always kept independent from each other. When there are more design parameters than functional requirements, the design is a redundant design. A coupled design can became decoupled by selecting different set of design parameters. The idea of construction of patent claims using Axiomatic Design is based on the assumption of independent claims as a part of an ideal design and dependent claims as a part of a decoupled design.

  14. 32 CFR 536.136 - Scope for claims arising under the Foreign Claims Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... member of the U.S. armed forces, a U.S. civilian employee, or a family member of either category. In a... noncombat activities of the armed forces. (b) Effect of Military Claims Act (MCA). Claims arising in foreign...

  15. 76 FR 36176 - Fully Developed Claim (Fully Developed Claims-Applications for Compensation, Pension, DIC, Death...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Fully Developed Claim (Fully Developed Claims--Applications for Compensation, Pension, DIC, Death Pension, and/or Accrued Benefits); Correction AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of...

  16. 32 CFR 536.103 - Statutory authority for claims cognizable under international claims agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Various international agreements, such as the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Status of Forces... international claims agreements. 536.103 Section 536.103 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued... International Agreements § 536.103 Statutory authority for claims cognizable under international claims...

  17. Perception of health claims among Nordic consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Boztug, Yasemin

    2009-01-01

    Health claim perception was investigated by a web-based instrument with a sample of 4612 respondents in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden). Respondents decided which of a pair of claims sounded better, was easier to understand, and was more convincing in their opinion...

  18. Moral Minimalism in American Indian Land Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Burke A.

    2005-01-01

    This is an essay about Indian claims for the return of historically stolen lands, written from the perspective of a "Western" academic moral philosopher. I want to try to outline points of agreement and disagreement between Indian and Western moral conceptions and to seek common ground on which land claims can be more clearly evaluated…

  19. 16 CFR 460.21 - Government claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Government claims. 460.21 Section 460.21 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.21 Government claims. Do not say or imply that a government agency uses, certifies...

  20. 14 CFR 1261.105 - Unallowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... agency of the Government other than NASA. (d) Business property. Claims may not be allowed for property used in a private business enterprise. (e) Articles of extraordinary value. Claims may not be allowed for valuable articles, such as cameras, watches, jewelry, furs; or other articles of extraordinary...

  1. Optimal claim behaviour for vehicle damage insurances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.P. Dellaert (Nico); J.B.G. Frenk (Hans); L.P. van Rijsoort

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyse the optimal claim behaviour of a risk sensitive policy holder having a vehicle damage insurance. It is proved that the optimal decision is of the form: to claim for damages only if its amount exceeds a certain limit. Moreover, we also derive the optimal stopping

  2. 32 CFR 279.4 - Claims process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims process. 279.4 Section 279.4 National... RETROACTIVE STOP LOSS SPECIAL PAY COMPENSATION § 279.4 Claims process. (a) The last day for submission of... members may not be knowledgeable of the process and will require additional assistance after filing their...

  3. 49 CFR 22.69 - Claim process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claim process. 22.69 Section 22.69 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation SHORT-TERM LENDING PROGRAM (STLP) Loan Administration § 22.69 Claim process. After reasonable efforts have been exhausted to collect on a delinquent debt, the...

  4. Forecasting claims in motor vehicle insurance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berridge, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    The forecasting of claims is central to the successful operation of an insurance company. Based on six years of claim and policy data for full cover car insurance from a major New Zealand insurance company, we set premiums for rating categories using a simple credibility method, a modified

  5. 24 CFR 17.67 - Claims files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development... against whom a claim is pending in his office. The file shall be kept reasonably up to date by the... also contain a checklist or brief summary of actions taken to collect or comprise a claim. ...

  6. Probiotics and prebiotics: health claim substantiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seppo Salminen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available ‘Probiotics’ and ‘prebiotics’ by definition should have health benefits. Health claims on microorganisms proposed as probiotics and probiotic stimulating agents (prebiotics suggest that there is a relationship between the specific food and maintaining good health or that the food can reduce the risk of a disease. The Health Claim Regulation in European Union aims at a level consumer protection. Thereby, health claim assessment focuses on defining the probiotics and prebiotics, assessing the health relationship and evaluating studies with emphasis on controlled human intervention studies. The challenges include the focus of claims for healthy populations while most intervention studies with probiotics and prebiotics have been conducted in patients or subjects at risk of specific diseases. Another challenge is the risk reduction claim, which requires demonstrated changes in biomarkers that are generally accepted as indicators of disease risk. Existing assessment opinions from EFSA illustrate the need for further research for probiotics and prebiotics in the future.

  7. 32 CFR 842.110 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... International Agreements Claims Act. (4) The Air Force Admiralty Claims Act and the Admiralty Extensions Act. (5.... (h) Claims arising from a private rather than a government transaction. (i) Claims for patent or... the Treasury or by regulation of the monetary system. (w) Claims caused by the negligent or wrongful...

  8. 40 CFR 1620.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claim; who may file... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.3 Administrative claim; who may file. (a) A claim for damage to or loss of property may be presented by the owner of the property, or his or...

  9. Why the European Food Safety Authority was right to reject health claims for probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katan, M B

    2012-06-01

    Probiotics are microbes that are claimed to promote health and well-being when added to foods. However, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) has so far advised negatively about health claims for probiotics. Companies and scientists have protested against these rejections, sometimes in vigorous language. I argue that EFSA could not have acted differently, given EU regulations and the lack of convincing evidence for some of the claimed effects of probiotics on human health and well-being. One EU regulation that makes it hard to demonstrate the benefits of probiotics is the prohibition of medical claims, i.e. claims that a food prevents or cures a disease. If this prohibition did not exist, manufacturers of nutritional treatments might circumvent the costly procedures required for drugs, and market their products to ill people without thorough proof that they are effective and safe. However, the prohibition is also a legal fiction, because promotion of health and prevention of disease is largely the same thing. EFSA has recently indicated that it will allow health claims based on the ability of probiotics to reduce infections. To a certain extent, this abolishes the distinction between health claims and medical claims. It remains to be seen if probiotics producers can convince EFSA that their products prevent or cure infections and other diseases in humans.

  10. Mental health insurance claims among spouses of frequent business travellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimberg, L A; Striker, J; Nordanlycke-Yoo, C; Nagy, L; Mundt, K A; Sulsky, S I

    2002-03-01

    Following up on two earlier publications showing increased psychological stress and psychosocial effects of travel on the business travellers this study investigated the health of spouses of business travellers. Medical claims of spouses of Washington DC World Bank staff participating in the medical insurance programme in 1997-8 were reviewed. Only the first of each diagnosis with the ninth revision of the international classification of diseases (ICD-9) recorded for each person was included in this analysis. The claims were grouped into 28 diagnostic categories and subcategories. There were almost twice as many women as men among the 4630 identified spouses. Overall, male and female spouses of travellers filed claims for medical treatment at about a 16% higher rate than spouses of non-travellers. As hypothesised, a higher rate for psychological treatment was found in the spouses of international business travellers compared with non-travellers (men standardised rate ratios (RR)=1.55; women RR=1.37). For stress related psychological disorders the rates tripled for both female and male spouses of frequent travellers (>or= four missions/year) compared with those of non-travelling employees. An increased rate of claims among spouses of travellers versus non-travellers was also found for treatment for certain other diagnostic groups. Of these, diseases of the skin (men RR=2.93; women RR=1.41) and intestinal diseases (men RR=1.31; women RR=1.47) may have some association with the spouses' travel, whereas others, such as malignant neoplasms (men RR=1.97; women RR=0.79) are less likely to have such a relation. The previously identified pattern of increased psychological disorders among business travellers is mirrored among their spouses. This finding underscores the permeable boundary between family relations and working life which earlier studies suggested, and it emphasises the need for concern within institutions and strategies for prevention.

  11. Must Metaethical Realism Make a Semantic Claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Guy

    2013-02-01

    Mackie drew attention to the distinct semantic and metaphysical claims made by meta ethical realists, arguing that although our evaluative discourse is cognitive and objective, there are no objective evaluative facts. This distinction, however, also opens up a reverse possibility: that our evaluative discourse is antirealist, yet objective values do exist. I suggest that this seemingly far-fetched possibility merits serious attention; realism seems com mitted to its intelligibility, and, despite appearances, it isn't incoherent, ineffable, inherently implausible or impossible to defend. I argue that reflection on this possibility should lead us to revise our understanding of the debate between realists and antirealists. It is not only that the realist's semantic claim is insufficient for realism to be true, as Mackie argued; it's not even necessary. Robust metaethical realism is best understood as making a purely metaphysical claim. It is thus not enough for antirealists to show that our discourse is antirealist. They must directly attack the realist's metaphysical claim.

  12. Surgical malpractice claims in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiam, Nicole Tin-Lok; Cooper, Michol A; Lyu, Heather G; Hirose, Kenzo; Makary, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Despite ongoing reform, there is still significant physician concern regarding the impact of medical claims on their practices. It is important that physicians and healthcare risk management professionals have a good understanding of the outcomes of medical malpractice to participate in its restructuring as needed and to prevent potentially harmful practices. In our study, we reviewed National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) paid malpractice claim reports from September 1, 1990, through July 30, 2011, and identified the 10 most common surgery-related allegations against physicians, excluding those listed as unspecified. Data were collected on the number of claims, the cost of the claims, and physician and patient characteristics. © 2014 American Society for Healthcare Risk Management of the American Hospital Association.

  13. 5 CFR 180.104 - Allowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... loss of personal property incident to service with OPM may be considered and allowed. The following are... mobile homes may be allowed only in cases of collision, theft, or vandalism. (5) Money. Claims for money...

  14. 44 CFR 11.73 - Allowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... to service with FEMA may be considered and allowed. The following are examples of the principal types... be allowed only in cases of collision, theft, or vandalism. (5) Money. Claims for money in an amount...

  15. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Zho-Tse, Incorporated. The... conveyed to Doyon, Limited, when the surface estate is conveyed to Zho-Tse, Incorporated. Notice of the...

  16. Contingent Claim-Based Expected Stock Returns

    OpenAIRE

    Nicholas Zhiyao Chen; Strebulaev, Ilya A.

    2013-01-01

    We develop and test a parsimonious contingent claims model for cross-sectional returns of stock portfolios formed on market leverage, book-to-market equity, asset growth rate, and equity size. Since stocks are residual claims on firms' assets that generate operating cash flows, stock returns are cash flow rates scaled by the sensitivities of stocks to cash flows. Our model performs well because the stock-cash flow sensitivities contain economic information. Value stocks, high-leverage stocks ...

  17. Nutrition and health claims as marketing tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Buul, Vincent J; Brouns, Fred J P H

    2015-01-01

    European regulations mandate that only substantiated and approved statements can be used as nutrition- and health-related claims in food marketing. A thorough understanding of consumer perceptions of these approved claims is needed to assess their impact on both the purchase intention of functional foods and the development of innovative functional food concepts. In this paper, a conceptual framework on the European consumers' perception of nutrition and health claims on these functional foods is proposed. Through a literature review, common independent variables are structured, and an analysis of these variables shows that nutrition and health claims are mostly only perceived positive by specific target consumers (who need the product, accept the ingredient, understand the benefit, and trust the brand). These consumers indicate that the products with substantiated and approved claims help them in reaching overall health goals. This increased expectation in functional efficacy may mediate an increase in repurchase intent, overall liking, and the amount consumers are willing to spend. Other consumers, however, may have adverse reactions towards nutrition and health claims on functional foods. Implications for the consumer and the industry are discussed.

  18. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Micheal A.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie [CRICO Risk Management Foundation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality

  19. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Micheál A; Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie; Taylor, George A

    2017-06-01

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality implicated in

  20. Effect of a health system's medical error disclosure program on gastroenterology-related claims rates and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan A; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Scheiman, James M

    2014-04-01

    In 2001, the University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) implemented a novel medical error disclosure program. This study analyzes the effect of this program on gastroenterology (GI)-related claims and costs. This was a review of claims in the UMHS Risk Management Database (1990-2010), naming a gastroenterologist. Claims were classified according to pre-determined categories. Claims data, including incident date, date of resolution, and total liability dollars, were reviewed. Mean total liability incurred per claim in the pre- and post-implementation eras was compared. Patient encounter data from the Division of Gastroenterology was also reviewed in order to benchmark claims data with changes in clinical volume. There were 238,911 GI encounters in the pre-implementation era and 411,944 in the post-implementation era. A total of 66 encounters resulted in claims: 38 in the pre-implementation era and 28 in the post-implementation era. Of the total number of claims, 15.2% alleged delay in diagnosis/misdiagnosis, 42.4% related to a procedure, and 42.4% involved improper management, treatment, or monitoring. The reduction in the proportion of encounters resulting in claims was statistically significant (P=0.001), as was the reduction in time to claim resolution (1,000 vs. 460 days) (P<0.0001). There was also a reduction in the mean total liability per claim ($167,309 pre vs. $81,107 post, 95% confidence interval: 33682.5-300936.2 pre vs. 1687.8-160526.7 post). Implementation of a novel medical error disclosure program, promoting transparency and quality improvement, not only decreased the number of GI-related claims per patient encounter, but also dramatically shortened the time to claim resolution.

  1. CLAIMS FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF EDUCATION FEES

    CERN Multimedia

    Personnel Division

    1999-01-01

    REMINDERYou are reminded that, in accordance with Article R A 8.07 of the Staff Regulations 'the relevant bills shall be grouped so that not more than three claims in respect of each child are submitted in an academic year'.For this purpose:the academic year is defined as the period going from 1st September to 31st August, only paid bills can be subject to reimbursement, a claim for reimbursement of education fees may only include bills for expenses incurred during a given academic year for a given child, bills for one child may be grouped on a claim by periods of term, semester or academic year, the months of July and August should be included in the third term, or the second semester, or the academic year, for each dependent child, a maximum of 3 claims can be submitted for the reimbursement of expenses incurred during one academic year, therefore, any bill submitted for reimbursement after the third claim will not be reimbursed.Please make sure that you have received and paid all bills, including those for...

  2. CLAIMS FOR REINBURSEMENT OF EDUCATION FEES

    CERN Multimedia

    PE-ADS

    1999-01-01

    You are reminded that, in accordance with Article R A 8.07 of the Staff Regulations 'the relevant bills shall be grouped so that not more than three claims in respect of each child are submitted in an academic year'.For this purpose:-\tthe academic year is defined as the period going from 1st September to 31st August,-\tonly paid bills can be subject to reimbursement,-\ta claim for reimbursement of education fees may only include bills for expenses incurred during a given academic year for a given child,-\tbills for one child may be grouped on a claim by periods of term, semester or academic year,-\tthe months of July and August should be included in the third term, or the second semester, or the academic year,-\tfor each dependent child, a maximum of 3 claims can be submitted for the reimbursement of expenses incurred during one academic year, therefore, any bill submitted for reimbursement after the third claim will not be reimbursed.Please make sure that you have receive...

  3. Being mixed: who claims a biracial identity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Sarah S M; Fryberg, Stephanie A; Wilkins, Clara L; Markus, Hazel Rose

    2012-01-01

    What factors determine whether mixed-race individuals claim a biracial identity or a monoracial identity? Two studies examine how two status-related factors-race and social class-influence identity choice. While a majority of mixed-race participants identified as biracial in both studies, those who were members of groups with higher status in American society were more likely than those who were members of groups with lower status to claim a biracial identity. Specifically, (a) Asian/White individuals were more likely than Black/White or Latino/White individuals to identify as biracial and (b) mixed-race people from middle-class backgrounds were more likely than those from working-class backgrounds to identify as biracial. These results suggest that claiming a biracial identity is a choice that is more available to those with higher status.

  4. Irish consumers' use and perception of nutrition and health claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Ann-Marie; McKevitt, Aideen; Gibney, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    To investigate Irish consumers' use and understanding of and their belief in nutrition and health (NH) claims in the context of the European Union (EU) legislation (Regulation no. 1924/2006), which permits a number of NH claims on food products. An interview-assisted questionnaire was administered to consumers (n 400). Preference for three types of NH claims across six products was tested. Perception of NH claims was assessed across a further eight food products. Claims were categorised as content, structure-function and disease-risk factor reduction claims. Six supermarkets in the Republic of Ireland. Four hundred adult Irish supermarket consumers. Older (P consumers were more likely to seek NH claims. Structure-function and content claims were preferred across six products. Consumers' perception was associated with the health benefit claimed rather than with the strength of the claim itself. Preference for claim type and claim perception differed with gender, age and educational level. Irish consumers prefer content and simpler NH claims rather than more complex disease-risk factor reduction claims. The food industry may thus be better served using these types of claims. Although the reported levels of understanding were high, evidence of positivity bias and misinterpretation was found. Thus, with regard to Regulation 1924/2006, consumers need more information on both simpler and more complex claims. Public health messages should be targeted according to gender, age and educational level.

  5. 32 CFR 536.19 - Disaster claims planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Disaster claims planning. 536.19 Section 536.19... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.19 Disaster claims planning. All ACOs will prepare... requirements related to disaster claims planning. ...

  6. 48 CFR 6104.402 - Filing claims [Rule 402].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES ADMINISTRATION TRAVEL AND RELOCATION EXPENSES CASES 6104.402 Filing claims . (a) Filing claims. A... shall be in writing and must be signed by the claimant or by the claimant's attorney or authorized...) Claim forwarded by agency on behalf of claimant. If an agency has denied a claim for travel or...

  7. 33 CFR 25.115 - Evidence supporting a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Evidence supporting a claim. 25... GENERAL CLAIMS General § 25.115 Evidence supporting a claim. The claimant shall present independent evidence to support a claim. This evidence may include, if available, statements of witnesses, accident or...

  8. 33 CFR 25.113 - Contents of claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Standard Form 95, Claim for Damage, Injury, or Death. (b) A claim under any other Act may be presented..., personal injury, or death, as applicable; (5) A detailed description of the incident giving rise to the... claimant to accept the total amount claimed in full satisfaction and final settlement of the claim. (c) A...

  9. 37 CFR 7.12 - Claim of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim of color. 7.12 Section... § 7.12 Claim of color. (a) If color is claimed as a feature of the mark in the basic application and/or registration, the international application must include a statement that color is claimed as a...

  10. Handling the Dependence of Claim Severities with Copula Models

    OpenAIRE

    Yulia Resti; Noriszura Ismail; Saiful H. Jaaman

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Several studies have been carried out on the modeling of claim severity data in actuarial literature as well as in insurance practice. Since it is well established that the claim cost distributions generally have positive support and are positively skewed, the regression models of Gamma and Lognormal have been used by practitioners for modeling claim severities. However, the fitting of claim severities via regression models assumes that the claim types are independent. Appr...

  11. 32 CFR 537.15 - Statutory authority for maritime claims and claims involving civil works of a maritime nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... claims involving civil works of a maritime nature. 537.15 Section 537.15 National Defense Department of....15 Statutory authority for maritime claims and claims involving civil works of a maritime nature. (a... affirmative claims involving civil works of a maritime nature is set out at 33 U.S.C. 408. ...

  12. 32 CFR 732.19 - Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... block 17 implies agreement for release of information to the responsible adjudication authority... given to cases that would have received prior approval but, due to lack of knowledge of the program, the... the claim is that of a physician or dentist, refer the difference in opinions to the grievance...

  13. 76 FR 8375 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior.... 1 to 18, inclusive; Secs. 19 to 24, inclusive, those lands lying north of the highway right-of-way...

  14. 32 CFR 842.31 - Claims payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... weather, such as severe lightning storms, hail, or high winds, occur routinely. Damage claims from these storms are normally not paid. Failure to take reasonable care in protecting property from such known... vehicles, and lightning damage to television sets, stereos, computer components, video recorders, and other...

  15. Automating claims management improves revenue cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivison, Matthew

    2008-02-01

    One healthcare organization was able to improve revenue cycle operations by automating its claims management. Using web-based technology enabled the organization to streamline internal workflow processes, redeploy staff, and reduce overhead costs. As a result, cash flow increased 7 percent, and A/R days dropped 16 percent.

  16. Commission on Traditional Leadership: Disputes and Claims

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article examines the practices of the Commission on Traditional Leadership: Disputes and Claims, set up under the Framework Act of 2003 to 'cleanse' the institution of traditional leadership by ridding it of the illegitimate traditional leaders installed during the colonial and homeland eras. Close analysis of the ...

  17. Competing jurisdictions : settling land claims in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, S.; Spierenburg, M.; Wels, H.

    2005-01-01

    The papers included in this volume were earlier presented at a conference on the settlement of land claims in Africa, which was held in Amsterdam in September 2003. The papers are written primarily from an anthropological perspective. Contributions: Introduction: competing jurisdictions: settling

  18. Claimed walking distance of lower limb amputees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geertzen, JHB; Bosmans, JC; Van der Schans, CP; Dijkstra, PU

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Walking ability in general and specifically for lower limb amputees is of major importance for social mobility and ADL independence. Walking determines prosthesis prescription. The aim of this study was to mathematically analyse factors influencing claimed walking distance of lower limb

  19. Archival claims in Southern Africa | Mnjama | Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The author examines the problem of archival claims in the region. He begins by defining the broad categories of archives that fall under the rubric of `migrated archives' and shows that virtually all states in the region are affected by problems related to this phenomenon. He argues that failure to distinguish the different ...

  20. Breaking down barriers to electronic claims settlement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Lynn

    2007-03-01

    Past attempts to transition payer and provider environments to electronic claims settlements have faced several obstacles. However, technological advances, the development of more secure databases, bank-independent approaches to electronic funds transfer and electronic remittance advice, and the availability of secure archives are now making electronic settlement increasingly practical, cost-effective, and attainable.

  1. Accuracy of marketing claims by providers of stereotactic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A; Deweese, Theodore L; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pronovost, Peter J; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. We reviewed the Web sites of all U.S. hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed.

  2. Accuracy of Marketing Claims by Providers of Stereotactic Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K.; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Pawlik, Timothy M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Herman, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. Methods: We reviewed the Web sites of all US hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Results: Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Conclusion: Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed. PMID:23633973

  3. Estimation of Missed Statin Prescription Use in an Administrative Claims Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Rolin L; Patel, Jeetvan G; Hill, Jerrold W; De, Ajita P; Harrison, David J

    2017-09-01

    Nonadherence to statin medications is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and poses a challenge to lipid management in patients who are at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have examined statin adherence based on administrative claims data; however, these data may underestimate statin use in patients who participate in generic drug discount programs or who have alternative coverage. To estimate the proportion of patients with missing statin claims in a claims database and determine how missing claims affect commonly used utilization metrics. This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy data from the PharMetrics Plus (P+) claims dataset linked to the IMS longitudinal pharmacy point-of-sale prescription database (LRx) from January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2014. Eligible patients were represented in the P+ and LRx datasets, had ≥1 claim for a statin (index claim) in either database, and had ≥ 24 months of continuous enrollment in P+. Patients were linked between P+ and LRx using a deterministic method. Duplicate claims between LRx and P+ were removed to produce a new dataset comprised of P+ claims augmented with LRx claims. Statin use was then compared between P+ and the augmented P+ dataset. Utilization metrics that were evaluated included percentage of patients with ≥ 1 missing statin claim over 12 months in P+; the number of patients misclassified as new users in P+; the number of patients misclassified as nonstatin users in P+; the change in 12-month medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC) in P+; the comparison between P+ and LRx of classifications of statin treatment patterns (statin intensity and patients with treatment modifications); and the payment status for missing statin claims. Data from 965,785 patients with statin claims in P+ were analyzed (mean age 56.6 years; 57% male). In P+, 20.1% had ≥ 1 missing statin claim post-index; 13.7% were misclassified as

  4. HEALTH INFO SANTE ANNUAL DEDUCTIBLE AND REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMS: HINTS FOR USE

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Information from the CHIS Board and the Personnel DivisionOne should bear in mind that the annual deductible is an amount (currently CHF 100) charged automatically by the Administrator of the scheme for every adult aged 18 and above. This is what happens: The amount is deducted annually for all medical services received over a calendar year.It is triggered by the date of the treatment and not by the date of the bill nor that of the reimbursement claim.In other words, if you receive medical treatment in December for the first time in a given year, the CHF 100 will be deducted from the claim for that treatment. So, except for urgent cases, it would be better to wait till the following month, thus avoiding one annual deductible.It is also worth remembering that the cost of processing our reimbursement claims - and there were 55, 000 in 1998 - is part of the cost of our insurance.Help keep administrative costs down : do not submit reimbursement claims for amounts less than the annual deductible unless your claims...

  5. Regulatory environment and claims - limits and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ambroise

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, the use of claims became more and more important in many countries in relation to the increased awareness of consumer about the link between foods and health, offering to industry a valuable opportunity to differentiate and valorize their products and to promote innovation. However, more and more stringent regulations are developed, all based on the general principles adopted by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. In addition to the different regulatory processes and administrative requirements according to the country, the high level (and cost) of scientific substantiation of claims, the constraints introduced by nutrient profiles and the poor knowledge of the impact on consumer depending on the cultural contexts may limit these opportunities or, at least complicate their use. All these issues are briefly analyzed, highlighting some striking convergences and differences between countries. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Dolphin-Assisted Therapy: Claims versus Evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Fiksdal, Britta L.; Houlihan, Daniel; Barnes, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and critique studies that have been conducted on dolphin-assisted therapy for children with various disorders. Studies have been released claiming swimming with dolphins is therapeutic and beneficial for children with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, physical disabilities, and other psychological disorders. The majority of the studies conducted supporting the effectiveness of dolphin-assisted therapy have been found to have major methodo...

  7. Development and evaluation of an algorithm to identify users of Prolia(®) during the early postmarketing period using health insurance claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Veena; Xue, Fei; Gardstein, Betsey; Skerry, Kathleen; Critchlow, Cathy W; Enger, Cheryl

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this study is to develop and validate an algorithm to identify Prolia(®) users within a health insurance claims database. Patients with a denosumab-specific or nonspecific administration claim during the early period of Prolia availability in the USA (June 1, 2010 to March 31, 2012) were classified as definite, probable, possible, and nonusers of Prolia using an algorithm consisting of nine different components based on claims patterns consistent with Prolia use. Medical record review confirmed a sample of definite, probable, and possible users and the positive predictive value (PPV) was estimated. The PPV of the claims-based algorithm components varied (17.8-95.8%). Requiring claims for a bone or cartilage disorder or osteoporotic fracture after excluding claims for cancer prior to a denosumab-specific administration code gave the highest PPV (95.8%), followed by requiring a Prolia National Drug Code on the same claim as a denosumab-specific or nonspecific administration code (88.2%). Among the 87 confirmed Prolia users, osteoporosis diagnoses were seen more frequently in the medical record than in claims (83% vs 62%). Prolia users are most accurately identified with administration code claims in conjunction with claims for Prolia National Drug Code and bone disorder treatment and diagnosis codes. Osteoporosis diagnoses may be under-recorded in claims data. The algorithm may require reassessment as uptake for more recently approved indications increases. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Rights as entitlements and rights as claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo, Marco Antônio Oliveira de

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Há pelo menos dois registros diferentes sobre o significado de “direitos”. Segundo um deles, os direitos são relações entre dois termos: uma pessoa e um bem; para o outro, os direitos são relações entre três termos: um indivíduo, uma pessoa e uma ação ou algo. Os registros são diferentes, mas não são totalmente incompatíveis. De acordo com a interpretação de direitos como entitlements, trata-se de direitos morais ou legais, ou seja, as relações de ordem moral ou jurídica das pessoas com bens (de benefícios concedidos a pessoas por uma lei humana, moral ou legal. Como uma espécie de direitos, os direitos humanos são vistos como direitos (entitlements das pessoas ou dos indivíduos a bens essenciais, dos quais podem-se inferir reivindicações (claims contra outras pessoas ou contra governos e representantes. Falamos sobre direitos humanos geralmente desta forma. Mas de acordo com o outro registro, os direitos em sentido próprio têm que ser interpretados como claims. Neste artigo, pretendo apresentar alguns argumentos em favor da vantagem de expor todos os enunciados significativos dos direitos como entitlements em termos explícitos de claims

  9. Modelling Claim Frequency in Vehicle Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Valecký

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on modelling claim frequency and extends the work of Kafková and Křivánková, 2014 (Kafková, S., Křivánková, L. 2014. Generalized linear models in vehicle insurance. Acta universitatis agriculturae et silviculturae mendelianae brunensis, 62(2: 383–388. We showed that overdispersion, non-linear systematic component and interacted rating factors should be considered when the claim frequency is modelled. We detected overdispersion in the Poisson model and employed the negative-binomial model to show that considering heterogeneity over insurance policies yields better fit of the model. We also analysed the linear effect of continuous rating factors and their mutual influences. We showed that non-linearity and interactions between rating factors yield the better fit of the model, as well as new findings related to the analysis of claim frequency. All empirical models were estimated on the insurance portfolio of Czech insurance company collected during the years 2004–2008.

  10. Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) , Medicare Claims data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2003 forward. CMS compiles claims data for Medicare and Medicaid patients across a variety of categories and years. This includes Inpatient and Outpatient claims,...

  11. 45 CFR 2554.3 - What is a claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Overview and Definitions § 2554.3 What is a claim? (a) Claim... it is received by the Corporation, an agent, fiscal intermediary, or other entity acting for the...

  12. 78 FR 15377 - Completion of Claims Adjudication Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... October 21, 1998 (22 U.S.C. 1623(a)(1)(C))), the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission hereby gives notice that on May 21, 2013, the Commission will complete the claims adjudication programs referred to the...

  13. 32 CFR 1645.7 - Evaluation of claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.7 Evaluation of claim. (a) In evaluating a claim for classification in Class 4... should request the registrant to furnish any additional information that it believes will be of...

  14. Claims-Based Definition of Death in Japanese Claims Database: Validity and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooba, Nobuhiro; Setoguchi, Soko; Ando, Takashi; Sato, Tsugumichi; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Kubota, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background For the pending National Claims Database in Japan, researchers will not have access to death information in the enrollment files. We developed and evaluated a claims-based definition of death. Methodology/Principal Findings We used healthcare claims and enrollment data between January 2005 and August 2009 for 195,193 beneficiaries aged 20 to 74 in 3 private health insurance unions. We developed claims-based definitions of death using discharge or disease status and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). We calculated sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPVs) using the enrollment data as a gold standard in the overall population and subgroups divided by demographic and other factors. We also assessed bias and precision in two example studies where an outcome was death. The definition based on the combination of discharge/disease status and CCI provided moderate sensitivity (around 60%) and high specificity (99.99%) and high PPVs (94.8%). In most subgroups, sensitivity of the preferred definition was also around 60% but varied from 28 to 91%. In an example study comparing death rates between two anticancer drug classes, the claims-based definition provided valid and precise hazard ratios (HRs). In another example study comparing two classes of anti-depressants, the HR with the claims-based definition was biased and had lower precision than that with the gold standard definition. Conclusions/Significance The claims-based definitions of death developed in this study had high specificity and PPVs while sensitivity was around 60%. The definitions will be useful in future studies when used with attention to the possible fluctuation of sensitivity in some subpopulations. PMID:23741526

  15. Medical insurance claims associated with international business travel.

    OpenAIRE

    Liese, B; Mundt, K A; L. D.; Nagy, L; Demure, B

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Preliminary investigations of whether 10,884 staff and consultants of the World Bank experience disease due to work related travel. Medical insurance claims filed by 4738 travellers during 1993 were compared with claims of non-travellers. METHODS: Specific diagnoses obtained from claims were analysed overall (one or more v no missions) and by frequency of international mission (1, 2-3, or > or = 4). Standardised rate of claims ratios (SSRs) for each diagnostic category were obtain...

