WorldWideScience

Sample records for pseudoscientific treatment claims

  1. Brain Gym: Pseudoscientific Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeze, Kevin; Hyatt, Keith J.; Lambert, M. Chuck

    2016-01-01

    There is an abundance of scams and pseudoscientific practices promising seemingly magical cures for whatever ails a person. A short viewing of late night television will readily reveal a whole host of scams that may be more effective at relieving the viewer of the cash in his or her pocket than alleviating any unwanted symptoms. Unfortunately,…

  2. The Prevalence of Pseudoscientific Ideas and Neuromyths Among Sports Coaches

    OpenAIRE

    Richard P. Bailey; Daniel J. Madigan; Ed Cope; Adam R. Nicholls

    2018-01-01

    There has been an exponential growth in research examining the neurological basis of human cognition and learning. Little is known, however, about the extent to which sports coaches are aware of these advances. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of pseudoscientific ideas among British and Irish sports coaches. In total, 545 coaches from the United Kingdom and Ireland completed a measure that included questions about how evidence-based theories of the brai...

  3. The Prevalence of Pseudoscientific Ideas and Neuromyths Among Sports Coaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Richard P; Madigan, Daniel J; Cope, Ed; Nicholls, Adam R

    2018-01-01

    There has been an exponential growth in research examining the neurological basis of human cognition and learning. Little is known, however, about the extent to which sports coaches are aware of these advances. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of pseudoscientific ideas among British and Irish sports coaches. In total, 545 coaches from the United Kingdom and Ireland completed a measure that included questions about how evidence-based theories of the brain might enhance coaching and learning, how they were exposed to these different theories, and their awareness of neuromyths. Results revealed that the coaches believed that an enhanced understanding of the brain helped with their planning and delivery of sports sessions. Goal-setting was the most frequently used strategy. Interestingly, 41.6% of the coaches agreed with statements that promoted neuromyths. The most prevalent neuromyth was "individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style (e.g., auditory, visual, or kinesthetic)," which 62% of coaches believed. It is apparent that a relatively large percentage of coaches base aspects of their coaching practice on neuromyths and other pseudoscientific ideas. Strategies for addressing this situation are briefly discussed and include changing the content of coach education programs.

  4. The Prevalence of Pseudoscientific Ideas and Neuromyths Among Sports Coaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Bailey

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been an exponential growth in research examining the neurological basis of human cognition and learning. Little is known, however, about the extent to which sports coaches are aware of these advances. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to examine the prevalence of pseudoscientific ideas among British and Irish sports coaches. In total, 545 coaches from the United Kingdom and Ireland completed a measure that included questions about how evidence-based theories of the brain might enhance coaching and learning, how they were exposed to these different theories, and their awareness of neuromyths. Results revealed that the coaches believed that an enhanced understanding of the brain helped with their planning and delivery of sports sessions. Goal-setting was the most frequently used strategy. Interestingly, 41.6% of the coaches agreed with statements that promoted neuromyths. The most prevalent neuromyth was “individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style (e.g., auditory, visual, or kinesthetic,” which 62% of coaches believed. It is apparent that a relatively large percentage of coaches base aspects of their coaching practice on neuromyths and other pseudoscientific ideas. Strategies for addressing this situation are briefly discussed and include changing the content of coach education programs.

  5. Challenging pseudoscientific and paranormal beliefs held by some pre-service primary teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happs, John C.

    1991-12-01

    The widespread public acceptance of many paranormal and pseudoscientific claims should be of some concern to science educators who are striving to produce a scientifically literate community. There is ample evidence to show that students at all levels of our education system believe in aspects of pseudoscience based on claims and assumptions that are in conflict with accumulated scientific knowledge and a rigorous methodology. A survey was designed to assess primary and secondary science teacher-trainees' views. Afterwards 60 students were introduced to the notion of a ‘fair test’ and what constitutes ‘evidence’. Demonstrations of psychic powers were provided and a video shown of professional water-diviners repeatedly failing to locate water under controlled conditions. A re-survey, 3 months later, indicated a rejection of many prior beliefs. However, almost half of the group retained their beliefs in miracles and E.S.P. whilst more than 40% retained their belief in visitors from outer space and that the solar system was created by a supernatural force.

  6. Pseudo-Scientific Information: Reasons of Spread and Premises of Vitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdas Pruskus

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of pseudo-scientific information, the reasons of its spread and premises of its vitality are discussed in the paper. Pseudo-scientific information is understandable as an attempt to suit a demand, which exists in society, while providing a simple answer to a question, which an individual or society is concerned about, and that answer is not sustained by scientific research. It is showed that the rise and spread of pseudo-scientific information in society are conditioned by objective reasons. Firstly, the lack of information concerning a subject which is significant for society. Secondly, the lack of information for a particular individual (social group concerning a substantial subject. Thirdly, fast spread of scientific and technical inventions and penetration of technological innovations into various spheres of life the understanding of which demands an appropriate informal “processing”, i e it demands provision in an appropriate form, which is partly provided by pseudo-scientific knowledge.The existence of pseudo-scientific information is determined by the fact that it performs important social functions in society. The existence of pseudo-scientific information by official certified scientific information and the fact, that all social groups are affected to a larger or lesser extent, show its ambivalent power and vitality. On the one part, the roots of its vitality lie in the duality of this phenomenon, where opposite things coexist in a strange way – the truth (scientifically verified propositions and speculations which are based on intuition rather than on scientifically verified facts. On the other part, it is maintained by our permanent wish to get an additional and fresher information, though not totally reliable, while seeking to know universally and better the world around us and its phenomena. While meeting this requirement, a pseudo-scientific information stimulates researchers both to enhance their attempts to

  7. Reducing Pseudoscientific and Paranormal Beliefs in University Students Through a Course in Science and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James A.

    2018-03-01

    This study measured the relationship between student's religion, gender, and propensity for fantasy thinking with the change in belief for paranormal and pseudoscientific subjects following a science and critical thinking course that directly confronted these subjects. Student pre-course endorsement of religious, paranormal, and pseudoscientific beliefs ranged from 21 to 53%, with religion having the highest endorsement rate. Pre-course belief in paranormal and pseudoscientific subjects was correlated with high scores in some fantasy thinking scales and showed a gender and a religion effect with females having an 11.1% higher belief across all paranormal and pseudoscience subcategories. Students' religion, and frequency of religious service attendance, was also important with agnostic or atheist students having lower beliefs in paranormal and pseudoscience subjects compared to religious students. Students with either low religious service attendance or very high attendance had lower paranormal and pseudoscientific beliefs. Following the critical thinking course, overall beliefs in paranormal and pseudoscientific subcategories lowered 6.8-28.9%, except for superstition, which did not significantly change. Change in belief had both a gender and religion effect with greater reductions among religious students and females.

  8. Reducing Pseudoscientific and Paranormal Beliefs in University Students Through a Course in Science and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James A.

    2018-02-01

    This study measured the relationship between student's religion, gender, and propensity for fantasy thinking with the change in belief for paranormal and pseudoscientific subjects following a science and critical thinking course that directly confronted these subjects. Student pre-course endorsement of religious, paranormal, and pseudoscientific beliefs ranged from 21 to 53%, with religion having the highest endorsement rate. Pre-course belief in paranormal and pseudoscientific subjects was correlated with high scores in some fantasy thinking scales and showed a gender and a religion effect with females having an 11.1% higher belief across all paranormal and pseudoscience subcategories. Students' religion, and frequency of religious service attendance, was also important with agnostic or atheist students having lower beliefs in paranormal and pseudoscience subjects compared to religious students. Students with either low religious service attendance or very high attendance had lower paranormal and pseudoscientific beliefs. Following the critical thinking course, overall beliefs in paranormal and pseudoscientific subcategories lowered 6.8-28.9%, except for superstition, which did not significantly change. Change in belief had both a gender and religion effect with greater reductions among religious students and females.

  9. Learning from no-fault treatment injury claims to improve the safety of older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Katharine Ann

    2015-09-01

    New Zealand's treatment injury compensation claims data set provides an uncommon no-fault perspective of patient safety incidents. Analysis of primary care claims data confirmed medication as the leading threat to the safety of older patients in primary care and drew particular attention to the threat posed by antibiotics. For most injuries there was no suggestion of error. The no-fault perspective reveals the greatest threat to the safety of older patients in primary care to be, not error, but the risk posed by treatment itself. To improve patients' safety, in addition to reducing error, clinicians need to reduce patients' exposure to treatment risk, where appropriate. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  10. Treatment patterns in multiple sclerosis: administrative claims analysis over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleen-Burkey, MerriKay; Cyhaniuk, Anissa; Swallow, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Treatment patterns for the MS disease-modifying therapies (DMT) have changed over time. The objective of this study was to examine and describe treatment patterns in MS over a 10-year period. MS patients who filled a DMT prescription between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2010 were identified from Clinformatics for DataMart affiliated with OptumInsight. Two cohorts were identified: those with a DMT prescription in 2003 and those with a DMT prescription in 2008. Treatment patterns were examined 2 years before and after the anchor prescriptions for each cohort. Comparing treatment patterns prior to the two anchor prescriptions, interferon-beta (IFNβ)-1a IM (Avonex) and IFNβ-1b (Betaseron) gained the most users in 2001-2003, while IFNβ-1a IM and IFNβ-1a SC (Rebif) gained the most users from 2006-2008. In the 2 years following the two anchor prescriptions, treatment patterns changed. From 2003-2005, 21.2% of IFNβ-1a SC users and more than 15.0% of IFNβ-1a IM and IFNβ-1b users changed to another interferon or glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone), while 12.5% of GA users changed to an interferon, most often IFNβ-1a SC. From 2008-2010 the largest proportion of changes from each of the interferons and natalizumab (NZ; Tysabri) were to GA, while those switching from GA were most often changed to IFNβ-1a SC. Those with a 2008 anchor prescription for NZ were most often changed (57%) to GA. In retrospective database analyses the presence of a claim for a filled prescription does not indicate that the drug was consumed, and reasons for changes in therapy are not available. The study design looking forward and backward from the anchor prescriptions may have contributed to differences in the proportion of patients seen with no observable change in DMT. Claims-based data are also constrained by coverage limitations that determine the data available and limit the generalizability of results to managed care patients. Changes in treatment patterns in the first half of the

  11. Medicare claims data reliably identify treatments for basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bridie S; Olsen, Catherine M; Subramaniam, Padmini; Neale, Rachel E; Whiteman, David C

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the accuracy of Medical Benefit Schedule (MBS) item numbers to identify treatments for basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). We linked records from QSkin Study participants (n=37,103) to Medicare. We measured the proportion of Medicare claims for primary excision of BCC/SCC that had corresponding claims for histopathology services. In subsets of participants, we estimated the sensitivity and external concordance of MBS item numbers for identifying BCC/SCC diagnoses by comparing against 'gold-standard' histopathology reports. A total of 2,821 (7.6%) participants had 4,830 separate Medicare claims for BCC/SCC excision; almost all (97%) had contemporaneous Medicare claims for histopathology services. Among participants with BCC/SCC confirmed by histology reports, 76% had a corresponding Medicare claim for primary surgical excision of BCC/SCC. External concordance for Medicare claims for primary BCC/SCC excision was 68%, increasing to 97% when diagnoses for intra-epidermal carcinomas and keratoacanthomas were included. MBS item numbers for primary excision of BCC/SCC are reasonably reliable for determining incident cases of keratinocyte skin cancers, but may underestimate incidence by up to 24%. Medicare claims data may have utility in monitoring trends in conditions for which there is no mandatory reporting. © 2015 Public Health Association of Australia.

  12. PSEUDO-SCIENTIFIC ECONOMIC POLICIES OF MOLDOVA ASSOCIATION TO THE EU: METHODOLOGY, PROBLEMS, SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe RUSU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Economic policies and decisions on EU association starting with the begginig of 90’s were pseudo-scientific, contradictory, incoherent because those policies have not based themselves on modern and current economic theories elaborated and promoted by the EU. Actuality. The topic is actual from the perspective of the factors’ analysis which were conducting to delay the association process of Moldova to the EU. At the same time, those were increasing instability, disequilibrium in the national economy and raise of social vulnerability and constraint levels which ultimately increased the gap between the national and EU economic development levels. During the period of 2000-2015, the socio-economic policy of the Republic of Moldova is described more as small and fragmented steps on conceiving economic and financial instruments for the integration into the EU which were reflected in the Neighbourhood Partnership and Association Agreement with the EU. These processes conducted for the state incapacity to define its own objectives and social-economic priorities for the association as well as legitimated a continuous stage of transition to the market economy. The scope of the present article is to propose a real change of the development and social-economic association policies for achieving final objective on integration to EU. The proposals would consist in emphasizing and implementation of the EU economic principles reflected in the neoclassic synthesis and neo-conservative theories; the elaboration and implementation of a new Strategy on economic supervision, coordination and anticipation of the economic disequilibrium; achieve economic stability for diminishing the negative effects of the global and regional crisis on national economy and adaptation of the development policies to the national socio-economic conditions. The methods used for the elaboration and achieving the expected results of the study were analysis and synthesis of the

  13. Predictors of latent tuberculosis infection treatment completion in the US private sector: an analysis of administrative claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Erica L; Miller, Thaddeus L; Carlson, Erin K; Ho, Christine

    2018-05-29

    Factors that affect latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) treatment completion in the US have not been well studied beyond public health settings. This gap was highlighted by recent health insurance-related regulatory changes that are likely to increase LTBI treatment by private sector healthcare providers. We analyzed LTBI treatment completion in the private healthcare setting to facilitate planning around this important opportunity for tuberculosis (TB) control in the US. We analyzed a national sample of commercial insurance medical and pharmacy claims data for people ages 0 to 64 years who initiated daily dose isoniazid treatment between July 2011 and March 2014 and who had complete data. All individuals resided in the US. Factors associated with treatment completion were examined using multivariable generalized ordered logit models and bivariate Kruskal-Wallis tests or Spearman correlations. We identified 1072 individuals with complete data who initiated isoniazid LTBI treatment. Treatment completion was significantly associated with less restrictive health insurance, age Private sector healthcare claims data provide insights into LTBI treatment completion patterns and patient/provider behaviors. Such information is critical to understanding the opportunities and limitations of private healthcare in the US to support treatment completion as this sector's role in protecting against and eliminating TB grows.

  14. 19 CFR 10.510 - Filing of claim for preferential tariff treatment upon importation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Import Requirements § 10.510 Filing of claim... method specified for equivalent reporting via an authorized electronic data interchange system. For all... classified, or by the method specified for equivalent reporting via an authorized electronic data interchange...

  15. Treatment patterns in hyperlipidaemia patients based on administrative claim databases in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wake, Mayumi; Onishi, Yoshie; Guelfucci, Florent; Oh, Akinori; Hiroi, Shinzo; Shimasaki, Yukio; Teramoto, Tamio

    2018-05-01

    Real-world evidence on treatment of hyperlipidaemia (HLD) in Japan is limited. We aimed to describe treatment patterns, persistence with, and adherence to treatment in Japanese patients with HLD. Retrospective analyses of adult HLD patients receiving drug therapy in 2014-2015 were conducted using the Japan Medical Data Center (JMDC) and Medical Data Vision (MDV) databases. Depending on their HLD treatment history, individuals were categorised as untreated (UT) or previously treated (PT), and were followed for at least 12 months. Outcomes of interest included prescribing patterns of HLD drug classes, persistence with treatment at 12 months, and adherence to treatment. Data for 49,582 and 53,865 patients from the JMDC and MDV databases, respectively, were analysed. First-line HLD prescriptions for UT patients were predominantly for moderate statins (JMDC: 75.9%, MDV: 77.0%). PT patients most commonly received combination therapy (JMDC: 43.9%, MDV: 52.6%). Approximately half of the UT patients discontinued treatment during observation. Within each cohort, persistence rates were lower in UT patients than in PT patients (JMDC: 45.0% vs. 77.5%; MDV: 51.9% vs. 85.3%). Adherence was ≥80% across almost all HLD drug classes, and was slightly lower in the JMDC cohort than MDV cohort. Most common prescriptions were moderate statins in UT patients and combination therapy in PT patients. The high discontinuation rate of HLD therapy in UT patients warrants further investigation and identification of methods to encourage and support long-term persistence. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Establishing a library of resources to help people understand key concepts in assessing treatment claims-The "Critical thinking and Appraisal Resource Library" (CARL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, John C; Chalmers, Iain; Atkinson, Patricia; Badenoch, Douglas; Oxman, Andrew D; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Nordheim, Lena; Krause, L Kendall; Schwartz, Lisa M; Woloshin, Steven; Burls, Amanda; Mosconi, Paola; Hoffmann, Tammy; Cusack, Leila; Albarqouni, Loai; Glasziou, Paul

    2017-01-01

    People are frequently confronted with untrustworthy claims about the effects of treatments. Uncritical acceptance of these claims can lead to poor, and sometimes dangerous, treatment decisions, and wasted time and money. Resources to help people learn to think critically about treatment claims are scarce, and they are widely scattered. Furthermore, very few learning-resources have been assessed to see if they improve knowledge and behavior. Our objectives were to develop the Critical thinking and Appraisal Resource Library (CARL). This library was to be in the form of a database containing learning resources for those who are responsible for encouraging critical thinking about treatment claims, and was to be made available online. We wished to include resources for groups we identified as 'intermediaries' of knowledge, i.e. teachers of schoolchildren, undergraduates and graduates, for example those teaching evidence-based medicine, or those communicating treatment claims to the public. In selecting resources, we wished to draw particular attention to those resources that had been formally evaluated, for example, by the creators of the resource or independent research groups. CARL was populated with learning-resources identified from a variety of sources-two previously developed but unmaintained inventories; systematic reviews of learning-interventions; online and database searches; and recommendations by members of the project group and its advisors. The learning-resources in CARL were organised by 'Key Concepts' needed to judge the trustworthiness of treatment claims, and were made available online by the James Lind Initiative in Testing Treatments interactive (TTi) English (www.testingtreatments.org/category/learning-resources).TTi English also incorporated the database of Key Concepts and the Claim Evaluation Tools developed through the Informed Healthcare Choices (IHC) project (informedhealthchoices.org). We have created a database of resources called CARL

  17. Tuberculosis Prevention in the Private Sector: Using Claims-Based Methods to Identify and Evaluate Latent Tuberculosis Infection Treatment With Isoniazid Among the Commercially Insured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockbridge, Erica L; Miller, Thaddeus L; Carlson, Erin K; Ho, Christine

    Targeted identification and treatment of people with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) are key components of the US tuberculosis elimination strategy. Because of recent policy changes, some LTBI treatment may shift from public health departments to the private sector. To (1) develop methodology to estimate initiation and completion of treatment with isoniazid for LTBI using claims data, and (2) estimate treatment completion rates for isoniazid regimens from commercial insurance claims. Medical and pharmacy claims data representing insurance-paid services rendered and prescriptions filled between January 2011 and March 2015 were analyzed. Four million commercially insured individuals 0 to 64 years of age. Six-month and 9-month treatment completion rates for isoniazid LTBI regimens. There was an annual isoniazid LTBI treatment initiation rate of 12.5/100 000 insured persons. Of 1074 unique courses of treatment with isoniazid for which treatment completion could be assessed, almost half (46.3%; confidence interval, 43.3-49.3) completed 6 or more months of therapy. Of those, approximately half (48.9%; confidence interval, 44.5-53.3) completed 9 months or more. Claims data can be used to identify and evaluate LTBI treatment with isoniazid occurring in the commercial sector. Completion rates were in the range of those found in public health settings. These findings suggest that the commercial sector may be a valuable adjunct to more traditional venues for tuberculosis prevention. In addition, these newly developed claims-based methods offer a means to gain important insights and open new avenues to monitor, evaluate, and coordinate tuberculosis prevention.

  18. Treatment patterns and health care resource utilization associated with dalfampridine extended release in multiple sclerosis: a retrospective claims database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo A

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Amy Guo,1 Michael Grabner,2 Swetha Rao Palli,2 Jessica Elder,1 Matthew Sidovar,1 Peter Aupperle,1 Stephen Krieger3 1Acorda Therapeutics Inc., Ardsley, New York, NY, USA; 2HealthCore Inc., Wilmington, DE, USA; 3Corinne Goldsmith Dickinson Center for MS, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA Background: Although previous studies have demonstrated the clinical benefits of dalfampridine extended release (D-ER tablets in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, there are limited real-world data on D-ER utilization and associated outcomes in patients with MS. Purpose: The objective of this study was to evaluate treatment patterns, budget impact, and health care resource utilization (HRU associated with D-ER use in a real-world setting. Methods: A retrospective claims database analysis was conducted using the HealthCore Integrated Research DatabaseSM. Adherence (measured by medication possession ratio, or [MPR] and persistence (measured by days between initial D-ER claim and discontinuation or end of follow-up were evaluated over 1-year follow-up. Budget impact was calculated as cost per member per month (PMPM over the available follow-up period. D-ER and control cohorts were propensity-score matched on baseline demographics, comorbidities, and MS-related resource utilization to compare walking-impairment-related HRU over follow-up. Results: Of the 2,138 MS patients identified, 1,200 were not treated with D-ER (control and 938 were treated with D-ER. Patients were aged 51 years on average and 74% female. Approximately 82.6% of D-ER patients were adherent (MPR >80%. The estimated budget impact range of D-ER was $0.014–$0.026 PMPM. Propensity-score-matched D-ER and controls yielded 479 patients in each cohort. Postmatching comparison showed that the D-ER cohort was associated with fewer physician (21.5% vs 62.4%, P<0.0001 and other outpatient visits (22.8% vs 51.4%, P<0.0001 over the 12-month follow-up. Changes in HRU from follow

  19. Evaluation of the treatment patterns and economic burden of dysmenorrhea in Japanese women, using a claims database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Sayako; Tanaka, Erika; Cristeau, Olivier; Onishi, Yoshie; Osuga, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to describe treatment patterns and estimate health care resource utilization and associated costs among Japanese women with dysmenorrhea, using a claims database. Methods This was a retrospective analysis using health insurance data from the Japan Medical Data Center, assessing female patients aged 18–49 years with newly diagnosed primary or secondary dysmenorrhea. Treatment pattern analyses focused on hormonal medications, analgesics, hemostatic agents, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), and gynecological surgeries. Data were collected on health care resource utilization and costs associated with medications, imaging procedures, and inpatient and outpatient care in both patients and matched controls. Results The analysis included 6,315 women with dysmenorrhea (3,441 primary; 2,874 secondary). The most commonly prescribed initial therapies were low-dose estrogen progestins (LEPs, 37.7%) and TCM (30.0%), with substantial differences between primary (LEPs: 27.4%, TCM: 38.8%) and secondary (LEPs: 50.2%, TCM: 19.5%) dysmenorrhea cohorts. Surgery was conducted in dysmenorrhea had significantly higher mean total health care costs compared to controls within the 1-year period following diagnosis (Case-primary: 191,680 JPY [1,916 USD]; secondary: 246,488 JPY [2,465 USD], Control-primary: 83,615 JPY [836 USD]; secondary: 90,711 JPY [907 USD]) (pdysmenorrhea cohorts, respectively, compared with matched controls, (both pdysmenorrhea patients compared to controls (pdysmenorrhea and those treated by internal medicine physicians. Total annual health care costs were approximately 2–3 times higher in patients with dysmenorrhea compared to women without the condition. PMID:28579813

  20. Treatment Patterns, Complications, and Health Care Utilization Among Endometriosis Patients Undergoing a Laparoscopy or a Hysterectomy: A Retrospective Claims Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surrey, Eric S; Soliman, Ahmed M; Yang, Hongbo; Du, Ella Xiaoyan; Su, Bowdoin

    2017-11-01

    Hysterectomy and laparoscopy are common surgical procedures used for the treatment of endometriosis. This study compares outcomes for women who received either procedure within the first year post initial surgery. The study used data from the Truven Health MarketScan claims databases from 2004 to 2013 to identify women aged 18-49 years who received an endometriosis-related laparoscopy or hysterectomy. Patients were excluded if they did not have continuous insurance coverage from 1 year before through 1 year after their endometriosis-related procedure, if they were diagnosed with uterine fibroids prior to or on the date of surgery (i.e., index date), or if they had a hysterectomy prior to the index date. The descriptive analyses examined differences between patients with an endometriosis-related laparoscopy or hysterectomy in regard to medications prescribed, complications, and hospitalizations during the immediate year post procedure. The final sample consisted of 24,915 women who underwent a hysterectomy and 37,308 who underwent a laparoscopy. Results revealed significant differences between the cohorts, with women who received a laparoscopy more likely to be prescribed a GnRH agonist, progestin, danazol, or an opioid analgesic in the immediate year post procedure compared to women who underwent a hysterectomy. In contrast, women who underwent a hysterectomy generally had higher complication rates. Index hospitalization rates and length of stay (LOS) were higher for women who had a hysterectomy, while post-index hospitalization rates and LOS were higher for women who had a laparoscopy. For both cohorts, post-procedure complications were associated with significantly higher hospitalization rates and longer LOS. This study indicated significantly different 1-year post-surgical outcomes for patients who underwent an endometriosis-related hysterectomy relative to a laparoscopy. Furthermore, the endometriosis patients in this analysis had a considerable risk of

  1. Analysis of treatment patterns and persistence on branded and generic medications in major depressive disorder using retrospective claims data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solem CT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Caitlyn T Solem,1 Ahmed Shelbaya,2,3 Yin Wan,1 Chinmay G Deshpande,1 Jose Alvir,2 Elizabeth Pappadopulos2 1Pharmerit International, Real World Evidence/Data Analytics, Bethesda, MD, 2Pfizer, Inc., Global Health Outcomes, New York, NY, 3Epidemiology Department of Mailman’s School of Public Health, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY, USA Background: In major depressive disorder (MDD, treatment persistence is critical to optimize symptom remission, functional recovery, and health care costs. Desvenlafaxine tends to have fewer drug interactions and better tolerability than other MDD drugs; however, its use has not been assessed in the real world.Objective: The aim of the present study is to compare medication persistence and concomitant MDD drug use with branded desvenlafaxine (Pristiq® compared with antidepressant drug groups classified as 1 branded selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs; ie, escitalopram [Lexapro™] and selective serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs; ie, venlafaxine [Effexor®], duloxetine [Cymbalta®] and 2 generic SSRIs/SNRIs (ie, escitalopram, citalopram, venlafaxine, fluvoxamine, fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine, and duloxetine.Patients and methods: MDD patients (ICD-9-CM codes 296.2, 296.3, with ≥2 prescription fills for study drugs and 12-month preindex continuous enrollment from the MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounters Database (2009–2013, were included. Time-to-treatment discontinuation (prescription gap ≥45 days was assessed using the Kaplan–Meier curve and Cox model. Concomitant MDD drug use was compared.Results: Of the 273,514 patients included, 14,379 patients were initiated with branded desvenlafaxine, 50,937 patients with other branded SSRIs/SNRIs, and 208,198 patients with generic SSRIs/SNRIs. The number of weeks for treatment discontinuation for branded desvenlafaxine were longer (40.7 [95% CI: 39.3, 42.0] compared with other branded

  2. 49 CFR 510.3 - Compulsory process, the service thereof, claims for confidential treatment, and terms of compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Compulsory process, the service thereof, claims... OF TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION GATHERING POWERS § 510.3 Compulsory process, the service thereof... description of the documents or things to be produced. (c) Service of the compulsory processes specified in...

  3. ClaimAssociationService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Retrieves and updates a veteranÆs claim status and claim-rating association (claim association for current rating) from the Corporate database for a claim selected...

  4. Claiming Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Bo

    As its point of departure this working paper takes the multitude of different uses and meanings of the concept of community in local politics in Cape Town. Instead of attempting to define it in substantive terms, the paper takes a social constructivist approach to the study of community...... is termed community work. First, the paper explores how community has become a governmental strategy, employed by the apartheid regime as well, although in different ways, as post-apartheid local government. Secondly, the paper explores the ways in which community becomes the means in which local residents...... lay claim on the state, as well as how it enters into local power struggles between different political groups within the township. In the third part, the paper explores how the meanings of community and the struggles to realise it have changed as South Africa, nationally and locally, has become...

  5. Paranormal health claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabanek, P

    1988-04-15

    Faith in paranormal cures has always been the last hope of many sufferers from chronic or incurable diseases. Magico-religious rituals of healing are still around, but some have been replaced by pseudo-scientific systems, thinly disguising old superstitions in new obscurantism, more appealing to the half-educated. In medical quackery, inventiveness seems to be limitless, and only the main paranormal healing systems can be reviewed here. The increasing popularity of 'alternative' healing indicates the extent of dissatisfaction with dehumanising aspects of modern, technological medicine and its preoccupation with curing the curable at the expense of caring for the incurable. This leaves the sufferers, and also healthy people labelled with non-existent diseases, bleeding prey for the sharks roving the seas of medical ignorance.

  6. Can an educational podcast improve the ability of parents of primary school children to assess the reliability of claims made about the benefits and harms of treatments: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semakula, Daniel; Nsangi, Allen; Oxman, Matt; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Kaseje, Margaret; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Fretheim, Atle; Chalmers, Iain; Oxman, Andrew D; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2017-01-21

    Claims made about the effects of treatments are very common in the media and in the population more generally. The ability of individuals to understand and assess such claims can affect their decisions and health outcomes. Many people in both low- and high-income countries have inadequate aptitude to assess information about the effects of treatments. As part of the Informed Healthcare Choices project, we have prepared a series of podcast episodes to help improve people's ability to assess claims made about treatment effects. We will evaluate the effect of the Informed Healthcare Choices podcast on people's ability to assess claims made about the benefits and harms of treatments. Our study population will be parents of primary school children in schools with limited educational and financial resources in Uganda. This will be a two-arm, parallel-group, individual-randomised trial. We will randomly allocate consenting participants who meet the inclusion criteria for the trial to either listen to nine episodes of the Informed Healthcare Choices podcast (intervention) or to listen to nine typical public service announcements about health issues (control). Each podcast includes a story about a treatment claim, a message about one key concept that we believe is important for people to be able to understand to assess treatment claims, an explanation of how that concept applies to the claim, and a second example illustrating the concept. We designed the Claim Evaluation Tools to measure people's ability to apply key concepts related to assessing claims made about the effects of treatments and making informed health care choices. The Claim Evaluation Tools that we will use include multiple-choice questions addressing each of the nine concepts covered by the podcast. Using the Claim Evaluation Tools, we will measure two primary outcomes: (1) the proportion that 'pass', based on an absolute standard and (2) the average score. As far as we are aware this is the first

  7. Effects of the Informed Health Choices podcast on the ability of parents of primary school children in Uganda to assess claims about treatment effects: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semakula, Daniel; Nsangi, Allen; Oxman, Andrew D; Oxman, Matt; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Morelli, Angela; Glenton, Claire; Lewin, Simon; Kaseje, Margaret; Chalmers, Iain; Fretheim, Atle; Kristoffersen, Doris Tove; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2017-07-22

    As part of the Informed Health Choices project, we developed a podcast called The Health Choices Programme to help improve the ability of people to assess claims about the benefits and harms of treatments. We aimed to evaluate the effects of the podcast on the ability of parents of primary school children in Uganda to assess claims about the effects of treatments. We did this randomised controlled trial in central Uganda. We recruited parents of children aged 10-12 years who were in their fifth year of school at 35 schools that were participating in a linked trial of the Informed Health Choices primary school resources. The parents were randomly allocated (1:1), via a web-based random number generator with block sizes of four and six, to listen to either the Informed Health Choices podcast (intervention group) or typical public service announcements about health issues (control group). Randomisation was stratified by parents' highest level of formal education attained (primary school, secondary school, or tertiary education) and the allocation of their children's school in the trial of the primary school resources (intervention vs control). The primary outcome, measured after listening to the entire podcast, was the mean score and the proportion of parents with passing scores on a test with two multiple choice questions for each of nine key concepts essential to assessing claims about treatments (18 questions in total). We did intention-to-treat analyses. This trial is registered with the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry, number PACTR201606001676150. We recruited parents between July 21, 2016, and Oct 7, 2016. We randomly assigned 675 parents to the podcast group (n=334) or the public service announcement group (n=341); 561 (83%) participants completed follow-up. The mean score for parents in the podcast group was 67·8% (SD 19·6) compared with 52·4% (17·6) in the control group (adjusted mean difference 15·5%, 95% CI 12·5-18·6; pparents had a predetermined

  8. A large pharmacy claims-based descriptive analysis of patients with migraine and associated pharmacologic treatment patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzina DJ

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available David J Muzina, William Chen, Steven J BowlinMedco Health Solutions Inc and Medco Research Institute, LLC, Franklin Lakes, NJ, USAPurpose: To investigate drug use, prescribing patterns, and comorbidities among patients with migraine in a large pharmacy claims database.Methods: 104,625 migraine subjects (identified according to the criteria in the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] for migraine or migraine-specific acute medication use and an equal number of control patients were selected from a de-identified claims database; the prevalence of patients with migraine-specific claims was determined. Patient demographics, migraine-related medication use, other psychotropic medication use, and comorbidities over a 12-month period were compared between the migraine population and the control group and between migraine subgroups.Results: Of the study population, 3.5% had a migraine diagnosis according to the ICD-9 or received a migraine-specific acute medication. Compared with controls, migraine patients had significantly greater disease comorbidity and higher use of prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and controlled painkillers; they were also more likely to receive medications used to prevent migraines and other nonmigraine psychotropic medications, such as anxiolytics and hypnotics. Among migraine patients, 66% received acute migraine-specific medication while only 20% received US Food and Drug Administration–approved migraine preventive therapy. Notably, one-third of high triptan users did not receive any kind of preventive medication. Multiple medical and psychiatric comorbidities were observed at higher rates among migraine sufferers. In addition to significantly higher utilization of antidepressants compared with controls, migraine patients also received significantly more other psychotropic drugs by a factor of 2:1.Conclusion: Acute migraine medications are commonly used and frequently dispensed at

  9. A retrospective claims analysis of combination therapy in the treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohl Gerhardt M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Combination therapy in managing psychiatric disorders is not uncommon. While combination therapy has been documented for depression and schizophrenia, little is known about combination therapy practices in managing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. This study seeks to quantify the combination use of ADHD medications and to understand predictors of combination therapy. Methods Prescription dispensing events were drawn from a U.S. national claims database including over 80 managed-care plans. Patients studied were age 18 or over with at least 1 medical claim with a diagnosis of ADHD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 314.0, a pharmacy claim for ADHD medication during the study period July2003 to June2004, and continuous enrollment 6 months prior to and throughout the study period. Dispensing events were grouped into 6 categories: atomoxetine (ATX, long-acting stimulants (LAS, intermediate-acting stimulants (IAS, short-acting stimulants (SAS, bupropion (BUP, and Alpha-2 Adrenergic Agonists (A2A. Events were assigned to calendar months, and months with combined use from multiple categories within patient were identified. Predictors of combination therapy for LAS and for ATX were modeled for patients covered by commercial plans using logistic regression in a generalized estimating equations framework to adjust for within-patient correlation between months of observation. Factors included age, gender, presence of the hyperactive component of ADHD, prior diagnoses for psychiatric disorders, claims history of recent psychiatric visit, insurance plan type, and geographic region. Results There were 18,609 patients identified representing a total of 11,886 months of therapy with ATX; 40,949 months with LAS; 13,622 months with IAS; 38,141 months with SAS; 22,087 months with BUP; and 1,916 months with A2A. Combination therapy was present in 19.7% of continuing

  10. A retrospective claims analysis of combination therapy in the treatment of adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Gerhardt M; Van Brunt, David L; Ye, Wenyu; Stoops, William W; Johnston, Joseph A

    2009-06-08

    Combination therapy in managing psychiatric disorders is not uncommon. While combination therapy has been documented for depression and schizophrenia, little is known about combination therapy practices in managing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study seeks to quantify the combination use of ADHD medications and to understand predictors of combination therapy. Prescription dispensing events were drawn from a U.S. national claims database including over 80 managed-care plans. Patients studied were age 18 or over with at least 1 medical claim with a diagnosis of ADHD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 314.0), a pharmacy claim for ADHD medication during the study period July 2003 to June 2004, and continuous enrollment 6 months prior to and throughout the study period. Dispensing events were grouped into 6 categories: atomoxetine (ATX), long-acting stimulants (LAS), intermediate-acting stimulants (IAS), short-acting stimulants (SAS), bupropion (BUP), and Alpha-2 Adrenergic Agonists (A2A). Events were assigned to calendar months, and months with combined use from multiple categories within patient were identified. Predictors of combination therapy for LAS and for ATX were modeled for patients covered by commercial plans using logistic regression in a generalized estimating equations framework to adjust for within-patient correlation between months of observation. Factors included age, gender, presence of the hyperactive component of ADHD, prior diagnoses for psychiatric disorders, claims history of recent psychiatric visit, insurance plan type, and geographic region. There were 18,609 patients identified representing a total of 11,886 months of therapy with ATX; 40,949 months with LAS; 13,622 months with IAS; 38,141 months with SAS; 22,087 months with BUP; and 1,916 months with A2A. Combination therapy was present in 19.7% of continuing months (months after the first month of therapy

  11. What does the U.S. Medicare administrative claims database tell us about initial antiepileptic drug treatment for older adults with new-onset epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roy C; Faught, Edward; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Richman, Joshua; Funkhouser, Ellen; Piper, Kendra; Juarez, Lucia; Dai, Chen; Pisu, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Disparities in epilepsy treatment are not uncommon; therefore, we examined population-based estimates of initial antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in new-onset epilepsy among racial/ethnic minority groups of older US Medicare beneficiaries. We conducted retrospective analyses of 2008-2010 Medicare administrative claims for a 5% random sample of beneficiaries augmented for minority representation. New-onset epilepsy cases in 2009 had ≥1 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) 345.x or ≥2 ICD-9 780.3x, and ≥1 AED, AND no seizure/epilepsy claim codes or AEDs in preceding 365 days. We examined AED use and concordance with Quality Indicators of Epilepsy Treatment (QUIET) 6 (monotherapy as initial treatment = ≥30 day first prescription with no other concomitant AEDs), and prompt AED treatment (first AED within 30 days of diagnosis). Logistic regression examined likelihood of prompt treatment by demographic (race/ethnicity, gender, age), clinical (number of comorbid conditions, neurology care, index event occurring in the emergency room (ER)), and economic (Part D coverage phase, eligibility for Part D Low Income Subsidy [LIS], and ZIP code level poverty) factors. Over 1 year of follow-up, 79.6% of 3,706 new epilepsy cases had one AED only (77.89% of whites vs. 89% of American Indian/Alaska Native [AI/AN]). Levetiracetam was the most commonly prescribed AED (45.5%: from 24.6% AI/AN to 55.0% whites). The second most common was phenytoin (30.6%: from 18.8% Asians to 43.1% AI/AN). QUIET 6 concordance was 94.7% (93.9% for whites to 97.3% of AI/AN). Only 50% received prompt AED therapy (49.6% whites to 53.9% AI/AN). Race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with AED patterns, monotherapy use, or prompt treatment. Monotherapy is common across all racial/ethnic groups of older adults with new-onset epilepsy, older AEDs are commonly prescribed, and treatment is frequently delayed. Further studies on reasons for treatment delays are warranted

  12. First-line treatment disruption among post-menopausal women with HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer: a retrospective US claims study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Derek H; Li, Nanxin; Du, Ella X; Peeples, Miranda; Chu, Lihao; Xie, Jipan; Barghout, Victoria

    2017-12-01

    This study assessed disruption of first-line treatments initiated after the approval of the first CDK 4/6 inhibitor, palbociclib, among post-menopausal women with HR+/HER2- metastatic breast cancer (mBC) in the US. Post-menopausal women with HR+/HER2- mBC who initiated first-line endocrine therapy or chemotherapy (index therapy) between February 3, 2015 (palbociclib approval date) and February 29, 2016 (end of data) were identified from the Symphony Source Lx database. Patients were required to have continuous quarterly activity (defined as ≥1 pharmacy or medical claim) for 12 months prior to and 1 month after the initiation of the index therapy (index date). Treatment disruption was defined as a treatment gap of ≥60 days or adding an agent after the original therapy. Kaplan-Meier analyses were conducted to estimate treatment disruption rates during the 6 months following the index date. Patients without treatment disruption were censored at the end of continuous quarterly activity or end of data. A total of 8,160 and 2,153 eligible patients initiated endocrine therapy or chemotherapy as their first-line mBC treatment, with a median follow-up of 6.7 and 7.6 months, respectively. The three most prevalent metastatic sites were bone (28.1-42.2%), liver (8.8-17.3%), and lung (8.6-9.5%). Overall, 37.7% (n = 3,074) of patients receiving endocrine therapy and 86.1% (n = 1,852) of patients receiving chemotherapy encountered treatment disruption at 6 months (log-rank test p disruption rates of first-line therapies were sub-optimal among post-menopausal women with HR+/HER2- mBC, primarily driven by chemotherapy users. New therapies or interventions are needed to reduce treatment disruption in this patient population.

