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Sample records for pseudorabies modified live-virus

  1. Evaluation of a modified live-virus vaccine for the prevention of porcine parvovirus-induced reproductive disease in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, P S; Mengeling, W L

    1980-12-01

    Each of 5 gilts was vaccinated IM with modified live-virus (MLV) vaccine for porcine parvovirus (PPV), and 5 gilts were used as nonvaccinated controls. Vaccinated gilts developed hemagglutination-inhibiting (HI) antibodies to PPV (titer of 320 to 1,280) by 2 weeks after vaccination. All gilts wee bred, and at about 40 days of gestation their immunity was challenged by intranasal and oral administration of a virulent strain of PPV. Gilts were killed at about 84 days of gestation and their litters were examined. Litters from vaccinated gilts comprised 59 live and 2 dead fetuses. Neither the virus nor antibodies to the virus were detected in any of the fetuses. In contrast, litters from nonvaccinated gilts comprised 25 live and 29 dead fetuses, and PPV was isolated from all dead and 9 live fetuses. Viral antigen was detected by direct immunofluorescence in the lungs of all PPV-infected fetuses, and 7 of the live infected fetuses had HI antibodies. Modified live virus did not cause transplacental fetal infection in 3 seronegative gilts inoculated at about 40 days of gestation. All 3 gilts had antibodies to PPV (80 to 640) when killed at about 84 days of gestation, and neither HI antibodies nor PPV were detected in any of the 20 live and 1 dead fetuses from these gilts. Modified live virus replicated in the tissues of fetuses of 2 gilts inoculated in utero. Seven of 8 fetuses inoculated with MLV died and were infected. These results demonstrated the efficacy of MLV vaccine for the prevention of PPV-induced reproductive disease in swine. Although MLV did not cross the placental barrier in pregnant animals, its pathogenicity for porcine fetuses after direct in utero inoculation indicates that its use should be limited to nonpregnant animals.

  2. Bovine viral diarrhea virus fetal persistent infection after immunization with a contaminated modified-live virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomares, Roberto A; Marley, Shonda M; Givens, M Daniel; Gallardo, Rodrigo A; Brock, Kenny V

    2013-05-01

    The objective was to determine whether a multivalent modified-live virus vaccine containing noncytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) administered off-label to pregnant cattle can result in persistently infected fetuses and to assess whether vaccinal strains can be shed to unvaccinated pregnant cattle commingling with vaccinates. Nineteen BVDV-naïve pregnant heifers were randomly assigned to two groups: cattle vaccinated near Day 77 of gestation with modified-live virus vaccine containing BVDV-1a (WRL strain), bovine herpes virus-1, parainfluenza 3, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (Vx group; N = 10) or control unvaccinated cattle (N = 9). During the course of the study a voluntary stop-sale/recall was conducted by the manufacturer because of the presence of a BVDV contaminant in the vaccine. At Day 175 of gestation, fetuses were removed by Cesarean section and fetal tissues were submitted for virus isolation, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using BVDV-1- and BVDV-2-specific probes. Nucleotide sequencing of viral RNA was performed for quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction-positive samples. Two vaccinated and two control heifers aborted their pregnancies, but their fetuses were unavailable for BVDV testing. Virus was isolated from all eight fetuses in the Vx group heifers and from 2 of 7 fetuses in the control unvaccinated heifers. Only BVDV-2 was detected in fetuses from the Vx group, and only BVDV-1 was detected in the two fetuses from the control group. Both BVDV-1 and BVDV-2 were detected in the vaccine. In conclusion, vaccination of pregnant heifers with a contaminated modified-live BVDV vaccine resulted in development of BVDV-2 persistently infected fetuses in all tested vaccinated animals. Furthermore, BVDV was apparently shed to unvaccinated heifers causing fetal infections from which only BVDV-1 was detected. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Canine Parvovirus (CPV) Vaccination: Comparison of Neutralizing Antibody Responses in Pups after Inoculation with CPV2 or CPV2b Modified Live Virus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Cavalli, Alessandra; Martella, Vito; Tempesta, Maria; Decaro, Nicola; Carmichael, Leland Eugene; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2001-01-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV2) emerged in 1978 as causative agent of a new disease of dogs. New antigenic variants (biotypes), designated CPV2a and CPV2b, became widespread during 1979 to 1980 and 1984, respectively. At the present time the original CPV2 has disappeared in the dog population and has been replaced by the two new viruses. In the present study the comparison of neutralizing antibody titers in two groups of pups (18 pups in each group) inoculated with CPV2 and CPV2b modified live virus vaccines is reported. Using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test, relevant differences between antibody titers, against either the homologous or the heterologous virus, were not constantly observed. Using the neutralization (Nt) test, however, the pups inoculated with CPV2 had antibody titers which were approximately 30 times higher to the homologous virus (mean, 4,732) than to the heterologous virus (CPV2b) (mean, 162). The results of these experiments support two conclusions: (i) the HI test may not always accurately evaluate the true immune status of dogs with respect to CPV, and (ii) dogs inoculated with CPV2 vaccine develop relatively low Nt antibody titers against the heterologous virus (CPV2b). These data may suggest an advantage for new vaccines, considering that most presently licensed vaccines are produced with CPV2, which no longer exists in the dog population. PMID:11329467

  4. Assessment of safety and reproductive performance after vaccination with a modified live-virus PRRS genotype 1 vaccine in pregnant sows at various stages of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Julia; Zoels, Susanne; Eddicks, Matthias; Kraft, Christian; Ritzmann, Mathias; Ladinig, Andrea

    2016-07-19

    The objective of the present study was to assess safety and efficacy of a new modified live-virus porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) genotype 1 vaccine in pregnant sows at various stages of gestation under field conditions. A total of 505 sows and gilts were allocated to two treatment groups and maintained in separate facilities. Animals of group 1 were vaccinated with a commercial modified live genotype 1 PRRSV vaccine (control product, CP), while animals of group 2 were immunized with a new modified live genotype 1 PRRSV vaccine (investigational veterinary product, IVP) (ReproCyc® PRRS EU, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica GmbH). Injection site reactions were noted to be significantly less frequent in the IVP group compared to the CP group for pain (p=0.039), redness (p=0.030), heat (p=0.016) and swelling (p=0.002). The mean total number of piglets alive at weaning did not differ significantly between both study groups (10.6 vs. 11.0, p=0.375). However, pre-weaning mortality was significantly higher (p=0.005) in piglets from the CP group (14.1% vs. 10.9%). Analyses of reproductive performance data for both groups did not result in statistically significant differences between CP group and IVP group for number of piglets alive (12.7 and 12.6, respectively), healthy live (11.9 and 11.8), weak (0.7 and 0.5), stillborn (1.0 and 0.8) and mummified piglets (0.3 and 0.2) per litter. No differences were detected between both groups for piglet birth weights, while body weights at weaning (7.2kg vs. 6.6kg, p=0.026) and average daily gain (0.2445kg vs. 0.2211kg, p=0.037) were significantly higher in piglets from the IVP group. In conclusion, the administration of a single dose of ReproCyc® PRRS EU to sows and gilts at various stages of gestation confirmed non-inferiority to a commercial PRRS vaccine regarding safety and efficacy parameters under field conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunogenicity of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine parainfluenza-3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus when administered intranasally in young calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenzhi; Ellis, John; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Brady, Ryan; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-05-14

    The immunogenicity of an intranasally-administered modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine in 3-8 day old calves was evaluated against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves were intranasally vaccinated with a single dose of a multivalent MLV vaccine and were challenged with one of the respective viruses three to four weeks post-vaccination in five separate studies. There was significant sparing of diseases in calves intranasally vaccinated with the MLV vaccine, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding, greater white blood cell and platelet counts, and less severe pulmonary lesions than control animals. This was the first MLV combination vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against BVDV types 1 and 2, IBR, PI-3 and BRSV in calves 3-8 days of age. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation for emergence of an Eastern European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain in Western Europe: Immunization with modified live virus vaccines or a field strain confers partial protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renson, P; Fablet, C; Le Dimna, M; Mahé, S; Touzain, F; Blanchard, Y; Paboeuf, F; Rose, N; Bourry, O

    2017-05-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes huge economic losses for the swine industry worldwide. In the past several years, highly pathogenic strains that lead to even greater losses have emerged. For the Western European swine industry, one threat is the possible introduction of Eastern European PRRSV strains (example Lena genotype 1.3) which were shown to be more virulent than common Western resident strains under experimental conditions. To prepare for the possible emergence of this strain in Western Europe, we immunized piglets with a Western European PRRSV field strain (Finistere: Fini, genotype 1.1), a new genotype 1 commercial modified live virus (MLV) vaccine (MLV1) or a genotype 2 commercial MLV vaccine (MLV2) to evaluate and compare the level of protection that these strains conferred upon challenge with the Lena strain 4 weeks later. Results show that immunization with Fini, MLV1 or MLV2 strains shortened the Lena-induced hyperthermia. In the Fini group, a positive effect was also demonstrated in growth performance. The level of Lena viremia was reduced for all immunized groups (significantly so for Fini and MLV2). This reduction in Lena viremia was correlated with the level of Lena-specific IFNγ-secreting cells. In conclusion, we showed that a commercial MLV vaccine of genotype 1 or 2, as well as a field strain of genotype 1.1 may provide partial clinical and virological protection upon challenge with the Lena strain. The cross-protection induced by these immunizing strains was not related with the level of genetic similarity to the Lena strain. The slightly higher level of protection established with the field strain is attributed to a better cell-mediated immune response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. 9 CFR 113.318 - Pseudorabies Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pseudorabies Vaccine. 113.318 Section... Virus Vaccines § 113.318 Pseudorabies Vaccine. Pseudorabies Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All serials of vaccine shall be prepared from the...

  8. Efficacy of four commercially available multivalent modified-live virus vaccines against clinical disease, viremia, and viral shedding in early-weaned beef calves exposed simultaneously to cattle persistently infected with bovine viral diarrhea virus and cattle acutely infected with bovine herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorro, Manuel F; Walz, Paul H; Passler, Thomas; Palomares, Roberto; Newcomer, Benjamin W; Riddell, Kay P; Gard, Julie; Zhang, Yijing; Galik, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of 4 commercially available multivalent modified-live virus vaccines against clinical disease, viremia, and viral shedding caused by bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) in early-weaned beef calves. 54 early-weaned beef steers (median age, 95 days). Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 groups and administered PBSS (group A [control]; n = 11) or 1 of 4 commercially available modified-live virus vaccines that contained antigens against BHV1, BVDV types 1 (BVDV1) and 2 (BVDV2), parainfluenza type 3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (groups B [11], C [10], D [11], and E [11]). Forty-five days after vaccination, calves were exposed simultaneously to 6 cattle persistently infected with BVDV and 8 calves acutely infected with BHV1 for 28 days (challenge exposure). For each calf, serum antibody titers against BVDV and BHV1 were determined before vaccination and before and after challenge exposure. Virus isolation was performed on nasal secretions, serum, and WBCs at predetermined times during the 28-day challenge exposure. None of the calves developed severe clinical disease or died. Mean serum anti-BHV1 antibody titers did not differ significantly among the treatment groups at any time and gradually declined during the study. Mean serum anti-BVDV antibody titers appeared to be negatively associated with the incidence of viremia and BVDV shedding. The unvaccinated group (A) had the lowest mean serum anti-BVDV antibody titers. The mean serum anti-BVDV antibody titers for group D were generally lower than those for groups B, C, and E. Results indicated differences in vaccine efficacy for the prevention of BVDV viremia and shedding in early-weaned beef calves.

  9. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus. 113.312... Virus Vaccines § 113.312 Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus. Rabies Vaccine shall be prepared from virus-bearing... vaccine shall be prepared using methods prescribed in the Outline of Production. If Rabies Vaccine is to...

  10. Coated microneedle arrays for transcutaneous delivery of live virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrdoljak, Anto; McGrath, Marie G; Carey, John B; Draper, Simon J; Hill, Adrian V S; O'Mahony, Conor; Crean, Abina M; Moore, Anne C

    2012-04-10

    Vaccines are sensitive biologics that require continuous refrigerated storage to maintain their viability. The vast majority of vaccines are also administered using needles and syringes. The need for cold chain storage and the significant logistics surrounding needle-and-syringe vaccination is constraining the success of immunization programs. Recombinant live viral vectors are a promising platform for the development of vaccines against a number of infectious diseases, however these viruses must retain infectivity to be effective. Microneedles offer an effective and painless method for delivery of vaccines directly into skin that in the future could provide solutions to current vaccination issues. Here we investigated methods of coating live recombinant adenovirus and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) vectors onto solid microneedle arrays. An effective spray-coating method, using conventional pharmaceutical processes, was developed, in tandem with suitable sugar-based formulations, which produces arrays with a unique coating of viable virus in a dry form around the shaft of each microneedle on the array. Administration of live virus-coated microneedle arrays successfully resulted in virus delivery, transcutaneous infection and induced an antibody or CD8(+) T cell response in mice that was comparable to that obtained by needle-and-syringe intradermal immunization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of successful vaccination with recombinant live viral vectored vaccines coated on microneedle delivery devices. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. 9 CFR 113.300 - General requirements for live virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General requirements for live virus... REQUIREMENTS Live Virus Vaccines § 113.300 General requirements for live virus vaccines. When prescribed in an applicable Standard Requirement or in the filed Outline of Production, a live virus vaccine shall meet the...

  12. Biological characterization of a recombinant pseudorabies virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, E.; Prieto, C.; Martinez-Lobo, F. J.; Castro, J. M.

    2008-07-01

    In a previous study we obtained and characterized in vitro a novel pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant named gIp2 with a TK, gI/gE, 11k and 28k negative phenotype and a duplication of PK gene. The main objective of the present study was to determine the safety and efficacy, as a vaccine candidate, of this recombinant PRV. For this purpose, we used 24 PRV seronegative three weeks old piglets that were divided into five groups of treatment. Piglets of groups A and B were immunized twice with 10{sup 6}.5 and 10{sup 5}.5 TCID{sub 5}0 of gIp2, respectively; pigs of group C were vaccinated twice with MLV vaccine Auskipra GN and pigs of groups D and E were not immunized and served as infected and uninfected controls, respectively. Four weeks after the second immunization pigs of groups A, B, C and D were challenged by intranasal inoculation of 10{sup 6} TCID{sub 5}0 of the wild type NIA-3 strain of PRV. No adverse reactions or clinical signs were observed in any group after immunization, indicating that the application of up to 10 times the conventional dose included in a commercial vaccine (i.e. 10{sup 5}.5 TCID{sub 5}0) of gIp2 was safe in piglets. Additionally, the inoculation of gIp2 induced an immune response able to provide clinical and virological protection against pseudorabies virus after challenge. In conclusion, the use of gIp2 in piglets as a vaccine virus is safe and induces an immunity comparable to that exerted by commercially available vaccines. (Author) 34 refs.

  13. 78 FR 23740 - Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies Proposed Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies... swine brucellosis and pseudorabies available for public review and comment. This action will allow... a potential new approach to managing swine brucellosis and pseudorabies available for public review...

  14. 78 FR 9028 - Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies Proposed Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Notice of Availability of a Swine Brucellosis and Pseudorabies... approach to managing swine brucellosis and pseudorabies available for public review and comment. Swine brucellosis and pseudorabies have been eliminated from commercial swine herds within the United States, but...

  15. 9 CFR 113.213 - Pseudorabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... established as pure, safe, and immunogenic shall be used for preparing seeds for vaccine production. All... immunogenicity of vaccine prepared from the Master Seed in accordance with the Outline of Production shall be... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pseudorabies Vaccine, Killed Virus...

  16. Comparison of single vaccination versus revaccination with a modified-live virus vaccine containing bovine herpesvirus-1, bovine viral diarrhea virus (types 1a and 2a), parainfluenza type 3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus in the prevention of bovine respiratory disease in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Step, Douglas L; Krehbiel, Clinton R; Burciaga-Robles, Luis O; Holland, Ben P; Fulton, Robert W; Confer, Anthony W; Bechtol, David T; Brister, David L; Hutcheson, John P; Newcomb, Harold L

    2009-09-01

    Objective-To compare effects of administration of a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine once with administration of the same vaccine twice on the health and performance of cattle. Design-Randomized, controlled trial. Animals-612 mixed-breed male cattle with unknown health histories. Procedures-Cattle were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups (single vaccination treatment group [SVAC group] vs revaccination treatment group [REVAC group]) during the preconditioning phase of production. All cattle were given a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine. Eleven days later, REVAC group cattle received a second injection of the same vaccine. During the finishing phase of production, cattle from each treatment group were either vaccinated a third time with the modified-live respiratory virus vaccine or given no vaccine. Health observations were performed daily. Blood and performance variables were measured throughout the experiment. Results-During preconditioning, no significant differences were observed in performance or antibody production between groups. Morbidity rate from bovine respiratory disease was lower for SVAC group cattle; however, days to first treatment for bovine respiratory disease were not different between groups. No significant differences in body weights, daily gains, or dry-matter intake between groups were observed during the finishing phase. Revaccination treatment group cattle had improved feed efficiency regardless of vaccination protocol in the finishing phase. Conclusions and Clinical Relevance-Vaccination once with a modified-live respiratory virus vaccine was as efficacious as vaccination twice in the prevention of bovine respiratory disease of high-risk cattle, although feed efficiency was improved in REVAC group cattle during the finishing period.

  17. A C. elegans-based foam for rapid on-site detection of residual live virus.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrete, Oscar A.; Branda, Catherine; Hardesty, Jasper O. E. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Tucker, Mark David (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Kaiser, Julia N. (Global Product Management, Hilden, Germany); Kozina, Carol L.; Chirica, Gabriela S.

    2012-02-01

    In the response to and recovery from a critical homeland security event involving deliberate or accidental release of biological agents, initial decontamination efforts are necessarily followed by tests for the presence of residual live virus or bacteria. Such 'clearance sampling' should be rapid and accurate, to inform decision makers as they take appropriate action to ensure the safety of the public and of operational personnel. However, the current protocol for clearance sampling is extremely time-intensive and costly, and requires significant amounts of laboratory space and capacity. Detection of residual live virus is particularly problematic and time-consuming, as it requires evaluation of replication potential within a eukaryotic host such as chicken embryos. The intention of this project was to develop a new method for clearance sampling, by leveraging Sandia's expertise in the biological and material sciences in order to create a C. elegans-based foam that could be applied directly to the entire contaminated area for quick and accurate detection of any and all residual live virus by means of a fluorescent signal. Such a novel technology for rapid, on-site detection of live virus would greatly interest the DHS, DoD, and EPA, and hold broad commercial potential, especially with regard to the transportation industry.

  18. Contamination of live virus during tissue homogenizing by ultrasonic processor and tissue disperser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juan; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ying; Cui, Yu; Huang, Xiao Xia; Zhang, Bao Yun; Wu, Gui Zhen; Han, Jun; Dong, Xiao Ping

    2012-04-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the contamination area and risk of a live pathogen during tissue homogenization by either ultrasonic processor or tissue disperser. A recombinant Herpes Simplex Virus (rHSV) containing GFP gene was used as the index virus, and fresh liver tissue from healthy mice was used as simulated specimen. After 10% liver homogenate was mixed with rHSV (100 TCID50/0.1 mL) in a 5 mL tube, the stability of rHSV in liver homogenate and influences of an ultrasonic processor and a tissue disperser on viral infectivity were determined by GFP expressions in cell cultures. The contaminating areas of live viruses during homogenization were evaluated by a cell culture-based sedimentary. The contamination radii were counted by measurement of the distance between the operator and the farthest GFP positive well. The infectivity of rHSV in 10% liver homogenate maintained almost unchanged after it was incubated at room temperature for 30 min. Treatment with an ultrasonic processor clearly dropped down the virus infectivity, while a disperser not. Obvious spills and slashes of live viruses were observed in processes of homogenization with those two apparatuses. The contamination radii are positively related with sample volume, output energy of operator and handling time. Homogenizing infectious samples with an ultrasonic processor and a tissue disperser at commonly used conditions caused obvious spills and splashes of live viruses, which possesses high risk to induce Laboratory acquired infections (LAIs).

  19. 9 CFR 85.6 - Interstate movement of pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be..., except swine from qualified negative gene-altered vaccinated herds, not known to be infected with or exposed to pseudorabies. Pseudorabies vaccinate swine, except swine from qualified negative gene-altered...

  20. A fast and biocompatible living virus labeling method based on sialic acid-phenylboronic acid recognition system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li-Li; Jin, Yong-Jie; Zhao, Dongxu; Yu, Chao; Hao, Jian; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2014-04-01

    The sialic acid (SA)-phenylboronic acid (PBA) recognition system is of particular interest in the bioconjugation field, because it is simple, fast, efficient, and biocompatible. In this paper, we report a novel method for reversibly labeling living virus with quantum dots (QDs) by taking advantage of this SA-PBA recognition system. The QDs were initially modified with PBA (QDs-PBA) to target them to the surface of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), which has abundant with SA on its envelope. The QDs-PBA was of good monodispersity and strong fluorescence, and could be conjugated with VSV by simply incubating with native VSV for 10 min at 37 °C, producing QDs-VSV that was capable of being imaged at the single virion level. The labeling efficiency attained 83 ± 4.3 % (mean ± SD); meanwhile, the activity and recognition ability of the labeled virus were minimally affected. This method was simple, rapid, and reversible. This work promotes the virus labeling development to a new step. That is, native viruses can be reversibly labeled without any modification.

  1. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  2. Detection of pseudorabies virus by duplex droplet digital PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Meishen; Lin, Hua; Chen, Shijie; Yang, Miao; An, Wei; Wang, Yin; Xue, Changhua; Sun, Yinjie; Yan, Yubao; Hu, Juan

    2018-01-01

    Aujeszky's disease, caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV), has damaged the economy of the Chinese swine industry. A large number of PRV gene-deleted vaccines have been constructed based on deletion of the glycoprotein E ( gE) gene combined with other virulence-related gene deletions, such as thymidine kinase ( TK), whereas PRV wild-type strains contain an intact gE gene. We developed a sensitive duplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay to rapidly detect PRV wild-type isolates and gE gene-deleted viral vaccines. We compared this assay with a TaqMan real-time PCR (qPCR) using the same primers and probes. Both assays exhibited good linearity and repeatability; however, ddPCR maintained linearity at extremely low concentrations, whereas qPCR did not. Based on positive results for both gE and gB, the detection limit of ddPCR was found to be 4.75 copies/µL in contrast of 76 copies/µL for qPCR, showing that ddPCR provided a 16-fold improvement in sensitivity. In addition, no nonspecific amplification was shown in specificity testing, and the PRV wild-type was distinguished from a gE-deleted strain. The ddPCR was more sensitive when analyzing clinical serum samples. Thus, ddPCR may become an appropriate detection platform for PRV.

  3. Regulation of pseudorabies virus gG glycoprotein gene promoter independently of pseudorabies immediate early IE180 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, A L; Torres, M; Martín, B; Lerma, L; Tabarés, E

    2010-04-01

    The pseudorabies virus (PRV) glycoprotein known as gG is generally regarded as an early protein, and the immediate early IE180 protein regulates its expression during infection. This study, however, provides evidence that although induction by IE180 is observed, the expression of a marker protein (EGFP), or gG itself, under the control of the gG promoter, can also occur independently of the expression of IE180. This result was demonstrated both with transient transfection assays using plasmids and with viral infections. In transient transfections, the expression under control of the gG promoter depends on the cell type and surprisingly, can be 1.3-fold higher than the expression under the control of the IE180 promoter in Hela Tet-Off cells. Recombinant PRV S3 was constructed by replacing gE in the PRV genome with a chimeric transgene, expressing EGFP under the control of the gG promoter. In PK15 cells infected with NIA-3 wild-type virus or with S3 recombinant virus, expression of gG PRV mRNA (or EGFP mRNA) under the control of the gG promoter in the presence of cycloheximide was detected by RT-PCR. This again indicates that some basal expression was produced in infected cells independently of IE180. This expression was augmented by IE180 protein in both plasmid transfections and viral infections.

  4. Pseudorabies virus infection alters neuronal activity and connectivity in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M McCarthy

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-herpesviruses, including human herpes simplex virus 1 & 2, varicella zoster virus and the swine pseudorabies virus (PRV, infect the peripheral nervous system of their hosts. Symptoms of infection often include itching, numbness, or pain indicative of altered neurological function. To determine if there is an in vitro electrophysiological correlate to these characteristic in vivo symptoms, we infected cultured rat sympathetic neurons with well-characterized strains of PRV known to produce virulent or attenuated symptoms in animals. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made at various times after infection. By 8 hours of infection with virulent PRV, action potential (AP firing rates increased substantially and were accompanied by hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials and spikelet-like events. Coincident with the increase in AP firing rate, adjacent neurons exhibited coupled firing events, first with AP-spikelets and later with near identical resting membrane potentials and AP firing. Small fusion pores between adjacent cell bodies formed early after infection as demonstrated by transfer of the low molecular weight dye, Lucifer Yellow. Later, larger pores formed as demonstrated by transfer of high molecular weight Texas red-dextran conjugates between infected cells. Further evidence for viral-induced fusion pores was obtained by infecting neurons with a viral mutant defective for glycoprotein B, a component of the viral membrane fusion complex. These infected neurons were essentially identical to mock infected neurons: no increased AP firing, no spikelet-like events, and no electrical or dye transfer. Infection with PRV Bartha, an attenuated circuit-tracing strain delayed, but did not eliminate the increased neuronal activity and coupling events. We suggest that formation of fusion pores between infected neurons results in electrical coupling and elevated firing rates, and that these processes may contribute to the altered neural

  5. Pseudorabies virus US3 protein kinase mediates actin stress fiber breakdown

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnebruggen, van G.; Favoreel, H.W.; Jacobs, L.; Nauwynck, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Disruption of specific components of the host cytoskeleton has been reported for several viruses and is thought to be beneficial for viral replication and spread. Our previous work demonstrated that infection of swine kidney (SK-6) cells with pseudorabies virus (PRV), a swine alphaherpesvirus,

  6. The Us3-encoded protein kinase from pseudorabies virus affects egress of virions from the nucleus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagenaar, F.; Pol, J.M.A.; Peeters, B.; Gielkens, A.L.J.; Wind, de N.; Kimman, T.G.

    1995-01-01

    We examined the influence of inactivation of various genes located in the unique short (U(s)) region of pseudorabies virus on virus replication and assembly in porcine nasal mucosa explant cultures. The following strains were used: the virulent wild-type strain NIA-3, and strains derived from NIA-3

  7. Global transcriptional response of pig brain and lung to natural infection by Pseudorabies virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furlong RA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudorabies virus (PRV is an alphaherpesviruses whose native host is pig. PRV infection mainly causes signs of central nervous system disorder in young pigs, and respiratory system diseases in the adult. Results In this report, we have analyzed native host (piglets gene expression changes in response to acute pseudorabies virus infection of the brain and lung using a printed human oligonucleotide gene set from Illumina. A total of 210 and 1130 out of 23,000 transcript probes displayed differential expression respectively in the brain and lung in piglets after PRV infection (p-value Conclusion This is the first comprehensive analysis of the global transcriptional response of the native host to acute alphaherpesvirus infection. The differentially regulated genes reported here are likely to be of interest for the further study and understanding of host viral gene interactions.

  8. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yang; Guo, Wanzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Yan, Qigui; Luo, Yan; Shi, Qian; Chen, Dishi; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and...

  9. Pseudorabies virus infection (Aujeszky's disease) in an Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) in Spain: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masot, A Javier; Gil, María; Risco, David; Jiménez, Olga M; Núñez, José I; Redondo, Eloy

    2017-01-05

    The only natural hosts of Pseudorabies virus (PRV) are members of the family Suidae (Sus scrofa scrofa). In species other than suids infection is normally fatal. In these mammals, including carnivores, PRV typically causes serious neurologic disease. The endangered Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) is a wild feline endemic to south-western Europe (Iberian Peninsula). The Iberian lynx was found to be the world's most endangered felid species in 2002. In wild felines, PRV infection has only been previously reported once in a Florida panther in 1994. No seropositive lynxes have ever been found, nor has PRV been detected in dead Iberian lynxes to date. We describe the first reported case of pseudorabies in an Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus). Pseudorabies was diagnosed in a young wild Iberian lynx from Extremadura (SW Spain) by histopathological examination, immunohistochemistry, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis. Gross lesions included alopecia of the ventral neck, bloody gastro-intestinal contents and congestion of the brain. Histopathological analysis showed a moderate nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis with diffuse areas of demyelination, necrotizing gastritis and enteritis of the small intestine. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) antigen was found in neuronal and non-neuronal cells of the brain, tonsils, and gastric glandular epithelial cells by immunohistochemical analysis. The presence of the virus in the brain was confirmed by nested PCR. The sequence analysis of the 146 bp fragment (from the viral glycoprotein B gene) showed that the amplified sequence matched (with 100% identity) the PRV genome. Furthermore, specific DNA from glycoprotein D and E encoding-genes was detected by conventional and real-time PCR, respectively, confirming the latter that this infection was produced by a wild-type PRV strain. This study supports the suspicion that PRV could infect the Iberian lynx. The detection of PRV in a dead Iberian lynx suggests that the virus may have a

  10. Protective antiviral immune responses to pseudorabies virus induced by DNA vaccination using dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide as an adjuvant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooij, van E.M.A.; Glansbeek, H.L.; Hilgers, L.A.T.; Lintelo, te E.G.; Visser, de Y.E.; Boersma, W.J.A.; Haagmans, B.L.; Bianchi, A.T.J.