  16. 33 CFR 211.22 - Real estate Claims Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real estate Claims Officers. 211..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Real Estate Claims § 211.22 Real estate Claims Officers. In each Division Office the Division...

  17. 34 CFR 35.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claim; who may file. 35.3 Section 35.3 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education TORT CLAIMS AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT Procedures..., his duly authorized agent, or his legal representative. (c) A claim based on death may be presented by...

  18. 32 CFR 536.6 - The Army claims mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... system commensurate with monetary jurisdiction delegated, or by denying non-meritorious claims. (c) Develop a system that has a high level of proficiency, so that litigation and appeals can be avoided or... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.6 The Army claims mission. (a) Promptly investigate...

  19. 48 CFR 227.7003 - Claims for copyright infringement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims for copyright... SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS PATENTS, DATA, AND COPYRIGHTS Infringement Claims, Licenses, and Assignments 227.7003 Claims for copyright infringement. The procedures set forth...

  20. 45 CFR 504.3 - Official claim forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... WAR CLAIMS ACT OF 1948, AS AMENDED FILING OF CLAIMS AND PROCEDURES THEREFOR § 504.3 Official claim... Forces of the United States Held as Prisoner of War in Vietnam; for Persons Assigned to Duty on board the ‘U.S.S. Pueblo’ Captured by Military Forces of North Korea; for Civilian American Citizens Captured...

  1. 32 CFR 842.50 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from the regulation of the monetary system. (m) Arises out of the combat activities of the military or... defense emergency. (x) Is for patent or copyright infringement. (y) Is for damage to property of a state.... (2) Foreign Claims Act. (3) International Agreements Claims Act. (4) Air Force Admiralty Claims Act...

  2. 19 CFR 191.0a - Claims filed under NAFTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claims filed under NAFTA. 191.0a Section 191.0a Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) DRAWBACK § 191.0a Claims filed under NAFTA. Claims for drawback filed under the...

  3. 28 CFR 7.4 - Procedure for claiming reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure for claiming reward. 7.4 Section 7.4 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REWARDS FOR CAPTURE OF ESCAPED FEDERAL PRISONERS § 7.4 Procedure for claiming reward. A person claiming a reward under this part shall present his...

  4. 32 CFR 536.22 - Claims investigative responsibility-General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... all commands or echelons bearing claims responsibility. (c) Notification to USARCS. A CPO or an ACO... forwarded to the Commander USARCS. (d) Geographic concept of responsibility. A command claims service or an... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims investigative responsibility-General. 536...

  5. 44 CFR 11.74 - Claims not allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claims not allowed. 11.74 Section 11.74 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... arose during the conduct of personal business are not payable. (2) Subrogation claims. Claims based upon...

  6. 5 CFR 180.105 - Claims not allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... articles acquired at the request of others and articles for sale. (9) Property used for business. Claims....105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS EMPLOYEES... payable: (1) Claims not incident to service. Claims which arose during the conduct of personal business...

  7. 27 CFR 20.24 - Allowance of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowance of claims. 20.24 Section 20.24 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Authorities § 20.24 Allowance of claims. The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to allow claims for losses...

  8. 27 CFR 22.23 - Allowance of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowance of claims. 22.23 Section 22.23 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Authorities § 22.23 Allowance of claims. The appropriate TTB officer is authorized to allow claims for losses...

  9. 27 CFR 17.148 - Allowance of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowance of claims. 17.148 Section 17.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... PRODUCTS Claims for Drawback § 17.148 Allowance of claims. (a) General. Except in the case of fraudulent...

  10. Impact of corporate social responsibility claims on consumer food choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller Loose, Simone; Remaud, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The study assesses the impact of two different corporate social responsibility (CSR) claims, relating to social and environmental dimensions, on consumers’ wine choice across international markets. It is analysed how point of purchase CSR claims compete with other food claims and their ...

  11. Potentially Deceptive Health Nutrition-Related Advertising Claims: The Role of Inoculation in Conferring Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alicia M.; Miller, Claude H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to examine the efficacy of inoculation message treatments to facilitate resistance to health nutrition-related (HNR) commercial food advertising claims. Design: Data were collected across three phases extending across a 5-week period conducted over two semesters at a Midwest US university. A 2 × 3 between-subjects…

  12. 29 CFR 15.5 - Administrative claim; evidence or information to substantiate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the nature and extent of the injury, nature and extent of treatment, any degree of temporary or... she is a full or part-time employee, and wages or salary actually lost. (5) If a claim is made for... occupation at the time of death, including his or her monthly or yearly salary or earnings (if any), and the...

  13. Accuracy of claims-based algorithms for epilepsy research: Revealing the unseen performance of claims-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Price, Maggie; Cole, Andrew J; Hoch, Daniel B; Hsu, John

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate published algorithms for the identification of epilepsy cases in medical claims data using a unique linked dataset with both clinical and claims data. Using data from a large, regional health delivery system, we identified all patients contributing biologic samples to the health system's Biobank (n = 36K). We identified all subjects with at least one diagnosis potentially consistent with epilepsy, for example, epilepsy, convulsions, syncope, or collapse, between 2014 and 2015, or who were seen at the epilepsy clinic (n = 1,217), plus a random sample of subjects with neither claims nor clinic visits (n = 435); we then performed a medical chart review in a random subsample of 1,377 to assess the epilepsy diagnosis status. Using the chart review as the reference standard, we evaluated the test characteristics of six published algorithms. The best-performing algorithm used diagnostic and prescription drug data (sensitivity = 70%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 66-73%; specificity = 77%, 95% CI 73-81%; and area under the curve [AUC] = 0.73, 95%CI 0.71-0.76) when applied to patients age 18 years or older. Restricting the sample to adults aged 18-64 years resulted in a mild improvement in accuracy (AUC = 0.75,95%CI 0.73-0.78). Adding information about current antiepileptic drug use to the algorithm increased test performance (AUC = 0.78, 95%CI 0.76-0.80). Other algorithms varied in their included data types and performed worse. Current approaches for identifying patients with epilepsy in insurance claims have important limitations when applied to the general population. Approaches incorporating a range of information, for example, diagnoses, treatments, and site of care/specialty of physician, improve the performance of identification and could be useful in epilepsy studies using large datasets. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  14. Dolphin-Assisted Therapy: Claims versus Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksdal, Britta L; Houlihan, Daniel; Barnes, Aaron C

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review and critique studies that have been conducted on dolphin-assisted therapy for children with various disorders. Studies have been released claiming swimming with dolphins is therapeutic and beneficial for children with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, physical disabilities, and other psychological disorders. The majority of the studies conducted supporting the effectiveness of dolphin-assisted therapy have been found to have major methodological concerns making it impossible to draw valid conclusions. Readers will be informed of the history of, theory behind, and variations of dolphin-assisted therapy along with a review and critique of studies published which purportedly support its use.

  15. Impact of the combined use of benzodiazepines and opioids on workers' compensation claim cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavin, Robert A; Tao, Xuguang Grant; Yuspeh, Larry; Bernacki, Edward J

    2014-09-01

    Study the use patterns and claim cost impact of prescription opioids and benzodiazepines in workers' compensation. A cohort of 11,394 lost time claims filed with the Louisiana Workers' Compensation Corporation from 1999 to 2002 was observed for 7 years post injuries. We found that benzodiazepines are almost always prescribed in combination with opioids. The odds ratios of benzodiazepines used alone, with short-acting opioids and with long-acting opioids for claims ≥$100,000, were 2.74, 4.69, and 14.24, respectively (after controlling for gender, low back pain, marital status, attorney involvement, and each other). Average benzodiazepine daily dose increased to year 3 postinjury and plateaued thereafter, whereas the average opioid dose escalated each year postinjury. The addition of benzodiazepines to an opioid treatment regimen significantly increases workers' compensation costs.

  16. Updates on nutrition and health claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Perales-Albert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is concern about the influence of social determinants related to advertising, communication and information on the selection of food for healthy eating and safe. From this point of view, Spain created the European Regulation 1924/2006 (ER1924/2006, its aim is to ensure and promote access to safe food that benefit health and prevent information received by consumers is inaccurate, ambiguous or misleading. The aims of regulation are to prevent nutritional and attributed health claims to food without reason or if there is sufficient scientific evidence. In this sense, a group of professionals from the University of Alicante in December 2012 performed the First Day of Food and Nutrition, organized by the Center Alinua of the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Alicante, related to updates on nutrition and health claims and its implications public health.By the interest and importance of this topic, this is a summary of the position papers from agents involved: consumers, government, food business, the gremial’s dietitian, the Academy and public health.

  17. HEALTH INFO SANTÉ – REMINDER ANNUAL DEDUCTIBLE AND REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMS HINTS FOR USE

    CERN Multimedia

    CHIS Board

    2000-01-01

    Information from the CHIS Board and the Human Resources Division:Annual deductible and reimbursement claims: hints for useOne should bear in mind that the annual deductible is an amount (currently CHF 100) charged automatically by the Administrator of the scheme for every adult aged 18 and above. This is what happens: The amount is deducted annually for all medical services received over a calendar year.It is triggered by the date of the treatment and neither by the date of the bill nor that of the reimbursement claim.In other words, if you receive medical treatment in December for the first time in a given year, the CHF 100 will be deducted from the claim for that treatment. So, except for urgent cases, it would be better to wait till the following month, thus avoiding one annual deductible.It is also worth remembering that the cost of processing our reimbursement claims - and there were 54, 000 in 1999 - is part of the cost of our insurance.Help keep administrative costs down: do not submit reimbursement cl...

  18. Predicting Consumer Effort in Finding and Paying for Health Care: Expert Interviews and Claims Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sandra; Monsen, Karen A; Pieczkiewicz, David; Wolfson, Julian; Khairat, Saif

    2017-10-12

    For consumers to accept and use a health care information system, it must be easy to use, and the consumer must perceive it as being free from effort. Finding health care providers and paying for care are tasks that must be done to access treatment. These tasks require effort on the part of the consumer and can be frustrating when the goal of the consumer is primarily to receive treatments for better health. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that result in consumer effort when finding accessible health care. Having an understanding of these factors will help define requirements when designing health information systems. A panel of 12 subject matter experts was consulted and the data from 60 million medical claims were used to determine the factors contributing to effort. Approximately 60 million claims were processed by the health care insurance organization in a 12-month duration with the population defined. Over 292 million diagnoses from claims were used to validate the panel input. The results of the study showed that the number of people in the consumer's household, number of visits to providers outside the consumer's insurance network, number of adjusted and denied medical claims, and number of consumer inquiries are a proxy for the level of effort in finding and paying for care. The effort level, so measured and weighted per expert panel recommendations, differed by diagnosis. This study provides an understanding of how consumers must put forth effort when engaging with a health care system to access care. For higher satisfaction and acceptance results, health care payers ideally will design and develop systems that facilitate an understanding of how to avoid denied claims, educate on the payment of claims to avoid adjustments, and quickly find providers of affordable care.

  19. Compensation claims for chiropractic in Denmark and Norway 2004-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevne, Jørgen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Christensen, Henrik Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Adverse events are commonly observed in all parts of health care and have been reported extensively following manual therapy, including chiropractic. The majority of reported adverse events following chiropractic care are mild, transitory and self-limiting. However, little is known about patient filed compensation claims related to the chiropractic consultation process. The aim of this study was to describe claims reported to the Danish Patient Compensation Association and the Norwegian System of Compensation to Patients related to chiropractic from 2004 to 2012. All finalized compensation claims involving chiropractors reported to one of the two associations between 2004 and 2012 were assessed for age, gender, type of complaint, decisions and appeals. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the study population. 338 claims were registered in Denmark and Norway between 2004 and 2012 of which 300 were included in the analysis. 41 (13.7%) were approved for financial compensation. The most frequent complaints were worsening of symptoms following treatment (n = 91, 30.3%), alleged disk herniations (n = 57, 19%) and cases with delayed referral (n = 46, 15.3%). A total financial payment of €2,305,757 (median payment €7,730) were distributed among the forty-one cases with complaints relating to a few cases of cervical artery dissection (n = 11, 5.7%) accounting for 88.7% of the total amount. Chiropractors in Denmark and Norway received approximately one compensation claim per 100.000 consultations. The approval rate was low across the majority of complaint categories and lower than the approval rates for general practioners and physiotherapists. Many claims can probably be prevented if chiropractors would prioritize informing patients about the normal course of their complaint and normal benign reactions to treatment.

  20. 77 FR 22204 - Administrative Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act and Related Statutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... implementing authority for the Job Corps was changed to the Workforce Investment Act (WIA) since the last time... regarding claims of Job Corps students under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA). DATES: This..., property incident to Government service. The WIA provides that Job Corps students are Federal employees for...

  1. 77 FR 22236 - Administrative Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act and Related Statutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    .... Further, the implementing authority for the Job Corps was changed to the Workforce Investment Act (WIA... regarding claims of Job Corps students under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA). DATES: Written..., property incident to Government service. The WIA provides that Job Corps students are Federal employees for...

  2. Food labeling: trans fatty acids in nutrition labeling, nutrient content claims, and health claims. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-07-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations on nutrition labeling to require that trans fatty acids be declared in the nutrition label of conventional foods and dietary supplements on a separate line immediately under the line for the declaration of saturated fatty acids. This action responds, in part, to a citizen petition from the Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI). This rule is intended to provide information to assist consumers in maintaining healthy dietary practices. Those sections of the proposed rule pertaining to the definition of nutrient content claims for the "free" level of trans fatty acids and to limits on the amounts of trans fatty acids wherever saturated fatty acid limits are placed on nutrient content claims, health claims, and disclosure and disqualifying levels are being withdrawn. Further, the agency is withdrawing the proposed requirement to include a footnote stating: "Intake of trans fat should be as low as possible." Issues related to the possible use of a footnote statement in conjunction with the trans fat label declaration or in the context of certain nutrient content and health claims that contain messages about cholesterol-raising fats in the diet are now the subject of an advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) which is published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register.

  3. Prebiotics, Fermentable Dietary Fiber, and Health Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcour, Jan A; Aman, Per; Courtin, Christophe M; Hamaker, Bruce R; Verbeke, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the positive effects of dietary fiber on health have increasingly been recognized. The collective term "dietary fiber" groups structures that have different physiologic effects. Since 1995, some dietary fibers have been denoted as prebiotics, implying a beneficial physiologic effect related to increasing numbers or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Given the complex composition of the microbiota, the demonstration of such beneficial effects is difficult. In contrast, an exploration of the metabolites of dietary fiber formed as a result of its fermentation in the colon offers better perspectives for providing mechanistic links between fiber intake and health benefits. Positive outcomes of such studies hold the promise that claims describing specific health benefits can be granted. This would help bridge the "fiber gap"-that is, the considerable difference between recommended and actual fiber intakes by the average consumer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Proof of payment for all reimbursement claims

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Members of the personnel are kindly requested to note that only documents proving that a payment has been made are accepted as proof of payment for any claims for reimbursement, including specifically the reimbursement of education fees. In particular, the following will be accepted as proof of payment: bank or post office bank statements indicating the name of the institution to which the payment was made; photocopies of cheques made out to the institution to which the payments were made together with bank statements showing the numbers of the relevant cheques; proof of payment in the form of discharged payment slips; invoices with acknowledgement of settlement, receipts, bank statements detailing operations crediting another account or similar documents. As a result, the following documents in particular will no longer be accepted as proof of payment: photocopies of cheques that are not submitted together with bank or post office bank statements showing the numbers of the relevant cheques; details of ...

  5. IMPROVEMENT OF THE FISCAL CLAIMS MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DELIMAN EUGEN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The conduct of the fiscal administration regarding the simplification and modernization of the systems of statements and payment of tax obligations is a necessary task to improve the relationship between the fiscal administration and the taxpayers, and also to induce efficiency regarding the management of fiscal duties in a single system. Regrouping the collecting of taxes under a single administration by taking over the functions of the social security administration has been the cornerstone of establishing a simplified tax administration. Improving the methods of compulsory enforcement of tax claims, the implementation of the management by objectives and the improvement of performance indicators of the fiscal administration activity, are considered to be the commitment of the fiscal body regarding the process of improving the collection of public financial resources.

  6. Dolphin-Assisted Therapy: Claims versus Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta L. Fiksdal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to review and critique studies that have been conducted on dolphin-assisted therapy for children with various disorders. Studies have been released claiming swimming with dolphins is therapeutic and beneficial for children with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, physical disabilities, and other psychological disorders. The majority of the studies conducted supporting the effectiveness of dolphin-assisted therapy have been found to have major methodological concerns making it impossible to draw valid conclusions. Readers will be informed of the history of, theory behind, and variations of dolphin-assisted therapy along with a review and critique of studies published which purportedly support its use.

  7. Are Claims of Global Warming Being Suppressed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-02-01

    Over the last few years, I have heard many rumors that climate science relevant to the global warming discussion is being suppressed by the Bush Administration. One cannot do much about third-hand information. However, on 29 January, the New York Times published a front page article on NASA efforts to suppress statements about global warming by James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. A claim by one government scientist, though, no matter how distinguished, still requires examples from other scientists before a general conclusion can be drawn about the overall scope of the problem. But if the charges are more widespread, then some government scientists might be reluctant to make such claims, because they might feel that their positions were jeopardized. Therefore, an alternate way may be needed to determine the scope of the issue, while still safeguarding government workers from possible retaliation. -On 30 January, Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (R-N.Y.), chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, wrote a letter to NASA Administrator Michael Griffin addressing many of the concerns Crowley has raised. Boehlert wrote,``It ought to go without saying that government scientists must be free to describe their scientific conclusions and the implications of those conclusions to their fellow scientists, policymakers and the general public.'' He continued,``Good science cannot long persist in an atmosphere of intimidation. Political figures ought to be reviewing their public statements to make sure they are consistent with the best available science; scientists should not be reviewing their statements to make sure they are consistent with the current political orthodoxy.'' I commend Rep. Boehlert for his quick and clear statement of the importance of unfettered communication of science. -FRED SPILHAUS, Editor

  8. [Quality of anesthesiological expert opinion in medical claims cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, T; Neu, J; Werner, S; Wiedemann, D; Schaffartzik, W

    2012-06-01

    Expert opinions have an important place for expert testimony in medical disputes. The report should contain a summary about facts and causality between the damage and the medical treatment in question as well as describe the current medical standard. The fulfillment of scientific criteria was investigated in 179 anesthesiological expert opinions from 150 arbitration cases. Anesthesiological expert reports (2005-2007) of the Arbitration Board of the North German Medical Associations were analyzed in terms of structure, general form of assessment and scientific substantiation of statements. Patient damage was confirmed in 76%, treatment failure in 29% and negligent malpractice in 17% of the reports. In 78% of the reports the facts were presented correctly and in 64% the question was answered whether the incident would have occurred even during adequate and professional action. Conclusive statements about the causality between the damage and the medical treatment in question were available only in 60% of the reports. The study findings suggest that anesthesia expert reports present a high incidence of non-scientific claims. The development of guidelines for expert witnesses by the medical societies is urgently recommended.

  9. Learning from lawsuits: Ten-years of NHS litigation authority claims against 11 surgical specialities in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kathryn E; Cooper, Lilli R L

    2016-05-06

    Medico-legal claims are a drain on NHS resources and promote defencive practice. The litigious burden of surgery in England has not been previously described. This paper describes trends over ten years of claims made against the NHS across 11 surgical specialities. Data were requested for all claims received by the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) from 2004 to 2014. Surgical specialities included cardiothoracic, general, neurosurgery, obstetric, oral and maxillofacial (OMFS), orthopaedic, otorhinolaryngology, paediatric, plastic, urology and vascular surgery. A literature review of peer-reviewed publications was performed with search terms 'NHSLA' and 'Surgery'. The NHS paid out approximately £1.5 billion across 11 surgical specialities from 2004 to 2014. Orthopaedic, obstetric and general surgery received the largest number of claims per year, and paediatric surgery the least. The mean time from registration of claim with the NHSLA to settlement was 25.5 months (range 17.8 months-35 months). Neurosurgery was responsible for the highest average amount paid per claim, and OMFS the lowest. Failure/delay in treatment and/or diagnosis and failure to warn/adequately consent were the three leading types of claim. 806 never events were successfully claimed for during the ten-year period. Sharing information and good practice should be a priority for surgical professionals. Lessons learnt from medico-legal claims are transferrable in strategic planning. This pan-speciality report has demonstrated considerable burden on the NHS and should promote improvement in practice on an individual level in addition to providing systems based recommendations to NHS and international organisations. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Blindside discounts: are you being underpaid for your noncontract claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emkes, Bernard J; Phillips, William

    2007-10-01

    White space managers--firms that access health networks on behalf of payers to pay noncontract claims at a discount--can undermine a hospital's revenue potential. Hospitals should routinely monitor their noncontract claims to ensure that they are not being subject to undue discounts as a result of white space manager activity. Identifying noncontract claims and confirming correct payment are two critical steps in this process.

  11. FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset contains closed and obligated projects funded under the following Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant programs: Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC). The...

  12. Joint Asymptotic Distributions of Smallest and Largest Insurance Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansjörg Albrecher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Assume that claims in a portfolio of insurance contracts are described by independent and identically distributed random variables with regularly varying tails and occur according to a near mixed Poisson process. We provide a collection of results pertaining to the joint asymptotic Laplace transforms of the normalised sums of the smallest and largest claims, when the length of the considered time interval tends to infinity. The results crucially depend on the value of the tail index of the claim distribution, as well as on the number of largest claims under consideration.

  13. Are the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Donald J; Rankin, Kenneth S; Jensen, Cyrus D; Moverley, Robert; Reed, Mike R; Sprowson, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    Advertisements are commonplace in orthopaedic journals and may influence the readership with claims of clinical and scientific fact. Since the last assessment of the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements ten years ago, there have been legislative changes and media scrutiny which have shaped this practice. The purpose of this study is to re-evaluate these claims. Fifty claims from 50 advertisements were chosen randomly from six highly respected peer-reviewed orthopaedic journals (published July-December 2011). The evidence supporting each claim was assessed and validated by three orthopaedic surgeons. The assessors, blinded to product and company, rated the evidence and answered the following questions: Does the evidence as presented support the claim made in the advertisement and what is the quality of that evidence? Is the claim supported by enough evidence to influence your own clinical practice? Twenty-eight claims cited evidence from published literature, four from public presentations, 11 from manufacturer "data held on file" and seven had no supporting evidence. Only 12 claims were considered to have high-quality evidence and only 11 were considered well supported. A strong correlation was seen between the quality of evidence and strength of support (Spearman r = 0.945, p advertisements. High-quality evidence is required by orthopaedic surgeons to influence clinical practice and this evidence should be sought by manufacturers wishing to market a successful product.

  14. Consumers’ willingness to pay for sustainable wine claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Simone; Remaud, Hervé; Chabin, Yann

    attributes (price, brand, region of origin and appellation system, grape variety, alcohol level, medal, sensory style, bottling, and sustainable claim), considering the majority of attributes, which are known to be important to consumers and preventing an overestimation of the effect of sustainable claims......-choice reference alternative. Findings: Of all sustainable claims, organic had the highest impact on consumer choice, followed by a privately used claim ‘protect the planet’. Carbon zero wines were only significantly positively valued in the UK, where consumers were made aware of its meaning through national...

  15. Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Safaa M. Raghab; Ahmed M. Abd El Meguid; Hala A. Hegazi

    2013-01-01

    ... composed. This paper presents the results of the analyses of leachate treatment from the solid waste landfill located in Borg El Arab landfill in Alexandria using an aerobic treatment process which was applied...

  16. Nature of Medical Malpractice Claims Against Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Deborah; Tringale, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Connor, Michael [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Punglia, Rinaa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona, E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To examine characteristics of medical malpractice claims involving radiation oncologists closed during a 10-year period. Methods and Materials: Malpractice claims filed against radiation oncologists from 2003 to 2012 collected by a nationwide liability insurance trade association were analyzed. Outcomes included the nature of claims and indemnity payments, including associated presenting diagnoses, procedures, alleged medical errors, and injury severity. We compared the likelihood of a claim resulting in payment in relation to injury severity categories (death as referent) using binomial logistic regression. Results: There were 362 closed claims involving radiation oncology, 102 (28%) of which were paid, resulting in $38 million in indemnity payments. The most common alleged errors included “improper performance” (38% of closed claims, 18% were paid; 29% [$11 million] of total indemnity), “errors in diagnosis” (25% of closed claims, 46% were paid; 44% [$17 million] of total indemnity), and “no medical misadventure” (14% of closed claims, 8% were paid; less than 1% [$148,000] of total indemnity). Another physician was named in 32% of claims, and consent issues/breach of contract were cited in 18%. Claims for injury resulting in death represented 39% of closed claims and 25% of total indemnity. “Improper performance” was the primary alleged error associated with injury resulting in death. Compared with claims involving death, major temporary injury (odds ratio [OR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-5.85, P=.009), significant permanent injury (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.48-6.46, P=.003), and major permanent injury (OR 5.5, 95% CI 1.89-16.15, P=.002) had a higher likelihood of a claim resulting in indemnity payment. Conclusions: Improper performance was the most common alleged malpractice error. Claims involving significant or major injury were more likely to be paid than those involving death. Insights into the nature of liability claims against

  17. Forensic bitemark identification: weak foundations, exaggerated claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Michael J.; Albright, Thomas; Bohan, Thomas L.; Bierer, Barbara E.; Bowers, C. Michael; Bush, Mary A.; Bush, Peter J.; Casadevall, Arturo; Cole, Simon A.; Denton, M. Bonner; Diamond, Shari Seidman; Dioso-Villa, Rachel; Epstein, Jules; Faigman, David; Faigman, Lisa; Fienberg, Stephen E.; Garrett, Brandon L.; Giannelli, Paul C.; Greely, Henry T.; Imwinkelried, Edward; Jamieson, Allan; Kafadar, Karen; Kassirer, Jerome P.; Koehler, Jonathan ‘Jay’; Korn, David; Mnookin, Jennifer; Morrison, Alan B.; Murphy, Erin; Peerwani, Nizam; Peterson, Joseph L.; Risinger, D. Michael; Sensabaugh, George F.; Spiegelman, Clifford; Stern, Hal; Thompson, William C.; Wayman, James L.; Zabell, Sandy; Zumwalt, Ross E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several forensic sciences, especially of the pattern-matching kind, are increasingly seen to lack the scientific foundation needed to justify continuing admission as trial evidence. Indeed, several have been abolished in the recent past. A likely next candidate for elimination is bitemark identification. A number of DNA exonerations have occurred in recent years for individuals convicted based on erroneous bitemark identifications. Intense scientific and legal scrutiny has resulted. An important National Academies review found little scientific support for the field. The Texas Forensic Science Commission recently recommended a moratorium on the admission of bitemark expert testimony. The California Supreme Court has a case before it that could start a national dismantling of forensic odontology. This article describes the (legal) basis for the rise of bitemark identification and the (scientific) basis for its impending fall. The article explains the general logic of forensic identification, the claims of bitemark identification, and reviews relevant empirical research on bitemark identification—highlighting both the lack of research and the lack of support provided by what research does exist. The rise and possible fall of bitemark identification evidence has broader implications—highlighting the weak scientific culture of forensic science and the law's difficulty in evaluating and responding to unreliable and unscientific evidence. PMID:28852538

  18. Knowledge Discovery from Massive Healthcare Claims Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandola, Varun [ORNL; Sukumar, Sreenivas R [ORNL; Schryver, Jack C [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The role of big data in addressing the needs of the present healthcare system in US and rest of the world has been echoed by government, private, and academic sectors. There has been a growing emphasis to explore the promise of big data analytics in tapping the potential of the massive healthcare data emanating from private and government health insurance providers. While the domain implications of such collaboration are well known, this type of data has been explored to a limited extent in the data mining community. The objective of this paper is two fold: first, we introduce the emerging domain of big"healthcare claims data to the KDD community, and second, we describe the success and challenges that we encountered in analyzing this data using state of art analytics for massive data. Specically, we translate the problem of analyzing healthcare data into some of the most well-known analysis problems in the data mining community, social network analysis, text mining, and temporal analysis and higher order feature construction, and describe how advances within each of these areas can be leveraged to understand the domain of healthcare. Each case study illustrates a unique intersection of data mining and healthcare with a common objective of improving the cost-care ratio by mining for opportunities to improve healthcare operations and reducing hat seems to fall under fraud, waste,and abuse.

  19. Forensic bitemark identification: weak foundations, exaggerated claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Michael J; Albright, Thomas; Bohan, Thomas L; Bierer, Barbara E; Bowers, C Michael; Bush, Mary A; Bush, Peter J; Casadevall, Arturo; Cole, Simon A; Denton, M Bonner; Diamond, Shari Seidman; Dioso-Villa, Rachel; Epstein, Jules; Faigman, David; Faigman, Lisa; Fienberg, Stephen E; Garrett, Brandon L; Giannelli, Paul C; Greely, Henry T; Imwinkelried, Edward; Jamieson, Allan; Kafadar, Karen; Kassirer, Jerome P; Koehler, Jonathan 'Jay'; Korn, David; Mnookin, Jennifer; Morrison, Alan B; Murphy, Erin; Peerwani, Nizam; Peterson, Joseph L; Risinger, D Michael; Sensabaugh, George F; Spiegelman, Clifford; Stern, Hal; Thompson, William C; Wayman, James L; Zabell, Sandy; Zumwalt, Ross E

    2016-12-01

    Several forensic sciences, especially of the pattern-matching kind, are increasingly seen to lack the scientific foundation needed to justify continuing admission as trial evidence. Indeed, several have been abolished in the recent past. A likely next candidate for elimination is bitemark identification. A number of DNA exonerations have occurred in recent years for individuals convicted based on erroneous bitemark identifications. Intense scientific and legal scrutiny has resulted. An important National Academies review found little scientific support for the field. The Texas Forensic Science Commission recently recommended a moratorium on the admission of bitemark expert testimony. The California Supreme Court has a case before it that could start a national dismantling of forensic odontology. This article describes the (legal) basis for the rise of bitemark identification and the (scientific) basis for its impending fall. The article explains the general logic of forensic identification, the claims of bitemark identification, and reviews relevant empirical research on bitemark identification-highlighting both the lack of research and the lack of support provided by what research does exist. The rise and possible fall of bitemark identification evidence has broader implications-highlighting the weak scientific culture of forensic science and the law's difficulty in evaluating and responding to unreliable and unscientific evidence.