  13. Characteristics, Treatment Patterns, and Economic Outcomes of Patients Initiating Injectable Medications for Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Japan: Results from a Retrospective Claims Database Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shuichi; Desai, Urvi; Strizek, Alena; Ivanova, Jasmina; Garcia-Horton, Viviana; Cai, Zhihong; Schmerold, Luke; Liu, Xinyue; Perez-Nieves, Magaly

    2018-04-16

    This study's objective was to describe characteristics, treatment patterns, and economic outcomes of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients initiating injectable antidiabetic medications in Japan. Adults (≥ 18 years) with T2DM, ≥ 2 claims for injectable antidiabetics between 1 August 2011 and 31 July 2015 (first claim = index date), no evidence of type 1 diabetes mellitus, ≤ 1 claim for insulin, no claims for GLP-1RA before index, and continuous enrollment for 6 months before (baseline) and 12 months after index (follow-up) were selected from the Japan Medical Center Database. Patient characteristics and outcomes during the baseline and follow-up periods were described overall and by provider, using the proxy setting of index medication [hospital (including outpatient departments) for specialists; clinic for general practitioner (GP)]. Of the 2683 patients included (mean age: 50 years, 67% male), 1879 (70%) initiated injectable antidiabetics with specialists and 804 (30%) with GPs. The specialist cohort had a significantly greater comorbidity burden, but lower HbA1c levels during baseline, and was more likely to receive intensified treatment at index than the GP cohort. Almost 40% of patients (almost 30% of GP cohort) did not use antidiabetics during baseline; the remaining patients received oral medications, primarily from GPs. During follow-up, patients used the index medication for approximately 7 months. Independent of specialist vs. GP setting, patients received antidiabetics and medications for T2DM-related comorbidities and complications during the baseline and follow-up periods from the same provider, primarily GPs. The overall average healthcare costs were ¥350,404 during baseline and ¥1,856,727 during follow-up. In Japan, most T2DM patients initiated injectable antidiabetics with specialists vs. GPs. There were considerable differences in characteristics of patients treated by specialists vs. GPs. After initiation, injectable

  14. 19 CFR 10.207 - Procedures for filing duty-free treatment claim and submitting supporting documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., product, or manufacture of a beneficiary country—(i) Declaration. In a case involving an article covered... growth, product, or manufacture of a single beneficiary country as defined in § 10.202(a), the exporter... submit the declaration in a timely fashion will result in a denial of duty-free treatment. (iii) Value...

  15. Treatment patterns and healthcare resource utilization and costs in heavy menstrual bleeding: a Japanese claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Sayako; Tanaka, Erika; Cristeau, Olivier; Onishi, Yoshie; Osuga, Yutaka

    2018-06-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a highly prevalent condition, characterized by excessive menstrual blood loss and cramping, that interferes with activities of daily life. The aim of this study was to investigate treatment patterns in HMB in Japan, and to assess healthcare resource utilization and costs among women newly-diagnosed with the condition. This study retrospectively analyzed health insurance data available in the Japan Medical Data Center (JMDC) database on women aged 18-49 years who were newly-diagnosed with primary or secondary HMB. Treatment patterns were analyzed, and healthcare utilization and costs were evaluated and compared to matched controls. The study included a total of 635 patients, 210 with primary HMB and 425 with secondary HMB. In the primary HMB cohort, 60.0% of patients received one or more pharmacological or surgical treatments, compared with 76.2% in the secondary HMB cohort. The most commonly prescribed medications in all patients were hemostatic agents (28.7%), traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) (12.1%), and low-dose estrogen progestins (LEPs) (10.1%). After adjustment for patient baseline characteristics, healthcare costs were 1.93-times higher in primary HMB cases (p < .0001) and 4.44-times higher in secondary HMB cases (p < .0001) vs healthy controls. Outpatient care was the main cost driver. The main limitations of this study are related to its retrospective nature, and the fact that only reimbursed medications were captured in the source database. A substantial proportion of HMB patients did not receive the recommended treatments. Healthcare costs were considerably increased in the presence of an HMB diagnosis.

  16. One-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and associated treatment costs in bipolar disorder treated with atypical antipsychotics: a retrospective claims database analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikalov Andrei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study compared 1-year risk of psychiatric hospitalization and treatment costs in commercially insured patients with bipolar disorder, treated with aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine, quetiapine or risperidone. Methods This was a retrospective propensity score-matched cohort study using the Ingenix Lab/Rx integrated insurance claims dataset. Patients with bipolar disorder and 180 days of pre-index enrollment without antipsychotic exposure who received atypical antipsychotic agents were followed for up to 12 months following the initial antipsychotic prescription. The primary analysis used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate time-dependent risk of hospitalization, adjusting for age, sex and pre-index hospitalization. Generalized gamma regression compared post-index costs between treatment groups. Results Compared to aripiprazole, ziprasidone, olanzapine and quetiapine had higher risks for hospitalization (hazard ratio 1.96, 1.55 and 1.56, respectively; p Conclusions In commercially insured adults with bipolar disorder followed for 1 year after initiation of atypical antipsychotics, treatment with aripiprazole was associated with a lower risk of psychiatric hospitalization than ziprasidone, quetiapine, olanzapine and risperidone, although this did not reach significance with the latter. Aripiprazole was also associated with significantly lower total healthcare costs than quetiapine, but not the other comparators.

  17. Does the use of the Informed Healthcare Choices (IHC) primary school resources improve the ability of grade-5 children in Uganda to assess the trustworthiness of claims about the effects of treatments: protocol for a cluster-randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsangi, Allen; Semakula, Daniel; Oxman, Andrew D; Oxman, Matthew; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Nyirazinyoye, Laetitia; Kaseje, Margaret; Chalmers, Iain; Fretheim, Atle; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2017-05-18

    The ability to appraise claims about the benefits and harms of treatments is crucial for informed health care decision-making. This research aims to enable children in East African primary schools (the clusters) to acquire and retain skills that can help them make informed health care choices by improving their ability to obtain, process and understand health information. The trial will evaluate (at the individual participant level) whether specially designed learning resources can teach children some of the key concepts relevant to appraising claims about the benefits and harms of health care interventions (treatments). This is a two-arm, cluster-randomised trial with stratified random allocation. We will recruit 120 primary schools (the clusters) between April and May 2016 in the central region of Uganda. We will stratify participating schools by geographical setting (rural, semi-urban, or urban) and ownership (public or private). The Informed Healthcare Choices (IHC) primary school resources consist of a textbook and a teachers' guide. Each of the students in the intervention arm will receive a textbook and attend nine lessons delivered by their teachers during a school term, with each lesson lasting 80 min. The lessons cover 12 key concepts that are relevant to assessing claims about treatments and making informed health care choices. The second arm will carry on with the current primary school curriculum. We have designed the Claim Evaluation Tools to measure people's ability to apply key concepts related to assessing claims about the effects of treatments and making informed health care choices. The Claim Evaluation Tools use multiple choice questions addressing each of the 12 concepts covered by the IHC school resources. Using the Claim Evaluation Tools we will measure two primary outcomes: (1) the proportion of children who 'pass', based on an absolute standard and (2) their average scores. As far as we are aware this is the first randomised trial to

  18. 32 CFR 536.120 - Claims payable as maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims payable as maritime claims. 536.120... ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.120 Claims payable as maritime claims. A claim is cognizable under this subpart if it arises in or on a maritime location, involves some...

  19. SyncClaimService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — Provides various methods to sync Claim related data for NWQ processing. It includes web operations to get Claims, get Unique Contention Classifications, get Unique...

  20. IBO Claim Taking Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — IBO manually tracks all Canadian Claims and DSU claims via this report. It also provides a summary for each region and office of origin that the DSU works with. This...

  1. Workers Compensation Claim Data -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — This data set contains DOT employee workers compensation claim data for current and past DOT employees. Types of data include claim data consisting of PII data (SSN,...

  2. Medicaid Drug Claims Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Medicaid Drug Claims Statistics CD is a useful tool that conveniently breaks up Medicaid claim counts and separates them by quarter and includes an annual count.

  3. Consistency of Use and Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment among Indian Households Claiming to Treat Their Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Clasen, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by populations at risk. Current international monitoring estimates by the Joint Monitoring Programme for water and sanitation suggest that at least 1.1 billion people practice HWT. These estimates, however, are based on surveys that may overstate the level of consistent use and do not address microbial effectiveness. We sought to assess how HWT is practiced among households identified as HWT users according to these monitoring standards. After a baseline survey (urban: 189 households, rural: 210 households) to identify HWT users, 83 urban and 90 rural households were followed up for 6 weeks. Consistency of reported HWT practices was high in both urban (100%) and rural (93.3%) settings, as was availability of treated water (based on self-report) in all three sampling points (urban: 98.8%, rural: 76.0%). Nevertheless, only 13.7% of urban and 25.8% of rural households identified at baseline as users of adequate HWT had water free of thermotolerant coliforms at all three water sampling points. Our findings raise questions about the value of the data gathered through the international monitoring of HWT as predictors of water quality in the home, as well as questioning the ability of HWT, as actually practiced by vulnerable populations, to reduce exposure to waterborne diseases.

  4. Survey of malpractice claims in dermatology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altman, J.

    1975-01-01

    A statistical survey of malpractice claims asserted against dermatologists was made. The subject matter of the claims was divided into eight major categories: drug reactions, x-ray burns, poor cosmetic result following surgery, poor cosmetic result following medication, failure to diagnose cancer, improper diagnosis, infection from treatment, and miscellaneous. The study showed that a group of ''serious'' damage cases, which accounted for 34 percent of total claims, generated 94 percent of total dollar losses. The problem areas for malpractice claims appeared to be drug reactions, cosmetic chemosurgery, and failure to diagnose cancer. (U.S.)

  5. Assessing the Consistency and Microbiological Effectiveness of Household Water Treatment Practices by Urban and Rural Populations Claiming to Treat Their Water at Home: A Case Study in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Ghislaine; Huaylinos, Maria L.; Gil, Ana; Lanata, Claudio; Clasen, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background Household water treatment (HWT) can improve drinking water quality and prevent disease if used correctly and consistently by vulnerable populations. Over 1.1 billion people report treating their water prior to drinking it. These estimates, however, are based on responses to household surveys that may exaggerate the consistency and microbiological performance of the practice—key factors for reducing pathogen exposure and achieving health benefits. The objective of this study was to examine how HWT practices are actually performed by households identified as HWT users, according to international monitoring standards. Methods and Findings We conducted a 6-month case study in urban (n = 117 households) and rural (n = 115 households) Peru, a country in which 82.8% of households report treating their water at home. We used direct observation, in-depth interviews, surveys, spot-checks, and water sampling to assess water treatment practices among households that claimed to treat their drinking water at home. While consistency of reported practices was high in both urban (94.8%) and rural (85.3%) settings, availability of treated water (based on self-report) at time of collection was low, with 67.1% and 23.0% of urban and rural households having treated water at all three sampling visits. Self-reported consumption of untreated water in the home among adults and children water of self-reported users was significantly better than source water in the urban setting and negligible but significantly better in the rural setting. However, only 46.3% and 31.6% of households had drinking water water quality. The lack of consistency and sub-optimal microbiological effectiveness also raises questions about the potential of HWT to prevent waterborne diseases. PMID:25522371

  6. Formalizing Probabilistic Safety Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herencia-Zapana, Heber; Hagen, George E.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    A safety claim for a system is a statement that the system, which is subject to hazardous conditions, satisfies a given set of properties. Following work by John Rushby and Bev Littlewood, this paper presents a mathematical framework that can be used to state and formally prove probabilistic safety claims. It also enables hazardous conditions, their uncertainties, and their interactions to be integrated into the safety claim. This framework provides a formal description of the probabilistic composition of an arbitrary number of hazardous conditions and their effects on system behavior. An example is given of a probabilistic safety claim for a conflict detection algorithm for aircraft in a 2D airspace. The motivation for developing this mathematical framework is that it can be used in an automated theorem prover to formally verify safety claims.

  7. SSA Disability Claim Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The dataset includes fiscal year data for initial claims for SSA disability benefits that were referred to a state agency for a disability determination. Specific...

  8. Health Claims Data Warehouse (HCDW)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Health Claims Data Warehouse (HCDW) will receive and analyze health claims data to support management and administrative purposes. The Federal Employee Health...

  9. 32 CFR 536.129 - Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Personnel Claims Act and chapter 11 of AR 27-20, which provides compensation only for tangible personal... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims cognizable as UCMJ claims. 536.129 Section 536.129 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS...

  10. Drug usage patterns and treatment costs in newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus cases, 2007 vs 2012: findings from a large US healthcare claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, W; Liang, Y; Kimball, E S; Hobbs, T; Kong, S; Sakurada, B; Bouchard, J

    2016-07-01

    Objective To explore trends in demographics, comorbidities, anti-diabetic drug usage, and healthcare utilization costs in patients with newly-diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) using a large US claims database. Methods For the years 2007 and 2012, Truven Health Marketscan Research Databases were used to identify adults with newly-diagnosed T2DM and continuous 12-month enrollment with prescription benefits. Variables examined included patient demographics, comorbidities, inpatient utilization patterns, healthcare costs (inpatient and outpatient), drug costs, and diabetes drug claim patterns. Results Despite an increase in the overall database population between 2007-2012, the incidence of newly-diagnosed T2DM decreased from 1.1% (2007) to 0.65% (2012). Hyperlipidemia and hypertension were the most common comorbidities and increased in prevalence from 2007 to 2012. In 2007, 48.3% of newly-diagnosed T2DM patients had no claims for diabetes medications, compared with 36.2% of patients in 2012. The use of a single oral anti-diabetic drug (OAD) was the most common diabetes medication-related claim (46.2% of patients in 2007; 56.7% of patients in 2012). Among OAD monotherapy users, metformin was the most commonly used and increased from 2007 (74.7% of OAD monotherapy users) to 2012 (90.8%). Decreases were observed for sulfonylureas (14.1% to 6.2%) and thiazolidinediones (7.3% to 0.6%). Insulin, predominantly basal insulin, was used by 3.9% of patients in 2007 and 5.3% of patients in 2012. Mean total annual healthcare costs increased from $13,744 in 2007 to $15,175 in 2012, driven largely by outpatient services, although costs in all individual categories of healthcare services (inpatient and outpatient) increased. Conversely, total drug costs per patient were lower in 2012 compared with 2007. Conclusions Despite a drop in the rate of newly-diagnosed T2DM from 2007 to 2012 in the US, increased total medical costs and comorbidities per individual patient suggest that

  11. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2013. Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and maintenance of normal defecation during antibiotic treatment pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    claim related to Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and maintenance of normal defecation during antibiotic treatment. The food constituent, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, which is the subject of the health claim, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed by the applicant is “help to maintain...... normal defecation during antibiotic treatment” and the target population proposed by the applicant is “healthy outpatient adults and children on oral antibiotic treatment”. Maintenance of normal defecation during antibiotic treatment is a beneficial physiological effect. The Panel notes...... human intervention studies, from which conclusions could be drawn for the scientific substantiation of the claim, did not show an effect of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on the incidence of diarrhoea resulting from antibiotic treatment. The Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been...

  12. BenefitClaimWebServiceBean/BenefitClaimWebService

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — A formal or informal request for a type of monetary or non-monetary benefit. This service provides benefit claims and benefit claim special issues data, allows the...

  13. Legal Services: Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-31

    waive such exemp- tions or privileges and direct release of the protected documents, upon balancing all pertinent factors, including finding that...injury causing death until expiration of decedent’s worklife ex- pectancy. When requested, the previous five years Federal income tax forms must be...knowing at all times how much of the CEA has been obligated, its remaining balance , and assessing each month whether the balance will cover claims

  14. Effects of the Informed Health Choices primary school intervention on the ability of children in Uganda to assess the reliability of claims about treatment effects: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsangi, Allen; Semakula, Daniel; Oxman, Andrew D; Austvoll-Dahlgren, Astrid; Oxman, Matt; Rosenbaum, Sarah; Morelli, Angela; Glenton, Claire; Lewin, Simon; Kaseje, Margaret; Chalmers, Iain; Fretheim, Atle; Ding, Yunpeng; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2017-07-22

    Claims about what improves or harms our health are ubiquitous. People need to be able to assess the reliability of these claims. We aimed to evaluate an intervention designed to teach primary school children to assess claims about the effects of treatments (ie, any action intended to maintain or improve health). In this cluster-randomised controlled trial, we included primary schools in the central region of Uganda that taught year-5 children (aged 10-12 years). We excluded international schools, special needs schools for children with auditory and visual impairments, schools that had participated in user-testing and piloting of the resources, infant and nursery schools, adult education schools, and schools that were difficult for us to access in terms of travel time. We randomly allocated a representative sample of eligible schools to either an intervention or control group. Intervention schools received the Informed Health Choices primary school resources (textbooks, exercise books, and a teachers' guide). Teachers attended a 2 day introductory workshop and gave nine 80 min lessons during one school term. The lessons addressed 12 concepts essential to assessing claims about treatment effects and making informed health choices. We did not intervene in the control schools. The primary outcome, measured at the end of the school term, was the mean score on a test with two multiple-choice questions for each of the 12 concepts and the proportion of children with passing scores on the same test. This trial is registered with the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry, number PACTR201606001679337. Between April 11, 2016, and June 8, 2016, 2960 schools were assessed for eligibility; 2029 were eligible, and a random sample of 170 were invited to recruitment meetings. After recruitment meetings, 120 eligible schools consented and were randomly assigned to either the intervention group (n=60, 76 teachers and 6383 children) or control group (n=60, 67 teachers and 4430 children

  15. Effects of School-Based Educational Interventions for Enhancing Adolescents Abilities in Critical Appraisal of Health Claims: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena V Nordheim

    Full Text Available Adolescents are frequent media users who access health claims from various sources. The plethora of conflicting, pseudo-scientific, and often misleading health claims in popular media makes critical appraisal of health claims an essential ability. Schools play an important role in educating youth to critically appraise health claims. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of school-based educational interventions for enhancing adolescents' abilities in critically appraising health claims.We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, Cinahl, Teachers Reference Centre, LISTA, ERIC, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, and sources of grey literature. Studies that evaluated school-based educational interventions to improve adolescents' critical appraisal ability for health claims through advancing the students' knowledge about science were included. Eligible study designs were randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, and interrupted time series. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in included studies. Due to heterogeneity in interventions and inadequate reporting of results, we performed a descriptive synthesis of studies. We used GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation to assess the certainty of the evidence.Eight studies were included: two compared different teaching modalities, while the others compared educational interventions to instruction as usual. Studies mostly reported positive short-term effects on critical appraisal-related knowledge and skills in favour of the educational interventions. However, the certainty of the evidence for all comparisons and outcomes was very low.Educational interventions in schools may have beneficial short-term effects on knowledge and skills relevant to the critical appraisal of health

  16. Effects of School-Based Educational Interventions for Enhancing Adolescents Abilities in Critical Appraisal of Health Claims: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordheim, Lena V; Gundersen, Malene W; Espehaug, Birgitte; Guttersrud, Øystein; Flottorp, Signe

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents are frequent media users who access health claims from various sources. The plethora of conflicting, pseudo-scientific, and often misleading health claims in popular media makes critical appraisal of health claims an essential ability. Schools play an important role in educating youth to critically appraise health claims. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effects of school-based educational interventions for enhancing adolescents' abilities in critically appraising health claims. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, AMED, Cinahl, Teachers Reference Centre, LISTA, ERIC, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, The Cochrane Library, Science Citation Index Expanded, Social Sciences Citation Index, and sources of grey literature. Studies that evaluated school-based educational interventions to improve adolescents' critical appraisal ability for health claims through advancing the students' knowledge about science were included. Eligible study designs were randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, and interrupted time series. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data, and assessed risk of bias in included studies. Due to heterogeneity in interventions and inadequate reporting of results, we performed a descriptive synthesis of studies. We used GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) to assess the certainty of the evidence. Eight studies were included: two compared different teaching modalities, while the others compared educational interventions to instruction as usual. Studies mostly reported positive short-term effects on critical appraisal-related knowledge and skills in favour of the educational interventions. However, the certainty of the evidence for all comparisons and outcomes was very low. Educational interventions in schools may have beneficial short-term effects on knowledge and skills relevant to the critical appraisal of health claims. The small

  17. 28 CFR 43.3 - Settlement and waiver of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Settlement and waiver of claims. 43.3 Section 43.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RECOVERY OF COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.3 Settlement and waiver of claims. (a) The...

  18. Cause and Event: Supporting Causal Claims through Logistic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Ann A.; Gray, DeLeon L.

    2011-01-01

    Efforts to identify and support credible causal claims have received intense interest in the research community, particularly over the past few decades. In this paper, we focus on the use of statistical procedures designed to support causal claims for a treatment or intervention when the response variable of interest is dichotomous. We identify…

  19. Contested Property Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Property relations are such a common feature of social life that we can sometimes forget the immense complexity of the web of laws, practices, and ideas that allow a property regime to function smoothly. But we are quickly reminded of this complexity when social conflict over property erupts. When...... social actors confront a property regime – for example by squatting – they enact what can be called ‘contested property claims’. These confrontations raise crucial issues of social justice and show the ways in which property conflicts often reflect wider social conflicts. Through a series of case studies...... from across the globe, this multidisciplinary anthology exploring contested property claims brings together works from anthropologists, legal scholars, and geographers, who show how disagreements give us a privileged window onto how property regimes function and illustrates the many ways...

  20. Contested Property Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Property relations are such a common feature of social life that the complexity of the web of laws, practices, and ideas that allow a property regime to function smoothly are often forgotten. But we are quickly reminded of this complexity when conflict over property erupts. When social actors...... confront a property regime – for example by squatting – they enact what can be called ‘contested property claims’. As this book demonstrates, these confrontations raise crucial issues of social justice and show the ways in which property conflicts often reflect wider social conflicts. Through a series...... of case studies from across the globe, this multidisciplinary anthology brings together works from anthropologists, legal scholars, and geographers, who show how exploring contested property claims offers a privileged window onto how property regimes function, as well as an illustration of the many ways...

  1. Medical treatment methods, medical indication claims and patentability: A quest into the rationale of the exclusion and patentability in the context of the future of personalised medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bostyn, S.J.R.

    2016-01-01

    This contribution discusses the thorny issue of the rationale of the exclusion from patentability of medical treatment methods and the patentability of medical indications. This quest is the consequence of our earlier findings that medical indication patents present a real life risk for many players

  2. Claiming health in food products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Health-related information is increasingly used on food products to convey their benefits. Health claims as a subcategory of these messages link the beneficial component, functions or health outcomes with specific products. For consumers, health claims seem to carry the message of increased...... healthiness, but not necessarily making the product more appealing. The wording of the claim seems to have little impact on claim perception, yet the health image of carrier products is important. From consumer-related factors the relevance and attitudes towards functional foods play a role, whereas socio......-demographic factors have only minor impact and the impact seems to be case-dependent. Familiarity with claims and functional foods increase perceived healthiness and acceptance of these products. Apparently consumers make rather rational interpretations of claims and their benefits when forced to assess...

  3. Claims in civil engineering contracts

    CERN Document Server

    Speirs, N A

    1999-01-01

    This paper considers claims arising during civil engineering construction contracts. The meaning of the word 'claim' is considered and its possible implications for additional cost and time to completion. The conditions of the construction contract selected will influence the risk apportionment between contractor and client and the price offered by the contractor for the work. Competitive bidding constraints and profit margins in the construction industry, however, may also influence the price offered. This in turn can influence the likelihood of claims arising. The client from his point of view is concerned to complete the work within an agreed time and budget. The circumstances under which claims may arise are reviewed in relation to typical conditions of contract. These circumstances are then related to the CERN LHC civil works. Ways of avoiding claims, where this is possible, are considered. Finally, the means of evaluation of claims and their settlement are considered.

  4. Claim prevention at reactor facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, B.P.

    1987-01-01

    Why does a radiation worker bring a claim alleging bodily injury from radiation exposure? Natural cancer, fear of radiation induced cancer, financial gain, emotional distress and mental anguish are some reasons for workers' claims. In this paper the author describes what power reactor health physicists are doing to reduce the likelihood of claims by establishing programs which provide sound protection of workers, prevent radiological events, improve workers' knowledge of radiological conditions and provide guidance for radiological incident response

  5. Initial Experience With Tofacitinib in Clinical Practice: Treatment Patterns and Costs of Tofacitinib Administered as Monotherapy or in Combination With Conventional Synthetic DMARDs in 2 US Health Care Claims Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, James; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Gerber, Robert; Gruben, David; Koenig, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor indicated for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Tofacitinib can be administered as a monotherapy or in combination with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). This study describes RA patients' characteristics, treatment patterns, and costs for those initiating tofacitinib treatment as monotherapy or combination therapy, using US claims data from clinical practice. A retrospective cohort analysis of patients aged ≥18 years with RA (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 714.xx) and with ≥1 tofacitinib claim in the Truven Marketscan (TM) or the Optum Clinformatics (OC) database. Index was defined as the first tofacitinib fill date (November 2012-June 2014). Patients were continuously enrolled for ≥12 months before and after index. Adherence was assessed using the proportion of days covered (PDC) and medication possession ratio (MPR). Persistence was evaluated using a 1.5× days' supply gap or switch. All-cause and RA-related costs in the 12-month pre- and post-index periods were evaluated. Unadjusted and adjusted analyses were conducted on data on treatment patterns and costs stratified by monotherapy status. A total of 337 (TM) and 118 (OC) tofacitinib patients met the selection criteria; 52.2% (TM) and 50.8% (OC) received monotherapy and 83.7% (TM) and 76.3% (OC) had pre-index biologic DMARD experience. Twelve-month mean PDC values were 0.56 (TM) and 0.53 (OC), and 12-month mean MPR was 0.84 (TM) and 0.80 (OC), with persistence of 140.0 (TM) and 124.6 (OC) days. Between 12-month pre- and post-index periods, mean (SD) 12-month RA-related medical costs decreased by $5784 ($31,832) in TM and $6103 ($25,897) in OC (both, P tofacitinib knowledge base and will enable informed clinical and policy decision making based on valuable datasets independent of randomized controlled trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chiropractic claims in the English-speaking world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Edzard; Gilbey, Andrew

    2010-04-09

    Some chiropractors and their associations claim that chiropractic is effective for conditions that lack sound supporting evidence or scientific rationale. This study therefore sought to determine the frequency of World Wide Web claims of chiropractors and their associations to treat, asthma, headache/migraine, infant colic, colic, ear infection/earache/otitis media, neck pain, whiplash (not supported by sound evidence), and lower back pain (supported by some evidence). A review of 200 chiropractor websites and 9 chiropractic associations' World Wide Web claims in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States was conducted between 1 October 2008 and 26 November 2008. The outcome measure was claims (either direct or indirect) regarding the eight reviewed conditions, made in the context of chiropractic treatment. We found evidence that 190 (95%) chiropractor websites made unsubstantiated claims regarding at least one of the conditions. When colic and infant colic data were collapsed into one heading, there was evidence that 76 (38%) chiropractor websites made unsubstantiated claims about all the conditions not supported by sound evidence. Fifty-six (28%) websites and 4 of the 9 (44%) associations made claims about lower back pain, whereas 179 (90%) websites and all 9 associations made unsubstantiated claims about headache/migraine. Unsubstantiated claims were made about asthma, ear infection/earache/otitis media, neck pain, The majority of chiropractors and their associations in the English-speaking world seem to make therapeutic claims that are not supported by sound evidence, whilst only 28% of chiropractor websites promote lower back pain, which is supported by some evidence. We suggest the ubiquity of the unsubstantiated claims constitutes an ethical and public health issue.

  7. Health claims made on multivitamin and mineral supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jovičić

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Basic purpose of health claims is consumers' benefit by providing information about healthy eating habits. It is necessary for health claims to be scientifically substantiated and truthful. Health claims should not attribute to food the property of preventing, treating or curing a human disease. Use of health claims should be followed by a statement indicating the importance of a varied and balanced diet and a healthy lifestyle. The objective of this research was to examine the compliance of health claims made on multivitamin and mineral dietary supplements' labels on the Serbian market with national regulation concerning health safety of dietary products.Methods: An assessment of labels of MVMs was done in two privately owned pharmacies in Novi Sad, Serbia in August 2010.Results: In total, 48 MVMs were sampled and 22 health claims were detected. Seven out of 22 health claims were in compliance with the national regulation. The main reason for health claims on foreign MVMs not to be compliant with the regulation in Serbia was inadequate or nonexistent translation of original labels.Conclusion: Detected use of terms such as "prevention", "treatment" and "indications" on vitamin and mineral dietary supplements' labels is both forbidden and misleading to consumers. Coupled with inadequate or nonexistent translation of the labels, it leads to a low level of protection of Serbian consumers. It is necessary to establish an effective monitoring system for dietary supplements' labeling on a national scale in order toprotect consumers and their wellbeing.

  8. Analysis of clinical negligence claims following tonsillectomy in England 1995 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rajeev; Asimacopoulos, Eleni; Walker, David; Gutierrez, Tatiana; Valentine, Peter; Pitkin, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    We determined the characteristics of medical negligence claims following tonsillectomy. Claims relating to tonsillectomy between 1995 and 2010 were obtained from the National Health Service Litigation Authority database. The number of open and closed claims was determined, and data were analyzed for primary injury claimed, outcome of claim, and associated costs. Over 15 years, there were 40 claims of clinical negligence related to tonsillectomy, representing 7.7% of all claims in otolaryngology. There were 34 closed claims, of which 32 (94%) resulted in payment of damages. Postoperative bleeding was the most common injury, with delayed recognition and treatment of bleeding alleged in most cases. Nasopharyngeal regurgitation as a result of soft palate fistulas or excessive tissue resection was the next-commonest cause of a claim. The other injuries claimed included dentoalveolar injury, bums, tonsillar remnants, and temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Inadequate informed consent was claimed in 5 cases. Clinical negligence claims following tonsillectomy have a high success rate. Although postoperative bleeding is the most common cause of negligence claims, a significant proportion of claims are due to rare complications of surgery. Informed consent should be tailored to the individual patient and should include a discussion of common and serious complications.

  9. BLM Colorado Mining Claims Closed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Shapefile Format –This data set consists of closed mining claim records extracted from BLM’s LR2000 database. These records contain case attributes as well as legal...

  10. BLM Colorado Mining Claims Active

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — Shapefile Format –This data set consists of active mining claim records extracted from BLM’s LR2000 database. These records contain case attributes as well as legal...

  11. Medicare Part D Claims Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This page contains information on Part D claims data for the purposes of research, analysis, reporting, and public health functions. These data will also be used to...

  12. Neonatal hypoglycaemia: learning from claims

    OpenAIRE

    Hawdon, Jane M; Beer, Jeanette; Sharp, Deborah; Upton, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Neonatal hypoglycaemia is a potential cause of neonatal morbidity, and on rare but tragic occasions causes long-term neurodevelopmental harm with consequent emotional and practical costs for the family. The organisational cost to the NHS includes the cost of successful litigation claims. The purpose of the review was to identify themes that could alert clinicians to common pitfalls and thus improve patient safety. Design The NHS Litigation Authority (NHS LA) Claims Management Syste...

  13. REMINDER : deadline for submission of reimbursements claims to UNIQA

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    We would like to remind you of the resolution which took effect from 1 June 2010 changing the deadline for submitting a claim from 24 months to 12 months from the invoice date (as opposed to from the time of treatment). As a transitional measure, it is still possible to submit invoices issued prior to 1 June 2010 as long as they do not date back to more than two years (from the invoice date) at the time of submission. The deadline for transitional claims is 31 May 2011. You are advised to check any outstanding submissions that you have since, as from 1 June 2011, no transitional claims will be accepted.  

  14. 32 CFR 536.121 - Claims not payable as maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims not payable as maritime claims. 536.121... ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.121 Claims not payable as maritime claims... (except at (e) and (k)), and 536.46; (b) Are not maritime in nature; (c) Are not in the best interests of...

  15. 32 CFR 842.94 - Assertable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., against a tort-feasor when: (a) Damage results from negligence and the claim is for: (1) More than $100... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Property Damage Tort Claims in Favor of the United States (31 U.S.C. 3701, 3711-3719) § 842.... (The two claims should be consolidated and processed under subpart N). (d) The Tort-feasor or his...

  16. Exaggerated Claims for Interactive Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thue, David; Bulitko, Vadim; Spetch, Marcia; Webb, Michael

    As advertising becomes more crucial to video games' success, developers risk promoting their products beyond the features that they can actually include. For features of interactive storytelling, the effects of making such exaggerations are not well known, as reports from industry have been anecdotal at best. In this paper, we explore the effects of making exaggerated claims for interactive stories, in the context of the theory of advertising. Results from a human user study show that female players find linear and branching stories to be significantly less enjoyable when they are advertised with exaggerated claims.

  17. Reserving by detailed conditioning on individual claim

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartikasari, Mujiati Dwi; Effendie, Adhitya Ronnie; Wilandari, Yuciana

    2017-03-01

    The estimation of claim reserves is an important activity in insurance companies to fulfill their liabilities. Recently, reserving method of individual claim have attracted a lot of interest in the actuarial science, which overcome some deficiency of aggregated claim method. This paper explores the Reserving by Detailed Conditioning (RDC) method using all of claim information for reserving with individual claim of liability insurance from an Indonesian general insurance company. Furthermore, we compare it to Chain Ladder and Bornhuetter-Ferguson method.

  18. Army Blast Claims Evaluation Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    ATIN: AFZX-JA Building 4551 Fort Polk, LA 71459-5000 Commander U.S. Army Engineer Center and Fort Leonard Wood ATIN: AlZT-JA Building 1706 East...U.S. Armed Forces Claims Service, Korea APO AP 96205-0084 No. of Copies Organization 1 Commander U.S. Army South ATI’N: SOJA Building 154 APO

  19. Nordic scepticism towards health claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2008-01-01

    Imagine that you are shopping in a supermarket and find a package of pork chops labelled "omega-3 added" or that the yogurt "contains phosphatidylserine, which can improve your memory"; would you buy these pork chops or this yogurt? Most Nordic consumers would choose products without health claims....

  20. Entrepreneurial Crowdfunding without Private Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boudreau, Kevin J.; Jeppesen, Lars Bo; Reichstein, Toke

    Today's crowdfunding raises funds for tiny, private entrepreneurial ventures without granting funders private claims to a project's future value. Rather than “investments,” these are “contributions.” This paper argues that for such crowdfunding neither producer nor consumer surplus – i.e., project...

  1. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of health claims related to Lactobacillus paracasei LPC 01 (CNCM I-1390) and treatment of disease (ID 3055, further assessment) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    paracasei LPC 01 (CNCM I-1390) and treatment of disease. The food constituent, L. paracasei LPC 01 (CNCM I-1390), is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect proposed for further assessment is “relieve symptoms typically associated with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), especially diarrhoea......”. The Panel considers that the claimed effect is related to the treatment of a disease and does not comply with the criteria laid down in Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006.......-predominant IBS, and to help reduce the daily number of bowel movements as well as improve the consistency of faeces in adult subjects reporting acute diarrhoea”. The proposed target population is “adults suffering either from Irritable Bowel Syndrome, especially diarrhoea-predominant IBS, or from acute diarrhoea...

  2. Analysis of 11 years of clinical negligence claims in esophagogastric cancer in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnasingham, K; Stroud, L; Knight, J; Preston, S R; Sultan, J

    2017-04-01

    In the National Health Service (NHS), clinical negligence claims and associated compensations are constantly rising. The aim of this study is to identify the size, trends, and causes of litigations claims in relation to esophagogastric (EG) cancer in the NHS. Data requests were submitted to the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) for the period of January 2003 to December 2013. Data were reviewed, categorized clinically, and analyzed in terms of causes and costs behind claims. In this time period, there were 163 claims identified from the NHSLA database. Ninety-five (58.3%) claims were successful with a pay out of £6.25 million. An increasing overall claim frequency and success rate were found over the last few years. Majority of the claims were from gastric cancer 84 (88.4%). The commonest cause of complaint in successful claims was delay or failure in diagnosis (21.1%) and treatment (17.9%). There were only 10.5% successful intraoperative claims, of which 50% were due to unnecessary or additional procedures. The frequency and success rates of malpractice claims in EG cancer are rising. The failure or delay in diagnosing and treatment in EG malignancy are the common cause for successful litigation claims. The findings further reinforce the need to improve early diagnosis. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Clinical negligence claims in pediatric surgery in England: pattern and trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyoka, Mandela

    2015-02-01

    We hypothesized that there has been an increase in the number of successful litigation claims in pediatric surgery in England. Our aim was to report the incidence, causes, and costs of clinical negligence claims against the National Health Service (NHS) in relation to pediatric surgery. We queried the NHS Litigation Authority (NHSLA) on litigation claims among children undergoing pediatric surgery in England (2004-2012). We decided a priori to only examine closed cases (decision and payment made). Data included year of claim, year of payment of claim, payment per claim, paid-to-closed ratio, and severity of outcome of clinical incident. Out of 112 clinical negligence claims in pediatric surgery, 93 (83%) were finalized-73 (65%) were settled and damages paid to the claimant and 20 (18%) were closed with no payment, and 19 (17%) remain open. The median payment was £13,537 (600-500,000) and median total cost borne by NHSLA was £31,445 (600-730,202). Claims were lodged at a median interval of 2 (0-13) years from time of occurrence with 55 (75%) cases being settled within the 3 years of being received. The commonest reasons for claims were postoperative complications (n=20, 28%), delayed treatment (n=16, 22%), and/or diagnosis (n=14, 19%). Out of 73, 17 (23%) closed claims resulted in case fatality. Conclusion: Two-thirds of all claims in pediatric surgery resulted in payment to claimant, and the commonest reasons for claims were postoperative complications, delayed treatment, and/or diagnosis. Nearly a quarter of successful claims were in cases where negligence resulted in case fatality. Pediatric surgeons should be aware of common diagnostic and treatment shortfalls as high-risk areas of increased susceptibility to clinical negligence claims. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. An examination of structure-function claims in dietary supplement advertising in the U.S.: 2003-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Rosemary J; Eisenberg, Matthew D; Cantor, Jonathan H

    2017-04-01

    Dietary supplement advertising cannot claim a causal link between the product and the treatment, prevention, or cure of a disease unless manufacturers seek approval from the FDA for a health claim. Manufacturers can make structure-function (S-F) claims without FDA approval linking a supplement to a body function or system using words such as "may help" or "promotes." These S-F claims are examined in this study in order to determine whether they mimic health claims for which the FDA requires stricter scientific evidence. Data include S-F claims in supplement advertisements (N=6179) appearing in US nationally circulated magazines (N=137) from 2003 to 2009. All advertisements were comprehensively coded for S-F claims, seals of approval, and other claims of guarantee. S-F claims associate supplements with a wide variety of health conditions, many of which are serious diseases and/or ailments. A significant number of the specific verbs used in these S-F claims are indicative of disease treatment/cure effects, thereby possibly mimicking health claims to the average consumer. The strength of the clinical associations made are largely unsubstantiated in the medical literature. Claims that a product is "scientifically proven" or "guaranteed" were largely unsubstantiated by clinical literature. Ads carrying externally validating seals of approval were highly prevalent. S-F claims that strongly mimic FDA-prohibited health claims are likely to create confusion in interpretation and possible public health concerns are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Should the District Courts Have Jurisdiction Over Pre-Award Contract Claims? A Claim for the Claims Court

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Short, John J

    1987-01-01

    This thesis briefly examines the jurisdiction of the federal district courts and the United States Court of Claims over pre-award contract claims before the Federal Courts Improvement Act of October 1...

  6. Political liberalism and religious claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of 4 important lacunae in political liberalism and identifies, in a preliminary fashion, some trends in the literature that can come in for support in filling these blind spots, which prevent political liberalism from a correct assessment of the diverse nature of religious claims. Political liberalism operates with implicit assumptions about religious actors being either ‘liberal’ or ‘fundamentalist’ and ignores a third, in-between group, namely traditionalist religious actors and their claims. After having explained what makes traditionalist religious actors different from liberal and fundamentalist religious actors, the author develops 4 areas in which political liberalism should be pushed further theoretically in order to correctly theorize the challenge which traditional religious actors pose to liberal democracy. These 4 areas (blind spots) are: (1) the context of translation; (2) the politics of exemptions; (3) the multivocality of theology; and (4) the transnational nature of norm-contestation. PMID:28344375

  7. Second WCB claims: who is at risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Nicola M; Sithole, Fortune; Beach, Jeremy R; Burstyn, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Many workers with one Workers' Compensation Board (WCB) claim make further claims. If the characteristics of the job, initial injury or worker were predictive of an early second claim, interventions at the time of return to work after the first claim might be effective in reducing the burden of work-related injury. This report explores the characteristic of those who make a second claim. Records of all Alberta WCB claims from January 1, 1995, to December 31, 2004, for individuals 18 to claim, sex and age of claimant, type of injury, type of accident, occupation, industry, an indicator of company size, and industry claim rate were extracted, as well as the date of any second claim. The likelihood of second claim and mean time to second claim were estimated. Multivariate analyses were performed using Cox regression. 1,047,828 claims were identified from 490,230 individuals. Of these, 49.2% had at least two claims. In the multivariate model a reduced time to second claim was associated with male sex, younger age and some types of injury and accident. Machining trades were at highest risk of early second claim (hazard ratio [HR] 2.54 compared with administration), and of the industry sectors manufacturing was at highest risk (HR 1.37 compared with business, personal and professional services). Some caution is needed in interpreting these data as they may be affected by under-reporting and job changes between claims. Nonetheless, they suggest that there remains room for interventions to reduce the considerable differences in risk of a second claim among workers, jobs and industries.