    2002-01-01

    To enhance the efficacy of a DNA vaccine against pseudorabies virus (PRV), we evaluated the adjuvant properties of plasmids coding for gamma interferon or interleukin-12, of CpG immunostimulatory motifs, and of the conventional adjuvants dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide in water (DDA) and

  11. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Guo, Wanzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Yan, Qigui; Luo, Yan; Shi, Qian; Chen, Dishi; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2011-06-16

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  12. An inactivated gE-deleted pseudorabies vaccine provides complete clinical protection and reduces virus shedding against challenge by a Chinese pseudorabies variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichun; Guo, Rongli; Qiao, Yongfeng; Xu, Mengwei; Wang, Zhisheng; Liu, Yamei; Gu, Yiqi; Liu, Chang; Hou, Jibo

    2016-12-07

    Since the end of 2011 an outbreak of pseudorabies affected Chinese pig herds that had been vaccinated with the commercial vaccine made of Bartha K61 strain. It is now clear that the outbreak was caused by an emergent PRV variant. Even though vaccines made of PRV Bartha K61 strain can confer certain cross protection against PRV variants based on experimental data, less than optimal clinical protection and virus shedding reduction were observed, making the control or eradication of this disease difficult. An infectious clone of PRV AH02LA strain was constructed to generate a gE deletion mutant PRV(LA-AB) strain. PRV(LA-AB) strain can reach a titer of 108.43 TCID50 /mL (50% tissue culture infectious dose) on BHK-21 cells. To evaluate the efficiency of the inactivated vaccine made of PRV(LA-AB) strain, thirty 3-week-old PRV-negative piglets were divided randomly into six groups for vaccination and challenge test. All five piglets in the challenge control showed typical clinical symptoms of pseudorabies post challenge. Sneezing and nasal discharge were observed in four and three piglets in groups C(vaccinated with inactivated PRV Bartha K61 strain vaccine) and D(vaccinated with live PRV Bartha K61 strain vaccine) respectively. In contrast, piglets in both groups A(vaccinated with inactivated PRV LA-AB strain vaccine) and B(vaccinated with inactivated PRV LA-AB strain vaccine with adjuvant) presented mild or no clinical symptoms. Moreover, viral titers detected via nasal swabs were approximately 100 times lower in group B than in the challenge control, and the duration of virus shedding (3-4 days) was shorter than in either the challenge control (5-10 days) or groups C and D (5-6 days). The infectious clone constructed in this study harbors the whole genome of the PRV variant AH02LA strain. The gE deletion mutant PRV(LA-AB)strain generated from PRV AH02LA strain can reach a high titer on BHK-21 cells. An inactivated vaccine of PRV LA-AB provides clinical protection

  13. Successful pseudorabies vaccination in maternally immune piglets using recombinant vaccinia virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeier, S I; Lager, K M; Mengeling, W L

    1997-01-01

    Three gilts were vaccinated with a NYVAC vaccinia recombinant expressing glycoprotein gD of pseudorabies virus (PRV) (NYVAC/gD). After farrowing, the piglets were allowed to nurse normally to obtain colostral immunity and then were divided into four groups, receiving NYVAC/gD, a NYVAC recombinant expressing glycoprotein gB of PRV (NYVAC/gB), an inactivated PRV vaccine (iPRV), or no vaccine. The piglets were vaccinated twice, three weeks apart beginning at approximately two weeks of age and later challenged with virulent PRV oronasally. Piglets that received NYVAC/gB or iPRV were the best protected based on lack of mortality, lower temperature responses, decreased weight loss and decreased viral shedding after challenge. These results indicate effective strategies for stimulating active immune response while still under the protection of maternal immunity.

  14. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection. PMID:21679423

  15. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dishi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28 following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31. Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  16. Comparison of different prime-boost regimes with DNA and recombinant Orf virus based vaccines expressing glycoprotein D of pseudorabies virus in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooij, E M A; Rijsewijk, F A M; Moonen-Leusen, H W; Bianchi, A T J; Rziha, H-J

    2010-02-17

    Both DNA and Orf virus (ORFV; Parapox virus) based vaccines have shown promise as alternatives for conventional vaccines in pigs against pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection causing Aujeszky's disease. In the present study we evaluated the efficacy of different prime-boost regimes in pigs in terms of immunogenicity and protection against challenge infection with PRV. The different prime-boost regimes consisted of the homologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by DNA or ORFV followed by ORFV) and the heterologous prime-boost regimes (DNA followed by ORFV and ORFV followed by DNA), all based on glycoprotein D (gD) of PRV. Moreover, we compared the efficacy of the different prime-boost regimes with the efficacy of a conventional modified live vaccine (MLV). The different prime-boost regimes resulted in different levels of immunity and protection against challenge infection. Most effective was the regime of priming with DNA vaccine followed by boosting with the ORFV based vaccine. This regime resulted in strong antibody responses, comparable to the antibody responses obtained after prime-boost vaccination with a conventional MLV vaccine. Also with regard to protection, the prime DNA-boost ORFV regime performed better than the other prime-boost regimes. This study demonstrates the potential of a heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy against PRV based on a single antigen, and that in the natural host, the pig. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A live gI/gE-deleted pseudorabies virus (PRV) protects weaned piglets against lethal variant PRV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yue; Xu, Zhiwen; Liu, Xiaowan; Li, Ping; Yang, Fan; Zhao, Jun; Fan, Yi; Sun, Xiangang; Zhu, Ling

    2017-08-01

    Emerging pseudorabies virus (PRV) variant has led to frequent outbreaks of PRV infection among Bartha-K61-vaccinated swine population in Chinese swine farms and caused high mortality in pigs of all age since late 2011. Here, we generated a gE/gI-deleted PRV (rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP) based on PRV variant strain (PRV-XJ) through homologous DNA recombination. Compared to parental strain, rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP showed similar growth kinetics in vitro. Its safety and immunogenicity were evaluated in weaned piglets. Our results showed that piglets immunized with rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP did not exhibit any clinical symptoms, and a high level of gB-specific antibody was detected. After lethal challenge with variant PRV (PRV-FJ strain), all vaccinated piglets survived without showing any clinical symptoms except slight fever within 7 days post-challenge. In unvaccinated piglets, typical clinical symptoms of pseudorabies were observed, and the piglets were all died at 5 days post-challenge. These results indicated that a live rPRVXJ-delgI/gE-EGFP vaccine could be a maker vaccine candidate to control the currently epidemic pseudorabies in China.

  18. Live virus immunization (LVI) with a recent 1-7-4 PRRSV isolate elicits broad protection against PRRSV challenge in finishing age swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    PRRSV infection is the most economically important disease affecting domestic swine herds in the United States and in many countries. Commercially available vaccines are often based on older viral strains and offer limited efficacy against heterologous challenge. Live virus immunization (LVI), a for...

  19. Structure-function dissection of the Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein B fusion loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallbracht, Melina; Brun, Delphine; Tassinari, Matteo; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Haouz, Ahmed; Klupp, Barbara G; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Rey, Felix A; Backovic, Marija

    2017-10-18

    Conserved across the Herpesviridae family, glycoprotein B (gB) is responsible for driving fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane for entry upon receptor binding and activation by the viral gH/gL complex. Although crystal structures of the gB ectodomain of several herpesviruses have been reported, the membrane fusion mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we report the X-ray structure of the Pseudorabies virus (PrV) gB ectodomain, revealing a typical class III post-fusion trimer that binds membranes via its fusion loops (FLs) in a cholesterol-dependent manner. Mutagenesis of FL residues allowed us to dissect those interacting with distinct sub-regions of the lipid bilayer and their role for membrane interactions. We tested 15 gB variants for their ability to bind to liposomes, and further investigated a subset of them in functional assays. We found that PrV gB FL residues Trp187, Tyr192, Phe275 and Tyr276, which were essential for liposome binding and for fusion in a cellular and viral context, form a continuous hydrophobic patch at the gB trimer surface. Together with reported results from other alpha-herpesvirus gBs, our data suggest a model in which Phe275 from the tip of FL2 protrudes deeper into the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer, while the side chains of Trp187, Tyr192 and Tyr276 form a rim that inserts into the more superficial, interfacial region of the membrane to catalyze the fusion process. Comparative analysis with gB from beta- and gamma-herpesviruses suggest that this membrane-interaction mode is valid for gB from all herpesviruses.IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses are common human and animal pathogens, which infect cells by entering via fusion of viral and cellular membranes and which cause life-long and incurable infections. Central to the membrane fusion event for entry is glycoprotein B (gB), which is the most conserved envelope protein across the herpesvirus family. Like other viral fusion proteins, gB anchors itself into the target

  20. EVIDENCE OF PSEUDORABIES VIRUS SHEDDING IN FERAL SWINE ( SUS SCROFA) POPULATIONS OF FLORIDA, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Felipe A; Sayler, Katherine A; Bounds, Courtney; Milleson, Michael P; Carr, Amanda N; Wisely, Samantha M

    2018-01-01

    :  Feral swine ( Sus scrofa) are a pathogen reservoir for pseudorabies virus (PrV). The virus can be fatal to wildlife and contributes to economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. National surveillance efforts in the US use serology to detect PrV-specific antibodies in feral swine populations, but PrV exposure is not a direct indicator of pathogen transmission among conspecifics or to non-suid wildlife species. We measured antibody production and the presence of PrV DNA in four tissue types from feral swine populations of Florida, US. We sampled blood, nasal, oral, and genital swabs from 551 individuals at 39 sites during 2014-16. Of the animals tested for antibody production, 224 of 436 (51%) feral swine were antibody positive while 38 of 549 feral swine (7%) tested for viral shedding were quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-positive for PrV. The detection of PrV DNA across all the collected sample types (blood, nasal, oral, and genital [vaginal] swabs) suggested viral shedding via direct (oronasal or venereal), and potentially indirect (through carcass consumption), routes of transmission among infected and susceptible animals. Fourteen of 212 seronegative feral swine were qPCR-positive, indicating 7% false negatives in the serologic assay. Our findings suggest that serology may underestimate the actual infection risk posed by feral swine to other species and that feral swine populations in Florida are capable of shedding the virus through multiple routes.

  1. Interferon-gamma response of PBMC indicates productive pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegen, Bärbel; Saalmüller, Armin; Röttgen, Marlene; Rziha, Hanns-Joachim; Geldermann, Hermann; Reiner, Gerald; Pfaff, Eberhard; Büttner, Mathias

    2004-12-28

    In Chinese Meishan/German Landrace cross-bred swine F2 generation interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was determined directly ex vivo at different time points after survival of a virulent pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection. This reactivity was compared with the reactivity of naïve PBMC. Significant IFN-gamma production was determined in ELISA and ELISPOT only after in vitro PBMC re-stimulation with PRV and not with the closely related bovine herpesvirus BHV-1. The PRV-specific IFN-gamma secretion from re-stimulated PBMC showed high levels 6 days after infection, before the presence of serum antibodies, and it persisted at a high level over a 3 months period. The response of a group of eight piglets infected intranasally with PRV varied. Only two animals showed the expected typical fever response. PRV specific IFN-gamma production by PBMC clearly indicated that infection had occurred. Early significant IFN-gamma production by primed PBMC turned out to be a reliable and specific ex vivo marker for cellular response against productive PRV infection in swine before antibody formation.

  2. Different methods of real-time PCR for detection of pseudorabies virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Kymie Vasques Nonaka

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Pseudorabies (PR is a highly contagious viral disease of great animal health and economic importance in swine industry. The aim of this study was to evaluate different genomic regions, real-time PCR chemistries and equipment for the molecular diagnosis of PR. Eight primer pairs targeting four genes (gB, gC, gE, gD, three different qPCR chemistries (SybrGreen, hydrolysis probes and plexor and two equipment (ABI7500, Rotorgene 3000 were evaluated. Oligonucleotides targeting gB using hydrolysis probes showed the best performance after evaluating efficiency (99%, the detection limit (10-1.5 TCID50 mL-1 and diagnostic sensitivity and; therefore, those primers were selected for performance verification factors such as repeatability, reproducibility and robustness (1.39% variance between days, 24% variance between analysts and 4.07% variance in analysis error. The qPCR standardized and validated in this research proved to be reliable for the diagnosis of PR and may be used in diagnostic laboratories that follow ISO 17025 and ISO 16140.

  3. Fluorescence-based monitoring of in vivo neural activity using a circuit-tracing pseudorabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea E Granstedt

    Full Text Available The study of coordinated activity in neuronal circuits has been challenging without a method to simultaneously report activity and connectivity. Here we present the first use of pseudorabies virus (PRV, which spreads through synaptically connected neurons, to express a fluorescent calcium indicator protein and monitor neuronal activity in a living animal. Fluorescence signals were proportional to action potential number and could reliably detect single action potentials in vitro. With two-photon imaging in vivo, we observed both spontaneous and stimulated activity in neurons of infected murine peripheral autonomic submandibular ganglia (SMG. We optically recorded the SMG response in the salivary circuit to direct electrical stimulation of the presynaptic axons and to physiologically relevant sensory stimulation of the oral cavity. During a time window of 48 hours after inoculation, few spontaneous transients occurred. By 72 hours, we identified more frequent and prolonged spontaneous calcium transients, suggestive of neuronal or tissue responses to infection that influence calcium signaling. Our work establishes in vivo investigation of physiological neuronal circuit activity and subsequent effects of infection with single cell resolution.

  4. Immunological surveillance in a pseudorabies quarantined herd using gilts and their progeny as sentinels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P P; Sacks, J M; Yang, P C; Pirtle, E C; Erickson, G A; Beran, G W

    1989-01-01

    Specific pathogen free gilts and their progeny were evaluated to use as sentinels in a pseudorabies virus (PRV) infected herd by immunologically monitoring for PRV seroconversions. Time intervals targeted were pre- and post-PRV vaccinations, herd exposure, and farrowing to finishing. Post-PRV vaccinations, gilts showed low PRV lymphocyte stimulation and humoral responses. Following herd exposure, control gilts PRV seroconverted and PRV vaccinated gilts increased (2 to 4 times) in virus neutralization (VN) titers. Sixty-seven percent (4/6) of the progeny from a control gilt were PRV seropositive at finishing. Progeny from PRV vaccinated gilts were depleted of passive immunity by week 7, and were seronegative until week 9. At finishing 47% (14/30) of them were PRV seropositive indicating exposure to PRV. The VN test was not sensitive enough to detect weak positive serums, noted as positives by latex agglutination (LA) test, ELISA, and Western blots. The gilts and progeny detected PRV, respectively, in the herd housing quarters and in the farrow to finish facilities. A strategy for future sentinel experimental surveillances using primarily the LA test is proposed.

  5. An approach to a FMD vaccine based on genetic engineered attenuated pseudorabies virus: one experiment using VP1 gene alone generates an antibody responds on FMD and pseudorabies in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ping; Li, Xiang-Min; Jin, Mei-Lin; Peng, Gui-Qing; Chen, Huan-Chun

    2004-06-02

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and pseudorabies (PR) are two important infectious diseases in swine. An attenuated pseudorabies virus (PRV) has been successfully used as a gene delivery vector for the development of live-viral vaccines. In this study, a recombinant PRV-VP1 virus was constructed by fusioning the VP1 gene of FMD virus in frame to the N-terminal sequence of the gG gene of PRV. To test the protective immunity, 15 FMDV sero-negative white swine were divided into three groups and immunized with the recombinant PRV-VP1 virus, commercial FMD vaccine and vector virus (TK(-)/gG(-)/LacZ(+)), respectively, and challenged intramuscularly with 20 minimal infecting doses (MID) of virulent type O FMDV 4 weeks after booster immunization. Swine vaccinated with PRV-VP1 acquired antibodies against both FMDV and PRV, however, anti-FMDV antibodies were much lower than those vaccinated with the commercial FMD vaccine. Our results suggested that the recombinant PRV-VP1 virus, which only expressed FMDV VP1 gene controlled by PRV gG promoter, could not protect swine from the challenge of 20 MID type O FMDV, but could delay and reduce the clinical symptoms of FMD.

  6. Cellular Mechanisms of Alpha Herpesvirus Egress: Live Cell Fluorescence Microscopy of Pseudorabies Virus Exocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B.; Bosse, Jens B.; Hu, Jiun-Ruey; Thiberge, Stephan Y.; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2014-01-01

    Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV) particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress. PMID:25474634

  7. Detection of quantitative trait loci for resistance/susceptibility to pseudorabies virus in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Gerald; Melchinger, Elke; Kramarova, Marcela; Pfaff, Eberhardt; Büttner, Matthias; Saalmüller, Armin; Geldermann, Hermann

    2002-01-01

    This study describes genetic differences in resistance/susceptibility to pseudorabies virus (PrV) between European Large White and Chinese Meishan pigs, with a mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) obtained from a genome-wide scan in F(2) animals. Eighty-nine F(2) pigs were challenged intranasally at 12 weeks with 10(5) p.f.u. of the wild-type PrV strain NIA-3. For QTL analysis, 85 microsatellite markers, evenly spaced on the 18 porcine autosomes and on the pseudoautosomal region of the X chromosome, were genotyped. All pigs developed clinical signs, i.e. fever, from 3 to 7 days p.i. The pure-bred Large White pigs, the F(1) and three-quarters of the F(2) animals, but none of the Meishan pigs, developed neurological symptoms and died or were euthanized. QTLs for appearance/non-appearance of neurological symptoms were found on chromosomes 9, 5, 6 and 13. They explained 10.6-17.9% of F(2) phenotypic variance. QTL effects for rectal temperature after PrV challenge were found on chromosomes 2, 4, 8, 10, 11 and 16. Effects on chromosomes 9, 10 and 11 were significant on a genome-wide level. The results present chromosomal regions that are associated with presence/absence of neurological symptoms as well as temperature course after intranasal challenge with NIA-3. The QTLs are in proximity to important candidate genes that are assumed to play crucial roles in host defence against PrV.

  8. Long-term Cre-mediated Retrograde Tagging of Neurons Using a Novel Recombinant Pseudorabies Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassana eOyibo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain regions contain diverse populations of neurons that project to different long-range targets. The study of these subpopulations in circuit function and behavior requires a toolkit to characterize and manipulate their activity in vivo. We have developed a novel set of reagents based on Pseudorabies Virus (PRV for efficient and long-term genetic tagging of neurons based on their projection targets. By deleting IE180, the master transcriptional regulator in the PRV genome, we have produced a mutant virus capable of infection and transgene expression in neurons but unable to replicate in or spread from those neurons. IE180-null mutants showed no cytotoxicity, and infected neurons exhibited normal physiological function more than 45 days after infection, indicating the utility of these engineered viruses for chronic experiments. To enable rapid and convenient construction of novel IE180-null recombinants, we engineered a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC shuttle-vector system for moving new constructs into the PRV IE180-null genome. Using this system we generated an IE180-null recombinant virus expressing the site-specific recombinase Cre. This Cre-expressing virus (PRV-hSyn-Cre efficiently and robustly infects neurons in vivo and activates transgene expression from Cre-dependent vectors in local and retrograde projecting populations of neurons in the mouse. We also generated an assortment of recombinant viruses expressing fluorescent proteins (mCherry, EGFP, ECFP. These viruses exhibit long-term labeling of neurons in vitro but transient labeling in vivo. Together these novel IE180-null PRV reagents expand the toolkit for targeted gene expression in the brain, facilitating functional dissection of neuronal circuits in vivo.

  9. Cellular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress: live cell fluorescence microscopy of pseudorabies virus exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian B Hogue

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Egress of newly assembled herpesvirus particles from infected cells is a highly dynamic process involving the host secretory pathway working in concert with viral components. To elucidate the location, dynamics, and molecular mechanisms of alpha herpesvirus egress, we developed a live-cell fluorescence microscopy method to visualize the final transport and exocytosis of pseudorabies virus (PRV particles in non-polarized epithelial cells. This method is based on total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy to selectively image fluorescent virus particles near the plasma membrane, and takes advantage of a virus-encoded pH-sensitive probe to visualize the precise moment and location of particle exocytosis. We performed single-particle tracking and mean squared displacement analysis to characterize particle motion, and imaged a panel of cellular proteins to identify those spatially and dynamically associated with viral exocytosis. Based on our data, individual virus particles travel to the plasma membrane inside small, acidified secretory vesicles. Rab GTPases, Rab6a, Rab8a, and Rab11a, key regulators of the plasma membrane-directed secretory pathway, are present on the virus secretory vesicle. These vesicles undergo fast, directional transport directly to the site of exocytosis, which is most frequently near patches of LL5β, part of a complex that anchors microtubules to the plasma membrane. Vesicles are tightly docked at the site of exocytosis for several seconds, and membrane fusion occurs, displacing the virion a small distance across the plasma membrane. After exocytosis, particles remain tightly confined on the outer cell surface. Based on recent reports in the cell biological and alpha herpesvirus literature, combined with our spatial and dynamic data on viral egress, we propose an integrated model that links together the intracellular transport pathways and exocytosis mechanisms that mediate alpha herpesvirus egress.

  10. Antiviral activities of 2,6-diaminopurine-based acyclic nucleoside phosphonates against herpesviruses: In vitro study results with pseudorabies virus (PrV, SuHV-1)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zouharová, D.; Lipenská, I.; Fojtiková, M.; Kulich, P.; Neca, J.; Slaný, M.; Kovařčík, K.; Turanek-Knotigová, P.; Hubatka, F.; Celechovská, H.; Mašek, J.; Koudelka, Š.; Procházka, L.; Eyer, L.; Plocková, J.; Bartheldyová, E.; Miller, A. D.; Růžek, Daniel; Raška, M.; Janeba, Zlatko; Turánek, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 184, FEB 29 (2016), s. 84-93 ISSN 0378-1135 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388963 Keywords : Pseudorabies * Acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * DNA viruses * Cidofovir * Antiviral drugs * DNA polymerase Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; CC - Organic Chemistry (UOCHB-X) Impact factor: 2.628, year: 2016

  11. A mouse model to study immunity against pseudorabies virus infection: Significance of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bianchi, A.T.J.; Moonen-Leusen, H.W.M.; Milligen, van F.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Zwart, R.J.; Kimman, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we firstly established a vaccination/challenge model to study pseudorabies virus infection in mice. The mouse model was used to investigate the significance of CD4 and CD8 cells and of IFN production in protective immunity. Functional depletion of CD4 and CD8 and IFN was obtained in

  12. Highly Efficient CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Homologous Recombination Promotes the Rapid Generation of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes of Pseudorabies Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin-Chao; Tang, Yan-Dong; Zhao, Kuan; Wang, Tong-Yun; Liu, Ji-Ting; Gao, Jia-Cong; Chang, Xiao-Bo; Cui, Hong-Yu; Tian, Zhi-Jun; Cai, Xue-Hui; An, Tong-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) are powerful tools for the manipulation of the large genomes of DNA viruses, such as herpesviruses. However, the methods currently used to construct the recombinant viruses, an important intermediate link in the generation of BACs, involve the laborious process of multiple plaque purifications. Moreover, some fastidious viruses may be lost or damaged during these processes, making it impossible to generate BACs from these large-genome DNA viruses. Here, we introduce the CRISPR/Cas9 as a site-specific gene knock-in instrument that promotes the homologs recombination of a linearized transfer vector and the Pseudorabies virus genome through double incisions. The efficiency of recombination is as high as 86%. To our knowledge, this is the highest efficiency ever reported for Pseudorabies virus recombination. We also demonstrate that the positions and distances of the CRISPR/Cas9 single guide RNAs from the homology arms correlate with the efficiency of homologous recombination. Our work show a simple and fast cloning method of BACs with large genome inserted by greatly enhancing the HR efficiencies through CRISPR/Cas9-mediated homology-directed repair mechanism, and this method could be of helpful for manipulating large DNA viruses, and will provide a successful model for insertion of large DNA fragments into other viruses.

  13. Placebo-controlled evaluation of a modified life virus vaccine against feline infectious peritonitis: safety and efficacy under field conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horzinek, M.C.; Fehr, D.; Holznagel, E.; Bolla, S.; Hauser, B.; Herrewegh, A.A.; Lutz, Hans

    1997-01-01

    A modified live virus vaccine against feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) was evaluated in a double blind, placebo-controlled field trial in two high-risk populations. The vaccine was found to be safe and efficacious in one population of cats that had low antibody titre against feline coronavirus

  14. Functional Carboxy-Terminal Fluorescent Protein Fusion to Pseudorabies Virus Small Capsid Protein VP26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Ian B; Jean, Jolie; Esteves, Andrew D; Tanneti, Nikhila S; Scherer, Julian; Enquist, Lynn W

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescent protein fusions to herpesvirus capsids have proven to be a valuable method to study virus particle transport in living cells. Fluorescent protein fusions to the amino terminus of small capsid protein VP26 are the most widely used method to visualize pseudorabies virus (PRV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) particles in living cells. However, these fusion proteins do not incorporate to full occupancy and have modest effects on virus replication and pathogenesis. Recent cryoelectron microscopy studies have revealed that herpesvirus small capsid proteins bind to capsids via their amino terminus, whereas the carboxy terminus is unstructured and therefore may better tolerate fluorescent protein fusions. Here, we describe a new recombinant PRV expressing a carboxy-terminal VP26-mCherry fusion. Compared to previously characterized viruses expressing amino-terminal fusions, this virus expresses more VP26 fusion protein in infected cells and incorporates more VP26 fusion protein into virus particles, and individual virus particles exhibit brighter red fluorescence. We performed single-particle tracking of fluorescent virus particles in primary neurons to measure anterograde and retrograde axonal transport, demonstrating the usefulness of this novel VP26-mCherry fusion for the study of viral intracellular transport.IMPORTANCE Alphaherpesviruses are among the very few viruses that are adapted to invade the mammalian nervous system. Intracellular transport of virus particles in neurons is important, as this process underlies both mild peripheral nervous system infection and severe spread to the central nervous system. VP26, the small capsid protein of HSV and PRV, was one of the first herpesvirus proteins to be fused to a fluorescent protein. Since then, these capsid-tagged virus mutants have become a powerful tool to visualize and track individual virus particles. Improved capsid tags will facilitate fluorescence microscopy studies of virus particle intracellular

  15. An alphavirus vector-based tetravalent dengue vaccine induces a rapid and protective immune response in macaques that differs qualitatively from immunity induced by live virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Laura J; Sariol, Carlos A; Mattocks, Melissa D; Wahala M P B, Wahala; Yingsiwaphat, Vorraphun; Collier, Martha L; Whitley, Jill; Mikkelsen, Rochelle; Rodriguez, Idia V; Martinez, Melween I; de Silva, Aravinda; Johnston, Robert E

    2013-03-01

    Despite many years of research, a dengue vaccine is not available, and the more advanced live attenuated vaccine candidate in clinical trials requires multiple immunizations with long interdose periods and provides low protective efficacy. Here, we report important contributions to the development of a second-generation dengue vaccine. First, we demonstrate that a nonpropagating vaccine vector based on Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus replicon particles (VRP) expressing two configurations of dengue virus E antigen (subviral particles [prME] and soluble E dimers [E85]) successfully immunized and protected macaques against dengue virus, while antivector antibodies did not interfere with a booster immunization. Second, compared to prME-VRP, E85-VRP induced neutralizing antibodies faster, to higher titers, and with improved protective efficacy. Third, this study is the first to map antigenic domains and specificities targeted by vaccination versus natural infection, revealing that, unlike prME-VRP and live virus, E85-VRP induced only serotype-specific antibodies, which predominantly targeted EDIII, suggesting a protective mechanism different from that induced by live virus and possibly live attenuated vaccines. Fourth, a tetravalent E85-VRP dengue vaccine induced a simultaneous and protective response to all 4 serotypes after 2 doses given 6 weeks apart. Balanced responses and protection in macaques provided further support for exploring the immunogenicity and safety of this vaccine candidate in humans.