  20. 20 CFR 325.4 - Claim for unemployment benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claim for unemployment benefits. 325.4 Section 325.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REGISTRATION FOR RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS § 325.4 Claim for unemployment benefits. (a...

  1. 42 CFR 60.39 - Death and disability claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Death and disability claims. 60.39 Section 60.39 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GRANTS HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOAN PROGRAM The Lender and Holder § 60.39 Death and disability claims. (a) Death. The Secretary...

  2. 76 FR 44504 - Claims for Patent and Copyright Infringement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Authority: 51 U.S.C. 20112-20113; 22 U.S.C. 2356; 35 U.S.C. 181-188 and 286; and 28 U.S.C. 1498. Sec. 1245... the time of filing a claim to permit rapid processing and resolution of the claim. (1) A copy of the...

  3. 77 FR 14686 - Claims for Patent and Copyright Infringement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ...; 22 U.S.C. 2356; 35 U.S.C. 181-188 and 286; and 28 U.S.C. 1498. Sec. 1245.200 Purpose. The purpose of... a claim to permit rapid processing and resolution of the claim. (1) A copy of the asserted patent(s...

  4. The space between: Land claims and the law in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.G.H.; Moniaga, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we look at rights discourses and law as an arena of struggle in which local people attempt to gain and secure access to localities of value Following administrative decentralisation in 1999, throughout Indonesia, individuals and communities lodged land claims To support these claims,

  5. Consumer Perceptions of Health Claims in Advertisements and Food Labels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazis, Michael B.; Raymond, Mary Anne

    1997-01-01

    Of sample of 180 women, 60 received information from ads, 60 from product labels, and 60 from labels with nutrition information. Beliefs about products did not differ whether health claims appeared in ads or on labels. Nutrition information influenced beliefs. Health claims challenged by the Federal Trade Commission or consumer groups were less…

  6. 39 CFR 601.110 - Payment of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE PROCUREMENT SYSTEM FOR THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE: INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS PURCHASING OF PROPERTY AND SERVICES § 601.110 Payment of claims. Any claim... part to the supplier must be implemented promptly. In cases when only the question of entitlement has...

  7. 20 CFR 336.15 - How to claim extended benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How to claim extended benefits. 336.15 Section 336.15 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT DURATION OF NORMAL AND EXTENDED BENEFITS Extended Benefits § 336.15 How to claim extended...

  8. 27 CFR 44.154 - Claim for refund of tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, OR WITH DRAWBACK OF TAX Operations by Export Warehouse Proprietors Claims § 44.154... refunded (without interest) to an export warehouse proprietor on proof satisfactory to the appropriate TTB... ownership of such export warehouse proprietor, or withdrawn by him from the market. Any claim for refund...

  9. 24 CFR 203.415 - Delivery of certificate of claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Delivery of certificate of claim... HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Certificate of Claim § 203.415...

  10. Machine-Assisted Serials Control. Bindery Preparation and Claims Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, W. A.; Stock, Loretta A.

    1971-01-01

    Binding specifications are maintained on embossed plastic plates, one plate for each title bound. All binding instructions are imprinted from the plate to a set of forms. The system saves time, reduces errors, is flexible and inexpensive. A computer-assisted system produces claim letters and a claims status report. (Author/NH)

  11. Rationale and scientific support for health claims on foods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    The role of diet and physical activity in health has been increasingly documented and pinpointed as a major ... development and normal physiological functions of the body; (ii) other function claims – previously referred to .... Draft guidelines for use of nutrition and health claims. ALINORM 04/27/22 APPENDIX III, 2004. 9.

  12. 20 CFR 702.221 - Claims for compensation; time limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Claims may be filed anytime after the seventh day of disability or anytime following the death of the... LONGSHOREMEN'S AND HARBOR WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Claims... disability or death shall be in writing and filed with the district director for the compensation district in...

  13. 77 FR 51068 - Remedies for Small Copyright Claims: Additional Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... Copyright Office Remedies for Small Copyright Claims: Additional Comments AGENCY: Copyright Office, Library... pertaining to a study undertaken by the U.S. Copyright Office at the request of Congress on the topic of adjudicating small copyright claims. The study will assess whether and, if so, how the current legal system...

  14. Canada’s Guideline 9: improving SOGIE claims assessment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Dustin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Asylum seekers making claims relating to their sexual orientation and gender identity often face unfair refusal. New guidance from the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada takes admirable steps towards improving claims assessment, and offers a model for practitioners elsewhere.

  15. 49 CFR 370.7 - Investigation of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... not already been made prior to receipt of the claim. (b) Supporting documents. When a necessary part of an investigation, each claim shall be supported by the original bill of lading, evidence of the... been invoiced to the consignee shown on the bill of lading or where an invoice does not show price or...

  16. Knowledge claim evaluation : a fundamental issue for knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, K.; Maruster, L.; Jorna, R.J.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to present a classification of approaches toward knowledge claim evaluation (KCE), which is the process of evaluating and testing knowledge claims in organizations, and to position KCE as a fundamental research issue for KM. Design/methodology/approach - The paper draws

  17. A unifying framework for the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave; Moreno-Terero, Juan D.

    2012-01-01

    In a recent paper, Thomson and Yeh [Thomson, W., Yeh, C.-H., 2008. Operators for the adjudication of conflicting claims. Journal of Economic Theory 143, 177–198] introduced the concept of operators on the space of rules for the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims. They focused on three...

  18. 40 CFR 704.7 - Confidential business information claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Provisions for Section 8(a) Information-Gathering Rules § 704.7 Confidential business information claims. (a) Any person submitting a notice under this rule may assert a business confidentiality claim covering... bodies) by use of legitimate means (other than discovery based on a showing of special need in a judicial...

  19. 44 CFR 295.5 - Overview of the claims process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provide the Claimant with a written acknowledgement that the claim has been filed and the claim number. (c... will help the Claimant formulate a strategy for obtaining any necessary documentation or other support... whether compensation is due to the Claimant. The Claimant will be notified in writing of the Authorized...

  20. 38 CFR 36.4324 - Guaranty claims; subsequent accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guaranty claims; subsequent accounting. 36.4324 Section 36.4324 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... § 36.4324 Guaranty claims; subsequent accounting. (a) Subject to the limitation that the total amounts...

  1. 41 CFR 101-39.405 - Claims against the Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.405 Claims against the Government. (a) Whenever a GSA Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS) vehicle is involved in an accident... against the agency using a GSA Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS) vehicle, the agency shall...

  2. The significance of claims fraud in microinsurance and a statistical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (2002) which has been shown to effectively identify fraudulent claims without the need for a training sample. The method can thus easily be applied by microinsurers to assist in the detection of claims fraud. While this method of fraud detection is not without limitations, it may provide a pragmatic and cost-effective way for ...

  3. 27 CFR 28.317 - Filing of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (including serial numbers, if any) and location of the container or containers from which the wine was lost; (e) The quantity of wine lost from each container, and the total quantity of wine covered by the... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS EXPORTATION OF ALCOHOL Losses Wine § 28.317 Filing of claims. Claims, for...

  4. 12 CFR 627.2745 - Priority of claims-associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Priority of claims-associations. 627.2745..., RECEIVERS, AND VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATIONS Receivers and Receiverships § 627.2745 Priority of claims—associations. The following priority of claims shall apply to the distribution of the assets of an association in...

  5. 37 CFR 360.22 - Form and content of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....loc.gov/crb/dart/ during the months of January and February for claims filed online in accordance with... address must be provided on claims submitted online through the Copyright Royalty Board Web site. (3) The... such information. Penalties for fraud and false statements are provided under 18 U.S.C. 1001 et seq. (c...

  6. 9 CFR 381.413 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Nutrition Labeling... implication, characterizes the level of a nutrient (nutrient content claim) of the type required in nutrition... claims regarding vitamins and minerals described in paragraph (q)(3) of this section, no nutrient content...

  7. 40 CFR 303.33 - Filing a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS CITIZEN AWARDS FOR INFORMATION ON CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS UNDER SUPERFUND... regulation is required to file a claim for such an award with the Deputy Assistant Administrator for Criminal... information was provided. (c) All claim submissions must be submitted to the Office of Criminal Enforcement...

  8. Theoretical Claims and Empirical Evidence in Maori Education Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Post-Marxist critical sociology of education has influenced the development of indigenous ("kaupapa") Maori educational theory and research. Its effects are examined in four claims made for Maori education by indigenous theorists. The claims are: indigenous kaupapa Maori education is a revolutionary initiative; it is a cultural solution…

  9. 27 CFR 44.232 - Allowance of claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Allowance of claim. 44.232 Section 44.232 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT..., WITHOUT PAYMENT OF TAX, OR WITH DRAWBACK OF TAX Drawback of Tax § 44.232 Allowance of claim. On receipt of...

  10. Worst-Case-Optimal Dynamic Reinsurance for Large Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Ralf; Menkens, Olaf; Steffensen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    We control the surplus process of a non-life insurance company by dynamic proportional reinsurance. The objective is to maximize expected (utility of the) surplus under the worst-case claim development. In the large claim case with a worst-case upper limit on claim numbers and claim sizes, we find...... the optimal reinsurance strategy in a differential game setting where the insurance company plays against mother nature. We analyze the resulting strategy and illustrate its characteristics numerically. A crucial feature of our result is that the optimal strategy is robust to claim number and size modeling...... of ruin. Finally, we calculate the intrinsic risk-free return of the model and we show that the principle of Markowitz - don't put all your eggs in one basket - does not hold in this setting....

  11. Administrative Claims Data for Economic Analyses in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preussler, Jaime M.; Mau, Lih-Wen; Majhail, Navneet S; Meyer, Christa L.; Denzen, Ellen; Edsall, Kristen C.; Farnia, Stephanie H.; Silver, Alicia; Saber, Wael; Burns, Linda J.; Vanness, David J.

    2017-01-01

    There is an increasing need for the development of approaches to measure quality, costs and resource utilization patterns among allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) patients. Administrative claims data provide an opportunity to examine service utilization and costs, particularly from the payer’s perspective. However, because administrative claims data are primarily designed for reimbursement purposes, challenges arise when using it for research. We use a case study with data derived from the 2007–2011 Truven Health MarketScan Research database to discuss opportunities and challenges for the use of administrative claims data to examine the costs and service utilization of allogeneic HCT and chemotherapy alone for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Starting with a cohort of 29,915 potentially eligible patients with a diagnosis of AML, we were able to identify 211 patients treated with HCT and 774 treated with chemotherapy only where we were sufficiently confident of the diagnosis and treatment path to allow analysis. Administrative claims data provide an avenue to meet the need for health care costs, resource utilization, and outcome information. However, when using these data, a balance between clinical knowledge and applied methods is critical to identifying a valid study cohort and accurate measures of costs and resource utilization. PMID:27184624

  12. Medical insurance claims associated with international business travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, B; Mundt, K A; Dell, L D; Nagy, L; Demure, B

    1997-07-01

    Preliminary investigations of whether 10,884 staff and consultants of the World Bank experience disease due to work related travel. Medical insurance claims filed by 4738 travellers during 1993 were compared with claims of non-travellers. Specific diagnoses obtained from claims were analysed overall (one or more v no missions) and by frequency of international mission (1, 2-3, or > or = 4). Standardised rate of claims ratios (SSRs) for each diagnostic category were obtained by dividing the age adjusted rate of claims for travellers by the age adjusted rate of claims for non-travellers, and were calculated for men and women travellers separately. Overall, rates of insurance claims were 80% higher for men and 18% higher for women travellers than their non-travelling counterparts. Several associations with frequency of travel were found. SRRs for infectious disease were 1.28, 1.54, and 1.97 among men who had completed one, two or three, and four or more missions, and 1.16, 1.28, and 1.61, respectively, among women. The greatest excess related to travel was found for psychological disorders. For men SRRs were 2.11, 3.13, and 3.06 and for women, SRRs were 1.47, 1.96, and 2.59. International business travel may pose health risks beyond exposure to infectious diseases. Because travellers file medical claims at a greater rate than non-travellers, and for many categories of disease, the rate of claims increases with frequency of travel. The reasons for higher rates of claims among travellers are not well understood. Additional research on psychosocial factors, health practices, time zones crossed, and temporal relation between travel and onset of disease is planned.

  13. The History of Science as a Tool to Identify and Confront Pseudoscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Seth C.

    2007-01-01

    The pseudoscientific views in educated society are facing increased problems, which needs the rectification of current deficiency of historical context in science education. This can change the way the students view claims and ideas presented to them.

  14. Modeling the Effects of Advertised Price Claims: Tensile Versus Precise Claims?

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay K. Dhar; Claudia González-Vallejo; Dilip Soman

    1999-01-01

    Department store chains use advertised price reductions as a major promotional tool to attract consumers to their stores. In advertising discounts, retailers typically use price claims that vary on two key dimensions. First, discounts may be specified either precisely (e.g., 60% off) or with nonspecific () information as in a range of discounts (e.g., 50–70% off). Second, discounts may be offered on an entire group (e.g., Sale on “All” items) or on a subset of an advertised group of items (e....

  15. Medico-legal claims against English radiologists: 1995-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, S F S

    2009-12-01

    A list of claims against radiologists from 1995-2006 was obtained from the NHS Litigation Authority. It shows a total of 440 claims. The largest number of claims (199) related to delayed or missed diagnoses of cancer, and 73 claims related to breast radiology. There is a trend for a mild increase in the number of claims each year. 30 claims were made after a false-positive diagnosis of cancer. Just under pound8.5 million has so far been paid in damages, with a further pound5 million in legal fees. A claim for multiple missed diagnoses of breast cancer led to a pay-out of pound464 000 ( pound673 000 after legal fees); the largest sum awarded following a delay in the diagnosis of an individual cancer was pound300 000. The subtle legal distinction between error and negligence is reviewed here. The reason why breast radiologists are more likely to be sued than any other type of British radiologist is also discussed, along with the implications for UK radiological practice, particularly in light of the recent Chief Medical Officer's report on revalidation. A method is proposed that may protect radiologists from allegations of clinical negligence in the future.

  16. USING CLAIMS DATA FOR EVIDENCE GENERATION IN MANAGED ENTRY AGREEMENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Alina; Schwarzkopf, Larissa; Rogowski, Wolf H

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses the use of routinely collected claims data for managed entry agreements (MEA) in the illustrative context of German statutory health insurance (SHI) funds. Based on a nonsystematic literature review, the data needs of different MEA were identified. A value-based typology to classify MEA on the basis of these data needs was developed. The typology is oriented toward health outcomes and utilization and costs, key components of a new technology's value. For each MEA type, the suitability of claims data in establishing evidence of the novel technology's value in routine care was systematically assessed. Assessment criteria were data availability, completeness, timeliness, confidentiality, reliability, and validity. Claims data are better suited to MEA addressing uncertainty regarding the utilization and costs of a novel technology in routine care. In schemes where safety aspects or clinical effectiveness are assessed, the role of claims data is limited because clinical information is not included in sufficient detail. The suitability of claims data depends on the source of uncertainty and, in consequence, the outcome measures chosen in the agreements. In all schemes, the validity of claims data should be judged with caution as data are collected for billing purposes. This framework may support manufacturers and payers in selecting the most suitable contract type and agreeing on contract conditions. More research is necessary to validate these results and to address remaining medical, economic, legal, and ethical questions of using claims data for MEA.

  17. Science and pseudoscience in communication disorders: criteria and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Patrick; Bothe, Anne K; Bramlett, Robin E

    2005-08-01

    The purpose of this tutorial is to describe 10 criteria that may help clinicians distinguish between scientific and pseudoscientific treatment claims. The criteria are illustrated, first for considering whether to use a newly developed treatment and second for attempting to understand arguments about controversial treatments. Pseudoscience refers to claims that appear to be based on the scientific method but are not. Ten criteria for distinguishing between scientific and pseudoscientific treatment claims are described. These criteria are illustrated by using them to assess a current treatment for stuttering, the SpeechEasy device. The authors read the available literature about the device and developed a consensus set of decisions about the 10 criteria. To minimize any bias, a second set of independent judges evaluated a sample of the same literature. The criteria are also illustrated by using them to assess controversies surrounding 2 treatment approaches: Fast ForWord and facilitated communication. Clinicians are increasingly being held responsible for the evidence base that supports their practice. The power of these 10 criteria lies in their ability to help clinicians focus their attention on the credibility of that base and to guide their decisions for recommending or using a treatment.

  18. 32 CFR 536.8 - Responsibilities and operations of command claims services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Responsibilities and operations of command claims... responsibility. (12) Appoint FCCs. (b) Operations of command claims services. The SJA of the command shall... CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.8 Responsibilities and...

  19. LEARNING POINTS FROM WHISTLEBLOWER CLAIMS AGAINST INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Schmidt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The types of whistleblowing claims made against institutions of higher education are not well understood nor are the various mechanisms used to solicit, investigate, and learn from such claims at the institutional and state levels. This research obtained and analyzed whistleblower claims made against institutions of higher education and explores and facilitates a discussion around the value of learning opportunities that come from whistleblowing claims. Aggregate claims data and detail workpapers for claims made against the 45 publicly funded colleges and universities in the state of Ohio, in the midwestern United States was analyzed to identify patterns and areas of focus which could improve institutional processes and internal controls. Four areas resulted from the analysis: hiring and pay practices, prevention of the theft of institutional assets, prevention of the theft of student funds, and an institutional accreditation issue. All claims that were reported reflected real concerns on topics of strategic importance to institutions and their management practices, although not all were substantiated or corroborated. One quarter of the claims resulted in proven cases for recovery and prosecution. At the state level, completeness of investigation and administrative learning were sometimes not pursued due to the code enforcement nature of the governing bodies whose mandate was limited to the identification and prosecution of crimes, although improvement opportunities clearly existed. The case of Ohio demonstrates that open government and public information request processes can provide sufficient information to allow insight into the nature of the claims and to identify improvement opportunities for both the institution and state level administration.

  20. Do clinical incidents, complaints and medicolegal claims overlap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, Paul; Moon, Jackie; Anderson, Paul; Kirkup, Steve; Williams, Susan; Gray, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Error reporting by healthcare staff, patient-derived complaints and patient-derived medico-legal claims are three separate processes present in most healthcare systems. It is generally assumed that all relate to the same cases. Given the high costs associated with these processes and strong desire to maximise quality and standards, the purpose of this paper is to see whether it was indeed the case that most complaints and claims related to medical errors and the relative resource allocation to each group. Electronic databases for clinical error recording, patient complaints and medico-legal claims in a large NHS healthcare provider organisation were reviewed and case overlap analysed. Most complaints and medico-legal claims do not associate with a prior clinical error. Disproportionate resource is required for a small number of complaints and the medico-legal claims process. Most complaints and claims are not upheld. The authors have only looked at data from one healthcare provider and for one period. It would be useful to analyse other healthcare organisations over a longer time period. The authors were unable to access data on secondary staffing costs, which would have been informative. As the medico-legal process can go on for many years, the authors do not know the ultimate outcomes for all cases. The authors also do not know how many medico-legal cases were settled out of court pragmatically to minimise costs. Practical implications - Staff error reporting systems and patient advisory services seem to be efficient and working well. However, the broader complaints and claims process is costing considerable time and money, yet may not be useful in driving up standards. System changes to maximise helpful complaints and claims, from a quality and standards perspective, and minimise unhelpful ones are recommended. This study provides important data on the lack of overlap between errors, complaints and claims cases.

  1. Reducing medical claims cost to Ghana's National Health Insurance scheme: a cross-sectional comparative assessment of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsiah-Boateng, Eric; Asenso-Boadi, Francis; Dsane-Selby, Lydia; Andoh-Adjei, Francis-Xavier; Otoo, Nathaniel; Akweongo, Patricia; Aikins, Moses

    2017-02-06

    A robust medical claims review system is crucial for addressing fraud and abuse and ensuring financial viability of health insurance organisations. This paper assesses claims adjustment rate of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana. The study was a cross-sectional comparative assessment of paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the NHIS. Medical claims of subscribers for the year, 2014 were requested from the claims directorate and analysed. Proportions of claims adjusted by the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews were determined for each type of healthcare facility. Bivariate analyses were also conducted to test for differences in claims adjustments between healthcare facility types, and between the two claims reviews. The electronic-based review made overall adjustment of 17.0% from GHS10.09 million (USD2.64 m) claims cost whilst the paper-based review adjusted 4.9% from a total of GHS57.50 million (USD15.09 m) claims cost received, and the difference was significant (p paper-based reviews (p = 0.6484). The electronic-based review adjusted significantly higher claims cost than the paper-based claims review. Scaling up the electronic-based review to cover claims from all accredited care providers could reduce spurious claims cost to the scheme and ensure long term financial sustainability.

  2. ARCO and Sun agree to settle Iranian claims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-24

    This paper reports that ARCO and Sun Co. Inc. have agreed to separate settlements totaling almost $261 million that resolve their claims over oil field assets expropriated by Iran in 1978--80. The agreements are subject to approval by the Iran-U.S. claims tribunal at The Hague. The tribunal was set up in 1981 to resolve foreign claims to assets nationalized by the government of Ayatollah Khomeini following the fall of the Shah of Iran as a result of the 1978-79 Iranian revolution. The settlements are seen as the latest steps Iran has taken to normalize relations with the U.S., notably through petroleum related deals.

  3. Professional Liability Insurance Contracts: Claims Made Versus Occurrence Policies

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Boyer; Karine Gobert

    2009-01-01

    One of the major contract innovation in liability insurance during the liability crisis of the early 1980s was the introduction of claims-made and reported insurance contracts. Typical insurance contracts are based on loss occurrence (i.e., occurrence-based contracts), which means that a loss incurred in a given year is covered by the insurance contract for that year, no matter when the claims is actually reported. In a claims-made contract, losses are covered in the year in which they are re...

  4. Fitting of Finite Mixture Distributions to Motor Insurance Claims

    OpenAIRE

    P. Sattayatham; T. Talangtam

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The modeling of claims is an important task of actuaries. Our problem is in modelling the actual motor insurance claim data set. In this study, we show that the actual motor insurance claim can be fitted by a finite mixture model. Approach: Firstly, we analyse the actual data set and then we choose the finite mixture Lognormal distributions as our model. The estimated parameters of the model are obtained from the EM algorithm. Then, we use the K-S and A-D test for showing h...

  5. A Unifying Framework for the Problem of Adjudicating Conflicting Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    In a recent paper, Thomson and Yeh [Operators for the adjudication of conflicting claims, Journal of Economic Theory 143 (2008) 177-198] introduced the concept of operators on the space of rules for the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims. They focussed on three operators in order to uncover...... the structure of such a space. In this paper, we generalize their analysis upon presenting and studying a general family of operators inspired by three apparently unrelated approaches to the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims. We study the structural properties of this family and show, in particular...

  6. Legal assumptions for private company claim for additional (supplementary payment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šogorov Stevan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject matter of analyze in this article are legal assumptions which must be met in order to enable private company to call for additional payment. After introductory remarks discussion is focused on existence of provisions regarding additional payment in formation contract, or in shareholders meeting general resolution, as starting point for company's claim. Second assumption is concrete resolution of shareholders meeting which creates individual obligations for additional payments. Third assumption is defined as distinctness regarding sum of payment and due date. Sending of claim by relevant company body is set as fourth legal assumption for realization of company's right to claim additional payments from member of private company.

  7. The EU health claim regulation in international comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition and health claims are voluntary claims on food indicating favourable nutritional content or health benefits of the food. Nutrition and health claims on food are increasingly regulated in the world market. This process is accompanied by intensive stakeholder discussions on the possible...... impact on consumer protection and food marketing effectiveness. This article reviews literature on regulations in the major food markets in comparison with the EU regulation. The focus is on identifying characteristics of regulations that are expected to have an impact on consumer protection and food...... marketing. The EU regulation is regarded as focusing relatively strongly on precaution and consumer understanding. The extent to which this hampers food innovations is in dispute. It is suggested that using marketing measures in favour of scientifically approved claims as well as stakeholder cooperation...

  8. 32 CFR 751.9 - Presentment of claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... office serving the area where the claim accrued, such as where the House Hold Goods were delivered. If... closely to determine the nature of the damage. For furniture, undersurfaces and the edges of drawers and...

  9. Health claims as communication tools that enhance brand loyalty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krystallis, Athanasios; Chrysochou, Polymeros

    2011-01-01

    strategy. Brands carrying a health claim are thus expected to have an advantage over their counterparts. In this study, we aim to investigate whether health claims, with emphasis on the low-fat claims, can act as a means to improve the performance of brands and further enhance their loyalty levels. Based......During the last decade a strong consumer interest has emerged for food products with health protecting or enhancing properties. In this connection, health claims are used as communication tools conveying the health message of a product and further constituting the means of a brand's differentiation...... on stated preference data using a purchase intention scale (i.e. Juster Scale), a set of Brand Performance Measures (BPMs) are empirically estimated to describe the market structure of two dairy product categories and their respective sub-categories that were defined according to health-related attributes...

  10. Creditors’ claims in bankruptcy proceedings - issues and concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Palić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A generally accepted rule in the bankruptcy law is that a bankruptcy creditor can file a claim against the debtor only in bankruptcy proceedings. This rule has a legal effect. If the creditor’s claim in the bankruptcy proceeding has not been disputed, the creditor is not able to instigate legal and execution proceedings. Obviously, this applies to financial claims. However, it is not clear whether the above can be applied when the claim is not financial but when it concerns a request for the nullification of a contract. It is of particular interest whether such a request can be made by a counterclaim against the debtor in an ordinary judicial proceeding or only in bankruptcy proceedings. Using a practical example, the authors concluded that it is possible for a creditor to make a request for the nullification of a contract by a counterclaim in a civil lawsuit.

  11. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Claims Public Use Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS is committed to increasing access to its Medicare claims data through the release of de-identified data files available for public use. They contain...

  12. 40 CFR 350.7 - Substantiating claims of trade secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... factors which influence the cost of determining the identity of the chemical claimed as trade secret by... manufacturing process, identify the activity where the chemical is used.) (ii) Has your company or facility...

  13. 32 CFR 842.32 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... food, lodging, and transportation costs due to delay in delivery of household goods or travel to port.... These claims may be payable through Accounting and Finance as a travel expense. (z) It is a cost to...

  14. 27 CFR 70.603 - Execution and filing of claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... determines that a major disaster has occurred. (c) Other causes of loss. (1) Claims for amounts of $250 or... as the result of: (i) Fire, flood, casualty, or other disaster; or (ii) Damage (excluding theft...

  15. Mining claim activity on Federal Land in the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Public Land spatial data sets (shapefile) contains Public Land Survey section polygons that had mining claims recorded in the U.S. Bureau of Land Management's...

  16. 21 CFR 101.70 - Petitions for health claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... contact the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition for details.) If any part of the material... the report, such as a physician or hospital or other institution. (f) Petitions for a health claim...

  17. The use of breast conserving surgery: linking insurance claims with tumor registry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashiro Gladys

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to use insurance claims and tumor registry data to examine determinants of breast conserving surgery (BCS in women with early stage breast cancer. Methods Breast cancer cases registered in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR from 1995 to 1998 were linked with insurance claims from a local health plan. We identified 722 breast cancer cases with stage I and II disease. Surgical treatment patterns and comorbidities were identified using diagnostic and procedural codes in the claims data. The HTR database provided information on demographics and disease characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess determinants of BCS vs. mastectomy. Results The linked data set represented 32.8% of all early stage breast cancer cases recorded in the HTR during the study period. Due to the nature of the health plan, 79% of the cases were younger than 65 years. Women with early stage breast cancer living on Oahu were 70% more likely to receive BCS than women living on the outer islands. In the univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis, lower tumor stage, smaller tumor size, and well-differentiated tumor grade were related to receiving BCS. Ethnicity, comorbidity count, menopausal and marital status were not associated with treatment type. Conclusions In addition to developing solutions that facilitate access to radiation facilities for breast cancer patients residing in remote locations, future qualitative research may help to elucidate how women and oncologists choose between BCS and mastectomy.

  18. Indian Land Claims in Maine and Elsewhere: A Long, Costly Path.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Reviewing Indian land claims and their impact on anti-Indian groups, states, Indian Claims Commission, and the federal government, this article reviews the Maine land claim, Taos Blue Lake, and the Submarginal Lands Act of 1933. (RTS)

  19. Health claims on foods: challenge for clinical research companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essi Sarkkinen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The Nutrition and Health Claim Regulation 1924/2006/EC, together with EFSA guidances on the scientific requirements for different type of health claims, is setting the basis for health claim substantiation in the EU. Aim The aim of this presentation is to bring up the key challenges that the food industry and clinical research organizations are facing when meeting these requirements. Results and discussion Key issues in clinical research planning to meet the requirements set for the health claim substantiation are: (1 Selection of right outcome markers since the selection of outcome marker defines actually the formulation of the health claim to be used on food or food ingredient. (2 Selection of right target population since that determines the target consumer group for the food with a health claim. (3 Selection of dose regime and food matrices used since these largely determine the conditions set for the use of the health claim. One of the major challenges in health claim substantiation is the deviant approach to risk factors or biomarkers. From the regulation point of view, a single risk factor approach is emphasized, but from the clinical and scientific point of view the pattern of different risk markers or biomarkers could, in some cases, be a more relevant choice to reflect the final health outcome. This is especially the case in the nutrition and health area because we are often dealing with weak but multiple health effects of certain food items or ingredients. Also the lack of validated well-established biomarkers potent to be affected by diet is a challenge in health claim substantiation.The selection of right target population is often a compromise between choosing a more potential target group to obtain efficacy (i.e. risk factors elevated vs. patient groups and choosing a rationale to generalize the results to wider population (target consumer group.The selection of optimal dosing regime and matrices for a clinical study is

  20. Lawsuits against plastic surgeons: Does locale affect incidence of claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Jonathan L; Hammert, Warren C; Zin, James E

    2007-01-01

    Physicians continue to practice in a very litigious environment. Some physicians try to mitigate their exposure to lawsuits by avoiding geographical locations known for their high incidence of medical malpractice claims. Not only are certain areas of the United States known to have a higher incidence of litigation, but it is also assumed that certain areas of the hospital incur a greater liability. There seems to be a medicolegal dogma suggesting a higher percentage of malpractice claims coming from patients seen in the emergency room (ER), as well as higher settlements for ER claims. To determine if there is any validity to the dogma that a higher percentage of malpractice claims arise from the ER. An analysis of common plastic surgery consults that result in malpractice claims was performed. The location where the basis for the lawsuit arose - the ER, office (clinic) or the operating room (OR) - was evaluated. The value of the indemnity paid and whether its value increased or decreased based on the location of the misadventure was evaluated. According to the data, which represented 60% of American physicians, there was a larger absolute number of malpractice claims arising from the OR, not the ER. However, the highest average indemnity was paid for cases involving amputations when the misadventure originated in the ER. The dogma that a greater percentage of lawsuits come from incidents arising in the ER is not supported. However, depending on the patient's injury and diagnosis, a lawsuit from the ER can be more costly than one from the OR.