  8. Sovereignty Frames and Sovereignty Claims

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Neil

    2013-01-01

    This essay argues that much of the contemporary confusion and controversy over the meaning and continuing utility of the concept of sovereignty stems from a failure to distinguish between sovereignty as a deep framing device for making sense of the modern legal and political word on the one hand, and the particular claims which are made on behalf of particular institutions, agencies, rules or other entities to possess sovereign authority on the other. The essay begins by providing a basic acc...

  9. Primary care closed claims experience of Massachusetts malpractice insurers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Gordon D; Puopolo, Ann Louise; Huben-Kearney, Anne; Yu, Winnie; Keohane, Carol; McDonough, Peggy; Ellis, Bonnie R; Bates, David W; Biondolillo, Madeleine

    Despite prior focus on high-impact inpatient cases, there are increasing data and awareness that malpractice in the outpatient setting, particularly in primary care, is a leading contributor to malpractice risk and claims. To study patterns of primary care malpractice types, causes, and outcomes as part of a Massachusetts ambulatory malpractice risk and safety improvement project. Retrospective review of pooled closed claims data of 2 malpractice carriers covering most Massachusetts physicians during a 5-year period (January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009). Data were harmonized between the 2 insurers using a standardized taxonomy. Primary care practices in Massachusetts. All malpractice claims that involved primary care practices insured by the 2 largest insurers in the state were screened. A total of 551 claims from primary care practices were identified for the analysis. Numbers and types of claims, including whether claims involved primary care physicians or practices; classification of alleged malpractice (eg, misdiagnosis or medication error); patient diagnosis; breakdown in care process; and claim outcome (dismissed, settled, verdict for plaintiff, or verdict for defendant). During a 5-year period there were 7224 malpractice claims of which 551 (7.7%) were from primary care practices. Allegations were related to diagnosis in 397 (72.1%), medications in 68 (12.3%), other medical treatment in 41 (7.4%), communication in 15 (2.7%), patient rights in 11 (2.0%), and patient safety or security in 8 (1.5%). Leading diagnoses were cancer (n = 190), heart diseases (n = 43), blood vessel diseases (n = 27), infections (n = 22), and stroke (n = 16). Primary care cases were significantly more likely to be settled (35.2% vs 20.5%) or result in a verdict for the plaintiff (1.6% vs 0.9%) compared with non-general medical malpractice claims (P < .001). In Massachusetts, most primary care claims filed are related to alleged misdiagnosis. Compared with malpractice

  10. Determinants of consumer understanding of health claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G; Scholderer, Joachim; Rogeaux, Michel

    2011-01-01

    as safe, risky or other. In addition to the open questions on claim understanding, respondents rated a number of statements on claim interpretation for agreement and completed scales on interest in healthy eating, attitude to functional foods, and subjective knowledge on food and health. Results showed......The new EU regulation on nutrition and health claims states that claims can be permitted only if they can be expected to be understood by consumers. Investigating determinants of consumer understanding of health claims has therefore become an important topic. Understanding of a health claim...... on a yoghurt product was investigated with a sample of 720 category users in Germany. Health claim understanding was measured using open answers, which were subsequently content analysed and classified by comparison with the scientific dossier of the health claim. Based on this respondents were classified...

  11. 40 CFR 35.6600 - Contractor claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Contractor claims. 35.6600 Section 35... Actions Procurement Requirements Under A Cooperative Agreement § 35.6600 Contractor claims. (a) General... prepared by the contractor to support a claim against the recipient; and (4) The award official determines...

  12. An Individual Claims History Simulation Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gabrielli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this project is to develop a stochastic simulation machine that generates individual claims histories of non-life insurance claims. This simulation machine is based on neural networks to incorporate individual claims feature information. We provide a fully calibrated stochastic scenario generator that is based on real non-life insurance data. This stochastic simulation machine allows everyone to simulate their own synthetic insurance portfolio of individual claims histories and back-test thier preferred claims reserving method.

  13. 76 FR 362 - Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... claims for such treatment. Certain businesses, however, do not meet the definition of ``affected business.... Certain businesses, however, do not meet the definition of ``affected business,'' and are not covered by... Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...

  14. Analysis of Closed Claims in the Clinical Management of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Otaki

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The characteristics of malpractice claims associated with RA management, including the high frequency of medication-related allegations, breakdowns in the assessment process, and high claim numbers among patients older than 60 years, suggest the importance of caution exercised by physicians when administering immunosuppressants for the clinical treatment of RA.

  15. Warranty claim analysis considering human factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Shaomin

    2011-01-01

    Warranty claims are not always due to product failures. They can also be caused by two types of human factors. On the one hand, consumers might claim warranty due to misuse and/or failures caused by various human factors. Such claims might account for more than 10% of all reported claims. On the other hand, consumers might not be bothered to claim warranty for failed items that are still under warranty, or they may claim warranty after they have experienced several intermittent failures. These two types of human factors can affect warranty claim costs. However, research in this area has received rather little attention. In this paper, we propose three models to estimate the expected warranty cost when the two types of human factors are included. We consider two types of failures: intermittent and fatal failures, which might result in different claim patterns. Consumers might report claims after a fatal failure has occurred, and upon intermittent failures they might report claims after a number of failures have occurred. Numerical examples are given to validate the results derived.

  16. Questioning the claims from Kaiser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot-Smith, Alison; Gnani, Shamini; Pollock, Allyson M; Gray, Denis Pereira

    2004-06-01

    The article by Feachem et al, published in the BMJ in 2002, claimed to show that, compared with the United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS), the Kaiser Permanente healthcare system in the United States (US) has similar healthcare costs per capita, and performance that is considerably better in certain respects. To assess the accuracy of Feachem et al's comparison and conclusions. Detailed re-examination of the data and methods used and consideration of the 82 letters responding to the article. Analyses revealed four main areas in which Feachem et al's methodology was flawed. Firstly, the populations of patients served by Kaiser Permanente and by the NHS are fundamentally different. Kaiser's patients are mainly employed, significantly younger, and significantly less socially deprived and so are healthier. Feachem et al fail to adjust adequately for these factors. Secondly, Feachem et al have wrongly inflated NHS costs by omitting substantial user charges payable by Kaiser members for care, excluding the costs of marketing and administration, and deducting the surplus from Kaiser's costs while underestimating the capital charge element of the NHS budget and other costs. They also used two methods of converting currency, the currency rate and a health purchasing power parity conversion. This is double counting. Feachem et al reported that NHS costs were 10% less per head than Kaiser. Correcting for the double currency conversion gives the NHS a 40% cost advantage such that per capita costs are 1161 dollars and 1951 dollars for the NHS and Kaiser, respectively. Thirdly, Feachem et al use non-standardised data for NHS bed days from the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, rather than official Department of Health bed availability and activity statistics for England. Leaving aside the non-comparability of the population and lack of standardisation of the data, the result is to inflate NHS acute bed use and underestimate the efficiency of

  17. 32 CFR 842.129 - Settlement of claims against NAFIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Nonappropriated Fund Claims § 842.129 Settlement of claims against NAFIs. (a) This subpart does not establish legal theories for adjudication of claims. Refer to the appropriate...

  18. [Health claims for medical foods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katan, Martijn B

    2013-01-01

    Souvenaid (Nutricia, Zoetermeer, the Netherlands) is a medical food for the dietary management of early Alzheimer's disease. The mix of nutrients in this drink is suggested to have a beneficial effect on cognitive function; such implicit health claims for medical foods are not checked by government agencies. Souvenaid has been investigated in three clinical trials. The first trial showed that Souvenaid produced a significant improvement in delayed verbal recall, but not in other psychological tests. The second and largest trial showed no effect on any outcome. The third trial showed no significant effect at 12 or 24 weeks, but a significant difference in the 24-week time course of the composite memory score. None of these outcomes was clearly specified as a primary outcome at trial registration. In conclusion, there is no convincing proof that Souvenaid benefits cognitive function. Better scrutiny of the efficacy of medical foods is warranted.

  19. CLAIMS OF SUSTAINABLE FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    Purpose: The purpose of the paper is to provide an overview of current practices within the emergent management discipline: Sustainable Facilities Management (SFM). Background: To develop a sustainable society, facilities managers must become change agents for sustainability in the built...... environment. Facilities Management (FM) is contributing to the environmental, social and economical problems, but can at the same time also be a part of the solution. However, to integrate sustainability in FM is still an emergent niche within FM, and the examples of SFM so far seems to come out of very......-creating of new socio-technical services and technologies These SFM understandings are concluded to be coexisting claims of SFM definitions. Practical Implications: Facilities managers will be able to identify the mindset behind different services and technologies that are promoted as SFM. But maybe just...

  20. 37 CFR 360.12 - Form and content of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBMISSION OF ROYALTY CLAIMS FILING OF CLAIMS TO ROYALTY FEES COLLECTED UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE Satellite Claims § 360.12 Form and content of claims. (a) Forms. (1) Each claim to compulsory license royalty fees... owner entitled to claim the royalty fees. (ii) A general statement of the nature of the copyright owner...

  1. 37 CFR 360.3 - Form and content of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBMISSION OF ROYALTY CLAIMS FILING OF CLAIMS TO ROYALTY FEES COLLECTED UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE Cable Claims § 360.3 Form and content of claims. (a) Forms. (1) Each claim to cable compulsory license royalty fees... copyright owner entitled to claim the royalty fees. (ii) A general statement of the nature of the copyright...

  2. 32 CFR 842.110 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Claims for a maritime occurrence covered under U.S. admiralty laws. (o) Claims for: (1) Any tax or... International Agreements Claims Act. (4) The Air Force Admiralty Claims Act and the Admiralty Extensions Act. (5...) Claims from the combat activities of the armed forces during war or armed conflict. (c) Claims for...

  3. Operating room fires: a closed claims analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sonya P; Bhananker, Sanjay M; Posner, Karen L; Domino, Karen B

    2013-05-01

    To assess patterns of injury and liability associated with operating room (OR) fires, closed malpractice claims in the American Society of Anesthesiologists Closed Claims Database since 1985 were reviewed. All claims related to fires in the OR were compared with nonfire-related surgical anesthesia claims. An analysis of fire-related claims was performed to identify causative factors. There were 103 OR fire claims (1.9% of 5,297 surgical claims). Electrocautery was the ignition source in 90% of fire claims. OR fire claims more frequently involved older outpatients compared with other surgical anesthesia claims (P fire claims (P fires (n = 93) increased over time (P fires occurred during head, neck, or upper chest procedures (high-fire-risk procedures). Oxygen served as the oxidizer in 95% of electrocautery-induced OR fires (84% with open delivery system). Most electrocautery-induced fires (n = 75, 81%) occurred during monitored anesthesia care. Oxygen was administered via an open delivery system in all high-risk procedures during monitored anesthesia care. In contrast, alcohol-containing prep solutions and volatile compounds were present in only 15% of OR fires during monitored anesthesia care. Electrocautery-induced fires during monitored anesthesia care were the most common cause of OR fires claims. Recognition of the fire triad (oxidizer, fuel, and ignition source), particularly the critical role of supplemental oxygen by an open delivery system during use of the electrocautery, is crucial to prevent OR fires. Continuing education and communication among OR personnel along with fire prevention protocols in high-fire-risk procedures may reduce the occurrence of OR fires.

  4. Alleged B. anthracis exposure claims in a workers' compensation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Gregory; Dunning, Kari; Lockey, James E

    2006-01-01

    Workers' compensation insurance in some states may not provide coverage for medical evaluation costs of workplace exposures related to potential bioterrorism acts if there is no diagnosed illness or disease. Personal insurance also may not provide coverage for these exposures occurring at the workplace. Governmental entities, insurers, and employers need to consider how to address such situations and the associated costs. The objective of this study was to examine characteristics of workers and total costs associated with workers' compensation claims alleging potential exposure to the bioterrorism organism B. anthracis. We examined 192 claims referred for review to the Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (OBWC) from October 10, 2001, through December 20, 2004. Although some cases came from out-of-state areas where B. anthracis exposure was known to exist, no Ohio claim was associated with true B. anthracis exposure or B. anthracis-related illness. Of the 155 eligible claims, 126 included medical costs averaging dollar 219 and ranging from dollar 24 to dollar 3,126. There was no difference in mean cost for government and non-government employees (p = 0.202 Wilcoxon). The number of claims and associated medical costs for evaluation and treatment of potential workplace exposure to B. anthracis were relatively small. These results can be attributed to several factors, including no documented B. anthracis exposures and disease in Ohio and prompt transmission of recommended diagnostic and prophylactic treatment protocols to physicians. How employers, insurers, and jurisdictions address payment for evaluation and treatment of potential or documented exposures resulting from a potential terrorism-related event should be addressed proactively.

  5. Oncology patient-reported claims: maximising the chance for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, H; Rofail, D; Caron, M; Emery, M-P

    2011-01-01

    To review Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) labelling claims achieved in oncology in Europe and in the United States and consider the benefits, and challenges faced. PROLabels database was searched to identify oncology products with PRO labelling approved in Europe since 1995 or in the United States since 1998. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) websites and guidance documents were reviewed. PUBMED was searched for articles on PRO claims in oncology. Among all oncology products approved, 22 were identified with PRO claims; 10 in the United States, 7 in Europe, and 5 in both. The language used in the labelling was limited to benefit (e.g. "…resulted in symptom benefits by significantly prolonging time to deterioration in cough, dyspnoea, and pain, versus placebo") and equivalence (e.g. "no statistical differences were observed between treatment groups for global QoL"). Seven products used a validated HRQoL tool; two used symptom tools; two used both; seven used single-item symptom measures (one was unknown). The following emerged as likely reasons for success: ensuring systematic PRO data collection; clear rationale for pre-specified endpoints; adequately powered trials to detect differences and clinically significant changes; adjusting for multiplicity; developing an a priori statistical analysis plan including primary and subgroup analyses, dealing with missing data, pooling multiple-site data; establishing clinical versus statistical significance; interpreting failure to detect change. End-stage patient drop-out rates and cessation of trials due to exceptional therapeutic benefit pose significant challenges to demonstrating treatment PRO improvement. PRO labelling claims demonstrate treatment impact and the trade-off between efficacy and side effects ultimately facilitating product differentiation. Reliable and valid instruments specific to the desired language, claim, and target population are required. Practical

  6. Radiation injury claims: an overview and update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, W.G.

    1984-01-01

    The author reviews the radiation injury claims problem and summarizes the legal framework in which the claims are presently brought. Two cases are reviewed in which the decisions are troubling. The implications of these decisions are discussed in the overall radiation injury claims problem. The author notes that in the largest radiation injury case tried in the United States, the court was unable to resolve the claims within the confines of the existing law. The disregard for established norms of adjudication and the resultant decline in predictability of outcome portends grave consequences, not only for the nuclear industry but for other industries involved with potentially toxic substances

  7. When Stepfathers Claim Stepchildren: A Conceptual Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsiglio, William

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Guided by social constructionist and symbolic interactionist perspectives and a grounded theory method, my conceptual analysis explores stepfathers experiences with claiming stepchildren as their own. Using indepth interviews with a diverse sample of 36 stepfathers, my analysis focuses on paternal claiming as a core category and generates…

  8. 49 CFR 22.69 - Claim process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Claim process. 22.69 Section 22.69 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation SHORT-TERM LENDING PROGRAM (STLP) Loan Administration § 22.69 Claim process. After reasonable efforts have been exhausted to collect on a delinquent debt, the...

  9. The Indirect Empathic Approach to Claim Letters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James D.

    1985-01-01

    In discussing letter-writing methods for business communication classes, the article explains that claim letter formats other than the direct approach are not only legitimate, but also effective, and suggests that the approach selected should depend upon the circumstances surrounding the claim. (CT)

  10. 16 CFR 460.22 - Tax claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Tax claims. 460.22 Section 460.22 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.22 Tax claims. Do not say or imply that your product qualifies for a tax benefit unless it is true. ...

  11. 20 CFR 410.705 - Duplicate claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Duplicate claims. 410.705 Section 410.705 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969, TITLE IV-BLACK LUNG BENEFITS (1969- ) Rules for the Review of Denied and Pending Claims Under the Black Lung...

  12. 78 FR 75944 - Commencement of Claims Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-13

    ... Agreement Between the United States of America and the Great Socialist People's Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.... Simkin, Chief Counsel, Foreign Claims Settlement Commission of the United States, 600 E Street NW., Room... provided that (1) the claim was set forth by a claimant named in Abbott et al. v. Socialist People's Libyan...

  13. 76 FR 3156 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 26 N., R. 47 W., Sec. 3, those lands formerly within mining claim... claim recordation AA- 32365. Containing approximately 155 acres. T. 27 N., R. 47 W., Sec. 34, those... e-mail at ak[email protected] , or by telecommunication device (TTD) through the Federal...

  14. 32 CFR 842.31 - Claims payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... which last for an extended period of time. The claimant must be free of negligence. (i) Claims for... hazards may be negligence. These types of claims would include pitted windshields, dents, chipped paint on..., or power outages which last for an extended period of time. The claimant must be free of negligence...

  15. Moral Minimalism in American Indian Land Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Burke A.

    2005-01-01

    This is an essay about Indian claims for the return of historically stolen lands, written from the perspective of a "Western" academic moral philosopher. I want to try to outline points of agreement and disagreement between Indian and Western moral conceptions and to seek common ground on which land claims can be more clearly evaluated…

  16. 32 CFR 536.77 - Applicable law for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... contributory negligence be interpreted and applied according to the law of the place of the occurrence... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Applicable law for claims under the Military... Act § 536.77 Applicable law for claims under the Military Claims Act. (a) General principles—(1) Tort...

  17. Perception of health claims among Nordic consumers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunert, Klaus G.; Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Boztug, Yasemin

    2009-01-01

    . Claims were constructed from an underlying universe combining different active ingredients (familiar, unfamiliar), type of claim (combination of information about ingredient, physiological function and health benefit), framing (positive, negative) and use of qualifier (with, without 'may'). Across pairs...... of active ingredient, physiological function and health benefit, whereas the other prefers 'short' claims consisting of the health benefit only. Results also showed that the familiar ingredient is preferred to the unfamiliar one, whereas effects of positive vs. negative framing depended on the type......Health claim perception was investigated by a web-based instrument with a sample of 4612 respondents in the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden). Respondents decided which of a pair of claims sounded better, was easier to understand, and was more convincing in their opinion...

  18. Defining hip fracture with claims data: outpatient and provider claims matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, S D; Zullo, A R; McConeghy, K; Lee, Y; Daiello, L; Kiel, D P

    2017-07-01

    Medicare claims are commonly used to identify hip fractures, but there is no universally accepted definition. We found that a definition using inpatient claims identified fewer fractures than a definition including outpatient and provider claims. Few additional fractures were identified by including inconsistent diagnostic and procedural codes at contiguous sites. Medicare claims data is commonly used in research studies to identify hip fractures, but there is no universally accepted definition of fracture. Our purpose was to describe potential misclassification when hip fractures are defined using Medicare Part A (inpatient) claims without considering Part B (outpatient and provider) claims and when inconsistent diagnostic and procedural codes occur at contiguous fracture sites (e.g., femoral shaft or pelvic). Participants included all long-stay nursing home residents enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B fee-for-service between 1/1/2008 and 12/31/2009 with follow-up through 12/31/2011. We compared the number of hip fractures identified using only Part A claims to (1) Part A plus Part B claims and (2) Part A and Part B claims plus discordant codes at contiguous fracture sites. Among 1,257,279 long-stay residents, 40,932 (3.2%) met the definition of hip fracture using Part A claims, and 41,687 residents (3.3%) met the definition using Part B claims. 4566 hip fractures identified using Part B claims would not have been captured using Part A claims. An additional 227 hip fractures were identified after considering contiguous fracture sites. When ascertaining hip fractures, a definition using outpatient and provider claims identified 11% more fractures than a definition with only inpatient claims. Future studies should publish their definition of fracture and specify if diagnostic codes from contiguous fracture sites were used.

  19. 37 CFR 360.25 - Copies of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 360.25 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS SUBMISSION OF ROYALTY CLAIMS FILING OF CLAIMS TO ROYALTY FEES COLLECTED UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE Digital Audio Recording Devices and Media Royalty Claims § 360.25 Copies of claims. A claimant shall, for each claim...

  20. 32 CFR 536.117 - Statutory authority for maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Statutory authority for maritime claims. 536.117... ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.117 Statutory authority for maritime claims. The Army Maritime Claims Settlement Act (AMCSA) (10 U.S.C. 4801-04, 4806, as amended) authorizes the...

  1. 12 CFR 627.2750 - Priority of claims-banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) All claims for taxes. (f) All claims of creditors which are secured by specific assets or equities of... accordance with priorities of applicable Federal or State law. (g) All claims of holders of bonds issued by... claims of holders of consolidated and System-wide bonds and all claims of the other Farm Credit banks...

  2. The importance of subjective claims management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, C S

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the causes and effects of "subjective disability" on today's workforce and employers. As employees feel out of control with both their careers and demands placed upon them, the number of claims characterized by self-reported symptoms are increasing. Subjective disabilities include chronic syndrome, fibromyalgia, psychiatric claims and chronic pain. The author discusses creative strategies in case studies that have helped employers contain the costs of disability claims, while empowering the employee to take control of their own situation and return to work sooner.

  3. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Inpatient Claims PUF

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This release contains the Basic Stand Alone (BSA) Inpatient Public Use Files (PUF) named CMS 2008 BSA Inpatient Claims PUF with information from 2008 Medicare...

  4. 5 CFR 180.107 - Claims procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... General Counsel, Office of Personnel Management, 1900 E Street NW., Washington, DC 20415. Claims shall be... the performance of official business at the request of, or with the knowledge and consent of, superior...

  5. 49 CFR 1018.7 - Conversion claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Conversion claims. These procedures are directed primarily to the recovery of money on behalf of the Government. The Board may demand: (a) The return of specific property; or (b) Either the return of property or the payment of its value. ...

  6. Must Metaethical Realism Make a Semantic Claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahane, Guy

    2013-02-01

    Mackie drew attention to the distinct semantic and metaphysical claims made by meta ethical realists, arguing that although our evaluative discourse is cognitive and objective, there are no objective evaluative facts. This distinction, however, also opens up a reverse possibility: that our evaluative discourse is antirealist, yet objective values do exist. I suggest that this seemingly far-fetched possibility merits serious attention; realism seems com mitted to its intelligibility, and, despite appearances, it isn't incoherent, ineffable, inherently implausible or impossible to defend. I argue that reflection on this possibility should lead us to revise our understanding of the debate between realists and antirealists. It is not only that the realist's semantic claim is insufficient for realism to be true, as Mackie argued; it's not even necessary. Robust metaethical realism is best understood as making a purely metaphysical claim. It is thus not enough for antirealists to show that our discourse is antirealist. They must directly attack the realist's metaphysical claim.

  7. [Urological diseases most frequently involved in medical professional liability claims].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Blasco, César; Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L; Arimany-Manso, Josep; Pera-Bajo, Francisco

    2014-03-01

    Clinical safety and medical professional liability are international major concerns, especially in surgical specialties such as urology. This article analyzes the claims filed at the Council of Medical Colleges of Catalonia between 1990 and 2012, exploring urology procedures. The review of the 173 cases identified in the database highlighted the importance of surgical procedures (74%). Higher frequencies related to scrotal-testicular pathology (34%), especially testicular torsion (7.5%) and vasectomy (19.6%), and prostate pathology (26 %), more specifically the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (17.9%). Although urology is not among the specialties with the higher frequency of claims, there are special areas of litigation in which it is advisable to implement improvements in clinical safety. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. 29 CFR 15.26 - Claims procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... forth in § 15.21(d) will be accepted and considered a claim under the Act if it constitutes a demand for compensation from the Department. A demand is not required to be for a specific sum of money. (c) Notification... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Claims procedures. 15.26 Section 15.26 Labor Office of the...

  9. 46 CFR 327.4 - Claim requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... statements made in the claim are subject to the provision of 18 U.S.C. 287 and 1001 and all other penalty... Admiralty Act, as amended by Public Law 877, 81st Congress (64 Stat. 1112; 46 app. U.S.C. 745), shall not be... physicians and hospitals related to a seaman's claim for injury, illness, or death shall be attached. If the...

  10. 40 CFR 1620.2 - Administrative claim; when presented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.2 Administrative claim; when presented. (a... negligence or wrongful act or omission of the CSB or its employees must be mailed or delivered to the Office...

  11. 32 CFR 842.95 - Non-assertable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Property Damage Tort Claims in Favor of the United States (31 U.S.C. 3701, 3711-3719) § 842...) Reimbursement for military or civilian employees for their negligence claims paid by the United States. (b) Loss...

  12. Consumer understanding of sugars claims on food and drink products

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, N J; Sadler, M J; Cooper, J M

    2012-01-01

    Consumer understanding of nutrition and health claims is a key aspect of current regulations in the European Union (EU). In view of this, qualitative and quantitative research techniques were used to investigate consumer awareness and understanding of product claims in the UK, focusing particularly on nutrition claims relating to sugars. Both research methods identified a good awareness of product claims. No added sugars claims were generally preferred to reduced sugars claims, and there was ...

  13. 20 CFR 429.103 - Who may file my claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... authorized agent, or your legal representative may file the claim. (c) Claims based on death. The executor or... behalf as agent, executor, administrator, parent, guardian or other representative. ...

  14. Framing and Claiming: How Information-Framing Affects Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey R.; Kapteyn, Arie; Mitchell, Olivia S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides evidence that Social Security benefit claiming decisions are strongly affected by framing and are thus inconsistent with expected utility theory. Using a randomized experiment that controls for both observable and unobservable differences across individuals, we find that the use of a “breakeven analysis” encourages early claiming. Respondents are more likely to delay when later claiming is framed as a gain, and the claiming age is anchored at older ages. Additionally, the financially less literate, individuals with credit card debt, and those with lower earnings are more influenced by framing than others. PMID:28579641

  15. Framing and Claiming: How Information-Framing Affects Expected Social Security Claiming Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jeffrey R; Kapteyn, Arie; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2016-03-01

    This paper provides evidence that Social Security benefit claiming decisions are strongly affected by framing and are thus inconsistent with expected utility theory. Using a randomized experiment that controls for both observable and unobservable differences across individuals, we find that the use of a "breakeven analysis" encourages early claiming. Respondents are more likely to delay when later claiming is framed as a gain, and the claiming age is anchored at older ages. Additionally, the financially less literate, individuals with credit card debt, and those with lower earnings are more influenced by framing than others.

  16. Healthcare resource utilization, costs of care, and treatment of mycosis fungoides cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patterns in a large managed care population: a retrospective US claims-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Yuen; Gu, Tao; Sharma, Gaurav; Raspa, Susan; Drake, Bill; Tan, Hiangkiat

    2018-05-07

    To evaluate health care utilization, treatment patterns and costs among patients with mycosis fungoides-cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (MF-CTCL). This retrospective cohort study queried the HealthCore Integrated Research Database to identify patients ≥18 years with ≥2 diagnoses of MF-CTCL (ICD-9-CM code 202.1x, 202.2x) between 07 January 2006 and 07 January 2013. Index date was defined as first MF-CTCL diagnosis. Patients were continuously enrolled ≥6 months before and ≥12 months after index date. Severe MF-CTCL was identified via systemic therapy use postindex. Generalized linear model (GLM) was used to estimate the relationship between MF-CTCL severity and healthcare costs controlling for selected factors. A total of 1981 MF-CTCL patients were evaluated: 493 (24.9%) severe and 1488 (75.1%) with mild to moderate disease. GLM analysis indicated severe MF-CTCL patients incurred higher all-cause healthcare total costs compared to patients with mild-to-moderate MF-CTCL (coefficient estimate: 4.19, p < .0001). About 51% of patients did not receive any MF-CTCL-specific treatment within 60 days after MF-CTCL diagnosis. MF-CTCL severity was associated with greater healthcare resource utilization and costs. These findings suggest that about half of MF-CTCL patients do not receive MF-CTCL-specific treatment within 60 days following initial diagnosis. Future studies are needed to understand reasons for delayed treatment initiation.

  17. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breen, Micheal A.; Taylor, George A.; Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie

    2017-01-01

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality implicated in

  18. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breen, Micheal A.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie [CRICO Risk Management Foundation, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality

  19. Pediatric radiology malpractice claims - characteristics and comparison to adult radiology claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Micheál A; Dwyer, Kathy; Yu-Moe, Winnie; Taylor, George A

    2017-06-01

    Medical malpractice is the primary method by which people who believe they have suffered an injury in the course of medical care seek compensation in the United States and Canada. An increasing body of research demonstrates that failure to correctly diagnose is the most common allegation made in malpractice claims against radiologists. Since the 1994 survey by the Society of Chairmen of Radiology in Children's Hospitals (SCORCH), no other published studies have specifically examined the frequency or clinical context of malpractice claims against pediatric radiologists or arising from pediatric imaging interpretation. We hypothesize that the frequency, character and outcome of malpractice claims made against pediatric radiologists differ from those seen in general radiology practice. We searched the Controlled Risk Insurance Co. (CRICO) Strategies' Comparative Benchmarking System (CBS), a private repository of approximately 350,000 open and closed medical malpractice claims in the United States, for claims related to pediatric radiology. We further queried these cases for the major allegation, the clinical environment in which the claim arose, the clinical severity of the alleged injury, indemnity paid (if payment was made), primary imaging modality involved (if applicable) and primary International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision (ICD-9) diagnosis underlying the claim. There were a total of 27,056 fully coded claims of medical malpractice in the CBS database in the 5-year period between Jan. 1, 2010, and Dec. 31, 2014. Of these, 1,472 cases (5.4%) involved patients younger than 18 years. Radiology was the primary service responsible for 71/1,472 (4.8%) pediatric cases. There were statistically significant differences in average payout for pediatric radiology claims ($314,671) compared to adult radiology claims ($174,033). The allegations were primarily diagnosis-related in 70% of pediatric radiology claims. The most common imaging modality implicated in

  20. Everyday Citizenship: Identity Claims and Their Reception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Hopkins

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Citizenship involves being able to speak and be heard as a member of the community. This can be a formal right (e.g., a right to vote. It can also be something experienced in everyday life. However, the criteria for being judged a fellow member of the community are multiple and accorded different weights by different people. Thus, although one may self-define alongside one’s fellows, the degree to which these others reciprocate depends on the weight they give to various membership criteria. This suggests we approach everyday community membership in terms of an identity claims-making process in which first, an individual claims membership through invoking certain criteria of belonging, and second, others evaluate that claim. Pursuing this logic we report three experiments investigating the reception of such identity-claims. Study 1 showed that in Scotland a claim to membership of the national ingroup was accepted more if couched in terms of place of birth and ancestry rather than just in terms of one’s subjective identification. Studies 2 and 3 showed that this differential acceptance mattered for the claimant’s ability to be heard as a community member. We discuss the implications of these studies for the conceptualization of community membership and the realization of everyday citizenship rights.

  1. CLAIMS FOR REINBURSEMENT OF EDUCATION FEES

    CERN Multimedia

    PE-ADS

    1999-01-01

    You are reminded that, in accordance with Article R A 8.07 of the Staff Regulations 'the relevant bills shall be grouped so that not more than three claims in respect of each child are submitted in an academic year'.For this purpose:-\tthe academic year is defined as the period going from 1st September to 31st August,-\tonly paid bills can be subject to reimbursement,-\ta claim for reimbursement of education fees may only include bills for expenses incurred during a given academic year for a given child,-\tbills for one child may be grouped on a claim by periods of term, semester or academic year,-\tthe months of July and August should be included in the third term, or the second semester, or the academic year,-\tfor each dependent child, a maximum of 3 claims can be submitted for the reimbursement of expenses incurred during one academic year, therefore, any bill submitted for reimbursement after the third claim will not be reimbursed.Please make sure that you have receive...

  2. CLAIMS FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF EDUCATION FEES

    CERN Multimedia

    Personnel Division

    1999-01-01

    REMINDERYou are reminded that, in accordance with Article R A 8.07 of the Staff Regulations 'the relevant bills shall be grouped so that not more than three claims in respect of each child are submitted in an academic year'.For this purpose:the academic year is defined as the period going from 1st September to 31st August, only paid bills can be subject to reimbursement, a claim for reimbursement of education fees may only include bills for expenses incurred during a given academic year for a given child, bills for one child may be grouped on a claim by periods of term, semester or academic year, the months of July and August should be included in the third term, or the second semester, or the academic year, for each dependent child, a maximum of 3 claims can be submitted for the reimbursement of expenses incurred during one academic year, therefore, any bill submitted for reimbursement after the third claim will not be reimbursed.Please make sure that you have received and paid all bills, including those for...

  3. Effect of a health system's medical error disclosure program on gastroenterology-related claims rates and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Megan A; Elmunzer, B Joseph; Scheiman, James M

    2014-04-01

    In 2001, the University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) implemented a novel medical error disclosure program. This study analyzes the effect of this program on gastroenterology (GI)-related claims and costs. This was a review of claims in the UMHS Risk Management Database (1990-2010), naming a gastroenterologist. Claims were classified according to pre-determined categories. Claims data, including incident date, date of resolution, and total liability dollars, were reviewed. Mean total liability incurred per claim in the pre- and post-implementation eras was compared. Patient encounter data from the Division of Gastroenterology was also reviewed in order to benchmark claims data with changes in clinical volume. There were 238,911 GI encounters in the pre-implementation era and 411,944 in the post-implementation era. A total of 66 encounters resulted in claims: 38 in the pre-implementation era and 28 in the post-implementation era. Of the total number of claims, 15.2% alleged delay in diagnosis/misdiagnosis, 42.4% related to a procedure, and 42.4% involved improper management, treatment, or monitoring. The reduction in the proportion of encounters resulting in claims was statistically significant (P=0.001), as was the reduction in time to claim resolution (1,000 vs. 460 days) (P<0.0001). There was also a reduction in the mean total liability per claim ($167,309 pre vs. $81,107 post, 95% confidence interval: 33682.5-300936.2 pre vs. 1687.8-160526.7 post). Implementation of a novel medical error disclosure program, promoting transparency and quality improvement, not only decreased the number of GI-related claims per patient encounter, but also dramatically shortened the time to claim resolution.

  4. Rates, Amounts, and Determinants of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Claim Reimbursements Among Medicare Beneficiaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Shia T.; Shimbo, Daichi; Huang, Lei; Diaz, Keith M.; Viera, Anthony J.; Kilgore, Meredith; Oparil, Suzanne; Muntner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) can be used to identify white coat hypertension and guide hypertensive treatment. We determined the percentage of ABPM claims submitted between 2007–2010 that were reimbursed. Among 1,970 Medicare beneficiaries with submitted claims, ABPM was reimbursed for 93.8% of claims that had an ICD-9 diagnosis code of 796.2 (“elevated blood pressure reading without diagnosis of hypertension”) versus 28.5% of claims without this code. Among claims without an ICD-9 diagnosis code of 796.2 listed, those for the component (e.g., recording, scanning analysis, physician review, reporting) versus full ABPM procedures and performed by institutional versus non-institutional providers were each more than two times as likely to be successfully reimbursed. Of the claims reimbursed, the median payment was $52.01 (25–75th percentiles: $32.95–$64.98). In conclusion, educating providers on the ABPM claims reimbursement process and evaluation of Medicare reimbursement may increase the appropriate use of ABPM and improve patient care. PMID:25492833

  5. Beyond genes, proteins, and abstracts: Identifying scientific claims from full-text biomedical articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Catherine

    2010-04-01

    Massive increases in electronically available text have spurred a variety of natural language processing methods to automatically identify relationships from text; however, existing annotated collections comprise only bioinformatics (gene-protein) or clinical informatics (treatment-disease) relationships. This paper introduces the Claim Framework that reflects how authors across biomedical spectrum communicate findings in empirical studies. The Framework captures different levels of evidence by differentiating between explicit and implicit claims, and by capturing under-specified claims such as correlations, comparisons, and observations. The results from 29 full-text articles show that authors report fewer than 7.84% of scientific claims in an abstract, thus revealing the urgent need for text mining systems to consider the full-text of an article rather than just the abstract. The results also show that authors typically report explicit claims (77.12%) rather than an observations (9.23%), correlations (5.39%), comparisons (5.11%) or implicit claims (2.7%). Informed by the initial manual annotations, we introduce an automated approach that uses syntax and semantics to identify explicit claims automatically and measure the degree to which each feature contributes to the overall precision and recall. Results show that a combination of semantics and syntax is required to achieve the best system performance. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. 76 FR 36176 - Fully Developed Claim (Fully Developed Claims-Applications for Compensation, Pension, DIC, Death...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-21

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-0747] Fully Developed Claim (Fully Developed Claims--Applications for Compensation, Pension, DIC, Death Pension, and/or Accrued Benefits); Correction AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs. ACTION: Notice; correction...

  7. 31 CFR 361.8 - Claim for replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim for replacement. 361.8 Section... § 361.8 Claim for replacement. Claim for replacement shall be made in writing to the Secretary, to the..., Parkersburg, WV 26106-1328. The claim, accompanied by a recommendation regarding the manner of replacement...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix to Part 281 - Claims Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... advance decision functions for claims under the following statutes: (a) 31 U.S.C. 3702, concerning claims... SETTLING PERSONNEL AND GENERAL CLAIMS AND PROCESSING ADVANCE DECISION REQUESTS Pt. 281, App. Appendix to... Personnel Management performs these functions for claims involving civilian employees' compensation and...

  9. 32 CFR Appendix B to Part 282 - Claims Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... perform the claims settlement and advance decision functions for claims under the following statutes: (a...) MISCELLANEOUS PROCEDURES FOR SETTLING PERSONNEL AND GENERAL CLAIMS AND PROCESSING ADVANCE DECISION REQUESTS Pt... Director of the Office of Personnel Management performs these functions for claims involving civilian...

  10. 37 CFR 7.12 - Claim of color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claim of color. 7.12 Section... § 7.12 Claim of color. (a) If color is claimed as a feature of the mark in the basic application and/or registration, the international application must include a statement that color is claimed as a...

  11. 38 CFR 3.160 - Status of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Compensation, and Dependency and Indemnity Compensation Claims § 3.160 Status of claims. The following definitions are applicable to claims for pension, compensation, and dependency and indemnity compensation. (a... for a benefit received after final disallowance of an earlier claim, or any application based on...

  12. 40 CFR 14.12 - Principal types of unallowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Principal types of unallowable claims... PERSONAL PROPERTY CLAIMS § 14.12 Principal types of unallowable claims. Claims that ordinarily will not be... valid appraisal or authentication with the carrier prior to shipment of the item; (d) Loss of bankbooks...

  13. 37 CFR 360.5 - Copies of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 360.5 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS SUBMISSION OF ROYALTY CLAIMS FILING OF CLAIMS TO ROYALTY FEES COLLECTED UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE Cable Claims... hand delivery or by mail, file an original and one copy of the claim to cable royalty fees. ...

  14. 37 CFR 360.22 - Form and content of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... 360.22 Section 360.22 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS SUBMISSION OF ROYALTY CLAIMS FILING OF CLAIMS TO ROYALTY FEES COLLECTED UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE Digital Audio Recording Devices and Media Royalty Claims § 360.22 Form and content of claims. (a) Forms. (1...

  15. 20 CFR 410.232 - Withdrawal of a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal of a claim. 410.232 Section 410.232 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT OF 1969... Claims and Evidence § 410.232 Withdrawal of a claim. (a) Before adjudication of claim. A claimant (or an...

  16. 49 CFR 1021.4 - Notice of claim and demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notice of claim and demand. 1021.4 Section 1021.4... § 1021.4 Notice of claim and demand. Initiation of administrative collection of enforcement claims will be commenced by the enforcement collection designee mailing a letter of notice of claim and demand to...

  17. 32 CFR 536.19 - Disaster claims planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Disaster claims planning. 536.19 Section 536.19... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES The Army Claims System § 536.19 Disaster claims planning. All ACOs will prepare... requirements related to disaster claims planning. ...

  18. 32 CFR 842.43 - Filing a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... completed Standard Form 95 or other signed and written demand for money damages in a sum certain. A claim... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE... amend a claim at any time prior to final action. To amend a claim, the claimant or his or her authorized...

  19. 32 CFR 536.118 - Related statutes for maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Related statutes for maritime claims. 536.118... ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.118 Related statutes for maritime claims... under the AMCSA is not mandatory for causes of action as it is for the SIAA or PVA. (b) Similar maritime...

  20. 32 CFR 537.16 - Scope for maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope for maritime claims. 537.16 Section 537.16... BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.16 Scope for maritime claims. The Army Maritime Claims Settlement Act... claims for damage to: (1) DA-accountable properties of a kind that are within the federal maritime...