  16. Genomic and antigenic characterization of bovine parainfluenza-3 viruses in the United States including modified live virus vaccine (MLV) strains and field strains from cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, R W; Neill, J D; Saliki, J T; Landis, C; Burge, L J; Payton, M E

    2017-05-02

    This study investigated the genetic and antigenic characterization of parainfluenza-3 virus (PI3V) of cattle. Using molecular tests including real time PCR and viral genome sequencing, PI3V strains could be separated into PI3V types, including PI3V A, PI3V B, and PI3V C. Isolates from cattle with bovine respiratory disease clinical signs and commercial vaccines in the U.S. with MLV PI3V were typed using these molecular tests. All the MLV vaccine strains tested were PI3V A. In most cases PI3V field strains from calves receiving MLV vaccines were types heterologous to the vaccine type A. Also antigenic differences were noted as PI3V C strains had lower antibody levels than PI3V A in serums from cattle receiving MLV PI3V A vaccines. This study further demonstrates there is genetic variability of U.S. PI3V strains and also antigenic variability. In addition, isolates from cattle with BRD signs and receiving MLV vaccines may have heterologous types to the vaccines, and molecular tests should be performed to differentiate field from vaccine strains. Potentially the efficacy of current PI3V A vaccines should be evaluated with other types such a PI3V B and PI3V C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Efficacy and safety of simultaneous vaccination with two modified live virus vaccines against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus types 1 and 2 in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Charlotte S.; Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Pawlowski, Maciej

    2018-01-01

    The objective of the study was to compare responses of pigs vaccinated with a PRRS MLV vaccine against PRRSV-1 or PRRSV-2 with the responses of pigs vaccinated simultaneously with both vaccines. Furthermore, the efficacy of the two PRRSV MLV vaccination strategies was assessed following challenge...

  18. Effect of West Nile virus DNA-plasmid vaccination on response to live virus challenge in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redig, Patrick T; Tully, Thomas N; Ritchie, Branson W; Roy, Alma F; Baudena, M Alexandra; Chang, Gwong-Jen J

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of an experimental adjuvanted DNA-plasmid vaccine against West Nile virus (WNV) in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). 19 permanently disabled but otherwise healthy red-tailed hawks of mixed ages and both sexes without detectable serum antibodies against WNV. Hawks were injected IM with an experimental WNV DNA-plasmid vaccine in an aluminum-phosphate adjuvant (n = 14) or with the adjuvant only (control group; 5). All birds received 2 injections at a 3-week interval. Blood samples for serologic evaluation were collected before the first injection and 4 weeks after the second injection (day 0). At day 0, hawks were injected SC with live WNV. Pre- and postchallenge blood samples were collected at intervals for 14 days for assessment of viremia and antibody determination; oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs were collected for assessment of viral shedding. Vaccination was not associated with morbidity or deaths. Three of the vaccinated birds seroconverted after the second vaccine injection; all other birds seroconverted following the live virus injection. Vaccinated birds had significantly less severe viremia and shorter and less-intense shedding periods, compared with the control birds. Use of the WNV DNA-plasmid vaccine in red-tailed hawks was safe, and vaccination attenuated but did not eliminate both the viremia and the intensity of postchallenge shedding following live virus exposure. Further research is warranted to conclusively determine the efficacy of this vaccine preparation for protection of red-tailed hawks and other avian species against WNV-induced disease.

  19. Evaluation of the impact of ul54 gene-deletion on the global transcription and DNA replication of pseudorabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csabai, Zsolt; Takács, Irma F; Snyder, Michael; Boldogkői, Zsolt; Tombácz, Dóra

    2017-09-01

    Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is an animal alphaherpesvirus with a wide host range. PRV has 67 protein-coding genes and several non-coding RNA molecules, which can be classified into three temporal groups, immediate early, early and late classes. The ul54 gene of PRV and its homolog icp27 of herpes simplex virus have a multitude of functions, including the regulation of viral DNA synthesis and the control of the gene expression. Therefore, abrogation of PRV ul54 function was expected to exert a significant effect on the global transcriptome and on DNA replication. Real-time PCR and real-time RT-PCR platforms were used to investigate these presumed effects. Our analyses revealed a drastic impact of the ul54 mutation on the genome-wide expression of PRV genes, especially on the transcription of the true late genes. A more than two hour delay was observed in the onset of DNA replication, and the amount of synthesized DNA molecules was significantly decreased in comparison to the wild-type virus. Furthermore, in this work, we were able to successfully demonstrate the utility of long-read SMRT sequencing for genotyping of mutant viruses.

  20. [Construction of an infectious clone of pseudorabies virus strain ZJ genome maintained as a bacterial artificial chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Wen-Ling; Yin, Long-Bo; Ye, Wei-Cheng; Sun, Xue-Qiang; Yao, Huo-Chun; Zhang, Miao-Tao; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Zhang, Cun

    2010-07-01

    pHA2 plasmid sequence,with Bacterial Artificial Chromosome(BAC) vector and the GFP expression cassette, was introduced into the UL23(TK) gene of Pseudorabies virus(PRV)strain ZJ by homologous recombination,and the recombinant PRV (rPRV-HA2) was confirmed and isolated by plaque purification. The circular genome of rPRV-HA2 was electroporated into Escherichia coli strain DH10B and then the PRV BAC (pPRV) was recovered. The transfection of pPRV into VeroE6 cells resulted in productive infection. The rescued virus isolated following transfection was indistinguishable from rPRV-HA2 in cytopathic effects (CPE) and replication curve in vitro. The growth kinetics of the viruses indicated that partial deletion of TK gene and BAC vector insertion had no effect on the viral titre and plaque size in vitro. The PRV BAC system will enable quick and reliable manipulation of the viral genome for the functional investigation on the PRV genes and the development of PRV vector in vaccine.

  1. New model cell systems (PK and XTC-2) for studying acute and persistent infections with herpes simplex and pseudorabies viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szántó, J; Lesso, J; Golais, F

    1980-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) showed limited replication in PK (pig kidney) and XTC-2 (Xenopus laevis frog) cell lines. Virus replication depended on the multiplicity of infection (MOI). At a high MOI, HSV-1 caused a typical cytopathic effect (CPE) in XTC-2 cells but a little marked CPE in PK cells. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) replicated intensively in PK cells (permissive system) but not in XTC-2 cells (nonpermissive system). Both viruses were adsorbed on to PK and XTC-2 cells. In infected PK cells, fluorescent HSV-1 antigen was demonstrated only in the vicinity of the nuclear membrane and in the paranuclear area of the cytoplasm but not in the nuclei. In XTC-2 cells, HSV-1 antigen was demonstrated also in the nuclei. Persistent HSV-1 infection was induced in PK but not in XTC-2 cells; it was of limited duration. PK cells which had lost HSV-1 multiplied further and proved susceptible to infection with HSV-1 or PRV.

  2. Insertions in the gG Gene of Pseudorabies Virus Reduce Expression of the Upstream Us3 Protein and Inhibit Cell-to-Cell Spread of Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Demmin, Gretchen L.; Clase, Amanda C.; Randall, Jessica A.; Enquist, L.W.; Banfield, Bruce W.

    2001-01-01

    The alphaherpesvirus Us4 gene encodes glycoprotein G (gG), which is conserved in most viruses of the alphaherpesvirus subfamily. In the swine pathogen pseudorabies virus (PRV), mutant viruses with internal deletions and insertions in the gG gene have shown no discernible phenotypes. We report that insertions in the gG locus of the attenuated PRV strain Bartha show reduced virulence in vivo and are defective in their ability to spread from cell to cell in a cell-type-specific manner. Similar i...

  3. Detection of pseudorabies virus DNA in the inner ear of intranasally infected BALB/c mice with nucleic acid hybridization in situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falser, N.; Bandtlow, I.; Haus, M.; Wolf, H.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence for the pathogenicity of pseudorabies virus for the auditory and vestibular organs of experimentally infected mice is presented. The authors demonstrate viral genomes in cells of the peripheral sensory organs, the nerve structures, and the affected areas of the brain in single sections from an entire cranium of an adult mouse. The data were obtained by an in situ hybridization technique adapted for use with fixed, plastic-embedded materials using /sup 3/H and /sup 125/I-labeled EBV. In contrast to conventional methods which use frozen sections, they were able to analyze cartilaginous and bony materials with high resolution.

  4. Characterization of a replication-incompetent pseudorabies virus mutant lacking the sole immediate early gene IE180.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Brendan W; Engel, Esteban A; Enquist, Lynn W

    2014-11-11

    The alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) encodes a single immediate early gene called IE180. The IE180 protein is a potent transcriptional activator of viral genes involved in DNA replication and RNA transcription. A PRV mutant with both copies of IE180 deleted was constructed 20 years ago (S. Yamada and M. Shimizu, Virology 199:366-375, 1994, doi:10.1006/viro.1994.1134), but propagation of the mutant depended on complementing cell lines that expressed the toxic IE180 protein constitutively. Recently, Oyibo et al. constructed a novel set of PRV IE180 mutants and a stable cell line with inducible IE180 expression (H. Oyibo, P. Znamenskiy, H. V. Oviedo, L. W. Enquist, A. Zador, Front. Neuroanat. 8:86, 2014, doi:10.3389/fnana.2014.00086), which we characterized further here. These mutants failed to replicate new viral genomes, synthesize immediate early, early, or late viral proteins, and assemble infectious virions. The PRV IE180-null mutant did not form plaques in epithelial cell monolayers and could not spread from primary infected neurons to second-order neurons in culture. PRV IE180-null mutants lacked the property of superinfection exclusion. When PRV IE180-null mutants infected cells first, subsequent superinfecting viruses were not blocked in cell entry and formed replication compartments in epithelial cells, fibroblasts, and neurons. Cells infected with PRV IE180-null mutants survived as long as uninfected cells in culture while expressing a fluorescent reporter gene. Transcomplementation with IE180 in epithelial cells restored all mutant phenotypes to wild type. The conditional expression of PRV IE180 protein enables the propagation of replication-incompetent PRV IE180-null mutants and will facilitate construction of long-term single-cell-infecting PRV mutants for precise neural circuit tracing and high-capacity gene delivery vectors. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is widely used for neural tracing in animal models. The virus replicates and spreads between

  5. Ceftiofur hydrochloride affects the humoral and cellular immune response in pigs after vaccination against swine influenza and pseudorabies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Czyżewska-Dors, Ewelina; Kwit, Krzysztof; Wierzchosławski, Karol; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2015-10-22

    Cephalosporins are a class of antibiotics that are active against many Gram-positive and some Gram-negative bacteria. Beyond their antibacterial activity, they are reported to have various immunomodulatory properties. It has been shown that they reduce the secretion of cytokines as well as influence the humoral and cellular immune response. In the field conditions antibiotics are frequently administered at the same time as vaccines in pigs and, in the view of their potential immunomodulatory properties, it is important to examine their effect on the development and persistence of the post-vaccinal immune response. Ceftiofur is a very popular veterinary medicine third-generation cephalosporin with a broad spectrum of activity. It has been shown that it can inhibit cytokines secretion and in this way can potentially affect host immune response. The influence of ceftiofur on the immune response has not yet been investigated in pigs. In the present study we evaluated the influence of therapeutic doses of ceftiofur hydrochloride on the post-vaccinal immune response after vaccination with two model vaccines (live and inactivated). Seventy pigs were divided into five groups: control, unvaccinated (C), control vaccinated against swine influenza (SI-V), control vaccinated against pseudorabies (PR-V), vaccinated against SI during ceftiofur administration (SI-CEF) and vaccinated against PR during ceftiofur administration (PR-CEF). Pigs from SICEF and PR-CEF groups received therapeutic dose of ceftiofur for five days. Pigs from SI-CEF, PR-CEF, SIV and PR-V groups were vaccinated against SI and PR. Antibodies to PRV were determined with the use of blocking ELISA tests (IDEXX Laboratories, USA). Humoral responses to SIV were assessed based on haemagglutination inhibition assay. T-cell response was analyzed with the use of proliferation test. The concentrations of IFN- γ and IL-4 in culture supernatant were determined with the use of ELISA kits Invitrogen Corporation, USA). The

  6. Targeting the pseudorabies virus DNA polymerase processivity factor UL42 by RNA interference efficiently inhibits viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Ping; Huang, Li-Ping; Du, Wen-Juan; Wei, Yan-Wu; Wu, Hong-Li; Feng, Li; Liu, Chang-Ming

    2016-08-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved gene-silencing mechanism in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) induce the sequence-specific degradation of homologous RNAs. It has been shown to be a novel and effective antiviral therapy against a wide range of viruses. The pseudorabies virus (PRV) processivity factor UL42 can enhance the catalytic activity of the DNA polymerase and is essential for viral replication, thus it may represent a potential drug target of antiviral therapy against PRV infection. Here, we synthesized three siRNAs (siR-386, siR-517, and siR-849) directed against UL42 and determined their antiviral activities in cell culture. We first examined the kinetics of UL42 expression and found it was expressed with early kinetics during PRV replication. We verified that siR-386, siR-517, and siR-849 efficiently inhibited UL42 expression in an in vitro transfection system, thereby validating their inhibitory effects. Furthermore, we confirmed that these three siRNAs induced potent inhibitory effects on UL42 expression after PRV infection, comparable to the positive control siRNA, siR-1046, directed against the PRV DNA polymerase, the UL30 gene product, which is essential for virus replication. In addition, PRV replication was markedly reduced upon downregulation of UL42 expression. These results indicate that UL42-targeted RNAi efficiently inhibits target gene expression and impairs viral replication. This study provides a new clue for the design of an intervention strategy against herpesviruses by targeting their processivity factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Construction and immune efficacy of recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing PrM-E proteins of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype І.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Ping; Zhi, Xianwei; Wang, Bo; Zhang, Huawei; Chen, Huanchun; Li, Xiangmin

    2015-12-10

    Japanese encephalitis (JE) is an arboviral disease with high case fatality rates and neurologic or psychiatric sequelae among survivors in Asia, western Pacific countries and northern Australia. Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the cause of JE and the emergence of genotype І (GI) JEV has displaced genotype III (GIII) as the dominant strains circulating in some Asian regions. The currently available JE vaccines are safe and effective in preventing this disease, but they are developed based on the GIII JEV strains. The recombinant virus PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) which expressed the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) proteins of JEV SX09S-01 strain (genotype I, GI) was constructed by homologous recombination between the genome of PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/LacZ(+) digested with EcoRI and plasmid pIE-CAG-PrM-E-BGH. Expression of JEV PrM and E proteins was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Immune efficacy of PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) was further evaluated in mouse model. A recombinant pseudorabies virus (PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+)) was successfully constructed. Mice experiments showed that PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) could induce a high level of ELISA antibodies against PRV and JEV, as well as high titer of PRV neutralizing antibodies. After challenge with 1 × 10(7) PFU virulent JEV SX09S-01 strain, the time of death was delayed and the survival rate was improved in PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) vaccinated mice. PRV TK(-)/gE(-)/PrM-E(+) is a potential vaccine candidate against PRV and JEV GI infection in the future.

  8. Assembly of pseudorabies virus genome-based transfer vehicle carrying major antigen sites of S gene of transmissible gastroenteritis virus: potential perspective for developing live vector vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jiechao; Ren, Xiaofeng; Tian, Zhijun; Li, Yijing

    2007-03-01

    Two severe porcine infectious diseases, pseudorabies (PR) and transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) caused by pseudorabies virus (PRV) and transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) respectively often result in serious economic loss in animal husbandry worldwide. Vaccination is the important prevention means against both infections. To achieve a PRV genome-based virus live vector, aiming at further TGEV/PRV bivalent vaccine development, a recombinant plasmid pUG was constructed via inserting partial PK and full-length gG genes of PRV strain Bartha K-61 amplified into pUC119 vector. In parallel, another recombinant pHS was generated by introducing a fragment designated S1 encoding the major antigen sites of S gene from TGEV strain TH-98 into a prokaryotic expression vector pP(RO)EX HTc. The SV40 polyA sequence was then inserted into the downstream of S1 fragment of pHS. The continuous region containing S1fragment, SV40 polyA and four single restriction enzyme sites digested from pHS was subcloned into the downstream of gG promoter of pUG. In addition, a LacZ reporter gene was introduced into the universal transfer vector named pUGS-LacZ. Subsequently, a PRV genome-based virus live vector was generated via homologous recombination. The functionally effective vector was purified and partially characterized. Moreover, the potential advantages of this system are discussed.

  9. Improved immune response to an attenuated pseudorabies virus vaccine by ginseng stem-leaf saponins (GSLS) in combination with thimerosal (TS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jingxuan; Bi, Shicheng; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Cenrong; Lu, Yisong; Zhai, Lijuan; Hu, Songhua

    2016-08-01

    Vaccination using attenuated vaccines remains an important method to control animal infectious diseases. The present study evaluated ginseng stem-leaf saponins (GSLS) and thimerosal (TS) for their adjuvant effect on an attenuated pseudorabies virus (aPrV) vaccine in mice. Compared to the group immunized with aPrV alone, the co-inoculation of GSLS and/or TS induced a higher antibody response. Particularly, when administered together with GSLS-TS, the aPrV vaccine provoked a higher serum gB-specific antibody, IgG1 and IgG2a levels, lymphocyte proliferative responses, as well as production of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-12, IL-5 and IL-10) from lymphocytes, and more importantly provided an enhanced cytotoxicity of NK cells and protection against virulent field pseudorabies virus challenge. Additionally, the increased expression of miR-132, miR-146a, miR-147 and miR-155 was found in murine macrophages cultured with GSLS and/or TS. These data suggest that GSLS-TS as adjuvant improve the efficacy of aPrV vaccine in mouse model and have potential for the development of attenuated viral vaccines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Whole-genome analysis of pseudorabies virus gene expression by real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovszki Pál

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudorabies virus (PRV, a neurotropic herpesvirus of pigs, serves as an excellent model system with which to investigate the herpesvirus life cycle both in cultured cells and in vivo. Real-time RT-PCR is a very sensitive, accurate and reproducible technique that can be used to detect very small amounts of RNA molecules, and it can therefore be applied for analysis of the expression of herpesvirus genes from the very early period of infection. Results In this study, we have developed and applied a quantitative reverse transcriptase-based real-time PCR technique in order to profile transcription from the whole genome of PRV after lytic infection in porcine kidney cells. We calculated the relative expression ratios in a novel way, which allowed us to compare different PRV genes with respect to their expression dynamics, and to divide the PRV genes into distinct kinetic classes. This is the first publication on the whole-genome analysis of the gene expression of an alpha-herpesvirus by qRT2-PCR. We additionally established the kinetic properties of uncharacterized PRV genes and revised or confirmed data on PRV genes earlier examined by traditional methods such as Northern blot analysis. Our investigations revealed that genes with the same expression properties form clusters on the PRV genome: nested overlapping genes belong in the same kinetic class, while most convergent genes belong in different kinetic classes. Further, we detected inverse relationships as concerns the expressions of EP0 and IE180 mRNAs and their antisense partners. Conclusion Most (if not all PRV genes begin to be expressed from the onset of viral expression. No sharp boundary was found between the groups of early and late genes classified on the basis of their requirement for viral DNA synthesis. The expressions of the PRV genes were analyzed, categorized and compared by qRT2-PCR assay, with the average of the minimum cycle threshold used as a control for

  11. Live viruses to treat cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Oliver; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Pandha, Hardev

    2013-08-01

    Viruses that selectively replicate in cancer cells, leading to the death of the cell, are being studied for their potential as cancer therapies. Some of these viruses are naturally occurring but cause little if any illness in humans; others have been engineered to make them specifically able to kill cancer cells while sparing normal cells. These oncolytic viruses may be selective for cancer cells because viral receptors are over-expressed on the surface of cancer cells or because antiviral pathways are distorted in cancer cells. Additionally, when oncolytic viruses kill cancer cells, it can stimulate an antitumour immune response from the host that can enhance efficacy. Numerous early phase trials of at least six oncolytic viruses have been reported with no evidence of concerning toxicity either as single agents or in combination with chemotherapies and radiotherapy. Three oncolytic viruses have reached randomized testing in cancer patients; reolysin in head and neck cancer and JX594 in hepatocellular cancers, while results from the first-phase III trial of T-vec in metastatic melanoma are expected shortly.

  12. Pseudorabies Virus US3 Protein Kinase Protects Infected Cells from NK Cell-Mediated Lysis via Increased Binding of the Inhibitory NK Cell Receptor CD300a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwet, K; Vitale, M; De Pelsmaeker, S; Jacob, T; Laval, K; Moretta, L; Parodi, M; Parolini, S; Cantoni, C; Favoreel, H W

    2015-11-18

    Several reports have indicated that natural killer (NK) cells are of particular importance in the innate response against herpesvirus infections. As a consequence, herpesviruses have developed diverse mechanisms for evading NK cells, although few such mechanisms have been identified for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. The antiviral activity of NK cells is regulated by a complex array of interactions between activating/inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface and the corresponding ligands on the surfaces of virus-infected cells. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties: it triggers the binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a to the surface of the infected cell, thereby providing increased CD300a-mediated protection of infected cells against NK cell-mediated lysis. US3-mediated CD300a binding was found to depend on aminophospholipid ligands of CD300a and on group I p21-activated kinases. These data identify a novel alphaherpesvirus strategy for evading NK cells and demonstrate, for the first time, a role for CD300a in regulating NK cell activity upon contact with virus-infected target cells. Herpesviruses have developed fascinating mechanisms to evade elimination by key elements of the host immune system, contributing to their ability to cause lifelong infections with recurrent reactivation events. Natural killer (NK) cells are central in the innate antiviral response. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus displays a previously uncharacterized capacity for evasion of NK cells. Expression of US3 protects infected cells from NK cell-mediated lysis via increased binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a. We show that this US3-mediated increase in CD300a binding depends on aminophospholipids and on cellular p21-activated kinases (PAKs). The identification of this

  13. Development of a rapid, simple, and specific real-time PCR assay for detection of pseudorabies viral DNA in domestic swine herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Katherine A; Bigelow, Troy; Koster, Leo G; Swenson, Sabrina; Bounds, Courtney; Hernández, Felipe; Wisely, Samantha M

    2017-07-01

    Despite successful eradication of pseudorabies virus (PRV) from the commercial pig industry in the United States in 2004, large populations of feral swine in certain regions act as wildlife reservoirs for the virus. Given the threat of reintroduction of the virus into domestic herds, a rapid, reliable, easily implemented assay is needed for detection of PRV. Although a real-time PCR (rtPCR) assay exists, improvements in rtPCR technology and a greater understanding of the diversity of PRV strains worldwide require an assay that would be easier to implement, more cost effective, and more specific. We developed a single-tube, rapid rtPCR that is capable of detecting 10 copies of PRV glycoprotein B ( gB) DNA per 20-µL total volume reaction. The assay did not produce a false-positive in samples known to be negative for the virus. The assay was negative for genetically similar herpesviruses and other porcine viruses. Our assay is a highly specific and sensitive assay that is also highly repeatable and reproducible. The assay should be a useful tool for early detection of PRV in pigs in the case of a suspected introduction or outbreak situation.

  14. Identification and Analysis of Novel Viral and Host Dysregulated MicroRNAs in Variant Pseudorabies Virus-Infected PK15 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Liu

    Full Text Available Pseudorabies (PR is one of the most devastating diseases in the pig industry. To identify changes in microRNA (miRNA expression and post-transcriptional regulatory responses to PRV infection in porcine kidney epithelial (PK15 cells, we sequenced a small RNA (sRNA library prepared from infected PK15 cells and compared it to a library prepared from uninfected cells using Illumina deep sequencing. Here we found 25 novel viral miRNAs by high-throughput sequencing and 20 of these miRNAs were confirmed through stem-loop RT-qPCR. Intriguingly, unlike the usual miRNAs encoded by the α-herpesviruses, which are found clustered in the large latency transcript (LLT, these novel viral miRNAs are throughout the PRV genome like β-herpesviruses. Viral miRNAs are predicted to target multiple genes and form a complex regulatory network. GO analysis on host targets of viral miRNAs were involved in complex cellular processes, including the metabolic pathway, biological regulation, stimulus response, signaling process and immune response. Moreover, 13 host miRNAs were expressed with significant difference after infection with PRV: 8 miRNAs were up-regulated and 5 miRNAs were down-regulated, which may affect viral replication in host cell. Our results provided new insight into the characteristic of miRNAs in response to PRV infection, which is significant for further study of these miRNAs function.

  15. Evaluation of humoral and antigen-specific T-cell responses after vaccination of pigs against pseudorabies in the presence of maternal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2010-08-26

    In this study the influence of maternal immunity against pseudorabies virus (PRV) on the development of humoral and T-cell mediated immune (CMI) responses was investigated under the experimental condition. Pigs born to immune sows were vaccinated with gE-deleted vaccine according to five different schedules. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), collected after vaccination, were used for PRV-induced lymphocyte proliferation assay (LPA). Antibodies to the gB and gE of PRV in serum were determined using ELISA kits. Maternally derived antibodies (MDA) in the serum of unvaccinated piglets born to immune sows were above the level considered to be positive until about 10-11 weeks of life. The active humoral as well as CMI responses was the highest in group vaccinated at 10 and 14 weeks of age. The results of this study suggest that MDA may disturb or even block development of active humoral response. Early priming of T-cells with attenuated gE-deleted PRV vaccine in the presence of MDA could be successful, but obtaining a long-term cellular immunity at least one booster is required. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The protective immune response against Pseudorabies virus induced by DNA vaccination is impaired if the plasmid harbors a functional Porcine circovirus type 2 rep and origin of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurez, Florence; Grasland, Béatrice; Béven, Véronique; Cariolet, Roland; Keranflec'h, André; Henry, Aurélie; Jestin, André; Dory, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    A plasmid rendered replicative in mammalian cells by inserting the Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) origin of replication and replicase gene (Ori-rep) has been previously constructed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if the replication capacity of this plasmid could be advantageously used to improve the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination. In this case we used the porcine Pseudorabies virus (PrV) DNA vaccination model. The replicative capacity of the DNA vaccine did not improve the protective immunity against PrV in pigs, but on the contrary the presence of the PCV2 Ori-rep sequence was harmful in the induction of this immunity compared to an equivalent but non-replicative DNA vaccine. In addition, the distribution and the persistence of the replicative and non-replicative plasmids inside the body were the same. This is the first study showing an in vivo deleterious effect of the replicative active PCV2 Ori-rep on the natural and specific protection against PrV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA vaccination of neonate piglets in the face of maternal immunity induces humoral memory and protection against a virulent pseudorabies virus challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Laurent; Barzu, Simona; Andreoni, Christine; Buisson, Nathalie; Brun, André; Audonnet, Jean Christophe

    2003-04-02

    DNA vaccination represents a unique opportunity to overcome the limitations of conventional vaccine strategy in early life in the face of maternal-derived immunity. We used the model of pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection in pigs to further explore the potential of DNA vaccination in piglets born to sows repeatedly vaccinated with a PRV inactivated vaccine. A single immunisation of 8-week-old piglets with a DNA vaccine expressing secreted forms of PRV gB, gC, and gD, triggered an active serological response, confirming that DNA vaccination can over-ride significant residual maternal-derived immunity. A clear anamnestic response was evidenced when a secondary DNA vaccination was performed at 11 weeks of age, suggesting that DNA vaccination, performed in the face of passive immunity, elicited a strong humoral memory. We subsequently explored the potential of DNA vaccination in neonate piglets (5-6 days of age) in the face of very high titres of maternal antibodies and demonstrated that very high titres of passive antibodies selectively inhibited serological responses but not the establishment of potent memory responses. Finally, we demonstrated that DNA vaccination provided protection against an infectious PRV challenge at the end of the fattening period (i.e. at approximately 5 months of age). Collectively, our results pave the way for a new flexible vaccination program, which could ensure uninterrupted protection of fattening pigs over their entire economical life under field conditions.

  18. Modified cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  19. Motor-coordination-dependent learning, more than others, is impaired in transgenic mice expressing pseudorabies virus immediate-early protein IE180.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C López-Ramos

    Full Text Available The cerebellum in transgenic mice expressing pseudorabies virus immediate-early protein IE180 (TgIE96 was substantially diminished in size, and its histoarchitecture was severely disorganized, resulting in severe ataxia. TgIE96 mice can therefore be used as an experimental model to study the involvement of cerebellar circuits in different learning tasks. The performance of three-month-old TgIE96 mice was studied in various behavioral tests, including associative learning (classical eyeblink conditioning, object recognition, spatial orientation (water maze, startle response and prepulse inhibition, and passive avoidance, and compared with that of wild-type mice. Wild-type and TgIE96 mice presented similar reflexively evoked eyeblinks, and acquired classical conditioned eyelid responses with similar learning curves for both trace and delay conditioning paradigms. The two groups of mice also had similar performances during the object recognition test. However, they showed significant differences for the other three tests included in this study. Although both groups of animals were capable of swimming, TgIE96 mice failed to learn the water maze task during the allowed time. The startle response to a severe tone was similar in both control and TgIE96 mice, but the latter were unable to produce a significant prepulse inhibition. TgIE96 mice also presented evident deficits for the proper accomplishment of a passive avoidance test. These results suggest that the cerebellum is not indispensable for the performance of classical eyeblink conditioning and for object recognition tasks, but seems to be necessary for the proper performance of water maze, prepulse inhibition, and passive avoidance tests.

  20. Modified Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Fabian

    2013-08-01

    These lectures provide a brief introduction into modified gravity theories, i.e. theories that deviate from General Relativity. We focus on theories that satisfy the Einstein Equivalence Principle, which are characterized by a single metric governing the motions of bodies and dynamics of fields. Further, we emphasize models that have received interest in the cosmological context, and which modify gravity on large scales.