  1. Health and Stress Management and Mental-health Disability Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Haines, Victor Y; Harvey, Steve; Dextras-Gauthier, Julie; Durand, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the associations between health and stress management (HSM) practices and mental-health disability claims. Data from the Salveo study was collected during 2009-2012 within 60 workplaces nested in 37 companies located in Canada (Quebec) and insured by a large insurance company. In each company, 1 h interviews were conducted with human resources managers in order to obtain data on 63 HSM practices. Companies and workplaces were sorted into the low-claims and high-claims groups according to the median rate of the population of the insurer's corporate clients. Logistic regression adjusted for design effect and multidimensional scaling was used to analyse the data. After controlling for company size and economic sector, task design, demands control, gratifications, physical activity and work-family balance were associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. Further analyses revealed three company profiles that were qualified as laissez-faire, integrated and partially integrated approaches to HSM. Of the three, the integrated profile was associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. The results of this study provide evidence-based guidance for a better control of mental-health disability claims. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Performance evaluation of court in construction claims settlement of litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Kemala; Latief, Yusuf; Rarasati, Ayomi Dita; Siddik, Arief

    2017-06-01

    Claim construction has a major influence on the implementation of projects, such as the cost and time. The success of the construction project is highly dependent on the effective resolution of claims. Although it has been recognized that litigation or court is not the best way because it may reduce or eliminate profits and damage the relationship, it is a method of resolving claims and disputes that is common in the world of construction. The method of resolving claims and disputes through litigation or court may solve the problem in an alternative method, namely the implementation of the judgment which can be enforced effectively against the losing party and the ruling which has the force of law of the country where the claims and disputes are examined. However, litigation or court may take longer time and require high cost. Thus, it is necessary to identify factors affecting the performance of the court and to develop a system capable of improving an existing system in order to run more effectively and efficiently. Resolution in the claims management of construction projects with the method of litigation is a procedure that can be used by the courts in order to shorten the time in order to reduce the cost. The scope of this research is directed to all parties involved in the construction, both the owners and the contractors as implementers and practitioners, as well as experts who are experienced in construction law.

  3. A Retrospective Administrative Claims Database Evaluation of the Utilization of Belimumab in US Managed Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Xuehua; Eisenberg Lawrence, Debra F; Oglesby, Alan; Patel, Jeetvan; Kan, Hong; Boggs, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Belimumab is an approved therapy for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study examined the real-world utilization patterns of belimumab and standard SLE therapies in patients after regulatory approval of belimumab in the United States. A retrospective, observational study of belimumab users in the HealthCore Integrated Research Database was conducted using administrative claims data (GlaxoSmithKline Clinical Study Register Study ID: 114955). The overall population for analysis was composed of patients who were prescribed belimumab, had ≥6 months pre- and ≥6 months post-index medical and pharmacy eligibility, and at least 1 medical claim for SLE. Patients' clinical and demographic characteristics, treatment history, treatment patterns of belimumab, utilization of other medications, all-cause resource utilization, and costs were assessed. No hypotheses were tested. All patients who were prescribed belimumab had an SLE claim. Patients who met all eligibility criteria (n = 155) were primarily female (94.2%; mean [SD] age, 44 [12] years) and 94.2% had used standard SLE therapies during the pre- and post-index periods. The majority had moderate SLE disease severity pre-index, and there was a small shift (approximately 8%) from moderate to mild SLE after initiation of belimumab. Two thirds of patients remained on belimumab therapy at 6 months post-index. The percentage of patients with any claim for oral corticosteroids remained stable; however, the point estimate for mean daily dose decreased slightly in months 3 to 6 post-index. Inpatient hospital admissions decreased slightly in the post-index period. The point estimate for total costs (excluding belimumab) decreased after initiation of belimumab, although overall total health care costs (including belimumab) increased. All patients with a belimumab prescription had an SLE diagnosis on at least 1 medical claim, and the vast majority of those meeting all eligibility criteria had previously

  4. Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa M. Raghab

    2013-08-01

    The main goal of this study is to utilize a natural low cost material “as an accelerator additive to enhance the chemical treatment process using Alum coagulant and the accelerator substances were Perlite and Bentonite. The performance of the chemical treatment was enhanced using the accelerator substances with 90 mg/l Alum as a constant dose. Perlite gave better performance than the Bentonite effluent. The removal ratio for conductivity, turbidity, BOD and COD for Perlite was 86.7%, 87.4%, 89.9% and 92.8% respectively, and for Bentonite was 83.5%, 85.0%, 86.5% and 85.0% respectively at the same concentration of 40 mg/l for each.

  5. Risk of Contractors’ Claims On the Example of Road Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Iwona; Bondar-Nowakowska, Elżbieta; Pawluk, Katarzyna; Połoński, Mieczysław

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study is to analyse claims filed by building contractors during the project implementation. The work is divided into two parts. In the first part problems associated with the management of claims in the construction process were discussed. Bearing in mind that claims may result in prolongation of the investment or exceeding planned budget, possibilities of applying information included in documents connected with claims procedure to risk management was analysed in the second part of the study. The basis of the analysis is a review of 226 documents. They originate from 8 construction sites completed in the last 5 years in southwestern Poland. In each case, these were linear road projects, executed by different contractors, according to conditions in the contract set out in the “Yellow Book” FIDIC. In the study, other documents relating events that according to contractors entitled them to claim were also analysed. They included among others: project documentation, terms of reference, construction log, reports and correspondence under the contract. The events constituting the reason for contractors` claims were classified according to their sources. 8 areas of potential threats were distinguished. They were presented in the form of a block diagram. Most events initiating the claims were reported in the following group - adverse actions of third parties, while the fewest were recorded in the group – the lack of access to the construction site. Based on calculated similarity indicators it was found that considered construction sites were diversified in terms of the number of the events occurrence that generated the claim and their sources. In recent years, many road projects are completed behind the schedule and their initially planned budgets are significantly exceeded. Conducted research indicated that data derived from the analysis of documents connected with claims can be applied to identify and classify both cost and schedule risk factors

  6. Claim substantiation and efficiency of hydrating body lotions and protective creams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paepe, K; Derde, M P; Roseeuw, D; Rogiers, V

    2000-04-01

    In the present work a practical claim substantiation study is shown by the example of 5 commercially available body lotions. Their efficacy with respect to effects on transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and stratum corneum (SC) hydration of ageing skin has been examined. Results were obtained after single and repeated application (14 days, 2 x a day). The best performing product was then selected and further tested for its potential effects on sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS)-damaged skin. This was done in a younger population and the recovery of the impaired barrier function was followed by TEWL measurements. The selected body lotion had a high efficacy, improving both the TEWL and SC hydration of ageing skin by more than 30%. When applied to SLS-damaged skin, the product was able to improve skin barrier repair in comparison with physiological barrier repair. The results of this study show that a combination of non-invasive objective measurements can be used to substantiate product claims. Claims can be made with respect to protective and preventive properties of products, but also as to effectiveness of topical skin treatment in the case of abnormal barrier function or barrier restoration.

  7. Can Medicaid Claims Validly Ascertain Foster Care Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S; Allaire, Benjamin T

    2017-08-01

    Medicaid claims have been used to identify populations of children in foster care in the current literature; however, the ability of such an approach to validly ascertain a foster care population is unknown. This study linked children in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being-I to their Medicaid claims from 36 states using their Social Security numbers. Using this match, we examined discordance between caregiver report of foster care placement and the foster care eligibility code contained in the child's Medicaid claims. Only 73% of youth placed in foster care for at least a year displayed a Medicaid code for foster care eligibility. Half of all youth coming into contact with child welfare displayed discordance between caregiver report and Medicaid claims. Children with emergency department utilization, and those in primary care case management health insurance arrangements, had the highest odds of accurate ascertainment. The use of Medicaid claims to identify a cohort of children in foster care results in high rates of underascertainment. Supplementing administrative data with survey data is one way to enhance validity of ascertainment.

  8. Validation of 2D flood models with insurance claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zischg, Andreas Paul; Mosimann, Markus; Bernet, Daniel Benjamin; Röthlisberger, Veronika

    2018-02-01

    Flood impact modelling requires reliable models for the simulation of flood processes. In recent years, flood inundation models have been remarkably improved and widely used for flood hazard simulation, flood exposure and loss analyses. In this study, we validate a 2D inundation model for the purpose of flood exposure analysis at the river reach scale. We validate the BASEMENT simulation model with insurance claims using conventional validation metrics. The flood model is established on the basis of available topographic data in a high spatial resolution for four test cases. The validation metrics were calculated with two different datasets; a dataset of event documentations reporting flooded areas and a dataset of insurance claims. The model fit relating to insurance claims is in three out of four test cases slightly lower than the model fit computed on the basis of the observed inundation areas. This comparison between two independent validation data sets suggests that validation metrics using insurance claims can be compared to conventional validation data, such as the flooded area. However, a validation on the basis of insurance claims might be more conservative in cases where model errors are more pronounced in areas with a high density of values at risk.

  9. Storytelling in drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    Professionals who provide drug treatment to young people regularly encounter what they conceive to be inauthentic client claims, that is, claims not in accordance with reality. Earlier research demonstrates how authenticity remains a key concern within drug treatment, but it has not sufficiently...... of ulterior motives, clients are interpreted as making inauthentic claims because they want to obtain something externally from drug treatment (e.g., avoid prison or work training programs), and (3) the story of disorders explains inauthenticity as a result of pathology. The study illuminates how...... professionals assert narrative control through storytelling and how specific stories carry specific consequences and may ultimately contribute to the exclusion of some clients from treatment....

  10. Providers must plan for accrual of medical malpractice claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorski, R

    1988-11-01

    Because of the change in accounting regulations that requires accrual for certain medical malpractice claims, healthcare providers could soon be experiencing significant effects on their financial results. AICPA Statement Position 87-1, "Accounting for Asserted and Unasserted Medical Malpractice Claims of Health Care Providers and Related Issues," states that if healthcare providers have not transferred all risk for medical malpractice claims arising out of occurrences prior to the financial statement date to a third party, some accrual will be required. Providers need to prepare themselves for the financial problems that could arise from these reporting guidelines. Estimating the potential accrual amounts with advanced planning and extensive data gathering and analysis could lower a healthcare provider's financial risk.

  11. How Danes evaluate moral claims related to abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, Sigurd Wiingaard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how Danish citizens evaluate four moral claims related to abortion issues, regarding the moral status of the fetus, autonomy, harm and possible negative consequences of allowing abortion and to explore the association between moral beliefs and attitudes towards abortion...... to at least one moral claim. Two hundred and fifty-eight responded to all four claims without using the option 'neither agree nor disagree' and were classified as 'morally engaged responders'. A majority of these had a pro-abortion moral. The general relationship between moral beliefs and attitudes towards...... abortion was morally sound. Being 'morally engaged' did not increase the likelihood of reaching moral judgement on whether requests for abortion should be permitted. Education, religion and parenthood were statistically associated with the investigated issues. DISCUSSION: The direction of causality...

  12. The public's trust in scientific claims regarding offshore oil drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Juliet E; Feezell, Jessica T; Michaud, Kristy E H; Smith, Eric R A N; Smith, Leeanna

    2010-09-01

    Our study examines how individuals decide which scientific claims and experts to believe when faced with competing claims regarding a policy issue. Using an experiment in a public opinion survey, we test the source content and credibility hypotheses to assess how much confidence people have in reports about scientific studies of the safety of offshore oil drilling along the California coast. The results show that message content has a substantial impact. People tend to accept reports of scientific studies that support their values and prior beliefs, but not studies that contradict them. Previous studies have shown that core values influence message acceptance. We find that core values and prior beliefs have independent effects on message acceptance. We also find that the sources of the claims make little difference. Finally, the public leans toward believing reports that oil drilling is riskier than previously believed.

  13. Sovereign Right Claim on Geo Stationary Orbit (GSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhy Riadhy Arafah

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The potency and unique characteristics of GSO for placing communication satellites located only above equatorial states makes the GSO as part of natural resources. The equatorial states realized that the use of GSO has many advantages and has implications to their national interest. However, basic principle in space law, Outer Space Treaty 1967 (Art.II, states that equatorial states forbidden to claim ownership of any part of outer space, particularly claim in sovereignty. The principle “first come first served” in placing of satellite on GSO, practically only gives the advantage to developed countries which have high satellite technology. Hence, the level of technology of a state plays important role in developing of space law internationally. The equatorial states which are mostly developing states (low and middle level in technology in outer space activities claimed their right to use natural resources for their national interest based on equatorial position principle.

  14. Are claims of advertisements in medical journals supported by RCTs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimans, L; van Hylckama Vlieg, A; Dekker, F W

    2010-01-01

    Claims made in advertisements in medical journals might not always be supported by high-quality evidence, and referenced studies may have been sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry itself. We studied to what extent randomised controlled trials (RCTs) support the claims in advertisements in leading medical journals. Consecutive unique advertisements were selected from nine different medical journals, and evaluated by 250 medical students using a standardised score form. The quality of RCTs that were referenced in these advertisements was assessed with an instrument based on the Chalmers' score. 158 RCTs from 94 advertisements were used in the study. In total 55% of the RCTs had a high-quality score, 44% intermediate, and advertisements are often not a high-quality and independent source of evidence. This distracts from the credibility of claims in advertisements, even in the high-ranked journals.

  15. The false dichotomy: a refutation of the Neandertal indistinguishability claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas; Overmann, Karenleigh; Coolidge, Frederick

    2016-06-20

    In the debate about the demise of the Neandertal, several scholars have claimed that humanity's nearest relatives were indistinguishable archaeologically, and thus behaviorally and cognitively, from contemporaneous Homo sapiens. They suggest that to hold otherwise is to characterize Neandertals as inferior to H. sapiens, a false dichotomy that excludes the possibility that the two human types simply differed in ways visible to natural selection, including their cognition. Support of the Neandertal indistinguishability claim requires ignoring the cranial differences between the two human types, which have implications for cognition and behavior. Further, support of the claim requires minimizing asymmetries in the quantity and degree of behavioral differences as attested by the archaeological record. The present paper reviews the evidence for cognitive and archaeological differences between the two human types in support of the excluded middle position.

  16. A child's potential claim for negligent misdiagnosis: The case of H v ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    if parents failed to pursue a claim against the health provider. However, given the narrow approach of the CC to merge the child's claim with that of the parent, the deterring effect of recognising the child's claim might not be that significant because the health provider would still only be liable against a single claim. This is not.

  17. 38 CFR 14.616 - Form and place of filing claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... applicable to the claim. (b) Place of filing claim. Claims arising in the Philippines under 38 U.S.C. 515(b) will be filed with the Director, Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office, Manila, Republic of the Philippines. Claims arising in other foreign countries will be filed with the American Embassy or...

  18. 20 CFR 702.223 - Claims; time limitations; time to object.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... such right unless objection to such failure is made at the first hearing of such claim in which all... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claims; time limitations; time to object. 702... Procedures Claims § 702.223 Claims; time limitations; time to object. Notwithstanding the requirements of...

  19. 22 CFR 304.2 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace Corps Office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...; appropriate Peace Corps Office. 304.2 Section 304.2 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS CLAIMS AGAINST GOVERNMENT UNDER FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT Procedures § 304.2 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate Peace... Peace Corps receives, at a place designated in paragraph (b) of this section, an executed “Claim for...

  20. 75 FR 56664 - Proposed Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)); Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)); Comment.... Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance), VA Form 29-4125. b. Claim for Monthly Payments (National Service Life Insurance), VA Form 29-4125a. c. Claim for Monthly Payments (United States Government...

  1. 78 FR 18424 - Proposed Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)); Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)); Comment.... Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance), VA Form 29-4125. b. Claim for Monthly Payments (National Service Life Insurance), VA Form 29-4125a. c. Claim for Monthly Payments (United States Government...

  2. Accessing indigenous land rights through claims in Taroko Area, Eastern Taiwan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo, Yung-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The thesis explores how indigenous people access land rights through claims. Land claims happens on the encounters between different regimes of property. The authors found indigenous people have many ways to express their land claims since Japanese time. There are individual claims on lands like

  3. 21 CFR 101.67 - Use of nutrient content claims for butter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of nutrient content claims for butter. 101.67....67 Use of nutrient content claims for butter. (a) Claims may be made to characterize the level of nutrients, including fat, in butter if: (1) The claim complies with the requirements of § 101.13 and with...

  4. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  5. Flood damage claims reveal insights about surface runoff in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernet, D. B.; Prasuhn, V.; Weingartner, R.

    2015-12-01

    A few case studies in Switzerland exemplify that not only overtopping water bodies frequently cause damages to buildings. Reportedly, a large share of the total loss due to flooding in Switzerland goes back to surface runoff that is formed and is propagating outside of regular watercourses. Nevertheless, little is known about when, where and why such surface runoff occurs. The described process encompasses surface runoff formation, followed by unchannelised overland flow until a water body is reached. It is understood as a type of flash flood, has short response times and occurs diffusely in the landscape. Thus, the process is difficult to observe and study directly. A promising source indicating surface runoff indirectly are houseowners' damage claims recorded by Swiss Public Insurance Companies for Buildings (PICB). In most of Switzerland, PICB hold a monopoly position and insure (almost) every building. Consequently, PICB generally register all damages to buildings caused by an insured natural hazard (including surface runoff) within the respective zones. We have gathered gapless flood related claim records of most of all Swiss PICB covering more than the last two decades on average. Based on a subset, we have developed a methodology to differentiate claims related to surface runoff from other causes. This allows us to assess the number of claims as well as total loss related to surface runoff and compare these to the numbers of overtopping watercourses. Furthermore, with the good data coverage, we are able to analyze surface runoff related claims in space and time, from which we can infer spatial and temporal characteristics of surface runoff. Although the delivered data of PICB are heterogeneous and, consequently, time-consuming to harmonize, our first results show that exploiting these damage claim records is feasible and worthwhile to learn more about surface runoff in Switzerland.

  6. Synovitis and tenosynovitis in Brazil: analysis of sickness benefit claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Dilma Maria de; Barbosa-Branco, Anadergh

    2015-01-01

    To analyse the personal and occupational factors associated with the prevalence and duration of sickness benefit claims due to synovitis and tenosynovitis (CID10 M65). Cross-sectional study regarding sickness benefit claims due to synovitis and tenosynovitis granted to employees by National Institute of Social Security in Brazil in 2008. Data on economic activity (Economic Activities National Classification - CNAE division, class), sex, age, type and duration of benefits were collected from the Unified Benefit System. The study's population consists of the average monthly employment contracts declared to the National Register of Social Information. In 2008, 35,601 employees were granted sickness benefits due to synovitis and tenosynovitis, with a prevalence of 10.9/10,000 employments. Sickness benefits showed higher prevalence rates (PR) for work-related claims (PR 1,2), mostly made by females (PR 3.3) and by workers older than 39 years (PR 1,4). The CNAE 37-Sewage (55.4) and 60-Broadcasting Activity (47.1) had the highest overall prevalence. However, the 64-Financial service activities, except insurance and pension funding and 6422-Multiple banks with commercial service had the highest rates of work-related claims (RP 3.2 and 3.8, respectively), and the longer duration (70 and 73 days, respectively). Workers older than 39 years had the highest durations of work disability claims. Both the CNAE-division 60-Broadcasting Activity, and the CNAE-class 6010-Radio showed a high activity ratio of females (PR 8.1 and 10.8, respectively). The work disability due to synovitis and tenosynovitis presents prevalence and duration associated with economic activity, sex, age and kind of benefit (non work-related and work-related claims).

  7. Evaluating Biological Claims to Enhance Critical Thinking through Position Statements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracie M. Addy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Critical thinking is an important skill for undergraduates to learn, yet rarely is it formally taught in the classroom. Here we explain how critical thinking can be fostered within an undergraduate biology course by encouraging students to evaluate biological claims related to current topics within the course. We found that with the completion of two writing assignments within a four-week period, students demonstrated a significantly greater ability to analyze the evidence within the claims. These results support the notion that even short-term learning experiences focused upon critical thinking can enhance students’ skills beyond discipline-specific knowledge.

  8. Teaching how to make specific historical causal claims.

    OpenAIRE

    Mazibuko, Edmund Zizwe

    2008-01-01

    The theme of the conference is a celebration of history teaching in the 350th year of schooling in South Africa. A lot of developments have happened during with regard to the teaching and understanding of history as a subject. In order to appreciate these developments in the classroom, students should be able to make specific historical claims. Making specific historical causal claims of the form 'A caused that B' is one of the most important things that a person learns. However, the makin...

  9. General scientific guidance for stakeholders on health claim applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to update the General guidance for stakeholders on the evaluation of Article 13.1, 13.5 and 14 health claims published in March 2011. Since then, the NDA Panel has completed the evaluation...... to be further clarified and addressed. This guidance document aims to explain the general scientific principles applied by the NDA Panel for the evaluation of all health claims and outlines a series of steps for the compilation of applications. The general guidance document represents the views of the NDA Panel...

  10. [Malpractice Claims Against Pediatricians - Analysis of Expert Testimonies from the Medical Service of Health Insurance Companies Between 2000 and 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauer, Heiko; Holzschuh, Joachim; Böhler, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Background In Germany, few data are available on medical malpractice claims against pediatricians. On behalf of Statutory Health Insurance Companies their Medical Service (MDK) regularly offers expert testimony in case of allegations during pediatric treatment. Methods Analysis of 374 written pediatric testimonies, documented between September 1st, 2000 and August 31st, 2014. Results 193 allegations against pediatricians were analysed separately for each sector of care (35% concerning outpatients, 28% normal inpatients, and 37% patients treated in an intensive care unit, ICU). Outpatient care led more frequently to malpractice claims regarding diagnosis, most often in the case of dysplasia of the hip (n=6), meningitis (n=5), and pneumonia (n=4). In inpatients, allegations regarding treatment errors were more common and frequently associated with extravasation injury (n=7), as well as periventricular leukomalacia (n=7), sepsis (=6), and intraventricular haemorrhage (n=4) in newborn infants on ICUs. Expert testimony confirmed allegations in 43% of the outpatients, 22% of the normal inpatients and 38% of the ICU patients. Discussion and conclusion The frequency of pediatric malpractice claims seems to depend primarily on the pattern of utilization of pediatric care services. Diagnosis-related constellations leading to malpractice claims in Germany are well-known internationally. Case analysis according to medical care sectors allows comprehensible conclusions for risk management. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Consumer appeal of nutrition and health claims in three existing product concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Wim; Scholderer, Joachim; Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on consumers' reactions towards calcium-enriched fruit juice, omega-3 enriched spread and fibre-enriched cereals, each with a nutrition claim, health claim and reduction of disease risk claim. Cross-sectional data were collected in April 2006 from a sample of 341 consumers...... two concepts. The interaction effects between claim type and product concept indicated that reduction of disease risk claims are perceived very well in omega-3 enriched spreads, particularly in terms of perceived convincingness of the claim, while not appealing to consumers in the other product......, attitudinal and demographic characteristics. Generally, health claims outperformed nutrition claims, and both of these claim types outperformed reduction of disease risk claims. Comparing consumer reactions across product concepts revealed clear preferences for fibre-enriched cereals as compared to the other...

  12. Indigenous Self-Determination. Legitimising Claims to Sovereignty by First Nations Peoples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harding, David

    2005-01-01

    First Nations Peoples in Canada have been increasingly assertive in pursuing self-determination and sovereignty. A continuation of this trend should not be taken for granted however. What is seen as a legitimate assertion of rights be First Nations can be viewed as special treatment by Canadians at......-large. In order to consolidate and increase gains in sovereignty, First Nations must reassert their claims to be soeverign peoples. The two key elements to this are cultural and economic. First Nations must maintain their cultural viatality and viability through means such as language preservation. Furthermore...

  13. Univariate time series modeling and an application to future claims amount in SOCSO's invalidity pension scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chek, Mohd Zaki Awang; Ahmad, Abu Bakar; Ridzwan, Ahmad Nur Azam Ahmad; Jelas, Imran Md.; Jamal, Nur Faezah; Ismail, Isma Liana; Zulkifli, Faiz; Noor, Syamsul Ikram Mohd

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this study is to forecast the future claims amount of Invalidity Pension Scheme (IPS). All data were derived from SOCSO annual reports from year 1972 - 2010. These claims consist of all claims amount from 7 benefits offered by SOCSO such as Invalidity Pension, Invalidity Grant, Survivors Pension, Constant Attendance Allowance, Rehabilitation, Funeral and Education. Prediction of future claims of Invalidity Pension Scheme will be made using Univariate Forecasting Models to predict the future claims among workforce in Malaysia.

  14. Causes of cataract surgery malpractice claims in England 1995-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nadeem; Little, Brian C

    2011-04-01

    To analyse the causes of malpractice claims related specifically to cataract surgery in the National Health Service in England from 1995 to 2008. All the malpractice claims related to cataract surgery from 1995 to 2008 from the National Health Service Litigation Authority were analysed. Claims were classified according to causative problem. Total numbers of claims, total value of damages, mean level damages and paid:closed ratio (a measure of the likelihood of a claim resulting in payment of damages) were determined for each cause. Over the 14-year period, there were 324 cataract surgery claims with total damages of £ 1.97 million and mean damages for a paid claim of £ 19,900. Negligent surgery (including posterior capsule tear and dropped nucleus) was the most frequent cause for claims, while reduced vision accounted for the highest total and mean damages. Claims relating to biometry errors/wrong intraocular lens power were the second most frequent cause of claims and result in payment of damages in 62% of closed cases. The claims with the highest paid:closed ratio were inadequate anaesthetic (75%) and complications of anaesthetic injections including globe perforation (67%). Claims from cataract surgery in the NHS are extremely infrequent. Consent, though essential, may not prevent a claim arising or resulting in damages. Refractive accuracy has significant medicolegal impact. Endophthalmitis can lead to successful claims if there is delay in diagnosis. Claims relating to inadequate anaesthesia or anaesthetic injection complications are particularly hard to defend.

  15. 19 CFR 181.47 - Completion of claim for drawback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... procedure must include the Canadian or Mexican customs entry number and the amount of duty paid to Canada or... “pedimento”); (3) The final customs duty determination of Canada or Mexico, or a copy thereof, respecting the... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Completion of claim for drawback. 181.47 Section...

  16. Claims in international construction projects in Ethiopia and case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One of the main observations of this research work has been the fact that the Ethiopian construction industry seriously lack qualified engineering professionals with an appropriate level of training in construction management, international contract administration and claims handling. Finally the findings of the study are ...

  17. A Kantian claim permitting the randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, P

    2001-01-01

    Among the most contested aspects of medical research is the randomized clinical trial (RCT). While the majority of arguments justifying the RCT and its use in medical research rest within a utilitarian framework, many Kantians claim that a deontological ethical framework is prohibitive of the use RCTs in medical research. This paper argues that, in fact, the RCT is permissible within a deontological framework.

  18. Towards best practice in the actuarial assessment of claims for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper begins to record best practice in the actuarial assessment of claims for maintenance against deceased estates in South Africa. Although this is a small field of actuarial practice, it is in the public interest that generally accepted standards be agreed upon. The paper applies an actuarial quality framework to identify ...

  19. 48 CFR 6101.52 - Small claims procedure [Rule 52].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Small claims procedure . 6101.52 Section 6101.52 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS...) There is a monetary amount in dispute and that amount is $50,000 or less, or (ii)(A) There is a monetary...

  20. Claims made by children for injuries caused before birth

    OpenAIRE

    境原, 三津夫

    2006-01-01

    In Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States, a child who is born disabled is able to file a claim against the person who injured him or her in the mother's womb. On the other hand, in Japan and the UK, it is traditionally considered that a fetus is

  1. The space between: land claims and the law in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.; Moniaga, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we look at rights discourses and law as an arena of struggle in which local people attempt to gain and secure access to localities of value. Following administrative decentralisation in 1999, throughout Indonesia, individuals and communities lodged land claims. To support these

  2. 7 CFR 249.20 - Claims and penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims and penalties. 249.20 Section 249.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SENIOR FARMERS' MARKET NUTRITION PROGRAM (SFMNP) Miscellaneous Provisions...

  3. 44 CFR 206.205 - Payment of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... provisions of the FEMA-State Agreement, and that payments for that project have been made in accordance with... HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE FEDERAL DISASTER ASSISTANCE Public Assistance Project Administration § 206.205 Payment of claims. (a) Small Projects. Final payment of the Federal share of these projects...

  4. Deterministic claims reserving in short-term insuarance contracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, recent disasters, such as the floods in Europe and the September 11th terrorist attacks on the U.S. have contributed to the need for more complex ... the basic chain ladder method, inflation adjusted chain ladder method, separation technique and Bornhuetter-Fergusson technique) used in claims' reserving, ...

  5. 21 CFR 101.69 - Petitions for nutrient content claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of a nutrient; and (3) Petitions for the use of an implied claim in a brand name. (c) An original and... requirements for informed consent set forth in part 50 of this chapter. (g) The availability for public... availability of the petition for public disclosure. (iii) If FDA does not act within 90 days of the date of...

  6. 29 CFR 4281.18 - Outstanding claims for withdrawal liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION, TERMINATION, AND OTHER RULES APPLICABLE TO MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS DUTIES OF PLAN... in insolvency proceedings. The plan sponsor shall value an outstanding claim for withdrawal liability... title 11, United States Code, or any case or proceeding under similar provisions of state insolvency...

  7. 16 CFR 260.7 - Environmental marketing claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... bag is marketed as “degradable,” with no qualification or other disclosure. The marketer relies on... irrelevant for those trash bags that are incinerated and, for those disposed of in landfills, the marketer.... The marketer of the card may claim either that the product “contains 50% recycled fiber,” or may...

  8. 76 FR 4072 - Registration of Claims of Copyright

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... Copyright Office 37 CFR Part 202 Registration of Claims of Copyright AGENCY: Copyright Office, Library of Congress. ACTION: Interim rule. SUMMARY: The Copyright Office is adopting interim regulations governing the... testing period and pilot program during which the Copyright Office will assess the desirability and...

  9. 76 FR 66758 - Remedies for Small Copyright Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-27

    ... Copyright Office Remedies for Small Copyright Claims AGENCY: Copyright Office, Library of Congress. ACTION: Notice of inquiry. SUMMARY: The U.S. Copyright Office is undertaking a study at the request of Congress to assess whether and, if so, how the current legal system hinders or prevents copyright owners from...

  10. 27 CFR 46.75 - Required information for claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required information for claim. 46.75 Section 46.75 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... 1,000 Large cigars—sale price $100/thousand 20.719% of sale price 20.72 500 Large cigars—sale price...