  1. 32 CFR 537.19 - Demands arising from maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Demands arising from maritime claims. 537.19 Section 537.19 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS ON BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.19 Demands arising from maritime claims. (a) It is...

  2. 32 CFR 536.119 - Scope for maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope for maritime claims. 536.119 Section 536... CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.119 Scope for maritime claims. The AMCSA applies...) Damage that is maritime in nature and caused by tortious conduct of U.S. military personnel or federal...

  3. 32 CFR 536.124 - Settlement authority for maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Settlement authority for maritime claims. 536.124 Section 536.124 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.124 Settlement authority for maritime...

  4. 32 CFR 537.18 - Settlement authority for maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Settlement authority for maritime claims. 537.18 Section 537.18 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS ON BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.18 Settlement authority for maritime claims. (a) The...

  5. 32 CFR 536.29 - Revision of filed claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.29 Revision of filed claims. (a... the writing alleges a new theory of liability, a new tortfeasor, a new party claimant, a different... amendment, not a new claim. Similarly, the addition of required information not on the original claim...

  6. Worst-Case-Optimal Dynamic Reinsurance for Large Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korn, Ralf; Menkens, Olaf; Steffensen, Mogens

    2012-01-01

    We control the surplus process of a non-life insurance company by dynamic proportional reinsurance. The objective is to maximize expected (utility of the) surplus under the worst-case claim development. In the large claim case with a worst-case upper limit on claim numbers and claim sizes, we fin...

  7. 42 CFR 456.722 - Electronic claims management system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Electronic Claims Management System for Outpatient Drug Claims § 456.722 Electronic claims management system...'s Medicaid Management Information System (MMIS) applicable to prescription drugs. (ii) Notifying the... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic claims management system. 456.722...

  8. 28 CFR 32.32 - Time for filing claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Time for filing claim. 32.32 Section 32.32 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICERS' DEATH, DISABILITY, AND EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE BENEFIT CLAIMS Educational Assistance Benefit Claims § 32.32 Time for filing claim. (a...

  9. 7 CFR 220.14 - Claims against school food authorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS SCHOOL BREAKFAST PROGRAM § 220.14 Claims against school food authorities. (a) State agencies shall disallow any portion of a claim and recover any payment made... FNSRO, when FNSRO disallows a claim or a portion of a claim, or makes a demand for refund of an alleged...

  10. Real-World Economic Outcomes During Time on Treatment Among Patients Who Initiated Sunitinib or Pazopanib as First Targeted Therapy for Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Retrospective Analysis of Medicare Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelzang, Nicholas J; Pal, Sumanta K; Ghate, Sameer R; Li, Nanxin; Swallow, Elyse; Peeples, Miranda; Zichlin, Miriam L; Meiselbach, Mark K; Perez, Jose Ricardo; Agarwal, Neeraj

    2018-06-01

    The median age at renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosis is 64 years. However, few studies have assessed the real-world time on treatment (TOT), health resource utilization (HRU), costs, or treatment compliance associated with targeted therapy use among patients in this age group with RCC. To assess the HRU, costs, and compliance during TOT among Medicare patients aged ≥ 65 years with advanced RCC (aRCC) who initiated first targeted therapy with pazopanib or sunitinib. Patients with aRCC were identified in the 100% Medicare + Part D databases administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Eligible patients initiated first targeted therapy with sunitinib or pazopanib (index drug) on or after their first diagnosis of secondary neoplasm between October 19, 2009, and January 1, 2014, and were aged ≥ 65 years as of 1 year before first targeted therapy initiation (index date). Included patients were stratified into pazopanib and sunitinib cohorts based on first targeted therapy and matched 1:1 on baseline characteristics using propensity scores. TOT was defined as the time from the index date to treatment discontinuation (prescription gap > 90 days) or death. Compliance was defined as the ratio of drug supply days to TOT. Monthly all-cause costs and costs associated with RCC diagnosis (medical and pharmacy in 2015 U.S. dollars) and HRU (inpatient [admissions, readmissions, and days], outpatient, and emergency room visits) were assessed in the 1-year post-index period during TOT. Matched cohorts' TOT was compared using Kaplan-Meier analyses and univariable Cox models, and compliance, HRU, and costs were compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Of 1,711 included patients, 526 initiated pazopanib and 1,185 initiated sunitinib. Before matching, more patients in the pazopanib cohort were white, diagnosed in 2010-2014 versus 2006-2009, and had lung metastases compared with the sunitinib cohort (all P < 0.05). The pazopanib cohort also had higher mean

  11. 32 CFR 537.15 - Statutory authority for maritime claims and claims involving civil works of a maritime nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Statutory authority for maritime claims and claims involving civil works of a maritime nature. 537.15 Section 537.15 National Defense Department of....15 Statutory authority for maritime claims and claims involving civil works of a maritime nature. (a...

  12. Recent cold fusion claims: are they valid?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalski, Ludwik

    2006-01-01

    Cold fusion consists of nuclear reactions occurring in solid metals loaded with hydrogen. Considerable progress has been made in that area in the last ten years. This 2004 paper summarizes recent claims without attempting to evaluate their validity. The manuscript was submitted to seven physics journals. Unfortunately, the editors rejected it without the benefit of the usual peer-review process. (author)

  13. 27 CFR 70.413 - Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... file a bond in double the amount of the tax in order to insure collection of the tax if the claim is... 5620.8 for allowance of loss, credit of tax, or relief from tax liability, as applicable, on (1....413 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE...

  14. IDENTITY CLAIMS, TEXTS, ROME AND GALATIANS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    inform the identity claimed and negotiated by people and groups. When ..... 24 To some extent, going against the grain of Bourdieu' notion that “what exist in the social world are .... based on words and information that create reality” (Lampe 1995:940, emphasis ..... Jesus, the Early Church and the Roman superpower.

  15. 45 CFR 34.5 - Unallowable claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS FILED UNDER THE MILITARY... as jewelry, cameras, watches, and binoculars when they are shipped with household goods by a moving... exercise due care in protecting his or her property. (10) Sales Tax. Reimbursements for the payment of...

  16. CLAIMS IN INTERNATIONAL CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The most significant effect-of claims in international projects in Ethiopia has ... however, do not accept the decision of the Engineer, then an .... The original design of the roof framing for the ..... have experienced tIus problem making it a prime.

  17. 33 CFR 25.507 - Claims payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... property involved would be liable under local law. (b) The fact that the act giving rise to a claim may constitute a crime does not, by itself, bar relief. (c) Local law or custom pertaining to contributory or comparative negligence, and to joint tort-feasors, are applied to the extent practicable. ...

  18. 32 CFR 750.9 - Claims: Payments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... requires submission of the payment voucher to the General Accounting Office. All other field authorized payment vouchers are submitted directly to the servicing disbursing office for payment. ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims: Payments. 750.9 Section 750.9 National...

  19. Consumer perceptions of nutrition and health claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijp, van H.C.M.; Lans, van der I.A.

    2007-01-01

    The number of food products containing extra or reduced levels of specific ingredients (e.g. extra calcium) that bring particular health benefits (e.g. stronger bones) is still increasing. Nutrition- and health-related (NH) claims promoting these ingredient levels and their health benefit differ in

  20. Quadratic Hedging Methods for Defaultable Claims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biagini, Francesca; Cretarola, Alessandra

    2007-01-01

    We apply the local risk-minimization approach to defaultable claims and we compare it with intensity-based evaluation formulas and the mean-variance hedging. We solve analytically the problem of finding respectively the hedging strategy and the associated portfolio for the three methods in the case of a default put option with random recovery at maturity

  1. Competing jurisdictions : settling land claims in Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, S.; Spierenburg, M.; Wels, H.

    2005-01-01

    The papers included in this volume were earlier presented at a conference on the settlement of land claims in Africa, which was held in Amsterdam in September 2003. The papers are written primarily from an anthropological perspective. Contributions: Introduction: competing jurisdictions: settling

  2. 32 CFR 750.43 - Claims payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in nature, having little parallel in civilian pursuits, and in which the U.S. Government has... agreement are payable under the MCA, even though legally enforceable against the U.S. Government as contract.... Claims filed under this paragraph may, if in the best interest of the U.S. Government, be referred to and...

  3. Archival claims in Southern Africa | Mnjama | Innovation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The author examines the problem of archival claims in the region. He begins by defining the broad categories of archives that fall under the rubric of `migrated archives' and shows that virtually all states in the region are affected by problems related to this phenomenon. He argues that failure to distinguish the different ...

  4. 32 CFR 732.19 - Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... naval medical or dental officer is not on duty, or by the member receiving care when on detached duty...) and line of duty (LOD) determination. When a reservist claims benefits for care received totally after... Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY PERSONNEL NONNAVAL MEDICAL AND DENTAL CARE Medical...

  5. Contested claims to gardens and land

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obika, Julaina; Adol, Ben Otto; Babiiha, Sulayman Mpisi

    2018-01-01

    This chapter explores how, in a patrilineal and patriarchal society recovering from two decades of war, women and men frame arguments about entitlement. Here claims to gardens (plots of land for cultivation) become a contested conversation about women’s rights of belonging to family and community...

  6. Accuracy of marketing claims by providers of stereotactic radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Amol K; Lam, Edwin; Makary, Martin A; Deweese, Theodore L; Pawlik, Timothy M; Pronovost, Peter J; Herman, Joseph M

    2013-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer advertising by industry has been criticized for encouraging overuse of unproven therapies, but advertising by health care providers has not been as carefully scrutinized. Stereotactic radiation therapy is an emerging technology that has sparked controversy regarding the marketing campaigns of some manufacturers. Given that this technology is also being heavily advertised on the Web sites of health care providers, the accuracy of providers' marketing claims should be rigorously evaluated. We reviewed the Web sites of all U.S. hospitals and private practices that provide stereotactic radiation using two leading brands of stereotactic radiosurgery technology. Centers were identified by using data from the manufacturers. Centers without Web sites were excluded. The final study population consisted of 212 centers with online advertisements for stereotactic radiation. Web sites were evaluated for advertisements that were inconsistent with advertising guidelines provided by the American Medical Association. Most centers (76%) had individual pages dedicated to the marketing of their brand of stereotactic technology that frequently contained manufacturer-authored images (50%) or text (55%). Advertising for the treatment of tumors that have not been endorsed by professional societies was present on 66% of Web sites. Centers commonly claimed improved survival (22%), disease control (20%), quality of life (17%), and toxicity (43%) with stereotactic radiation. Although 40% of Web sites championed the center's regional expertise in delivering stereotactic treatments, only 15% of Web sites provided data to support their claims. Provider advertisements for stereotactic radiation were prominent and aggressive. Further investigation of provider advertising, its effects on quality of care, and potential oversight mechanisms is needed.

  7. HEALTH INFO SANTE ANNUAL DEDUCTIBLE AND REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMS: HINTS FOR USE

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Information from the CHIS Board and the Personnel DivisionOne should bear in mind that the annual deductible is an amount (currently CHF 100) charged automatically by the Administrator of the scheme for every adult aged 18 and above. This is what happens: The amount is deducted annually for all medical services received over a calendar year.It is triggered by the date of the treatment and not by the date of the bill nor that of the reimbursement claim.In other words, if you receive medical treatment in December for the first time in a given year, the CHF 100 will be deducted from the claim for that treatment. So, except for urgent cases, it would be better to wait till the following month, thus avoiding one annual deductible.It is also worth remembering that the cost of processing our reimbursement claims - and there were 55, 000 in 1998 - is part of the cost of our insurance.Help keep administrative costs down : do not submit reimbursement claims for amounts less than the annual deductible unless your claims...

  8. 32 CFR 536.93 - Claims not payable under the Non-Scope Claims Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agent or employee. The doctrine of comparative negligence does not apply. (b) Is for medical, hospital... recoverable by the claimant under an indemnifying law or indemnity contract. If the claim is in part legally...

  9. Estimation of Missed Statin Prescription Use in an Administrative Claims Dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Rolin L; Patel, Jeetvan G; Hill, Jerrold W; De, Ajita P; Harrison, David J

    2017-09-01

    Nonadherence to statin medications is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and poses a challenge to lipid management in patients who are at risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Numerous studies have examined statin adherence based on administrative claims data; however, these data may underestimate statin use in patients who participate in generic drug discount programs or who have alternative coverage. To estimate the proportion of patients with missing statin claims in a claims database and determine how missing claims affect commonly used utilization metrics. This retrospective cohort study used pharmacy data from the PharMetrics Plus (P+) claims dataset linked to the IMS longitudinal pharmacy point-of-sale prescription database (LRx) from January 1, 2012, through December 31, 2014. Eligible patients were represented in the P+ and LRx datasets, had ≥1 claim for a statin (index claim) in either database, and had ≥ 24 months of continuous enrollment in P+. Patients were linked between P+ and LRx using a deterministic method. Duplicate claims between LRx and P+ were removed to produce a new dataset comprised of P+ claims augmented with LRx claims. Statin use was then compared between P+ and the augmented P+ dataset. Utilization metrics that were evaluated included percentage of patients with ≥ 1 missing statin claim over 12 months in P+; the number of patients misclassified as new users in P+; the number of patients misclassified as nonstatin users in P+; the change in 12-month medication possession ratio (MPR) and proportion of days covered (PDC) in P+; the comparison between P+ and LRx of classifications of statin treatment patterns (statin intensity and patients with treatment modifications); and the payment status for missing statin claims. Data from 965,785 patients with statin claims in P+ were analyzed (mean age 56.6 years; 57% male). In P+, 20.1% had ≥ 1 missing statin claim post-index; 13.7% were misclassified as

  10. Ultra-processed family foods in Australia: nutrition claims, health claims and marketing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulker, Claire Elizabeth; Scott, Jane Anne; Pollard, Christina Mary

    2018-01-01

    To objectively evaluate voluntary nutrition and health claims and marketing techniques present on packaging of high-market-share ultra-processed foods (UPF) in Australia for their potential impact on public health. Cross-sectional. Packaging information from five high-market-share food manufacturers and one retailer were obtained from supermarket and manufacturers' websites. Ingredients lists for 215 UPF were examined for presence of added sugar. Packaging information was categorised using a taxonomy of nutrition and health information which included nutrition and health claims and five common food marketing techniques. Compliance of statements and claims with the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code and with Health Star Ratings (HSR) were assessed for all products. Almost all UPF (95 %) contained added sugars described in thirty-four different ways; 55 % of UPF displayed a HSR; 56 % had nutrition claims (18 % were compliant with regulations); 25 % had health claims (79 % were compliant); and 97 % employed common food marketing techniques. Packaging of 47 % of UPF was designed to appeal to children. UPF carried a mean of 1·5 health and nutrition claims (range 0-10) and 2·6 marketing techniques (range 0-5), and 45 % had HSR≤3·0/5·0. Most UPF packaging featured nutrition and health statements or claims despite the high prevalence of added sugars and moderate HSR. The degree of inappropriate or inaccurate statements and claims present is concerning, particularly on packaging designed to appeal to children. Public policies to assist parents to select healthy family foods should address the quality and accuracy of information provided on UPF packaging.

  11. The pseudo-scientific psychologyof the economic neo-liberalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alečković-Nikolić Mila S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to call attention to logical, axiological, psychological and historical foundations of the problem of economic neo-liberalism. The question is how to achieve psychological comprehension of the historical developpement of the idea of scientific reductionism, the idea of 'common law' and rational utilitarism (Hobbes, Locke, Smith, Bentham, of rationalism (Kant and socialism (Rousseau. In the second part of this analysis the aim is to show that the theory of mechanical simplification in the comprehension of human society is logically wrong theory and that this logically wrong theory is the premise of the social totalitarianism. Finally, the goal of our analysis (specially relevant for the Serbian society trapped today is to show that the world of actual financial reductionism and economic neo-liberalism does not understand at all the real human nature.

  12. Surgical exploration of hand wounds in the emergency room: Preliminary study of 80 personal injury claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, J; Houdre, H; Beccari, R; Tarissi, N; Autran, M; Auquit-Auckbur, I

    2016-12-01

    The SHAM Insurance Company in Lyon, France, estimated that inadequate hand wound exploration in the emergency room (ER) accounted for 10% of all ER-related personal injury claims in 2013. The objective of this study was to conduct a critical analysis of 80 claims that were related to hand wound management in the ER and led to compensation by SHAM. Eighty claims filed between 2007 and 2010 were anonymised then included into the study. To be eligible, claims had to be filed with SHAM, related to the ER management of a hand wound in an adult, and closed at the time of the study. Claims related to surgery were excluded. For each claim, we recorded 104 items (e.g., epidemiology, treatments offered, and impact on social and occupational activities) and analysed. Of the 70 patients, 60% were manual workers. The advice of a surgeon was sought in 16% of cases. The most common wound sites were the thumb (33%) and index finger (17%). Among the missed lesions, most involved tendons (74%) or nerves (29%). Many patients had more than one reason for filing a claim. The main reasons were inadequate wound exploration (97%), stiffness (49%), and dysaesthesia (41%). One third of patients were unable to return to their previous job. Mean sick-leave duration was 148 days and mean time from discharge to best outcome was 4.19%. Most claims (79%) were settled directly with the insurance company, 16% after involvement of a public mediator, and 12% in court. The mean compensatory damages award was 4595Euros. Inadequate surgical exploration of hand wounds is common in the ER, carries a risk of lasting and sometimes severe residual impairment, and generates considerable societal costs. IV. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Database and Registry Research in Orthopaedic Surgery: Part I: Claims-Based Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugely, Andrew J; Martin, Christopher T; Harwood, Jared; Ong, Kevin L; Bozic, Kevin J; Callaghan, John J

    2015-08-05

    The use of large-scale national databases for observational research in orthopaedic surgery has grown substantially in the last decade, and the data sets can be grossly categorized as either administrative claims or clinical registries. Administrative claims data comprise the billing records associated with the delivery of health-care services. Orthopaedic researchers have used both government and private claims to describe temporal trends, geographic variation, disparities, complications, outcomes, and resource utilization associated with both musculoskeletal disease and treatment. Medicare claims comprise one of the most robust data sets used to perform orthopaedic research, with >45 million beneficiaries. The U.S. government, through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, often uses these data to drive changes in health policy. Private claims data used in orthopaedic research often comprise more heterogeneous patient demographic samples, but allow longitudinal analysis similar to that offered by Medicare claims. Discharge databases, such as the U.S. National Inpatient Sample, provide a wide national sampling of inpatient hospital stays from all payers and allow analysis of associated adverse events and resource utilization. Administrative claims data benefit from the high patient numbers obtained through a majority of hospitals. Using claims, it is possible to follow patients longitudinally throughout encounters irrespective of the location of the institution delivering health care. Some disadvantages include lack of precision of ICD-9 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision) coding schemes. Much of these data are expensive to purchase, complicated to organize, and labor-intensive to manipulate--often requiring trained specialists for analysis. Given the changing health-care environment, it is likely that databases will provide valuable information that has the potential to influence clinical practice improvement and health policy for

  14. 76 FR 16804 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-8102-05, AA-8102-08, AA-8102-10, AA-8102-25, AA-8102-28, AA-8102- 37, AA-8102-47; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims... phone at 907-271-5960, by e-mail at ak[email protected] , or by telecommunication device (TTD...

  15. Rights as entitlements and rights as claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo, Marco Antônio Oliveira de

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Há pelo menos dois registros diferentes sobre o significado de “direitos”. Segundo um deles, os direitos são relações entre dois termos: uma pessoa e um bem; para o outro, os direitos são relações entre três termos: um indivíduo, uma pessoa e uma ação ou algo. Os registros são diferentes, mas não são totalmente incompatíveis. De acordo com a interpretação de direitos como entitlements, trata-se de direitos morais ou legais, ou seja, as relações de ordem moral ou jurídica das pessoas com bens (de benefícios concedidos a pessoas por uma lei humana, moral ou legal. Como uma espécie de direitos, os direitos humanos são vistos como direitos (entitlements das pessoas ou dos indivíduos a bens essenciais, dos quais podem-se inferir reivindicações (claims contra outras pessoas ou contra governos e representantes. Falamos sobre direitos humanos geralmente desta forma. Mas de acordo com o outro registro, os direitos em sentido próprio têm que ser interpretados como claims. Neste artigo, pretendo apresentar alguns argumentos em favor da vantagem de expor todos os enunciados significativos dos direitos como entitlements em termos explícitos de claims

  16. 12 CFR 793.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... authorized agent, or his legal representative. (c) A claim based on death may be presented by the executor or... accompanied by evidence of his authority to present a claim on behalf of the claimant as agent, executor...

  17. 25 CFR 11.707 - Claims against estate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... executor or administrator within 60 days from official notice of the appointment of the executor or... appropriate notice for the filing of claims. (b) The executor or administrator shall examine all claims within...

  18. 40 CFR 10.3 - Administrative claims; who may file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) A claim based on death may be presented by the executor or administrator of the decedent's estate or... to present a claim on behalf of the claimant as agent, executor, administrator, parent, guardian, or...

  19. 24 CFR 17.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... representative. (c) A claim based on death may be presented by the executor or administrator of the decedent's... evidence of his authority to present a claim on behalf of the claimant as agent, executor, administrator...

  20. 29 CFR 15.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... representative. (c) A claim for death may be presented by the executor or administrator of the decedent's estate... her authority to present a claim on behalf of the claimant as agent, executor, administrator, parent...

  1. 37 CFR 360.14 - Copies of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 360.14 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights COPYRIGHT ROYALTY BOARD, LIBRARY OF CONGRESS SUBMISSION OF ROYALTY CLAIMS FILING OF CLAIMS TO ROYALTY FEES COLLECTED UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE Satellite... royalty fees. ...

  2. 32 CFR 750.10 - Claims: Settlement and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... amount in full settlement and final satisfaction of the claim. In the latter instance, no payment will be... employee of the Government whose act or omission gave rise to the claim. [57 FR 4722, Feb. 7, 1992, as...

  3. 32 CFR 536.22 - Claims investigative responsibility-General.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... involving serious injury or death or those in which property damage exceeds $50,000. A command claims... forwarded to the Commander USARCS. (d) Geographic concept of responsibility. A command claims service or an...

  4. Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) , Medicare Claims data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2003 forward. CMS compiles claims data for Medicare and Medicaid patients across a variety of categories and years. This includes Inpatient and Outpatient claims,...

  5. 28 CFR 543.32 - Processing the claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Central Office for their review. (f) Will appreciation or depreciation be considered? Yes. Staff will consider appreciation or depreciation of lost or damaged property in settling a claim. (g) If my claim is...

  6. 40 CFR 1620.3 - Administrative claim; who may file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) A claim based on death may be presented by the executor or administrator of the decedent's estate... that the basis for the representation is documented in writing. (d) A claim for loss totally...

  7. Claims-based definition of death in Japanese claims database: validity and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooba, Nobuhiro; Setoguchi, Soko; Ando, Takashi; Sato, Tsugumichi; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Kubota, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    For the pending National Claims Database in Japan, researchers will not have access to death information in the enrollment files. We developed and evaluated a claims-based definition of death. We used healthcare claims and enrollment data between January 2005 and August 2009 for 195,193 beneficiaries aged 20 to 74 in 3 private health insurance unions. We developed claims-based definitions of death using discharge or disease status and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). We calculated sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPVs) using the enrollment data as a gold standard in the overall population and subgroups divided by demographic and other factors. We also assessed bias and precision in two example studies where an outcome was death. The definition based on the combination of discharge/disease status and CCI provided moderate sensitivity (around 60%) and high specificity (99.99%) and high PPVs (94.8%). In most subgroups, sensitivity of the preferred definition was also around 60% but varied from 28 to 91%. In an example study comparing death rates between two anticancer drug classes, the claims-based definition provided valid and precise hazard ratios (HRs). In another example study comparing two classes of anti-depressants, the HR with the claims-based definition was biased and had lower precision than that with the gold standard definition. The claims-based definitions of death developed in this study had high specificity and PPVs while sensitivity was around 60%. The definitions will be useful in future studies when used with attention to the possible fluctuation of sensitivity in some subpopulations.

  8. Claims-Based Definition of Death in Japanese Claims Database: Validity and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooba, Nobuhiro; Setoguchi, Soko; Ando, Takashi; Sato, Tsugumichi; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Mochizuki, Mayumi; Kubota, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Background For the pending National Claims Database in Japan, researchers will not have access to death information in the enrollment files. We developed and evaluated a claims-based definition of death. Methodology/Principal Findings We used healthcare claims and enrollment data between January 2005 and August 2009 for 195,193 beneficiaries aged 20 to 74 in 3 private health insurance unions. We developed claims-based definitions of death using discharge or disease status and Charlson comorbidity index (CCI). We calculated sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive values (PPVs) using the enrollment data as a gold standard in the overall population and subgroups divided by demographic and other factors. We also assessed bias and precision in two example studies where an outcome was death. The definition based on the combination of discharge/disease status and CCI provided moderate sensitivity (around 60%) and high specificity (99.99%) and high PPVs (94.8%). In most subgroups, sensitivity of the preferred definition was also around 60% but varied from 28 to 91%. In an example study comparing death rates between two anticancer drug classes, the claims-based definition provided valid and precise hazard ratios (HRs). In another example study comparing two classes of anti-depressants, the HR with the claims-based definition was biased and had lower precision than that with the gold standard definition. Conclusions/Significance The claims-based definitions of death developed in this study had high specificity and PPVs while sensitivity was around 60%. The definitions will be useful in future studies when used with attention to the possible fluctuation of sensitivity in some subpopulations. PMID:23741526

  9. Closed medical negligence claims can drive patient safety and reduce litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegalis, Steven E; Bal, B Sonny

    2012-05-01

    Medical liability reform is viewed by many physician groups as a means of reducing medical malpractice litigation and lowering healthcare costs. However, alternative approaches such as closed medical negligence claims data may also achieve these goals. We asked whether information gleaned from closed claims related to medical negligence could promote patient safety and reduce costs related to medical liability. Specifically, we investigated whether physician groups have examined such data to identify error patterns and to then institute specific patient treatment protocols. We searched for medical societies that have systematically examined closed medical negligence claims in their specialty to develop specific standards of physician conduct. We then searched the medical literature for published evidence of the efficacy, if any, related to the patient safety measures thus developed. Anesthesia and obstetric physician societies have successfully targeted costs and related concerns arising from medical malpractice lawsuits by using data from closed claims to develop patient safety and treatment guidelines. In both specialties, after institution of safety measures derived from closed medical negligence claims, the incidence and costs related to medical malpractice decreased and physician satisfaction improved. Tort reform, in the form of legislatively prescribed limits on damages arising from lawsuits, is not the only means of addressing the incidence and costs related to medical malpractice litigation. As the experience of anesthesia and obstetric physicians has demonstrated, safety guidelines derived from analyzing past medical malpractice litigation can achieve the same goals while also promoting patient safety.

  10. Repeat workers' compensation claims: risk factors, costs and work disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of our study was to describe factors associated with repeat workers' compensation claims and to compare the work disability arising in workers with single and multiple compensation claims. Methods All initial injury claims lodged by persons of working age during a five year period (1996 to 2000) and any repeat claims were extracted from workers' compensation administrative data in the state of Victoria, Australia. Groups of workers with single and multiple claims were identified. Descriptive analysis of claims by affliction, bodily location, industry segment, occupation, employer and workplace was undertaken. Survival analysis determined the impact of these variables on the time between the claims. The economic impact and duration of work incapacity associated with initial and repeat claims was compared between groups. Results 37% of persons with an initial claim lodged a second claim. This group contained a significantly greater proportion of males, were younger and more likely to be employed in manual occupations and high-risk industries than those with single claims. 78% of repeat claims were for a second injury. Duration between the claims was shortest when the working conditions had not changed. The initial claims of repeat claimants resulted in significantly (p claims. Conclusions A substantial proportion of injured workers experience a second occupational injury or disease. These workers pose a greater economic burden than those with single claims, and also experience a substantially greater cumulative period of work disability. There is potential to reduce the social, health and economic burden of workplace injury by enacting prevention programs targeted at these workers. PMID:21696637

  11. Prevalence rates for depression by industry: a claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulsin, Lawson; Alterman, Toni; Timothy Bushnell, P; Li, Jia; Shen, Rui

    2014-11-01

    To estimate and interpret differences in depression prevalence rates among industries, using a large, group medical claims database. Depression cases were identified by ICD-9 diagnosis code in a population of 214,413 individuals employed during 2002-2005 by employers based in western Pennsylvania. Data were provided by Highmark, Inc. (Pittsburgh and Camp Hill, PA). Rates were adjusted for age, gender, and employee share of health care costs. National industry measures of psychological distress, work stress, and physical activity at work were also compiled from other data sources. Rates for clinical depression in 55 industries ranged from 6.9 to 16.2 %, (population rate = 10.45 %). Industries with the highest rates tended to be those which, on the national level, require frequent or difficult interactions with the public or clients, and have high levels of stress and low levels of physical activity. Additional research is needed to help identify industries with relatively high rates of depression in other regions and on the national level, and to determine whether these differences are due in part to specific work stress exposures and physical inactivity at work. Claims database analyses may provide a cost-effective way to identify priorities for depression treatment and prevention in the workplace.

  12. Prevalence rates for depression by industry: a claims database analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alterman, Toni; Bushnell, P. Timothy; Li, Jia; Shen, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To estimate and interpret differences in depression prevalence rates among industries, using a large, group medical claims database. Methods Depression cases were identified by ICD-9 diagnosis code in a population of 214,413 individuals employed during 2002–2005 by employers based in western Pennsylvania. Data were provided by Highmark, Inc. (Pittsburgh and Camp Hill, PA). Rates were adjusted for age, gender, and employee share of health care costs. National industry measures of psychological distress, work stress, and physical activity at work were also compiled from other data sources. Results Rates for clinical depression in 55 industries ranged from 6.9 to 16.2 %, (population rate = 10.45 %). Industries with the highest rates tended to be those which, on the national level, require frequent or difficult interactions with the public or clients, and have high levels of stress and low levels of physical activity. Conclusions Additional research is needed to help identify industries with relatively high rates of depression in other regions and on the national level, and to determine whether these differences are due in part to specific work stress exposures and physical inactivity at work. Clinical significance Claims database analyses may provide a cost-effective way to identify priorities for depression treatment and prevention in the workplace. PMID:24907896

  13. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMPENSATION FUND OF 2001 Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.31 Procedure for claims..., described herein as “Track A” and “Track B,” selected by the claimant on the Personal Injury Compensation Form or Death Compensation Form. (1) Procedure for Track A. The Claims Evaluator shall determine...

  14. Evaluation of Modified Risk Claim Advertising Formats for Camel Snus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fix, Brian V.; Adkison, Sarah E.; O'Connor, Richard J.; Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Cummings, K. Michael; Rees, Vaughan W.; Hatsukami, Dorothy K.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has regulatory authority for modified risk tobacco product advertising claims. To guide future regulatory efforts, we investigated how variations in modified risk claim advertisements influence consumer perceptions of product risk claims for Camel Snus. Methods: Young people and adults (15-65),…

  15. 33 CFR 211.22 - Real estate Claims Officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Real estate Claims Officers. 211..., DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REAL ESTATE ACTIVITIES OF THE CORPS OF ENGINEERS IN CONNECTION WITH CIVIL WORKS PROJECTS Real Estate Claims § 211.22 Real estate Claims Officers. In each Division Office the Division...

  16. 48 CFR 33.208 - Interest on claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... otherwise would be due, if that date is later, until the date of payment. (b) Simple interest on claims... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interest on claims. 33.208... REQUIREMENTS PROTESTS, DISPUTES, AND APPEALS Disputes and Appeals 33.208 Interest on claims. (a) The Government...

  17. 32 CFR 842.6 - Signature on the claim form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signature on the claim form. 842.6 Section 842.6... ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS General Information § 842.6 Signature on the claim form. The claimant or authorized agent... authorized agent signing for a claimant shows, after the signature, the title or capacity and attaches...

  18. 27 CFR 70.608 - Action on claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 70.608 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... appropriate TTB officer shall date stamp and examine each claim filed under this subpart and will determine the validity of the claim. Claims and supporting data involving customs duties will be forwarded to...

  19. 32 CFR 842.76 - Filing a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... by a demand for money damages in a sum certain. A claim incorrectly presented to the Air Force will... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE.... A claim has been filed when a federal agency receives from a claimant or the claimant's duly...

  20. 32 CFR 842.24 - Filing a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... properly completed AF Form 180, DD Form 1842 or other written and signed demand for a specified sum of money. (b) Amending a claim. A claimant may amend a claim at any time prior to the expiration of the... Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE...

  1. 32 CFR 842.46 - Who may file a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... authorized agents may file claims for personal injury. (c) Duly appointed guardians of minor children or any other persons legally entitled to do so under applicable local law may file claims for minors' personal... action surviving an individual's death. (e) Insurers with subrogation rights may file claims for losses...

  2. 13 CFR 142.3 - What is a claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is a claim? 142.3 Section 142.3 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROGRAM FRAUD CIVIL REMEDIES ACT REGULATIONS Overview and Definitions § 142.3 What is a claim? (a) Claim means any request, demand, or...

  3. 31 CFR 360.29 - Adjudication of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Adjudication of claims. 360.29 Section 360.29 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL... the ordinary course of business. (b) Claims filed 10 years after payment. Any claim filed 10 years or...

  4. 16 CFR 260.7 - Environmental marketing claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... pieces if left uncovered in sunlight.” The claim is supported by competent and reliable scientific... sunlight and into sufficiently small pieces to become part of the soil. The qualified claim is not... time. The claim is not deceptive. Example 4: A plastic six-pack ring carrier is marked with a small...

  5. 27 CFR 70.123 - Claims for credit or refund.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., documentary evidence to establish the legal authority of the fiduciary need not accompany the claim, provided... necessary documentary evidence should accompany the claim. A claim may be executed by an agent of the person... Office of Management and Budget under control number 1512-0141) (26 U.S.C. 6402) [T.D. ATF-251, 52 FR...

  6. Claim Assessment Profile: A Method for Capturing Healthcare Evidence in the Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Lara; Jonas, Wayne B

    2017-02-01

    Grounding health claims in an evidence base is essential for determining safety and effectiveness. However, it is not appropriate to evaluate all healthcare claims with the same methods. "Gold standard" randomized controlled trials may skip over important qualitative and observational data about use, benefits, side effects, and preferences, issues especially salient in research on complementary and integrative health (CIH) practices. This gap has prompted a move toward studying treatments in their naturalistic settings. In the 1990s, a program initiated under the National Institutes of Health was designed to provide an outreach to CIH practices for assessing the feasibility of conducting retrospective or prospective evaluations. The Claim Assessment Profile further develops this approach, within the framework of Samueli Institute's Scientific Evaluation and Review of Claims in Health Care (SEaRCH) method. The goals of a Claim Assessment Profile are to clarify the elements that constitute a practice, define key outcomes, and create an explanatory model of these impacts. The main objective is to determine readiness and capacity of a practice to engage in evaluation of effectiveness. This approach is informed by a variety of rapid assessment and stakeholder-driven methods. Site visits, structured qualitative interviews, surveys, and observational data on implementation provide descriptive data about the practice. Logic modeling defines inputs, processes, and outcome variables; Path modeling defines an analytic map to explore. The Claim Assessment Profile is a rapid assessment of the evaluability of a healthcare practice. The method was developed for use on CIH practices but has also been applied in resilience research and may be applied beyond the healthcare sector. Findings are meant to provide sufficient data to improve decision-making for stakeholders. This method provides an important first step for moving existing promising yet untested practices into

  7. Potentially Deceptive Health Nutrition-Related Advertising Claims: The Role of Inoculation in Conferring Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Alicia M.; Miller, Claude H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to examine the efficacy of inoculation message treatments to facilitate resistance to health nutrition-related (HNR) commercial food advertising claims. Design: Data were collected across three phases extending across a 5-week period conducted over two semesters at a Midwest US university. A 2 × 3 between-subjects…

  8. 19 CFR 10.420 - Filing of claim for tariff preference level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cotton or man-made fiber fabric or apparel good described in § 10.421 of this subpart that does not... tariff treatment under the US-CFTA under an applicable tariff preference level (TPL). To make a TPL claim... subheading in Chapter 52 through 62 of the HTSUS under which each non-originating cotton or man-made fiber...

  9. 19 CFR 10.520 - Filing of claim for tariff preference level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... A cotton or man-made fiber apparel good described in § 10.521 of this subpart that does not qualify... tariff treatment under the SFTA under an applicable tariff preference level (TPL). To make a TPL claim... Chapter 61 or 62 of the HTSUS under which each non-originating cotton or man-made fiber apparel good is...

  10. 28 CFR 43.1 - Administrative determination and assertion of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative determination and assertion of claims. 43.1 Section 43.1 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RECOVERY OF COST OF HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CARE AND TREATMENT FURNISHED BY THE UNITED STATES § 43.1 Administrative...

  11. 75 FR 44951 - Inquiry To Learn Whether Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    ... such treatment. Certain businesses, however, do not meet the definition of ``affected business,'' and... definition of ``affected business,'' and are not covered by today's notice. They consist of any business that... Businesses Assert Business Confidentiality Claims AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...

  12. Accuracy of claims-based algorithms for epilepsy research: Revealing the unseen performance of claims-based studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Lidia M V R; Price, Maggie; Cole, Andrew J; Hoch, Daniel B; Hsu, John

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate published algorithms for the identification of epilepsy cases in medical claims data using a unique linked dataset with both clinical and claims data. Using data from a large, regional health delivery system, we identified all patients contributing biologic samples to the health system's Biobank (n = 36K). We identified all subjects with at least one diagnosis potentially consistent with epilepsy, for example, epilepsy, convulsions, syncope, or collapse, between 2014 and 2015, or who were seen at the epilepsy clinic (n = 1,217), plus a random sample of subjects with neither claims nor clinic visits (n = 435); we then performed a medical chart review in a random subsample of 1,377 to assess the epilepsy diagnosis status. Using the chart review as the reference standard, we evaluated the test characteristics of six published algorithms. The best-performing algorithm used diagnostic and prescription drug data (sensitivity = 70%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 66-73%; specificity = 77%, 95% CI 73-81%; and area under the curve [AUC] = 0.73, 95%CI 0.71-0.76) when applied to patients age 18 years or older. Restricting the sample to adults aged 18-64 years resulted in a mild improvement in accuracy (AUC = 0.75,95%CI 0.73-0.78). Adding information about current antiepileptic drug use to the algorithm increased test performance (AUC = 0.78, 95%CI 0.76-0.80). Other algorithms varied in their included data types and performed worse. Current approaches for identifying patients with epilepsy in insurance claims have important limitations when applied to the general population. Approaches incorporating a range of information, for example, diagnoses, treatments, and site of care/specialty of physician, improve the performance of identification and could be useful in epilepsy studies using large datasets. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  13. The role of radiology in diagnostic error: a medical malpractice claims review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Dana; Stratchko, Lindsay M; DeRoo, Courtney

    2017-09-26

    Just as radiologic studies allow us to see past the surface to the vulnerable and broken parts of the human body, medical malpractice claims help us see past the surface of medical errors to the deeper vulnerabilities and potentially broken aspects of our healthcare delivery system. And just as the insights we gain through radiologic studies provide focus for a treatment plan for healing, so too can the analysis of malpractice claims provide insights to improve the delivery of safe patient care. We review 1325 coded claims where Radiology was the primary service provider to better understand the problems leading to patient harm, and the opportunities most likely to improve diagnostic care in the future.

  14. Food claims and nutrition facts of commercial infant foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Yu-Chin; Chang, Jung-Su; Chen, Yi Chun

    2018-01-01

    Composition claim, nutrition claim and health claim are often found on the commercial complementary food packaging. The introduction of complementary foods (CFs) to infants is a turning point in the development of their eating behavior, and their commercial use for Taiwanese infants is growing. In Taiwan, lots of the advertisements for CFs employed health or nutrition claims to promote the products, but the actual nutritional content of these CFs is not clear. The aim of this study was to compare the food claims of commercial complementary food products with their actual nutrition facts. A sample of 363 commercial CFs was collected from websites, local supermarkets, and other food stores, and their nutrition-related claims were classified into composition, nutrition, and health categories. Although the World Health Organization recommends that infants should be exclusively breastfed for the first 6 months, 48.2% of the commercial CFs were targeted at infants younger than 6 months. Therefore, marketing regulations should be implemented to curb early weaning as a result of products targeted at infants younger than 6 months. More than 50% of Taiwanese commercial CFs have high sugar content and more than 20% were high in sodium. Products with health claims, such as "provides good nutrition to children" or "improves appetite," have higher sodium or sugar content than do those without such claims. Moreover, products with calcium or iron content claims did not contain more calcium or iron than products without such claims. Additionally, a significantly greater proportion of the products with "no added sugar" claims were classified as having high sugar content as compared to those without such claims. Parents cannot choose the healthiest food products for their children by simply focusing on food claims. Government should regulate the labeling of nutrition facts and food claims for foods targeted at infants younger than 12 months.