  1. Pseudorabies virus infected porcine epithelial cell line generates a diverse set of host microRNAs and a special cluster of viral microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Quan Wu

    Full Text Available Pseudorabies virus (PRV belongs to Alphaherpesvirinae subfamily that causes huge economic loss in pig industry worldwide. It has been recently demonstrated that many herpesviruses encode microRNAs (miRNAs, which play crucial roles in viral life cycle. However, the knowledge about PRV-encoded miRNAs is still limited. Here, we report a comprehensive analysis of both viral and host miRNA expression profiles in PRV-infected porcine epithelial cell line (PK-15. Deep sequencing data showed that the ∼4.6 kb intron of the large latency transcript (LLT functions as a primary microRNA precursor (pri-miRNA that encodes a cluster of 11 distinct miRNAs in the PRV genome, and 209 known and 39 novel porcine miRNAs were detected. Viral miRNAs were further confirmed by stem-loop RT-PCR and northern blot analysis. Intriguingly, all of these viral miRNAs exhibited terminal heterogeneity both at the 5' and 3' ends. Seven miRNA genes produced mature miRNAs from both arms and two of the viral miRNA genes showed partially overlapped in their precursor regions. Unexpectedly, a terminal loop-derived small RNA with high abundance and one special miRNA offset RNA (moRNA were processed from a same viral miRNA precursor. The polymorphisms of viral miRNAs shed light on the complexity of host miRNA-processing machinery and viral miRNA-regulatory mechanism. The swine genes and PRV genes were collected for target prediction of the viral miRNAs, revealing a complex network formed by both host and viral genes. GO enrichment analysis of host target genes suggests that PRV miRNAs are involved in complex cellular pathways including cell death, immune system process, metabolic pathway, indicating that these miRNAs play significant roles in virus-cells interaction of PRV and its hosts. Collectively, these data suggest that PRV infected epithelial cell line generates a diverse set of host miRNAs and a special cluster of viral miRNAs, which might facilitate PRV replication in cells.

  2. A differential ELISA based on recombinant immunodominant epitopes of the gE gene of SHV-1 in a baculovirus-insect cell system to discriminate between pigs infected naturally with pseudorabies and vaccinated pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serena, María Soledad; Metz, Germán Ernesto; Corva, Santiago Gerardo; Mórtola, Eduardo Carlos; Echeverría, María Gabriela

    2011-02-01

    In the present study, the fragment corresponding to the immunodominant epitopes of the gE gene (gEpi) from the CL15 Argentinean strain of pseudorabies virus was expressed successfully in a baculovirus-insect cell system that contained the M6 gene of Bluetongue virus, which encodes the NS1 nonstructural protein. This protein has the ability to polymerize into highly immunogenic tubules inside infected cells that can be purified at large quantities by ultracentrifugation. Previously, the NS1 protein has been expressed by fusing it to sequences derived from viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus type 1, hepatitis B virus, bovine leukemia virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus and influenza A virus. In the present study, a recombinant protein was obtained containing the gEpi fused to NS1 (NS1-gEpi) and used it as ELISA antigen for detection of anti-gE antibodies in order to discriminate between infected and vaccinated animals. This is the first report where gEpi was expressed in this particular baculovirus-insect cell system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Phosphine modified cobalt hydroformylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rensburg, H. van; Tooze, R.P.; Foster, D.F. [Sasol Technology UK, St. Andrews (United Kingdom); Janse van Rensburg, W. [Sasol Technology, Sasolburg (South Africa)

    2006-07-01

    An ongoing challenge in phosphine modified cobalt hydroformylation is the fundamental understanding of the electronic and steric properties of phosphine ligands that influence the selectivity and activity of the catalytic reaction. A series of acyclic and cyclic phosphines have been prepared and tested in phosphine modified cobalt hydroformylation of 1-octene. Molecular modelling on a series of phospholanes showed some interesting theoretical and experimental correlations. We also evaluated the use of N-heterocyclic carbenes as an alternative for phosphines in modified cobalt hydroformylation. (orig.)

  4. Modified Nance palatal button

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes modified Nance palatal button by which problems encountered in the palatal region around the acrylic button during space closure and molar distalization can be minimized.

  5. EAMJ Modifiable 10.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-02

    %CI. = 1.08-17.29). Conclusions: Modifiable factors associated with active PTB in Nakuru G.K prison are: HIV status, BCG vaccination, PTB case contact, poverty and poor personal hygiene. We recommend HIV counselling ...

  6. Modifying Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, Louis J.; Farber, Barry A.

    1976-01-01

    An introductory framework for analyzing and modifying classroom behavior...is followed by presentation of illustrative case materials, discussion of philosophical and ethical issues, analysis of pitfalls to be avoided, and consideration of limitations inherent in behavioral approaches. (Author)

  7. Biological response modifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-10-01

    Much of what used to be called immunotherapy is now included in the term biological response modifiers. Biological response modifiers (BRMs) are defined as those agents or approaches that modify the relationship between the tumor and host by modifying the host's biological response to tumor cells with resultant therapeutic effects.'' Most of the early work with BRMs centered around observations of spontaneous tumor regression and the association of tumor regression with concurrent bacterial infections. The BRM can modify the host response in the following ways: Increase the host's antitumor responses through augmentation and/or restoration of effector mechanisms or mediators of the host's defense or decrease the deleterious component by the host's reaction; Increase the host's defenses by the administration of natural biologics (or the synthetic derivatives thereof) as effectors or mediators of an antitumor response; Augment the host's response to modified tumor cells or vaccines, which might stimulate a greater response by the host or increase tumor-cell sensitivity to an existing response; Decrease the transformation and/or increase differentiation (maturation) of tumor cells; or Increase the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic modalities of cancer treatment.

  8. Freeze-drying of live virus vaccines: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, L J J; Daoussi, R; Vervaet, C; Remon, J-P; De Beer, T R M

    2015-10-13

    Freeze-drying is the preferred method for stabilizing live, attenuated virus vaccines. After decades of research on several aspects of the process like the stabilization and destabilization mechanisms of the live, attenuated viruses during freeze-drying, the optimal formulation components and process settings are still matter of research. The molecular complexity of live, attenuated viruses, the multiple destabilization pathways and the lack of analytical techniques allowing the measurement of physicochemical changes in the antigen's structure during and after freeze-drying mean that they form a particular lyophilization challenge. The purpose of this review is to overview the available information on the development of the freeze-drying process of live, attenuated virus vaccines, herewith focusing on the freezing and drying stresses the viruses can undergo during processing as well as on the mechanisms and strategies (formulation and process) that are used to stabilize them during freeze-drying. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Normal modified stable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses two classes of distributions, and stochastic processes derived from them: modified stable (MS) laws and normal modified stable (NMS) laws. This extends corresponding results for the generalised inverse Gaussian (GIG) and generalised hyperbolic (GH) or normal generalised inverse...... Gaussian (NGIG) laws. The wider framework thus established provides, in particular, for added flexibility in the modelling of the dynamics of financial time series, of importance especially as regards OU based stochastic volatility models for equities. In the special case of the tempered stable OU process...

  10. Modified Newton's rings: II

    OpenAIRE

    Chaitanya, T. Sai; Kumar, Rajiv; Krishna, V. Sai; Anandh, B Shankar; Umesh, K S

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier work (Shankar kumar Jha, A Vyas, O S K S Sastri, Rajkumar Jain & K S Umesh, 'Determination of wavelength of laser light using Modified Newton's rings setup', Physics Education, vol. 22, no.3, 195-202(2005)) reported by our group, a version of Newton's rings experiment called Modified Newton's rings was proposed. The present work is an extension of this work. Here, a general formula for wavelength has been derived, applicable for a plane of observation at any distance. A relation...

  11. Tip-modified Propellers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul

    1999-01-01

    wings. The literature on four different designs is reviewed: the end-plate propeller; the two-sided, shifted end-plate propeller; the tip-fin propeller; and the bladelet propeller. The conclusion is that it is indeed possible to design tip-modified propellers that, relative to an optimum conventional...

  12. Modified Gravity Research

    OpenAIRE

    Levi Said, Jackson; Farrugia, Gabriel; Finch, Andrew; Pace, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Five small articles by each author: 1 The Gravity Research Group by Jackson Levi Said 2 Cosmology and Gravity: The dark side of the universe by Gabriel Farrugia 3 Galactic Rotation Dynamics in Modifi ed Gravity by Andrew Finch 4 Exotic Stars by Mark Pace

  13. Elastomer-Modified Polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohlen, G. M.; Parker, J.; Varma, I. K.

    1984-01-01

    New resins yield laminates with improved mechanical properties. Ingredients of Modified Polymer include bisimide of formula 1 and amine-terminated elastomer. Cure effected by heating to temperature suited to particular ingredients used, generally in range of 200 degrees to 300 degrees C. Solution of solvent and reactants used for fabricating fiber-reinforced structures or as adhesive.

  14. Modifying Cookbook Labs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Robert, L.; Clough, Michael P.; Berg, Craig A.

    2000-01-01

    Modifies an extended lab activity from a cookbook approach for determining the percent mass of water in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystals to one which incorporates students' prior knowledge, engenders active mental struggling with prior knowledge and new experiences, and encourages metacognition. (Contains 12 references.) (ASK)

  15. On the modifier razgovetno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivić Milka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A problem not previously considered is whether the actual Standard Serbian vocabulary of manner adverbs coincides with the one attested in Vuk Karadzic' times. Pointing to some relevant facts concerning the co-occurrence of the speech act verbs with the manner modifier razgovetno, this paper not only delineates the differences in the expression of such a manner modification between the earlier stages of Standard Serbian and the contemporary language but also provides a novel argument for the validity of the author's claim (published in one of her previous articles that it is theoretically as well as pragmatically important to distinguish between the partial and the total types of predicate modifiers.

  16. Modified Faraday cup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    A tomographic technique for measuring the current density distribution in electron beams using electron beam profile data acquired from a modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power beams. The modified Faraday cup includes a narrow slit and is rotated by a stepper motor and can be moved in the x, y and z directions. The beam is swept across the slit perpendicular thereto and controlled by deflection coils, and the slit rotated such that waveforms are taken every few degrees form 0.degree. to 360.degree. and the waveforms are recorded by a digitizing storage oscilloscope. Two-din-tensional and three-dimensional images of the current density distribution in the beam can be reconstructed by computer tomography from this information, providing quantitative information about the beam focus and alignment.

  17. Genetically Modified Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claro Llaguno

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports have brought to public attention concerns about Bt corn and genetically modified organisms (GMO in general. The timing, it seems, is most appropriate considering two related developments early this year: the final approval of the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety in Montreal on January 29, 2001, and the OECD Edinburgh Conference on GM food safety last February 28- March 1, 2001. The protocol makes clear that GMOs include all living modified organisms (LMO defined as "any living organism that possesses a novel combination of genetic material obtained through the use of modern biotechnology". This includes seeds, live fish, and other organisms intentionally obtained for release to the environment. It would seem that the common understanding about GMOs as referring to farm-to-table products is perforce expanded to embrace genetically modified farm animals and aquatic resources. Being a trade agreement, the Montreal accord primarily deals with the safety issues related to the transboundary movement of LMOs around the globe. The OECD conference on the other hand, called for an international body "to address all sides of the GM debate" in response to the public outcry, particularly in Western Europe, regarding the risks the new products pose to human health and the environment. Some points of contention, which remain unresolved, include issues such as whether countries should be allowed to develop their own GM food based on their needs, and whether a global moratorium on GMOs and mandatory labeling should be enforced worldwide.

  18. Surface modified aerogel monoliths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leventis, Nicholas (Inventor); Johnston, James C. (Inventor); Kuczmarski, Maria A. (Inventor); Meador, Mary Ann B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    This invention comprises reinforced aerogel monoliths such as silica aerogels having a polymer coating on its outer geometric surface boundary, and to the method of preparing said aerogel monoliths. The polymer coatings on the aerogel monoliths are derived from polymer precursors selected from the group consisting of isocyanates as a precursor, precursors of epoxies, and precursors of polyimides. The coated aerogel monoliths can be modified further by encapsulating the aerogel with the polymer precursor reinforced with fibers such as carbon or glass fibers to obtain mechanically reinforced composite encapsulated aerogel monoliths.

  19. Modified harmony search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Najihah; Lutfi Amri Ramli, Ahmad; Majid, Ahmad Abd; Piah, Abd Rahni Mt

    2017-09-01

    A metaheuristic algorithm, called Harmony Search is quite highly applied in optimizing parameters in many areas. HS is a derivative-free real parameter optimization algorithm, and draws an inspiration from the musical improvisation process of searching for a perfect state of harmony. Propose in this paper Modified Harmony Search for solving optimization problems, which employs a concept from genetic algorithm method and particle swarm optimization for generating new solution vectors that enhances the performance of HS algorithm. The performances of MHS and HS are investigated on ten benchmark optimization problems in order to make a comparison to reflect the efficiency of the MHS in terms of final accuracy, convergence speed and robustness.

  20. A modified transmetatarsal amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terashi, Hiroto; Kitano, Ikuro; Tsuji, Yoriko; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Tahara, Shinya

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of the diabetic foot is increasing worldwide. Because evidence has shown that transmetatarsal amputation is associated with fewer failures in amputations of the diabetic foot with or without peripheral arterial disease, improving its management and surgical technique is a mission for the surgeon. Conventional transmetatarsal amputation has held firm, however, for more than 150 years. With a new concept for the transmetatarsal amputation method aimed at a better outcome, we propose a modified procedure for preserving the soft tissue between the metatarsal bones (the vasculature complex with the muscles, periostea, and vessels) and applying it to the distal bone stumps. The purpose of this method is to secure a functional foot by preserving the longitudinal arch. The new method was applied to 11 patients with diabetes mellitus or peripheral arterial disease, or both. All wounds closed successfully. Of the 11 patients, 8 were still alive with no complications. Of these 8 patients, 6 were able to ambulate with a custom-made shoe and 2 used a wheelchair, just as preoperatively. Of the 3 patients who died, 1 died a natural death, 1 died of sepsis, and 1 of cerebral infarction. We believe that the modified transmetatarsal amputation that we have described in this report is a potential breakthrough in the care of patients with forefoot gangrene and may gain acceptance over time. Copyright © 2011 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Modified Clipped LMS Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfizad Mojtaba

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new algorithm is proposed for updating the weights of an adaptive filter. The proposed algorithm is a modification of an existing method, namely, the clipped LMS, and uses a three-level quantization ( scheme that involves the threshold clipping of the input signals in the filter weight update formula. Mathematical analysis shows the convergence of the filter weights to the optimum Wiener filter weights. Also, it can be proved that the proposed modified clipped LMS (MCLMS algorithm has better tracking than the LMS algorithm. In addition, this algorithm has reduced computational complexity relative to the unmodified one. By using a suitable threshold, it is possible to increase the tracking capability of the MCLMS algorithm compared to the LMS algorithm, but this causes slower convergence. Computer simulations confirm the mathematical analysis presented.

  2. Distinguishing modified gravity models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris-Saclay, CEA, CNRS, F-91191 Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Davis, Anne-Christine, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: A.C.Davis@damtp.cam.ac.uk [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-01

    Modified gravity models with screening in local environments appear in three different guises: chameleon, K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms. We propose to look for differences between these classes of models by considering cosmological observations at low redshift. In particular, we analyse the redshift dependence of the fine structure constant and the proton to electron mass ratio in each of these scenarios. When the absorption lines belong to unscreened regions of space such as dwarf galaxies, a time variation would be present for chameleons. For both K-mouflage and Vainshtein mechanisms, the cosmological time variation of the scalar field is not suppressed in both unscreened and screened environments, therefore enhancing the variation of constants and their detection prospect. We also consider the time variation of the redshift of distant objects using their spectrocopic velocities. We find that models of the K-mouflage and Vainshtein types have very different spectroscopic velocities as a function of redshift and that their differences with the Λ-CDM template should be within reach of the future ELT-HIRES observations.

  3. Modified biplanar chevron osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corte-Real, Nuno M; Moreira, Rodrigo M

    2009-12-01

    The surgical treatment of hallux valgus with an increased distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA) should include the correction of this angle to maintain a congruent joint. The purpose of this study was to report our results with this procedure. From January 2000 until December 2006, 23 feet (13 patients) with an increased DMAA were operated upon by the same surgeon using a biplanar chevron osteotomy. The technique was modified making the plantar cut more horizontal and only removing a wedge from the dorsal cut. Clinical and radiographic evaluation was made after a mean followup of 56 months. The AOFAS score for the hallux was used and angular deformities were measured. The patients had a mean age of 51 years and were all female. A good functional result was achieved with a mean AOFAS score of 87. An improvement of the angular deformities was noted in all patients. The mean hallux valgus angle improved from 28 degrees pre-op to 14 degrees post-op, the intermetatarsal angle from 12 degrees to 7 degrees and the DMAA from 20 degrees to 7 degrees. All patients except one were satisfied with the outcome of the procedure. Minimally symptomatic AVN of the metatarsal head was observed in one foot. We conclude that this procedure is a good choice for the treatment of symptomatic hallux valgus with an increased DMAA, producing a good clinical and radiographic result.

  4. Expected Net Benefit of Vaccinating Rangeland Sheep against Bluetongue Virus Using a Modified-Live versus Killed Virus Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsick, Tristram R; Peck, Dannele E; Ritten, John P; Jones, Randall; Jones, Michelle; Miller, Myrna M

    2017-01-01

    Recurring outbreaks of bluetongue virus in domestic sheep of the US Intermountain West have prompted questions about the economic benefits and costs of vaccinating individual flocks against bluetongue (BT) disease. We estimate the cost of a BT outbreak on a representative rangeland sheep operation in the Big Horn Basin of the state of Wyoming using enterprise budgets and stochastic simulation. The latter accounts for variability in disease severity and lamb price, as well as uncertainty about when an outbreak will occur. We then estimate the cost of purchasing and administering a BT vaccine. Finally, we calculate expected annual net benefit of vaccinating under various outbreak intervals. Expected annual net benefit is calculated for both a killed virus (KV) vaccine and modified-live virus vaccine, using an observed price of $0.32 per dose for modified-live and an estimated price of $1.20 per dose for KV. The modified-live vaccine's expected annual net benefit has a 100% chance of being positive for an outbreak interval of 5, 10, or 20 years, and a 77% chance of being positive for a 50-year interval. The KV vaccine's expected annual net benefit has a 97% chance of being positive for a 5-year outbreak interval, and a 42% chance of being positive for a 10-year interval. A KV vaccine is, therefore, unlikely to be economically attractive to producers in areas exposed less frequently to BT disease. A modified-live vaccine, however, requires rigorous authorization before legal use can occur in Wyoming. To date, no company has requested to manufacture a modified-live vaccine for commercial use in Wyoming. The KV vaccine poses less risk to sheep reproduction and less risk of unintentional spread, both of which facilitate approval for commercial production. Yet, our results show an economically consequential tradeoff between a KV vaccine's relative safety and higher cost. Unless the purchase price is reduced below our assumed $1.20 per dose, producer adoption of a KV

  5. Genetically modified foods and allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H; Ho, H K; Leung, T F

    2017-06-01

    2015 marked the 25th anniversary of the commercial use and availability of genetically modified crops. The area of planted biotech crops cultivated globally occupies a cumulative two billion hectares, equivalent to twice the land size of China or the United States. Foods derived from genetically modified plants are widely consumed in many countries and genetically modified soybean protein is extensively used in processed foods throughout the industrialised countries. Genetically modified food technology offers a possible solution to meet current and future challenges in food and medicine. Yet there is a strong undercurrent of anxiety that genetically modified foods are unsafe for human consumption, sometimes fuelled by criticisms based on little or no firm evidence. This has resulted in some countries turning away food destined for famine relief because of the perceived health risks of genetically modified foods. The major concerns include their possible allergenicity and toxicity despite the vigorous testing of genetically modified foods prior to marketing approval. It is imperative that scientists engage the public in a constructive evidence-based dialogue to address these concerns. At the same time, improved validated ways to test the safety of new foods should be developed. A post-launch strategy should be established routinely to allay concerns. Mandatory labelling of genetically modified ingredients should be adopted for the sake of transparency. Such ingredient listing and information facilitate tracing and recall if required.

  6. The Effects of Pre Modified Input, Interactionally Modified Input, and Modified Output on EFL Learners' Comprehension of New Vocabularies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Zinat; Pazhakh, AbdolReza

    2012-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to investigate the effects of premodified input, interactionally modified input and modified output on 80 EFL learners' comprehension of new words. The subjects were randomly assigned into four groups of pre modified input, interactionally modified input, modified output and unmodified (control) groups. Each group…

  7. Value Modifier Public Use File

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Center for Medicare (CM) has created a standard analytical file intended to promote transparency. For each Value Modifier performance year, CM will publish a...

  8. Improving the Modified Euler Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham OCHOCHE

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to propose an improved approximation technique for the computation of the numerical solutions of initial value problems (IVP. The method we have improved upon is the Modified Euler method. By the simple improvement we effected we were able to obtain a much better performance by our Improved Modified Euler (IME method which was shown to also be of order two.

  9. Implant materials modified by colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zboromirska-Wnukiewicz Beata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in general medicine led to the development of biomaterials. Implant material should be characterized by a high biocompatibility to the tissue and appropriate functionality, i.e. to have high mechanical and electrical strength and be stable in an electrolyte environment – these are the most important properties of bioceramic materials. Considerations of biomaterials design embrace also electrical properties occurring on the implant-body fluid interface and consequently the electrokinetic potential, which can be altered by modifying the surface of the implant. In this work, the surface of the implants was modified to decrease the risk of infection by using metal colloids. Nanocolloids were obtained using different chemical and electrical methods. It was found that the colloids obtained by physical and electrical methods are more stable than colloids obtained by chemical route. In this work the surface of modified corundum implants was investigated. The implant modified by nanosilver, obtained by electrical method was selected. The in vivo research on animals was carried out. Clinical observations showed that the implants with modified surface could be applied to wounds caused by atherosclerotic skeleton, for curing the chronic and bacterial inflammations as well as for skeletal reconstruction surgery.

  10. Modifying Knowledge, Emotions, and Attitudes Regarding Genetically Modified Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddy, Benjamin C.; Danielson, Robert W.; Sinatra, Gale M.; Graham, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether conceptual change predicted emotional and attitudinal change while learning about genetically modified foods (GMFs). Participants were 322 college students; half read a refutation text designed to shift conceptual knowledge, emotions, and attitudes, while the other half served as a control group.…

  11. Modified gravity without dark matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Robert; Papantonopoulos, L

    2007-01-01

    On an empirical level, the most successful alternative to dark matter in bound gravitational systems is the modified Newtonian dynamics, or MOND, proposed by Milgrom. Here I discuss the attempts to formulate MOND as a modification of General Relativity. I begin with a summary of the phenomenological

  12. Modifying Students' Tastes in Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, John Edward

    To test whether student tastes in poetry could be modified by a particular method of teaching it, the poetic preferences of 751 eighth grade students were pretested and compared with the poetic choices made by a panel of English educators, 35 student teachers in English, and the students' own English teachers. Consistently, poems selected by any…

  13. Nanoparticles Modified ITO Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z. H.

    2017-04-01

    Incorporation of nanomaterials with controlled molecular architecture shows great promise in improving electronic communication between biomolecules and the electrode substrate. In electrochemical applications metal nanoparticles (NPs) modified electrodes have been widely used and are emerging as candidates to develop highly sensitive electrochemical sensors. There has been a growing technological interest in modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes due to their prominent optoelectronic properties and their wide use as a transducing platform. The introduction of NPs into the transducing platform is commonly achieved by their adsorption onto conventional electrode surfaces in various forms, including that of a composite. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metallic NPs for surface fabrication of ITO thin films leading to detection of specific biomolecules and applications as a biosensor platform.

  14. Genetic Modifiers of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    and Biomedical Network on Rare Diseases (CIBERER), Madrid, Spain; 23Institute of Biology and Molecular Genetics , University of Valladolid, Valladolid...d’Hebron, Barcelona, Spain; 99The Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Cancer Family Registry; Cancer Genetics Center, Hong Kong Sanatorium and Hospital, Hong... disease , but the absolute risk differences for mutation carriers will be much greater. As more genetic modifiers of ovarian cancer risk are identified, in

  15. QGP and Modified Jet Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xin-Nian

    2005-04-18

    Recent progresses in the study of jet modification in hotmedium and their consequences in high-energy heavy-ion collisions are reviewed. In particular, I will discuss energy loss for propagating heavy quarks and the resulting modified fragmentation function. Medium modification of the parton fragmentation function due to quark recombination are formulated within finite temperature field theory and their implication on the search for deconfined quark-gluon plasma is also discussed.

  16. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  17. Cosmological tests of modified gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya

    2016-04-01

    We review recent progress in the construction of modified gravity models as alternatives to dark energy as well as the development of cosmological tests of gravity. Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR) has been tested accurately within the local universe i.e. the Solar System, but this leaves the possibility open that it is not a good description of gravity at the largest scales in the Universe. This being said, the standard model of cosmology assumes GR on all scales. In 1998, astronomers made the surprising discovery that the expansion of the Universe is accelerating, not slowing down. This late-time acceleration of the Universe has become the most challenging problem in theoretical physics. Within the framework of GR, the acceleration would originate from an unknown dark energy. Alternatively, it could be that there is no dark energy and GR itself is in error on cosmological scales. In this review, we first give an overview of recent developments in modified gravity theories including f(R) gravity, braneworld gravity, Horndeski theory and massive/bigravity theory. We then focus on common properties these models share, such as screening mechanisms they use to evade the stringent Solar System tests. Once armed with a theoretical knowledge of modified gravity models, we move on to discuss how we can test modifications of gravity on cosmological scales. We present tests of gravity using linear cosmological perturbations and review the latest constraints on deviations from the standard [Formula: see text]CDM model. Since screening mechanisms leave distinct signatures in the non-linear structure formation, we also review novel astrophysical tests of gravity using clusters, dwarf galaxies and stars. The last decade has seen a number of new constraints placed on gravity from astrophysical to cosmological scales. Thanks to on-going and future surveys, cosmological tests of gravity will enjoy another, possibly even more, exciting ten years.

  18. Bonferroni's and Sidak's modified tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conagin Armando

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of practical importance had been discarded testing formulated hypothesis with the aid of statistical analysis of experimental data because of the power of the utilized test. This study compares the power of two Bonferroni's Modified and one Sidak's Modified tests with known tests analyzing 1200 simulated experiments. All differences of means were obtained in relation to the mean of the adopted control to guarantee parametrical magnitude of mean differences. Student's test (type I comparisonwise error and Waller-Duncan's (Bayesian error showed the highest percentage of significative differences, followed by Duncan's, BM2, SiM, BM1, DunnettU's, SiN, BN, Dunnettu's, SNK's, REGWF's, REGWQ's, Tukey's, Sidak's and Bonferroni's tests. For differences equal to zero, Student's and Waller-Duncan's test exhibit 5% frequency of rejection of the null hypothesis, in accordance the nominal error I adopted (alpha = 0.05. All other tests had values below 0.05, generally ranging on 0.01 to 0.02 or less. Depending of the number of zero differences and considering the type I experimentwise error I, Student's, Waller-Duncan's and Duncan's tests showed crescent values of errors (> 0.05, proportional to the number of null differences included in the experiment; all other tests exhibit showed of type I experimentwise error < 0.05, most nearing 0.01-0.02 or less. Efficiency of the three "Modified Tests" was close to DunnettU's test, but higher than the other testes of type I experimentwise error nature (MEER.

  19. A New Modified Firefly Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medha Gupta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nature inspired meta-heuristic algorithms studies the emergent collective intelligence of groups of simple agents. Firefly Algorithm is one of the new such swarm-based metaheuristic algorithm inspired by the flashing behavior of fireflies. The algorithm was first proposed in 2008 and since then has been successfully used for solving various optimization problems. In this work, we intend to propose a new modified version of Firefly algorithm (MoFA and later its performance is compared with the standard firefly algorithm along with various other meta-heuristic algorithms. Numerical studies and results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is superior to existing algorithms.

  20. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  1. Metabolomics of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-10-20

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  2. Adhesives from modified soy protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Susan [Manhattan, KS; Wang, Donghai [Manhattan, KS; Zhong, Zhikai [Manhattan, KS; Yang, Guang [Shanghai, CN

    2008-08-26

    The present invention provides useful adhesive compositions having similar adhesive properties to conventional UF and PPF resins. The compositions generally include a protein portion and modifying ingredient portion selected from the group consisting of carboxyl-containing compounds, aldehyde-containing compounds, epoxy group-containing compounds, and mixtures thereof. The composition is preferably prepared at a pH level at or near the isoelectric point of the protein. In other preferred forms, the adhesive composition includes a protein portion and a carboxyl-containing group portion.

  3. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  4. On the Modified Barkhausen Criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik; Murali, K.