  11. Philosophers should be interested in 'common currency' claims in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A recurring claim in a number of behavioural, cognitive and neuro-scientific literatures is that there is, or must be, a unidimensional 'common currency' in which the values of different available options are represented. There is striking variety in the quantities or properties that have been proposed as determinants of the ...

  12. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Claims Office Master Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Claims Office Master Files System collects information on companies in debt to the EPA. Learn how this data is collected, how it will be used, access to the data, the purpose of data collection, and record retention policies for this data.

  13. 13 CFR 142.3 - What is a claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is a claim? 142.3 Section 142.3 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT... received by SBA, an agent, fiscal intermediary, or other entity acting for SBA, or when it is received by...

  14. 49 CFR 1005.4 - Investigation of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... be supported by the original bill of lading, evidence of the freight charges, if any, and either the... be promptly and thoroughly investigated if investigation has not already been made prior to receipt..., however, That where property involved in a claim has not been invoiced to the consignee shown on the bill...

  15. Identity claims, texts, Rome and Galatians | Punt | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This contribution explores the interplay between Paul's use of the Scriptures of Israel and the imperial setting in claims about Abraham and the negotiation of identity in the Galatians letter. The letter, from Paul's perspective, is testimony to fierce contestation of identity and finds him engaged in describing, defining and ...

  16. Rationale and scientific support for health claims on foods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    Rationale and scientific support for health claims on foods. The role of diet and physical activity in health has been increasingly documented and pinpointed as a major target for health-promoting strategies. The supply, availability, marketing and price of food products have a strong impact on consumers' diets.1 Therefore,.

  17. General health assessment in refugees claiming to have been tortured

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draminsky Petersen, Hans; Christensen, Maria Elisabeth; Kastrup, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    General health assessment of refugees claiming to have been previously exposed to torture takes place in a psychological atmosphere affected by the difficult situation of the refugee. Thirty-one refugees, mainly from the Middle East and Africa, were assessed as regards their physical and mental...

  18. Diversity and immune boosting claims of some African indigenous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diversity and immune boosting claims of some African indigenous leafy vegetables in western Kenya. ... Out of the nine, five are known for various health benefits, African nightshade and spider plant for good nutrition by 31.8% and 25.1% of the respondents, respectively, slender leaf for healing power by 34%, cowpea ...

  19. Clarity and causality needed in claims about Big Gods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Joseph; Bulbulia, Joseph; Gray, Russell D; Atkinson, Quentin D

    2016-01-01

    We welcome Norenzayan et al.'s claim that the prosocial effects of beliefs in supernatural agents extend beyond Big Gods. To date, however, supporting evidence has focused on the Abrahamic Big God, making generalisations difficult. We discuss a recent study that highlights the need for clarity about the causal path by which supernatural beliefs affect the evolution of big societies.

  20. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 281 - Claims Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... settlement of accounts of deceased members of the armed forces (but not the National Guard). 2 2 Claims under... the jurisdiction of the Army or Air Force or of deceased residents of the Armed Forces Retirement Home. (e) 37 U.S.C. 554, concerning the sale of personal property of members of the Uniformed Services who...

  1. Functional food health claims must be supported by sound science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardinaal, A.; Mennen, L.; Hendriks, H.

    2009-01-01

    Alwine Kardinnal, Louise Mennen, and Henk Hendriks share their views on the way scientific evidence for a health claim can be obtained and use weight management to demonstrate different approaches. Weight management products are used to explain the steps that need to be taken to obtain approval for

  2. 42 CFR 456.722 - Electronic claims management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ECM system developed by the State must include at least the on-line, real-time capabilities specified...) Taking steps up to, but not including, payment of the claim. (c) Additional requirements. In order to... circular A-102. The request for proposal (RFP) may be substituted for the advance planning and...

  3. 37 CFR 10.67 - Settling similar claims of clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... clients. 10.67 Section 10.67 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.67 Settling similar claims of clients. A practitioner who represents two or more clients shall not make or participate in the making of an aggregate settlement of the...

  4. 20 CFR 321.2 - Filing claims for benefits electronically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Board's Internet Web site, http://www.rrb.gov, utilizing a User ID and a PIN/Password. (b) Adjudication.... 321.2 Section 321.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD... Board's electronic system. If an attempt to file a claim for benefits under the Railroad Unemployment...

  5. 12 CFR 627.2750 - Priority of claims-banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Priority of claims-banks. 627.2750 Section 627.2750 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM TITLE IV CONSERVATORS, RECEIVERS, AND VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATIONS Receivers and Receiverships § 627.2750 Priority of claims—banks. The...

  6. A cross-sectional analysis of medicine claims data

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Creative Commons licence CC-BY-NC 4.0. Inappropriate medicine prescribing in older South Africans: A cross-sectional analysis of medicine claims data. J A van Heerden, BPharm; J R Burger, BPharm, MPharm, PhD (Pharm Pract); J J Gerber, BSc (Pharm) Hons, BSc (Ind Pharm),. MSc (Ind Pharm) Hons, BSc (Pharmacol), ...

  7. They claim that the executive branch has become too authoritarian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Furthermore, according to the. Heritage Foundation!The World Street. Journal 2006 Index of Economic. Freedom's report, Nigeria's "per capita income remains low, and. They claim that the executive branch has become too authoritarian and dictatorial and that. President Obasanjo has not exercised any of the political will to.

  8. 42 CFR 447.45 - Timely claims payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... additional information from the provider of the service or from a third party. It includes a claim with... section 501(e) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954, or any public entity. Third party is defined in § 433... recipient's characteristics and circumstances, such as type of illness, age, sex, service location; (iii...

  9. Perceived relevance and foods with health-related claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, M.; Lampila, P.; Shepherd, R.

    2012-01-01

    affect the consumers’ perceptions of nutrition and health claims. The data (N = 2385) were collected by paper and pencil surveys in Finland, the UK, Germany and Italy on a target group of consumers over 35 year old, solely or jointly responsible for the family’s food shopping. The results showed...

  10. Legal claims for malignant mesothelioma: dealing with all cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Bij, Sjoukje; Baas, Paul; van de Vijver, Marc J.; de Mol, Bas A. J. M.; Burgers, Jacobus A.

    2013-01-01

    Apart of medical reasons, a definitive diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma may be required as a basis for a claim of financial compensation although a pathological source of conclusive evidence is missing. Clinical assessment of all available data is then the only option to come to a final

  11. 33 CFR 136.105 - General requirements for a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., street and mailing addresses of residence and business, and telephone numbers of the claimant. (2) The... basis for such identity or belief. (4) A general description of the nature and extent of the impact of... properly process the claim for payment. ...

  12. 32 CFR 750.13 - Claims: Single service responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 750.13 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CLAIMS GENERAL... Refugee Crisis Area are also assigned to the Army. (2) Department of the Navy: Bahrain, Greece, Iceland..., Canada, Cyprus, Denmark, India, Japan, Luxembourg, Morocco, Nepal, Norway, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia...

  13. 37 CFR 360.12 - Form and content of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...'s work or works, and identification of at least one secondary transmission by a satellite carrier of... general statement of the nature of the copyright owners' works, identification of at least one secondary... claim, and the identification of the copyright owner of each work so identified. (iv) The name...

  14. 37 CFR 360.3 - Form and content of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... owner's work or works, and identification of at least one secondary transmission by a cable system of... general statement of the nature of the copyright owners' works and identification of at least one... joint claim and the identification of the copyright owner of each work so identified. (iv) The name...

  15. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION LABELING, MARKING DEVICES, AND CONTAINERS Nutrition... required in nutrition labeling pursuant to § 317.309, may not be made on a label or in labeling of that...”). (3) Except for claims regarding vitamins and minerals described in paragraph (q)(3) of this section...

  16. Transparent Emotions? A critical analysis of Moran's transparency claim

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterboer, N.J.G.

    2015-01-01

    I critically analyze Richard Moran's account of knowing one's own emotions, which depends on the Transparency Claim (TC) for self-knowledge. Applied to knowing one's own beliefs, TC states that when one is asked "Do you believe P?", one can answer by referencing reasons for believing P. TC works for

  17. 37 CFR 1.55 - Claim for foreign priority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... language translation of a non-English language foreign application is not required except: (A) When the...) If an English language translation is required, it must be filed together with a statement that the... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim for foreign priority. 1...

  18. Equality of Opportunity, Cultural Diversity and Claims for Fairness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardoc, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines some of the tensions, problems and challenges associated with claims for equality of opportunity (the fairness argument). The introductory part identifies three separate forms of justification for public education, including the argument associated with equality of opportunity. Part II examines in detail two questions…

  19. Two Connecticut Companies Settle EPA Claims of Violating PCB Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    wo Connecticut companies, a scrap metal recycling facility and a waste oil transporter, agreed to pay fines to settle claims by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that they violated federal laws regarding toxic substances in their handling of PCBs.

  20. 22 CFR 40.63 - Misrepresentation; Falsely claiming citizenship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... NONIMMIGRANTS AND IMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Illegal Entrants and Immigration Violators § 40.63 Misrepresentation; Falsely claiming citizenship. (a) Fraud and misrepresentation... of the U.S. immigration laws, or investigation of the alien's record at the place of former residence...

  1. The Arctic scramble: introducing claims in a contest mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ansink, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper I integrate elements from the bankruptcy literature in a resource contest model. In a contest model, agents fight over a contested resource and their investment in 'guns' determines how much of the resource is secured by each agent. In a bankruptcy problem, agents claim a share of a

  2. Outcomes after hip arthroscopy in patients with workers' compensation claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvo, John P; Hammoud, Sommer; Flato, Russell; Sgromolo, Nicole; Mendelsohn, Elliot S

    2015-02-01

    Patients with a workers' compensation claim have been shown to have inferior outcomes after various orthopedic procedures. In hip arthroscopy, good to excellent results have been shown in the athletic and prearthritic population in short-term and long-term follow-up. In the current study, the authors' hypothesis was that patients with a workers' compensation claim would have inferior outcomes after hip arthroscopy compared with patients without a workers' compensation claim. All patients with a workers' compensation claim who underwent hip arthroscopy over a 2-year period were studied. Postoperative functional outcomes were assessed with the Hip Outcome Score and modified Harris Hip Score. A cohort of 30 patients who did not have a workers' compensation claim was selected for comparison. Twenty-six patients were identified who had a workers' compensation claim and underwent hip arthroscopy performed by a single surgeon at the authors' institution with at least 6 months of follow-up. These patients were compared with 30 patients who did not have a workers' compensation claim. The workers' compensation group had a Hip Outcome Score of 66.5±28.8 and the non-workers' compensation group had a Hip Outcome Score of 89.4±12.0. This difference was statistically significant with Wilcoxon test (P=.003). The workers' compensation group had an average modified Harris Hip Score of 72.5±20.7 (mean±SD), and the non-workers' compensation group had a modified Harris Hip Score of 75.6±15.3. This difference was not significantly significant with Wilcoxon test (P=.9). At latest follow-up, 15 patients in the workers' compensation group (58%) were working. Patients returned to work an average of 6.8 months after surgery. The current study showed that postoperative functional outcomes in the workers' compensation group, as measured by Hip Outcome Score, were significantly inferior to those in the non-workers' compensation group. No statistical difference in postoperative modified

  3. The claims handling process of engineering insurance in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C. de Beer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to technological developments, the complicated world of engineering and its associated products are continuously becoming more specialized. Short-term insurers provide engineering insurance to enable the owners and operators of engineering assets to combat the negative impact of the associated risks. It is, however, a huge challenge to the insurers of engineering insurance to manage the particular risks against the background of technological enhancement. The skills gap in the short-term insurance market and the engineering environment may be the main factor which inhibits the growth of the engineering insurance market. The objective of this research embodies the improvement of financial decision-making concerning the claims handling process of engineering insurance. Secondary as well as primary data were necessary to achieve the stated objective. The secondary data provided the background of the research and enabled the researchers to compile a questionnaire for the empirical survey. The questionnaire and a cover letter were sent to the top 10 short-term insurers in South Africa that are providing engineering insurance. Their perceptions should provide guidelines to other short-term insurers who are engaged in engineering insurance, as they are regarded as the market leaders of engineering insurance in South Africa. The empirical results of this research focus on the importance of various claims handling factors when assessing the claims handling process of engineering insurance, the problem areas in the claims handling process concerned, as well as how often the stipulations of engineering insurance policies are adjusted to take the claims handling factors into account.

  4. Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Toggle Nav Nine Things To Know About Stem Cell Treatments Home > Stem Cells and Medicine > Nine Things ... Know About Stem Cell Treatments Many clinics offering stem cell treatments make claims that are not supported by ...

  5. 77 FR 5217 - Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563: Seamen's Claims; Admiralty Extension Act Claims; and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... longshoremen and harbor workers, contractors, invitees injured aboard vessels, and the owners of damaged... of the economy, productivity, competition, jobs, the environment, public health or safety, or State... in the claim should be made to the best of the knowledge of the claimant and are subject to the...

  6. Negligent care and malpractice claiming behavior in Utah and Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studdert, D M; Thomas, E J; Burstin, H R; Zbar, B I; Orav, E J; Brennan, T A

    2000-03-01

    Previous studies relating the incidence of negligent medical care to malpractice lawsuits in the United States may not be generalizable. These studies are based on data from 2 of the most populous states (California and New York), collected more than a decade ago, during volatile periods in the history of malpractice litigation. The study objectives were (1) to calculate how frequently negligent and nonnegligent management of patients in Utah and Colorado in 1992 led to malpractice claims and (2) to understand the characteristics of victims of negligent care who do not or cannot obtain compensation for their injuries from the medical malpractice system. We linked medical malpractice claims data from Utah and Colorado with clinical data from a review of 14,700 medical records. We then analyzed characteristics of claimants and nonclaimants using evidence from their medical records about whether they had experienced a negligent adverse event. The study measures were negligent adverse events and medical malpractice claims. Eighteen patients from our study sample filed claims: 14 were made in the absence of discernible negligence and 10 were made in the absence of any adverse event. Of the patients who suffered negligent injury in our study sample, 97% did not sue. Compared with patients who did sue for negligence occurring in 1992, these nonclaimants were more likely to be Medicare recipients (odds ratio [OR], 3.5; 95% CI [CI], 1.3 to 9.6), Medicaid recipients (OR, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.4 to 9.0), > or =75 years of age (OR, 7.0; 95% CI, 1.7 to 29.6), and low income earners (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 0.9 to 4.2) and to have suffered minor disability as a result of their injury (OR, 6.3; 95% CI, 2.7 to 14.9). The poor correlation between medical negligence and malpractice claims that was present in New York in 1984 is also present in Utah and Colorado in 1992. Paradoxically, the incidence of negligent adverse events exceeds the incidence of malpractice claims but when a physician is

  7. Nutrition and health claims on healthy and less-healthy packaged food products in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ani, Haya H; Devi, Anandita; Eyles, Helen; Swinburn, Boyd; Vandevijvere, Stefanie

    2016-09-01

    Nutrition and health claims are displayed to influence consumers' food choices. This study assessed the extent and nature of nutrition and health claims on the front-of-pack of 'healthy' and 'less-healthy' packaged foods in New Zealand. Foods from eight categories, for which consumption may affect the risk of obesity and diet-related chronic diseases, were selected from the 2014 Nutritrack database. The internationally standardised International Network for Food and Obesity/Non-Communicable Diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support (INFORMAS) taxonomy was used to classify claims on packages. The Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (NPSC) was used to classify products as 'healthy' or 'less healthy'. In total, 7526 products were included, with 47 % (n 3557) classified as 'healthy'. More than one-third of products displayed at least one nutrition claim and 15 % featured at least one health claim on the front-of-pack. Claims were found on one-third of 'less-healthy' products; 26 % of those products displayed nutrition claims and 7 % featured health claims. About 45 % of 'healthy' products displayed nutrition claims and 23 % featured health claims. Out of 7058 individual claims, the majority (69 %) were found on 'healthy' products. Cereals displayed the greatest proportion of nutrition and health claims (1503 claims on 564 products), of which one-third were displayed on 'less-healthy' cereals. Such claims could be misleading consumers' perceptions of nutritional quality of foods. It needs to be explored how current regulations on nutrition and health claims in New Zealand could be further strengthened (e.g. using the NPSC for nutrition claims, including general health claims as per the INFORMAS taxonomy) to ensure consumers are protected and not misled.

  8. Health and nutrition content claims on Australian fast-food websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Lyndal; Koukoumas, Alexandra; Watson, Wendy L; Hughes, Clare

    2017-03-01

    To determine the extent that Australian fast-food websites contain nutrition content and health claims, and whether these claims are compliant with the new provisions of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code ('the Code'). Systematic content analysis of all web pages to identify nutrition content and health claims. Nutrition information panels were used to determine whether products with claims met Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criteria (NPSC) and qualifying criteria, and to compare them with the Code to determine compliance. Australian websites of forty-four fast-food chains including meals, bakery, ice cream, beverage and salad chains. Any products marketed on the websites using health or nutrition content claims. Of the forty-four fast-food websites, twenty (45 %) had at least one claim. A total of 2094 claims were identified on 371 products, including 1515 nutrition content (72 %) and 579 health claims (28 %). Five fast-food products with health (5 %) and 157 products with nutrition content claims (43 %) did not meet the requirements of the Code to allow them to carry such claims. New provisions in the Code came into effect in January 2016 after a 3-year transition. Food regulatory agencies should review fast-food websites to ensure compliance with the qualifying criteria for nutrition content and health claim regulations. This would prevent consumers from viewing unhealthy foods as healthier choices. Healthy choices could be facilitated by applying NPSC to nutrition content claims. Fast-food chains should be educated on the requirements of the Code regarding claims.

  9. Legal liability and claims for the hotel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimcho Todorov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of various aspects of legal liability and claims to hotel management arising in the hotel industry in the context of the legal framework and possible legal consequences for hotels and other types of commercial accommodation establishments. The main reasons for accidents' occurrence in the hotel industry are chronologically traced. Possible claims to the hotel management are also presented in detail. The problem with workplace discrimination, which is considered as unrightfully actions from administration towards hospitably industry personnel and the connected consequences, is discussed. A definition is given of the various forms of discrimination and the obligations of management to provide a healthy work environment without problems for the personnel are stated, as well. Regulative measures and documents are also presented, regarding measures following possible labour law violations. Conclusions and recommendations are formulated and ways to prevent and overcome problems and accidents in various accommodation establishments and the hotel industry as a whole are shown

  10. Political liberalism and religious claims: Four blind spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    This article gives an overview of 4 important lacunae in political liberalism and identifies, in a preliminary fashion, some trends in the literature that can come in for support in filling these blind spots, which prevent political liberalism from a correct assessment of the diverse nature of religious claims. Political liberalism operates with implicit assumptions about religious actors being either 'liberal' or 'fundamentalist' and ignores a third, in-between group, namely traditionalist religious actors and their claims. After having explained what makes traditionalist religious actors different from liberal and fundamentalist religious actors, the author develops 4 areas in which political liberalism should be pushed further theoretically in order to correctly theorize the challenge which traditional religious actors pose to liberal democracy. These 4 areas (blind spots) are: (1) the context of translation; (2) the politics of exemptions; (3) the multivocality of theology; and (4) the transnational nature of norm-contestation.

  11. Sex work and the claim for grassroots legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassi, Marisa N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to understanding of legal models that aim to control sex work, and the policy implications of these, by discussing the experience of developing a grassroots legislation bill proposal by organised sex workers in Córdoba, Argentina. The term 'grassroots legislation' here refers to a legal response that derives from the active involvement of local social movements and thus incorporates the experiential knowledge and claims of these particular social groupings in the proposal. The experience described in this paper excludes approaches that render sex workers as passive victims or as deviant perpetrators; instead, it conceives of sex workers in terms of their political subjectivity and of political subjectivity in its capacity to speak, to decide, to act and to propose. This means challenging current patterns of knowledge/power that give superiority to 'expert knowledge' above and beyond the claims, experiences, knowledge and needs of sex workers themselves as meaningful sources for law making.

  12. Colorado's Voucher Law:Examining the Claim of Fiscal Neutrality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin G. Welner

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Colorado's voucher law was declared unconstitutional by the Colorado Supreme Court on June 28, 2004. Voucher supporters have begun drafting revised legislation designed to address the legal problem. This article calls into question the key financial claim of revenue neutrality'a claim that was central to the promotion and passage of the departing voucher law. The author concludes that the voucher law was not revenue neutral, even though it attempts to exclude from eligibility those children already enrolled in private schools. In fact, this law, as well as any revised law with similar eligibility provisions, would actually cost taxpayers an additional $10 million per year once fully implemented because the eligibility provision provides little more than a short-term damper on the law's long-term fiscal impact.

  13. Claims of Need in Property Law and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Patrick Joseph

    2016-01-01

    between the claims of the needy and the rights of property owners. Against this backdrop this article compares three theoretical accounts of how the fact of human need should impact upon our thinking about property rights: the rights-based arguments of Jeremy Waldron, the radical democratic theory...... of Lawrence Hamilton, and the anarchist commentary of Colin Ward. While ‘theories’ of need have paid much attention to the nature of need ‘itself’, the paper argues that this comparison reveals another issue that is just as important: where and how should claims of need be registered in legal and political......Both courts of law and political theorists have grappled with the problem of giving the concept of ‘need’ a place in our reasoning about the rights and wrongs of property regimes. But in the UK, legal changes in the last 15 years have eroded the legal possibilities for striking some compromise...

  14. Misdiagnosed inmate to get trial under Rehabilitation Act claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-11

    A Federal judge dismissed most portions of a lawsuit filed by a prison inmate who was misdiagnosed with AIDS, but will send to trial his claim that his segregation to a special prison AIDS unit violated Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act. The Rehabilitation Act prohibits federally-funded state programs from discriminating against an individual on the basis of disability. A lab report on a biopsy of the inmate's skin lesions concluded that the lesions were consistent with early Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), common among persons with AIDS. [Name removed], an inmate of the Green Haven Correctional Facility in Stormville, NY, was sent to the AIDS unit without being tested for HIV. He filed a grievance, and was tested five months after entering the unit. He tested negative for HIV and KS. The judge rejected [name removed] claims that he was denied procedural due process, but found that he qualified as a handicapped individual, entitled to Federal protection against discrimination.

  15. What is Implied When Researchers Claim to Use a Theory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmér, Hanna; Roos, Helena

    2017-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the use of theories and on what we imply when we in research claim to use a theory. In this article, diverse uses of one theory will be illustrated with reference to 10 different studies. The aim is not to evaluate or judge how the theory is used in these studies, but to discuss how the diverse uses of one and the…

  16. OCC and state of New York settle Love Canal claims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    Following a 14-year legal battle, the state of New York and Occidental Chemical Corporation (OCC) have entered into a consent judgement in the Love Canal litigation. The June 21, 1994 judgement, which was approved by the US District Court for the Western District of New York on July 1, 1994, requires that OCC pay the state $98 million in exchange for a release of all state claims remaining against the company.

  17. VERIFICATION OF SOCIAL IMPACT THEORY CLAIMS IN SOCIAL MEDIA CONTEXT

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Mir; Arshad Zaheer

    2012-01-01

    Social media explosion changed the way of communication. It affected the ways companies used to interact with their consumers. Most important it changed the way consumers used to think. Present study attempts to verify the claims and assumptions of social impact theory in the social media environment. Based on social impact theory present study examines the impa ct of number of users (NUs) on the perceived credibility of user generated content (PCUGC). Furthermo re, ...

  18. Identifying suicidal behavior among adolescents using administrative claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, S Todd; Fuchs, D Catherine; Shelton, Richard C; Balmer, Leanne S; Dudley, Judith A; Gideon, Patricia S; Deranieri, Michelle M; Stratton, Shannon M; Williams, Candice L; Ray, Wayne A; Cooper, William O

    2013-07-01

    To assess the safety of psychotropic medication use in children and adolescents, it is critical to be able to identify suicidal behaviors from medical claims data and distinguish them from other injuries. The purpose of this study was to develop an algorithm using administrative claims data to identify medically treated suicidal behavior in a cohort of children and adolescents. The cohort included 80,183 youth (6-18 years) enrolled in Tennessee's Medicaid program from 1995-2006 who were prescribed antidepressants. Potential episodes of suicidal behavior were identified using external cause-of-injury codes (E-codes) and ICD-9-CM codes corresponding to the potential mechanisms of or injuries resulting from suicidal behavior. For each identified episode, medical records were reviewed to determine if the injury was self-inflicted and if intent to die was explicitly stated or could be inferred. Medical records were reviewed for 2676 episodes of potential self-harm identified through claims data. Among 1162 episodes that were classified as suicidal behavior, 1117 (96%) had a claim for suicide and self-inflicted injury, poisoning by drugs, or both. The positive predictive value of code groups to predict suicidal behavior ranged from 0-88% and improved when there was a concomitant hospitalization but with the limitation of excluding some episodes of confirmed suicidal behavior. Nearly all episodes of confirmed suicidal behavior in this cohort of youth included an ICD-9-CM code for suicide or poisoning by drugs. An algorithm combining these ICD-9-CM codes and hospital stay greatly improved the positive predictive value for identifying medically treated suicidal behavior. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Challenges in Using Medicaid Claims to Ascertain Child Maltreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S.; Allaire, Benjamin T.; Garfield, Lauren D.; Ross, Raven E.; Hedeker, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Medicaid data contain International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes indicating maltreatment, yet there is a little information on how valid these codes are for the purposes of identifying maltreatment from health, as opposed to child welfare, data. This study assessed the validity of Medicaid codes in identifying maltreatment. Participants (n = 2,136) in the first National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being were linked to their Medicaid claims obtaine...

  20. Patient reported outcomes: looking beyond the label claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doward Lynda C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of patient reported outcome scales in clinical trials conducted by the pharmaceutical industry has become more widespread in recent years. The use of such outcomes is particularly common for products developed to treat chronic, disabling conditions where the intention is not to cure but to ameliorate symptoms, facilitate functioning or, ultimately, to improve quality of life. In such cases, patient reported evidence is increasingly viewed as an essential complement to traditional clinical evidence for establishing a product's competitive advantage in the marketplace. In a commercial setting, the value of patient reported outcomes is viewed largely in terms of their potential for securing a labelling claim in the USA or inclusion in the summary of product characteristics in Europe. Although, the publication of the recent US Food and Drug Administration guidance makes it difficult for companies to make claims in the USA beyond symptom improvements, the value of these outcomes goes beyond satisfying requirements for a label claim. The European regulatory authorities, payers both in the US and Europe, clinicians and patients all play a part in determining both the availability and the pricing of medicinal products and all have an interest in patient-reported data that go beyond just symptoms. The purpose of the current paper is to highlight the potential added value of patient reported outcome data currently collected and held by the industry for these groups.

  1. Weasel claims in advertisements in English and Serbian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidaković Mirna M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the use of weasel claims in advertisements in English and Serbian. Weasel claims represent a form of covert communication and are characterized by the use of deliberately vague and misleading language. In the advertising discourse, this linguistic device helps advertisers to deal with sensitive issues, overcome consumers' distrust and thus influence their behavior. The research has been conducted on a corpus of 100 advertisements that belong to various categories, such as cars, cleaning products, cosmetics, drinks, food, etc., published in printed magazines and online sources from the year 2000 onwards. The aim of the analysis is to identify manifestations of weasel claims in the corpus, establish similarities and differences regarding their use in the given languages, and show how they influence the interpretation of the advertising message and create consumer behavioral patterns. Descriptive and contrastive analyses have been employed in the research. The study also draws on Grice's Cooperative Principle. The results will show that this deceptive tool is widespread in both languages and that its use in the advertising discourse in Serbian requires further research.

  2. 20 CFR 71.7 - Claim filing, processing, adjudication and time limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Labor, Washington, DC 20211. All claims originating in the Philippine Islands may be filed by mailing to the Bureau of Employees' Compensation, United States Department of Labor, Manila, P.I. All claims will...

  3. Motivation outweighs ability in explaining European consumers’ use of health claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hung, Yung; Grunert, Klaus G.; Hoefkens, Christine

    2017-01-01

    is driven by an interest in healthy eating. Participants with greater health claim-related knowledge tended to be more able but less motivated to process health claims. There were no substantial differences in the tested model between countries that had regulation for health claims prior to 2006 and those...... that did not, despite the considerable differences in their historical and current prevalence of health claims. Therefore, European food and nutrition policies and marketing strategies should focus on ways to improve consumers’ motivation to process health claims by increasing their interest in healthy......Health claims promise health benefits beyond basic nutrition, but their impact on food choices is largely determined by consumers’ motivation and ability to process these claims. This study investigates the role of consumers’ motivation and ability to process health claims as well as attitudinal...

  4. Analysis of new workers' compensation claims in the Department of Defense civilian workforce, 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cameron J L; Bigley, Daniel P; Mallon, Timothy M

    2015-03-01

    This study of Department of Defense (DoD) civilian employees Workers' Compensation (WC) claims for chargeback year 2000 through 2012 aimed to analyze the frequency, rates, and costs of WC claims representing 5% of the DoD annual personnel budget. A multiyear cross-sectional study of WC claims data identified the top five most frequent causes, natures, and anatomical sites; changes in frequency, worker age, costs, and time were evaluated for trends. The annual frequency and rate of new DoD WC claims decreased over time, whereas costs per new claim have increased. New claim frequencies, rates, and costs aggregated in older age groups. The increasing trend in costs of each claim and the overall program costs presents a need for case management. Analysis of WC claims data is necessary to help target injury prevention efforts and reduce program costs.

  5. 32 CFR 536.23 - Identifying claims incidents both for and against the government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... may also provide a remedy). (v) Assigned as students or ordered into training at a non-federal... Claims Judge Advocate (MCJA), or claims attorney should consult with USARCS to determine if that health...

  6. 77 FR 43144 - Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects AGENCY... claim seeking judicial review of the FTA actions announced herein for the listed public transportation...

  7. 78 FR 26112 - Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects..., concerning a limitation on claims for certain specified public transportation projects. The notice contained...