  15. Global Warming: Claims, Science, and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Laurence I.

    2007-04-01

    Widespread (and seemingly dominant) claims about the dire consequences of anthropogenic global warming (AGW) have been propagated by both scientists and politicians and have been prominently featured by much of the mass media. This talk will examine some of those claims --- such as those made in the popular pro-AGW film, An Inconvenient Truth^1 --- from the perspectives of science^2 and scientific methodology^3. Some of the issues considered will be: What are the major ``greenhouse gases''? To what extent is global warming a result of human influences through an increase of ``greenhouse gases''? Is an increase in (1) global temperature and (2) carbon dioxide bad/good? What are some meanings that can be given to the term ``consensus'' in science? What are the estimated financial and other costs of governments implementing the Kyoto accords? Links to readings and videos will be given at the conclusion of the talk. ^1Gore, Al, An Inconvenient Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It -- (Rodale Press, May, 2006). ^2Marlo Lewis, ``A Skeptic's Guide to An Inconvenient Truth'' http://www.cei.org/pages/aitresponse-book.cfm ^3Aaron Wildavsky, But Is It True? A Citizen's Guide to Environmental Health and Safety Issues (Harvard University Press, 1995), Intro. and Chap. 11. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.NES07.C1.6

  16. Updates on nutrition and health claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Perales-Albert

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There is concern about the influence of social determinants related to advertising, communication and information on the selection of food for healthy eating and safe. From this point of view, Spain created the European Regulation 1924/2006 (ER1924/2006, its aim is to ensure and promote access to safe food that benefit health and prevent information received by consumers is inaccurate, ambiguous or misleading. The aims of regulation are to prevent nutritional and attributed health claims to food without reason or if there is sufficient scientific evidence. In this sense, a group of professionals from the University of Alicante in December 2012 performed the First Day of Food and Nutrition, organized by the Center Alinua of the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Alicante, related to updates on nutrition and health claims and its implications public health.By the interest and importance of this topic, this is a summary of the position papers from agents involved: consumers, government, food business, the gremial’s dietitian, the Academy and public health.

  17. Attitudes toward the dubious compensation claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEGGO, C

    1951-07-01

    Laws providing for compensation of workmen for occupational injury are a powerful socio-economic force. In settlement of compensation claims the goal, difficult to achieve, is fairness to employee, employer and insurance carrier. Often, medical, legal, economic and social considerations conflict with one another. A "fact" in one field may not be considered so in another. Since medical data and testimony often guide the ultimate decision of a compensation claim, the physician's attitude is a large factor not only immediately and directly in determination of the case at hand but, perhaps more important, in the ultimate direction of the socio-economic forces which spring from the sum of all such determinations. To perpetuate the good in workmen's compensation laws, the next generation of physicians-and of lawyers and business administrators as well, for they, too, are involved-ought to have basic training in the social sciences in order that they may have a broad rather than a segmental view of the problems with which they deal.

  18. [Motivations and obstacles to occupational disease claims in lung cancer patients: an exploratory psychosocial study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britel, Manon; Pérol, Olivia; Blois Da Conceiçao, Stéphanie; Ficty, Manon; Brunet, Houria; Avrillon, Virginie; Charbotel, Barbara; Fervers, Béatrice

    2017-10-02

    The proportion of lung cancers with an occupational origin has been estimated to be between 10 and 20%. They are largely under-reported, as 60% are not compensated as occupational disease. Although most patients are not familiar with the process of compensation, other factors could explain this under-reporting. The aim of this study was to identify psychosocial factors that could impact patients with occupational lung cancer to claim for compensation. We conducted a case study involving semi-structured interviews with eight lung cancer patients enrolled in a cohort designed to systematically screen occupational exposures and propose claims for compensation to work-related cancer patients. Seven interviewed patients were familiar with occupational cancers, but most of them did not believe that past exposure could be related to their current disease. Patients associated compensation claims with a long and complex procedure for an abstract purpose. Several patients expressed a certain attachment to their employers. Interviewed patients often considered compensation claims to be a grievance procedure against the employers whom they did not consider to be responsible for their disease. Lung cancer is itself an obstacle to compensation considering the aggressive treatments and related adverse events, the poor medium-term prognosis and the predominant role of smoking in the etiology of the disease. Patients mentioned the financial compensation and the role of healthcare professionals as key elements to motivate them to claim for compensation.

  19. HEALTH INFO SANTÉ – REMINDER ANNUAL DEDUCTIBLE AND REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMS HINTS FOR USE

    CERN Multimedia

    CHIS Board

    2000-01-01

    Information from the CHIS Board and the Human Resources Division:Annual deductible and reimbursement claims: hints for useOne should bear in mind that the annual deductible is an amount (currently CHF 100) charged automatically by the Administrator of the scheme for every adult aged 18 and above. This is what happens: The amount is deducted annually for all medical services received over a calendar year.It is triggered by the date of the treatment and neither by the date of the bill nor that of the reimbursement claim.In other words, if you receive medical treatment in December for the first time in a given year, the CHF 100 will be deducted from the claim for that treatment. So, except for urgent cases, it would be better to wait till the following month, thus avoiding one annual deductible.It is also worth remembering that the cost of processing our reimbursement claims - and there were 54, 000 in 1999 - is part of the cost of our insurance.Help keep administrative costs down: do not submit reimbursement cl...

  20. Predicting Consumer Effort in Finding and Paying for Health Care: Expert Interviews and Claims Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Sandra; Monsen, Karen A; Pieczkiewicz, David; Wolfson, Julian; Khairat, Saif

    2017-10-12

    For consumers to accept and use a health care information system, it must be easy to use, and the consumer must perceive it as being free from effort. Finding health care providers and paying for care are tasks that must be done to access treatment. These tasks require effort on the part of the consumer and can be frustrating when the goal of the consumer is primarily to receive treatments for better health. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that result in consumer effort when finding accessible health care. Having an understanding of these factors will help define requirements when designing health information systems. A panel of 12 subject matter experts was consulted and the data from 60 million medical claims were used to determine the factors contributing to effort. Approximately 60 million claims were processed by the health care insurance organization in a 12-month duration with the population defined. Over 292 million diagnoses from claims were used to validate the panel input. The results of the study showed that the number of people in the consumer's household, number of visits to providers outside the consumer's insurance network, number of adjusted and denied medical claims, and number of consumer inquiries are a proxy for the level of effort in finding and paying for care. The effort level, so measured and weighted per expert panel recommendations, differed by diagnosis. This study provides an understanding of how consumers must put forth effort when engaging with a health care system to access care. For higher satisfaction and acceptance results, health care payers ideally will design and develop systems that facilitate an understanding of how to avoid denied claims, educate on the payment of claims to avoid adjustments, and quickly find providers of affordable care. ©Sandra Long, Karen A. Monsen, David Pieczkiewicz, Julian Wolfson, Saif Khairat. Originally published in JMIR Medical Informatics (http://medinform.jmir.org), 12.10.2017.

  1. 77 FR 22204 - Administrative Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act and Related Statutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... relationship between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and... relationship between the Federal government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and... claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant is required to submit the...

  2. 77 FR 22236 - Administrative Claims Under the Federal Tort Claims Act and Related Statutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... between the national government and the States, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities among... relationship between the Federal government and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and... claim for personal injury, including pain and suffering, the claimant is required to submit the...

  3. 32 CFR 536.78 - Settlement authority for claims under the Military Claims Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compensation of federal employees for job-related injuries (see § 536.44), or untimely filing, TJAG or TAJAG... satisfaction of the claim. (6) Authority to further delegate payment authority is set forth in § 536.3(g)(1) of...

  4. 48 CFR 1652.204-72 - Filing health benefit claims/court review of disputed claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... beyond his or her control from making the request within the time limit. (2) The Carrier has 30 days... information is required to make a decision on the claim; (iii) Specify the time limit (60 days after the date... that time and give a written notice of its decision to the covered individual and to the Carrier. (f...

  5. Impact of corporate social responsibility claims on consumer food choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller Loose, Simone; Remaud, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - The study assesses the impact of two different corporate social responsibility (CSR) claims, relating to social and environmental dimensions, on consumers’ wine choice across international markets. It is analysed how point of purchase CSR claims compete with other food claims and their ......Purpose - The study assesses the impact of two different corporate social responsibility (CSR) claims, relating to social and environmental dimensions, on consumers’ wine choice across international markets. It is analysed how point of purchase CSR claims compete with other food claims...... Eastcoast, the US Midwest, Anglophone and Francophone Canada. Findings - CSR claims relating to social and environmental responsibility have a similar awareness, penetration and consumer trust, but differ in their impact on consumer choice, where environmental corporate responsibility claims benefit from...... a higher marginal willingness to pay. Consumer valuation of CSR claims significantly differs across international markets, but is consistently lower than for organic claims. Research limitations/implications - The study was limited to wine and future research is required to generalise findings to other...

  6. Sport-related concussions in New Zealand: a review of 10 years of Accident Compensation Corporation moderate to severe claims and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Doug; Gissane, Conor; Brughelli, Matt; Hume, Patria A; Harawira, Joseph

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the epidemiology of sport-related concussion and associated costs in New Zealand requiring medical treatment from 2001 to 2011 in seven sports codes. A retrospective review of injury entitlement claims by seven sports from 2001 to 2011. Data were analyzed by sporting code, age, ethnicity, gender and year of competition for total and moderate-to-severe (MSC) Accident Compensation Corporation (ACC) claims and costs. A total of 20,902 claims costing $NZD 16,546,026 were recorded over the study period of which 1330 (6.4%) were MSC claims. The mean yearly number and costs of MSC claims were 133 ± 36 and $1,303,942 ± 378,949. Rugby union had the highest number of MSC claims per year (38; 95% CI 36-41 per 1000 MSC claims). New Zealand Māori recorded the highest total ($6,000,759) and mean cost ($21,120) per MSC claim. Although MSC injury claims were only 6.4% of total claims, they accounted for 79.1% of total costs indicating that although the majority of sport-related concussions may be minor in severity, the related economic costs associated with more serious sport-related concussion can be high. The finding that rugby union recorded the most MSC claims in the current study was not unexpected. Of concern is that rugby league recorded a low number of MSC claims but the highest mean cost per claim. Due to the high mean cost per concussion, and the high total and mean cost for New Zealand Māori, further investigation is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Degrees of Truthfulness in Accepted Scientific Claims.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hassan Mabrouk

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-MY X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0cm; mso-para-margin-right:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0cm; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;} Abstract: Sciences adopt different methodologies in deriving claims and establishing theories. As a result, two accepted claims or theories belonging to two different sciences may not necessarily carry the same degree of truthfulness. Examining the different methodologies of deriving claims in the sciences of ʿaqīdah (Islamic Creed, fiqh (Islamic Jurisprudence and physics, the study shows that ʿaqīdah provides a holistic understanding of the universe. Physics falls short of interpreting physical phenomena unless these phenomena are looked at through the ʿaqīdah holistic view. Left to itself, error may creep into laws of physics due to the methodology of conducting the physical experiments, misinterpreting the experimental results, or accepting invalid assumptions. As for fiqh, it is found that apart from apparent errors, fiqh views cannot be falsified. It is, therefore, useful to consider ʿaqīdah as a master science which would permit all other sciences to live in harmony.

  8. European consumers and health claims: attitudes, understanding and purchasing behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Josephine M; Storcksdieck genannt Bonsmann, Stefan; Kolka, Magdalena; Grunert, Klaus G

    2012-05-01

    Health claims on food products are often used as a means to highlight scientifically proven health benefits associated with consuming those foods. But do consumers understand and trust health claims? This paper provides an overview of recent research on consumers and health claims including attitudes, understanding and purchasing behaviour. A majority of studies investigated selective product-claim combinations, with ambiguous findings apart from consumers' self-reported generic interest in health claims. There are clear indications that consumer responses differ substantially according to the nature of carrier product, the type of health claim, functional ingredient used or a combination of these components. Health claims tend to be perceived more positively when linked to a product with an overall positive health image, whereas some studies demonstrate higher perceived credibility of products with general health claims (e.g. omega-3 and brain development) compared to disease risk reduction claims (e.g. bioactive peptides to reduce risk of heart disease), others report the opposite. Inconsistent evidence also exists on the correlation between having a positive attitude towards products with health claims and purchase intentions. Familiarity with the functional ingredient and/or its claimed health effect seems to result in a more favourable evaluation. Better nutritional knowledge, however, does not automatically lead to a positive attitude towards products carrying health messages. Legislation in the European Union requires that the claim is understood by the average consumer. As most studies on consumers' understanding of health claims are based on subjective understanding, this remains an area for more investigation.

  9. Claims procedures for employee benefit plans--Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration, Department of Labor. Request for information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-09-08

    This document requests information from the public concerning the advisability of amending the existing regulation under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) that establishes minimum requirements for employee benefit plan claims procedures. The term "claims procedure" refers to the process that employee benefit plans must provide for participants and beneficiaries who seek to obtain pension or welfare plan benefits, including requests for medical treatment or services, consideration of claims, and review of denials of claims by plans. The primary purpose of this notice is to obtain information to assist the Department of Labor (the Department) in evaluating (1) the extent to which the current claims procedure regulation assures that group health plan participants and beneficiaries are provided with effective and timely means to file and resolve claims for health care benefits, and (1) whether and in what way the existing minimum requirements should be amended with respect to group health plans covered by ERISA. The furnished information also will assist the Department in determining whether the regulation should be amended with respect to pension plans covered by ERISA and in developing legislative proposals to address any identified deficiencies relating to the claims procedures that cannot be addressed by amending the current regulation.

  10. Proof of payment for all reimbursement claims

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Members of the personnel are kindly requested to note that only documents proving that a payment has been made are accepted as proof of payment for any claims for reimbursement, including specifically the reimbursement of education fees. In particular, the following will be accepted as proof of payment: bank or post office bank statements indicating the name of the institution to which the payment was made; photocopies of cheques made out to the institution to which the payments were made together with bank statements showing the numbers of the relevant cheques; proof of payment in the form of discharged payment slips; invoices with acknowledgement of settlement, receipts, bank statements detailing operations crediting another account or similar documents. As a result, the following documents in particular will no longer be accepted as proof of payment: photocopies of cheques that are not submitted together with bank or post office bank statements showing the numbers of the relevant cheques; details of ...

  11. Prebiotics, Fermentable Dietary Fiber, and Health Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delcour, Jan A; Aman, Per; Courtin, Christophe M; Hamaker, Bruce R; Verbeke, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Since the 1970s, the positive effects of dietary fiber on health have increasingly been recognized. The collective term "dietary fiber" groups structures that have different physiologic effects. Since 1995, some dietary fibers have been denoted as prebiotics, implying a beneficial physiologic effect related to increasing numbers or activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota. Given the complex composition of the microbiota, the demonstration of such beneficial effects is difficult. In contrast, an exploration of the metabolites of dietary fiber formed as a result of its fermentation in the colon offers better perspectives for providing mechanistic links between fiber intake and health benefits. Positive outcomes of such studies hold the promise that claims describing specific health benefits can be granted. This would help bridge the "fiber gap"-that is, the considerable difference between recommended and actual fiber intakes by the average consumer. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Are Claims of Global Warming Being Suppressed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-02-01

    Over the last few years, I have heard many rumors that climate science relevant to the global warming discussion is being suppressed by the Bush Administration. One cannot do much about third-hand information. However, on 29 January, the New York Times published a front page article on NASA efforts to suppress statements about global warming by James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies. A claim by one government scientist, though, no matter how distinguished, still requires examples from other scientists before a general conclusion can be drawn about the overall scope of the problem. But if the charges are more widespread, then some government scientists might be reluctant to make such claims, because they might feel that their positions were jeopardized. Therefore, an alternate way may be needed to determine the scope of the issue, while still safeguarding government workers from possible retaliation. -On 30 January, Rep. Sherwood Boehlert (R-N.Y.), chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, wrote a letter to NASA Administrator Michael Griffin addressing many of the concerns Crowley has raised. Boehlert wrote,``It ought to go without saying that government scientists must be free to describe their scientific conclusions and the implications of those conclusions to their fellow scientists, policymakers and the general public.'' He continued,``Good science cannot long persist in an atmosphere of intimidation. Political figures ought to be reviewing their public statements to make sure they are consistent with the best available science; scientists should not be reviewing their statements to make sure they are consistent with the current political orthodoxy.'' I commend Rep. Boehlert for his quick and clear statement of the importance of unfettered communication of science. -FRED SPILHAUS, Editor

  13. Perceived relevance and foods with health-related claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, M.; Lampila, P.; Shepherd, R.

    2012-01-01

    consumers’ responses to health claims that either promise to reduce a targeted disease risk or improve well-being in comparison to other types of health-related messages, and how attitudes towards nutritionally healthy eating, functional food and previous experience relating to products with health claims...... affect the consumers’ perceptions of nutrition and health claims. The data (N = 2385) were collected by paper and pencil surveys in Finland, the UK, Germany and Italy on a target group of consumers over 35 year old, solely or jointly responsible for the family’s food shopping. The results showed...... risk reduction with detailed information about function and health outcome. Previous experience with products with health claims and interest in nutritionally healthy eating promoted the utility of all claims, regardless of whether they were health or nutrition claims. However, to be influenced...

  14. General scientific guidance for stakeholders on health claim applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjödin, Anders Mikael

    2016-01-01

    of Article 13.1 claims except for claims put on hold by the European Commission, and has evaluated additional health claim applications submitted pursuant to Articles 13.5, 14 and also 19. In addition, comments received from stakeholders indicate that general issues that are common to all health claims need...... based on the experience gained to date with the evaluation of health claims, and it may be further updated, as appropriate, when additional issues are addressed.......The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Dietetic Products Nutrition and Allergies (NDA) to update the General guidance for stakeholders on the evaluation of Article 13.1, 13.5 and 14 health claims published in March 2011. Since then, the NDA Panel has completed the evaluation...

  15. Electronic Health Record-Related Events in Medical Malpractice Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, Mark L; Siegal, Dana; Riah, Heather; Johnston, Doug; Kenyon, Kathy

    2015-11-06

    There is widespread agreement that the full potential of health information technology (health IT) has not yet been realized and of particular concern are the examples of unintended consequences of health IT that detract from the safety of health care or from the use of health IT itself. The goal of this project was to obtain additional information on these health IT-related problems, using a mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative) analysis of electronic health record-related harm in cases submitted to a large database of malpractice suits and claims. Cases submitted to the CRICO claims database and coded during 2012 and 2013 were analyzed. A total of 248 cases (<1%) involving health IT were identified and coded using a proprietary taxonomy that identifies user- and system-related sociotechnical factors. Ambulatory care accounted for most of the cases (146 cases). Cases were most typically filed as a result of an error involving medications (31%), diagnosis (28%), or a complication of treatment (31%). More than 80% of cases involved moderate or severe harm, although lethal cases were less likely in cases from ambulatory settings. Etiologic factors spanned all of the sociotechnical dimensions, and many recurring patterns of error were identified. Adverse events associated with health IT vulnerabilities can cause extensive harm and are encountered across the continuum of health care settings and sociotechnical factors. The recurring patterns provide valuable lessons that both practicing clinicians and health IT developers could use to reduce the risk of harm in the future. The likelihood of harm seems to relate more to a patient's particular situation than to any one class of error.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share thework provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used

  16. 29 CFR 15.4 - Administrative claim; where to file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... accompanied by a claim for money damages in a sum certain for injury to or loss of property or personal injury... hereunder to the Council for Claims and Compensation, Office of the Solicitor of Labor, U.S. Department of... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Administrative claim; where to file. 15.4 Section 15.4 Labor...

  17. 36 CFR 1009.4 - Payment of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1009.4 Payment of claims. (a) When an award of $2,500 or less is made, the voucher signed by the claimant shall be transmitted for payment to the Presidio Trust. When an award over $2,500... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of claims. 1009.4...

  18. Consumers’ willingness to pay for sustainable wine claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Simone; Remaud, Hervé; Chabin, Yann

    attributes (price, brand, region of origin and appellation system, grape variety, alcohol level, medal, sensory style, bottling, and sustainable claim), considering the majority of attributes, which are known to be important to consumers and preventing an overestimation of the effect of sustainable claims......-choice reference alternative. Findings: Of all sustainable claims, organic had the highest impact on consumer choice, followed by a privately used claim ‘protect the planet’. Carbon zero wines were only significantly positively valued in the UK, where consumers were made aware of its meaning through national...

  19. Joint Asymptotic Distributions of Smallest and Largest Insurance Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansjörg Albrecher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Assume that claims in a portfolio of insurance contracts are described by independent and identically distributed random variables with regularly varying tails and occur according to a near mixed Poisson process. We provide a collection of results pertaining to the joint asymptotic Laplace transforms of the normalised sums of the smallest and largest claims, when the length of the considered time interval tends to infinity. The results crucially depend on the value of the tail index of the claim distribution, as well as on the number of largest claims under consideration.

  20. Are the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements valid?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Donald J; Rankin, Kenneth S; Jensen, Cyrus D; Moverley, Robert; Reed, Mike R; Sprowson, Andrew P

    2014-05-01

    Advertisements are commonplace in orthopaedic journals and may influence the readership with claims of clinical and scientific fact. Since the last assessment of the claims made in orthopaedic print advertisements ten years ago, there have been legislative changes and media scrutiny which have shaped this practice. The purpose of this study is to re-evaluate these claims. Fifty claims from 50 advertisements were chosen randomly from six highly respected peer-reviewed orthopaedic journals (published July-December 2011). The evidence supporting each claim was assessed and validated by three orthopaedic surgeons. The assessors, blinded to product and company, rated the evidence and answered the following questions: Does the evidence as presented support the claim made in the advertisement and what is the quality of that evidence? Is the claim supported by enough evidence to influence your own clinical practice? Twenty-eight claims cited evidence from published literature, four from public presentations, 11 from manufacturer "data held on file" and seven had no supporting evidence. Only 12 claims were considered to have high-quality evidence and only 11 were considered well supported. A strong correlation was seen between the quality of evidence and strength of support (Spearman r = 0.945, p advertisements. High-quality evidence is required by orthopaedic surgeons to influence clinical practice and this evidence should be sought by manufacturers wishing to market a successful product.

  1. FEMA Hazard Mitigation Assistance Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This dataset contains closed and obligated projects funded under the following Hazard Mitigation Assistance (HMA) grant programs: Repetitive Flood Claims (RFC). The...

  2. 13 CFR 114.103 - Who may file a claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND REPRESENTATION AND INDEMNIFICATION OF SBA EMPLOYEES Administrative.... Death The executor, administrator, or legal representative of the decedent's estate, or any other person...

  3. Artificial intelligence applied in claims management: Bet on the right customer with claims satisfaction predictive modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Lamarsaude, Benoit

    2017-01-01

    Insurance companies suffer from loss of customer consecutively to claims. Only a small portion of dissatisfied customer expresses themselves, creating difficulties in establishing a long term relationship. Increase customer loyalty is a major subject for insurers, because they have to maintain a minimum portfolio size and acquiring newclients is more expensive than retains the existing. In this work we use artificial intelligence techniques to assess and manage the customer satisfaction when ...

  4. Linking individual medicare health claims data with work-life claims and other administrative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokyr Horner, Elizabeth; Cullen, Mark R

    2015-09-30

    Researchers investigating health outcomes for populations over age 65 can utilize Medicare claims data, but these data include no direct information about individuals' health prior to age 65 and are not typically linkable to files containing data on exposures and behaviors during their worklives. The current paper is a proof-of-concept, of merging employers' administrative data and private, employment-based health claims with Medicare data. Characteristics of the linked data, including sensitivity and specificity, are evaluated with an eye toward potential uses of such linked data. This paper uses a sample of former manufacturing workers from an industrial cohort as a test case. The dataset created by this integration could be useful to research in areas such as social epidemiology and occupational health. Medicare and employment administrative data were linked for a large cohort of manufacturing workers (employed at some point during 1996-2008) who transitioned onto Medicare between 2001-2009. Data on work-life health, including biometric indicators, were used to predict health at age 65 and to investigate the concordance of employment-based insurance claims with subsequent Medicare insurance claims. Chronic diseases were found to have relatively high levels of concordance between employment-based private insurance and subsequent Medicare insurance. Information about patient health prior to receipt of Medicare, including biometric indicators, were found to predict health at age 65. Combining these data allows for evaluation of continuous health trajectories, as well as modeling later-life health as a function of work-life behaviors and exposures. It also provides a potential endpoint for occupational health research. This is the first harmonization of its kind, providing a proof-of-concept. The dataset created by this integration could be useful for research in areas such as social epidemiology and occupational health.

  5. Do Insurers Have to Pay for Bad Behaviour in Settling Claims? Legal Aspects of Insurers' Wrongful Claims Handling

    OpenAIRE

    Boom, Willem

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: This article presents a comparative legal analysis of wrongful claims handling by insurance companies in indemnity and liability insurance. From the outset, it is clear that it may be difficult to draw the line between legitimate claims denial and refusal to pay, on the one hand, and malicious protraction, procrastination and rejection of valid claims, on the other hand. Therefore, it is interesting to find that European legal systems diverge considerably in their stance...

  6. The plaintiff's two-sided mouth: defeating ADA claims based on inconsistent positions taken by the plaintiff on other claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, D S

    1996-01-01

    In the typical ADA claim, the plaintiff will claim that he or she has a disability but is nevertheless able to perform the essential functions of his or her job. This position is often in direct conflict with other non-ADA claims that the plaintiff has made or is making, where the plaintiff is claiming total disability and/or that he or she is unable to work. This article examines these phenomena, reviews the numerous recent cases that have found for employers based on these inconsistent positions of the plaintiff, and explains how employers can be develop and present this defense.

  7. Nature of Medical Malpractice Claims Against Radiation Oncologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Deborah; Tringale, Kathryn [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); Connor, Michael [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States); University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, California (United States); Punglia, Rinaa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Recht, Abram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hattangadi-Gluth, Jona, E-mail: jhattangadi@ucsd.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine and Applied Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose: To examine characteristics of medical malpractice claims involving radiation oncologists closed during a 10-year period. Methods and Materials: Malpractice claims filed against radiation oncologists from 2003 to 2012 collected by a nationwide liability insurance trade association were analyzed. Outcomes included the nature of claims and indemnity payments, including associated presenting diagnoses, procedures, alleged medical errors, and injury severity. We compared the likelihood of a claim resulting in payment in relation to injury severity categories (death as referent) using binomial logistic regression. Results: There were 362 closed claims involving radiation oncology, 102 (28%) of which were paid, resulting in $38 million in indemnity payments. The most common alleged errors included “improper performance” (38% of closed claims, 18% were paid; 29% [$11 million] of total indemnity), “errors in diagnosis” (25% of closed claims, 46% were paid; 44% [$17 million] of total indemnity), and “no medical misadventure” (14% of closed claims, 8% were paid; less than 1% [$148,000] of total indemnity). Another physician was named in 32% of claims, and consent issues/breach of contract were cited in 18%. Claims for injury resulting in death represented 39% of closed claims and 25% of total indemnity. “Improper performance” was the primary alleged error associated with injury resulting in death. Compared with claims involving death, major temporary injury (odds ratio [OR] 2.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-5.85, P=.009), significant permanent injury (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.48-6.46, P=.003), and major permanent injury (OR 5.5, 95% CI 1.89-16.15, P=.002) had a higher likelihood of a claim resulting in indemnity payment. Conclusions: Improper performance was the most common alleged malpractice error. Claims involving significant or major injury were more likely to be paid than those involving death. Insights into the nature of liability claims against

  8. A Comparative Analysis of Outstanding Claim Reserves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlata Djuric

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The key processes in the business of insurance companies which define the financial viability of their business activities, as the most important element, are the adequate amount of technical reserves. A qualitative assessment of the technical reserves level is the basic support to the management of the key business processes and proper strategic and financial decision-making in order to maximize the viability, profitability, competitiveness, and further development of the company. Based on the data on the operations of an insurance company, within a single line of insurance, different, in practice, most frequently used methods were applied in order to determine the deviation amplitude of the projected amounts from the actual claims. Another direction of research focuses on actuarial practice in non-life insurance companies operating in the territory of the Republic of Serbia. The comparative analysis of the obtained projection points to the fact that the chosen methods, commonly used in actuarial practice in the Republic of Serbia, should be monitored and reviewed. The results of the multidirectional research and detection of the existing problems provide a useful framework and a stimulating mechanism, as well as the guidelines to improve the operations and better positioning of insurance in the commercial and economic environment of the Republic of Serbia.

  9. Petroleum taxation under uncertainty - contingent claims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, D.

    1990-01-01

    A workable method for the analysis of incentive effects of petroleum taxes under uncertainty is presented. The main advantage of the method is that it concludes with a single number for the after-tax value of any development plan, and thus allows for a quantification of incentive effects for any given description of production possibilities. It is, however, not possible to describe tax effects under uncertainty by simple magnitudes independent of production possibilities, such as wedges in rates of return. The theoretical basis is the contingent claims analysis from finance theory, which is applicable in particular to companies that are owned by well-diversified shareholders. It is not obvious that the tax authorities of poorly diversified countries should value uncertain income streams by the same method. The Norwegian petroleum taxation is shown to have strongly distortionary effects compared to a no-tax situation or a cash flow tax. These distortions were reduced by the tax changes that followed the 1986 decreases in crude oil prices. A weakness of the model of the Norwegian system is that an exactly optimal financial policy for the company has not been found. 30 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Forensic bitemark identification: weak foundations, exaggerated claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saks, Michael J.; Albright, Thomas; Bohan, Thomas L.; Bierer, Barbara E.; Bowers, C. Michael; Bush, Mary A.; Bush, Peter J.; Casadevall, Arturo; Cole, Simon A.; Denton, M. Bonner; Diamond, Shari Seidman; Dioso-Villa, Rachel; Epstein, Jules; Faigman, David; Faigman, Lisa; Fienberg, Stephen E.; Garrett, Brandon L.; Giannelli, Paul C.; Greely, Henry T.; Imwinkelried, Edward; Jamieson, Allan; Kafadar, Karen; Kassirer, Jerome P.; Koehler, Jonathan ‘Jay’; Korn, David; Mnookin, Jennifer; Morrison, Alan B.; Murphy, Erin; Peerwani, Nizam; Peterson, Joseph L.; Risinger, D. Michael; Sensabaugh, George F.; Spiegelman, Clifford; Stern, Hal; Thompson, William C.; Wayman, James L.; Zabell, Sandy; Zumwalt, Ross E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several forensic sciences, especially of the pattern-matching kind, are increasingly seen to lack the scientific foundation needed to justify continuing admission as trial evidence. Indeed, several have been abolished in the recent past. A likely next candidate for elimination is bitemark identification. A number of DNA exonerations have occurred in recent years for individuals convicted based on erroneous bitemark identifications. Intense scientific and legal scrutiny has resulted. An important National Academies review found little scientific support for the field. The Texas Forensic Science Commission recently recommended a moratorium on the admission of bitemark expert testimony. The California Supreme Court has a case before it that could start a national dismantling of forensic odontology. This article describes the (legal) basis for the rise of bitemark identification and the (scientific) basis for its impending fall. The article explains the general logic of forensic identification, the claims of bitemark identification, and reviews relevant empirical research on bitemark identification—highlighting both the lack of research and the lack of support provided by what research does exist. The rise and possible fall of bitemark identification evidence has broader implications—highlighting the weak scientific culture of forensic science and the law's difficulty in evaluating and responding to unreliable and unscientific evidence. PMID:28852538

  11. Consumer attitudes and understanding of cholesterol-lowering claims on food: randomize mock-package experiments with plant sterol and oat fibre claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C L; Mendoza, J; Henson, S J; Qi, Y; Lou, W; L'Abbé, M R

    2014-08-01

    Few studies have examined consumer acceptability or comprehension of cholesterol-lowering claims on food labels. Our objective was to assess consumer attitudes and understanding of cholesterol-lowering claims regarding plant sterols (PS) and oat fibre (OF). We conducted two studies on: (1) PS claims and (2) OF claims. Both studies involved a randomized mock-packaged experiment within an online survey administered to Canadian consumers. In the PS study (n=721), we tested three PS-related claims (disease risk reduction claim, function claim and nutrient content claim) and a 'tastes great' claim (control) on identical margarine containers. Similarly, in the OF study (n=710), we tested three claims related to OF and a 'taste great' claim on identical cereal boxes. In both studies, participants answered the same set of questions on attitudes and understanding of claims after seeing each mock package. All claims that mentioned either PS or OF resulted in more positive attitudes than the taste control claim (Pprofile. How consumers responded to the nutrition claims between the two studies was influenced by contextual factors such as familiarity with the functional food/component and the food product that carried the claim. Permitted nutrition claims are approved based on physiological evidence and are allowed on any food product as long as it meets the associated nutrient criteria. However, it is difficult to generalize attitudes and understanding of claims when they are so highly dependent on contextual factors.

  12. 38 CFR 36.4324 - Guaranty claims; subsequent accounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guaranty claims; subsequent accounting. 36.4324 Section 36.4324 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... § 36.4324 Guaranty claims; subsequent accounting. (a) Subject to the limitation that the total amounts...

  13. 40 CFR 307.20 - Who may present claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... agent, executor, administrator, or other legal representative. A claim presented by an entity or an authorized agent, executor, administrator, or other legal representative must be presented in the name of the claimant. The claim must be signed by the authorized agent, executor, administrator, or other legal...

  14. 78 FR 18365 - Commencement of Iraq Claims Adjudication Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ..., are defined as: claims of U.S. nationals for compensation for serious personal injuries knowingly... Agreement for claims of hostage-taking \\2\\ provided that (1) the claimant has already received compensation... warranting additional compensation. For purposes of this referral, ``serious personal injury'' may include...

  15. 32 CFR 842.65 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims not payable. 842.65 Section 842.65 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND LITIGATION... costs. (d) Accrues from a private contractual relationship between US personnel and third parties about...

  16. 20 CFR 325.4 - Claim for unemployment benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claim for unemployment benefits. 325.4 Section 325.4 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT REGISTRATION FOR RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS § 325.4 Claim for unemployment benefits. (a...

  17. The Space Between: Land Claims and the Law in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.G.H.; Moniaga, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we look at rights discourses and law as an arena of struggle in which local people attempt to gain and secure access to localities of value Following administrative decentralisation in 1999, throughout Indonesia, individuals and communities lodged land claims To support these claims,

  18. Altering health-pleasure trade-off via advertising claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bialkova, Svetlana; Bialkova, S.E.; Sasse, L.; Fenko, Anna; Verlegh, P.; Voorveld, H.; de Pelsmacker, P.

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated whether and how advertising claims (taste vs. health benefit) influenced consumer taste perception and buying intentions of potato chips. Participants (N=154) were exposed to the front of the product package and were invited to taste the product. Taste benefit claims lead to

  19. The “Weight” of Product Claims and Vertical Location

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Festila, Alexandra; Chrysochou, Polymeros

    The present research shows that claims denoting healthy attributes will elicit more favorable consumer evaluations (towards ads, packages and products) when placed at higher locations, whereas claim denoting “unhealthy” attributes (e.g., taste) will elicit more favorable evaluations when placed a...

  20. 41 CFR 101-39.405 - Claims against the Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VEHICLES 39-INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS 39.4-Accidents and Claims § 101-39.405 Claims against the Government. (a) Whenever a GSA Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS) vehicle is involved in an accident... against the agency using a GSA Interagency Fleet Management System (IFMS) vehicle, the agency shall...

  1. 27 CFR 70.414 - Preparation and filing of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Spirits, Wines, and Beer § 70.414 Preparation and filing of claims. (a) Distilled spirits at distilled.... (d) Wine spirits and wine at bonded wine cellar. Procedural instructions in respect of claims for: (1) Remission of tax on wine spirits lost on the premises of a bonded wine cellar or in transit thereto, (2...

  2. 37 CFR 360.15 - Separate claims required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... SUBMISSION OF ROYALTY CLAIMS FILING OF CLAIMS TO ROYALTY FEES COLLECTED UNDER COMPULSORY LICENSE Satellite... license and satellite carrier compulsory license royalty fees during the same month of July, that party... both cable and satellite carrier royalty fees will be dismissed. ...

  3. Opportunities, Problems and Pitfalls of Nutrition and Health Claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmers, H.J.; Meulen, van der B.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The provision of reliable food information, for instance by printing an authorised nutrition or health claim on a package of food, makes credence dimensions of a food transparent to the consumer. In Europe, prior-to-use authorisation of nutrition and health claims are mandatory and governed by

  4. 39 CFR 601.111 - Interest on claim amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... that date is later, until the date of payment. Simple interest will be paid at the rate established by... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interest on claim amounts. 601.111 Section 601.111... PROPERTY RIGHTS OTHER THAN PATENTS PURCHASING OF PROPERTY AND SERVICES § 601.111 Interest on claim amounts...

  5. 40 CFR 303.33 - Filing a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS CITIZEN AWARDS FOR INFORMATION ON CRIMINAL VIOLATIONS UNDER SUPERFUND... regulation is required to file a claim for such an award with the Deputy Assistant Administrator for Criminal... information was provided. (c) All claim submissions must be submitted to the Office of Criminal Enforcement...

  6. 29 CFR 15.10 - Action on approved claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Payment. Payment of a claim approved under this subpart is contingent upon claimant's execution of a “Voucher for Payment Under Federal Tort Claims Act,” Standard Form 1145. When a claimant is represented by an attorney, the voucher for payment shall designate both the claimant and his or her attorney...

  7. Canada’s Guideline 9: improving SOGIE claims assessment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Dustin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Asylum seekers making claims relating to their sexual orientation and gender identity often face unfair refusal. New guidance from the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada takes admirable steps towards improving claims assessment, and offers a model for practitioners elsewhere.

  8. Knowledge claim evaluation : a fundamental issue for knowledge management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, K.; Maruster, L.; Jorna, R.J.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose - This paper aims to present a classification of approaches toward knowledge claim evaluation (KCE), which is the process of evaluating and testing knowledge claims in organizations, and to position KCE as a fundamental research issue for KM. Design/methodology/approach - The paper draws

  9. 7 CFR 273.18 - Claims against households.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., referrals to collection and/or other similar private and public sector agencies, state tax refund and... different type of claim (e.g., as an IHE rather than an IPV claim). (B) all adult household members die must... public service This form of payment must be ordered by a court and specifically be in lieu of paying any...

  10. 20 CFR 702.221 - Claims for compensation; time limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... which the last compensation payment was made. (b) In the case of a hearing loss claim, the time for... report which indicates the employee has sustained a hearing loss that is related to his or her employment... LONGSHOREMEN'S AND HARBOR WORKERS' COMPENSATION ACT AND RELATED STATUTES ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURE Claims...

  11. Theoretical Claims and Empirical Evidence in Maori Education Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rata, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Post-Marxist critical sociology of education has influenced the development of indigenous ("kaupapa") Maori educational theory and research. Its effects are examined in four claims made for Maori education by indigenous theorists. The claims are: indigenous kaupapa Maori education is a revolutionary initiative; it is a cultural solution…

  12. 44 CFR 295.31 - Reimbursement of claim expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... § 295.31 Reimbursement of claim expenses. (a) FEMA will reimburse Claimants for the reasonable costs they incur in copying documentation requested by OCGFC. FEMA will also reimburse Claimants for the... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Reimbursement of claim...

  13. 32 CFR 842.32 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... cost of it. The claim file must show clear intent to defraud. A mere mistake is not a fraud. (o) It is.... These claims may be payable through Accounting and Finance as a travel expense. (z) It is a cost to...

  14. Native title claim puts Roxby in fluid situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, M.

    1993-01-01

    Aboriginal land rights and water supply have long been issues raised in relation to the Olympic Dam Mine at Roxby Downs. Now a native title claim has revealed the vulnerability of the water supply. The author reports that the mine's owner, Western Mining Corporation, has to confront issues it has inflamed by favouring one interest group claiming to represent Aboriginal interests 8 refs

  15. 10 CFR 765.21 - Procedures for processing reimbursement claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Department shall complete a final review of all relevant information prior to making a reimbursement decision... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for processing reimbursement claims. 765.21... AND THORIUM PROCESSING SITES Procedures for Submitting and Processing Reimbursement Claims § 765.21...

  16. 26 CFR 509.120 - Double taxation claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Double taxation claims. 509.120 Section 509.120... CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.120 Double taxation claims. (a) General. Under Article XVII... United States or Switzerland has resulted, or will result, in double taxation contrary to the provisions...

  17. Status of medical liability claims in Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarkandi, A.

    2006-01-01

    With the evolution of health services in Saudi Arabia, there has been increase in the number of medical practice litigations. The author analyzed the medical malpractice litigation that was referred to the National Medico-Legal Committee (MLC) in order to evaluate the magnitude and underlying factors of the problem in Saudi Arabia. A retrospective analysis of the official records of Medico-Legal malpractice over the period 1420H-1424H (199-2003) was performed. The incidence among different medical specialties, location, and final resolution of each claim were identified. Data analysis revealed an increasing trend in the total number of claims over the study period, with a sharp increase in the transition between 1422H and 1423H (2001-200). The distribution of claims over different medical specialties showed that obstetrical practice took the lead with 27%, followed by general surgery and subspecialties, represented by 17% each, internal medicine 13%, while pediatrics contributed 10% of claims: the fewest claims were in dentistry with 2.5%. The majority of claims were referred to the Ministry of Health and private sectors medical facilities. Most claims were from the Riyadh region over the period between 1420H to 1422H (1999-2001), while thereafter, during 1423 and 1424H (2002 and 2003), the Holy Capital had the highest number of claims referred to the MLC. Adherence to standards of medical practice is by far the best approach to avoid or reduce the incidence of litigation. (author)

  18. 33 CFR 136.105 - General requirements for a claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MARINE POLLUTION FINANCIAL RESPONSIBILITY AND COMPENSATION OIL SPILL LIABILITY TRUST FUND; CLAIMS... the Fund the claimant receives any compensation for the claimed amounts, the claimant shall... certain for compensation for each category of uncompensated damages or removal costs (as described in...