    2016-01-01

    Oscillators are normally designed according to the Modified Barkhausen Criterion i.e. the complex pole pair is moved out in RHP so that the linear circuit becomes unstable. By means of the Mancini Phaseshift Oscillator it is demonstrated that the distortion of the oscillator may be minimized by i...... by introducing a nonlinear ”Hewlett Resistor” so that the complex pole-pair is in the RHP for small signals and in the LHP for large signals i.e. the complex pole pair of the instant linearized small signal model is moving around the imaginary axis in the complex frequency plane....

  5. NITROANILINE FILM-HOLE MODIFIED GLASSY CARBON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Herein, we report determination of dopamine (DA) at modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) with a film produced by reduction of diazonium generated from p-nitroaniline (PNA). Pores were created purposely by stripping pre-deposited gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in the modifier film. The modified electrodes.

  6. Naturopathic Oncology Modified Delphi Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Jacob; Hodsdon, Wendy; Schor, Jacob; McKinney, Neil; Rubin, Daniel; Seely, Dugald; Parmar, Gurdev; Birdsall, Tim; Alschuler, Lise; Lamson, Davis; Birdsall, Shauna; Zwickey, Heather

    2016-03-01

    Naturopathic oncology is a relatively new and emerging field capable of providing professional integrative or alternative services to cancer patients. Foundational research is critical to identify topics in the clinical and research development of naturopathic oncology for future growth of the field. This study implements a modified Delphi protocol to develop expert consensus regarding ethics, philosophy, and research development in naturopathic oncology. The modified protocol implements a nomination process to select a panel of 8 physicians and to assist in question formulation. The protocol includes an in-person discussion of 6 questions with multiple iterations to maintain the concept of the Delphi methodology as well as a postdiscussion consensus survey. The protocol identified, ranked, and established consensus for numerous themes per question. Underlying key topics include integration with conventional medicine, evidence-based medicine, patient education, patient safety, and additional training requirements for naturopathic oncologists. The systematic nomination and questioning of a panel of experts provides a foundational and educational resource to assist in clarification of clinical ethics, philosophy, and research development in the emerging field of naturopathic oncology. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Genetic modifiers of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusella, James F; MacDonald, Marcy E; Lee, Jong-Min

    2014-09-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that directly affects more than 1 in 10,000 persons in Western societies but, as a family disorder with a long, costly, debilitating course, it has an indirect impact on a far greater proportion of the population. Although some palliative treatments are used, no effective treatment exists for preventing clinical onset of the disorder or for delaying its inevitable progression toward premature death, approximately 15 years after diagnosis. Huntington's disease involves a movement disorder characterized by chorea, as well as a variety of psychiatric disturbances and intellectual decline, with a gradual loss of independence. A dire need exists for effective HD therapies to alleviate the suffering and costs to the individual, family, and health care system. In past decades, genetics, the study of DNA sequence variation and its consequences, provided the tools to map the HD gene to chromosome 4 and ultimately to identify its mutation as an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the coding sequence of a large protein, dubbed huntingtin. Now, advances in genetic technology offer an unbiased route to the identification of genetic factors that are disease-modifying agents in human patients. Such genetic modifiers are expected to highlight processes capable of altering the course of HD and therefore to provide new, human-validated targets for traditional drug development, with the goal of developing rational treatments to delay or prevent onset of HD clinical signs. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  8. Chern-Simons Modified Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstratiou, P.

    2013-09-01

    This presentation will be based on my, undergraduate, thesis at Aristotle University of Thessoliniki with the same subject, supervised by Professor Demetrios Papadopoulos. I will first present the general mathematical formulation of the Chern-Simons (CS) modified gravity, which is split in a dynamical and a non-dynamical context, and the different physical theories which suggest this modification. Then proceed by examing the possibility that the CS theory shares solutions with General Relativity in both contexts. In the non-dynamical context I will present a new, undocumented solution as well as all the other possible solutions found to date. I will conclude by arguing that General Relativity and CS Theory share any solutions in the dynamical context.

  9. Genetically Modified Foods and Nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reci MESERI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available To consume a balanced diet may prevent many illnesses. After the Second World War the “Green Revolution” was conducted to increase efficiency in agriculture. After its harmful effects on environment were understood genetically modified foods (GMO were served to combat hunger in the world. Today insufficiency in food product is not the main problem; imbalanced food distribution is the problem. In addition, GMO’s might be harmful for health and environment. Moreover economical dependency to industrialized countries will carry on. If the community tends to use up all the sources and the population increases steadily hunger will not be the only scarcity that the human population would face. There will also be shortage in energy and clean water resources. In conclusion combating just with hunger using high technology will only postpone the problems for a short period of time. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(5.000: 455-460

  10. SUMMARY OF 2009 RHEOLOGY MODIFIER PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, E.

    2009-12-08

    The overall objective of the EM-31 Rheological Modifiers and Wetting Agents program is to utilize commercially available rheology modifiers to increase the solids fraction of radioactive sludge based waste streams, resulting in an increase in throughput and decreasing the overall processing time. The program first investigates the impact of rheology modifiers on slurry simulants and then utilizes the most effective rheology modifiers on radioactive slurries. The work presented in this document covers the initial investigation of rheology modifier testing with simulants. This task is supported by both the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The SRNL EM-31 task, for this year, was to investigate the use of rheology modifiers on simulant Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) melter feeds. The task is to determine, based on the impact of the rheology modifier, if there are rheology modifiers that could reduce the water content of the slurry going to the DWPF melter, hence increasing the melt rate by decreasing the water loading. The rheology modifier in essence would allow a higher solids content slurry to have the same type of rheology or pumpability of a lower solids slurry. The modifiers selected in this report were determined based on previous modifiers used in high level waste melter feed simulants, on-going testing performed by counterparts at PNNL, and experiences gain through use of modifiers in other Department of Energy (DOE) processes such as grout processing. There were 12 rheology modifiers selected for testing, covering both organic and inorganic types and they were tested at four different concentrations for a given melter feed. Five different DWPF melter feeds were available and there was adequate material in one of the melter feeds to increase the solids concentration, resulting in a total of six simulants for testing. The mass of melter feed available in each simulant was not adequate for

  11. Lactone modified viscosity modifiers useful in oleaginous compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, A.; Lundberg, R.D.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a lactone modified reaction product useful as a viscosity index improver additive for lubricating oil compositions. It comprises: the reaction produce of: oil soluble ethylene copolymer comprising within the range of about 15 to 90 wt.% ethylene and about 10 to 85 wt.% of one or more C{sub 3} to C{sub 28} alpha-olefin, having a number average molecular weight within a range of about 15,000 to 500,000 and grafted with ethylenically unsaturated C{sub 4}--C{sub 10} monocarboxylic acid or anhydride or C{sub 4}--C{sub 0} dicarboxylic acid or anhydride wherein the carboxylic acid groups or anhydride groups are located on vicinal carbon atoms; amine selected from the group consisting of amines having at least two primary amine groups and amines having at least one primary amine group and at least one secondary amine group; long chain hydrocarbyl substituted succinic anhydride or acid having 25 to 400 carbon atoms; and lactone.

  12. Photodegradation of thermally modified wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, Kavyashree; Pandey, Krishna K

    2012-12-05

    Natural wood, being biological material, undergoes rapid degradation by ultraviolet (UV) radiations and other environmental factors under outdoor exposure. In order to protect wood from such degradation, the chemical structure of wood is altered by chemical modification or heat treatment. In the present study, heat treated specimens of rubberwood (Hevea brasiliensis) were exposed to xenon light source in a weather-o-meter for different periods up to 300 h. Photostability of modified and unmodified wood was evaluated in terms of colour and chemical changes. Light coloured untreated wood became dark upon UV irradiation whereas, dark colour of heat treated wood lightened on UV exposure. CIE lightness parameter (L(*)) decreased for untreated wood whereas its value increased for heat treated wood upon irradiation. Other colour coordinates a(*) and b(*) increased with exposure duration for both untreated and heat treated wood. The overall colour change (ΔE(*)) increased for both untreated and heat treated wood. The Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies revealed severe lignin degradation of heat treated wood due to UV light exposure. Colour changes and FTIR measurements indicate that thermal modification of wood was ineffective in restricting light induced colour changes and photodegradation of wood polymers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Solution properties of hydrophobically modified

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Al-Sabagh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We tested nine hydrophobically modified polyacrylamides with molecular weights situated between 1.58 and 0.89 × 106 g/mol for enhanced oil recovery applications. Their solution properties were investigated in the distilled water, brine solution, formation water and sea water. Their critical association concentrations were determined from the relationship between their concentrations and the corresponding apparent viscosities (ηapp at 30 °C at shear rate 6 s−1. They were between 0.4 and 0.5 g/dl. The brine solutions of 0.5 g/dl of HM-PAMs were investigated at different conditions regarding their apparent viscosities. Such conditions were mono and divalent cations, temperature ranging from 30 to 90 °C, the shear rate ranging from 6 to 30 s−1 and the aging time for 45 days. The surface and interfacial tensions for the HM-PAMs were measured for concentration range from 0.01 to 1 g/dl brine solutions at 30 °C and their emulsification efficiencies were investigated for 7 days. The discrepancy in the properties and efficiencies of the tested copolymers was discussed in the light of their chemical structure.

  14. Traceability of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, Henk J M; van Rie, Jean-Paul P F; Kok, Esther J

    2002-01-01

    EU regulations stipulate the labeling of food products containing genetically modified organisms (GMOs) unless the GMO content is due to adventitious and unintended 'contamination' and not exceeding the 1% level at ingredient basis. In addition, member states have to ensure full traceability at all stages of the placing on the market of GMOs. Both requirements ensure consumers 'right to know', facilitate enforcement of regulatory requirements and are of importance for environmental monitoring and postmarket surveillance. Besides administrative procedures, such as used in quality certification systems, the significance of adequate molecular methods becomes more and more apparent. During the last decade a considerable number of molecular methods have been developed and validated that enable the detection, identification and quantification of GMO impurities. Most of them rely on the PCR technology and can only detect one specific stretch of DNA. It can, however, be anticipated that in the near future the situation will become more complex. The number of GMO varieties, including 'stacked-gene' varieties, which will enter the European Market will increase and it is likely that these varieties will harbor more variable constructs. New tools will be necessary to keep up with these developments. One of the most promising techniques is microarray analysis. This technique enables the screening for a large number of different GMOs within a single experiment.

  15. Modified tubularized incised plate urethroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaji Mane

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To share our experience of doing tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with modifications. Materials and Methods: This is a single surgeon personal series from 2004 to 2009. One hundred patients of distal hypospadias were subjected for Snodgrass urethroplasty with preputioplasty. The age range was 1 to 5 year with mean age of 2.7 years. Selection criteria were good urethral plate, without chordee and torsion needing complete degloving. Main technical modification from original Snodgrass procedure was spongioplasty, preputioplasty, and dorsal slit when inability to retract prepuce during surgery. Results: Average follow-up period is 23 months. Seven (7% patients developed fistula and one patient had complete preputial dehiscence. Phimosis developed in three (3% patients and required circumcision. Dorsal slit was required in seven patients. One patient developed meatal stenosis in postoperative period. All other patients are passing single urinary stream and have cosmesis that is acceptable. Conclusions: Modified tubularized incised plate urethroplasty with preputioplasty effectively gives cosmetically normal looking penis with low complications.

  16. Imide modified epoxy matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a program designed to develop tough imide modified epoxy resins cured by bisimide amine (BIA) hardeners are described. State-of-the-art epoxides MY720 and DER383 were used, and four bismide amines were evaluated. These were the BIA's derived from the 6F anhydride (4,4'-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) bis(phthalic anhydride) and the diamines 3,3'-diaminodiphynyl sulfone, 4,4'-oxygianiline, 4,4'-methylene dianiline, and 1,12-dodecane diamine. A key intermediate, designated 6F anhydride, is required for the synthesis of the bisimide amines. Reaction parameters to synthesize a precursor to the 6F anhydride (6FHC) in high yields were investigated. The catalyst trifluoromethane sulfonic acid was studied. Although small scale runs yielded the 6FHC in 50 percent yield, efforts to ranslate these results to a larger scale synthesis gave the 6FHC in only 9 percent yield. Results show that the concept of using bisimide amine as curing agents to improve the toughness properties of epoxies is valid.

  17. [Therapeutic approaches using genetically modified cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anliker, Brigitte; Renner, Matthias; Schweizer, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Medicinal products containing genetically modified cells are, in most cases, classified as gene therapy and cell therapy medicinal products. Although no medicinal product containing genetically modified cells has been licensed in Europe yet, a variety of therapeutic strategies using genetically modified cells are in different stages of clinical development for the treatment of acquired and inherited diseases. In this chapter, several examples of promising approaches are presented, with an emphasis on gene therapy for inherited immunodeficiencies and on tumour immunotherapy with genetically modified T-cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor or a recombinant T-cell receptor.

  18. Performance Characteristics of Silane Silica Modified Asphalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuedong Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present there are many kinds of fillers and modifier used for modified asphalt, but the effect of modifier differs in thousands of ways; most of them can increase the high temperature performance of asphalt, but the modified effect of low-temperature crack resistance, water stability, and antifatigue performance is different. Aiming at the subsistent problems, this paper innovatively puts forward the idea of taking the silane silica (nanosilica modified with silane coupling agent as filler to develop one kind of modified asphalt concrete which has excellent comprehensive performance based on the idea of enhance the whole performance of asphalt concrete and interface consolidation strength between aggregate and asphalt at the same time. The best mixing amount of silane silica and the production process of modified asphalt were conducted by contrasting the test date as penetration, viscosity, and softening point; the aging of asphalt and modified asphalt was analyzed by TG test, the superiority of silane silica modified asphalt is more clearly understandable by chemical analysis results. Meanwhile it is proved that silane silica has positive effect to improve the mixture of high and low temperature performance, water stability, and aging resistance through a series of road performance tests.

  19. Disseminating genetically modified (GM) maize technology to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disseminating genetically modified (GM) maize technology to smallholder farmers in the Eastern Cape province of South Africa: extension personnel's awareness of stewardship requirements and dissemination practices.

  20. UNDERSTANDING OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last sixteen years biotechnology, genetic engineering, transgenic organisms or genetically modified organisms (GMOs have been raising numerous controversies. In the scientific sphere, genetic engineering and GMOs represent a special challenge for geneticists, breeders and physicians, in philosophy it is a topic of interest for bioethicists and agricultural ethicists, environmentalists are interested in the interconnectictions between new technology and environment protection, for multinational companies this is a potential source of huge profits, and for certain governments they represent an instrument for strategic control of food production within their countries as well as internationally. By taking into account the views of both advocates and opponents of this "revolutionary" method, authors believe that we should not a priori reject new and insufficiently studied technologies, but that in this particular it is necessary to be extremely cautious, in other words that from (bioethical point of view only those GMO investigations limited to scientific purposes are justified, provided that all required precautions have been taken. Also, authors are of the opinion that in this region as well as in Europe as a whole, at this moment, transgenic organisms are not necessery, neither in agricultural production nor in the food chain. Arguments for such a statement are found primarily in the potential issues that intentional breeding of GMOs might inflict upon the human health and environment. Namely, if borders of individual species are not overstepped and if their endogenous traits are made stronger, the potential risk of causing irreparable damage for both present and future generations which may be brought by changed biological succession will be reduced, i.e. one of the four fundamental bioethical principles will be applied and that is the nonmaleficence. Further intentional decreasing of biodiversity should not be allowed, which means

  1. UNDERSTANDING OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last sixteen years biotechnology, genetic engineering, transgenic organisms or genetically modified organisms (GMOs have been raising numerous controversies. In the scientific sphere, genetic engineering and GMOs represent a special challenge for geneticists, breeders and physicians, in philosophy it is a topic of interest for bioethicists and agricultural ethicists, environmentalists are interested in the interconnectictions between new technology and environment protection, for multinational companies this is a potential source of huge profits, and for certain governments they represent an instrument for strategic control of food production within their countries as well as internationally. By taking into account the views of both advocates and opponents of this "revolutionary" method, authors believe that we should not a priori reject new and insufficiently studied technologies, but that in this particular it is necessary to be extremely cautious, in other words that from (bioethical point of view only those GMO investigations limited to scientific purposes are justified, provided that all required precautions have been taken. Also, authors are of the opinion that in this region as well as in Europe as a whole, at this moment, transgenic organisms are not necessery, neither in agricultural production nor in the food chain. Arguments for such a statement are found primarily in the potential issues that intentional breeding of GMOs might inflict upon the human health and environment. Namely, if borders of individual species are not overstepped and if their endogenous traits are made stronger, the potential risk of causing irreparable damage for both present and future generations which may be brought by changed biological succession will be reduced, i.e. one of the four fundamental bioethical principles will be applied and that is the nonmaleficence. Further intentional decreasing of biodiversity should not be allowed, which means

  2. Series expansion of the modified Einstein Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema Chandrakant Shah-Fairbank

    2009-01-01

    This study examines calculating total sediment discharge based on the Modified Einstein Procedure (MEP). A new procedure based on the Series Expansion of the Modified Einstein Procedure (SEMEP) has been developed. This procedure contains four main modifications to MEP. First, SEMEP solves the Einstein integrals quickly and accurately based on a series expansion. Next,...

  3. NITROANILINE FILM-HOLE MODIFIED GLASSY CARBON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Graphene modified GCE. DPV. 2.64. [43] p-Nitroaniline film-holes modified GCE. Amp. 0.611. This work. LSV – linear sweep voltammetry, DPV – differential pulse voltammetry, Amp – Amperometry. The proposed sensor is selective and sensitive for DA detection when compared with other techniques (Table 1) by excluding ...

  4. Chromatin-modifying proteins in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fog, Cathrine K; Jensen, Klaus T; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2007-01-01

    -despite the fact that all cells in the organism contain the same genetic information. A large amount of data gathered over the last decades has demonstrated that deregulation of chromatin-modifying proteins is etiologically involved in the development and progression of cancer. Here we discuss how epigenetic...... alterations influence cancer development and review known cancer-associated alterations in chromatin-modifying proteins....

  5. Surface thermodynamic parameters of modified wood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokrovskaya Elena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy characteristics of modified wood are studied in the paper. Application of this approach during the study of wooden materials allows forecasting the efficiency of modifiers for surface layer of wood. Phosphites, the efficient fire-retarders, were applied as modifiers. Using the example of a number of ethers with various alkoxy substituents of phosphorus atom, we have made an attempt to associate surface thermodynamic properties of modified wood and formation of properties for fire-, bio- and smoke protection. The dependence of change of energy characteristics and surface structure of wood on the nature of modifiers is determined. To study energy characteristics of wood, modified by various compounds, the following characteristics were used: σ surface tension and ΔG free enthalpy gradient. Easy Drop setting and the corresponding software were used to determine these values. According to the obtained data, the conclusion is made about the influence of modifiers on energy characteristics of wood. The high degree of modification (% P causes bigger change of Gibbs energy, which determines formation of high-level fire-, bio- and smoke protection. Diethyl phosphite is the most efficient modifier. Formation of fire-protective properties stipulates long-term operation of wood and wood-based materials.

  6. Generation of Modified Sinusoidal Waves Using Operational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The production of modified sinusoidal waves is currently a field of active research even in already developed countries as it combines the ease of production associated with square waves and avoids the low energy efficiency associated with true sinusoidal waves. This paper discusses the production of Modified Sinusoidal ...

  7. Societal aspects of genetically modified foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frewer, L.J.; Lassen, J.; Kettlitz, B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper aims to examine some of the reasons behind public controversy associated with the introduction of genetically modified foods in Europe the 1990s. The historical background to the controversy is provided to give context. The issue of public acceptance of genetically modified foods...

  8. Public attitudes towards genetically-modified food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miles, S.; Ueland, O.; Frewer, L.J.

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: Purpose - This study aimed to investigate the impact of information about traceability and new detection methods for identifying genetically-modified organisms in food, on consumer attitudes towards genetically-modified food and consumer trust in regulators in Italy, Norway and England. It

  9. Adsorption of hydrocarbons on modified nanoclays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharafimasooleh, M [Department of Materials Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bazgir, S [Department of Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tamizifar, M [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nemati, A, E-mail: m.sharafimasooleh@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-04-15

    In this study organically modified nanoclay were prepared by exchanging of the cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAB), with inorganic/metal ions/cations in montmorillonite structure. To investigate the influence of the amount of modifier on basal spacing and subsequent removal efficiency of hydrocarbon, different amount of modifier was used. The modified and unmodified nanoclays characterized by XRD, CHN and FTIR techniques. The X-ray diffraction results showed that the interlayer spacing of CTAB-modified clays increased from 12 to 22A. The effectiveness of the sorbent materials for sorption of a range of products was investigated using crude oil, kerosene, gasoline and toluene. The process parameters such as sorbent dosage and contact time were reported. The results showed that the adsorption capacity was in the range of 2 to 8 gram per gram of adsorbent. Results also showed that adsorption capacity of the organoclay was clearly higher than of the unmodified clay. These results were confirmed by CHN analysis.

  10. Genistein Modified Polymer Blends for Hemodialysis Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Teng; Kyu, Thein; Define, Linda; Alexander, Thomas

    2012-02-01

    A soybean-derived phytochemical called genistein was used as a modifying agent to polyether sulfone/polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PES/PVP) blends to produce multi-functional hemodialysis membranes. With the aid of phase diagrams of PES/PVP/genistein blends, asymmetric porous membranes were fabricated by coagulating in non-solvent. Both unmodified and genistein modified PES/PVP membranes were shown to be non-cytotoxic to the blood cells. Unmodified PES/PVP membranes were found to reduce reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, whereas the genistein modified membranes exhibited suppression for ˜60% of the ROS levels. Also, the genistein modified membranes revealed significant suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α. Moreover, addition of PVP to PES showed the reduced trend of platelet adhesion and then leveled off. However, the modified membranes exhibited suppression of platelet adhesion at low genistein loading, but beyond 15 wt%, the platelet adhesion level rised up.

  11. Adsorption of hydrocarbons on modified nanoclays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafimasooleh, M.; Bazgir, S.; Tamizifar, M.; Nemati, A.

    2011-04-01

    In this study organically modified nanoclay were prepared by exchanging of the cetyltrimethylammonium (CTAB), with inorganic/metal ions/cations in montmorillonite structure. To investigate the influence of the amount of modifier on basal spacing and subsequent removal efficiency of hydrocarbon, different amount of modifier was used. The modified and unmodified nanoclays characterized by XRD, CHN and FTIR techniques. The X-ray diffraction results showed that the interlayer spacing of CTAB-modified clays increased from 12 to 22Å. The effectiveness of the sorbent materials for sorption of a range of products was investigated using crude oil, kerosene, gasoline and toluene. The process parameters such as sorbent dosage and contact time were reported. The results showed that the adsorption capacity was in the range of 2 to 8 gram per gram of adsorbent. Results also showed that adsorption capacity of the organoclay was clearly higher than of the unmodified clay. These results were confirmed by CHN analysis.

  12. Modified Fittings Enhance Industrial Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center is not only home to one of the largest buildings in the world - the massive Vehicle Assembly Building - it also hosts a number of one-of-a-kind facilities. The more than 30-mile-long campus has witnessed every launch from the Space Shuttle Launch Pad, as well as many homecomings at the Shuttle Landing Facility. Just as important, the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) has seen each element of the International Space Station (ISS) that passes through Kennedy before it goes into orbit. The SSPF is where ISS components are checked, tested, and adjusted before being packed into the Space Shuttle for transport. In an environment like the SSPF - spanning 457,000 square feet of processing areas, operational control rooms, laboratories, logistics areas, and office space - large workstands and equipment used to support the processing of ISS components need to be moved around the facility. One of the devices employed for this task is an air pallet. An air pallet moves on cushions of air instead of wheels. Compressed air inflates the cushions underneath the pallet and is then expelled through exhaust holes. This forms a thin film of air between the cushions and the floor, lifting the platform off the floor and making it easy to move the heavy workstands, equipment, and ISS components. Concerned with the safety of the connections on the pressurized air hoses used for the air pallets, engineers at Kennedy modified an existing commercial cam and groove fitting to control the air supply hose in the event of an accidental release of a pressurized hose. This modification prevented the hose from detaching and, propelled by compressed air, striking workers or equipment. "At the time, these were not available on commercial coupling halves, so NASA made a modification and then put them into use. If a worker were to accidentally try to remove a pressurized hose from the pallet, it no longer rapidly separated, and it safely relieved the pressure," says Paul

  13. Detection of Genetically Modified Food: Has Your Food Been Genetically Modified?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandner, Diana L.

    2002-01-01

    Explains the benefits and risks of genetically-modified foods and describes methods for genetically modifying food. Presents a laboratory experiment using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test to detect foreign DNA in genetically-modified food. (Contains 18 references.) (YDS)

  14. Allosteric regulation of epigenetic modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucconi, Beth E; Cole, Philip A

    2017-08-01

    Epigenetic enzymes including histone modifying enzymes are key regulators of gene expression in normal and disease processes. Many drug development strategies to target histone modifying enzymes have focused on ligands that bind to enzyme active sites, but allosteric pockets offer potentially attractive opportunities for therapeutic development. Recent biochemical studies have revealed roles for small molecule and peptide ligands binding outside of the active sites in modulating the catalytic activities of histone modifying enzymes. Here we highlight several examples of allosteric regulation of epigenetic enzymes and discuss the biological significance of these findings. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Conditional live virus as a novel approach towards a safe live attenuated HIV vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Zhou, Xue; Vink, Monique; Klaver, Bep; Berkhout, Ben

    2002-01-01

    To control the worldwide spread of HIV, a safe and effective prophylactic vaccine is urgently needed. Studies with the simian immunodeficiency virus demonstrated that a live attenuated virus can be effective as a vaccine, but serious concerns about the safety of such a vaccine virus have arisen. We

  16. Application of modified complex Tremblay operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esa, Zainab; Kilicman, Adem; Ibrahim, Rabha W.; Ismail, Mat Rofa; Husain, Sharifah Kartini Said

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new fractional integral operator defined by modified fractional derivative Tremblay operator of analytic functions and show that the univalence of this integral operator is preserved under certain sufficient conditions in complex domain

  17. Modified Continuous Loop Technique for microvascular anastomosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of continuous loop technique for microvascular anastomosis is described. The handling of loop is easier & even last suture is placed under vision. This makes the microvascular anastomosis easier and simpler.

  18. Modified function projective combination synchronization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Combination hyperchaotic system; modified function projective combination synchronization; adaptive control; hyperchaotic Lorenz system; hyperchaotic Lu system ... A self-combination system is constructed from hyperchaotic Lorenz system by combining state variables of the Lorenz system with appropriate scaling factors.

  19. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundie, P. [Envirotech (Scotland) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Environmental Resource Industries Disposal Pty Ltd., Perth (Australia); McLeod, N. [Envirotreat Ltd., Kingswinford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  20. INVESTIGATION OF RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF MODIFIED BITUMEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erofeev Vladimir Trofimovich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available At the present time the most widely used type of road pavement is asphalt-concrete pavement produced on the basis of oil bitumen. One of the efficient ways to increase the quality and durability of asphalt-concrete pavement is modification of bitumen. Though Russian specialists still don’t have the global view of the ideal and real asphalt cement, the requirements to its quality and durability indicators in the composition of road structure haven’t yet formed. The authors present the investigation results of the properties of oil asphalt cement containing 0.5-2.0% of modifier “Olazol”. The physical, mechanical and rheological properties of the modified bitumen are determined. The dependences of the dynamic viscosity of the modified bitumen from the quantity of introduced modifier, shear rate and reheat temperature are analyzed.

  1. Genetically Modified Foods and Social Concerns

    OpenAIRE

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M.

    2011-01-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision...

  2. Global Convergence of a Modified LS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu JinKui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The LS method is one of the effective conjugate gradient methods in solving the unconstrained optimization problems. The paper presents a modified LS method on the basis of the famous LS method and proves the strong global convergence for the uniformly convex functions and the global convergence for general functions under the strong Wolfe line search. The numerical experiments show that the modified LS method is very effective in practice.

  3. The Modified Atkins Diet in Refractory Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvasini Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The modified Atkins diet is a less restrictive variation of the ketogenic diet. This diet is started on an outpatient basis without a fast, allows unlimited protein and fat, and does not restrict calories or fluids. Recent studies have shown good efficacy and tolerability of this diet in refractory epilepsy. In this review, we discuss the use of the modified Atkins diet in refractory epilepsy.

  4. Advanced Polyelectrolyte-Modified Zinc Phosphate Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    September 1995 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Advanced Polyelectrolyte-Modified Zinc Phosphate Coatings 6. AUTHOR(S) T. Sugama, N. Carciello and C.I...was to develop polyelectrolyte-modified zinc phosphate conversion coatings to protect cold-rolled steels against corrosion. Accordingly, we formulated...environmentally acceptable material systems for the zinc phosphating make-up solution, and developed the process technology to meet this purpose

  5. A Deterministic and Polynomial Modified Perceptron Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olof Barr

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct a modified perceptron algorithm that is deterministic, polynomial and also as fast as previous known algorithms. The algorithm runs in time O(mn3lognlog(1/ρ, where m is the number of examples, n the number of dimensions and ρ is approximately the size of the margin. We also construct a non-deterministic modified perceptron algorithm running in timeO(mn2lognlog(1/ρ.