  8. Changes over time in prescription practices of pain medications in Switzerland between 2006 and 2013: an analysis of insurance claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertli, Maria M; Reich, Oliver; Signorell, Andri; Burgstaller, Jakob M; Steurer, Johann; Held, Ulrike

    2017-02-27

    In Europe, scant information is available about prescription practices for pain medications. The aim of this research was to assess changes in prescription rates of non-opioid, weak opioid, and strong opioid medications between 2006 and 2013 in the Swiss population. Using insurance claims data covering one-sixth of the Swiss population, we analyzed the numbers of reimbursed pain medications, the number of reimbursements per persons, and the cumulative dose in milligrams. For opioids, the morphine equivalent dose and treatment days were calculated. Data were extrapolated to the dose per day per 100'000 population stratified by age, gender, and canton. In total, 4'746'942 paracetamol, 2'156'620 NSAIDs or Coxibs, 931'129 metamizole, 1'322'272 weak opioid, and 807'835 strong opioid claims were analyzed. Between 2006 and 2013, the increase in claims per 100'000 persons was 32% for paracetamol, 242% for metamizole, 107% for NSAIDS, 86% for Coxibs, 13% for weak opioids, and 121% for strong opioids. For strong opioids the total MED in mg /100'000 increased by 117%, the treatment days /100'000 by 101%. For strong opioids, fentanyl was most frequently used (increase between 2006 and 2013 by 91% for MED/100'000 persons and 94% treatment days / 100'000) followed by buprenorphine and oxycodone. The highest proportional increase in MED / 100'000 was observed for methadone (+1414%) and oxycodone (+313%). Marked geographical variation was detected in the use of metamizole, paracetamole, and strong opioids in different cantons. The analysis of insurance claims data provides evidence that the prescription rates for pain medications increased in Switzerland within the last ten years, in particular for metamizole and strong opioids. Furthermore, the prescription rates for metamizole, paracetamol, and strong opioids varied substantially between different cantons in Switzerland.

  9. Health foods and foods with health claims in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohama, Hirobumi; Ikeda, Hideko; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi

    2006-04-03

    The terms 'nutraceuticals' and 'dietary or food supplements' are not very popular in Japan as compared to most of other countries. However, the concept of 'functional foods', which benefits the structure and function of the human body, is known as a result of research studies initiated on the health benefits of foods in 1984. The Ministry of Education organized a national research and development project to evaluate the functionalities of various foods. Researchers from diverse scientific fields succeeded to define new functions of food, successfully incorporating the previously recognized functions of nutrition, sensory/satisfaction and physiological effects of ingredients in foods. Some of the food manufacturers and distributors unfortunately capitalized on such food functionalities to promote 'health foods' by claiming drug-like effects and violating laws. In 1991, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW) now as the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) introduced a 'foods for specified health uses' (FOSHU) system, for the control of such exaggerated and misleading claims. The other reason for such enforcement is due to an increase in the population of elderly people and lifestyle-related diseases that include obesity, diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In 2001, a new regulatory system, 'foods with health claims' (FHC) with a 'foods with nutrient function claims' (FNFC) system and newly established FOSHU was introduced. In addition, MHLW has changed the existing FOSHU, FNFC and other systems in 2005. Such changes include the new subsystems of FOSHU such as (1) standardized FOSHU, (2) qualified FOSHU and (3) disease risk reduction claims for FOSHU. In the present chapter, two guidelines that require good manufacturing practice (GMP) and self-investigative systems for ensuring the safety of raw materials used for products in the dosage forms such as capsules, tablets, etc. have been discussed

  10. Ampliando la protección a segundas indicaciones en Europa: swiss-type claim y european-type claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Conde-Gutiérrez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available La Oficina de Patentes Europea (EPO protege las segundas indicaciones o usos sobre composiciones o sustancias ya existentes en el estado de la técnica con el ánimo de incentivar a la industria farmacéutica en Europa. Este artículo explora los aspectos legales y técnicos mediante los cuales la EPO ha otorgado patentes no solo a segundas indicaciones, sino también a terceras o sucesivas indicaciones. En particular, se analiza el alcance del Swiss-type Claim y el European-type Claim. De igual manera, se realiza un análisis comparativo entre el Convenio sobre Patentes Europeo y decisiones de la EPO, y la Decisión 486 de 2000 de la Comunidad Andina (Régimen Común sobre Propiedad Industrial sobre segundas indicaciones.

  11. Final report on the scientific screening of health claims on food

    OpenAIRE

    Federal Institute for Risk Assessment

    2008-01-01

    Food manufacturers are increasingly placing health claims on their products like “important for eyesight” or “calcium is good for bones”. In order to protect consumers from erroneous claims and misleading information and to prevent unfair competition, uniform provisions have been introduced within the EU for health claims. The legal foundation is Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006 on nutrition and health claims made on food. According to this Regulation, food manufacturers may only use health clai...

  12. Precise large deviations of aggregate claims in a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Dehui; Yu, Shihang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process. In this model, we do not make any assumption on the dependence structure of claim sizes and inter-arrival times. We study large deviations of the aggregate amount of claims. For the subexponential heavy-tailed case, we obtain a precise large-deviation formula; our method substantially relies on a martingale for the structure of our models.

  13. Precise large deviations of aggregate claims in a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process. In this model, we do not make any assumption on the dependence structure of claim sizes and inter-arrival times. We study large deviations of the aggregate amount of claims. For the subexponential heavy-tailed case, we obtain a precise large-deviation formula; our method substantially relies on a martingale for the structure of our models.

  14. 32 CFR 536.154 - Claims involving tortfeasors other than nonappropriated fund employees: NAFI risk management...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims involving tortfeasors other than nonappropriated fund employees: NAFI risk management program (RIMP) claims. 536.154 Section 536.154 National... nonappropriated fund employees: NAFI risk management program (RIMP) claims. The risk management program (RIMP) is...

  15. 19 CFR 133.44 - Decision of disputed claim of infringement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Decision of disputed claim of infringement. 133.44...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TRADEMARKS, TRADE NAMES, AND COPYRIGHTS Importations Violating Copyright Laws § 133.44 Decision of disputed claim of infringement. (a) Claim of infringement sustained. Upon...

  16. 32 CFR 552.16 - Real estate claims founded upon contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Real estate claims founded upon contract. 552.16... Real Estate Claims Founded Upon Contract § 552.16 Real estate claims founded upon contract. (a) Purpose... interest in real estate for which compensation must be made according to the Fifth Amendment to the...

  17. 34 CFR 35.4 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted. 35.4 Section 35.4 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education TORT CLAIMS AGAINST...) Death. In support of a claim based on death, the claimant may be required to submit the following...

  18. 77 FR 65048 - Privacy Act; System of Records: Personal Property Claims, State-27

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-24

    ... State. STATE-27 SYSTEM NAME: Personal Property Claims. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION: Unclassified. SYSTEM... Act; System of Records: Personal Property Claims, State- 27 SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that the Department of State proposes to amend an existing system of records, Personal Property Claims, State-27...

  19. 42 CFR 426.310 - LCD and NCD reviews and individual claim appeals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false LCD and NCD reviews and individual claim appeals... COVERAGE DETERMINATIONS General Provisions for the Review of LCDs and NCDs § 426.310 LCD and NCD reviews and individual claim appeals. (a) LCD and NCD reviews are distinct from the claims appeal processes...

  20. 32 CFR 536.35 - Unique issues related to environmental claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Unique issues related to environmental claims... issues related to environmental claims. Claims for property damage, personal injury, or death arising in... reported by USARCS to the Environmental Law Division of the Army Litigation Center and the Environmental...

  1. 16 CFR 260.5 - Interpretation and substantiation of environmental marketing claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... environmental marketing claims. 260.5 Section 260.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION GUIDES AND TRADE PRACTICE RULES GUIDES FOR THE USE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MARKETING CLAIMS § 260.5 Interpretation and substantiation of environmental marketing claims. Section 5 of the FTC Act makes unlawful deceptive acts and...

  2. 28 CFR 79.12 - Criteria for eligibility for claims relating to leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... relating to leukemia. 79.12 Section 79.12 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims Relating to Leukemia § 79.12 Criteria for eligibility for claims relating to leukemia. To establish eligibility for...

  3. 77 FR 62121 - Guides for the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    .... I. General Environmental Benefit Claims The final Guides caution marketers not to make unqualified general environmental benefit claims because ``it is highly unlikely that marketers can substantiate all reasonable interpretations of these claims.'' \\5\\ A new example illustrates how marketers may make general...

  4. 25 CFR 101.24 - Loans for expert assistance for preparation and trial of Indian claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loans for expert assistance for preparation and trial of... preparation and trial of Indian claims. (a) Loans may be made to Indian tribes, bands and other identifiable... assistance of counsel, for the preparation and trial of claims pending before the Indian Claims Commission...

  5. 31 CFR 535.335 - Claim arising out of events in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim arising out of events in Iran. 535.335 Section 535.335 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance... General Definitions § 535.335 Claim arising out of events in Iran. For purposes of § 535.216, a claim is...

  6. 78 FR 53014 - Agency Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)) Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)) Activities... for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance), VA Form 29-4125. ] b. Claim for Monthly Payments (National Service Life Insurance), VA Form 29-4125a. c. Claim for Monthly Payments (United States Government...

  7. 75 FR 73166 - Agency Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)) Activities...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Claim for One Sum Payment (Government Life Insurance)) Activities... Insurance), VA Form 29-4125. b. Claim for Monthly Payments (National Service Life Insurance), VA Form 29-4125a. c. Claim for Monthly Payments (United States Government Life Insurance, (USGLI)), VA Form 29...

  8. 41 CFR 301-52.11 - What must I do to challenge a disallowed claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What must I do to challenge a disallowed claim? 301-52.11 Section 301-52.11 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal... challenging disallowed claims. (g) If after reconsideration by your agency your claim is still denied, you may...

  9. Young Children's Trust in Their Mother's Claims: Longitudinal Links with Attachment Security in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriveau, Kathleen H.; Harris, Paul L.; Meins, Elizabeth; Fernyhough, Charles; Arnott, Bronia; Elliott, Lorna; Liddle, Beth; Hearn, Alexandra; Vittorini, Lucia; de Rosnay, Marc

    2009-01-01

    In a longitudinal study of attachment, children (N = 147) aged 50 and 61 months heard their mother and a stranger make conflicting claims. In 2 tasks, the available perceptual cues were equally consistent with either person's claim but children generally accepted the mother's claims over those of the stranger. In a 3rd task, the perceptual cues…

  10. 45 CFR 2506.6 - What is a claim or debt?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is a claim or debt? 2506.6 Section 2506.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE COLLECTION OF DEBTS Introduction § 2506.6 What is a claim or debt? A claim or debt is an amount of...

  11. Reserving by conditioning on markers of individual claims: a case study using historical simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godecharle, E.; Antonio, K.

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the use of claim specific characteristics, so-called claim markers, for loss reserving with individual claims. Starting from the approach of Rosenlund and using the technique of historical simulation we develop a stochastic Reserve by Detailed Conditioning method that is

  12. 32 CFR 536.9 - Responsibilities and operations of area claims offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... chief of a command claims service, as appropriate, grant claims approval authority to a CPO for claims... CPO at the command, unit, or activity (see § 536.10(b)(4)). Normally, all CPOs will operate under the supervision of the ACO in whose area the CPO is located. Where a proposed CPO is not under the command of the...

  13. 32 CFR 516.34 - Referral of medical care and property claims for litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Referral of medical care and property claims for litigation. 516.34 Section 516.34 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY... States Medical Care and Property Claims § 516.34 Referral of medical care and property claims for...

  14. 45 CFR 162.1101 - Health care claims or equivalent encounter information transaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Health care claims or equivalent encounter... ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Health Care Claims or Equivalent Encounter Information § 162.1101 Health care claims or equivalent encounter information...

  15. 41 CFR 301-71.200 - Who must review and sign travel claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... travel claims? 301-71.200 Section 301-71.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement § 301-71.200 Who must review and sign travel claims...

  16. 41 CFR 301-52.7 - When must I submit my travel claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... travel claim? 301-52.7 Section 301-52.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES, PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES, AND CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT 52-CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT § 301-52.7 When must I submit my travel...

  17. 14 CFR 1261.405 - Subdivision of claims not authorized; other administrative proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... administrative proceedings. 1261.405 Section 1261.405 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... Subdivision of claims not authorized; other administrative proceedings. (a) Subdivision of claims. Claims may...). The debtor's liability arising from a particular transaction or contract shall be considered a single...

  18. 41 CFR 102-118.545 - What information must a TSP claim include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TSP claim include? 102-118.545 Section 102-118.545 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-TRANSPORTATION PAYMENT AND AUDIT Claims and Appeal Procedures Transportation Service Provider (tsp) Filing Requirements § 102-118.545 What information must a TSP claim include? Transportation service provider (TSP...

  19. 45 CFR 149.320 - Universe of claims that must be submitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Universe of claims that must be submitted. 149.320 Section 149.320 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH... Universe of claims that must be submitted. (a) Claims submitted for an early retiree, as defined in § 149.2...

  20. Impact of health-related claims on the perception of other product attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Lampila, Piritta; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2010-01-01

    of the products, whereas earlier  market presence of the ingredient had a large impact: differences among the Nordic countries reflected the previous exposure to health claims. The findings from this study suggest that consumers do not imply other health benefits from health claims and the health claim per se...

  1. Validity of claims made in weight management research: a narrative review of dietetic articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aphramor Lucy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The best available evidence demonstrates that conventional weight management has a high long-term failure rate. The ethical implications of continued reliance on an energy deficit approach to weight management are under-explored. Methods A narrative literature review of journal articles in The Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics from 2004 to 2008. Results Although the energy deficit approach to weight management has a high long-term failure rate it continues to dominate research in the field. In the current research agenda, controversies and complexities in the evidence base are inadequately discussed, and claims about the likely success of weight management misrepresent available evidence. Conclusions Dietetic literature on weight management fails to meet the standards of evidence based medicine. Research in the field is characterised by speculative claims that fail to accurately represent the available data. There is a corresponding lack of debate on the ethical implications of continuing to promote ineffective treatment regimes and little research into alternative non-weight centred approaches. An alternative health at every size approach is recommended.

  2. The patient-reported outcome (PRO) consortium: filling measurement gaps for PRO end points to support labeling claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coons, S J; Kothari, S; Monz, B U; Burke, L B

    2011-11-01

    The importance of appropriately and effectively incorporating the patient's voice into the evaluation of new medical products has been recognized and affirmed by regulators.(1,2,3) Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly being assessed in clinical trials to quantify treatment benefits such as symptom relief and improved functioning. Translating PRO-based treatment benefits into labeling claims can provide information to physicians and patients and assist in prescribing decisions.(4,5) Hence, standardizing the valid and reliable measurement of PRO end points is critical.

  3. Differential Impact of Message Appeals, Food Healthiness, and Poverty Status on Evaluative Responses to Nutrient-Content Claimed Food Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hojoon; Reid, Leonard N

    2015-01-01

    A 2 × 3 × 2 mixed factorial experimental design was used to examine how three message appeals (benefit-seeking vs. risk-avoidance vs. taste appeals), food healthiness (healthy vs. unhealthy foods), and consumer poverty status (poverty vs. nonpoverty groups) impact evaluative responses to nutrient-content claimed food advertisements. Subjects were partitioned into two groups, those below and those above the poverty line, and exposed to nutrient-content claimed advertisement treatments for healthy and unhealthy foods featuring the three appeals. The findings reaffirmed the interaction effects between perceivably healthy and unhealthy foods and different appeals reported in previous studies, and found interaction effects between consumer poverty level and response to the message appeals featured in the experimental food advertisements. Age, body mass index, current dieting status, education, and gender were examined as covariates.

  4. Clinical safety and professional liability claims in Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz-Güerri, F; Gómez-Durán, E L; Martínez-Palmer, A; Castilla Céspedes, M; Arimany-Manso, J

    2017-11-01

    Patient safety is an international public health priority. Ophthalmology scientific societies and organisations have intensified their efforts in this field. As a tool to learn from errors, these efforts have been linked to the management of medical professional liability insurance through the analysis of claims. A review is performed on the improvements in patient safety, as well as professional liability issues in Ophthalmology. There is a high frequency of claims and risk of economic reparation of damage in the event of a claim in Ophthalmology. Special complaints, such as wrong surgery or lack of information, have a high risk of financial compensation and need strong efforts to prevent these potentially avoidable events. Studies focused on pathologies or specific procedures provide information of special interest to sub-specialists. The specialist in Ophthalmology, like any other doctor, is subject to the current legal provisions and appropriate mandatory training in the medical-legal aspects of health care is essential. Professionals must be aware of the fundamental aspects of medical professional liability, as well as specific aspects, such as defensive medicine and clinical safety. The understanding of these medical-legal aspects in the routine clinical practice can help to pave the way towards a satisfactory and safe professional career, and help in increasing patient safety. The aim of this review is to contribute to this training, for the benefit of professionals and patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According ... to their doctor before trying or buying such products and should not stop or delay their conventional ...

  6. Patient factors influencing return to work and cumulative financial claims after clavicle fractures in workers' compensation cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Edward; Thirukumaran, Caroline; Thorsness, Robert; Noyes, Katia; Voloshin, Ilya

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzed workers' compensation patients after surgical or nonoperative treatment of clavicle fractures to identify factors that influence the time for return to work and total health care reimbursement claims. We hypothesized that return to work for operative patients would be faster. The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification diagnosis codes and Current Procedural Terminology codes were used to retrospectively query the Workers' Compensation national database. The outcomes of interest were the number of days for return to full work after surgery and total reimbursement for health care-related claims. The primary independent variable was treatment modality. There were 169 claims for clavicle fractures within the database (surgical, n = 34; nonoperative, n = 135). The average health care claims reimbursed were $29,136 ± $26,998 for surgical management compared with $8366 ± $14,758 for nonoperative management (P work (P = .06); however, there was high variability in both groups. Litigation was an independent predictor of prolonged return to work (P = .007) and higher health care costs (P = .003). Workers' compensation patients treated for clavicle fractures return to work at roughly the same time whether they are treated surgically or nonoperatively, with surgery being roughly 3 times more expensive. There was a substantial amount of variability in return to work timing by subjects in both groups. Litigation was a predictor of longer return to work timing and higher health care costs. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Strategy for a transparent, accessible, and sustainable national claims database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelburd, Robin

    2015-03-01

    The article outlines the strategy employed by FAIR Health, Inc, an independent nonprofit, to maintain a national database of over 18 billion private health insurance claims to support consumer education, payer and provider operations, policy makers, and researchers with standard and customized data sets on an economically self-sufficient basis. It explains how FAIR Health conducts all operations in-house, including data collection, security, validation, information organization, product creation, and transmission, with a commitment to objectivity and reliability in data and data products. It also describes the data elements available to researchers and the diverse studies that FAIR Health data facilitate.

  8. [Selected medical closed claims in the field of regional anaesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Paul; Schaffartzik, Walter; Neu, Johann

    2016-05-01

    Legal malpractice cases in regional anaesthesia comprise a significant number of all cases before the expert commissions and arbitration boards of the state medical associations. One reason for this is the increasing use of neuraxial and peripheral regional blocks in orthopaedics and traumatology. Only in about one fourth of the reviewed cases could either a causal relationship between substandard performance and patient injury or an inadequate obtaining of informed consent be established. In the great majority of cases patients' claims were unfounded, since the patients' injuries were adjudged to be unavoidable and adequate consent had been abtained prior to performance of the blocks. © Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Does diagnostic delay of colorectal cancer result in malpractice claims? A retrospective analysis of the Swedish board of malpractice from 1995-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafström, Larsolof; Johansson, Henry; Ahlberg, Jon

    2012-06-18

    Delay in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) may have important clinical and medico-legal implications. This study identifies the claims made on the basis of delay in the diagnosis of CRC to the Swedish insurance agency (whose English name is The County Council´s Mutual Insurance Company) and the impact and consequences of the delay on prognosis, treatment and survival for patients who reported the claims. The Company handles claims of medical malpractice where claimants seek compensation for alleged suffering and/or negative clinical impacts of diagnostic delays. Between January 1, 1995 and December 31, 2008, a total of 80 patients filed claims for negative effects resulting from delays in the diagnosis of CRC. Review of the claims led to identification of delay for 62 patients. The clinical symptoms that were overlooked and other causes of delay that had any relation to therapy, prognosis and economic compensation were evaluated. The median delay in the diagnosis of CRC was six months. This delay was considered to have had an impact on the therapy in 20 % of the cases. The prognosis was postulated to have been adversely affected for 15 % of the patients. The delay was mainly caused by incomplete consideration of the symptoms hematoschisis or anaemia, changed bowel routine, or incomplete clinical or radiological examination and by misinterpretations of the results. No impact of duration of delay on survival was identified. The importance of identifying concomitant metastatic disease at diagnosis was overwhelming. Economic compensation was given in 79 % of the cases. This study found that claims for compensation for delay in diagnosis of CRC are rare. The delay in the diagnosis of the primary tumour was considered to have had an impact on the magnitude of therapeutic measures for a fifth of the patients who filed claims. Economic compensation for the patients´ injuries was given in almost 80 % of the cases.

  10. Complications and patient-injury after ankle fracture surgery. -A closed claim analysis with data from the Patient Compensation Association in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars Bo; Mersø, Camilla

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Patient Compensation Association (PCA) receives claims for financial compensation from patients who believe they have sustained damage from their treatment in the Danish health care system. In this study, we have analysed closed claims in which patients suffered injuries due....... This study indicates that extra attention should be paid to the most technically demanding fractures as the pronation-external-rotation-, diabetic- and fragility fractures. Surgeons should follow the recommendations for ORIF. Emphasis should also focus on adequate postoperative plans. This study finds a high...

  11. Claims analysis of hypertension occurrence, severity changes and patterns of antihypertensive use in cancer patients receiving vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lisa A; Saseen, Joseph J; O'Bryant, Cindy L; Allen, Richard R; Nair, Kavita V

    2015-08-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors such as bevacizumab, sorafenib, and sunitinib are utilized in the treatment of multiple cancers. Although these agents are associated with hypertension, there is a lack of evidence describing patterns of antihypertensive use in patients with vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor-associated hypertension in a non-trial, "real-world" setting. To describe the occurrence and severity of vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor-associated hypertension, patterns of antihypertensive use and occurrence of cardiovascular complications in a non-trial population, and to describe patterns of initial antihypertensive therapy in patients developing hypertension during treatment with a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. This retrospective cohort study utilized claims data from the Medstat MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounter database to identify patients with claims for a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor and a diagnosis of cancer using International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification codes, Healthcare Common Procedure Coding System J-codes and National Drug Codes. The study period encompassed claims from one year before the patient's first claim for a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, and continued through one year after the initial vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor claim. Patients meeting study criteria were classified into cohorts A1, patients with no hypertension throughout the study period; A2, patients without hypertension at baseline who developed hypertension after starting a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor; and cohort B, patients with hypertension prior to receiving a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. We utilized medical and pharmacy claims data to describe the presence of hypertension, its severity, and the occurrence of cardiovascular complications throughout the study period. Initial antihypertensive use in

  12. Litigation related to anaesthesia: an analysis of claims against the NHS in England 1995-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, T M; Bland, L; Mihai, R; Scott, S

    2009-07-01

    The distribution of medico-legal claims in English anaesthetic practice is unreported. We studied National Health Service Litigation Authority claims related to anaesthesia since 1995. All claims were reviewed by three clinicians and variously categorised, including by type of incident, claimed outcome and cost. Anaesthesia-related claims account for 2.5% of all claims and 2.4% of the value of all claims. Of 841 relevant claims 366 (44%) were related to regional anaesthesia, 245 (29%) obstetric anaesthesia, 164 (20%) inadequate anaesthesia, 95 (11%) dental damage, 71 (8%) airway (excluding dental damage), 63 (7%) drug related (excluding allergy), 31 (4%) drug allergy related, 31 (4%) positioning, 29 (3%) respiratory, 26 (3%) consent, 21 (2%) central venous cannulation and 18 (2%) peripheral venous cannulation. Defining which cases are, from a medico-legal viewpoint, 'high risk' is uncertain, but the clinical categories with the largest number of claims were regional anaesthesia, obstetric anaesthesia, inadequate anaesthesia, dental damage and airway, those with the highest overall cost were regional anaesthesia, obstetric anaesthesia, and airway and those with the highest mean cost per closed claim were respiratory, central venous cannulation and drug error excluding allergy. The data currently available have limitations but offer useful information. A closed claims analysis similar to that in the USA would improve the clinical usefulness of analysis.

  13. Consumers’ Health-Related Motive Orientations and Reactions to Claims about Dietary Calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Hoefkens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Health claims may contribute to better informed and healthier food choices and to improved industrial competitiveness by marketing foods that support healthier lifestyles in line with consumer preferences. With the more stringent European Union regulation of nutrition and health claims, insights into consumers’ health-related goal patterns and their reactions towards such claims are needed to influence the content of lawful claims. This study investigated how consumers’ explicit and implicit health-related motive orientations (HRMOs together with the type of calcium-claim (nutrition claim, health claim and reduction of disease risk claim influence perceived credibility and purchasing intention of calcium-enriched fruit juice. Data were collected in April 2006 through a consumer survey with 341 Belgian adults. The findings indicate that stronger implicit HRMOs (i.e., indirect benefits of calcium for personal health are associated with higher perceived credibility, which is not (yet translated into a higher purchasing intention. Consumers’ explicit HRMOs, which refer to direct benefits or physiological functions of calcium in the body — as legally permitted in current calcium-claims in the EU — do not associate with reactions to the claims. Independently of consumers’ HRMOs, the claim type significantly affects the perceived credibility and purchasing intention of the product. Implications for nutrition policy makers and food industries are discussed.

  14. Quality of claims and references found in Australian pharmacy journal advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandoh, Mona; Curtain, Colin Michael

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the quality of pharmaceutical advertisement claims and supporting references in Australian pharmacy journals that target community pharmacists. All full-page advertisements for a medicinal product, found in two Australian pharmacy journals from the year 2012 to 2015 were included. Advertisement claims and references were evaluated by claim type (unambiguous to immeasurable) and level of evidence (strong to irrelevant) in supporting references. Two hundred and ninety distinct advertisements and 598 claims were identified, with a median of 2 claims per advertisement. Twenty-seven percent of claims were unambiguous, 40% were vague, 16% were emotive/immeasurable and 17% were non-clinical or other marketing claims. Half of all claims were referenced. Although 68% of unambiguous claims were referenced, 63% of those were supported by studies that were funded directly or indirectly by pharmaceutical companies. Only 13% of claims were supported with strong or moderate independent evidence. Pharmaceutical advertisements continue to present vague and emotive claims with little independent supporting evidence. Pharmacists need to be aware of these limitations when providing patient care. Increased awareness of this issue among pharmaceutical companies, Australian pharmaceutical journal publishers, regulators and pharmacists will assist in promoting optimised healthcare outcomes for the Australian public. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  15. A Critical Review of the Marketing Claims of Infant Formula Products in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belamarich, Peter F; Bochner, Risa E; Racine, Andrew D

    2016-05-01

    A highly competitive infant formula market has resulted in direct-to-consumer marketing intended to promote the sale of modified formulas that claim to ameliorate common infant feeding problems. The claims associated with these marketing campaigns are not evaluated with reference to clinical evidence by the Food and Drug Administration. We aimed to describe the language of claims made on formula labels and compare it with the evidence in systematic reviews. Of the 22 product labels we identified, 13 product labels included claims about colic and gastrointestinal symptoms. There is insufficient evidence to support the claims that removing or reducing lactose, using hydrolyzed or soy protein or adding pre-/probiotics to formula benefits infants with fussiness, gas, or colic yet claims like "soy for fussiness and gas" encourage parents who perceive their infants to be fussy to purchase modified formula. Increased regulation of infant formula claims is warranted. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Musculoskeletal disorder costs and medical claim filing in the US retail trade sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Anasua; Leigh, J Paul

    2011-01-01

    The average costs of Musculoskeletal Disorder (MSD) and odds ratios for filing medical claims related to MSD were examined. The medical claims were identified by ICD 9 codes for four US Census regions within retail trade. Large private firms' medical claims data from Thomson Reuters Inc. MarketScan databases for the years 2003 through 2006 were used. Average costs were highest for claims related to lumbar region (ICD 9 Code: 724.02) and number of claims were largest for low back syndrome (ICD 9 Code: 724.2). Whereas the odds of filing an MSD claim did not vary greatly over time, average costs declined over time. The odds of filing claims rose with age and were higher for females and southerners than men and non-southerners. Total estimated national medical costs for MSDs within retail trade were $389 million (2007 USD).

  17. Motivation outweighs ability in explaining European consumers' use of health claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoefkens, Christine; Hung, Yung; Hieke, Sophie

    Introduction: Health claims promise health benefits beyond basic nutrition, but their impact on food choices is largely determined by consumers’ motivation and ability to process these claims. Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the role of consumers’ motivation and ability to process...... determinants, and use of health claims. Results: Motivation to process emerged as a key determinant of European consumers’ use of health claims. Ability to process impacted claim use to a much smaller extent, but was strongly influenced by the motivation to process. In order to be motivated, consumers....... Moreover, participants with greater objective knowledge were found to be less able to process health claims. Both types of objective knowledge were positively related. Conclusions: Motivation rather than the ability determines European consumers’ use of health claims. Therefore, food and nutrition policy...

  18. Recommendations for successful substantiation of new health claims in the European Union

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pravst, Igor; Kušar, Anita; Žmitek, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Background While functional foods offer promise for public health and innovation in the food industry, the efficiency of such foods should be assured to protect consumers from misleading claims. Globally, many countries regulate the communication of the health effects of such foods to final...... consumers. Scope and approach In the European Union (EU), the use of health claims was harmonized in 2006. All claims need to be scientifically assessed by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) and pre-approved. Implementing the regulation has involved a steep learning curve for stakeholders, resulting...... claims. Key findings and conclusions Recommendations for the successful substantiation of new health claims in the EU were prepared. The substantiation of health claims is primarily based on human efficacy studies, and greater resources are required to authorize more innovative claims. The reported...

  19. The impact of opioid prescription dose and duration during a workers compensation claim, on post-claim continued opioid use: A retrospective population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Leigh Anne; Raymond, Colette; Ekuma, Okechukwu; Kraut, Allen

    2015-06-01

    Workers Compensation Board (WCB) recipients are a group commonly prescribed opioids. We explored factors influencing post-claim opioid dose and duration by linking data from 22,451 claims with the Manitoba Center for Population Health registry. On average, the WCB paid for 94.55% of opioids prescribed during a claim. The amount paid for by the WCB varied significantly by total opioids prescribed. The main predictors of high opioid dosage (120 + morphine equivalents (ME)/day) during the first year post-claim (logistic regression), and of longer post-claim opioid usage (survival analysis), included opioid dosage during the final month of the claim both paid for and not paid for by the WCB. Amongst low dose opioid claims, the WCB covers most opioids prescribed. Higher opioid dose WCB recipients are often prescribed opioids not covered by the WCB. Both opioids paid for and not paid for by the WCB are associated with post-claim opioid use. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comparison of the claim percent gross margin earned by Texas community independent pharmacies for dual-eligible beneficiary claims before and after Medicare Part D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winegar, Angela L; Shepherd, Marvin D; Lawson, Kenneth A; Richards, Kristin M

    2009-01-01

    To describe dual eligibles' claims before and after Medicare Part D and to evaluate the effect that Medicare Part D has had on the claim percent gross margin (CPGM) earned by Texas community independent pharmacies. Nonexperimental time series study. Texas, October 2005 through September 2006. 313 community independent pharmacies. Review of more than 150,000 Medicaid and 300,000 Medicare Part D claims acquired from a drug claims processor. CPGM per prescription claim before and after the implementation of Medicare Part D, controlling for generic/brand drug status. The mean CPGM for prescriptions dispensed before Part D (Medicaid claims) was 26.7%. The mean CPGM for claims dispensed after Part D (Medicare claims) was 17.0% (using ingredient costs in 2006 dollars) or 20.4% (using ingredient costs adjusted to 2005 dollars), a reduction of 36.3% and 23.6%, respectively. Under both Medicaid and Part D, pharmacies earned higher margins for generic drugs (39.9% and 29.5%, respectively) than for brand-name drugs (8.7% and 8.3%, respectively). These results support community pharmacy assertions of lower reimbursements from Part D payers compared with Medicaid payers. Based on these results, pharmacies can respond to this evolving environment by carefully reviewing their Part D plans' impact on CPGM and taking available steps to increase the proportion of generic drugs dispensed to Medicare beneficiaries.