  19. 23 CFR 190.5 - Bonus project claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... which advertising controls are in effect. The eligible system mileage reported in subsequent projects on... CONTROLLING OUTDOOR ADVERTISING ON THE INTERSTATE SYSTEM § 190.5 Bonus project claims. (a) The State may claim payment by submitting a form PR-20 voucher, supported by strip maps which identify advertising control...

  20. 9 CFR 317.313 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nutrient content claims; general principles. 317.313 Section 317.313 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... Labeling § 317.313 Nutrient content claims; general principles. (a) This section applies to meat or meat...

  1. 9 CFR 381.413 - Nutrient content claims; general principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nutrient content claims; general principles. 381.413 Section 381.413 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... § 381.413 Nutrient content claims; general principles. (a) This section applies to poultry products that...

  2. 28 CFR 14.2 - Administrative claim; when presented.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....2 Section 14.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER FEDERAL... the affected agencies, the Department of Justice shall be consulted and will thereafter designate an... Federal agency subsequently desires to take further action with a view towards settling the claim the...

  3. 21 CFR 101.74 - Health claims: sodium and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Health claims: sodium and hypertension. 101.74... claims: sodium and hypertension. (a) Relationship between sodium and hypertension (high blood pressure). (1) Hypertension, or high blood pressure, generally means a systolic blood pressure of greater than...

  4. Does a Claims Diagnosis of Autism Mean a True Case?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James P.; Jain, Anjali; Yang, Wenya; Kelly, Jonathan P.; Kaiser, Marygrace; Becker, Laura; Lawer, Lindsay; Newschaffer, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate autism spectrum disorder cases identified through claims-based case identification algorithms against a clinical review of medical charts. Charts were reviewed for 432 children who fell into one of the three following groups: (a) more than or equal to two claims with an autism spectrum disorder diagnosis…

  5. Consumer understanding of sugars claims on food and drink products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, N J; Sadler, M J; Cooper, J M

    2012-06-01

    Consumer understanding of nutrition and health claims is a key aspect of current regulations in the European Union (EU). In view of this, qualitative and quantitative research techniques were used to investigate consumer awareness and understanding of product claims in the UK, focusing particularly on nutrition claims relating to sugars. Both research methods identified a good awareness of product claims. No added sugars claims were generally preferred to reduced sugars claims, and there was a general assumption that sweeteners and other ingredients would be added in place of sugars. However, there was little awareness of the level of sugar reduction and the associated calorie reduction in products when reduced sugars claims were made on pack. In focus groups, participants felt deceived if sugar reduction claims were being made without a significant reduction in calories. This was reinforced in the quantitative research which showed that respondents expected a similar and meaningful level of calorie reduction to the level of sugar reduction. The research also identified consumer confusion around the calorie content of different nutrients, including over-estimation of the calorie content of sugars. This is crucial to consumers' expectations as they clearly link sugar to calories and therefore expect a reduction in sugar content to deliver a reduction in calorie content.

  6. Characteristics of claims in the management of septic arthritis in Japan: Retrospective analyses of judicial precedents and closed claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otaki, Yasuhiro; DaSilva, Makiko Ishida; Saito, Yuichi; Oyama, Yasuaki; Oiso, Giichiro; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Fukuhara, Masakazu; Moriyama, Mitsuru

    2018-03-01

    Septic arthritis (SA) cases can result in claims or litigation because of poor prognosis even if it is unavoidable. Although these claims or litigation are useful for understanding causes and background factors of medical errors, the characteristics of malpractice claims associated with SA remain undetermined in Japan. This study aimed to increase our understanding of malpractice claims in the clinical management of SA. We analyzed 6 civil precedents and 16 closed claims of SA from 8530 malpractice claims processed between July 2004 and June 2014 by the Tokyo office of Sompo Japan Nipponkoa Insurance, Incorporated. We also studied 5 accident and 21 incident reports of SA based on project data compiled by the Japan Council for Quality Health Care. The rate of negligence was 83.3% in the precedents and 75.0% in closed claims. Two main malpractice claim patterns were revealed: SA in a lower extremity joint following sepsis caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in newborns and SA in an injection site following joint injection. These two patterns accounted for 83.3% and 56.3% of judicial cases and closed claim cases, respectively. Breakdowns in care process of accident and incident reports were clearly differentiated from judicial cases or closed claim cases (Fisher's exact test, p < 0.001). It is important to pay particular attention to SA following sepsis in newborns and to monitor for any signs of SA after joint injection to ensure early diagnosis. Analysis of both malpractice claims and accident and incident reports is essential to ensure a full understanding of the situation in Japan. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  7. Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa M. Raghab

    2013-08-01

    The main goal of this study is to utilize a natural low cost material “as an accelerator additive to enhance the chemical treatment process using Alum coagulant and the accelerator substances were Perlite and Bentonite. The performance of the chemical treatment was enhanced using the accelerator substances with 90 mg/l Alum as a constant dose. Perlite gave better performance than the Bentonite effluent. The removal ratio for conductivity, turbidity, BOD and COD for Perlite was 86.7%, 87.4%, 89.9% and 92.8% respectively, and for Bentonite was 83.5%, 85.0%, 86.5% and 85.0% respectively at the same concentration of 40 mg/l for each.

  8. Medical insurance claims associated with international business travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liese, B; Mundt, K A; Dell, L D; Nagy, L; Demure, B

    1997-07-01

    Preliminary investigations of whether 10,884 staff and consultants of the World Bank experience disease due to work related travel. Medical insurance claims filed by 4738 travellers during 1993 were compared with claims of non-travellers. Specific diagnoses obtained from claims were analysed overall (one or more v no missions) and by frequency of international mission (1, 2-3, or > or = 4). Standardised rate of claims ratios (SSRs) for each diagnostic category were obtained by dividing the age adjusted rate of claims for travellers by the age adjusted rate of claims for non-travellers, and were calculated for men and women travellers separately. Overall, rates of insurance claims were 80% higher for men and 18% higher for women travellers than their non-travelling counterparts. Several associations with frequency of travel were found. SRRs for infectious disease were 1.28, 1.54, and 1.97 among men who had completed one, two or three, and four or more missions, and 1.16, 1.28, and 1.61, respectively, among women. The greatest excess related to travel was found for psychological disorders. For men SRRs were 2.11, 3.13, and 3.06 and for women, SRRs were 1.47, 1.96, and 2.59. International business travel may pose health risks beyond exposure to infectious diseases. Because travellers file medical claims at a greater rate than non-travellers, and for many categories of disease, the rate of claims increases with frequency of travel. The reasons for higher rates of claims among travellers are not well understood. Additional research on psychosocial factors, health practices, time zones crossed, and temporal relation between travel and onset of disease is planned.

  9. 32 CFR 536.111 - Investigation of claims arising under international agreements (for those claims arising in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... under international agreements (for those claims arising in the United States). Responsibility for... civilian component is attached, including the legal office of another armed force, to carry out the responsibility to investigate. The investigation will comply with the responsible Service's implementing claims...

  10. 41 CFR 105-55.003 - Antitrust, fraud, tax, interagency claims, and claims over $100,000 excluded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... apply to any debt based in whole or in part on conduct in violation of the antitrust laws or to any debt... antitrust laws or any claim involving fraud, the presentation of a false claim, or misrepresentation on the... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Antitrust, fraud, tax...

  11. Nutrition labelling, marketing techniques, nutrition claims and health claims on chip and biscuit packages from sixteen countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Alexandra J; Lock, Karen; Kelishadi, Roya; Swaminathan, Sumathi; Marcilio, Claudia S; Iqbal, Romaina; Dehghan, Mahshid; Yusuf, Salim; Chow, Clara K

    2016-04-01

    Food packages were objectively assessed to explore differences in nutrition labelling, selected promotional marketing techniques and health and nutrition claims between countries, in comparison to national regulations. Cross-sectional. Chip and sweet biscuit packages were collected from sixteen countries at different levels of economic development in the EPOCH (Environmental Profile of a Community's Health) study between 2008 and 2010. Seven hundred and thirty-seven food packages were systematically evaluated for nutrition labelling, selected promotional marketing techniques relevant to nutrition and health, and health and nutrition claims. We compared pack labelling in countries with labelling regulations, with voluntary regulations and no regulations. Overall 86 % of the packages had nutrition labels, 30 % had health or nutrition claims and 87 % displayed selected marketing techniques. On average, each package displayed two marketing techniques and one health or nutrition claim. In countries with mandatory nutrition labelling a greater proportion of packages displayed nutrition labels, had more of the seven required nutrients present, more total nutrients listed and higher readability compared with those with voluntary or no regulations. Countries with no health or nutrition claim regulations had fewer claims per package compared with countries with regulations. Nutrition label regulations were associated with increased prevalence and quality of nutrition labels. Health and nutrition claim regulations were unexpectedly associated with increased use of claims, suggesting that current regulations may not have the desired effect of protecting consumers. Of concern, lack of regulation was associated with increased promotional marketing techniques directed at children and misleadingly promoting broad concepts of health.

  12. Do Insurers Have to Pay for Bad Behaviour in Settling Claims? Legal Aspects of Insurers' Wrongful Claims Handling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H. van Boom (Willem)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: This article presents a comparative legal analysis of wrongful claims handling by insurance companies in indemnity and liability insurance. From the outset, it is clear that it may be difficult to draw the line between legitimate claims denial and refusal to pay, on the one

  13. Medico-legal claims against English radiologists: 1995–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, S F S

    2009-01-01

    A list of claims against radiologists from 1995–2006 was obtained from the NHS Litigation Authority. It shows a total of 440 claims. The largest number of claims (199) related to delayed or missed diagnoses of cancer, and 73 claims related to breast radiology. There is a trend for a mild increase in the number of claims each year. 30 claims were made after a false-positive diagnosis of cancer. Just under £8.5 million has so far been paid in damages, with a further £5 million in legal fees. A claim for multiple missed diagnoses of breast cancer led to a pay-out of £464 000 (£673 000 after legal fees); the largest sum awarded following a delay in the diagnosis of an individual cancer was £300 000. The subtle legal distinction between error and negligence is reviewed here. The reason why breast radiologists are more likely to be sued than any other type of British radiologist is also discussed, along with the implications for UK radiological practice, particularly in light of the recent Chief Medical Officer's report on revalidation. A method is proposed that may protect radiologists from allegations of clinical negligence in the future. PMID:19470570

  14. Medico-legal claims against English radiologists: 1995-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, S F S

    2009-12-01

    A list of claims against radiologists from 1995-2006 was obtained from the NHS Litigation Authority. It shows a total of 440 claims. The largest number of claims (199) related to delayed or missed diagnoses of cancer, and 73 claims related to breast radiology. There is a trend for a mild increase in the number of claims each year. 30 claims were made after a false-positive diagnosis of cancer. Just under pound8.5 million has so far been paid in damages, with a further pound5 million in legal fees. A claim for multiple missed diagnoses of breast cancer led to a pay-out of pound464 000 ( pound673 000 after legal fees); the largest sum awarded following a delay in the diagnosis of an individual cancer was pound300 000. The subtle legal distinction between error and negligence is reviewed here. The reason why breast radiologists are more likely to be sued than any other type of British radiologist is also discussed, along with the implications for UK radiological practice, particularly in light of the recent Chief Medical Officer's report on revalidation. A method is proposed that may protect radiologists from allegations of clinical negligence in the future.

  15. The claims handling process of liability insurance in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacoline van Jaarsveld

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Liabilities play a very important financial role in business operations, professional service providers as well as in the personal lives of people. It is possible that a single claim may even lead to the bankruptcy of the defendant. The claims handling process of liability insurance by short-term insurers is therefore very important to these parties as it should be clear that liability claims may have enormous and far-reaching financial implications for them. The objective of this research paper embodies the improvement of financial decision-making by short-term insurers with regard to the claims handling process of liability insurance. Secondary data was initially studied which provided the basis to compile a questionnaire for the empirical survey. The leaders of liability insurance in the South African short-term insurance market that represented 69.5% of the annual gross written premiums received for liability insurance in South Africa were the respondents of the empirical study. The perceptions of these short-term insurers provided the primary data for the vital conclusions of this research. This paper pays special attention to the importance of the claims handling factors of liability insurance, how often the stipulations of liability insurance policies are adjusted by the short-term insurers to take the claims handling factors into consideration, as well as the problem areas which short-term insurers may experience during the claims handling process. Feasible solutions to address the problem areas are also discussed.

  16. Tradeoffs of Using Administrative Claims and Medical Records to Identify the Use of Personalized Medicine for Patients with Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Su-Ying; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Wang, Grace; Keohane, Carol; Armstrong, Joanne; Morris, William M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Administrative claims and medical records are important data sources to examine healthcare utilization and outcomes. Little is known about identifying personalized medicine technologies in these sources. Objectives To describe agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of administrative claims compared to medical records for two pairs of targeted tests and treatments for breast cancer. Research Design Retrospective analysis of medical records linked to administrative claims from a large health plan. We examined whether agreement varied by factors that facilitate tracking in claims (coding and cost) and that enhance medical record completeness (records from multiple providers). Subjects Women (35 – 65 years) with incident breast cancer diagnosed in 2006–2007 (n=775). Measures Use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and gene expression profiling (GEP) testing, trastuzumab and adjuvant chemotherapy in claims and medical records. Results Agreement between claims and records was substantial for GEP, trastuzumab, and chemotherapy, and lowest for HER2 tests. GEP, an expensive test with unique billing codes, had higher agreement (91.6% vs. 75.2%), sensitivity (94.9% vs. 76.7%), and specificity (90.1% vs. 29.2%) than HER2, a test without unique billing codes. Trastuzumab, a treatment with unique billing codes, had slightly higher agreement (95.1% vs. 90%) and sensitivity (98.1% vs. 87.9%) than adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions Higher agreement and specificity were associated with services that had unique billing codes and high cost. Administrative claims may be sufficient for examining services with unique billing codes. Medical records provide better data for identifying tests lacking specific codes and for research requiring detailed clinical information. PMID:21422962

  17. Work ability, effort-reward imbalance and disability pension claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienert, J; Spanier, K; Radoschewski, F M; Bethge, M

    2017-12-30

    Effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and self-rated work ability are known independent correlates and predictors of intended disability pension claims. However, little research has focused on the interrelationship between the three and whether self-rated work ability mediates the relationship between ERI and intended disability pension claims. To investigate whether self-rated work ability mediates the association between ERI and intended disability pension claims. Baseline data from participants of the Third German Sociomedical Panel of Employees, a 5-year cohort study that investigates determinants of work ability, rehabilitation utilization and disability pensions in employees who have previously received sickness benefits, were analysed. We tested direct associations between ERI with intended disability pension claims (Model 1) and self-rated work ability (Model 2). Additionally, we tested whether work ability mediates the association between ERI and intended disability pension claims (Model 3). There were 2585 participants. Model 1 indicated a significant association between ERI and intended disability pension claims. Model 2 showed a significant association between ERI and self-rated work ability. The mediation in Model 3 revealed a significant indirect association between ERI and intended disability pension claims via self-rated work ability. There was no significant direct association between ERI and intended disability pension claims. Our results support the adverse health-related impact of ERI on self-rated work ability and intended disability pension claims. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  18. LEARNING POINTS FROM WHISTLEBLOWER CLAIMS AGAINST INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Schmidt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The types of whistleblowing claims made against institutions of higher education are not well understood nor are the various mechanisms used to solicit, investigate, and learn from such claims at the institutional and state levels. This research obtained and analyzed whistleblower claims made against institutions of higher education and explores and facilitates a discussion around the value of learning opportunities that come from whistleblowing claims. Aggregate claims data and detail workpapers for claims made against the 45 publicly funded colleges and universities in the state of Ohio, in the midwestern United States was analyzed to identify patterns and areas of focus which could improve institutional processes and internal controls. Four areas resulted from the analysis: hiring and pay practices, prevention of the theft of institutional assets, prevention of the theft of student funds, and an institutional accreditation issue. All claims that were reported reflected real concerns on topics of strategic importance to institutions and their management practices, although not all were substantiated or corroborated. One quarter of the claims resulted in proven cases for recovery and prosecution. At the state level, completeness of investigation and administrative learning were sometimes not pursued due to the code enforcement nature of the governing bodies whose mandate was limited to the identification and prosecution of crimes, although improvement opportunities clearly existed. The case of Ohio demonstrates that open government and public information request processes can provide sufficient information to allow insight into the nature of the claims and to identify improvement opportunities for both the institution and state level administration.

  19. 27 CFR 24.65 - Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claims for wine or spirits... Provisions Claims § 24.65 Claims for wine or spirits lost or destroyed in bond. (a) Claim for remission of... 27 CFR part 70, subpart F. A claim filed under this paragraph with respect to spirits, wine, or...

  20. 5 CFR 177.102 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate OPM office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... SERVICE REGULATIONS ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 177.102 Administrative claim... have occurred as a result of the incident. (b) All claims filed under the Federal Tort Claims Act as a result of the alleged negligence or wrongdoing of OPM or its employees will be mailed or delivered to the...

  1. 32 CFR 536.123 - Limitation of liability for maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Limitation of liability for maritime claims. 536... AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.123 Limitation of liability for maritime claims. For admiralty claims arising within the United States under the provisions of the...

  2. Registry and health insurance claims data in vascular research and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Heidemann, Franziska; Rieß, Henrik Christian; Stoberock, Konstanze; Debus, Sebastian Eike

    2017-01-01

    The expansion of procedures in multidisciplinary vascular medicine has sparked a controversy regarding measures of quality improvement. In addition to primary registries, the use of health insurance claims data is becoming of increasing importance. However, due to the fact that health insurance claims data are not collected for scientific evaluation but rather for reimbursement purposes, meticulous validation is necessary before and during usage in research and quality improvement matters. This review highlights the advantages and disadvantages of such data sources. A recent comprehensive expert opinion panel examined the use of health insurance claims data and other administrative data sources in medicine. Results from several studies concerning the validity of administrative data varied significantly. Validity of these data sources depends on the clinical relevance of the diagnoses considered. The rate of implausible information was 0.04 %, while the validity of the considered diagnoses varied between 80 and 97 % across multiple validation studies. A matching study between health insurance claims data of the third-largest German health insurance provider, DAK-Gesundheit, and a prospective primary registry of the German Society for Vascular Surgery demonstrated a good level of validity regarding the mortality of endovascular and open surgical treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm in German hospitals. In addition, a large-scale international comparison of administrative data for the same disorder presented important results in treatment reality, which differed from those from earlier randomized controlled trials. The importance of administrative data for research and quality improvement will continue to increase in the future. When discussing the internal and external validity of this data source, one has to distinguish not only between its intended usage (research vs. quality improvement), but also between the included diseases and/or treatment procedures

  3. ARCO and Sun agree to settle Iranian claims

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that ARCO and Sun Co. Inc. have agreed to separate settlements totaling almost $261 million that resolve their claims over oil field assets expropriated by Iran in 1978--80. The agreements are subject to approval by the Iran-U.S. claims tribunal at The Hague. The tribunal was set up in 1981 to resolve foreign claims to assets nationalized by the government of Ayatollah Khomeini following the fall of the Shah of Iran as a result of the 1978-79 Iranian revolution. The settlements are seen as the latest steps Iran has taken to normalize relations with the U.S., notably through petroleum related deals

  4. Legal assumptions for private company claim for additional (supplementary payment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šogorov Stevan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Subject matter of analyze in this article are legal assumptions which must be met in order to enable private company to call for additional payment. After introductory remarks discussion is focused on existence of provisions regarding additional payment in formation contract, or in shareholders meeting general resolution, as starting point for company's claim. Second assumption is concrete resolution of shareholders meeting which creates individual obligations for additional payments. Third assumption is defined as distinctness regarding sum of payment and due date. Sending of claim by relevant company body is set as fourth legal assumption for realization of company's right to claim additional payments from member of private company.

  5. Claims Procedure for Plans Providing Disability Benefits. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-19

    This document contains a final regulation revising the claims procedure regulations under the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) for employee benefit plans providing disability benefits. The final rule revises and strengthens the current rules primarily by adopting certain procedural protections and safeguards for disability benefit claims that are currently applicable to claims for group health benefits pursuant to the Affordable Care Act. This rule affects plan administrators and participants and beneficiaries of plans providing disability benefits, and others who assist in the provision of these benefits, such as third-party benefits administrators and other service providers.

  6. A Unifying Framework for the Problem of Adjudicating Conflicting Claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    the structure of such a space. In this paper, we generalize their analysis upon presenting and studying a general family of operators inspired by three apparently unrelated approaches to the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims. We study the structural properties of this family and show, in particular......In a recent paper, Thomson and Yeh [Operators for the adjudication of conflicting claims, Journal of Economic Theory 143 (2008) 177-198] introduced the concept of operators on the space of rules for the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims. They focussed on three operators in order to uncover...

  7. The use of breast conserving surgery: linking insurance claims with tumor registry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maskarinec, Gertraud; Dhakal, Sanjaya; Yamashiro, Gladys; Issell, Brian F

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use insurance claims and tumor registry data to examine determinants of breast conserving surgery (BCS) in women with early stage breast cancer. Breast cancer cases registered in the Hawaii Tumor Registry (HTR) from 1995 to 1998 were linked with insurance claims from a local health plan. We identified 722 breast cancer cases with stage I and II disease. Surgical treatment patterns and comorbidities were identified using diagnostic and procedural codes in the claims data. The HTR database provided information on demographics and disease characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess determinants of BCS vs. mastectomy. The linked data set represented 32.8% of all early stage breast cancer cases recorded in the HTR during the study period. Due to the nature of the health plan, 79% of the cases were younger than 65 years. Women with early stage breast cancer living on Oahu were 70% more likely to receive BCS than women living on the outer islands. In the univariate analysis, older age at diagnosis, lower tumor stage, smaller tumor size, and well-differentiated tumor grade were related to receiving BCS. Ethnicity, comorbidity count, menopausal and marital status were not associated with treatment type. In addition to developing solutions that facilitate access to radiation facilities for breast cancer patients residing in remote locations, future qualitative research may help to elucidate how women and oncologists choose between BCS and mastectomy

  8. Reducing medical claims cost to Ghana?s National Health Insurance scheme: a cross-sectional comparative assessment of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews

    OpenAIRE

    Nsiah-Boateng, Eric; Asenso-Boadi, Francis; Dsane-Selby, Lydia; Andoh-Adjei, Francis-Xavier; Otoo, Nathaniel; Akweongo, Patricia; Aikins, Moses

    2017-01-01

    Background A robust medical claims review system is crucial for addressing fraud and abuse and ensuring financial viability of health insurance organisations. This paper assesses claims adjustment rate of the paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in Ghana. Methods The study was a cross-sectional comparative assessment of paper- and electronic-based claims reviews of the NHIS. Medical claims of subscribers for the year, 2014 were requested fr...

  9. Geographic variation in expenditures for workers' compensation physician claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T R; Levy, D T

    1997-07-01

    We examine interstate variations in the cost of claims for physician care using injury claims from Worker's Compensation, and consider some of the factors that may explain cost differences. Multivariate regression analysis is used to isolate state variations, while controlling for personal and injury characteristics, and state characteristics. Statistical analyses reveal considerable variation in expenditures for physician care of injuries across states, even after controlling for case mix and state characteristics. We also find that the presence of HMOs and of general practitioners as a percent of physicians are associated with lower claims, and that the percent of the state that is urban is associated with higher claims. The large variation in costs suggests a potential to affect the costs of physician care for work-related injuries.

  10. 8529 DIVERSITY AND IMMUNE BOOSTING CLAIMS OF SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... elderly women were keen in this process and spent more time in preparing the vegetables which were ... farmers use indigenous vegetables both to meet their food and nutrition security as ..... marketing and medicinal claims.

  11. 77 FR 44155 - Administration of Mining Claims and Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-27

    ... hypothetical 66-acre placer claim would be $560. IV. Procedural Matters Regulatory Planning and Review... miner maintenance fee waiver program, which further reduces any potential impact on small miners. A...

  12. Basic Stand Alone Medicare Claims Public Use Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS is committed to increasing access to its Medicare claims data through the release of de-identified data files available for public use. They contain...

  13. Products Claiming to "Cure" Cancer Are a Cruel Deception

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products claiming to cure cancer on websites or social media platforms, such as Facebook and Instagram. According to Nicole Kornspan, M.P.H., a consumer safety officer at the U.S. Food and Drug ...

  14. 27 CFR 28.304 - Action on claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... appropriate TTB officer will allow or disallow claims filed under § 28.303 in accordance with existing law and... spirits as the result of any connivance, collusion, fraud, or negligence on the part of the exporter...

  15. Contract Claims Experience at the Naval Air Systems Command

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carty, John

    1999-01-01

    ...) experienced at the Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) between January 1997 and December 1998 as a means to identify areas of potential improvement in management practices which could result in reduced numbers of claims being submitted...

  16. 31 CFR 248.7 - Claims requiring settlement action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICE ISSUE OF SUBSTITUTES OF LOST... claimant and transmit such data to the Claims Division, General Accounting Office, for settlement action. ...

  17. 19 CFR 24.72 - Claims; set-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... CUSTOMS FINANCIAL AND ACCOUNTING PROCEDURE § 24.72 Claims; set-off. When an importer of record or other... indebted to the United States, either as principal or surety, for an amount which is legally fixed and...

  18. 32 CFR 750.44 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... death which was proximately caused, in whole or in part, by any negligence or wrongful act on the part... Chapter. (4) Federal Tort Claims Act. 28 U.S.C. 2671, 2672, and 2674-2680. (5) International Agreements...

  19. 24 CFR 207.258 - Insurance claim requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... in 24 CFR part 200, subpart B, of its intention to file an insurance claim and of its election either..., ledger cards, documents, books, papers, and accounts relating to the mortgage transaction. (iv) All...

  20. Mixtures of tails in clustered automobile collision claims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Kalb (Reinhard); P. Kofman (Paul); A.C.F. Vorst (Ton)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractKnowledge of the tail shape of claim distributions provides important actuarial information. This paper discusses how two techniques commonly used in assessing the most appropriate underlying distribution can be usefully combined. The maximum likelihood approach is theoretically

  1. Creditors’ claims in bankruptcy proceedings - issues and concerns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Palić

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A generally accepted rule in the bankruptcy law is that a bankruptcy creditor can file a claim against the debtor only in bankruptcy proceedings. This rule has a legal effect. If the creditor’s claim in the bankruptcy proceeding has not been disputed, the creditor is not able to instigate legal and execution proceedings. Obviously, this applies to financial claims. However, it is not clear whether the above can be applied when the claim is not financial but when it concerns a request for the nullification of a contract. It is of particular interest whether such a request can be made by a counterclaim against the debtor in an ordinary judicial proceeding or only in bankruptcy proceedings. Using a practical example, the authors concluded that it is possible for a creditor to make a request for the nullification of a contract by a counterclaim in a civil lawsuit.

  2. 50 CFR 296.5 - Instructions for filing claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... method of position fixing available to the claimant, (vi) A description of the item or obstruction (if... cost. (6) The amount claimed for economic loss and the basis for that amount with supporting...

  3. The EU health claim regulation in international comparison

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition and health claims are voluntary claims on food indicating favourable nutritional content or health benefits of the food. Nutrition and health claims on food are increasingly regulated in the world market. This process is accompanied by intensive stakeholder discussions on the possible...... impact on consumer protection and food marketing effectiveness. This article reviews literature on regulations in the major food markets in comparison with the EU regulation. The focus is on identifying characteristics of regulations that are expected to have an impact on consumer protection and food...... marketing. The EU regulation is regarded as focusing relatively strongly on precaution and consumer understanding. The extent to which this hampers food innovations is in dispute. It is suggested that using marketing measures in favour of scientifically approved claims as well as stakeholder cooperation...

  4. Predicting Immediate Belief Change and Adherence to Argument Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hample, Dale

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the probative potential of evidence in argument, and evaluates the importance of evidence in predicting belief change. Predicts adherence to argument claims and confirms the traditionally recognized importance of evidence to persuasion. (JMF)

  5. Health claims on foods: challenge for clinical research companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essi Sarkkinen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The Nutrition and Health Claim Regulation 1924/2006/EC, together with EFSA guidances on the scientific requirements for different type of health claims, is setting the basis for health claim substantiation in the EU. Aim The aim of this presentation is to bring up the key challenges that the food industry and clinical research organizations are facing when meeting these requirements. Results and discussion Key issues in clinical research planning to meet the requirements set for the health claim substantiation are: (1 Selection of right outcome markers since the selection of outcome marker defines actually the formulation of the health claim to be used on food or food ingredient. (2 Selection of right target population since that determines the target consumer group for the food with a health claim. (3 Selection of dose regime and food matrices used since these largely determine the conditions set for the use of the health claim. One of the major challenges in health claim substantiation is the deviant approach to risk factors or biomarkers. From the regulation point of view, a single risk factor approach is emphasized, but from the clinical and scientific point of view the pattern of different risk markers or biomarkers could, in some cases, be a more relevant choice to reflect the final health outcome. This is especially the case in the nutrition and health area because we are often dealing with weak but multiple health effects of certain food items or ingredients. Also the lack of validated well-established biomarkers potent to be affected by diet is a challenge in health claim substantiation.The selection of right target population is often a compromise between choosing a more potential target group to obtain efficacy (i.e. risk factors elevated vs. patient groups and choosing a rationale to generalize the results to wider population (target consumer group.The selection of optimal dosing regime and matrices for a clinical study is

  6. Compensation culture reviewed: incentives to claim and damages levels

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Richard Kurt

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews some recent developments which have affected the debate concerning ‘compensation culture.’ It focuses upon the number of claims and the cost of claims, looking especially at the level of damages. The role of insurers and the changing nature of personal injury practice are also discussed. The conclusion is that issues arising from the debate will continue for some time to come.

  7. Mediation as an alternative solution to medical malpractice court claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neels Claassen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Is there a crisis in the healthcare industry? Most certainly there is. Dr Motsoaledi, Minister of Health, publicly acknowledged the existence of such a crisis at a Medico-Legal Summit held at his initiative in Pretoria on 9 and 10 March 2015 at St Georges Hotel.[1] Currently, as recently confirmed by the MEC for Health, Ms Mahlangu, there are about 2 000 pending court cases against the Gauteng Provincial Health Department, the total quantum being claimed amounting to approximately ZAR 3.5 billion. During 2013/2014 this department spent about ZAR 256 million on legal costs payable to claimants’ attorneys. No budget for these expenses exists, resulting in payment being made from funds designated for the acquisition of medical equipment and other purposes.[1] This undermines the department’s ability to renew old equipment and upgrade to more modern equipment, resulting in even further claims. More claims are therefore to be expected. The Medical Protection Society also confirmed an increase in medical malpractice claims against their members of nearly 550% compared to 10 years ago. The quantum of claims that exceeded ZAR 5 million per claim, also increased by 900%.[2,3] The ripple effect of these increases in medico-legal claims causes insurance premiums for healthcare professionals to become exorbitantly expensive, resulting in some practitioners leaving the medical profession. Practitioners also act more defensively in applying their trade, resulting in additional and sometimes unnecessary tests that increase the costs of medical care and often cause further grounds for the institution of claims.

  8. Legal liability and claims for the hotel industry

    OpenAIRE

    Dimcho Todorov

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a review of various aspects of legal liability and claims to hotel management arising in the hotel industry in the context of the legal framework and possible legal consequences for hotels and other types of commercial accommodation establishments. The main reasons for accidents' occurrence in the hotel industry are chronologically traced. Possible claims to the hotel management are also presented in detail. The problem with workplace discrimination, which is considered as ...

  9. A Systematic Method to Analyze Force Majeure in Construction Claims

    OpenAIRE

    Saud Alshammari; Khalid Al-Gahtani; Ibrahim Alhammad; Nuhu Braimah

    2017-01-01

    In construction delay claims, force majeure is normally recognized as an excusable risk that entitles contractors only to time extensions, but neither of the contracting parties is entitled to monetary compensation to recover delay damages. However, there are instances where contractors are entitled to both time and cost compensations, as evidenced by some court cases relating to force majeure claims. Such instances involve attributing the occurrence of the force majeure to the effect of othe...

  10. 77 FR 11564 - Draft Policy on Consultation With Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Corporations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... Claims Settlement Act Corporations AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... draft policy on consultation with Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act corporations. DATES: Submit...-199, this consultation policy also applies to corporations established under the Alaska Native Claims...

  11. Employee health and frequency of workers' compensation and disability claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhnen, Ann E; Burch, Steven P; Shenolikar, Rahul A; Joy, Karen A

    2009-09-01

    To assess the relationship between self-assessed employee health risk status and future workers' compensation (WC) and short-term disability (STD) claims. A historical cohort study linking Health Risk Assessment (HRA) survey data with subsequent WC and STD claims. HRA participants who developed a WC or STD claim in the subsequent 12 months were identified as cases and compared with HRA participants who did not develop a claim in the subsequent 12 months. High-risk participants had higher odds of filing a WC claim, when compared with low-risk participants (OR: 2.99, 95% CI: 1.22 to 7.32) despite adjustment for demographic factors including job type. Medium-risk participants had 1.5 times higher odds, when compared with low-risk participants to file for STD (OR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15 to 1.82). Other relationships trended similarly but did not reach statistical significance. Self-assessed personal health risk does impact future lost productivity in WC and STD claims even after adjustment for demographic, health factors, and job type (WC only). Employers wishing to reduce the impact of lost productivity should consider a worker's personal health risks as predictors of future lost productivity and may want to address this in broad risk reduction programs.

  12. Health and Stress Management and Mental-health Disability Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Haines, Victor Y; Harvey, Steve; Dextras-Gauthier, Julie; Durand, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    This study examines the associations between health and stress management (HSM) practices and mental-health disability claims. Data from the Salveo study was collected during 2009-2012 within 60 workplaces nested in 37 companies located in Canada (Quebec) and insured by a large insurance company. In each company, 1 h interviews were conducted with human resources managers in order to obtain data on 63 HSM practices. Companies and workplaces were sorted into the low-claims and high-claims groups according to the median rate of the population of the insurer's corporate clients. Logistic regression adjusted for design effect and multidimensional scaling was used to analyse the data. After controlling for company size and economic sector, task design, demands control, gratifications, physical activity and work-family balance were associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. Further analyses revealed three company profiles that were qualified as laissez-faire, integrated and partially integrated approaches to HSM. Of the three, the integrated profile was associated with low mental-health disability claims rates. The results of this study provide evidence-based guidance for a better control of mental-health disability claims. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Health claims in the labelling and marketing of food products:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, Nils-Georg; Bryngelsson, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    Since 1990 certain health claims in the labelling and marketing of food products have been allowed in Sweden within the food sector's Code of Practice. The rules were developed in close dialogue with the authorities. The legal basis was a decision by the authorities not to apply the medicinal products’ legislation to “foods normally found on the dinner table” provided the rules defined in the Code were followed. The Code of Practice lists nine well-established diet–health relationships eligible for generic disease risk reduction claims in two steps and general rules regarding nutrient function claims. Since 2001, there has also been the possibility for using “product-specific physiological claims (PFP)”, subject to premarketing evaluation of the scientific dossier supporting the claim. The scientific documentation has been approved for 10 products with PFP, and another 15 products have been found to fulfil the Code's criteria for “low glycaemic index”. In the third edition of the Code, active since 2004, conditions in terms of nutritional composition were set, i.e. “nutrient profiles”, with a general reference to the Swedish National Food Administration's regulation on the use of a particular symbol, i.e. the keyhole symbol. Applying the Swedish Code of practice has provided experience useful in the implementation of the European Regulation on nutrition and health claims made on foods, effective from 2007.

  14. Performance evaluation of court in construction claims settlement of litigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Kemala; Latief, Yusuf; Rarasati, Ayomi Dita; Siddik, Arief

    2017-06-01

    Claim construction has a major influence on the implementation of projects, such as the cost and time. The success of the construction project is highly dependent on the effective resolution of claims. Although it has been recognized that litigation or court is not the best way because it may reduce or eliminate profits and damage the relationship, it is a method of resolving claims and disputes that is common in the world of construction. The method of resolving claims and disputes through litigation or court may solve the problem in an alternative method, namely the implementation of the judgment which can be enforced effectively against the losing party and the ruling which has the force of law of the country where the claims and disputes are examined. However, litigation or court may take longer time and require high cost. Thus, it is necessary to identify factors affecting the performance of the court and to develop a system capable of improving an existing system in order to run more effectively and efficiently. Resolution in the claims management of construction projects with the method of litigation is a procedure that can be used by the courts in order to shorten the time in order to reduce the cost. The scope of this research is directed to all parties involved in the construction, both the owners and the contractors as implementers and practitioners, as well as experts who are experienced in construction law.

  15. The influence of motor vehicle legislation on injury claim incidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemstra, Mark; Olszynski, W P

    2005-01-01

    Although there have been numerous strategies to prevent motor vehicle collisions and their subsequent injuries, few have been effective in preventing motor vehicle injury claims. In this paper, we examine the role of legislation and compensation system in altering injury claim incidence. The population base for our natural experiment was all Saskatchewan, Manitoba, British Columbia and Quebec residents who submitted personal injury claims to their respective motor vehicle insurance provider from 1990 to 1999. The provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba switched from Tort to pure No-Fault insurance on January 1, 1995 and on March 1, 1994 respectively. British Columbia maintained tort insurance and Quebec maintained pure no-fault insurance throughout the entire 10-year period. The conversion from tort insurance to pure no-fault motor vehicle insurance resulted in a five-year 31% (RR = 0.69; 95% CI 0.68-0.70) reduction in total injury claims per 100,000 residents in Saskatchewan and a five-year 43% (RR = 0.57; 95% CI 0.56-0.58) reduction in Manitoba. At the same time, the province of British Columbia retained tort insurance and had a five-year 5% reduction (RR = 0.95; 95% CI 0.94-0.99). Quebec, which retained pure no-fault throughout the entire 10-year period, had less than one third of the injury claims per 100,000 residents than the tort province of British Columbia. The conversion from tort to pure no-fault legislation has a large influence in reducing motor vehicle injury claim incidence in Canada. Legislative system and injury compensation scheme have an observable impact on injury claim incidence and can therefore have significant impact on the health care system.

  16. Economic cost and epidemiological characteristics of patients with fibromyalgia claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Rebecca L; Birnbaum, Howard G; Morley, Melissa A; Sisitsky, Tamar; Greenberg, Paul E; Claxton, Ami J

    2003-06-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is characterized by widespread pain that can lead to significant patient disability, complex management decisions for physicians, and economic burden on society. We investigated the total costs of FM in an employer population. Administrative claims data of a Fortune 100 manufacturer were used to quantify direct (i.e., medical and pharmaceutical claims) and indirect (i.e., disability claims and imputed absenteeism) costs associated with FM. A total of 4699 patients with at least one FM claim between 1996 and 1998 were contrasted with a 10% random sample of the overall beneficiary population. Employee-only subsets of both samples also were drawn. Medical utilization, receipt of prescription drugs, and annual total costs were proportionately similar yet significantly greater among FM claimants than the overall sample (all p < 0.0001). Total annual costs for FM claimants were $5945 versus $2486 for the typical beneficiary (p < 0.0001). Six percent of these costs were attributable to FM-specific claims. The prevalence of disability was twice as high among FM employees than overall employees (p < 0.0001). For every dollar spent on FM-specific claims, the employer spent another $57 to $143 on additional direct and indirect costs. Hidden costs of disability and comorbidities greatly increase the true burden of FM. Regardless of the clinical understanding of FM, when a claim for FM is present, considerable costs are involved. Findings suggest that within the management of FM there may be large cost-offset opportunities for reductions in patient, physician, and employer burdens.

  17. Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a Cancer Treatment Scam Anatomy of a Cancer Treatment Scam January 19, 2012 Curious about a product that claims to treat or cure cancer? According to the Federal Trade Commission, consumers should ...