  6. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  7. Reproductive, productivity, and mortality outcomes in late-gestation gilts and their litters following simulation of inadvertent exposure to a modified-live vaccine strain of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelkopf, Adam; Nerem, Joel; Cowles, Bobby; Amodie, Deb; Swalla, Richard; Dee, Scott

    2014-08-06

    The study evaluated the safety of a modified live-virus (MLV) porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) vaccine in susceptible, pregnant gilts. To simulate inadvertent exposure secondary to postvaccination shedding of PRRS-MLV, seronegative gilts (n=51) were exposed by IM vaccination at 90 days of gestation. Vaccinated and nonvaccinated, seronegative control gilts (n=25) were maintained in separate facilities. The PRRS-MLV vaccine was given in a 2mL dose on day 0. On day 7 all vaccinated gilts were PRRSV-PCR-positive for PRRSV and had responded serologically as determined by an ELISA. All control gilts remained PRRSV-PCR- and ELISA-negative throughout the study. Abortions did not occur in gilts from either group. The difference between vaccinated and control gilts in average number of piglets per litter (12.43 and 12.16, respectively), number of live births per litter (11.21 and 11.54), and mean piglet birth weight (3.22 and 3.26 lbs) were not significantly different. Piglets in the control group had significantly greater average daily gain versus piglets from vaccinated gilts (0.52 vs. 0.46 lbs, Pgilts (19.7% vs. 10.9%). A single gilt accounted for 18.2% of stillbirths in the vaccinated group. Air samples were borderline PRRSV-PCR-positive for PRRSV on days 29 and 32, after more than 98% of gilts had farrowed. Results demonstrated that vaccination of pregnant gilts at the time of peak fetal susceptibility was non-abortigenic and that the PRRS-MLV agent did not significantly affect reproductive outcomes. Lower ADG in piglets from vaccinated gilts may be due to PRRS-MLV viremia following transplacental or post-farrowing exposure. Air sampling results indicated that environmental contamination with PRRS-MLV shed from vaccinated gilts was minimal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 184.1287 - Enzyme-modified fats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Enzyme-modified fats. 184.1287 Section 184.1287... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1287 Enzyme-modified fats. (a) Enzyme-modified refined beef fat, enzyme-modified butterfat, and enzyme-modified steam-rendered chicken fat are prepared...

  9. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF THE MODIFIED MAGNESIUM-CONTAINING SILUMINS WITH DIFFERENT TYPE OF MODIFIER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Rafalskij

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The modification of the eutectic structure in aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloys related to the thermal parameters analysis is investigated. The magnitude of the eutectic undercooling and eutectic arrest depression caused by modifying sodium and strontium has been correlated to the eutectic microstructure accordingly to the type of modifier. The reason for difference of cooling curves and microstructure of aluminum-silicon-magnesium alloys modified sodium and strontium is changing in growth mode of eutectic crystals from the liquid.

  10. Characterization of lime mortar additivated with crystallization modifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Granneman, S.J.C.; Lubelli, B.; van Hees, R.P.J.

    2018-01-01

    Additivating mortars with crystallization modifiers is a novel approach to mitigate salt crystallization damage in historic masonry. Once verified the effectiveness of crystallization modifiers in bulk solution, the next step consists in verifying whether: (i) modifiers are still effective when

  11. Gout: a review of non-modifiable and modifiable risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Lindsey A.; Kim, Seoyoung C.

    2014-01-01

    Gout is a common inflammatory arthritis triggered by the crystallization of uric acid within the joints. Gout affects millions worldwide and has an increasing prevalence. Recent research has been carried out to better qualify and quantify the risk factors predisposing individuals to gout. These can largely be broken into non-modifiable risk factors such as sex, age, race, and genetics, and modifiable risk factors such as diet and lifestyle. Increasing knowledge of factors predisposing certain individuals to gout could potentially lead to improved preventive practices. This review summarizes the non-modifiable and modifiable risk factors associated with development of gout. PMID:25437279

  12. Hypolipidemic effects of modified psyllium preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Kenneth G D; Bristow, Sandee J; Yu, Liangli

    2004-08-11

    The hypolipidemic effects of two solid-state enzymatically modified psyllium preparations were compared to that of the original psyllium husks in hamsters. Hamsters were ad libitum fed 0.2 wt % cholesterol diets formulated to contain 12% cellulose or 5% cellulose plus 7% raw or enzymatically modified psyllium preparations. Psyllium additions to the diet did not significantly alter food consumption or the weekly mean hamster weight over the 5 weeks of feeding. However, the total weight gained over 35 days of feeding of modified psyllium Y-26-4, one of the modified psyllium preparations, was significantly lower, 48, 47, and 32% than that for the cellulose, raw psyllium, and modified psyllium Y-24-3 groups, respectively. At 35 days, psyllium feeding significantly reduced plasma total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 50-100% in comparison to cellulose feeding, with no significant differences between the psyllium preparations. Fecal dry weight was unaffected by dietary treatment. At days 29-31, fecal bile acid excretion was significantly increased by 30-70% with all three psyllium diets, with no significant differences between psyllium preparations. These results suggest that improving the functional properties of psyllium by solid-state enzymatic procedures, such that its incorporation into food products is feasible, does not alter psyllium-mediated hypolipidemic effects.

  13. Genetically modified soybean plants and their ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Mirjana B.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Transgenic plants are developed by introgressing new genes using methods of molecular genetics and genetic engineering. The presence of these genes in plant genome is identified on the basis of specific oligonucleotides primers, and the use of PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction and DNA fragments multiplication. Genetically modified plants such as soybean constitute a newly created bioenergetic potential whose gene expression can cause disturbance of the biological balance ecosystem, soil structure and soil microbiological activity. Genetically modified plants may acquire monogenic or polygenic traits causing genetic and physiological changes in these plants, which may elicit a certain reaction of the environment including changes of microbiological composition of soil rhizosphere. The aim of introgressing genes for certain traits into a cultivated plant is to enhance its yield and intensify food production. There are more and more genetically modified plant species such as soybean, corn, potato, rice and others and there is a pressure to use them as human food and animal feed. Genetically modified soybean plants with introgressed gene for resistance to total herbicides, such as Round-up, are more productive than non-modified herbicide-sensitive soybeans.

  14. [National consensus on the modified Atkins diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccarezza, María; Agustinho, Ariela; Alberti, M Julia; Argumedo, Laura; Armeno, Marisa; Blanco, Virginia; Bouquet, Cecilia; Cabrera, Analía; Caraballo, Roberto; Caramuta, Luciana; Cresta, Araceli; de Grandis, Elizabeth S; DeMartini, Martha G; Diez, Cecilia; Diz, Mariana; Dlugoszewski, Corina; Escobal, Nidia; Ferrero, Hilario; Galicchio, Santiago; Gambarini, Victoria; Gamboni, Beatriz; Gonzalez, Lara; Guisande, Silvina; Hassan, Amal; Matarrese, Pablo; Mestre, Graciela; Pesce, Laura; Rios, Viviana; Semprino, Marcos; Sosa, Patricia; Toma, Marisol; Viollaz, Rocío; Panico, Luis

    2016-04-16

    Epilepsy is a chronic disease that affects 0.5-1% of the population. One third of the patients become refractory to antiepileptic drugs. Among the non-pharmacological treatments available, the modified Atkins diet is an effective treatment used since 2003 as another alternative for children and adults with refractory epilepsy. The Ketogenic Diet National Committee, which depends on the Argentine Society of Pediatric Neurology, elaborated this consensus on the modified Atkins diet, basing itself on a review of the literature and on their clinical experience. This consensus in Spanish explains the different aspects to be taken into account regarding the modified Atkins diet, patient selection, implementation, different controls and adverse effects. Unlike the classic ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet is initiated without fasting or hospital stay, nor does it require protein, calorie or fluid restriction, thus improving patient palatability and consequently patient tolerability. The modified Atkins diet is a useful treatment for patients with intractable epilepsy. The publication of this consensus offers the possibility for new centers to get oriented regarding this diet implementation.

  15. Magnetically modified biocells in constant magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramov, E.G.; Panina, L.K. [Saint Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kolikov, V.A., E-mail: kolikov1@yandex.ru [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bogomolova, E.V. [Botanical Institute of the RAS after V.L.Komarov, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Snetov, V.N. [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Cherepkova, I.A. [Saint Petersburg State Institute of Technology, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kiselev, A.A. [Institute for Electrophysics and Electric Power of the RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-01

    Paper addresses the inverse problem in determining the area, where the external constant magnetic field captures the biological cells modified by the magnetic nanoparticles. Zero velocity isolines, in area where the modified cells are captured by the magnetic field were determined by numerical method for two locations of the magnet. The problem was solved taking into account the gravitational field, magnetic induction, density of medium, concentration and size of cells, and size and magnetization of nanoparticles attached to the cell. Increase in the number of the nanoparticles attached to the cell and decrease in the cell’ size, enlarges the area, where the modified cells are captured and concentrated by the magnet. Solution is confirmed by the visible pattern formation of the modified cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae. - Highlights: • The inverse problem was solved for finding zero velocity isolines of magnetically modified biological cells. • Solution of the inverse problem depends on the size of cells and the number of nanoparticles attached to the single cell. • The experimental data are in agreement with theoretical solution.

  16. Modified food starches in baby foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciers, S; Mehta, D I; Blecker, U; Lebenthal, E

    1998-01-01

    Modified food starches were developed as a stabilizer, providing desirable consistency, texture, and storage ability. They are used primarily in strained and junior foods and, to a minor extent, in infant formulas. However, despite the fact that there is an increasing tendency to introduce solid foods to infants at a very early age, there is few long-term studies to delineate the effect of starch feeding on the growth of young infants. Modified food starches used by the food industry for infants and young children are of concern and there is an urgent need for additional data regarding their bioavailability, effect on nutrient absorption, intestinal changes, and toxic, mutagenic, and carcinogenic effects. Therefore, the inclusion of modified food starches should be used prudently and sparingly.

  17. Modified iron oxide nanomaterials: Functionalization and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Samira; Julkapli, Nurhidayatullaili Muhd

    2016-10-15

    Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles have aroused the interest of researchers of materials' chemistry due to its exceptional properties such as decent magnetic, electric, catalytic, biocompatibility, and low toxicity. However, these magnetic nanoparticles are predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles, due to its strong anisotropic dipolar interactions, particularly in the aqueous phase, consequently depriving them of dispersibility and particular properties, ultimately degrading their performance. Hence, this review focuses on modified magnetic nanoparticles that are stable, easily synthesized, possess a high surface area and could be facile-separated via magnetic forces, and are of low toxicity and costs for applications such as catalyst/catalyst support, food security, biomedical, and pollutant remediation. - Highlights: • Nanomagnetite is interesting due to its exceptional properties. • Nanomagnetite is predisposed towards aggregation and forming larger particles. • Modified nanomagnetite are stable, easily synthesized, possess high surface area. • Modified nanomagnetite got applications as catalyst/catalyst support.

  18. Attitudes towards genetically modified and organic foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saher, Marieke; Lindeman, Marjaana; Hursti, Ulla-Kaisa Koivisto

    2006-05-01

    Finnish students (N=3261) filled out a questionnaire on attitudes towards genetically modified and organic food, plus the rational-experiential inventory, the magical thinking about food and health scale, Schwartz's value survey and the behavioural inhibition scale. In addition, they reported their eating of meat. Structural equation modelling of these measures had greater explanatory power for attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) foods than for attitudes towards organic foods (OF). GM attitudes were best predicted by natural science education and magical food and health beliefs, which mediated the influence of thinking styles. Positive attitudes towards organic food, on the other hand, were more directly related to such individual differences as thinking styles and set of values. The results of the study indicate that OF attitudes are rooted in more fundamental personal attributes than GM attitudes, which are embedded in a more complex but also in a more modifiable network of characteristics.

  19. Genetically Modified Foods and Consumer Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Flavio; Sarnacchiaro, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified food is able to oppose the world's hunger and preserve the environment, even if the patents in this matter are symptomatic of several doubts. And also, transgenic consumption causes problems and skepticism among consumers in several European countries, but above all in Italy, where there is a strong opposition over recent years. So, the present study conducted a research to study the consumption of genetically modified food products by Italian young generation. This research presented the following purposes: firstly, to analyze genetically modified products' consumption among a particular category of consumers; secondly, to implement a quantitative model to understand behaviour about this particular kind of consumption and identify the factors that determine their purchase. The proposed model shows that transgenic consumption is especially linked to knowledge and impact on environment and mankind's health.

  20. Review Of Rheology Modifiers For Hanford Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-09-30

    As part of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL)'s strategic development scope for the Department of Energy - Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste feed acceptance and product qualification scope, the SRNL has been requested to recommend candidate rheology modifiers to be evaluated to adjust slurry properties in the Hanford Tank Farm. SRNL has performed extensive testing of rheology modifiers for use with Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) simulated melter feed - a high undissolved solids (UDS) mixture of simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm sludge, nitric and formic acids, and glass frit. A much smaller set of evaluations with Hanford simulated waste have also been completed. This report summarizes past work and recommends modifiers for further evaluation with Hanford simulated wastes followed by verification with actual waste samples. Based on the review of available data, a few compounds/systems appear to hold the most promise. For all types of evaluated simulated wastes (caustic Handford tank waste and DWPF processing samples with pH ranging from slightly acidic to slightly caustic), polyacrylic acid had positive impacts on rheology. Citric acid also showed improvement in yield stress on a wide variety of samples. It is recommended that both polyacrylic acid and citric acid be further evaluated as rheology modifiers for Hanford waste. These materials are weak organic acids with the following potential issues: The acidic nature of the modifiers may impact waste pH, if added in very large doses. If pH is significantly reduced by the modifier addition, dissolution of UDS and increased corrosion of tanks, piping, pumps, and other process equipment could occur. Smaller shifts in pH could reduce aluminum solubility, which would be expected to increase the yield stress of the sludge. Therefore, it is expected that use of an acidic modifier would be limited to concentrations that

  1. Disease-modifying agents in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coyle P

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 1993, six disease-modifying therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS have been proven to be of benefit in rigorous phase III clinical trials. Other agents are also available and are used to treat MS, but definitive data on their efficacy is lacking. Currently, disease-modifying therapy is used for relapsing forms of MS. This includes clinically isolated syndrome/first-attack high-risk patients, relapsing patients, secondary progressive patients who are still experiencing relapses, and progressive relapsing patients. The choice of agent depends upon drug factors (including affordability, availability, convenience, efficacy, and side effects, disease factors (including clinical and neuroimaging prognostic indicators, and patient factors (including comorbidities, lifestyle, and personal preference. This review will discuss the disease-modifying agents used currently in MS, as well as available alternative agents.

  2. [Genetically modified food and allergies - an update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Birgit; Pöting, Annette; Braeuning, Albert; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-07-01

    Approval by the European Commission is mandatory for placing genetically modified plants as food or feed on the market in member states of the European Union (EU). The approval is preceded by a safety assessment based on the guidance of the European Food Safety Authority EFSA. The assessment of allergenicity of genetically modified plants and their newly expressed proteins is an integral part of this assessment process. Guidance documents for the assessment of allergenicity are currently under revision. For this purpose, an expert workshop was conducted in Brussels on June 17, 2015. There, methodological improvements for the assessment of coeliac disease-causing properties of proteins, as well as the use of complex models for in vitro digestion of proteins were discussed. Using such techniques a refinement of the current, proven system of allergenicity assessment of genetically modified plants can be achieved.

  3. Dynamical Analysis of a Modified Lorenz System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loong Soon Tee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents another new modified Lorenz system which is chaotic in a certain range of parameters. Besides that, this paper also presents explanations to solve the new modified Lorenz system. Furthermore, some of the dynamical properties of the system are shown and stated. Basically, this paper shows the finding that led to the discovery of fixed points for the system, dynamical analysis using complementary-cluster energy-barrier criterion (CCEBC, finding the Jacobian matrix, finding eigenvalues for stability, finding the Lyapunov functions, and finding the Lyapunov exponents to investigate some of the dynamical behaviours of the system. Pictures and diagrams will be shown for the chaotic systems using the aide of MAPLE in 2D and 3D views. Nevertheless, this paper is to introduce the new modified Lorenz system.

  4. Proposal for Modified Damage Probability Distribution Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup; Hansen, Peter Friis

    1996-01-01

    Immidiately following the Estonia disaster, the Nordic countries establishe a project entitled "Safety of Passenger/RoRo Vessels" As part of this project the present proposal for modified damage stability probability distribution functions has been developed. and submitted to "Sub-committee on st......Immidiately following the Estonia disaster, the Nordic countries establishe a project entitled "Safety of Passenger/RoRo Vessels" As part of this project the present proposal for modified damage stability probability distribution functions has been developed. and submitted to "Sub...

  5. Halo scale predictions of symmetron modified gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clampitt, Joseph; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Khoury, Justin, E-mail: clampitt@sas.upenn.edu, E-mail: bjain@physics.upenn.edu, E-mail: jkhoury@sas.upenn.edu [Center for Particle Cosmology and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, 209 South 33rd St., Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)

    2012-01-01

    We offer predictions of symmetron modified gravity in the neighborhood of realistic dark matter halos. The predictions for the fifth force are obtained by solving the nonlinear symmetron equation of motion in the spherical NFW approximation. In addition, we compare the three major known screening mechanisms: Vainshtein, Chameleon, and Symmetron around such dark matter halos, emphasizing the significant differences between them and highlighting observational tests which exploit these differences. Finally, we demonstrate the host halo environmental screening effect (''blanket screening'') on smaller satellite halos by solving for the modified forces around a density profile which is the sum of satellite and approximate host components.

  6. Modified Coaxial Probe Feeds for Layered Antennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.

    2006-01-01

    In a modified configuration of a coaxial probe feed for a layered printed-circuit antenna (e.g., a microstrip antenna), the outer conductor of the coaxial cable extends through the thickness of at least one dielectric layer and is connected to both the ground-plane conductor and a radiator-plane conductor. This modified configuration simplifies the incorporation of such radio-frequency integrated circuits as power dividers, filters, and low-noise amplifiers. It also simplifies the design and fabrication of stacked antennas with aperture feeds.

  7. Testing Modified Gravity in the Solar System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozaffari, A. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    It is well known that the Earth-Sun gravitational field has a few interesting features, such as the Lagrange points. It also has a saddle point, which from a Newtonian/GR point of view is rather boring, but in the context of modified gravity becomes a whole lot more interesting. Using both theoretical and computational models, we will present a way of testing modified gravity theories in the Solar System, using the forthcoming LISA-pathfinder space probe. This document is composed of the slides of the presentation. (author)

  8. Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

    2013-09-10

    Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

  9. LNA-modified isothermal oligonucleotide microarray for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-10-20

    Oct 20, 2014 ... Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus megaterium and Bacillus circulans), we unified the melting temperatures of .... Sequences and calculated melting temperatures of DNA oligonucleotide probes and LNA-modified oligonucleotide probes for. Bacillus .... quick chilling on ice for 5 min. 13.5 μL of ...

  10. A modified photoresist resistant to oxygen plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashburn, S.P.; DuBois, T.D.; Frieser, R.G.; Tranjan, F.M.; Bobbio, S.M. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC (US)); Jones, S.K. (Microelectronics Center of North Carolina, Research Triangle Park, NC (US))

    1990-07-01

    Conventional photoresists have been modified by the incorporation of a phosphorus-containing compound, {ital i.e.}, phosphonitrilic chloride trimer (P{sub 3}N{sub 3}Cl{sub 6}). The modification was achieved by simply dissolving P{sub 3}N{sub 3}Cl{sub 6} (PNCT) in conventional photoresists. The phosphorus concentration varied from 5 weight percent (w/o) to 12 w/o in the modified photoresist films. These films formed a barrier layer when exposed to oxygen plasmas. After the layer was formed, no measurable resist etch rate could be detected. The resolution and mechanical properties of the modified resist films were essentially unchanged, although an increase by a factor of 1.5 in the exposure threshold was observed. Features of less than 1 {mu}m lines and spaces were anisotropically etched in polyamide masked by this photoresist. Furthermore, metal lift-off structures have been obtained using a bilayer process employing the modified resist.

  11. Clusters of galaxies with modified Newtonian dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, RH

    2003-01-01

    I consider X-ray emitting clusters of galaxies in the context of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND). Self-gravitating isothermal gas spheres are not good representations of rich clusters; the X-ray luminosity at a given temperature is typically an order of magnitude larger than observed, and the

  12. Addressing the Socioeconomic Impacts of Genetically Modified ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    But despite rapid diffusion of genetically modified (GM) cotton - and subsequent yield increases - most small-scale farmers continue to live in poverty. This is because existing science and technology (S&T) policy tends to ignore their interests and established practices, such as informal acquisition and recycling of seeds.

  13. Zirconium modified nickel-copper alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittenberger, J. D. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An improved material for use in a catalytic reactor which reduces nitrogen oxide from internal combustion engines is in the form of a zirconium-modified, precipitation-strengthened nickel-copper alloy. This material has a nominal composition of Ni-30 Cu-0.2 Zr and is characterized by improved high temperature mechanical properties.

  14. Modified planar functions and their components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anbar Meidl, Nurdagül; Meidl, Wilfried Meidl

    2017-01-01

    Zhou ([20]) introduced modified planar functions in order to describe (2n; 2n; 2n; 1) relative difference sets R as a graph of a function on the finite field F2n, and pointed out that projections of R are difference sets that can be described by negabent or bent4 functions, which are Boolean func...

  15. Drought in a human-modified world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, van Anne F.; Stahl, Kerstin; Baldassarre, Di Giuliano; Clark, Julian; Rangecroft, Sally; Wanders, Niko; Gleeson, Tom; Dijk, van Albert I.J.M.; Tallaksen, Lena M.; Hannaford, Jamie; Uijlenhoet, Remko; Teuling, Ryan; Hannah, David M.; Sheffield, Justin; Svoboda, Mark; Verbeiren, Boud; Wagener, Thorsten; Lanen, van Henny A.J.

    2016-01-01

    In the current human-modified world, or Anthropocene, the state of water stores and fluxes has become dependent on human as well as natural processes. Water deficits (or droughts) are the result of a complex interaction between meteorological anomalies, land surface processes, and human inflows,

  16. Case studies on genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santis, De Barbara; Stockhofe, Norbert; Wal, Jean Michel; Weesendorp, Eefke; Lallès, Jean Paul; Dijk, van Jeroen; Kok, Esther; Giacomo, De Marzia; Einspanier, Ralf; Onori, Roberta; Brera, Carlo; Bikker, Paul; Meulen, van der Jan; Kleter, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    Within the frame of the EU-funded MARLON project, background data were reviewed to explore the possibility of measuring health indicators during post-market monitoring for potential effects of feeds, particularly genetically modified (GM) feeds, on livestock animal health, if applicable. Four case

  17. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air–water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir–Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple.

  18. Validated modified Lycopodium spore method development for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Validated modified lycopodium spore method has been developed for simple and rapid quantification of herbal powdered drugs. Lycopodium spore method was performed on ingredients of Shatavaryadi churna, an ayurvedic formulation used as immunomodulator, galactagogue, aphrodisiac and rejuvenator. Estimation of ...

  19. Modified mouthparts in hydrophilous cave millipedes (Diplopoda)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enghoff, Henrik

    1985-01-01

    In several unrelated cave-dwelling millipedes from southern Europe and the Caucasus, the mouthparts are convergently modified: The biting/masticating parts of the mandibles are reduced, whereas the pectinate lamellae are hypertrophied; the medial labral teeth are often reduced, and the

  20. Comparison of immunohistochemical and modified Giemsa stains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BackgroundModified Giemsa staining has been favoured by many researchers because it is easy to perform but, like many other stains, demonstration of the bacteria depends on its morphology. It has been arged in some research circles that some of the organisms in the gastric mucosa may not be true H.pylori.

  1. Self-healing of polymer modified concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd_Elmoaty M. Abd_Elmoaty

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Self healing phenomenon of concrete has been observed in traditional, fibrous, self compacting concrete. This phenomenon occurred mainly due to the presence of unhydrated cement particles in the presence of water. Mechanism of polymer in concrete depends on creating a layer and net of polymer around cement particles which enhances the properties of polymer modified concrete. This mechanism may affect the self healing of this type of concrete. This work aims to study the presence of the self healing phenomenon in polymer modified concrete and the related parameters. An experimental investigation on self healing of polymer modified concrete was undertaken. In this research work, effect of polymer type, polymer dose, cement content, cement type, w/cm ratio and age of damage were studied. The healing process extended up to 60 days. Ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements were used to evaluate the healing process. Results indicated that, the self healing phenomenon existed in polymer modified concrete as in traditional concrete. The increase of polymer dose increases the healing degree at the same healing time. This increase depends on polymer type. Also, the decrease of w/cm ratio reduces the self healing degree while the use of Type V Portland cement improves the self healing process compared with Type I Portland cement. Cement content has an insignificant effect on healing process for both concrete with and without polymer. In addition, the increase of damage age decreases the efficiency of self healing process.

  2. Modified triglyceride oil through reactions with phenyltriazolinedione

    Science.gov (United States)

    The synthesis of a modified triglyceride oil was achieved through the reactions with 4-phenyl-1,2-4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD). 1H NMR was used for structure determination and to monitor the reactions. Several reaction products were produced, and their relative yields depended on the stoichiometry ...

  3. decorated nano silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieves-modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nano SAPO; molecular sieves; modified electrode; electrocatalytic oxidation; methanol. 1. Introduction. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) as power sources for electronic devices are attractive for storage and apply in portable power generator [1]. In the DMFC, methanol is used as a fuel so it is important that to improve ...

  4. Safety assessment of genetically modified foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Noordam, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops has steadily increased since their introduction to the market in the mid-1990s. Before these crops can be grown and sold they have to obtain regulatory approval in many countries, the process of which includes a pre-market safety assessment. The

  5. Modified function projective combination synchronization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-08

    Feb 8, 2017 ... tography, secure communications [6,7], etc. Many ap- proaches have been proposed for the synchronization ... more secure communication. Hyperchaotic systems characterized by more than one positive ... We define the modified function projective synchronization error system e(t) as e(t) = z − f(t)y. (5).

  6. Monitoring Transport Across Modified Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich D. Steinle

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of several characterization methods to examinealumina nanotubule membranes that have been modified with specific silanes. The functionof these silanes is to alter the transport properties through the membrane by changing thelocal environment inside the alumina nanotube. The presence of alkyl groups, either long(C18 or short and branched (isopropyl hydrocarbon chains, on these silanes significantlydecreases the rate of transport of permeant molecules through membranes containingalumina nanotubes as monitored via absorbance spectroscopy. The presence of an ionicsurfactant can alter the polarity of these modified nanotubes, which correlates to anincreased transport of ions. Fluorescent spectroscopy is also utilized to enhance thesensitivity of detecting these permeant molecules. Confirmation of the alkylsilaneattachment to the alumina membrane is achieved with traditional infrared spectroscopy,which can also examine the lifetime of the modified membrane. The physical parameters ofthese silane-modified porous alumina membranes are studied via scanning electronmicroscopy. The alumina nanotubes are not physically closed off or capped by the silanesthat are attached to the alumina surfaces.

  7. 3'-Pyrene-modified unlocked nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlersen, Maria; Langkjær, Niels; Wengel, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    , and fluorescence-based detection of mismatched hybridization was observed for some modified strand constitutions. Incorporation of the monomer in a triplex-forming oligonucleotide (TFO) strand lead to an increase of triplex melting temperature both at pH 6.0 and pH 7.0 for parallel triplexes - again an effect...

  8. Nanostructured metal particle-modified electrodes for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jcsc/118/06/0593-0600 ... The nanostructured Mnano modified electrodes were utilized for efficient electrocatalytic selective oxidation of neurotransmitter molecules in the presence of interfering species such as ascorbic acid (AA) and uric acid (UA). It has been also shown ...

  9. Preconditioning the modified conjugate gradient method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the convergence analysis of the conventional conjugate Gradient method was reviewed. And the convergence analysis of the modified conjugate Gradient method was analysed with our extension on preconditioning the algorithm. Convergence of the algorithm is a function of the condition number of M-1A.