  1. Factors associated with the duration of disability benefits claims among Canadian workers: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Sohail M; Makosso-Kallyth, Sun; St-Hilaire, Nathalie; Munsch, Katrena; Gove, Peter B; Heels-Ansdell, Diane; Guyatt, Gordon H; Busse, Jason W

    2017-01-01

    Disability insurance protects workers from total loss of income in case of a disabling injury or illness by providing wage-replacement benefits. To better inform early identification of claims at risk of prolonged recovery, we explored predictors of the duration of disability benefits claims. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using claims data provided by SSQ Life Insurance Company Inc., a private Canadian disability insurer. We examined all claims SSQ approved for short- and long-term disability benefits from Jan. 1, 2007, to Mar. 31, 2014, and evaluated the association between 9 variables and duration of short- and long-term disability benefits using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. For both short- (n = 70 776) and long-term disability (n = 22 205) claims, and across all disorders, older age, female sex, heavy job demands, presence of comorbidity, attending an independent medical evaluation, receipt of rehabilitation therapy and longer time to claim approval were associated with longer claim duration. Higher predisability salary was associated with longer short-term disability claim duration. Quebec residency was associated with longer short-term disability claim duration among workers with psychological disorders, but shorter short-term disability claim duration among those with musculoskeletal complaints and other illnesses. For long-term disability claims, however, residing in Quebec was associated with shorter claim duration, although the size of the association differed across clinical conditions. The factors we found to be associated with the duration of short- and long-term disability claims may be helpful to identify claims at risk of prolonged recovery. Our study has limitations, however, and well-designed prospective studies are needed to confirm our findings and identify other promising predictors.

  2. Health Care Service Utilization of Dementia Patients before and after Institutionalization: A Claims Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Schwarzkopf

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-based and institutional dementia care has been compared in cross-sectional studies, but longitudinal information on the effect of institutionalization on health care service utilization is sparse. Methods: We analyzed claims data from 651 dementia patients via Generalized Estimation Equations to assess health care service utilization profiles and corresponding expenditures from four quarters before to four quarters after institutionalization. Results: In all domains, utilization increased in the quarter of institutionalization. Afterwards, the use of drugs, medical aids, and non-physician services (e.g., occupational therapy and physiotherapy remained elevated, but use of in- and outpatient treatment decreased. Cost of care showed corresponding profiles. Conclusion: Institutional dementia care seems to be associated with an increased demand for supportive services but not necessarily for specialized medical care.

  3. Science and pseudoscience in developmental disabilities: guidelines for social workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyer, Bruce A; Pignotti, Monica

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with a developmental disability can now be provided a variety of empirically supported treatments that have been shown to be useful in promoting educational attainments, social and vocational skills, and self-care, and in reducing behavioral problems. Unfortunately, a large number of pseudoscientific or bogus therapies continue to be offered to this population and their families. We review the characteristics of pseudoscientific and bogus treatments and provide several examples of unsupported or harmful interventions offered by contemporary social workers and other human service professionals, to the detriment of people with disabilities. We encourage social workers to identify pseudoscientific interventions and avoid providing these, in favor of using empirically supported treatments.

  4. Microorganisms with Claimed Probiotic Properties: An Overview of Recent Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijan, Sabina

    2014-01-01

    Probiotics are defined as live microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Health benefits have mainly been demonstrated for specific probiotic strains of the following genera: Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Saccharomyces, Enterococcus, Streptococcus, Pediococcus, Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Escherichia coli. The human microbiota is getting a lot of attention today and research has already demonstrated that alteration of this microbiota may have far-reaching consequences. One of the possible routes for correcting dysbiosis is by consuming probiotics. The credibility of specific health claims of probiotics and their safety must be established through science-based clinical studies. This overview summarizes the most commonly used probiotic microorganisms and their demonstrated health claims. As probiotic properties have been shown to be strain specific, accurate identification of particular strains is also very important. On the other hand, it is also demonstrated that the use of various probiotics for immunocompromised patients or patients with a leaky gut has also yielded infections, sepsis, fungemia, bacteraemia. Although the vast majority of probiotics that are used today are generally regarded as safe and beneficial for healthy individuals, caution in selecting and monitoring of probiotics for patients is needed and complete consideration of risk-benefit ratio before prescribing is recommended. PMID:24859749

  5. Testing consumer perception of nutrient content claims using conjoint analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Moskowitz, Howard; Reisner, Michele; Krieger, Bert

    2010-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposes to establish standardized and mandatory criteria upon which front-of-pack (FOP) nutrition labelling must be based. The present study aimed to estimate the relative contribution of declared amounts of different nutrients to the perception of the overall 'healthfulness' of foods by the consumer. Protein, fibre, vitamin A, vitamin C, calcium and iron were nutrients to encourage. Total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, total and added sugar, and sodium were the nutrients to limit. Two content claims per nutrient used the FDA-approved language. An online consumer panel (n 320) exposed to multiple messages (n 48) rated the healthfulness of each hypothetical food product. Utility functions were constructed using conjoint analysis, based on multiple logistic regression and maximum likelihood estimation. Consumer perception of healthfulness was most strongly driven by the declared presence of protein, fibre, calcium and vitamin C and by the declared total absence of saturated fat and sodium. For this adult panel, total and added sugar had lower utilities and contributed less to the perception of healthfulness. There were major differences between women and men. Conjoint analysis can lead to a better understanding of how consumers process information about the full nutrition profile of a product, and is a powerful tool for the testing of nutrient content claims. Such studies can help the FDA develop science-based criteria for nutrient profiling that underlies FOP and shelf labelling.

  6. ADA perceived disability claims: a decision-tree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, William R; Hawley, Carolyn E; McMahon, Brian T; Reid, Christine A; Barbir, Lara A

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the possible interactions of predictor variables pertaining to perceived disability claims contained in a large governmental database. Specifically, it is a retrospective analysis of US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) data for the entire population of workplace discrimination claims based on the "regarded as disabled" prong of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) definition of disability. The study utilized records extracted from a "master database" of over two million charges of workplace discrimination in the Integrated Mission System of the EEOC. This database includes all ADA-related discrimination allegations filed from July 26, 1992 through December 31, 2008. Chi squared automatic interaction detection (CHAID) was employed to analyze interaction effects of relevant variables, such as issue (grievance) and industry type. The research question addressed by CHAID is: What combination of factors are associated with merit outcomes for people making ADA EEOC allegations who are "regarded as" having disabilities? The CHAID analysis shows how merit outcome is predicted by the interaction of relevant variables. Issue was found to be the most prominent variable in determining merit outcome, followed by industry type, but the picture is made more complex by qualifications regarding age and race data. Although discharge was the most frequent grievance among charging parties in the perceived disability group, its merit outcome was significantly less than that for the leading factor of hiring.

  7. Equality of Opportunity, Cultural Diversity and Claims for Fairness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Sardoč

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper examines some of the tensions, problems and challenges associated with claims for equality of opportunity (the fairness argument. The introductory part identifies three separate forms of justification for public education, including the argument associated with equality of opportunity. Part II examines in detail two questions that reveal part of the anatomy of equality of opportunity: (1 what an opportunity is, and (2 when individuals’ opportunities are equal. This is followed by a presentation of the two basic principles of equality of opportunity: (1 the principle of non-discrimination, and (2 the “levelling the playing field” principle. The next part takes up the multiculturalist hypothesis advanced by minority groups for the accommodation and recognition of cultural diversity. This is followed by the identification of a set of claims comprising the “fairness argument”. The last section focuses on the “currency problem” associated with cultural diversity as a form of “unfair disadvantage”. Part V examines two of the major shortcomings associated with the multicultural conception of equality of opportunity, while the concluding part discusses some of the questions that must be answered by any conception of equal opportunities.

  8. Telehomecare technology across sectors: claims of jurisdiction and emerging controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Dinesen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore and identify inter-organisational and inter-professional controversies that emerge when telehomecare technology is implemented across healthcare sectors. Theory: A combined inter-organisational and inter-professional perspective constitutes the conceptual framework for this study. Methods: The case study approach was applied as the overall methodology of the study. A triangulation of data collection techniques was used in order to provide multiple sources of evidence for exploring and identifying controversies (documents, participant observation, qualitative interviews, focus group interviews. Findings: During the design and implementation phases of a telehomecare system, several types of controversies emerged as part of the inter-organisational and inter-professional agenda. These controversies involved competing claims of jurisdiction, controversies over knowledge technologies, or differences in network visions and network architecture. Discussion and conclusions: The identification of such controversies and differences in the design and implementation process of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology can contribute to the uncovering of new knowledge. These issues should be taken into account when initiating a telehomecare project and implementing telehomecare technology. Technology in a network and across inter-professional relations poses a challenge to this new field. There is a particular need to precisely define the claims of jurisdiction, and the accompanying controversies that can arise related to knowledge technologies, network visions and network architecture.

  9. Telehomecare technology across sectors: claims of jurisdiction and emerging controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinesen, Birthe; Gustafsson, Jeppe; Nøhr, Christian; Kjærandersen, Stig; Sejersen, Holger; Toft, Egon

    2007-11-21

    The purpose of this study was to explore and identify inter-organisational and inter-professional controversies that emerge when telehomecare technology is implemented across healthcare sectors. A combined inter-organisational and inter-professional perspective constitutes the conceptual framework for this study. The case study approach was applied as the overall methodology of the study. A triangulation of data collection techniques was used in order to provide multiple sources of evidence for exploring and identifying controversies (documents, participant observation, qualitative interviews, focus group interviews). During the design and implementation phases of a telehomecare system, several types of controversies emerged as part of the inter-organisational and inter-professional agenda. These controversies involved competing claims of jurisdiction, controversies over knowledge technologies, or differences in network visions and network architecture. The identification of such controversies and differences in the design and implementation process of the concept of home hospitalisation for heart patients by means of telehomecare technology can contribute to the uncovering of new knowledge. These issues should be taken into account when initiating a telehomecare project and implementing telehomecare technology. Technology in a network and across inter-professional relations poses a challenge to this new field. There is a particular need to precisely define the claims of jurisdiction, and the accompanying controversies that can arise related to knowledge technologies, network visions and network architecture.

  10. Are claims made in orthodontic journal advertisements evidence-supported?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Christos; Kouskoura, Thaleia; Ren, Yijin; Katsaros, Christos; Pandis, Nikolaos

    2015-03-01

    To examine the supporting evidence of advertisements published in six leading orthodontic journals. The 2012-2013 printed issues of American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, Australian Orthodontic Journal, Journal of Orthodontics, European Journal of Orthodontics, Journal of Clinical Orthodontics, and Journal of Orofacial Orthopedics were screened for advertisements implying superior performance compared with competitor products. Advertisements were classified according to type of product, availability, and currency of supporting references. A total of 99 unique advertisements claiming clinical benefit or superiority were identified. The overwhelming majority of the identified advertisements promoted appliance products (62.6%), orthodontic materials (14.1%), and dental operatory equipment, including imaging systems (12.1%). Advertisements were found to provide references or not regardless of the product type. Half of the advertisements referred to at least one peer-reviewed publication, whereas unpublished studies were cited by 25% of the advertisements. Most of the referenced articles were published within the past 5 years. The scientific background of advertisements in the orthodontic literature appears limited. While surveillance of journal advertising needs to be regulated, clinicians are urged to critically appraise the claims being made in orthodontic print advertisements by consulting the associated existing evidence.

  11. Challenges in using medicaid claims to ascertain child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S; Allaire, Benjamin T; Garfield, Lauren D; Ross, Raven E; Hedeker, Donald

    2015-05-01

    Medicaid data contain International Classification of Diseases, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes indicating maltreatment, yet there is a little information on how valid these codes are for the purposes of identifying maltreatment from health, as opposed to child welfare, data. This study assessed the validity of Medicaid codes in identifying maltreatment. Participants (n = 2,136) in the first National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being were linked to their Medicaid claims obtained from 36 states. Caseworker determinations of maltreatment were compared with eight sets of ICD-9-CM codes. Of the 1,921 children identified by caseworkers as being maltreated, 15.2% had any relevant ICD-9-CM code in any of their Medicaid files across 4 years of observation. Maltreated boys and those of African American race had lower odds of displaying a maltreatment code. Using only Medicaid claims to identify maltreated children creates validity problems. Medicaid data linkage with other types of administrative data is required to better identify maltreated children. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. From Value Assessment to Value Cocreation: Informing Clinical Decision-Making with Medical Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven; Varvel, Stephen; Sasinowski, Maciek; Burke, James P

    2016-09-01

    Big data and advances in analytical processes represent an opportunity for the healthcare industry to make better evidence-based decisions on the value generated by various tests, procedures, and interventions. Value-based reimbursement is the process of identifying and compensating healthcare providers based on whether their services improve quality of care without increasing cost of care or maintain quality of care while decreasing costs. In this article, we motivate and illustrate the potential opportunities for payers and providers to collaborate and evaluate the clinical and economic efficacy of different healthcare services. We conduct a case study of a firm that offers advanced biomarker and disease state management services for cardiovascular and cardiometabolic conditions. A value-based analysis that comprised a retrospective case/control cohort design was conducted, and claims data for over 7000 subjects who received these services were compared to a matched control cohort. Study subjects were commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees with evidence of CHD, diabetes, or a related condition. Analysis of medical claims data showed a lower proportion of patients who received biomarker testing and disease state management services experienced a MI (p < 0.01) or diabetic complications (p < 0.001). No significant increase in cost of care was found between the two cohorts. Our results illustrate the opportunity healthcare payers such as Medicare and commercial insurance companies have in terms of identifying value-creating healthcare interventions. However, payers and providers also need to pursue system integration efforts to further automate the identification and dissemination of clinically and economically efficacious treatment plans to ensure at-risk patients receive the treatments and interventions that will benefit them the most.

  13. Analysis of the presence of nutrient claims on labels of ultra-processed foods directed at children and of the perception of kids on such claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Durigon ZUCCHI

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To characterize the presence of nutrient claims on the front-of-pack labels of ultra-processed foods directed at children and gain insight on children' views about the presence of marketing strategies and nutrient claims on labels of ultra-processed foods. Methods: Analysis of images (front panel, nutrition facts table, and ingredients list of labels from 535 packaged foods with marketing strategies directed at children obtained in an audit-type survey conducted at a Brazilian large supermarket store. Food products with ultra-processed characteristics were identified, and the nutrient claims were quantified and described. Focus groups were conducted with children aged 8-10 years. Results: A total of 472 (88.0% of the 535 packaged foods directed at children were classified as ultra-processed. Of these, 220 (46.6% had one or more nutrient claims on their front-of-pack label (n=321, most (n=236, 73.5% claiming the presence/increased quantities of vitamins and minerals. The most common 'free/reduced' content claim regarded trans fat content (n=48. The focus groups allowed the identification of a noticeable influence of nutrition claims on children, who considered the emphasis important but were confused by the meaning and focus of such claims. Conclusion: Highlighted nutrient claims on the packages of ultra-processed foods were common and seemed to influence the children's perception of the products' quality as a whole. The results indicate the need of thoroughly reviewing the legislation on nutrient claims on the packages of ultra-processed foods.

  14. Health and nutrition content claims on websites advertising infant formula available in Australia: A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Nina J; Gribble, Karleen D

    2017-10-01

    The use of health and nutrition content claims in infant formula advertising is restricted by many governments in response to WHO policies and WHA resolutions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether such prohibited claims could be observed in Australian websites that advertise infant formula products. A comprehensive internet search was conducted to identify websites that advertise infant formula available for purchase in Australia. Content analysis was used to identify prohibited claims. The coding frame was closely aligned with the provisions of the Australian and New Zealand Food Standard Code, which prohibits these claims. The outcome measures were the presence of health claims, nutrition content claims, or references to the nutritional content of human milk. Web pages advertising 25 unique infant formula products available for purchase in Australia were identified. Every advertisement (100%) contained at least one health claim. Eighteen (72%) also contained at least one nutrition content claim. Three web pages (12%) advertising brands associated with infant formula products referenced the nutritional content of human milk. All of these claims appear in spite of national regulations prohibiting them indicating a failure of monitoring and/or enforcement. Where countries have enacted instruments to prohibit health and other claims in infant formula advertising, the marketing of infant formula must be actively monitored to be effective. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Food labeling: health claims; calcium and osteoporosis, and calcium, vitamin D, and osteoporosis. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its labeling regulation authorizing a health claim on the relationship between calcium and a reduced risk of osteoporosis to include vitamin D so that, in addition to the claim for calcium and osteoporosis, an additional claim can be made for calcium and vitamin D and osteoporosis; eliminate the requirement that the claim list sex, race, and age as specific risk factors for the development of osteoporosis; eliminate the requirement that the claim does not state or imply that the risk of osteoporosis is equally applicable to the general U.S. population, and that the claim identify the populations at particular risk for the development of osteoporosis; eliminate the requirement that the claim identify the mechanism by which calcium reduces the risk of osteoporosis and instead make it optional; eliminate the requirement that the claim include a statement that a total dietary intake greater than 200 percent of the recommended daily intake (2,000 milligrams (mg) of calcium) has no further benefit to bone health when the food contains 400 mg or more of calcium per reference amount customarily consumed or per total daily recommended supplement intake; and allow reference for the need of physical activity in either of the health claims to be optional rather then required. This final rule is, in part, in response to a health claim petition submitted by The Beverage Institute for Health and Wellness, LLC.

  16. Dietary supplement labeling and advertising claims: are clinical studies on the full product required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafranco, John E; Bond, Katie

    2009-01-01

    Whether labeling and advertising claims for multi-ingredient dietary supplements may be based on the testing of individual, key ingredients--rather than the actual product--has caused a good deal of confusion. This confusion stems from the dearth of case law and the open-endedness of Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidance on this issue. Nevertheless, the relevant regulatory guidance, case law and self-regulatory case law--when assessed together--indicate that the law allows and even protects "key ingredient claims" (i.e., claims based on efficacy testing of key ingredients in the absence of full product testing). This article provides an overview of the relevant substantiation requirements for dietary supplement claims and then reviews FTC's and FDA's guidance on key ingredient claims; relevant case law; use of key ingredient claims in the advertising of other consumer products; and the National Advertising Division of the Better Business Bureau, Inc.'s (NAD's) approach to evaluating key ingredient claims for dietary supplements. This article concludes that key ingredient claims--provided they are presented in a truthful and non-deceptive manner--are permissible, and should be upheld in litigation and cases subject to industry self-regulation. This article further concludes that the NAD's approach to key ingredient claims provides practical guidance for crafting and substantiating dietary supplement key ingredient claims.

  17. Online E-cigarette Marketing Claims: A Systematic Content and Legal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Elizabeth G; Berman, Micah; Hemmerich, Natalie; Carlson, Cristen; Htut, SuSandi; Slater, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS), or e-cigarettes, are heavily marketed online. The purpose of our study was to perform a systematic identification and evaluation of claims made within ENDS retailer and manufacturer websites, and the legal status of such claims. We employed a systematic search protocol with popular search engines using 6 terms: (1) e-cigarettes; (2) e-cigs; (3) e-juice; (4) e-liquid; (5) e-hookah; and (6) vape pen. We analyzed English-language websites where ENDS are sold for implicit and explicit health-related claims. A legal analysis determined whether such claims are permissible under the US Food and Drug Administration's regulations. The vast majority of ENDS manufacturer (N = 78) and retailer (N = 32) websites made at least one health-related claim (77% and 65%, respectively). Modified risk claims and secondhand smoke-related claims were most prevalent, with an average of 2 claims per site. Health-related claims are plentiful within ENDS manufacturer and retailer websites. Results demonstrate that these sites focus on potential benefits while minimizing or eliminating information about possible harmful effects of ENDS. These claims are subject to the current regulatory authority by the FDA, and pose a risk of misinforming consumers.

  18. [The essentials of workplace analysis for examining occupational disability claims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholz, St

    2015-12-01

    The insurance branch that covers the risk of occupational disability ranks among the most important private entities for offering security as far as the limitation or loss of one's ability to work is concerned. The financial risk of the insurer, the existential concerns and expectations of the claimant, as well as the legal framework and the need for a careful interdisciplinary evaluation, necessitate a professional review and assessment of the facts conducted with a sense of both responsibility and sensitivity. Carefully deliberated and sustainable decisions benefit both insurers and the insured. In order to achieve this, an opinion is required in many--and especially the more complex--cases from an external medical expert, which in turn can only be plausible and conclusive when based on a comprehensive review of the claimant's working environment and its particular (and often unique) requirements. This article is intended to increase the reader's understanding of the coherencies of workplace analysis and medical assessments, as required by insurance law and legislation. In addition, the article delivers valuable clues and guidance, both for medical experts and claims managers at insurance companies. Primarily, the claimant's occupation, as conceived in the terms and conditions of the insurance companies, is explained. The reader is then introduced to the various criteria to be considered when a claimant has several jobs at the same time, is self-employed, could be transferred to another job, is simply unable to commute to the workplace, or is prevented from working due to legal restrictions related to an illness. The article goes on to address the crucial aspect of how the degree of disability is to be measured under different circumstances, namely using the quantitative and the qualitative approach. As a reliable method for obtaining the essential data regarding the claimant's specific working conditions, which are required by both the medical expert and the

  19. Review of Ophthalmology Medical Professional Liability Claims in the United States from 2006 through 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Atalie C; Parikh, P Divya; Lad, Eleonora M

    2018-01-13

    To describe characteristics of closed medical professional liability (MPL) claims against ophthalmologists in the United States. Retrospective analysis of MPL claims from 2006-2015. Data were obtained from the Physician Insurers Association of America (PIAA) Data Sharing Project (DSP). Comparison was made between ophthalmology and all healthcare specialties for physician demographics, prevalence and costs associated with closed claims, and resolution of claims. The most prevalent chief medical factor, presenting medical condition, operative procedure, outcomes, and resolution of ophthalmology claims were compared between the 2006-2010 and 2011-2015 periods. From 2006-2015, 90 743 MPL claims were closed: 2.6% (2325/90 743) of closed claims and 2.2% (564/24 670) of all paid claims were against ophthalmologists. Retrospective analysis of MPL claims captured by the PIAA DSP over a 10-year period. Subspecialty pertaining to the claim, number of claims closed and paid, indemnity paid, allocated loss adjustment expenses, chief medical factor, presenting medical condition, operative procedure, outcome, and resolution. Only 24% of closed claims against ophthalmologists resulted in payment. Two-thirds were dropped, withdrawn, or dismissed. Ninety percent of claims that received a verdict were favorable toward the ophthalmologist. Cataract and cornea surgeries were the most prevalent and most costly operative procedures, accounting for 50% of all claims and $47 641 376 and $32 570 148 in total paid indemnity, respectively. Average indemnity was higher for corneal procedures ($304 476) than vitreoretinal procedures ($270 141) or oculoplastic procedures on the eyelid ($222 471) or orbit and eyeball ($183 467). The prevalence and cost of claims related to endophthalmitis declined from 2006-2010 (n = 38/1160 [3.3%]; average indemnity, $516 875) period to the 2011-2015 (n = 26/1165 [2.2%]; average indemnity, $247 083) period. Average indemnity paid

  20. Characteristics of otolaryngology claims to Medicare in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Neil; Lin, Harrison W

    2014-11-01

    The Medicare provider utilization and payment public use datafile for 2012 was analyzed with respect to otolaryngology specialty providers to characterize otolaryngology services billed to and reimbursed by Medicare, both overall and according to provider characteristics. Among 8450 otolaryngology specialty providers submitting claims, the top 5 billed services were (count in millions): 99213 (2.23), 95165 (1.81), 99203 (0.92), 99214 (0.83), and 69210 (0.71), and the top 5 total reimbursed services were (aggregate total reimbursements in millions): 99213 ($114), 99203 ($68), 99214 ($63), 31231 ($60), and 31575 ($47). There was a mean of 1567 services billed per provider with an average (yearly) total reimbursement from Medicare of $76,068 per provider. These data characterize the current level of provision of otolaryngology services to the Medicare population. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  1. Measuring Prices in Health Care Markets Using Commercial Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neprash, Hannah T; Wallace, Jacob; Chernew, Michael E; McWilliams, J Michael

    2015-12-01

    To compare methods of price measurement in health care markets. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan commercial claims. We constructed medical prices indices using three approaches: (1) a "sentinel" service approach based on a single common service in a specific clinical domain, (2) a market basket approach, and (3) a spending decomposition approach. We constructed indices at the Metropolitan Statistical Area level and estimated correlations between and within them. Price indices using a spending decomposition approach were strongly and positively correlated with indices constructed from broad market baskets of common services (r > 0.95). Prices of single common services exhibited weak to moderate correlations with each other and other measures. Market-level price measures that reflect broad sets of services are likely to rank markets similarly. Price indices relying on individual sentinel services may be more appropriate for examining specialty- or service-specific drivers of prices. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Gender, Justice, and the Indian Residential School Claims Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Hanson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of Indian Residential Schools in Canada are involved in one of the largest compensation processes in the world. A significant component in the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement (IRSSA is the Independent Assessment Process (IAP, an out-of-court process aimed at resolving claims related to serious physical and sexual abuse suffered at residential schools. This article discusses a community–university research collaboration, which set out to explore how women involved in the IAP, including Survivors, support workers, lawyers, and adjudicators, understood the capacity of the model to facilitate healing. The results suggest attention to several aspects of policy development including representations of the body and sexuality, impacts of child abuse and trauma, and colonial histories of power and control, in addition to healing and training strategies.

  3. Are food brands that carry light claims different?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjostrom, Therese; Corsi, Armando Maria; Driesener, Carl

    2014-01-01

    , such as market share and penetration, b) loyalty levels, and c) customer sharing. We analyse three product categories (Cola, Flavoured Carbonated Beverages and Margarine) using UK household panel data provided by Kantar. The results show that when considering standard brand performance measures (i.e. market......Little is known about the market performance of brands that carry light claims (e.g. low fat, low sugar) in comparison to their regular counterparts. In order to fill this gap, we explore whether light brands perform similarly to regular brands in terms of a) brand performance measures...... share, penetration and purchase frequency), regular brands receive higher brand performance measures than light brands. However, when considering repeat purchase loyalty, light brands achieve greater levels of loyalty than their regular counterparts. Finally, light brands share their buyers more...

  4. 25 CFR 900.205 - To what non-medical-related claims against self-determination contractors does FTCA apply?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... THE INDIAN SELF-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ASSISTANCE ACT Federal Tort Claims Act Coverage General Provisions Non-Medical Related Claims § 900.205 To what non-medical-related claims against self-determination... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false To what non-medical-related claims against self...

  5. Aboriginal Determination: Native Title Claims and Barriers to Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zia Akhtar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Australian government has proposed a referendum in 2012 to decide the constitutional status of its indigenous people. There is at present no mechanism to define the indigenous people as a domestic or foreign entity of the Commonwealth. This is an important issue because other settler governments have developed a framework to implement their relationship with the native people. As a result, it is difficult prove title to land that has been abrogated by the deeds of the settlers. In Mabo v Queensland (2,the Commonwealth government was found to have breached its fiduciary duty to the Aboriginal peoples. The judgment led to the Native Title Act 1993 that established the process of asserting native rights that were held to coexist with pastoral ownership. The promulgation of the Native Title Amendment Act 1998 reversed this process and augmented the powers of non-native landlords by providing the device to extinguish native rights. In Western Australia v Ward, a mining lease was held to have precedence over native title that was adjudged to be part of a bundle of rights. In implementing the Native Title Act the issue turns on the determination of the ties to land/ sea that the government allows to the Aboriginal peoples. The judgment in Harrington-Smith on behalf of the Wongatha People v Western Australia indicates that title can be excluded on procedural grounds and that there was an incompatibility between the claims of the Aboriginal peoples and the settlers’ claims. The road map towards a more effective regime of proving title can be achieved if the Aboriginal peoples are granted recognition as a nation in the Constitution and a treaty is signed with them.

  6. Are Front of Pack Claims Indicators of Nutrition Quality? Evidence from 2 Product Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Debra; Hooker, Neal H; Stanton, John L

    2016-01-01

    American grocery shoppers face an array of front of pack (FOP) nutrition and health claims when making food selections. Such systems have been categorized as summary or nutrient specific. Either type should help consumers make judgments about the nutrition quality of a product. This research tests if the type or quantity of FOP claims are indeed good indicators of objective nutrition quality. Claim and nutrition information from more than 2200 breakfast cereals and prepared meals launched between 2006 and 2010 were analyzed using binary and multinomial logistic regression models. Results suggest that no type or number of front of pack claims could distinguish "healthy" foods. However, some types and frequencies of FOP claims were significant predictors of higher or lower levels of certain key nutrients. Given the complex and crowded label environment in which these FOP claims reside, one may be concerned that such cues are not closely related to objective measures of nutrition quality. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  7. Association Between Employee Dental Claims, Health Risks, Workplace Productivity, and Preventive Services Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Wayne N; Chen, Chin-Yu; Li, Xingquan; Schultz, Alyssa B

    2017-08-01

    This study examined differences in health risks and workplace outcomes among employees who utilized preventive dental services compared with other employees. A retrospective observational study of employees of a large financial services corporation, with data from health risk appraisal questionnaires, medical claims, pharmacy claims, and dental claims. Employees with no dental claims were significantly more likely to have a variety of health risk factors (such as obesity and tobacco use), health conditions (such as diabetes), absenteeism, and lost on-the-job productivity, and were significantly less likely to be compliant with clinical preventive services compared with those with preventive dental claims. Employees with preventive dental claims had fewer health risks and medical conditions and better health and productivity measures. Study employees underutilized free dental care; employers should incorporate preventive dental care awareness into their worksite wellness programs.

  8. [Practical use of E-claim data for regional healthcare planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimori, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Japanese E-claim data contain comprehensive medical procedures and are adapted nationwide. Almost 94% of hospitals and pharmacies claim medical records for payment electronically. Although the handling and analysis of E-claim data are not as easy as those of Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC) data, these data contain important and useful information for the next regional healthcare planning of local governments in Japan. In this paper, we explain some examples of a healthcare delivery system in each region and patients' behavior in Hokkaido obtained from the Joint Program for E-claim database of Hokkaido University Hospital and the Hokkaido local government. Differences between the E-claim data format and the DPC data format are also described in terms of data analysis. Some suggestions are provided for the E-claim data format of the next generation.