  18. Risk of Contractors’ Claims On the Example of Road Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybka, Iwona; Bondar-Nowakowska, Elżbieta; Pawluk, Katarzyna; Połoński, Mieczysław

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the study is to analyse claims filed by building contractors during the project implementation. The work is divided into two parts. In the first part problems associated with the management of claims in the construction process were discussed. Bearing in mind that claims may result in prolongation of the investment or exceeding planned budget, possibilities of applying information included in documents connected with claims procedure to risk management was analysed in the second part of the study. The basis of the analysis is a review of 226 documents. They originate from 8 construction sites completed in the last 5 years in southwestern Poland. In each case, these were linear road projects, executed by different contractors, according to conditions in the contract set out in the “Yellow Book” FIDIC. In the study, other documents relating events that according to contractors entitled them to claim were also analysed. They included among others: project documentation, terms of reference, construction log, reports and correspondence under the contract. The events constituting the reason for contractors` claims were classified according to their sources. 8 areas of potential threats were distinguished. They were presented in the form of a block diagram. Most events initiating the claims were reported in the following group - adverse actions of third parties, while the fewest were recorded in the group - the lack of access to the construction site. Based on calculated similarity indicators it was found that considered construction sites were diversified in terms of the number of the events occurrence that generated the claim and their sources. In recent years, many road projects are completed behind the schedule and their initially planned budgets are significantly exceeded. Conducted research indicated that data derived from the analysis of documents connected with claims can be applied to identify and classify both cost and schedule risk factors

  19. Can Medicaid Claims Validly Ascertain Foster Care Status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Ramesh; Brown, Derek S; Allaire, Benjamin T

    2017-08-01

    Medicaid claims have been used to identify populations of children in foster care in the current literature; however, the ability of such an approach to validly ascertain a foster care population is unknown. This study linked children in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being-I to their Medicaid claims from 36 states using their Social Security numbers. Using this match, we examined discordance between caregiver report of foster care placement and the foster care eligibility code contained in the child's Medicaid claims. Only 73% of youth placed in foster care for at least a year displayed a Medicaid code for foster care eligibility. Half of all youth coming into contact with child welfare displayed discordance between caregiver report and Medicaid claims. Children with emergency department utilization, and those in primary care case management health insurance arrangements, had the highest odds of accurate ascertainment. The use of Medicaid claims to identify a cohort of children in foster care results in high rates of underascertainment. Supplementing administrative data with survey data is one way to enhance validity of ascertainment.

  20. Conscience claims, metaphysics, and avoiding an LGBT eugenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummett, Abram

    2018-06-01

    Novel assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are poised to present our society with strange new ethical questions, such as whether lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) couples should be allowed to produce children biologically related to both parents, or whether trans-women who want to experience childbirth should be allowed to receive uterine transplants. Clinicians opposed to offering such technologies to LGBT couples on moral grounds are likely to seek legal shelter through the conscience clauses enshrined in U.S. law. This paper begins by briefly discussing some novel ART on the horizon and noting that it is unclear whether current conscience clauses will permit fertility clinics to deny such services to LGBT individuals. A compromise approach to conscience is any view that sees the value of respecting conscience claims within limits. I describe and critique the constraints proposed in the recent work of Wicclair, NeJaime and Siegel as ultimately begging the question. My purpose is to strengthen their arguments by suggesting that in the controversial situations that elicit claims of conscience, bioethicists should engage with the metaphysical claims in play. I argue that conscience claims against LGBT individuals ought to be constrained because the underlying metaphysic-that God has decreed the LGBT lifestyle to be sinful-is highly implausible from the perspective of a naturalized metaphysic, which ought to be the lens through which we evaluate conscience claims. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Naturally good: Front-of-package claims as message cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubisz, Christine

    2017-01-01

    Excess bodyweight is a significant public health problem in the United States, increasing the risk of adverse health conditions including hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and cancer. Americans are consuming more calories than their bodies need each day and making purchasing decisions using heuristic cues, rather than caloric information. A recent trend in food and beverage labeling is the placement of a natural claim on a product's package. Unfortunately, the United States has not established clear requirements for natural claims and manufacturers are using this term liberally. Using models of information processing as a framework, the goal of this study was to predict the effects of natural claims on message processing and evaluations. It was predicted that natural claims would be perceived as heuristics for healthfulness. A 6 (product) x 2 (claim) experimental design was carried out. Support for the prediction that natural labeled products are evaluated as more healthful was found. Despite the fact that natural products contained the same number of calories as their regular counterparts, participants estimated that natural products contained 18% fewer calories. Implications of these findings for food labeling and public health are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Systematic Method to Analyze Force Majeure in Construction Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saud Alshammari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In construction delay claims, force majeure is normally recognized as an excusable risk that entitles contractors only to time extensions, but neither of the contracting parties is entitled to monetary compensation to recover delay damages. However, there are instances where contractors are entitled to both time and cost compensations, as evidenced by some court cases relating to force majeure claims. Such instances involve attributing the occurrence of the force majeure to the effect of other prior delay events that pushed project performance into the period of the force majeure. Existing delay analysis methods are not capable of addressing this issue, as none take the impact of other delays into consideration when analyzing force majeure claims. Stimulated by this gap, this study proposes an improved and sound method for fairly analyzing the responsibility of force majeure delay claims amongst contracting parties. This method was implemented on a case project to help demonstrate its application and also ascertain its practicability. The contribution of this paper is twofold. First, it has highlighted the situation of force majeure delay that can be compensable, creating more awareness among researchers and industry practitioners. The second is a proposed systematic process to appropriately analyze its responsibility, which equitably addresses claims from such delays with little or no chance of dispute ensuing.

  3. Formulation of Generic Simulation Models for Analyzing Construction Claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rifat Rustom

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available While there are several techniques for analyzing the impact of claims on time schedule and productivity,very few are considered adequate and comprehensive to consider risks and uncertainties.A generic approach for claims analysis using simulation is proposed. The formulation of the generic methodology presented in this paper depends on three simulation models;As-Planned Model (APM,As-Built Model (ABM, and What-Would-HaveBeenModel(WWHBM. The proposed generic methodology as presented in this paper provides a good basis as a more elaborate approach to better analyze claims and their impacts on project time and productivity utilizing discrete event simulation.The approach proposed allows for scenario analysis to account for the disputed events and workflow disruptions. The proposed models will assist claimants in presenting their cases effectively and professionally.

  4. How Danes evaluate moral claims related to abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall, Sigurd Wiingaard

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate how Danish citizens evaluate four moral claims related to abortion issues, regarding the moral status of the fetus, autonomy, harm and possible negative consequences of allowing abortion and to explore the association between moral beliefs and attitudes towards abortion...... to at least one moral claim. Two hundred and fifty-eight responded to all four claims without using the option 'neither agree nor disagree' and were classified as 'morally engaged responders'. A majority of these had a pro-abortion moral. The general relationship between moral beliefs and attitudes towards...... abortion was morally sound. Being 'morally engaged' did not increase the likelihood of reaching moral judgement on whether requests for abortion should be permitted. Education, religion and parenthood were statistically associated with the investigated issues. DISCUSSION: The direction of causality...

  5. A unifying framework for the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave; Moreno-Terero, Juan D.

    2012-01-01

    operators in order to uncover the structure of such a space. In this paper, we generalize their analysis upon presenting and studying a general family of operators inspired by three apparently unrelated approaches to the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims. We study the structural properties......In a recent paper, Thomson and Yeh [Thomson, W., Yeh, C.-H., 2008. Operators for the adjudication of conflicting claims. Journal of Economic Theory 143, 177–198] introduced the concept of operators on the space of rules for the problem of adjudicating conflicting claims. They focused on three...... of this family and show, in particular, that most of Thomson and Yeh’s results are specific cases of our study....

  6. 21 CFR 101.60 - Nutrient content claims for the calorie content of foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nutrient content claims for the calorie content of... Claims § 101.60 Nutrient content claims for the calorie content of foods. (a) General requirements. A claim about the calorie or sugar content of a food may only be made on the label or in the labeling of a...

  7. 38 CFR 14.616 - Form and place of filing claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... applicable to the claim. (b) Place of filing claim. Claims arising in the Philippines under 38 U.S.C. 515(b... the Philippines. Claims arising in other foreign countries will be filed with the American Embassy or... documents in other than the English language will be accompanied by English translations. (2) Personal...

  8. 44 CFR 11.11 - Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate FEMA office.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Federal Tort Claims Act § 11.11 Administrative claim; when presented; appropriate FEMA office. (a) For the purpose of this part, and the provisions of the Federal Tort Claims Act a claim is deemed to have been... Administrator of the FEMA Regional Office in which is employed the FEMA employee whose negligence or wrongful...

  9. 32 CFR 537.17 - Scope for civil works claims of maritime nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Scope for civil works claims of maritime nature. 537.17 Section 537.17 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS ON BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.17 Scope for civil works claims of maritime...

  10. 32 CFR 537.1 - Statutory authority for non-maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Statutory authority for non-maritime claims. 537.1 Section 537.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS ON BEHALF OF THE UNITED STATES § 537.1 Statutory authority for non-maritime claims. (a) The...

  11. 32 CFR 536.122 - Limitation of settlement of maritime claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Limitation of settlement of maritime claims. 536... AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Maritime Claims § 536.122 Limitation of settlement of maritime claims. (a) Within the United States the period of completing an administrative settlement under...

  12. 24 CFR 213.270 - Supplementary loans; election of action; claims; debentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... desires to pursue. (b) Maximum claim period. Notice of intention to file claim on a form prescribed by the... filed on submitting claim. Within 30 days after the filing of the notice of intention to file claim, or...) All records, ledger cards, documents, books, papers and accounts relating to the loan transaction; (10...

  13. Accessing indigenous land rights through claims in Taroko Area, Eastern Taiwan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lo, Yung-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The thesis explores how indigenous people access land rights through claims. Land claims happens on the encounters between different regimes of property. The authors found indigenous people have many ways to express their land claims since Japanese time. There are individual claims on lands like

  14. 38 CFR 20.1500 - Rule 1500. Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Claims Adjudication Initiative. 20.1500 Section 20.1500 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief... Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program § 20.1500 Rule 1500. Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative. (a) Purpose. The Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative is a pilot program designed to streamline the claims...

  15. 13 CFR 114.104 - What evidence and information may SBA require relating to my claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT AND REPRESENTATION AND... relevant to the government's alleged liability or the damages you claim. (c) For a claim based on death: (1) An authenticated death certificate or other competent evidence showing cause of death, date of death...

  16. 36 CFR 223.9 - Free use to owners of certain mining claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... mining claims. 223.9 Section 223.9 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... of certain mining claims. Free use will be granted to an owner of a mining claim located subsequent to July 23, 1955, or of a mining claim which is otherwise subject to Section 4 of the Act of July 23...

  17. Valuation of Non-Life Liabilities from Claims Triangles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Lindholm

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a complete program for the valuation of aggregate non-life insurance liability cash flows based on claims triangle data. The valuation is fully consistent with the principle of valuation by considering the costs associated with a transfer of the liability to a so-called reference undertaking subject to capital requirements throughout the runoff of the liability cash flow. The valuation program includes complete details on parameter estimation, bias correction and conservative estimation of the value of the liability under partial information. The latter is based on a new approach to the estimation of mean squared error of claims reserve prediction.

  18. Empirical Musicology Review: Serialist Claims versus Sonic Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Thomson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the descriptive mores of Serialism, as found in writings of leading American academics of the past half-century. A serious gap is revealed, especially between claims made for structural conditions rooted in dodecaphonic procedures and the actual kinetics of music as heard. Curious (and debilitating ambiguities and dead ends are noted in terms used to define critical perceptual conditions in such music; some claims of significance for features of 12- tone rows in certain works are revealed as wholly irrelevant to music as sonic event. Most prominent of the writings discussed are those of Milton Babbitt, Allen Forte and David Lewin.

  19. Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Toggle Nav Nine Things To Know About Stem Cell Treatments Home > Stem Cells and Medicine > Nine Things ... Know About Stem Cell Treatments Many clinics offering stem cell treatments make claims that are not supported by ...

  20. Development of an electronic claim system based on an integrated electronic health record platform to guarantee interoperability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwa Sun; Cho, Hune; Lee, In Keun

    2011-06-01

    We design and develop an electronic claim system based on an integrated electronic health record (EHR) platform. This system is designed to be used for ambulatory care by office-based physicians in the United States. This is achieved by integrating various medical standard technologies for interoperability between heterogeneous information systems. The developed system serves as a simple clinical data repository, it automatically fills out the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)-1500 form based on information regarding the patients and physicians' clinical activities. It supports electronic insurance claims by creating reimbursement charges. It also contains an HL7 interface engine to exchange clinical messages between heterogeneous devices. The system partially prevents physician malpractice by suggesting proper treatments according to patient diagnoses and supports physicians by easily preparing documents for reimbursement and submitting claim documents to insurance organizations electronically, without additional effort by the user. To show the usability of the developed system, we performed an experiment that compares the time spent filling out the CMS-1500 form directly and time required create electronic claim data using the developed system. From the experimental results, we conclude that the system could save considerable time for physicians in making claim documents. The developed system might be particularly useful for those who need a reimbursement-specialized EHR system, even though the proposed system does not completely satisfy all criteria requested by the CMS and Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). This is because the criteria are not sufficient but necessary condition for the implementation of EHR systems. The system will be upgraded continuously to implement the criteria and to offer more stable and transparent transmission of electronic claim data.

  1. Women workers and the politics of claims-making in a globalizing economy

    OpenAIRE

    Kabeer, Naila

    2015-01-01

    The paper analyses the evolving politics of claims-making by women workers in the Global South in the context of a globalized economy. It addresses the following questions. What kinds of claims are prioritized in relation to women workers? Who is making these claims? To whom are they addressed? What strategies are pursued to advance these claims? Which claims are heard and acted on - and which go unheard? The paper considers three categories of women workers: those working in global value cha...

  2. Univariate time series modeling and an application to future claims amount in SOCSO's invalidity pension scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chek, Mohd Zaki Awang; Ahmad, Abu Bakar; Ridzwan, Ahmad Nur Azam Ahmad; Jelas, Imran Md.; Jamal, Nur Faezah; Ismail, Isma Liana; Zulkifli, Faiz; Noor, Syamsul Ikram Mohd

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of this study is to forecast the future claims amount of Invalidity Pension Scheme (IPS). All data were derived from SOCSO annual reports from year 1972 - 2010. These claims consist of all claims amount from 7 benefits offered by SOCSO such as Invalidity Pension, Invalidity Grant, Survivors Pension, Constant Attendance Allowance, Rehabilitation, Funeral and Education. Prediction of future claims of Invalidity Pension Scheme will be made using Univariate Forecasting Models to predict the future claims among workforce in Malaysia.

  3. Accessing indigenous land rights through claims in Taroko Area, Eastern Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, Yung-Ching

    2013-01-01

    The thesis explores how indigenous people access land rights through claims. Land claims happens on the encounters between different regimes of property. The authors found indigenous people have many ways to express their land claims since Japanese time. There are individual claims on lands like reservation land that suggests individualism among indigenous communities. There are collective claims on autonomy, co-management of river resources and development projects. Various mapping activitie...

  4. Occupational injuries and diseases in Alberta : lost-time claims, disabling injury claims and claim rates in the upstream oil and gas industries, 2002 to 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    Alberta Employment, Immigration and Industry (EII) prepares an annual report of the occupational injuries and diseases in the upstream oil and gas industries operating in the province. The purpose is to determine if the industries meet the demand from industry and safety association, labour organizations, employers and workers to improve workplace health and safety. This report described programs and initiatives undertaken by EII in pursuit of these goals. It analyzed provincial occupational injury and disease information against national statistics and estimated the risk of injury or disease at the provincial, industry sector and sub-sector level. The report also presented an analysis of aggregate injury claim data to allow for the tracking of workplace health and safety performance over time. For comparative purposes, 2006 data was presented beside 2005 data. Additional historical data was presented in some cases. It was noted that approximately 80 per cent of employed persons in Alberta are covered by the Workman's Compensation Board (WCB). Therefore, this report focused on all industry activity in Alberta covered by the WCB and by the provincial legislation of occupational health and safety. General descriptions about the incidents and injured workers were presented along with fatality rates for the major industry sectors as well as the occupational fatalities that the Workers Compensation Board (WCB) accepted for compensation. The number of employers that earned a certificate of recognition was also identified. Injury and disease analysis was discussed in terms of injured worker characteristics; nature of injury or disease; source of injury or disease; type of event or exposure; and, duration of disability. It was shown that the lost-time claim rate for the upstream oil and gas industries in Alberta decreased by 10 per cent in 2006, due to fewer injury claims. The disabling injury rate decreased by 4.9 per cent. The tar sand subsector had the lowest lost

  5. The art of directing a workers' compensation claim: personal observations on the role of the workers' compensation claim adjuster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Chris; Emmett, Ted

    2004-05-01

    Workers' compensation claims are becoming more complex and expensive every day. One of the contributing factors for the increase is the aging workforce as well as federal legislation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). The workforce is aging, mobile, and educated about their rights. The key to avoiding spiraling costs is a strong safety and claims program that is sponsored by senior management,valued by the employees, and implemented by the entire company.

  6. [Surgical procedures involved in claims for alleged defects in praxis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimany-Manso, Josep; Benet-Travé, J; Bruguera-Cortada, M; Torné-Escasany, R; Klamburg-Pujol, J; Gómez-Durán, Esperanza L

    2014-03-01

    Medical professional liability and adverse events in health care are major concerns worldwide and the analysis of claims for alleged defects in praxis is a potential source of knowledge. High rates of adverse events and complaints have been reported in surgical procedures. This article analyzes the claims registered by the Council of Medical Colleges in Catalonia between 1986 and 2012, and explores surgical procedures claimed (ICD- 9-CM coding), as well as the final outcome of the claim. Among the 5,419 records identified on surgical procedures, the interventions of the musculoskeletal system and skin and integument showed the highest frequencies. Interventions related to "non-curative" medicine should be emphasized because of their higher rates of economical agreement or condemnation outcomes, which were significantly higher for mastopexia. The results underscore the importance of the surgical area in medical professional liability and the high risk of payouts among those procedures belonging to the so-called "non-curative" medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  7. 25 CFR 117.28 - Payment of claims against estates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMPETENCY § 117.28 Payment of claims against estates. The superintendent may disburse to the executor or... the Indian. (b) Expenses incurred pending the qualifications of an executor or administrator under... executor or administrator, transcript fees and appraiser fees. (d) Living expenses incurred within 90 days...

  8. Deterministic claims reserving in short-term insuarance contracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Claims reserving for general insurance business has developed significantly over the recent past. This has been occasioned by the growth of the insurance market, with the risk underwriting process becoming more and more complex. New insurance products have been developed that cater for the more specific needs of ...

  9. Stress related workers' compensation claims: recommendations involving records release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, K J

    1992-08-01

    1. The cost of stress claims is predicted to cripple the workers' compensation system, where stress claims are burgeoning and the average payout is twice that of a typical injury. The major reason to release medical records in a stress claim is to determine the validity of the claim arising from the job. 2. Occupational health nurses are frequently asked by the courts to reveal personal client information and may not be protected by the "nurse-client relationship" or "privileged communication." Politically, very little interest has been shown in restricting disclosure of private information. 3. Both ANA and AAOHN have adopted strong positions about safeguarding privacy. Legally, the ultimate responsibility for wrongful acts committed by the nurse falls on the individual nurse. 4. The most important reason to guard confidential health information is the basic tenet of the nurse-client relationship in which personal matters are held in confidence. To break this trust is to jeopardize the ability to provide optimal client care, which is the essence of nursing.

  10. 21 CFR 101.14 - Health claims: general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... evidence (including evidence from well-designed studies conducted in a manner which is consistent with... sold in a restaurant or in other establishments in which food that is ready for immediate human... food for which a health claim is made in accordance with § 101.9; for restaurant foods, in accordance...

  11. 7 CFR 226.14 - Claims against institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS CHILD AND ADULT CARE FOOD PROGRAM Payment Provisions § 226.14 Claims... searchable records of funds recovery activities. If the State agency determines that a sponsoring...

  12. Top Management Team Crisis Communication after Claims of Sexual Harassment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull Schaefer, Rebecca A.; Crosswhite, Alicia M.

    2018-01-01

    Both sexual harassment and managerial crisis communication are important topics in undergraduate, graduate, and executive programs. This article describes a group role-play exercise that engages students in the process of responding to a public claim of workplace sexual harassment and requires small groups to share their reactions within a press…

  13. The space between: land claims and the law in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, L.; Moniaga, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this article we look at rights discourses and law as an arena of struggle in which local people attempt to gain and secure access to localities of value. Following administrative decentralisation in 1999, throughout Indonesia, individuals and communities lodged land claims. To support these

  14. Equality of Opportunity, Cultural Diversity and Claims for Fairness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardoc, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    The present paper examines some of the tensions, problems and challenges associated with claims for equality of opportunity (the fairness argument). The introductory part identifies three separate forms of justification for public education, including the argument associated with equality of opportunity. Part II examines in detail two questions…

  15. 29 CFR 15.23 - Restrictions on certain claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... restrictions noted: (a) Money or currency. Claims may be allowed for loss of money or currency (which includes... currency is limited to an amount which is determined to have been reasonable for the claimant to have had... motor vehicles were required to be used for official Government business (official Government business...

  16. 24 CFR 206.129 - Payment of claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... limit on the claim amount. (c) Shared appreciation mortgages. The terms mortgage balance and accrued... appreciated value of the property. (d) Amount of payment—mortgagee acquires title or is unsuccessful bidder...) subtracting from that total the amount for which the property was sold (or the appraised value determined...

  17. 22 CFR 231.12 - Prosecution of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prosecution of claims. 231.12 Section 231.12 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ARAB REPUBLIC OF EGYPT LOAN GUARANTEES ISSUED UNDER THE EMERGENCY WARTIME SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT OF 2003, PUBLIC LAW 108-11-STANDARD TERMS AND...

  18. 76 FR 4072 - Registration of Claims of Copyright

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    ... of published photographs should contact the Visual Arts Division for permission and guidance on... online registration has been available for basic registration claims, it has not yet been made generally... is registered is primarily photographic in nature. In fact, the Visual Arts Division has accepted...

  19. Hand Sanitizers Carry Unproven Claims to Prevent MRSA Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... misled if they think these products you can buy in a drug store or from other places will protect them ... Deborah Autor, compliance director at FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and ... claims, too—whether they buy a product from a retail store or through ...

  20. 38 CFR 10.46 - Authentication of statements supporting claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authentication of statements supporting claims. 10.46 Section 10.46 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS ADJUSTED COMPENSATION Adjusted Compensation; General § 10.46 Authentication of statements...

  1. General health assessment in refugees claiming to have been tortured

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draminsky Petersen, Hans; Christensen, Maria Elisabeth; Kastrup, Marianne

    1994-01-01

    General health assessment of refugees claiming to have been previously exposed to torture takes place in a psychological atmosphere affected by the difficult situation of the refugee. Thirty-one refugees, mainly from the Middle East and Africa, were assessed as regards their physical and mental...... (P general) health. Reliability was moderate with respect to clinical observation during interview....

  2. 34 CFR 35.7 - Payment of approved claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... sign the voucher for payment, Standard Form 1145, before payment is made. (b) When the claimant is represented by an attorney, the voucher for payment (SF 1145) shall designate both the claimant and his... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of approved claims. 35.7 Section 35.7 Education...

  3. 45 CFR 35.7 - Payment of approved claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... duly authorized agent shall sign the voucher for payment, Standard Form 1145, before payment is made. (b) When the claimant is represented by an attorney, the voucher for payment (SF 1145) shall... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment of approved claims. 35.7 Section 35.7...

  4. 40 CFR 10.7 - Payment of approved claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., claimant or his duly authorized agent shall sign the voucher for payment, Standard Form 1145, before payment is made. (b) When the claimant is represented by an attorney, the voucher for payment (SF 1145... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Payment of approved claim. 10.7 Section...

  5. 5 CFR 177.110 - Action on approved claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Damage, Injury or Death); a claims settlement agreement; and a Standard Form 1145 (Voucher for Payment), as appropriate. When a claimant is represented by an attorney, the Voucher for Payment will designate..., whose address is to appear on the Voucher for Payment. (b) Acceptance by the claimant, his or her agent...

  6. 12 CFR 793.7 - Payment of approved claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... voucher for payment, Standard Form 1145, before payment is made. (b) When the claimant is represented by an attorney, the voucher for payment (S.F. 1145) shall designate both the claimant and his attorney... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment of approved claims. 793.7 Section 793.7...

  7. 32 CFR 199.7 - Claims submission, review, and payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... review or audit, whether the review or audit is prospective, concurrent, or retroactive, OCHAMPUS or... preauthorization must be attached to the appropriate CHAMPUS claim. (4) Advance payment prohibited. No CHAMPUS... and supplies will be subject to utilization review and quality assurance standards, norms, and...

  8. 14 CFR 1261.414 - Compromise of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... potential income; (3) Inheritance prospects; (4) The possibility that assets have been concealed or... compromised. The practical benefits of vigorous collection of a small claim may include a demonstration to... requiring a waiver of the tax-loss-carry-back rights of the debtor. (i) Joint and several liability. When...

  9. 32 CFR 564.55 - Claims not payable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (a) Contributory negligence. Negligence or wrongful act of the claimant or of his agent or employee... or incident occurred will be followed in determining whether contributory negligence is present but the doctrine of comparative negligence will not be applied. (b) Personal injury. Claims for personal...

  10. 48 CFR 6101.52 - Small claims procedure [Rule 52].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPEALS, GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT DISPUTE CASES 6101.52 Small claims procedure [Rule 52..., unless the presiding judge enlarges the time for good cause shown. The appellant may elect this procedure... business concern (as that term is defined in the Small Business Act and regulations promulgated under that...

  11. 20 CFR 335.2 - Manner of claiming sickness benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., or in the case of a female employee, pregnancy, miscarriage, or childbirth, an employee must file the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manner of claiming sickness benefits. 335.2 Section 335.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD UNEMPLOYMENT...

  12. Claiming damages where dividends remain unpaid: A contribution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Besides a contractual right, this article also investigates the Oxford Legal Group case in establishing at least an implied right (based on the doctrine of proper purpose) to claim an undeclared dividend or unauthorised dividend that is contrary to the board of directors discretion not to authorise any dividends. Both these cases ...

  13. 20 CFR 211.15 - Verification of compensation claimed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employee, which is not credited in the records of the Board, must be verified to the satisfaction of the... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Verification of compensation claimed. 211.15 Section 211.15 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD REGULATIONS UNDER THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT ACT...

  14. 44 CFR 63.9 - Sale while claim pending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Sale while claim pending. 63.9 Section 63.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT... pending. If a claimant sells a structure prior to its demolition or relocation, no benefits are payable to...

  15. 15 CFR 700.90 - Protection against claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Protection against claims. 700.90 Section 700.90 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS...

  16. 77 FR 51068 - Remedies for Small Copyright Claims: Additional Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-23

    ... Adobe Portable Document File (PDF) format that contains searchable, accessible text (not an image..., 2012 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The agendas and the process for submitting requests to participate in... discussion covered topics ranging from constitutional considerations to the definition of a ``small claim...

  17. 37 CFR 10.67 - Settling similar claims of clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... clients. 10.67 Section 10.67 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.67 Settling similar claims of clients. A practitioner who represents two or more clients shall not make or participate in the making of an aggregate settlement of the...

  18. 9 CFR 52.6 - Claims not allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... violation of a law or regulation administered by the Secretary regarding animal disease, or in violation of... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims not allowed. 52.6 Section 52.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  19. 9 CFR 55.7 - Claims not allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... owner in violation of a law or regulation administered by the Secretary regarding animal disease, or in... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims not allowed. 55.7 Section 55.7 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  20. Dissecting Practical Intelligence Theory: Its Claims and Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfredson, Linda S.

    2003-01-01

    The two key theoretical propositions of "Practical Intelligence in Everyday Life" are made plausible only if one ignores considerable evidence contradicting them. The six key empirical claims rest primarily on the illusion of evidence enhanced by selective reporting of results. (SLD)

  1. 38 CFR 6.7 - Claims of creditors, taxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Claims of creditors, taxation. 6.7 Section 6.7 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS UNITED... creditors, taxation. (a) Effective January 1, 1958, payments of insurance to a beneficiary under a United...

  2. Privacy Impact Assessment for the Claims Office Master Files

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Claims Office Master Files System collects information on companies in debt to the EPA. Learn how this data is collected, how it will be used, access to the data, the purpose of data collection, and record retention policies for this data.

  3. Moral Judgment Development across Cultures: Revisiting Kohlberg's Universality Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, John C.; Basinger, Karen S.; Grime, Rebecca L.; Snarey, John R.

    2007-01-01

    This article revisits Kohlberg's cognitive developmental claims that stages of moral judgment, facilitative processes of social perspective-taking, and moral values are commonly identifiable across cultures. Snarey [Snarey, J. (1985). "The cross-cultural universality of social-moral development: A critical review of Kohlbergian research."…

  4. Identifying Interbank Loans, Rates, and Claims Networks from Transactional Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon Rincon, C.E.; Cely, Jorge; Cadena, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    We identify interbank (i.e. non-collateralized) loans from the Colombian large-value payment system by implementing Furfine’s method. After identifying interbank loans from transactional data we obtain the interbank rates and claims without relying on financial institutions’ reported data.

  5. 5 CFR 551.705 - Filing an FLSA claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., and the current mailing address, commercial telephone number, and facsimile machine number, if... the claim, including the identity, commercial telephone number, and location of other individuals who... has not filed an action in an appropriate United States court; and (11) Any other information that the...

  6. 28 CFR 79.71 - Filing of claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to the sender with a statement identifying the reason(s) why the claim does not comply with this part... decedent; (iv) A death certificate or divorce decree for each spouse of the claimant (if applicable); and... applicable); (iv) A death certificate or divorce decree for each spouse of the claimant (if applicable); (v...

  7. 29 CFR 4281.18 - Outstanding claims for withdrawal liability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INSOLVENCY, REORGANIZATION, TERMINATION, AND OTHER RULES APPLICABLE TO MULTIEMPLOYER PLANS DUTIES OF PLAN... in insolvency proceedings. The plan sponsor shall value an outstanding claim for withdrawal liability... title 11, United States Code, or any case or proceeding under similar provisions of state insolvency...

  8. 40 CFR 350.7 - Substantiating claims of trade secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... publications or other information sources available to the public or your competitors (of which you are aware... of the chemical claimed as trade secret and explain why it is a secret of interest to competitors... competitors could deduce this use from disclosure of the chemical identity together with other information on...

  9. A Kantian claim permitting the randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, P

    2001-01-01

    Among the most contested aspects of medical research is the randomized clinical trial (RCT). While the majority of arguments justifying the RCT and its use in medical research rest within a utilitarian framework, many Kantians claim that a deontological ethical framework is prohibitive of the use RCTs in medical research. This paper argues that, in fact, the RCT is permissible within a deontological framework.

  10. Collective Settlement of Mass Claims in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.H. van Boom (Willem)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAs far as collective mass claim settlement is concerned, it has been said that ‘the European landscape is a mixed bag of differing collective redress mechanisms’. One of the legal sys-tems in this ‘mixed bag’ is the small jurisdiction of the Kingdom of The Netherlands. With the enactment

  11. 20 CFR 429.203 - When is a claim allowable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of you, your agent, the members of your family, or your private employee (the standard to be applied... 429.203 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS UNDER THE FEDERAL... travel under orders, including property in your custody or in the custody of a carrier, an agent or...

  12. Gender Disparities in Ghana National Health Insurance Claims: An Econometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Antwi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to find out the gender disparities in Ghana national health insurance claims. In this work, data was collected from the policyholders of the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme with the help of the National Health Insurance database and the patients’ attendance register of the Koforidua Regional Hospital, from 1st January to 31st December 2011. The generalized linear regression (GLR models and the SPSS version 17.0 were used for the analysis. Among men, the younger people prefer attending hospital for treatment as compared to their adult counterparts. In contrast to women, younger women favor attending hospital for treatment as compared to their adult counterparts. Among men, various levels of income impact greatly on their propensity to make an insurance claim, whereas among women only the highest income level did as compared to lowest income level.Men, who completed senior high school education, were less likely to make an insurance claim as compared to their counterparts with basic or no education. However it was women who had basic education that preferred using the hospital as compared to their more educated counterparts. It is suggested that the government should consider building more health centers, clinics and cheap-compounds in at least every community, to help reduce the travel time in accessing health care.  The ministry of health and the Ghana health service should engage older citizens by encouraging them to use hospitals when they are sick instead of other alternative care providers.

  13. Factors influencing mode of claims settlement in workers' compensation cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, D L; Wood, G A; MacDonald, S

    1995-01-01

    This paper examines the variables that influence the means by which 10,192 injured workers settled their compensation claims during 1990. The data on which this study is based come from a state in Australia where there are three means by which workers' compensation claims can be settled by lump sum payment: settlement following a specific injury payment, early settlement payment and settlement following a common law payment. This paper is specifically concerned with identifying the variables that determine whether the claim will be settled by a lump sum payment and whether different modes of claims settlement by lump sum are unique and predictable from a range of variables that include injury characteristics and demographics. The results of logistic regression modelling revealed that those who received a lump sum settlement could be reliably distinguished from those who did not receive such a payment. Each mode of settlement varied in the extent to which it could be predicted. Contrary to expectations, the most difficult form of settlement mode to predict was that of specific injury payments (4% accurate) with the most predictive being early settlement payments (81% accurate). Common law payments were also highly predictable (48% accurate). The form of lump sum payment received by injured workers was found to depend on a range of injury characteristics, indices of severity and for common law payments, gender and potential income loss. It is argued that although injury characteristics play a part in the process of claims settlement, personal circumstances and insurance company policies are influential in dictating the form by which workers compensation cases are finalized.

  14. Malpractice claims in interventional radiology: frequency, characteristics and protective measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnavita, N; Fileni, A; Mirk, P; Magnavita, G; Ricci, S; Cotroneo, A R

    2013-04-01

    The use of interventional radiology procedures has considerably increased in recent years, as has the number of related medicolegal litigations. This study aimed to highlight the problems underlying malpractice claims in interventional radiology and to assess the importance of the informed consent process. The authors examined all insurance claims relating to presumed errors in interventional radiology filed by radiologists over a period of 14 years after isolating them from the insurance database of all radiologists registered with the Italian Society of Medical Radiology (SIRM) between 1 January1993 and 31 December 2006. In the period considered, 98 malpractice claims were filed against radiologists who had performed interventional radiology procedures. In 21 cases (21.4%), the event had caused the patient's death. In >80% of cases, the event occurred in a public facility. The risk of a malpractice claim for a radiologist practising interventional procedures is 47 per 1,000, which corresponds to one malpractice claim for each 231 years of activity. Interventional radiology, a discipline with a biological risk profile similar to that of surgery, exposes practitioners to a high risk of medicolegal litigation both because of problems intrinsic to the techniques used and because of the need to operate on severely ill patients with compromised clinical status. Litigation prevention largely depends on both reducing the rate of medical error and providing the patient with correct and coherent information. Adopting good radiological practices, scrupulous review of procedures and efficiency of the instruments used and audit of organisational and management processes are all factors that can help reduce the likelihood of error. Improving communication techniques while safeguarding the patient's right to autonomy also implies adopting clear and rigorous processes for obtaining the patient's informed consent to the medical procedure.

  15. Operator-related aspects in endodontic malpractice claims in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehkalahti, Miira M; Swanljung, Outi

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed operator-related differences in endodontic malpractice claims in Finland. Data comprised the endodontic malpractice claims handled at the Patient Insurance Centre (PIC) in 2002-2006 and 2011-2013. Two dental advisors at the PIC scrutinized the original documents of the cases (n = 1271). The case-related information included patient's age and gender, type of tooth, presence of radiographs, and methods of instrumentation and apex location. As injuries, we recorded broken instrument, perforation, injuries due to root canal irrigants/medicaments, and miscellaneous injuries. We categorized the injuries according to the PIC decisions as avoidable, unavoidable, or no injury. Operator-related information included dentist's age, gender, specialization, and service sector. We assessed level of patient documentation as adequate, moderate, or poor. Chi-squared tests, t-tests, and logistic regression modelling served in statistical analyses. Patients' mean age was 44.7 (range 8-85) years, and 71% were women. The private sector constituted 54% of claim cases. Younger patients, female dentists, and general practitioners predominated in the public sector. We found no sector differences in patients' gender, dentists' age, or type of injured tooth. PIC advisors confirmed no injury in 24% of claim cases; the advisors considered 65% of injury cases (n = 970) as avoidable and 35% as unavoidable. We found no operator-related differences in these figures. Working methods differed by operator's age and gender. Adequate patient documentation predominated in the public sector and among female, younger, or specialized dentists. Operator-related factors had no impact on endodontic malpractice claims.

  16. A logistic regression model for Ghana National Health Insurance claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Antwi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In August 2003, the Ghanaian Government made history by implementing the first National Health Insurance System (NHIS in Sub-Saharan Africa. Within three years, over half of the country’s population had voluntarily enrolled into the National Health Insurance Scheme. This study had three objectives: 1 To estimate the risk factors that influences the Ghana national health insurance claims. 2 To estimate the magnitude of each of the risk factors in relation to the Ghana national health insurance claims. In this work, data was collected from the policyholders of the Ghana National Health Insurance Scheme with the help of the National Health Insurance database and the patients’ attendance register of the Koforidua Regional Hospital, from 1st January to 31st December 2011. Quantitative analysis was done using the generalized linear regression (GLR models. The results indicate that risk factors such as sex, age, marital status, distance and length of stay at the hospital were important predictors of health insurance claims. However, it was found that the risk factors; health status, billed charges and income level are not good predictors of national health insurance claim. The outcome of the study shows that sex, age, marital status, distance and length of stay at the hospital are statistically significant in the determination of the Ghana National health insurance premiums since they considerably influence claims. We recommended, among other things that, the National Health Insurance Authority should facilitate the institutionalization of the collection of appropriate data on a continuous basis to help in the determination of future premiums.

  17. The claims handling process of engineering insurance in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.C. de Beer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to technological developments, the complicated world of engineering and its associated products are continuously becoming more specialized. Short-term insurers provide engineering insurance to enable the owners and operators of engineering assets to combat the negative impact of the associated risks. It is, however, a huge challenge to the insurers of engineering insurance to manage the particular risks against the background of technological enhancement. The skills gap in the short-term insurance market and the engineering environment may be the main factor which inhibits the growth of the engineering insurance market. The objective of this research embodies the improvement of financial decision-making concerning the claims handling process of engineering insurance. Secondary as well as primary data were necessary to achieve the stated objective. The secondary data provided the background of the research and enabled the researchers to compile a questionnaire for the empirical survey. The questionnaire and a cover letter were sent to the top 10 short-term insurers in South Africa that are providing engineering insurance. Their perceptions should provide guidelines to other short-term insurers who are engaged in engineering insurance, as they are regarded as the market leaders of engineering insurance in South Africa. The empirical results of this research focus on the importance of various claims handling factors when assessing the claims handling process of engineering insurance, the problem areas in the claims handling process concerned, as well as how often the stipulations of engineering insurance policies are adjusted to take the claims handling factors into account.

  18. Characteristics of claims in the management of septic arthritis in Japan: Retrospective analyses of judicial precedents and closed claims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Otaki

    2018-03-01

    Conclusion: It is important to pay particular attention to SA following sepsis in newborns and to monitor for any signs of SA after joint injection to ensure early diagnosis. Analysis of both malpractice claims and accident and incident reports is essential to ensure a full understanding of the situation in Japan.

  19. Functional foods: health claim-food product compatibility and the impact of health claim framing on consumer evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Trijp, van H.C.M.; Luning, P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Two studies are reported, which aim to strengthen the scientific underpinning of strategic decisions regarding functional food development, as to (1) which health benefits to claim, (2) with which product (category), and (3) in which communication format. The first exploratory study is a secondary

  20. Consumer appeal of nutrition and health claims in three existing product concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verbeke, Wim; Scholderer, Joachim; Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on consumers' reactions towards calcium-enriched fruit juice, omega-3 enriched spread and fibre-enriched cereals, each with a nutrition claim, health claim and reduction of disease risk claim. Cross-sectional data were collected in April 2006 from a sample of 341 consumers...... in Belgium. Consumers' reactions to the carrier product, functional ingredient and claim combinations were assessed as perceived convincingness of the claim, credibility of the product, attractiveness of the product, and intention to buy the product, while accounting for differences in product familiarity......, attitudinal and demographic characteristics. Generally, health claims outperformed nutrition claims, and both of these claim types outperformed reduction of disease risk claims. Comparing consumer reactions across product concepts revealed clear preferences for fibre-enriched cereals as compared to the other...