  10. Solving Differential Equations Using Modified Picard Iteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, W. A.

    2010-01-01

    Many classes of differential equations are shown to be open to solution through a method involving a combination of a direct integration approach with suitably modified Picard iterative procedures. The classes of differential equations considered include typical initial value, boundary value and eigenvalue problems arising in physics and…

  11. Modified penoplasty for concealed penis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tianyou; Zhang, Liyu; Su, Cheng; Li, Zhongmin; Wen, Yingquan

    2013-09-01

    To report a modified penoplasty technique for concealed penis in children. Between January 2006 and June 2012, 201 cases of concealed penis were surgically repaired with modified penoplasty. The modified penoplasty technique consisted of 3 major steps: (1) degloved the penile skin and excised the inner prepuce, (2) advanced penoscrotal skin to cover penile shaft, and (3) fixed the penis base and reconstructed the penoscrotal angle. Two hundred one cases of concealed penis were enrolled in this study over a period of 6 years. Mean age at the time of surgery was 5.3 years (range 1-13 years) and mean operative time was 40 minutes (range 30-65minutes). All patients were routinely followed up at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. Most patients developed postoperative edema and were resolved within 1 month, whereas 20 cases developed prolonged postoperative edema, especially at the site of frenulum, which took 3 months to be resolved. Ten cases had retraction after surgery. No erection difficulties were recorded. Patients/parents reported better hygiene and improved visualization and accessibility of penis after surgery and were satisfied with the cosmetic outcome. The result of this study shows that the modified penoplasty technique is a simple, safe, and effective procedure for concealed penis with satisfied cosmetic outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cosmology with modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that the application of Newtonian dynamics to an expanding spherical region leads to the correct relativistic expression (the Friedmann equation) for the evolution of the cosmic scalefactor. Here, the cosmological implications of Milgrom's modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) are

  13. Beam aperture modifier design with acoustic metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weipeng; Ren, Chunyu

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we present a design concept of acoustic beam aperture modifier using two metasurface-based planar lenses. By appropriately designing the phase gradient profile along the metasurface, we obtain a class of acoustic convex lenses and concave lenses, which can focus the incoming plane waves and collimate the converging waves, respectively. On the basis of the high converging and diverging capability of these lenses, two kinds of lens combination scheme, including the convex-concave type and convex-convex type, are proposed to tune up the incoming beam aperture as needed. To be specific, the aperture of the acoustic beam can be shrunk or expanded through adjusting the phase gradient of the pair of lenses and the spacing between them. These lenses and the corresponding aperture modifiers are constructed by the stacking ultrathin labyrinthine structures, which are obtained by the geometry optimization procedure and exhibit high transmission coefficient and a full range of phase shift. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed beam aperture modifiers. Due to the flexibility in aperture controlling and the simplicity in fabrication, the proposed modifiers have promising potential in applications, such as acoustic imaging, nondestructive evaluation, and communication.

  14. Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Biodeterioration of Plantain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fruits of two local plantain cultivars and a disease-resistant tetraploid hybrid were subjected to modified atmosphere packaging. The same organisms namely Colletotricum musae, Botryodiplodia theobromae, Fusarium monilifomae, Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus, were isolated from the local cultivars and the ...

  15. Transboundary movements of genetically modified organisms and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While the CBD includes international rules on access to genetic resources, access to and the transfer of technology, the handling of biotechnology and the distribution of its benefits, it does not include a detailed regulation on genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and their possible adverse effects on the environment, ...

  16. MODIFIED EDGE FED SIERPINSKI CARPET MINIATURIZED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presented a modified edge fed Sierpinski carpet microstrip patch antenna for antenna miniaturization. The proposed design was etched as Sierpinski carpet to lower the antenna resonant frequency, which is used to reduce the conventional patch antenna size. After the Sierpinski carpet second iteration, the ...

  17. Risk assessment of genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-30

    Sep 30, 2011 ... Key words: Risk assessment, biosafety, Malaysian Biosafety Act 2007, genetically modified organisms. (GMOs). INTRODUCTION. Nowadays, with ... from the early stages of genetic engineering, legal frameworks were set up to ensure the ..... Since the advances in gene technology have led to speculation ...

  18. Genetically Modified Organisms : Public Knowledge, Attitudes and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The application of modern biotechnology to agriculture has courted considerable controversy in both developed and developing countries. While proponents argue that genetically modified crops can contribute to food security in developing countries, opponents maintain that their social and economic impacts are unknown ...

  19. MODIFIED DYNAMICS (MOND) AS A DARK HALO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SANDERS, RH; BEGEMAN, KG

    1994-01-01

    We propose a form for dark haloes that embodies the fundamental aspect of Milgrom's modified dynamics (MOND): the discrepancy between the visible mass and the Newtonian dynamical mass appears below a critical acceleration. This is a halo having a density distribution, at least to several tens of

  20. mwnts composite film modified glassy carbon electrode

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    ABSTRACT: A poly p-aminosalicylic acid (Poly(p-ASA)) and multiwall carbon nanotubes. (MWCNTs) composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode was constructed by casting the MWNTs on the GC electrode surface followed by electropolymerization of the p-ASA on the MWCNTs/GCE. The electrochemical behaviours ...

  1. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic ...

  2. Genetically modified pig models for neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Ida E; Alstrup, Aage Kristian Olsen; Luo, Yonglun

    2016-01-01

    Increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease has become one of the most challenging health issues in ageing humans. One approach to combat this is to generate genetically modified animal models of neurodegenerative disorders for studying pathogenesis, prognosis, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Owing to the genetic, anatomic, physiologic, pathologic, and neurologic similarities between pigs and humans, genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders have been attractive large animal models to bridge the gap of preclinical investigations between rodents and humans. In this review, we provide a neuroanatomical overview in pigs and summarize and discuss the generation of genetically modified pig models of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's diseases, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy, and ataxia-telangiectasia. We also highlight how non-invasive bioimaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET), computer tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and behavioural testing have been applied to characterize neurodegenerative pig models. We further propose a multiplex genome editing and preterm recloning (MAP) approach by using the rapid growth of the ground-breaking precision genome editing technology CRISPR/Cas9 and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). With this approach, we hope to shorten the temporal requirement in generating multiple transgenic pigs, increase the survival rate of founder pigs, and generate genetically modified pigs that will more closely resemble the disease-causing mutations and recapitulate pathological features of human conditions. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Comparative evaluation of modified pulse width modulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative evaluation of modified pulse width modulation schemes of Z-source inverter for various applications and demands. ... In this paper, for the common boost factor and modulation index, the output voltage, output current, output line harmonics profile of the inverters with different PWM schemes powered by the ...

  4. Leukotriene modifiers in pediatric asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    -acting beta-agonists as complementary treatment to inhaled corticosteroids in pediatric asthma management because they provide bronchodilation and bronchoprotection without development of tolerance, and complement the antiinflammatory activity unchecked by steroids. In addition, the Cys-LTRA montelukast has...... modifiers will play an important role in the treatment of asthmatic children....

  5. Factors Modifying Burnout in Osteopathic Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, Jessica; Yost, Morgan; Sexton, Patricia; LaBaere, Richard J

    2016-02-01

    The purposes of the current study are to examine factors modifying burnout and identify which of these factors place osteopathic medical students at risk for developing burnout. The current study used a cross-sectional study design and an anonymous, web-based survey to assess burnout and depression in osteopathic medical students. The survey included Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Stressors and their impact scale, students' sleeping and studying habits, and students' extracurricular involvement. In total, 1294 osteopathic medical students completed the survey. Burnout was present in 516 (39.9%) osteopathic medical students, and 1006 (77.0%) met criteria for depression. Females were 1.5 times more likely to be burned out in comparison to males. For the burnout subscales, males had lower emotional exhaustion, slightly higher depersonalization, and lower personal accomplishment. Lesbian/gay/bisexual/asexual students were 2.62 times more likely to be burned out compared with heterosexual students. Depression and academic, personal, and family stressors were all strongly linked to overall burnout. Finally, for modifiable factors, average hours of sleep, average hours spent studying, and club involvement appeared to be linked to burnout. The current study suggested that a variety of factors, including non-modifiable, situational, and modifiable, impact burnout in osteopathic medical students. Future research is necessary since burnout in physicians affects the quality of care provided to patients.

  6. [Genetically modified food--unnecessary controversy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchórz, Michał; Radoniewicz-Chagowska, Anna; Lewandowska-Stanek, Hanna; Szponar, Elzbieta; Szponar, Jarosław

    2012-01-01

    Fast development of genetic engineering and biotechnology allows use of genetically modified organisms (GMO) more and more in different branches of science and economy. Every year we can see an increase of food amount produced with the use of modification of genetic material. In our supermarkets we can find brand new types of plants, products including genetically modified ingredients or meat from animals fed with food containing GMO. This article presents general information about genetically modified organisms, it also explains the range of genetic manipulation, use of newly developed products and current field area for GMO in the world. Based on scientific data the article presents benefits from development of biotechnology in reference to modified food. It also presents the voice of skeptics who are extremely concerned about the impact of those organisms on human health and natural environment. Problems that appear or can appear as a result of an increase of GMO are very important not only from a toxicologist's or a doctor's point of view but first of all from the point of view of ordinary consumers--all of us.

  7. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  8. Unpacking attitudes towards genetically modified food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liver, Y. de; Pligt, J. van der; Wigboldus, D.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates the structure of attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) food. A total of 431 respondents completed a questionnaire measuring their overall attitude, cognition and affect towards GM food. A model with distinct positive and negative, affective and cognitive

  9. Biopreservation in modified atmosphere packaged vegetables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennik, M.H.J.

    1997-01-01


    Recent trends in food preservation are the use of mild preservation techniques, such as modified atmosphere (MA) packaging and refrigeration, to prolong the shelflife of foods without affecting the fresh character of the product. This has resulted in the development of a new generation of

  10. Architecture-level modifiability analysis (ALMA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bengtsson, P; Lassing, N; Bosch, J; van Vliet, H

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have shown that 50-70% of the total lifecycle cost for a software system is spent on evolving the system. Organizations aim to reduce the cost of these adaptations, by addressing modifiability during the system's development. The software architecture plays an important role in

  11. Architecture-Level Modifiability Analysis (ALMA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bengtsson, P.O.; Lassing, N.H.; Bosch, J.; van Vliet, H.

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have shown that 50-70% of the total lifecycle cost for a software system is spent on evolving the system. Organizations aim to reduce the cost of these adaptations, by addressing modifiability during the system's development. The software architecture plays an important role in

  12. Glassy carbon electrodes modified with gelatin functionalized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Glassy carbon electrodes modified with gelatin functionalized reduced graphene oxide nanosheet for determination of gallic acid. Fereshteh Chekin Samira Bagheri Sharifah Bee Abd Hamid. Volume 38 Issue 7 December 2015 pp 1711-1716 ...

  13. Cobalt Phthalocyanine Modified Electrodes Utilised in Electroanalysis: Nano-Structured Modified Electrodes vs. Bulk Modified Screen-Printed Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. Foster

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPC compounds have been reported to provide electrocatalytic performances towards a substantial number of analytes. In these configurations, electrodes are typically constructed via drop casting the CoPC onto a supporting electrode substrate, while in other cases the CoPC complex is incorporated within the ink of a screen-printed sensor, providing a one-shot economical and disposable electrode configuration. In this paper we critically compare CoPC modified electrodes prepared by drop casting CoPC nanoparticles (nano-CoPC onto a range of carbon based electrode substrates with that of CoPC bulk modified screen-printed electrodes in the sensing of the model analytes L-ascorbic acid, oxygen and hydrazine. It is found that no “electrocatalysis” is observed towards L-ascorbic acid using either of these CoPC modified electrode configurations and that the bare underlying carbon electrode is the origin of the obtained voltammetric signal, which gives rise to useful electroanalytical signatures, providing new insights into literature reports where “electrocatalysis” has been reported with no clear control experiments undertaken. On the other hand true electrocatalysis is observed towards hydrazine, where no such voltammetric features are witnessed on the bare underlying electrode substrate.

  14. Modified symbolic play test for Oriental children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Mandy Man-Yee; Lee, Wing-Cheong; Leung, Joy Lok-Sum; Wong, Virginia

    2006-12-01

    Symbolic play test (SPT) is a simple test for screening preverbal language in children. This test had been validated in English-speaking children. However, the toys may not be useful for other cultures such as Orientals like Chinese, Japanese, Koreans or Thais as they use chopsticks and bowls as eating utensils rather than spoon, fork or knife. The aim of this study was to find a set of miniature toys suitable for children of Oriental ethnic origin in order to get a reliable language test. Altogether 140 children were recruited into this study. This included 62 control children and 78 with idiopathic developmental delay. The original SPT was applied together with an additional set of miniature toys appropriate for Oriental culture (i.e. modified version of SPT) by modifying play items in situations 3 and 4 to suit the Chinese culture. The authors replaced the knife, fork and plate with chopsticks and bowl in situation 3 and replaced the tractor and trailer with train carts in situation 4. For the ease of comparison, the authors segregated the age groups with the same age range as the original English-based SPT: less than 20 months (N= 11); 21-30 months (N= 45); 31-40 months (N= 43); 41-50 months (N= 21), and more than 50 months (N= 4). The mean scores of the cohort was higher (14.83) with the modified version of SPT than when the original SPT was used (13.64). A statistically significant increase in the mean score in situation 3 (3.67-3.24 = 0.43), situation 4 (3.76-3.36 = 0.40) and the overall score (14.83-13.64 = 1.19) was obtained when the modified SPT was used instead of the original SPT (all with P knife, fork and plate with Oriental culture-based items like chopsticks and bowl for the modified SPT (Oriental version). Users of the test should have a set of toy train carts available to supplement the tractor and trailer as these toys were not commonly seen in real life for Oriental children. The authors hope that the modified SPT can be used reliably to assess

  15. WELLFOCUS PPT: Modifying positive psychotherapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Simon; Schrank, Beate; Rashid, Tayyab; Slade, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) is an established psychological intervention initially validated with people experiencing symptoms of depression. PPT is a positive psychology intervention, an academic discipline that has developed somewhat separately from psychotherapy and focuses on amplifying well-being rather than ameliorating deficit. The processes targeted in PPT (e.g., strengths, forgiveness, gratitude, savoring) are not emphasized in traditional psychotherapy approaches to psychosis. The goal in modifying PPT is to develop a new clinical approach to helping people experiencing psychosis. An evidence-based theoretical framework was therefore used to modify 14-session standard PPT into a manualized intervention, called WELLFOCUS PPT, which aims to improve well-being for people with psychosis. Informed by a systematic review and qualitative research, modification was undertaken in 4 stages: qualitative study, expert consultation, manualization, and stake-holder review. The resulting WELLFOCUS PPT is a theory-based 11-session manualized group therapy. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Modified dispersion relations, inflation, and scale invariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Stefano; Friedhoff, Victor Nicolai; Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    2018-02-01

    For a certain type of modified dispersion relations, the vacuum quantum state for very short wavelength cosmological perturbations is scale-invariant and it has been suggested that this may be the source of the scale-invariance observed in the temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. We point out that for this scenario to be possible, it is necessary to redshift these short wavelength modes to cosmological scales in such a way that the scale-invariance is not lost. This requires nontrivial background dynamics before the onset of standard radiation-dominated cosmology; we demonstrate that one possible solution is inflation with a sufficiently large Hubble rate, for this slow roll is not necessary. In addition, we also show that if the slow-roll condition is added to inflation with a large Hubble rate, then for any power law modified dispersion relation quantum vacuum fluctuations become nearly scale-invariant when they exit the Hubble radius.

  17. Generation of Modified Pestiviruses by Targeted Recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Friis, Martin Barfred; Risager, Peter Christian

    Infectious cDNA clones are a prerequisite for directed genetic manipulation of pestivirus RNA genomes. We have developed a novel strategy to facilitate manipulation and rescue of modified pestiviruses from infectious cDNA clones based on bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). The strategy...... involves targeted modification of viral cDNA genomes, cloned within BACs, by Red/ET recombination-mediated mutagenesis in E.coli DH10B cells. Using recombination-mediated mutagenesis for the targeted design, the work can be expedited and focused in principal on any sequence within the viral genome...... and hence is not limited to the use of internal restriction sites. Rescue of modified pestiviruses can be obtained by electroporation of cell cultures with full-length RNA transcripts in vitro transcribed from the recombined BAC clones. We have used this approach to generate a series of new pestivirus BACs...

  18. Modifiable environmental factors in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yara Dadalti Fragoso

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Potential environmental modifiable factors involved in multiple sclerosis (MS include low adherence to treatment, smoking, obesity, low levels of liposoluble vitamins A and D, high consumption of salt, and a sedentary lifestyle. Chronic tobacco use, obesity, sedentarism and insufficient levels of these vitamins all contribute to maintenance of a proinflammatory state. It is unlikely that there will be noticeable improvement in the inflammatory condition of MS if stopping smoking, reducing weight, exercising, increasing vitamin levels are done in an isolated and erratic manner. Modification of each and every one of these environmental risk factors is likely to be an important approach in the management of MS. The present review presents the arguments for an association between these hazardous modifiable factors and the chronic inflammatory state observed in MS.

  19. Genetically modified plants: Decade of commercial cultivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović-Drinić Snežana

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The year 2005 marks the beginning of the 10th consecutive year of commercial cultivation of genetically modified plants all around the world. The first GM variety of crops appeared on market during 1995 year and from that global area of biotech crops increased to 81 mil hectares in 2004. Genetically modified plant tolerant to herbicides, resistant to insects, improved quality have been developed. The use of GMO, their release into environment cultivation, utilization as food and feed is regulated in the EU by set of directives: 90/220, 2001/18, 2002/53, 1830/2003. Informer Yugoslavia the low about GMO was adopted in may 2001. That law consist of common regulation and it is in accordinance with EU regulation. Detection of genetic modification in seed and food could be done by PCR or ELISA methods.

  20. Epigenetic modifiers in normal and malignant hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladyna, Jessica N; Yamauchi, Taylor; Neff, Tobias; Bernt, Kathrin M

    2015-01-01

    Genome scale sequencing in patients with cancer has revealed a lower frequency of genetic aberrations in hematologic disorders compared with most other malignancies, suggesting a prominent role for epigenetic mechanisms. In parallel, epigenetic modifiers that are altered in cancer play critical roles in normal hematopoietic development, influencing both self-renewal of hematopoietic stem cells and differentiation into the different lineages. In this review, we aim to compare the role of several key DNA or histone modifying enzymes and complexes in normal development and hematopoietic malignancies, including DNMT3A, TET2, IDH1, IDH2, MLL1, MLL4, DOT1L, PRC1/2 and WSHC1/NSD2/MMSET. Insights into their biological mechanisms led to the development of therapies designed to target mutant IDH1 and IDH2, DOT1L in MLL-rearranged leukemias and EZH2 in several cancer types including lymphomas. Inhibitors for these enzymes are currently in clinical trials.

  1. [Genetically modified food--great unknown].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichosz, G; Wiackowski, S K

    2012-08-01

    Genetically modified food (GMF) creates evident threat to consumers' health. In spite of assurances of biotechnologists, DNA of transgenic plants is instable, so, synthesis of foreign, allergenic proteins is possible. Due to high trypsin inhibitor content the GMF is digested much more slowly what, alike Bt toxin presence, increases probability of alimentary canal diseases. Next threats are bound to the presence of fitoestrogens and residues of Roundup pesticide, that can diminish reproductiveness; and even lead to cancerogenic transformation through disturbance of human hormonal metabolism. In spite of food producers and distributors assurances that food made of GMF raw materials is marked, de facto consumers have no choice. Moreover, along the food law products containing less than 0.9% of GMF protein are not included into genetically modified food.

  2. Adsorption of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons from aqueous solution: Agrowaste-modified kaolinite vs surfactant modified bentonite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Unuabonah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption efficiency of a new hybrid clay adsorbent for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs is compared with known modified clay adsorbents. The new hybrid clay adsorbent (HYCA showed far higher adsorption capacities for the adsorption of various PAH molecules compared with sodium dodecyl sulfate modified and humic acid modified Bentonite clay adsorbents. With the new hybrid clay adsorbent (HYCA, the adsorption of some of the larger PAH molecules was complete in the first 1 h as compared with ≈ 62% and ≈ 76% observed for both humic acid modified and sodium dodecyl sulfate modified Bentonite clay adsorbents respectively. In 24 h adsorption of the PAHs was complete for all adsorbents with HYCA adsorbent showing better efficiency in the removal of the PAH molecules from aqueous solutions. No significant change was observed with increase in time up to 48 h. The adsorption was observed to be more spontaneous with HYCA adsorbent than with either modified Bentonite adsorbents. The enthalpy of adsorption did not follow any specific order and were not consistent for all PAH molecules considered.

  3. Exact Solutions in Modified Gravity Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery V. Obukhov

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We review the exact solutions in modified gravity. It is one of the main problems of mathematical physics for the gravity theory. One can obtain an exact solution if the field equations reduce to a system of ordinary differential equations. In this paper we consider a number of exact solutions obtained by the method of separation of variables. Some applications to Cosmology and BH entropy are briefly mentioned.

  4. Self-healing of polymer modified concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Abd_Elmoaty M. Abd_Elmoaty

    2011-01-01

    Self healing phenomenon of concrete has been observed in traditional, fibrous, self compacting concrete. This phenomenon occurred mainly due to the presence of unhydrated cement particles in the presence of water. Mechanism of polymer in concrete depends on creating a layer and net of polymer around cement particles which enhances the properties of polymer modified concrete. This mechanism may affect the self healing of this type of concrete. This work aims to study the presence of the self h...

  5. Viscosity in Modified Gravity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iver Brevik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A bulk viscosity is introduced in the formalism of modified gravity. It is shownthat, based on a natural scaling law for the viscosity, a simple solution can be found forquantities such as the Hubble parameter and the energy density. These solutions mayincorporate a viscosity-induced Big Rip singularity. By introducing a phase transition inthe cosmic fluid, the future singularity can nevertheless in principle be avoided. 

  6. Cosmological acceleration. Dark energy or modified gravity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bludman, S.

    2006-05-15

    We review the evidence for recently accelerating cosmological expansion or ''dark energy'', either a negative pressure constituent in General Relativity (Dark Energy) or modified gravity (Dark Gravity), without any constituent Dark Energy. If constituent Dark Energy does not exist, so that our universe is now dominated by pressure-free matter, Einstein gravity must be modified at low curvature. The vacuum symmetry of any Robertson-Walker universe then characterizes Dark Gravity as low- or high-curvature modifications of Einstein gravity. The dynamics of either kind of ''dark energy'' cannot be derived from the homogeneous expansion history alone, but requires also observing the growth of inhomogeneities. Present and projected observations are all consistent with a small fine tuned cosmological constant, but also allow nearly static Dark Energy or gravity modified at cosmological scales. The growth of cosmological fluctuations will potentially distinguish between static and ''dynamic'' ''dark energy''. But, cosmologically distinguishing the Concordance Model {lambda}CDM from modified gravity will require a weak lensing shear survey more ambitious than any now projected. Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati low-curvature modifications of Einstein gravity may also be detected in refined observations in the solar system (Lue and Starkman) or at the intermediate Vainstein scale (Iorio) in isolated galaxy clusters. Dark Energy's epicyclic character, failure to explain the original Cosmic Coincidence (''Why so small now?'') without fine tuning, inaccessibility to laboratory or solar system tests, along with braneworld theories, now motivate future precision solar system, Vainstein-scale and cosmological-scale studies of Dark Gravity. (Orig.)

  7. Modified elastic tissue-Masson trichrome stain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, W

    1984-07-01

    A combined elastic tissue-Masson technique is presented which stains elastic fibers of all sizes, nuclei and connective tissue. The modified elastic tissue stain consists of hematoxylin, ferric chloride and Verhoeff's iodine; nuclei and elastic fibers are stained blue-black in six minutes without differentiation. By contrast, cytoplasmic elements are stained red, (Biebrich scarlet-acid fuchsin) and collagen is stained green (light green) or blue (aniline blue). The entire staining procedure takes approximately one hour.

  8. Biopreservation in modified atmosphere packaged vegetables

    OpenAIRE

    Bennik, M.H.J.

    1997-01-01


    Recent trends in food preservation are the use of mild preservation techniques, such as modified atmosphere (MA) packaging and refrigeration, to prolong the shelflife of foods without affecting the fresh character of the product. This has resulted in the development of a new generation of chill stored, minimally processed foods, such as vegetables that are packaged under reduced oxygen (0 2 ) and elevated carbon dioxide (C0 ...

  9. Synthesis and characterization of hydrophobically modified xanthan

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobically modified polysaccharides show unusual rheological and interfacial properties in solution due to the self association of hydrophobic entities grafted onto their hydrophilic backbone. Their properties are tunable according to some well known parameters, such as the length of the hydrophobic moieties or the grafting density. However, very few studies deal with the influence of the backbone conformation on the properties of such systems in solution. Therefore, the objective of thi...

  10. Modified Embedded Switched Inductor Z Source Inverter

    OpenAIRE

    V. Saravanan; R. Ramanujam; M. Arumugam

    2014-01-01

    A novel modified embedded switched inductor Z-source inverter is proposed by inserting the photovoltaic panels at various locations to improve the output voltage boosting performance. The proposed inverter have the concepts of embedded and switched inductor Z source network to have better features in terms of increased voltage boost inversion ability, continuous input current, reduced voltage stress on the switches/capacitors. Simulations are carried out by employing (120°) pulse width modula...

  11. Exponential-modified discrete Lindley distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mehmet; Hameldarbandi, Monireh; Acik Kemaloglu, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have considered a series system composed of stochastically independent M-component where M is a random variable having the zero truncated modified discrete Lindley distribution. This distribution is newly introduced by transforming on original parameter. The properties of the distribution of the lifetime of above system have been examined under the given circumstances and also parameters of this new lifetime distribution are estimated by using moments, maximum likelihood and EM-algorithm.

  12. Genetically Modified Crops and Food Security

    OpenAIRE

    Qaim, Matin; Kouser, Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers’ income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the firs...

  13. Modifiable risk factors for surgical site infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moucha, Calin S; Clyburn, Terry A; Evans, Richard P; Prokuski, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Multiple risk factors for orthopaedic surgical site infection have been identified. Some of these factors directly affect the wound-healing process, whereas others can lead to blood-borne sepsis or relative immunosuppression. Modifying a patient's medications; screening for comorbidities, such as HIV or diabetes mellitus; and advising the patient on options to diminish or eliminate adverse behaviors, such as smoking, should lower the risk for surgical site infections.

  14. Systematic simulations of modified gravity: chameleon models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brax, Philippe [Institut de Physique Theorique, CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA 2306, F-91191Gif/Yvette Cedex (France); Davis, Anne-Christine [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Li, Baojiu [Institute for Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Winther, Hans A. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo (Norway); Zhao, Gong-Bo, E-mail: philippe.brax@cea.fr, E-mail: a.c.davis@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: baojiu.li@durham.ac.uk, E-mail: h.a.winther@astro.uio.no, E-mail: gong-bo.zhao@port.ac.uk [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    In this work we systematically study the linear and nonlinear structure formation in chameleon theories of modified gravity, using a generic parameterisation which describes a large class of models using only 4 parameters. For this we have modified the N-body simulation code ecosmog to perform a total of 65 simulations for different models and parameter values, including the default ΛCDM. These simulations enable us to explore a significant portion of the parameter space. We have studied the effects of modified gravity on the matter power spectrum and mass function, and found a rich and interesting phenomenology where the difference with the ΛCDM paradigm cannot be reproduced by a linear analysis even on scales as large as k ∼ 0.05 hMpc{sup −1}, since the latter incorrectly assumes that the modification of gravity depends only on the background matter density. Our results show that the chameleon screening mechanism is significantly more efficient than other mechanisms such as the dilaton and symmetron, especially in high-density regions and at early times, and can serve as a guidance to determine the parts of the chameleon parameter space which are cosmologically interesting and thus merit further studies in the future.

  15. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, Leonard C. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ishida, Takanobu [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between -0.24 and +1.25 VSCE while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-ρ-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  16. Characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krebs, L.C.; Ishida, Takanobu.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization of electrochemically modified polycrystalline platinum surfaces has been accomplished through the use of four major electrochemical techniques. These were chronoamperometry, chronopotentiommetry, cyclic voltammetry, and linear sweep voltammetry. A systematic study on the under-potential deposition of several transition metals has been performed. The most interesting of these were: Ag, Cu, Cd, and Pb. It was determined, by subjecting the platinum electrode surface to a single potential scan between {minus}0.24 and +1.25 V{sub SCE} while stirring the solution, that the electrocatalytic activity would be regenerated. As a consequence of this study, a much simpler method for producing ultra high purity water from acidic permanganate has been developed. This method results in water that surpasses the water produced by pyrocatalytic distillation. It has also been seen that the wettability of polycrystalline platinum surfaces is greatly dependent on the quantity of oxide present. Oxide-free platinum is hydrophobic and gives a contact angle in the range of 55 to 62 degrees. We have also modified polycrystalline platinum surface with the electrically conducting polymer poly-{rho}-phenylene. This polymer is very stable in dilute sulfuric acid solutions, even under applied oxidative potentials. It is also highly resistant to electrochemical hydrogenation. The wettability of the polymer modified platinum surface is severely dependent on the choice of supporting electrolyte chosen for the electrochemical polymerization. Tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate produces a film that is as hydrophobic as Teflon, whereas tetraethylammonium perchlorate produces a film that is more hydrophilic than oxide-free platinum.