  9. [Learning from experience. Analysis of claims submitted to the National Commission of Medical Arbitration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés-Salgado, R; Molina-Leza, J; Solís-Torres, C

    2001-01-01

    To describe claims brought to Comisión Nacional de Arbitraje Médico (Medical Arbitration National Commission or Conamed) against medical care services in Mexico City. Also, to identify deficiencies in the quality of care by institution and medical speciality and describe some characteristics of the plaintiffs. A total of 1925 claims were collected and data were analysed quantitatively. Pearson's chi-square (c2) test and a cluster analysis were performed. Most claims are related to therapy, surgery, and diagnosis problems. Claims related to structure, process, and outcomes were also identified for each defendant institution. Claims vary by sex, age, and socio-economic levels. Claims brought to Co-named are useful indicators of users' dissatisfaction. Our results are consistent with other papers about users' satisfaction and quality of health care.

  10. Body mass index as a predictor of firefighter injury and workers' compensation claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehl, Kerry S; Kisbu-Sakarya, Yasemin; Elliot, Diane L; Moe, Esther L; Defrancesco, Carol A; Mackinnon, David P; Lockhart, Ginger; Goldberg, Linn; Kuehl, Hannah E

    2012-05-01

    To determine the relationship between lifestyle variables including body mass index and filing a workers' compensation claim due to firefighter injury. A cross-sectional evaluation of firefighter injury related to workers" compensation claims occurring 5 years after the original Promoting Healthy Lifestyles: Alternative Models' Effects study intervention. A logistic regression analysis for variables predicting filing a workers' compensation claim due to an injury was performed with a total of 433 participants. The odds of filing a compensation claim were almost 3 times higher for firefighters with a body mass index of more than 30 kg/m than firefighters with a normal body mass index (odds ratio, 2.89; P firefighter injuries and workers' compensation claims. Maintaining a healthy body weight is important to reduce injury and workers' compensation claims among firefighters.

  11. Use of electronic medical records (EMR for oncology outcomes research: assessing the comparability of EMR information to patient registry and health claims data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau EC

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Edmund C Lau1, Fionna S Mowat1, Michael A Kelsh1,*, Jason C Legg2, Nicole M Engel-Nitz3, Heather N Watson1, Helen L Collins2, Robert J Nordyke4,5, Joanna L Whyte21Exponent, Menlo Park, CA, USA; 2Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA; 3i3 Innovus, Eden Prairie, MN, USA; 4PriceSpective LLC, El Segundo, CA, USA; 5Department of Health Services, UCLA School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA*Now at Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USAAbstract: Electronic medical records (EMRs are used increasingly for research in clinical oncology, epidemiology, and comparative effectiveness research (CER.Objective: To assess the utility of using EMR data in population-based cancer research by comparing a database of EMRs from community oncology clinics against Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER cancer registry data and two claims databases (Medicare and commercial claims.Study design and setting: Demographic, clinical, and treatment patterns in the EMR, SEER, Medicare, and commercial claims data were compared using six tumor sites: breast, lung/bronchus, head/neck, colorectal, prostate, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL. We identified various challenges in data standardization and selection of appropriate statistical procedures. We describe the patient and clinic inclusion criteria, treatment definitions, and consideration of the administrative and clinical purposes of the EMR, registry, and claims data to address these challenges.Results: Sex and 10-year age distributions of patient populations for each tumor site were generally similar across the data sets. We observed several differences in racial composition and treatment patterns, and modest differences in distribution of tumor site.Conclusion: Our experience with an oncology EMR database identified several factors that must be considered when using EMRs for research purposes or generalizing results to the US cancer population. These factors were related primarily to evaluation of treatment patterns, including

  12. General guidance for stakeholders on the evaluation of Article 13.1, 13.5 and 14 health claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    2011-01-01

    of available scientific evidence, pertinent studies for substantiation of health claims, wording of claims, the extent to which a food needs to be characterised for the claimed effect, claimed effects which are beneficial physiological effects, definition of a risk factor for the development of a human disease...... claim applications, and a briefing document for Member States and the European Commission on the evaluation of Article 13.1 health claims). This guidance document summarises the general principles applied by the NDA Panel in the evaluation of health claims, and covers issues such as the totality...

  13. Modelling the disability severity score in motor insurance claims: an application to the Spanish case

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Santolino; Jean-Philippe Boucher

    2009-01-01

    Bodily injury claims have the greatest impact on the claim costs of motor insurance companies. The disability severity of motor claims is assessed in numerous European countries by means of score systems. In this paper a zero inflated generalized Poisson regression model is implemented to estimate the disability severity score of victims in-volved in motor accidents on Spanish roads. We show that the injury severity estimates may be automatically converted into financial terms by insurers at ...

  14. 9 CFR 317.363 - Nutrient content claims for “healthy.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... content claims for “healthy.” (a) The term “healthy,” or any other derivative of the term “health,” may be..., individual meat products bearing the claim “healthy” (or any derivative of the term “health”) must contain no more than 360 mg of sodium and that meal-type products bearing the claim “healthy” (or any other...

  15. 9 CFR 381.463 - Nutrient content claims for “healthy.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... content claims for “healthy.” (a) The term “healthy,” or any other derivative of the term “health,” may be... poultry products bearing the claim “healthy” (or any derivative of the term “health”) must contain no more than 360 mg of sodium and that meal-type products bearing the claim “healthy” (or any other derivative...

  16. Analysis of obstetrics and gynecology professional liability claims in Catalonia, Spain (1986-2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L; Mulà-Rosías, Joan Antoni; Lailla-Vicens, Josep Maria; Benet-Travé, Josep; Arimany-Manso, Josep

    2013-07-01

    To identify relevant factors involved in obstetrics and gynecology (OG) professional liability claims to help archive better management of risks. Analysis of 885 OG claims opened between 1986 and 2010, with the identification of the most common events leading to a claim, the economical and juridical characteristics of the claims, as well as the relevant trends over the study period. Most claims related to obstetrics. Labor, delivery and its complications accounted for 33.1% of the claims; 12.77% related specifically to cesarean. Oncological diseases, fetus death during labor and delivery, neurologically impaired infant and histerectomy-related problems were the most frequently claimed events. Most cases ended up without an indemnity payment and 37.7% of closed files were solved by an out-of-court procedure. Average payment was higher for the obstetric procedures than for those concerning gynecology cases. The proportion of claims relating to obstetrics increased during the study period, as well as the average payment. OG is at high-risk for malpractice claims, but compensation awards are not frequent. However, particular events, such as retained foreign objects, tubal ligation, ultrasound diagnosis or neurologically impaired newborns, deserve special attention regarding medico-legal issues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  17. Consumers’ health-related motive orientations and reactions to claims about dietary calcium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoefkens, Christine; Verbeke, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Health claims may contribute to better informed and healthier food choices and to improved industrial competitiveness by marketing foods that support healthier lifestyles in line with consumer preferences...

  18. Classification accuracy of claims-based methods for identifying providers failing to meet performance targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Benjamin-Johnson, Rhondee; Onega, Tracy; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Zhu, Weiwei; Fenton, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Quality assessment is critical for healthcare reform but data sources are lacking for measurement of many important healthcare outcomes. With over 49 million people covered by Medicare as of 2010, Medicare claims data offer a potentially valuable source that could be used in targeted health care quality improvement efforts. However, little is known about the operating characteristics of provider profiling methods using claims-based outcome measures that may estimate provider performance with error. Motivated by the example of screening mammography performance, we compared approaches to identifying providers failing to meet guideline targets using Medicare claims data. We used data from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium and linked Medicare claims to compare claims-based and clinical estimates of cancer detection rate. We then demonstrated the performance of claim-based estimates across a broad range of operating characteristics using simulation studies. We found that identification of poor performing providers was extremely sensitive to algorithm specificity, with no approach identifying more than 65% of poorly performing providers when claims-based measures had specificity of 0.995 or less. We conclude that claims have the potential to contribute important information on healthcare outcomes to quality improvement efforts. However, to achieve this potential, development of highly accurate claims-based outcome measures should remain a priority. PMID:25302935

  19. 32 CFR 536.10 - Responsibilities and operations of claims processing offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...). (3) Budget for and fund claims investigations and activities; including, per diem and transportation... adequate investigatory, administrative, and logistical support, including damage assessment and finance and...

  20. How many foods in the UK carry health and nutrition claims, and are they healthier than those that do not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Asha; Scarborough, Peter; Matthews, Anne; Payne, Sarah; Mizdrak, Anja; Rayner, Mike

    2016-04-01

    The present study aimed to measure the prevalence of different types of health and nutrition claims on foods and non-alcoholic beverages in a UK sample and to assess the nutritional quality of such products carrying health or nutrition claims. A survey of health and nutrition claims on food packaging using a newly defined taxonomy of claims and internationally agreed definitions of claim types. A national UK food retailer: Tesco. Three hundred and eighty-two products randomly sampled from those available through the retailer's website. Of the products, 32 % (95 % CI 28, 37 %) carried either a health or nutrition claim; 15 % (95 % CI 11, 18 %) of products carried at least one health claim and 29 % (95 % CI 25, 34 %) carried at least one nutrition claim. When adjusted for product category, products carrying health claims tended to be lower in total fat and saturated fat than those that did not, but there was no significant difference in sugar or sodium levels. Products carrying health claims had slightly higher fibre levels than products without. Results were similar for comparisons between products that carry nutrition claims and those that do not. Health and nutrition claims appear frequently on food and beverage products in the UK. The nutrient profile of products carrying claims is marginally healthier than for similar products without claims, suggesting that claims may have some but limited informational value. The implication of these findings for guiding policy is unclear; future research should investigate the 'clinical relevance' of these differences in nutritional quality.

  1. The Functional Foods Dossier: Building Solid Health Claims. How to prepare the scientific dossier for health claims of European functional food. Practical Industrial guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Korver, O.; Kühn, M.C.; Richardson, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    This practical book explains to the industry manager all the special aspects related to the preparation of the scientific dossier for health claims of European functional foods (science, legislation, communication, product development).

  2. Use of Health Care Claims Data to Study Patients with Ophthalmologic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Joshua D.; Lum, Flora; Lee, Paul P.; Rich, William L.; Coleman, Anne L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe what information is or is not included in health care claims data, provide an overview of the main advantages and limitations of performing analyses using health care claims data, and offer general guidance on how to report and interpret findings of ophthalmology-related claims data analyses. Design Systematic review. Participants Not applicable. Methods A literature review and synthesis of methods for claims-based data analyses. Main Outcome Measures Not applicable. Results Some advantages of using claims data for analyses include large, diverse sample sizes, longitudinal follow-up, lack of selection bias, and potential for complex, multivariable modeling. The disadvantages include (a) the inherent limitations of claims data, such as incomplete, inaccurate, or missing data, or the lack of specific billing codes for some conditions; and (b) the inability, in some circumstances, to adequately evaluate the appropriateness of care. In general, reports of claims data analyses should include clear descriptions of the following methodological elements: the data source, the inclusion and exclusion criteria, the specific billing codes used, and the potential confounding factors incorporated in the multivariable models. Conclusions The use of claims data for research is expected to increase with the enhanced availability of data from Medicare and other sources. The use of claims data to evaluate resource use and efficiency and to determine the basis for supplementary payment methods for physicians is anticipated. Thus, it will be increasingly important for eye care providers to use accurate and descriptive codes for billing. Adherence to general guidance on the reporting of claims data analyses, as outlined in this article, is important to enhance the credibility and applicability of findings. Guidance on optimal ways to conduct and report ophthalmology-related investigations using claims data will likely continue to evolve as health services

  3. Content analysis of false and misleading claims in television advertising for prescription and nonprescription drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faerber, Adrienne E; Kreling, David H

    2014-01-01

    False and misleading advertising for drugs can harm consumers and the healthcare system, and previous research has demonstrated that physician-targeted drug advertisements may be misleading. However, there is a dearth of research comparing consumer-targeted drug advertising to evidence to evaluate whether misleading or false information is being presented in these ads. To compare claims in consumer-targeted television drug advertising to evidence, in order to evaluate the frequency of false or misleading television drug advertising targeted to consumers. A content analysis of a cross-section of television advertisements for prescription and nonprescription drugs aired from 2008 through 2010. We analyzed commercial segments containing prescription and nonprescription drug advertisements randomly selected from the Vanderbilt Television News Archive, a census of national news broadcasts. For each advertisement, the most-emphasized claim in each ad was identified based on claim iteration, mode of communication, duration and placement. This claim was then compared to evidence by trained coders, and categorized as being objectively true, potentially misleading, or false. Potentially misleading claims omitted important information, exaggerated information, made lifestyle associations, or expressed opinions. False claims were factually false or unsubstantiated. Of the most emphasized claims in prescription (n = 84) and nonprescription (n = 84) drug advertisements, 33 % were objectively true, 57 % were potentially misleading and 10 % were false. In prescription drug ads, there were more objectively true claims (43 %) and fewer false claims (2 %) than in nonprescription drug ads (23 % objectively true, 7 % false). There were similar numbers of potentially misleading claims in prescription (55 %) and nonprescription (61 %) drug ads. Potentially misleading claims are prevalent throughout consumer-targeted prescription and nonprescription drug advertising on

  4. Allegations of Failure to Obtain Informed Consent in Spinal Surgery Medical Malpractice Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauberger, Jennifer; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Choudhry, Asad J; Alvi, Mohammed Ali; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-06-21

    Predictive factors associated with increased risk of medical malpractice litigation have been identified, including severity of injury, physician sex, and error in diagnosis. However, there is a paucity of literature investigating informed consent in spinal surgery malpractice. To investigate the failure to obtain informed consent as an allegation in medical malpractice claims for patients undergoing a spinal procedure. In this retrospective cohort study, a national medicolegal database was searched for malpractice claim cases related to spinal surgery for all years available (ie, January 1, 1980, through December 31, 2015). Failure to obtain informed consent and associated medical malpractice case verdict. A total of 233 patients (117 [50.4%] male and 116 [49.8%] female; 80 with no informed consent allegation and 153 who cited lack of informed consent) who underwent spinal surgery and filed a malpractice claim were studied (mean [SD] age, 47.1 [13.1] years in the total group, 45.8 [12.9] years in the control group, and 47.9 [13.3] years in the informed consent group). Median interval between year of surgery and year of verdict was 5.4 years (interquartile range, 4-7 years). The most common informed consent allegations were failure to explain risks and adverse effects of surgery (52 [30.4%]) and failure to explain alternative treatment options (17 [9.9%]). In bivariate analysis, patients in the control group were more likely to require additional surgery (45 [56.3%] vs 53 [34.6%], P = .002) and have more permanent injuries compared with the informed consent group (46 [57.5%] vs 63 [42.0%], P = .03). On multivariable regression analysis, permanent injuries were more often associated with indemnity payment after a plaintiff verdict (odds ratio [OR], 3.12; 95% CI, 1.46-6.65; P = .003) or a settlement (OR, 6.26; 95% CI, 1.06-36.70; P = .04). Informed consent allegations were significantly associated with less severe (temporary or emotional) injury (OR

  5. The relationship between type of drug therapy and blood glucose self-monitoring test strips claimed by beneficiaries of the Seniors' Pharmacare Program in Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Chiranjeev; Graham, Stephen D; Cooke, Charmaine; Sketris, Ingrid; Frail, Dawn M; Flowerdew, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    Background The healthcare expenditure on self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) test strips under the Nova Scotia Seniors' Pharmacare Program (NSSPP) has increased significantly in recent years. The objective of this study was to identify the frequency and cost of claims for blood glucose monitoring test strips by NSSPP beneficiaries in the fiscal year 2005/06 and to explore the variation in the use of test strips by type of treatment, age and sex. Methods Retrospective analysis was conducted using pharmacy administrative claims data for NSSPP beneficiaries. Study subjects were aged ≥ 65 years on October 1, 2004, received SMBG test strips in the 110 days prior to April 1, 2005, and were alive throughout the twelve month study period. Subjects were categorized into four groups: insulin only, oral antihyperglycemic agents (OAA) only, both OAA and insulin; and no reimbursed diabetes medications. Statistical analysis was performed to identify differences in expenditure by medication group and in frequency of SMBG test strips claimed by medication group, age, and sex. Results Of 13,564 included beneficiaries, 13.2% were categorized as insulin only, 53.5% OAA only, 7.2% both OAA and insulin, and 26.0% no reimbursed diabetes medications. Over half (58.7%) were femle. The insulin only category had the highest mean (± SD) number of SMBG test strips claimed per day (2.0 ± 1.5) with a mean annual total cost of $615 ± $441/beneficiary. Beneficiaries aged 80 years and above claimed fewer test strips than beneficiaries below 80 years. Conclusion This population based study shows that in Nova Scotia the SMBG test strips claimed by the majority of seniors were within Canadian guidelines. However, a small proportion of beneficiaries claimed for SMBG test strips infrequently or too frequently, which suggests areas for improvement. The provincial drug plan covers the majority of the costs of test strip utilization, suggesting that the majority of test strips claimed did not

  6. A REALISTIC EXAMINATION OF COLD FUSION CLAIMS 24 YEARS LATER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanahan, K.

    2012-10-22

    On March 29, 1989, chemists Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced they had discovered an effect whose explanation was required to lie in the realm of nuclear reactions. Their claim, and those subsequent to it of roughly similar nature, became known as ‘cold fusion’. Research continues to this day on this effect, but what has become clear is that whatever it is, it is not a conventional fusion process. Thus the ‘cold fusion’ moniker is somewhat inappropriate and many current researchers in the field prefer the term “Low Energy Nuclear Reactions (LENR)”, although other terms have been coined for it as well. the results developed out of the LENR research do in fact show something is happening to produce signals which might be interpreted as supporting nuclear reactions (which is what encourages and sustains LENR researchers), but which can also be interpreted via a set of unique and interesting conventional processes. The focus of this document is to describe and address recent objections to such processes so that subsequent LENR research can be guided to develop information that will determine whether either set of explanations has merit. It is hoped that criteria delineated herein will aid the USDOE and other agencies in determining if LENR proposals are meritorious and worthy of support or not.

  7. LDRD 140639 final report : investigation of transmutation claims.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, Jeffrey E.; Van Devender, J. Pace; Mowry, Curtis Dale; Grant, Richard P.; Ohlhausen, James Anthony

    2009-11-01

    The Proton-21 Laboratory in the Ukraine has been publishing results on shock-induced transmutation of several elements, including Cobalt 60 into non-radioactive elements. This report documents exploratory characterization of a shock-compressed Aluminum-6061 sample, which is the only available surrogate for the high-purity copper samples in the Proton-21 experiments. The goal was to determine Sandia's ability to detect possible shock-wave-induced transmutation products and to unambiguously validate or invalidate the claims in collaboration with the Proton-21 Laboratory. We have developed a suitable characterization process and tested it on the surrogate sample. Using trace elemental analysis capabilities, we found elevated and localized concentrations of impurity elements like the Ukrainians report. All our results, however, are consistent with the ejection of impurities that were not in solution in our alloy or were deposited from the cathode during irradiation or possibly storage. Based on the detection capabilities demonstrated and additional techniques available, we are positioned to test samples from Proton-21 if funded to do so.

  8. 'Every space is claimed': smokers' experiences of tobacco denormalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Kirsten; McCullough, Lucy; Salmon, Amy; Bell, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    Over the past decade, the strategy of 'denormalising' tobacco use has become one of the cornerstones of the global tobacco control movement. Although tobacco denormalisation policies primarily affect people on the lowest rungs of the social ladder, few qualitative studies have explicitly set out to explore how smokers have experienced and responded to these legislative and social changes in attitudes towards tobacco use. Drawing on a qualitative study of interviews with 25 current and ex-smokers living in Vancouver, Canada, this paper examines the ways they interpret and respond to the new socio-political environment in which they must manage the increasingly problematised practice of tobacco smoking. Overall, while not opposed to smoking restrictions per se, study participants felt that recent legislation, particularly efforts to prohibit smoking in a variety of outdoor settings, was overly restrictive and that all public space had increasingly been 'claimed' by non-smokers. Also apparent from participants' accounts was the high degree of stigma attached to smoking. However, although the 'denormalisation' environment had encouraged several participants to quit smoking, the majority continued to smoke, raising ethical and practical questions about the value of denormalisation strategies as a way of reducing smoking-related mortality and morbidity. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Auditing Litigation and Claims: Conflicts and the Compromise of Privilege

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harleen Kaur

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Auditing standards require an auditor to make various enquiries about liabilities in general this may entail consideration of potential litigations and claims that the audited entity may be facing. To perform this part of audit, the auditors will generally seek representation letters from lawyers of the company detailing an estimate prepared by management, confirmed by their lawyers through a representation letter, and then sent directly to the auditors. This paper reviews the implications for the auditing profession of a case that involved auditors seeking such representation letters. The case involves litigation between theWestpac Banking Corporation and 789TEN Pty Ltd. While theWestpac case confirmed the legal position of the auditor in their task of collecting evidence in order to form an opinion in Australia, it highlights a significant anomaly under the law and should place the issue of solicitor’s representation letters as audit evidence firmly on the agenda of policymakers. This issue of the compromise of legal privilege during the conduct of an audit is also not confined to Australia: other common law jurisdictions, such as the UK and the US, have also sought to clarify the position of auditors when issues of the integrity of legal privacy privilege arise.

  10. 40 CFR 350.5 - Assertion of claims of trade secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the specific chemical identity of an extremely hazardous substance under sections 303 (d)(2) and (d)(3... (d)(3), the submitter may claim as trade secret the specific chemical identity of any chemical... local emergency planning committee, with the chemical identity or identities claimed trade secret...

  11. Empirical Study of the Serverity of Loss and Expense Claims on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Claims for loss and /or expense is characteristic of most building contracts in Nigeria irrespective of their size and scope; and often defeats project objectives of time, cost and functionality by leading to their time and cost overrun. This study aims at minimizing the negative effect of loss and /or expense claims by providing an ...

  12. 76 FR 362 - Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims AGENCY: Environmental... issue: The preliminary inquiry and the notice of opportunity to comment. a. Inquiry To Learn Whether... learn whether the business asserts a claim covering the information. b. Notice of Opportunity To Submit...

  13. 75 FR 44951 - Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... information at issue: The preliminary inquiry and the notice of opportunity to comment. a. Inquiry To Learn... business to learn whether the business asserts a claim covering the information. b. Notice of Opportunity...

  14. 77 FR 25475 - Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims Regarding Waste Import...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... AGENCY Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims Regarding Waste Import... information at issue: the preliminary inquiry and the notice of opportunity to comment. a. Inquiry To Learn... business to learn whether the business asserts a claim covering the information. b. Notice of Opportunity...

  15. 37 CFR 201.38 - Designation of agent to receive notification of claimed infringement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designation of agent to receive notification of claimed infringement. 201.38 Section 201.38 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights... Designation of agent to receive notification of claimed infringement. (a) General. This section prescribes...

  16. 26 CFR 40.6696-1 - Claims for credit or refund by tax return preparers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Claims for credit or refund by tax return preparers. 40.6696-1 Section 40.6696-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES EXCISE TAX PROCEDURAL REGULATIONS § 40.6696-1 Claims for credit or refund by tax return preparers. (a) In...

  17. The predicament of the African wild dog, Lycaon pictus, is less precarious than claimed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetsier, T.; Jongeling, Tjeerd B.

    2014-01-01

    In a paper published fifteen years ago, Gorman et al. (Nature 391, 479–481) made precise claims about how sensitive the African wild dog is to kleptoparasitism by spotted hyaenas Crocuta crocuta and lions Panthera leo. These claims are regularly referred to in the literature, and so far, they have

  18. 26 CFR 1.860-4 - Claim for credit or refund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claim for credit or refund. 1.860-4 Section 1.860-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860-4 Claim for credit or refund. If the allowance...

  19. Trustworthy satiety claims are good for science and society. Comment on 'Satiety. No way to slim'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de C.

    2011-01-01

    In their short communication against satiety claims, Booth and Nouwen (2010) neglect dozens of well designed studies that show consistent relations between satiety, energy intake and body weight. Satiety, intake and weight are separate concepts, that need different claims and evidence to support

  20. 78 FR 2669 - Waste Import and Export; Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-14

    ... AGENCY Waste Import and Export; Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality... 268, and did not assert a claim of business confidentiality covering any of that information at the... of submission, cannot later make a business confidentiality claim.\\13\\ Nevertheless, other businesses...

  1. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer... CORPORATION Closeout Or Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.400 Satisfaction of customer claims... behalf of customers in satisfaction of claims pursuant to section 7(b)(1) of the Act. (f) In no event...

  2. 20 CFR 725.497 - Procedures in special claims transferred to the fund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... an informed consideration of the transferability of the claim. Where the issue of the transferability... sufficient for a resolution of the issue, the hearing record may be reopened or the case remanded for the... to, the assignment of the claim to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund for the payment of benefits...

  3. Claims in advertisements for anti hypertensive drugs in a Dutch medical journal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greving, Jacoba P.; Denig, Petra; de Zeeuw, Dick; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.

    Background Advertising claims must not conflict with the official summary of product characteristics. After a drug has been approved, new clinical evidence may become available. Aims To determine how the pharmaceutical industry deals with evolving clinical evidence in advertising claims for anti

  4. 20 CFR 410.226 - Periods for which claims are effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... provisions of § 410.202(b), be considered to be entitled to benefits for that month. (b) Prospective life of... filed in such first month of entitlement. (c) Retroactive life of claims. Except in the case of a claim... SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Requirements for Entitlement; Duration of...

  5. The Educational Benefits Claimed for Physical Education and School Sport: An Academic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Richard; Armour, Kathleen; Kirk, David; Jess, Mike; Pickup, Ian; Sandford, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This academic review critically examines the theoretical and empirical bases of claims made for the educational benefits of physical education and school sport (PESS). An historical overview of the development of PESS points to the origins of claims made in four broad domains: physical, social, affective and cognitive. Analysis of the evidence…

  6. 9 CFR 317.369 - Labeling applications for nutrient content claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... characterizing the level of a nutrient, and (3) Labeling applications for the use of an implied claim in a brand... chapter 1, title 21. (g) The availability for public disclosure of labeling applications, along with... content claim in a brand name shall be accompanied by the following data which shall be submitted in the...

  7. 9 CFR 381.469 - Labeling applications for nutrient content claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... characterizing the level of a nutrient, and (3) Labeling applications for the use of an implied claim in a brand... chapter 1, title 21. (g) The availability for public disclosure of labeling applications, along with... content claim in a brand name shall be accompanied by the following data which shall be submitted in the...

  8. 75 FR 63551 - Guides for the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... proposed revisions aim to respond to changes in the marketplace and help marketers avoid making unfair or... environmental claims, guidance from the FTC can benefit both businesses and consumers alike. To help marketers... them in 1996 and 1998. The Guides help marketers avoid making deceptive claims by outlining general...

  9. 37 CFR 1.145 - Subsequent presentation of claims for different invention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... claims for different invention. 1.145 Section 1.145 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES... Processing Provisions Joinder of Inventions in One Application; Restriction § 1.145 Subsequent presentation of claims for different invention. If, after an Office action on an application, the applicant...

  10. Postnationalism, Multiculturalism, and the Collective Claims Making in Britain and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmans, Ruud; Statham, Paul

    1999-01-01

    Derives and tests hypotheses from three perspectives on citizenship (postnational, multicultural, and national) with data on the claims making of migrants and ethnic minorities in Britain and Germany from 1990-95. Shows that migrant claims making is forged in the image of a particular nation-state. (CMK)

  11. 5 CFR 845.405 - Creditor agency processing for non-fraud claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Creditor agency processing for non-fraud... non-fraud claims. (a) Where to submit the debt claim, judgment or notice of debt—(1) Creditor agencies... column 8 under “Fiscal Record” on the Individual Retirement Record, if the Individual Retirement Record...

  12. Scientific Method and the Regulation of Health and Nutritional Claims by the European Food Safety Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad, Darren

    2011-01-01

    The protection of European consumers from the false or misleading scientific and nutritional claims of food manufacturers took a step forward with the recent opinions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). As a risk assessment agency, the EFSA recently assessed and rejected a vast number of food claim forcing the withdrawal of many claims…

  13. 76 FR 16039 - Agency Information Collection (Statement in Support of Claim for Service Connection for PTSD...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Statement in Support of Claim for Service Connection for PTSD... Connection for Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), VA Form 21-0781. b. Statement in Support of Claim for Service Connection for Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Secondary to Personal Assault, VA Form 21...

  14. 20 CFR 429.104 - What evidence do I need to submit with my claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... claim? 429.104 Section 429.104 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS... evidence or information: (1) A written report from your attending physician or dentist setting forth the... required to submit to a physical or mental examination by a physician employed or designated by SSA. If you...

  15. 32 CFR 1645.2 - The claim for minister of religion classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The claim for minister of religion classification. 1645.2 Section 1645.2 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM CLASSIFICATION OF MINISTERS OF RELIGION § 1645.2 The claim for minister of religion...

  16. 25 CFR 900.184 - Is there a deadline for filing FTCA claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Is there a deadline for filing FTCA claims? 900.184 Section 900.184 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, AND INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE... ASSISTANCE ACT Federal Tort Claims Act Coverage General Provisions § 900.184 Is there a deadline for filing...

  17. The shrinkwrap snafu: untangling the "extra element" in breach of contract claims based on shrinkwrap licenses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Nathan

    2003-01-01

    ... contract law, should be preempted by federal copyright law. However, an analysis of § 301 of the Copyright Act,2 read in light of the purposes of copyright law, shows that breach of contract claims based on shrinkwrap licenses should be preempted by copyright law. Courts denying preemption under § 301 distinguished copyright claims from contrac...

  18. 38 CFR 10.42 - Claim of child other than legitimate child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim of child other than legitimate child. 10.42 Section 10.42 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUSTED COMPENSATION Adjusted Compensation; General § 10.42 Claim of child other than legitimate child. A...

  19. Optimal claim behaviour for third-party liability insurances with perfect information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.P. Dellaert (Nico); J.B.G. Frenk (Hans); I. Voshol (Ilje)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we analyse the optimal claim behaviour of a policy holder having a third-party liability insurance in which one is allowed to decide at the end of an insurance year which damages occurred during that year should be claimed. This analysis can only be carried out in detail in

  20. Analysis of 136 ureteral injuries in gynecological and obstetrical surgery from completed insurance claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hove, L.D.; Michelsen, Jonas Bock; Christoffersen, J.K.

    2010-01-01

    . Evaluation of claims concerning ureteral injuries reported to the Danish Patient Insurance Association. Setting. Danish Patient Insurance Association. Sample. All registered claims for ureteral injuries from 1996 to 2006. Methods. Retrospective study of medical records and data from Danish Patient Insurance...