  1. Quality of care in patients with atrial fibrillation in primary care: a cross-sectional study comparing clinical and claims data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preuss, Rebekka; Chenot, Jean-François; Angelow, Aniela

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a common cardiac arrhythmia with increased risk of thromboembolic stroke. Oral anticoagulation (OAC) reduces stroke risk by up to 68%. The aim of our study was to evaluate quality of care in patients with AF in a primary health care setting with a focus on physician guideline adherence for OAC prescription and heart rate- and rhythm management. In a second step we aimed to compare OAC rates based on primary care data with rates based on claims data. Methods: We included all GP practices in the region Vorpommern-Greifswald, Germany, which were willing to participate (N=29/182, response rate 16%). Claims data was derived from the regional association of statutory health insurance physicians. Patients with a documented AF diagnosis (ICD-10-GM-Code ICD I48.-) from 07/2011-06/2012 were identified using electronic medical records (EMR) and claims data. Stroke and bleeding risk were calculated using the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc and HAS-BLED scores. We calculated crude treatment rates for OAC, rate and rhythm control medications and adjusted OAC treatment rates based on practice and claims data. Adjusted rates were calculated including the CHA 2 DS 2 -VASc and HAS-BLED scores and individual factors affecting guideline based treatment. Results: We identified 927 patients based on EMR and 1,247 patients based on claims data. The crude total OAC treatment rate was 69% based on EMR and 61% based on claims data. The adjusted OAC treatment rates were 90% for patients based on EMR and 63% based on claims data. 82% of the AF patients received a treatment for rate control and 12% a treatment for rhythm control. The most common reasons for non-prescription of OAC were an increased risk of falling, dementia and increased bleeding risk. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a high rate of AF patients receive a drug therapy according to guidelines. There is a large difference between crude and adjusted OAC treatment rates. This is due to individual

  2. From Value Assessment to Value Cocreation: Informing Clinical Decision-Making with Medical Claims Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven; Varvel, Stephen; Sasinowski, Maciek; Burke, James P

    2016-09-01

    Big data and advances in analytical processes represent an opportunity for the healthcare industry to make better evidence-based decisions on the value generated by various tests, procedures, and interventions. Value-based reimbursement is the process of identifying and compensating healthcare providers based on whether their services improve quality of care without increasing cost of care or maintain quality of care while decreasing costs. In this article, we motivate and illustrate the potential opportunities for payers and providers to collaborate and evaluate the clinical and economic efficacy of different healthcare services. We conduct a case study of a firm that offers advanced biomarker and disease state management services for cardiovascular and cardiometabolic conditions. A value-based analysis that comprised a retrospective case/control cohort design was conducted, and claims data for over 7000 subjects who received these services were compared to a matched control cohort. Study subjects were commercial and Medicare Advantage enrollees with evidence of CHD, diabetes, or a related condition. Analysis of medical claims data showed a lower proportion of patients who received biomarker testing and disease state management services experienced a MI (p companies have in terms of identifying value-creating healthcare interventions. However, payers and providers also need to pursue system integration efforts to further automate the identification and dissemination of clinically and economically efficacious treatment plans to ensure at-risk patients receive the treatments and interventions that will benefit them the most.

  3. Asymmetrical knowledge claims in general practice consultations with frequently attending patients: limitations and opportunities for patient participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariss, Steven M

    2009-09-01

    Asymmetry of knowledge does not simply relate to knowing or not knowing. Participants in consultations also display normative entitlements to knowledge which are related to their identities in the interaction. Claims of entitlement to knowledge are oriented to by the other participant as either straightforwardly acceptable or problematic. Thus research has shown that asymmetry in doctor-patient interactions is collaboratively achieved. Whilst the asymmetry of medical consultations has long been recognised, understanding asymmetry in the context of patient participation is becoming an increasingly important priority. This paper is not concerned with potential benefits or the feasibility of increasing patient participation in general practice (GP) consultations. Rather it seeks to describe specific limitations and opportunities for the participation of patients regarding the discussion of their problems, treatments and management of illness. Using Conversation Analysis this paper investigates GP consultations with frequently attending patients in the UK. It describes how the moral dimensions of epistemic authority constrain the different conversational resources available to GPs and patients. Findings suggest that in maintaining asymmetrical claims to knowledge debate is foregone in favour of efficient progression through the phases of the interaction. Thus interactions militate against the discussion of areas where alignment of perspectives might be lacking and participants do not pursue actions which might lead towards claiming a greater understanding of each others' point of view. However, there are aspects of consultations with frequently attending patients which display reduced asymmetry with regard to participants' claims to epistemic authority.

  4. Impact of health-related claims on the perception of other product attributes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, Liisa; Lampila, Piritta; Grunert, Klaus G.

    2010-01-01

    countries explored consumers' perceptions of attractiveness, healthiness, naturalness, tastiness and ability to reduce risk of disease by comparing ratings of products with and without health claims. Used claims varied in their benefit, active ingredient, claim structure and framing. The results showed...... that health claims had a moderate but mostly negative impact on the perception of other product attributes; the most significant impact was decrease in perceived naturalness. Consumers could also interpret the benefits in claims as intended. The wording of the claim had only small impact on the perception...... is not likely to cause any unrealistic positive inferences in perceived product quality....

  5. Evaluating Integrative Cancer Clinics With the Claim Assessment Profile: An Example With the InspireHealth Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Lara; Elfenbaum, Pamela; Jain, Shamini; Sprengel, Meredith; Jonas, Wayne B

    2018-03-01

    The evaluation of freestanding integrative cancer clinical programs is challenging and is rarely done. We have developed an approach called the Claim Assessment Profile (CAP) to identify whether evaluation of a practice is justified, feasible, and likely to provide useful information. A CAP was performed in order to (1) clarify the healing claims at InspireHealth, an integrative oncology treatment program, by defining the most important impacts on its clients; (2) gather information about current research capacity at the clinic; and (3) create a program theory and path model for use in prospective research. This case study design incorporates methods from a variety of rapid assessment approaches. Procedures included site visits to observe the program, structured qualitative interviews with 26 providers and staff, surveys to capture descriptive data about the program, and observational data on program implementation. The InspireHealth program is a well-established, multi-site, thriving integrative oncology clinical practice that focuses on patient support, motivation, and health behavior engagement. It delivers patient-centered care via a standardized treatment protocol. There arehigh levels of research interest from staff and resources by which to conduct research. This analysis provides the primary descriptive and claims clarification of an integrative oncology treatment program, an evaluation readiness report, a detailed logic model explicating program theory, and a clinical outcomes path model for conducting prospective research. Prospective evaluation of this program would be feasible and valuable, adding to our knowledge base of integrative cancer therapies.

  6. Claiming peaceful embodiment through yoga in the aftermath of trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Alison M

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the experiences of practicing yoga and its role within processes of healing for adult women with complex trauma histories. Using a hermeneutic phenomenological method, data were analyzed from interviews with 39 women. Results showed that the core meaning of participants' experience of healing through yoga is claiming peaceful embodiment. This is an ongoing process occurring on a continuum whereby women experienced improved connections with and sense of ownership and control over their bodies, emotions and thoughts, and a greater sense of well-being, calmness, and wholeness in their bodies and minds. A number of interconnected essential themes related to this core meaning were also identified, illuminating processes that supported claiming peaceful embodiment and capabilities that were enabled by being more peacefully embodied. Additional themes were identified highlighting factors that facilitated or impeded participants' engagement with yoga and their experiences of healing through yoga. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Political liberalism and religious claims: Four blind spots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckl, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    This article gives an overview of 4 important lacunae in political liberalism and identifies, in a preliminary fashion, some trends in the literature that can come in for support in filling these blind spots, which prevent political liberalism from a correct assessment of the diverse nature of religious claims. Political liberalism operates with implicit assumptions about religious actors being either 'liberal' or 'fundamentalist' and ignores a third, in-between group, namely traditionalist religious actors and their claims. After having explained what makes traditionalist religious actors different from liberal and fundamentalist religious actors, the author develops 4 areas in which political liberalism should be pushed further theoretically in order to correctly theorize the challenge which traditional religious actors pose to liberal democracy. These 4 areas (blind spots) are: (1) the context of translation; (2) the politics of exemptions; (3) the multivocality of theology; and (4) the transnational nature of norm-contestation.

  8. How to manage a claim for medical and technical error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, T.D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - The fast modifications in French medical legislation, the increasing number of litigations and the professional consequences for the practitioner warrant the necessity to recall the 'how to manage' a claim for medical error. Patients and methods. - Four cases of legal action against oncologists are presented. Results and discussion. - The importance of quality and traceability of the given information, the essential pieces of the medical file, the description of the different process steps and of the contradictory meeting are presented and discussed. Conclusion. - Beyond the control of medical and technical risks, the practitioners in general and the radiation oncologist in particular should learn on the daily management of the risk related to medical claim. (authors)

  9. Sex work and the claim for grassroots legislation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassi, Marisa N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to contribute to understanding of legal models that aim to control sex work, and the policy implications of these, by discussing the experience of developing a grassroots legislation bill proposal by organised sex workers in Córdoba, Argentina. The term 'grassroots legislation' here refers to a legal response that derives from the active involvement of local social movements and thus incorporates the experiential knowledge and claims of these particular social groupings in the proposal. The experience described in this paper excludes approaches that render sex workers as passive victims or as deviant perpetrators; instead, it conceives of sex workers in terms of their political subjectivity and of political subjectivity in its capacity to speak, to decide, to act and to propose. This means challenging current patterns of knowledge/power that give superiority to 'expert knowledge' above and beyond the claims, experiences, knowledge and needs of sex workers themselves as meaningful sources for law making.

  10. Organized investigation expedites insurance claims following a blowout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstreet, R.

    1996-01-01

    Various types of insurance policies cover blowouts to different degrees, and a proper understanding of the incident and the coverage can expedite the adjustment process. Every well control incident, and the claim arising therefrom, has a unique set of circumstances which must be analyzed thoroughly. A blowout incident, no matter what size or how severe, can have an emotional impact on all who become involved. Bodily injuries or death of friends and coworkers can result in additional stress following a blowout. Thus, it is important that all parties involved remain mindful of sensitive matters when investigating a blowout. This paper reviews the definition of a blowout based on insurance procedures and claims. It reviews blowout expenses and contractor cost and accepted well control policies. Finally, it reviews the investigation procedures normally followed by an agent and the types of information requested from the operator

  11. Legal liability and claims for the hotel industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimcho Todorov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of various aspects of legal liability and claims to hotel management arising in the hotel industry in the context of the legal framework and possible legal consequences for hotels and other types of commercial accommodation establishments. The main reasons for accidents' occurrence in the hotel industry are chronologically traced. Possible claims to the hotel management are also presented in detail. The problem with workplace discrimination, which is considered as unrightfully actions from administration towards hospitably industry personnel and the connected consequences, is discussed. A definition is given of the various forms of discrimination and the obligations of management to provide a healthy work environment without problems for the personnel are stated, as well. Regulative measures and documents are also presented, regarding measures following possible labour law violations. Conclusions and recommendations are formulated and ways to prevent and overcome problems and accidents in various accommodation establishments and the hotel industry as a whole are shown

  12. Barefoot running claims and controversies: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David W; Cauthon, David J

    2011-01-01

    Barefoot running is slowly gaining a dedicated following. Proponents of barefoot running claim many benefits, such as improved performance and reduced injuries, whereas detractors warn of the imminent risks involved. Multiple publications were reviewed using key words. A review of the literature uncovered many studies that have looked at the barefoot condition and found notable differences in gait and other parameters. These findings, along with much anecdotal information, can lead one to extrapolate that barefoot runners should have fewer injuries, better performance, or both. Several athletic shoe companies have designed running shoes that attempt to mimic the barefoot condition and, thus, garner the purported benefits of barefoot running. Although there is no evidence that either confirms or refutes improved performance and reduced injuries in barefoot runners, many of the claimed disadvantages to barefoot running are not supported by the literature. Nonetheless, it seems that barefoot running may be an acceptable training method for athletes and coaches who understand and can minimize the risks.

  13. Claims of Need in Property Law and Politics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Patrick Joseph

    2016-01-01

    between the claims of the needy and the rights of property owners. Against this backdrop this article compares three theoretical accounts of how the fact of human need should impact upon our thinking about property rights: the rights-based arguments of Jeremy Waldron, the radical democratic theory...... of Lawrence Hamilton, and the anarchist commentary of Colin Ward. While ‘theories’ of need have paid much attention to the nature of need ‘itself’, the paper argues that this comparison reveals another issue that is just as important: where and how should claims of need be registered in legal and political......Both courts of law and political theorists have grappled with the problem of giving the concept of ‘need’ a place in our reasoning about the rights and wrongs of property regimes. But in the UK, legal changes in the last 15 years have eroded the legal possibilities for striking some compromise...

  14. Twenty Years of Evidence on the Outcomes of Malpractice Claims

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Two decades of social science research on the outcomes of medical malpractice claims show malpractice outcomes bear a surprisingly good correlation with the quality of care provided to the patient as judged by other physicians. Physicians win 80% to 90% of the jury trials with weak evidence of medical negligence, approximately 70% of the borderline cases, and even 50% of the trials in cases with strong evidence of medical negligence. With only one exception, all of the studies of malpractice settlements also find a correlation between the odds of a settlement payment and the quality of care provided to the plaintiff. Between 80% and 90% of the claims rated as defensible are dropped or dismissed without payment. In addition, the amount paid in settlement drops as the strength of the patient’s evidence weakens. PMID:19048355

  15. Complications and patient-injury after ankle fracture surgery. -A closed claim analysis with data from the Patient Compensation Association in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørslev, Naja; Ebskov, Lars Bo; Mersø, Camilla

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Patient Compensation Association (PCA) receives claims for financial compensation from patients who believe they have sustained damage from their treatment in the Danish health care system. In this study, we have analysed closed claims in which patients suffered injuries due...... to the surgical treatment of their ankle fracture. We identified causalities contributing to these injuries and malpractices, as well as the economic consequences of these damages. METHODS: Fifty-one approved closed claims from the PCA database from the years 2004-2009 were analysed in a retrospective systematic...... of damages. General recommendations regarding ORIF were not followed in 21/49 of the perioperative damages. The pronation fracture was the most common. The patients received a total average compensation of 17.561 USD each. CONCLUSION: Managing the complex ankle fracture, requires considerable experience...

  16. The betrayal of Edom: Remarks on a claimed tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Becking

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biblical and post-Biblical texts refer to the tradition of the betrayal of Edom. During theconquest the brother-nation of Edom would have betrayed Judah by choosing sides with the Babylonians. Historical and archaeological evidence for this ‘fact’ is absent or not convincing. It is argued that the occupation of Southern Judah by the Edomites in late Babylonian and/or Persian times would have been the source of this claimed tradition.

  17. Pricing of Claims in Discrete Time with Partial Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien Dahl, Kristina, E-mail: kristrd@math.uio.no [University of Oslo, Department of Mathematics (Norway)

    2013-10-15

    We consider the pricing problem of a seller with delayed price information. By using Lagrange duality, a dual problem is derived, and it is proved that there is no duality gap. This gives a characterization of the seller's price of a contingent claim. Finally, we analyze the dual problem, and compare the prices offered by two sellers with delayed and full information respectively.

  18. Pricing of Claims in Discrete Time with Partial Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rognlien Dahl, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    We consider the pricing problem of a seller with delayed price information. By using Lagrange duality, a dual problem is derived, and it is proved that there is no duality gap. This gives a characterization of the seller’s price of a contingent claim. Finally, we analyze the dual problem, and compare the prices offered by two sellers with delayed and full information respectively

  19. Estimating anesthesia and surgical procedure times from medicare anesthesia claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silber, Jeffrey H; Rosenbaum, Paul R; Zhang, Xuemei; Even-Shoshan, Orit

    2007-02-01

    Procedure times are important variables that often are included in studies of quality and efficiency. However, due to the need for costly chart review, most studies are limited to single-institution analyses. In this article, the authors describe how well the anesthesia claim from Medicare can estimate chart times. The authors abstracted information on time of induction and entrance to the recovery room ("anesthesia chart time") from the charts of 1,931 patients who underwent general and orthopedic surgical procedures in Pennsylvania. The authors then merged the associated bills from claims data supplied from Medicare (Part B data) that included a variable denoting the time in minutes for the anesthesia service. The authors also investigated the time from incision to closure ("surgical chart time") on a subset of 1,888 patients. Anesthesia claim time from Medicare was highly predictive of anesthesia chart time (Kendall's rank correlation tau = 0.85, P < 0.0001, median absolute error = 5.1 min) but somewhat less predictive of surgical chart time (Kendall's tau = 0.73, P < 0.0001, median absolute error = 13.8 min). When predicting chart time from Medicare bills, variables reflecting procedure type, comorbidities, and hospital type did not significantly improve the prediction, suggesting that errors in predicting the chart time from the anesthesia bill time are not related to these factors; however, the individual hospital did have some influence on these estimates. Anesthesia chart time can be well estimated using Medicare claims, thereby facilitating studies with vastly larger sample sizes and much lower costs of data collection.

  20. Auditing Litigation and Claims: Conflicts and the Compromise of Privilege

    OpenAIRE

    Harleen Kaur; Sandra van der Laan

    2013-01-01

    Auditing standards require an auditor to make various enquiries about liabilities in general this may entail consideration of potential litigations and claims that the audited entity may be facing. To perform this part of audit, the auditors will generally seek representation letters from lawyers of the company detailing an estimate prepared by management, confirmed by their lawyers through a representation letter, and then sent directly to the auditors. This paper reviews the ...

  1. The Impact of Incident Disclosure Behaviors on Medical Malpractice Claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Priscila; Sato, Luke; Castells, Xavier

    2017-06-30

    To provide preliminary estimates of incident disclosure behaviors on medical malpractice claims. We conducted a descriptive analysis of data on medical malpractice claims obtained from the Controlled Risk Insurance Company and Risk Management Foundation of Harvard Medical Institutions (Cambridge, Massachusetts) between 2012 and 2013 (n = 434). The characteristics of disclosure and apology after medical errors were analyzed. Of 434 medical malpractice claims, 4.6% (n = 20) medical errors had been disclosed to the patient at the time of the error, and 5.9% (n = 26) had been followed by disclosure and apology. The highest number of disclosed injuries occurred in 2011 (23.9%; n = 11) and 2012 (34.8%; n = 16). There was no incremental increase during the financial years studied (2012-2013). The mean age of informed patients was 52.96 years, 58.7 % of the patients were female, and 52.2% were inpatients. Of the disclosed errors, 26.1% led to an adverse reaction, and 17.4% were fatal. The cause of disclosed medical error was improper surgical performance in 17.4% (95% confidence interval, 6.4-28.4). Disclosed medical errors were classified as medium severity in 67.4%. No apology statement was issued in 54.5% of medical errors classified as high severity. At the health-care centers studied, when a claim followed a medical error, providers infrequently disclosed medical errors or apologized to the patient or relatives. Most of the medical errors followed by disclosure and apology were classified as being of high and medium severity. No changes were detected in the volume of lawsuits over time.

  2. Causal uncertainty, claimed and behavioural self-handicapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ted; Hepburn, Jonathan

    2003-06-01

    Causal uncertainty beliefs involve doubts about the causes of events, and arise as a consequence of non-contingent evaluative feedback: feedback that leaves the individual uncertain about the causes of his or her achievement outcomes. Individuals high in causal uncertainty are frequently unable to confidently attribute their achievement outcomes, experience anxiety in achievement situations and as a consequence are likely to engage in self-handicapping behaviour. Accordingly, we sought to establish links between trait causal uncertainty, claimed and behavioural self-handicapping. Participants were N=72 undergraduate students divided equally between high and low causally uncertain groups. We used a 2 (causal uncertainty status: high, low) x 3 (performance feedback condition: success, non-contingent success, non-contingent failure) between-subjects factorial design to examine the effects of causal uncertainty on achievement behaviour. Following performance feedback, participants completed 20 single-solution anagrams and 12 remote associate tasks serving as performance measures, and 16 unicursal tasks to assess practice effort. Participants also completed measures of claimed handicaps, state anxiety and attributions. Relative to low causally uncertain participants, high causally uncertain participants claimed more handicaps prior to performance on the anagrams and remote associates, reported higher anxiety, attributed their failure to internal, stable factors, and reduced practice effort on the unicursal tasks, evident in fewer unicursal tasks solved. These findings confirm links between trait causal uncertainty and claimed and behavioural self-handicapping, highlighting the need for educators to facilitate means by which students can achieve surety in the manner in which they attribute the causes of their achievement outcomes.

  3. Consumer appeal of nutrition and health claims in three existing product concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Wim; Scholderer, Joachim; Lähteenmäki, Liisa

    2009-06-01

    This paper reports on consumers' reactions towards calcium-enriched fruit juice, omega-3 enriched spread and fibre-enriched cereals, each with a nutrition claim, health claim and reduction of disease risk claim. Cross-sectional data were collected in April 2006 from a sample of 341 consumers in Belgium. Consumers' reactions to the carrier product, functional ingredient and claim combinations were assessed as perceived convincingness of the claim, credibility of the product, attractiveness of the product, and intention to buy the product, while accounting for differences in product familiarity, attitudinal and demographic characteristics. Generally, health claims outperformed nutrition claims, and both of these claim types outperformed reduction of disease risk claims. Comparing consumer reactions across product concepts revealed clear preferences for fibre-enriched cereals as compared to the other two concepts. The interaction effects between claim type and product concept indicated that reduction of disease risk claims are perceived very well in omega-3 enriched spreads, particularly in terms of perceived convincingness of the claim, while not appealing to consumers in the other product concepts. Positive attitudes towards functional foods and familiarity with the concrete functional product category boosted the claim type and product ratings, whereas perceived control over own health and perceiving functional foods as a marketing scam decreased all product concept's appeal.

  4. Health and nutrition content claims on Australian fast-food websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellard, Lyndal; Koukoumas, Alexandra; Watson, Wendy L; Hughes, Clare

    2017-03-01

    To determine the extent that Australian fast-food websites contain nutrition content and health claims, and whether these claims are compliant with the new provisions of the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code ('the Code'). Systematic content analysis of all web pages to identify nutrition content and health claims. Nutrition information panels were used to determine whether products with claims met Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criteria (NPSC) and qualifying criteria, and to compare them with the Code to determine compliance. Australian websites of forty-four fast-food chains including meals, bakery, ice cream, beverage and salad chains. Any products marketed on the websites using health or nutrition content claims. Of the forty-four fast-food websites, twenty (45 %) had at least one claim. A total of 2094 claims were identified on 371 products, including 1515 nutrition content (72 %) and 579 health claims (28 %). Five fast-food products with health (5 %) and 157 products with nutrition content claims (43 %) did not meet the requirements of the Code to allow them to carry such claims. New provisions in the Code came into effect in January 2016 after a 3-year transition. Food regulatory agencies should review fast-food websites to ensure compliance with the qualifying criteria for nutrition content and health claim regulations. This would prevent consumers from viewing unhealthy foods as healthier choices. Healthy choices could be facilitated by applying NPSC to nutrition content claims. Fast-food chains should be educated on the requirements of the Code regarding claims.

  5. Online advertising and marketing claims by providers of proton beam therapy: are they guideline-based?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corkum, Mark T; Liu, Wei; Palma, David A; Bauman, Glenn S; Dinniwell, Robert E; Warner, Andrew; Mishra, Mark V; Louie, Alexander V

    2018-03-15

    Cancer patients frequently search the Internet for treatment options, and hospital websites are seen as reliable sources of knowledge. Guidelines support the use of proton radiotherapy in specific disease sites or on clinical trials. This study aims to evaluate direct-to-consumer advertising content and claims made by proton therapy centre (PTC) websites worldwide. Operational PTC websites in English were identified through the Particle Therapy Co-Operative Group website. Data abstraction of website content was performed independently by two investigators. Eight international guidelines were consulted to determine guideline-based indications for proton radiotherapy. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the characteristics of PTC websites that indicated proton radiotherapy offered greater disease control or cure rates. Forty-eight PTCs with 46 English websites were identified. 60·9% of PTC websites claimed proton therapy provided improved disease control or cure. U.S. websites listed more indications than international websites (15·5 ± 5·4 vs. 10·4 ± 5·8, p = 0·004). The most common disease sites advertised were prostate (87·0%), head and neck (87·0%) and pediatrics (82·6%), all of which were indicated in least one international guideline. Several disease sites advertised were not present in any consensus guidelines, including pancreatobiliary (52·2%), breast (50·0%), and esophageal (43·5%) cancers. Multivariate analysis found increasing number of disease sites and claiming their centre was a local or regional leader in proton radiotherapy was associated with indicating proton radiotherapy offers greater disease control or cure. Information from PTC websites often differs from recommendations found in international consensus guidelines. As online marketing information may have significant influence on patient decision-making, alignment of such information with accepted guidelines and consensus

  6. Geographic variation in expenditures for Workers' Compensation hospitalized claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, T R; Levy, D T

    1999-02-01

    Past literature finds considerable variation in the cost of physician care and in the utilization of medical procedures. Variation in the cost of hospitalized care has received little attention. We examine injury costs of hospitalized claims across states. Multivariate regression analysis is used to isolate state variations, while controlling for personal and injury characteristics, and state characteristics. Injuries to workers filing Workers' Compensation lost workday claims. About 35,000 randomly sampled Workers' Compensation claims from 17 states filed between 1979 and 1988. Medical payments per episode of three injury groups: upper and lower extremity fractures and dislocations, other upper extremity injuries, and back strains and sprains. Statistical analyses reveal considerable variation in expenditures for hospitalized injuries across states, even after controlling for case mix and state characteristics. A substantial portion of the variation is explained by state rate regulations; regulated states have lower costs. The large variation in costs suggests a potential to affect the costs of hospitalized care. Efforts should be directed at those areas that have higher costs without sufficient input price, quality, or case mix justification.

  7. Patient reported outcomes: looking beyond the label claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doward Lynda C

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of patient reported outcome scales in clinical trials conducted by the pharmaceutical industry has become more widespread in recent years. The use of such outcomes is particularly common for products developed to treat chronic, disabling conditions where the intention is not to cure but to ameliorate symptoms, facilitate functioning or, ultimately, to improve quality of life. In such cases, patient reported evidence is increasingly viewed as an essential complement to traditional clinical evidence for establishing a product's competitive advantage in the marketplace. In a commercial setting, the value of patient reported outcomes is viewed largely in terms of their potential for securing a labelling claim in the USA or inclusion in the summary of product characteristics in Europe. Although, the publication of the recent US Food and Drug Administration guidance makes it difficult for companies to make claims in the USA beyond symptom improvements, the value of these outcomes goes beyond satisfying requirements for a label claim. The European regulatory authorities, payers both in the US and Europe, clinicians and patients all play a part in determining both the availability and the pricing of medicinal products and all have an interest in patient-reported data that go beyond just symptoms. The purpose of the current paper is to highlight the potential added value of patient reported outcome data currently collected and held by the industry for these groups.

  8. Weasel claims in advertisements in English and Serbian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidaković Mirna M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the use of weasel claims in advertisements in English and Serbian. Weasel claims represent a form of covert communication and are characterized by the use of deliberately vague and misleading language. In the advertising discourse, this linguistic device helps advertisers to deal with sensitive issues, overcome consumers' distrust and thus influence their behavior. The research has been conducted on a corpus of 100 advertisements that belong to various categories, such as cars, cleaning products, cosmetics, drinks, food, etc., published in printed magazines and online sources from the year 2000 onwards. The aim of the analysis is to identify manifestations of weasel claims in the corpus, establish similarities and differences regarding their use in the given languages, and show how they influence the interpretation of the advertising message and create consumer behavioral patterns. Descriptive and contrastive analyses have been employed in the research. The study also draws on Grice's Cooperative Principle. The results will show that this deceptive tool is widespread in both languages and that its use in the advertising discourse in Serbian requires further research.

  9. Determination of the optimal case definition for the diagnosis of end-stage renal disease from administrative claims data in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komenda, Paul; Yu, Nancy; Leung, Stella; Bernstein, Keevin; Blanchard, James; Sood, Manish; Rigatto, Claudio; Tangri, Navdeep

    2015-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a major public health problem with increasing prevalence and costs. An understanding of the long-term trends in dialysis rates and outcomes can help inform health policy. We determined the optimal case definition for the diagnosis of ESRD using administrative claims data in the province of Manitoba over a 7-year period. We determined the sensitivity, specificity, predictive value and overall accuracy of 4 administrative case definitions for the diagnosis of ESRD requiring chronic dialysis over different time horizons from Jan. 1, 2004, to Mar. 31, 2011. The Manitoba Renal Program Database served as the gold standard for confirming dialysis status. During the study period, 2562 patients were registered as recipients of chronic dialysis in the Manitoba Renal Program Database. Over a 1-year period (2010), the optimal case definition was any 2 claims for outpatient dialysis, and it was 74.6% sensitive (95% confidence interval [CI] 72.3%-76.9%) and 94.4% specific (95% CI 93.6%-95.2%) for the diagnosis of ESRD. In contrast, a case definition of at least 2 claims for dialysis treatment more than 90 days apart was 64.8% sensitive (95% CI 62.2%-67.3%) and 97.1% specific (95% CI 96.5%-97.7%). Extending the period to 5 years greatly improved sensitivity for all case definitions, with minimal change to specificity; for example, for the optimal case definition of any 2 claims for dialysis treatment, sensitivity increased to 86.0% (95% CI 84.7%-87.4%) at 5 years. Accurate case definitions for the diagnosis of ESRD requiring dialysis can be derived from administrative claims data. The optimal definition required any 2 claims for outpatient dialysis. Extending the claims period to 5 years greatly improved sensitivity with minimal effects on specificity for all case definitions.

  10. 76 FR 78332 - Amended Notice of Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Amended Notice of Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Project AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION... actions announced herein for the listed public transportation project will be barred unless the claim is...

  11. 78 FR 26112 - Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Transit Administration Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects; Correction AGENCY: Federal Transit Administration (FTA), DOT. ACTION... Register on April 22, 2013, concerning a limitation on claims for certain specified public transportation...

  12. 40 CFR 1620.5 - Administrative claim; evidence and information to be submitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... INVESTIGATION BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.5 Administrative... before and after the alleged negligence or wrongful act or omission. (6) Any other evidence or...

  13. 24 CFR 220.821 - Items to be filed on submitting claim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... filed on submitting claim. Within 30 days after the filing of the notice of intention to file claim, or... principal of the mortgage indebtedness; (h) All records, ledger cards, documents, books, papers and accounts...

  14. 24 CFR 17.64 - Referral of claims to the Assistant Secretary for Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... claim: (1) As to which there is an indication of fraud, the presentation of a false claim, or... from an exception made by the General Accounting Office in the account of an accountable officer. Such...

  15. Health foods and foods with health claims in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohama, Hirobumi; Ikeda, Hideko; Moriyama, Hiroyoshi

    2006-01-01

    The terms 'nutraceuticals' and 'dietary or food supplements' are not very popular in Japan as compared to most of other countries. However, the concept of 'functional foods', which benefits the structure and function of the human body, is known as a result of research studies initiated on the health benefits of foods in 1984. The Ministry of Education organized a national research and development project to evaluate the functionalities of various foods. Researchers from diverse scientific fields succeeded to define new functions of food, successfully incorporating the previously recognized functions of nutrition, sensory/satisfaction and physiological effects of ingredients in foods. Some of the food manufacturers and distributors unfortunately capitalized on such food functionalities to promote 'health foods' by claiming drug-like effects and violating laws. In 1991, the Ministry of Health and Welfare (MHW) now as the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) introduced a 'foods for specified health uses' (FOSHU) system, for the control of such exaggerated and misleading claims. The other reason for such enforcement is due to an increase in the population of elderly people and lifestyle-related diseases that include obesity, diabetes mellitus, high blood pressure, cerebro- and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. In 2001, a new regulatory system, 'foods with health claims' (FHC) with a 'foods with nutrient function claims' (FNFC) system and newly established FOSHU was introduced. In addition, MHLW has changed the existing FOSHU, FNFC and other systems in 2005. Such changes include the new subsystems of FOSHU such as (1) standardized FOSHU (2) qualified FOSHU and (3) disease risk reduction claims for FOSHU. In the present chapter, two guidelines that require good manufacturing practice (GMP) and self-investigative systems for ensuring the safety of raw materials used for products in the dosage forms such as capsules, tablets, etc. have been discussed. Furthermore

  16. Ampliando la protección a segundas indicaciones en Europa: swiss-type claim y european-type claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Conde-Gutiérrez

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available La Oficina de Patentes Europea (EPO protege las segundas indicaciones o usos sobre composiciones o sustancias ya existentes en el estado de la técnica con el ánimo de incentivar a la industria farmacéutica en Europa. Este artículo explora los aspectos legales y técnicos mediante los cuales la EPO ha otorgado patentes no solo a segundas indicaciones, sino también a terceras o sucesivas indicaciones. En particular, se analiza el alcance del Swiss-type Claim y el European-type Claim. De igual manera, se realiza un análisis comparativo entre el Convenio sobre Patentes Europeo y decisiones de la EPO, y la Decisión 486 de 2000 de la Comunidad Andina (Régimen Común sobre Propiedad Industrial sobre segundas indicaciones.

  17. Precise large deviations of aggregate claims in a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Zhang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we consider a size-dependent renewal risk model with stopping time claim-number process. In this model, we do not make any assumption on the dependence structure of claim sizes and inter-arrival times. We study large deviations of the aggregate amount of claims. For the subexponential heavy-tailed case, we obtain a precise large-deviation formula; our method substantially relies on a martingale for the structure of our models.

  18. Validity of claims made in weight management research: a narrative review of dietetic articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aphramor Lucy

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The best available evidence demonstrates that conventional weight management has a high long-term failure rate. The ethical implications of continued reliance on an energy deficit approach to weight management are under-explored. Methods A narrative literature review of journal articles in The Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics from 2004 to 2008. Results Although the energy deficit approach to weight management has a high long-term failure rate it continues to dominate research in the field. In the current research agenda, controversies and complexities in the evidence base are inadequately discussed, and claims about the likely success of weight management misrepresent available evidence. Conclusions Dietetic literature on weight management fails to meet the standards of evidence based medicine. Research in the field is characterised by speculative claims that fail to accurately represent the available data. There is a corresponding lack of debate on the ethical implications of continuing to promote ineffective treatment regimes and little research into alternative non-weight centred approaches. An alternative health at every size approach is recommended.

  19. Healthfulness and nutritional composition of Canadian prepackaged foods with and without sugar claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Jodi T; Franco-Arellano, Beatriz; Schermel, Alyssa; Labonté, Marie-Ève; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate differences in calories, nutrient content, overall healthfulness, and use of sweetener ingredients between products with and without sugar claims. Consumers assume products with sugar claims are healthier and lower in calories. It is therefore important claims be found on comparatively healthier items. This study is a cross-sectional analysis of the University of Toronto's 2013 Food Label Database. Subcategories where at least 5% of products (and n ≥ 5) carried a sugar claim were included (n = 3048). Differences in median calorie content, nutrient content, and overall healthfulness, using the Food Standards Australia/New Zealand Nutrient Profiling Scoring criterion, between products with and without sugar claims, were determined. Proportion of products with and without claims that had excess free sugar levels (≥10% of calories from free sugar) and that contained sweeteners was also determined. Almost half (48%) of products with sugar claims contained excess free sugar, and a greater proportion contained sweeteners than products without such claims (30% vs 5%, χ 2 = 338.6, p contents than products without claims. At the subcategory level, reductions in free sugar contents were not always met with similar reductions in calorie contents. This study highlights concerns with regards to the nutritional composition of products bearing sugar claims. Findings can support educational messaging to assist consumer interpretation of sugar claims and can inform changes in nutrition policies, for example, permitting sugar claims only on products with calorie reductions and without excess free sugar.

  20. 77 FR 73051 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Claims of U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-07

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: Claims of U.S. Nationals for Compensation for Serious Personal Injuries Against the Government of Iraq and Referred to the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission by the Department..., examine, adjudicate and render final decisions with respect to claims for [[Page 73052

  1. 78 FR 9428 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Claims of U.S...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: Claims of U.S. Nationals for Compensation for Serious Personal Injuries Against the Government of Iraq and Referred to the Foreign Claims Settlement Commission by the Department of State Legal Adviser ACTION: 30-day notice. The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission (Commission...

  2. 32 CFR 842.121 - Referring a claim to the US Attorney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referring a claim to the US Attorney. 842.121 Section 842.121 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE CLAIMS AND... to the US Attorney. Only HQ USAF/JACC authorizes referral of a claim to the US Attorney. The base SJA...

  3. 28 CFR 79.52 - Criteria for eligibility for claims by uranium millers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... uranium millers. 79.52 Section 79.52 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CLAIMS UNDER THE RADIATION EXPOSURE COMPENSATION ACT Eligibility Criteria for Claims by Uranium Millers § 79.52 Criteria for eligibility for claims by uranium millers. To establish eligibility for compensation under...

  4. 20 CFR 405.510 - Claims remanded by a Federal court.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Claims remanded by a Federal court. 405.510 Section 405.510 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCESS FOR ADJUDICATING INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Judicial Review § 405.510 Claims remanded by a Federal court. When a...

  5. 20 CFR 405.410 - Selecting claims for Decision Review Board review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... will not review claims based on the identity of the administrative law judge who decided the claim. (b... Decision Review Board review. (a)(1) The Board may review your claim if the administrative law judge made a decision under §§ 405.340 or 405.370 of this part, regardless of whether the administrative law judge's...

  6. 43 CFR 30.145 - When can a judge reduce or disallow a claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false When can a judge reduce or disallow a... PROBATE HEARINGS PROCEDURES Claims § 30.145 When can a judge reduce or disallow a claim? The judge has discretion to decide whether part or all of an otherwise valid claim is unreasonable, and if so, to reduce...

  7. 20 CFR 405.340 - Deciding a claim without a hearing before an administrative law judge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....340 Deciding a claim without a hearing before an administrative law judge. (a) Decision wholly... the decision is based. (b) You do not wish to appear. The administrative law judge may decide a claim... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deciding a claim without a hearing before an...

  8. 32 CFR 552.16 - Real estate claims founded upon contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Real estate claims founded upon contract. 552.16... Real Estate Claims Founded Upon Contract § 552.16 Real estate claims founded upon contract. (a) Purpose... interest in real estate for which compensation must be made according to the Fifth Amendment to the...

  9. 41 CFR 301-52.7 - When must I submit my travel claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... travel claim? 301-52.7 Section 301-52.7 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES ARRANGING FOR TRAVEL SERVICES, PAYING TRAVEL EXPENSES, AND CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT 52-CLAIMING REIMBURSEMENT § 301-52.7 When must I submit my travel...

  10. 38 CFR 3.161 - Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Adjudication Initiative-Pilot Program. 3.161 Section 3.161 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT... Claims § 3.161 Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative—Pilot Program. Rules pertaining to the Expedited Claims Adjudication Initiative Pilot Program are set forth in part 20, subpart P, of this chapter...

  11. 36 CFR 1201.11 - Will NARA refer claims to the Department of Justice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Will NARA refer claims to the Department of Justice? 1201.11 Section 1201.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND... claims to the Department of Justice? NARA will refer to DOJ for litigation claims on which aggressive...

  12. 22 CFR 213.3 - Loans, guarantees, sovereign and interagency claims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Loans, guarantees, sovereign and interagency claims. 213.3 Section 213.3 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT CLAIMS COLLECTION... thereof, or any public international organization; (d) Claims where the CFO determines that the...

  13. 40 CFR 350.15 - Public petitions requesting disclosure of chemical identity claimed as trade secret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of chemical identity claimed as trade secret. 350.15 Section 350.15 Protection of Environment... TRADE SECRECY CLAIMS FOR EMERGENCY PLANNING AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW INFORMATION: AND TRADE SECRET... chemical identity claimed as trade secret. (a) The public may request the disclosure of chemical identity...

  14. 76 FR 14024 - Guidance for Industry on Hypertension Indication: Drug Labeling for Cardiovascular Outcome Claims...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ...] Guidance for Industry on Hypertension Indication: Drug Labeling for Cardiovascular Outcome Claims... ``Hypertension Indication: Drug Labeling for Cardiovascular Outcome Claims.'' This guidance is intended to assist applicants in developing labeling for outcome claims for drugs that are indicated to treat hypertension. With...

  15. 26 CFR 48.6427-10 - Kerosene; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (blocked pumps). 48.6427-10 Section 48.6427-10 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE...; claims by registered ultimate vendors (blocked pumps). (a) Overview. This section provides rules under... allowed by section 6427(l)(5)(B)(i). These claims relate to kerosene sold from a blocked pump. Claims...

  16. 20 CFR 429.207 - What are the procedures for filing a claim?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... considered a claim under the MPCECA if it constitutes a demand for compensation from SSA. A demand is required to be for a specific sum of money. (b) Award. The SSA Claims Officer is authorized to settle... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the procedures for filing a claim...

  17. 45 CFR 1160.11 - Certification of claim and amount of loss to the Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certification of claim and amount of loss to the Congress. 1160.11 Section 1160.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... the Congress. Upon receipt of a claim of total loss or a claim in which the Council is in agreement...

  18. 41 CFR 301-71.200 - Who must review and sign travel claims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... travel claims? 301-71.200 Section 301-71.200 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 71-AGENCY TRAVEL ACCOUNTABILITY REQUIREMENTS Travel Claims for Reimbursement § 301-71.200 Who must review and sign travel claims...

  19. 77 FR 74830 - Request for Comments on a Patent Small Claims Proceeding in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ...; (d) Whether there should be certain required pleadings or evidence to initiate a small claims... nature of that fee should be; (f) Whether multiple parties should be able to file claims in a small... a small claims proceeding be enforced; (o) What the nature of appellate review should be including...

  20. 7 CFR 1.51 - Claims based on negligence, wrongful act or omission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Claims based on negligence, wrongful act or omission. 1.51 Section 1.51 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Claims § 1.51 Claims based on negligence, wrongful act or omission. (a) Authority of the Department...