  17. Modifying Bananas: From Transgenics to Organics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Dale

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Bananas are one of the top ten world food crops. Unlike most other major food crops, bananas are difficult to genetically improve. The challenge is that nearly all banana cultivars and landraces are triploids, with high levels of male and female infertility. There are a number of international conventional breeding programs and many of these are developing new cultivars. However, it is virtually impossible to backcross bananas, thus excluding the possibility of introgressing new traits into a current cultivar. The alternative strategy is to “modify” the cultivar itself. We have been developing the capacity to modify Cavendish bananas and other cultivars for both disease resistance and enhanced fruit quality. Initially, we were using transgenes; genes that were derived from species outside of the Musa or banana genus. However, we have recently incorporated two banana genes (cisgenes into Cavendish; one to enhance the level of pro-vitamin A and the other to increase the resistance to Panama disease. Modified Cavendish with these cisgenes have been employed in a field trial. Almost certainly, the next advance will be to edit the Cavendish genome, to generate the desired traits. As these banana cultivars are essentially sterile, transgene flow and the outcrossing of modified genes into wild Musa species. are highly unlikely and virtually impossible in other triploid cultivars. Therefore, genetic changes in bananas may be compatible with organic farming.

  18. Modified angle's classification for primary dentition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Narendra Chandranee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to propose a modification of Angle's classification for primary dentition and to assess its applicability in children from Central India, Nagpur. Methods: Modification in Angle's classification has been proposed for application in primary dentition. Small roman numbers i/ii/iii are used for primary dentition notation to represent Angle's Class I/II/III molar relationships as in permanent dentition, respectively. To assess applicability of modified Angle's classification a cross-sectional preschool 2000 children population from central India; 3–6 years of age residing in Nagpur metropolitan city of Maharashtra state were selected randomly as per the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: Majority 93.35% children were found to have bilateral Class i followed by 2.5% bilateral Class ii and 0.2% bilateral half cusp Class iii molar relationships as per the modified Angle's classification for primary dentition. About 3.75% children had various combinations of Class ii relationships and 0.2% children were having Class iii subdivision relationship. Conclusions: Modification of Angle's classification for application in primary dentition has been proposed. A cross-sectional investigation using new classification revealed various 6.25% Class ii and 0.4% Class iii molar relationships cases in preschool children population in a metropolitan city of Nagpur. Application of the modified Angle's classification to other population groups is warranted to validate its routine application in clinical pediatric dentistry.

  19. Disease-modifying drugs in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghezzi L

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Laura Ghezzi, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti Neurology Unit, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, University of Milan, Fondazione Cà Granda, IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Milan, Italy Abstract: Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder and the most common cause of dementia. The early stages of AD are characterized by short-term memory loss. Once the disease progresses, patients experience difficulties in sense of direction, oral communication, calculation, ability to learn, and cognitive thinking. The median duration of the disease is 10 years. The pathology is characterized by deposition of amyloid beta peptide (so-called senile plaques and tau protein in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. Currently, two classes of drugs are licensed by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of AD, ie, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for mild to moderate AD, and memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, for moderate and severe AD. Treatment with acetylcholinesterase inhibitors or memantine aims at slowing progression and controlling symptoms, whereas drugs under development are intended to modify the pathologic steps leading to AD. Herein, we review the clinical features, pharmacologic properties, and cost-effectiveness of the available acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and memantine, and focus on disease-modifying drugs aiming to interfere with the amyloid beta peptide, including vaccination, passive immunization, and tau deposition. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, memantine, disease-modifying drugs, diagnosis, treatment

  20. 3-Nitrotyrosine Modified Proteins in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Thomson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of premature death worldwide, and atherosclerosis is the main contributor. Lipid-laden macrophages, known as foam cells, accumulate in the subendothelial space of the lesion area and contribute to consolidate a chronic inflammatory environment where oxygen and nitrogen derived oxidants are released. Oxidatively modified lipids and proteins are present both in plasma as well as atherosclerotic lesions. A relevant oxidative posttranslational protein modification is the addition of a nitro group to the hydroxyphenyl ring of tyrosine residues, mediated by nitric oxide derived oxidants. Nitrotyrosine modified proteins were found in the lesion and also in plasma from atherosclerotic patients. Despite the fact of the low yield of nitration, immunogenic, proatherogenic, and prothrombotic properties acquired by 3-nitrotyrosine modified proteins are in agreement with epidemiological studies showing a significant correlation between the level of nitration found in plasma proteins and the prevalence of cardiovascular disease, supporting the usefulness of this biomarker to predict the outcome and to take appropriate therapeutic decisions in atherosclerotic disease.

  1. Measuring electric conductivity with modified light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Ernestine; Weiler, Markus; Blume, Theresa

    2017-04-01

    To obtain spatially distributed time series of electric conductivity (EC) of stream water we needed robust, reliable and low cost EC sensors with data logging and storage capacity. We modified the Onset temperature + light sensors and replaced their light detector with a simple setup to measure EC. Each sensor was calibrated individually. The raw data has to be adjusted for temperature effects and can then be recalculated into EC of the water with a calibration function. The final measurement accuracy varied little at lower ECs (+- 5 µS/cm at 0 - 200 µS/cm) and increased for higher ECs (+- 50µS/cm at 1000µs/cm). Measurements were possible until 3000 µS/cm with the 'best' data quality between 0 and 600µS/cm. 95 thus modified sensors are currently employed in streams of the Attert catchment (Luxembourg). In addition to stream EC data, dry periods of streams could also be easily detected with the modified sensors, as extremely low EC values indicate periods of no flow.

  2. Landfill Leachates Treatment by /UV, /, Modified Fenton, and Modified Photo-Fenton Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremi Naumczyk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs such as H2O2/UV, O3/H2O2, modified Fenton, and modified photo-Fenton processes have been investigated in terms of the treatment of landfill leachate with ratio of BOD5/COD in the range of 0.22 to 0.24. The modification of Fenton and photo-Fenton processes consisted in the inclusion of precipitation and separation of humic substances at pH 3. Due to the precipitation, the value of COD decreased by 39% and BOD5 by 7.1%. The modification of the processes allowed us to improve the efficiency and to decrease the doses of reagents necessary to continue the process. Modified photo-Fenton process proved to be the most effective (92.7% COD removal of all processes investigated. Additionally, modified-Fenton process was much more effective than the other two processes when compared up to 120 min, while after longer times it gave the least satisfactory results. After 30 min of modified-Fenton process BOD5/COD ratio increased to 0.43. The parameter referred to as “efficiency of oxidants” was used to estimate the efficiency of all the processes—its value varied from 178 to 239%. Various substances including phthalates, hydrocarbons, silanes, and siloxanes were identified in raw and treated leachate.

  3. Genetically modified foods and social concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghari, Behrokh Mohajer; Ardekani, Ali M

    2011-07-01

    Biotechnology is providing us with a wide range of options for how we can use agricultural and commercial forestry lands. The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops on millions of hectares of lands and their injection into our food chain is a huge global genetic experiment involving all living beings. Considering the fast pace of new advances in production of genetically modified crops, consumers, farmers and policymakers worldwide are challenged to reach a consensus on a clear vision for the future of world food supply. The current food biotechnology debate illustrates the serious conflict between two groups: 1) Agri-biotech investors and their affiliated scientists who consider agricultural biotechnology as a solution to food shortage, the scarcity of environmental resources and weeds and pests infestations; and 2) independent scientists, environmentalists, farmers and consumers who warn that genetically modified food introduces new risks to food security, the environment and human health such as loss of biodiversity; the emergence of superweeds and superpests; the increase of antibiotic resistance, food allergies and other unintended effects. This article reviews major viewpoints which are currently debated in the food biotechnology sector in the world. It also lays the ground-work for deep debate on benefits and risks of Biotech-crops for human health, ecosystems and biodiversity. In this context, although some regulations exist, there is a need for continuous vigilance for all countries involved in producing genetically engineered food to follow the international scientific bio-safety testing guidelines containing reliable pre-release experiments and post-release track of transgenic plants to protect public health and avoid future environmental harm.

  4. Enhanced oil recovery with modified nonionic surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capelle, A.; Littmann, W.

    1982-01-01

    Practically all work on chemical flooding, both in the laboratory and in the field, has been focused on petroleum sulphonates. However, as soon as the concentration of electrolyes, especially of divalent ions, exceeds a critical value, the use of this class of anionic surfactants becomes troublesome. Some of the difficulties may be overcome by the use of additives, preferably ether sulphates or ether sulphonates. Hence, the favourable properties of nonionic substances, such as excellent stability to electrolytes, have been combined with those of anionics, and thus the so-called modified nonionics are available for chemical flooding. These products offer the possibility of chemical adaption to the reservoir conditions, are very stable toward electrolytes, and their solubility does not depend on the temperature. The latter is a drawback of nonionic products (cloud point). The modified nonionics are essentially anionics based on ethene oxide derivatives of alcohols or alkylphenols, with subsequent incorporation of sulphate, sulphonate, carboxyl or phosphate groups. On the basis of the reservoir conditions, crude oil properties, and reservoir water, various processes have been screened for enhanced oil recovery in the Velebit reservoir. It was decided to simultaneously inject modified nonionic surfactants and polymers. In part of the reservoir, this process will be tested in two stages in a line drive with several injection wells and production wells. The total area is about 20,000 m/sup 3/. The first stage involves water flooding of about half the area, in order to collect additional data on the reservoir. During the second stage, simultaneous injection of surfactants and polymers will take place. The reservoir is described, and possible EOR processes, the flooding concept and selection of chemicals are discussed.

  5. Convulsant bicuculline modifies CNS muscarinic receptor affinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz Georgina

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous work from this laboratory has shown that the administration of the convulsant drug 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MP, a GAD inhibitor, modifies not only GABA synthesis but also binding of the antagonist [3H]-quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]-QNB to central muscarinic receptors, an effect due to an increase in affinity without modifications in binding site number. The cholinergic system has been implicated in several experimental epilepsy models and the ability of acetylcholine to regulate neuronal excitability in the neocortex is well known. To study the potential relationship between GABAergic and cholinergic systems with seizure activity, we analyzed the muscarinic receptor after inducing seizure by bicuculline (BIC, known to antagonize the GABA-A postsynaptic receptor subtype. Results We analyzed binding of muscarinic antagonist [3H]-QNB to rat CNS membranes after i.p. administration of BIC at subconvulsant (1.0 mg/kg and convulsant (7.5 mg/kg doses. Subconvulsant BIC dose failed to develop seizures but produced binding alteration in the cerebellum and hippocampus with roughly 40% increase and 10% decrease, respectively. After convulsant BIC dose, which invariably led to generalized tonic-clonic seizures, binding increased 36% and 15% to cerebellar and striatal membranes respectively, but decreased 12% to hippocampal membranes. Kd value was accordingly modified: with the subconvulsant dose it decreased 27% in cerebellum whereas it increased 61% in hippocampus; with the convulsant dose, Kd value decreased 33% in cerebellum but increased 85% in hippocampus. No change in receptor number site was found, and Hill number was invariably close to unity. Conclusion Results indicate dissimilar central nervous system area susceptibility of muscarinic receptor to BIC. Ligand binding was modified not only by a convulsant BIC dose but also by a subconvulsant dose, indicating that changes are not attributable to the seizure process

  6. Solid waste forecasting using modified ANFIS modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, Mohammad K; Nopiah, Z M; Basri, N E Ahmad; Basri, H; Abushammala, Mohammed F M; K N A, Maulud

    2015-10-01

    Solid waste prediction is crucial for sustainable solid waste management. Usually, accurate waste generation record is challenge in developing countries which complicates the modelling process. Solid waste generation is related to demographic, economic, and social factors. However, these factors are highly varied due to population and economy growths. The objective of this research is to determine the most influencing demographic and economic factors that affect solid waste generation using systematic approach, and then develop a model to forecast solid waste generation using a modified Adaptive Neural Inference System (MANFIS). The model evaluation was performed using Root Mean Square Error (RMSE), Mean Absolute Error (MAE) and the coefficient of determination (R²). The results show that the best input variables are people age groups 0-14, 15-64, and people above 65 years, and the best model structure is 3 triangular fuzzy membership functions and 27 fuzzy rules. The model has been validated using testing data and the resulted training RMSE, MAE and R² were 0.2678, 0.045 and 0.99, respectively, while for testing phase RMSE =3.986, MAE = 0.673 and R² = 0.98. To date, a few attempts have been made to predict the annual solid waste generation in developing countries. This paper presents modeling of annual solid waste generation using Modified ANFIS, it is a systematic approach to search for the most influencing factors and then modify the ANFIS structure to simplify the model. The proposed method can be used to forecast the waste generation in such developing countries where accurate reliable data is not always available. Moreover, annual solid waste prediction is essential for sustainable planning.

  7. Modified interstitial water squeezer for trace metal analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Rajaraman, V.S.; Mudholkar, A.V.

    Hydraulic squeezer of Manheim, used in the extraction of pore water of sediments, has been modified by providing teflon inner lining and increasing the volume of squeezer. The modified version facilitates collection of pore water sample, for trace...

  8. Modified Bare Sclera method for the treatment of primary pterygium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified Bare Sclera method for the treatment of primary pterygium: A preliminary report. ... Method: The bare sclera technique was modified by performing a partial ... for varying periods between 8 to 31months to determine the recurrence rate ...

  9. ASTHME INFANTILE: Les facteurs de risque modifiables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cette étude transversale avait pour objectif de déterminer les facteurs de risque modifiables de l'asthme infantile. En d'autres termes, il s'agit des facteurs pour lesquels l'on pourrait intervenir. Pour cela 145 enfants âgés de 3 mois à 5 ans ont été recrutés dans 10 hôpitaux en zone urbaine, sélectionnés au hasard dans 3 ...

  10. Modifier constraints in alkali ultraphosphate glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodrigues, B.P.; Mauro, J.C.; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-01-01

    In applying the recently introduced concept of cationic constraint strength [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 214501 (2014)] to bond constraint theory (BCT) of binary phosphate glasses in the ultraphosphate region of xR2O-(1-x)P2O5 (with x ≤ 0.5 and R = {Li, Na, Cs}), we demonstrate that a fundamental...... of the modifier sites and then use this to calculate the glass transition temperature as a function of chemical composition. A statistical distribution of sites achieves a remarkable agreement with experimental data for all tested glasses and greatly improves upon previously published work....

  11. Preoperative modifiable risk factors in colorectal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Rooijen, Stefanus; Carli, Francesco; Dalton, Susanne O

    2017-01-01

    complications (CCI ≥20). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was done to explore the combined effect of individual risk factors. RESULTS: In this 139 patient cohort, smoking, malnutrition, alcohol consumption, neoadjuvant therapy, higher age, and male sex, were seen more frequently in the severe...... in higher mortality rates and greater hospital costs. The number and severity of complications is closely related to patients' preoperative performance status. The aim of this study was to identify the most important preoperative modifiable risk factors that could be part of a multimodal prehabilitation...

  12. Inflationary Cosmology in Modified Gravity Theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuharu Bamba

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We review inflationary cosmology in modified gravity such as R2 gravity with its extensions in order to generalize the Starobinsky inflation model. In particular, we explore inflation realized by three kinds of effects: modification of gravity, the quantum anomaly, and the R2 term in loop quantum cosmology. It is explicitly demonstrated that in these inflationary models, the spectral index of scalar modes of the density perturbations and the tensor-to-scalar ratio can be consistent with the Planck results. Bounce cosmology in F(R gravity is also explained.

  13. Furin is a chemokine-modifying enzyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hensbergen, Paul J; Verzijl, Dennis; Balog, Crina I A

    2004-01-01

    Chemokines comprise a class of structurally related proteins that are involved in many aspects of leukocyte migration under basal and inflammatory conditions. In addition to the large number of genes, limited processing of these proteins by a variety of enzymes enhances the complexity of the total...... agonist activity on the virally encoded receptor ORF74 and the direct antibacterial activity of CXCL10 are fully retained. Hence, we have identified furin as a novel chemokine-modifying enzyme in vitro and most probably also in vivo, generating a C-terminally truncated CXCL10, which fully retains its...

  14. Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardmore, J A; Porter, Joanne S

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the nature of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), the range of aquatic species in which GMOs have been produced, the methods and target genes employed, the benefits to aquaculture, the problems attached to use of GMOs in aquatic species and the regulatory and other social frameworks surrounding them. A set of recommendations aimed at best practice is appended. This states the potential value of GMOs in aquaculture but also calls for improved knowledge particularly of sites of integration, risk analysis, progress in achieving sterility in fish for production and better dissemination of relevant information.

  15. Development of modified FT (MFT) process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinglai Zhou; Zhixin Zhang; Wenjie Shen [Institute of Coal Chemistry, Taiyuan (China)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Two-Stage Modified FT (MFT) process has been developed for producing high-octane gasoline from coal-based syngas. The main R&D are focused on the development of catalysts and technologies process. Duration tests were finished in the single-tube reactor, pilot plant (100T/Y), and industrial demonstration plant (2000T/Y). A series of satisfactory results has been obtained in terms of operating reliability of equipments, performance of catalysts, purification of coal - based syngas, optimum operating conditions, properties of gasoline and economics etc. Further scaling - up commercial plant is being considered.

  16. Effective potential evaluations in a modified PQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, A.; Martinez-Pedrera, D. [International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, Group of Theoretical Physics, La Habana (Cuba)

    2006-08-15

    A procedure discussed in a previous work for properly defining the Feynman diagrams at any number of loops in a modified version of PQCD, is employed here to evaluate some zero- and one-loop corrections to the effective potential, as functions of the gluon and quark condensate parameters. The calculated terms indicate an instability of massless QCD under the development of quark condensates even in the absence of the gluon one. Therefore, a mechanism is suggested for the dynamical generation of quark masses and condensates. The absence of indications coming from lattice calculations to this possibility could be determined by the current limitations in treating fermion determinants. (orig.)

  17. Risk Assessment of Genetically Modified Microorganisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B. L.; Wilcks, Andrea

    2001-01-01

    the industry, national administration and research institutions were gathered to discuss which elements should be considered in a risk assessment of genetically modified microorganisms used as food or food ingredients. The existing EU and national regulations were presented, together with the experiences......The rapid development of recombinant DNA techniques for food organisms urges for an ongoing discussion on the risk assessment of both new as traditional use of microorganisms in food production. This report, supported by the Nordic Council of Ministers, is the result of a workshop where people from...

  18. [Genetically modified organisms (GMO): toxicological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwicki, J K

    1998-01-01

    The genetically modified organisms (GMO) are one of the major public concerns partially due to the activity of the non-governmental organizations which believe that public opinion must be duly informed on what leaves the laboratories and enters the environment or is proposed as food. This article discusses some major toxicological and nutritional aspects of GMO designed as food for humans. The range of current use of GMOs, potential hazards for humans, safety assessment, allergenic concerns, and some aspects of the use of marker genes are discussed in regard to human safety. The need for relevant regulations is stressed.

  19. The modified procedures in coercivity scaling*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najgebauer Mariusz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a scaling approach to the analysis of coercivity. The Widom-based procedure of coercivity scaling has been tested for non-oriented electrical steel. Due to insufficient results, the scaling procedure was improved relating to the method proposed by Van den Bossche. The modified procedure of coercivity scaling gave better results, in comparison to the original approach. The influence of particular parameters and a range of measurement data used in the estimations on the final effect of the coercivity scaling were discussed.

  20. A modified test for Brucella agglutinins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, J. N.

    1969-01-01

    0·1% Protamine sulphate in normal (0·85% w/v) saline has been used as a diluent in Brucella serology instead of saline as such. The use of protamine sulphate in this concentration has obviated the need for performing the modified Coombs test to detect non-agglutinating Brucella antibodies. This method has been used in the Microbiological Diagnostic Unit of the University of Melbourne in the routine titration of 721 sera and has proved to give reliable and reproducible results. PMID:4983354

  1. Immobilization of Peroxidase onto Magnetite Modified Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fernandes Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the immobilization of horseradish peroxidase (HRP on magnetite-modified polyaniline (PANImG activated with glutaraldehyde. After the optimization of the methodology, the immobilization of HRP on PANImG produced the same yield (25% obtained for PANIG with an efficiency of 100% (active protein. The optimum pH for immobilization was displaced by the effect of the partition of protons produced in the microenvironment by the magnetite. The tests of repeated use have shown that PANImG-HRP can be used for 13 cycles with maintenance of 50% of the initial activity.

  2. 21 CFR 172.892 - Food starch-modified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Food starch-modified. 172.892 Section 172.892 Food... Multipurpose Additives § 172.892 Food starch-modified. Food starch-modified as described in this section may be... limitation prescribed. To insure safe use of the food starch-modified, the label of the food additive...

  3. 21 CFR 178.3520 - Industrial starch-modified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Industrial starch-modified. 178.3520 Section 178... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3520 Industrial starch-modified. Industrial starch... provisions of this section. (a) Industrial starch-modified is identified as follows: (1) A food starch...

  4. 21 CFR 173.10 - Modified polyacrylamide resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Modified polyacrylamide resin. 173.10 Section 173... CONSUMPTION Polymer Substances and Polymer Adjuvants for Food Treatment § 173.10 Modified polyacrylamide resin. Modified polyacrylamide resin may be safely used in food in accordance with the following prescribed...

  5. 40 CFR 721.5908 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5908 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified phenolic resin (PMN P...

  6. 40 CFR 721.3135 - Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous modified epoxy resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3135 Phosphorous modified epoxy resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... phosphorous modified epoxy resin (PMNs P-00-992 and P-01-471) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.5905 - Modified phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified phenolic resin (generic). 721... Substances § 721.5905 Modified phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified phenolic resin (PMN...

  8. 40 CFR 721.9499 - Modified silicone resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified silicone resin. 721.9499... Substances § 721.9499 Modified silicone resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified silicone resin (PMN P-96-1649) is...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418) is...

  10. Modifiable risk factors of hypertension and socio demographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Factors associated with the development of hypertension can be categorized into modifiable and non‑modifiable risk factors. The modifiable risk factors include obesity, physical inactivity, high salt diet, smoking alcohol consumption and others. Aim: This study was aimed to determine the prevalence of ...

  11. Performance evaluation of hybrid modified micro-channel solar cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Abstract. In this communication, an attempt has been made to evaluate the performance of hybrid modified micro-channel solar cell thermal (MCSCT) tile. Based on energy balance of each component of modified MCSCT tile, analytical expressions for the different parameters of modified MCSCT tiles connected in series ...

  12. after solid phase extraction on modified sawdust s

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    poly vinyl chloride [6], modified activated carbon [1, 7, 8], loaded Amberlite XAD-7 [9], modified alumina [10], octadecyl bonded silica [11], octadecyl-bonded silica memberane disk. [12], immobilized salen [13], Dowex optipore V-493 [14], MEFMAT [15], Ambersorb 563 adsorption resin [16] and modified activated carbon [17].

  13. 21 CFR 172.560 - Modified hop extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Modified hop extract. 172.560 Section 172.560 Food... Flavoring Agents and Related Substances § 172.560 Modified hop extract. The food additive modified hop extract may be safely used in beer in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (a) The food...

  14. We tasted a genetically modified cheese - and we like it!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech-Larsen, Tino; Grunert, Klaus G.; Scholderer, Joachim

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a conjoint study of 750 Danish, Swedish, Norwegian and Finnish consumers´ preferences for genetically modified and conventional cheese with different types of benefits. The results showed homogeneity in preferences within as well as across countries....... In general, the genetically modified cheese was rejected, but this was modified somewhat by health and taste benefits....

  15. Luneburg modified lens for surface water waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichard, Helene; Maurel, Agnes; Petitjeans, Phillipe; Martin, Paul; Pagneux, Vincent

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that when the waves pass across an elevated bathymetry, refraction often results in amplification of waves behind it. In this sense, focusing of liquid surface waves can be used to enhance the harvest efficiency of ocean power. An ocean wave focusing lens concentrates waves on a certain focal point by transforming straight crest lens of incident waves into circular ones just like an optical lens. These devices have attracted ocean engineers and are promising because they enable the effective utilization of wave energy, the remaining challenge being to increase the harvest efficiency of the lens. In this work, in order to improve well known focusing of surface liquid waves by lens, the propagation of liquid surface waves through a Luneburg modified lens is investigated. The traditional Luneburg lens is a rotationally symmetric lens with a spatially varying refractive-index profile that focuses an incident plane wave on the rim of the lens. The modified Luneburg lens allows to choose the position of the focal point, which can lie inside or outside the lens. This new degree of freedom leads to enhanced focusing and tunable focusing. The focusing of linear surface waves through this lens is investigated and is shown to be more efficient than classical profile lenses.

  16. Constituent quark masses from modified perturbative QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, La Habana (Cuba); International Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics (IITAP), UNESCO and Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Rigol Madrazo, M. [Centro de Estudios Aplicados al Desarrollo Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba)

    2002-03-01

    A recently proposed modified perturbative expansion for QCD incorporating gluon condensation is employed to evaluate the quark and gluon self-energy corrections in first approximation. The results predict mass values of 1/3 of the nucleon mass for the light quarks u, d, and s and a monotonously growing variation with the current mass. The only phenomenological input is that left angle G{sup 2} right angle is evaluated up to order g{sup 2} as a function of the unique parameter C defining the modified propagator, and then C is fixed to give a current estimate of left angle g{sup 2}G{sup 2} right angle. The light quarks u and d as a result are found to be confined and the s, c, b and t ones show damped propagation modes, suggesting a model for the large differences in stability between the nucleons and the higher resonances. The above properties of quark modes diverge from the fully confinement result following from the similar gluon propagator previously considered by Munczek and Nemirovski. On the other hand, the condensate effects on the gluon self-energy furnish a tachyonic mass shell as predicted by the Fukuda analysis of gluon condensation in QCD. (orig.)

  17. Structure of Hydrophobically Modified Phytoglycogen Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, John; Nickels, Jonathan; Dutcher, John; Katsaras, John

    Phytoglycogen is a highly branched, polysaccharide nanoparticle produced by some varieties of plants including sweet corn. These particles are attractive candidates for cosmetic, industrial and biomedical applications. Many of these applications result from phytoglycogen's unique interaction with water: (1) high solubility; (2) low viscosity and high stability in aqueous dispersions; and (3) a remarkable capacity to sequester and retain water. Neutron scattering measurements of native phytoglycogen revealed that the particles have uniform size, uniform radial particle density, and a high level of hydration. Hydrophobically modifying the outer surface of the hydrophilic nanoparticles opens up new applications in food and biomedicine, such as solubilizing and stabilizing bioactive compounds. One such modification is octenyl succinate anhydride (OSA), where the hydrophobicity can be tuned by adjusting the degree of substitution. I will present the results of small angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements of aqueous dispersions of OSA-modified phytoglycogen with two different degrees of modification. Contrast series SANS measurements have yielded information about the radial density profile, providing insight into the nature of the chemical modification of the particles.

  18. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD CROPS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Chaparro Giraldo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The progress made in plant biotechnology has provided an opportunity to new food crops being developed having desirable traits for improving crop yield, reducing the use of agrochemicals and adding nutritional properties to staple crops. However, genetically modified (GM crops have become a subject of intense debate in which opponents argue that GM crops represent a threat to individual freedom, the environment, public health and traditional economies. Despite the advances in food crop agriculture, the current world situation is still characterised by massive hunger and chronic malnutrition, representing a major public health problem. Biofortified GM crops have been considered an important and complementary strategy for delivering naturally-fortified staple foods to malnourished populations. Expert advice and public concern have led to designing strategies for assessing the potential risks involved in cultivating and consuming GM crops. The present critical review was aimed at expressing some conflicting points of view about the potential risks of GM crops for public health. It was concluded that GM food crops are no more risky than those genetically modified by conventional methods and that these GM crops might contribute towards reducing the amount of malnourished people around the world. However, all this needs to be complemented by effective political action aimed at increasing the income of people living below the poverty-line.

  19. Modifying glass surfaces via internal diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedskjaer, M.M.; Yue, Y.Z.; Deubener, J.

    2010-01-01

    The surface chemistry and structure of iron-bearing silicate glasses have been modified by means of heat-treatment around the glass transition temperature under different gaseous media at ambient pressure. When the glasses are heat-treated in atmospheric air, oxidation of Fe2+ to Fe3+ occurs, which...... leads to outward diffusion (OD) of divalent cations (primarily Mg2+), i.e., diffusion from the interior of the glass to the surface, and thereby, to formation of an oxide surface nano-layer. in contrast, when the glasses are heat-treated in H-2/N-2 gas containing 10 vol.% H-2, reduction of Fe3+ to Fe2......- ions in the network and their strong attraction to the modifying ions, whereas the latter is due to the requirement of the charge neutrality. The role of N3- in driving OD is verified by the composition profile of the surface layer of the glass treated in pure N-2 gas. The OD exerts pronounced impacts...

  20. MODIFIED GRAVITY SPINS UP GALACTIC HALOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jounghun [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, FPRD, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Zhao, Gong-Bo [National Astronomy Observatories, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Li, Baojiu [Institute of Computational Cosmology, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Koyama, Kazuya, E-mail: jounghun@astro.snu.ac.kr [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom)

    2013-01-20

    We investigate the effect of modified gravity on the specific angular momentum of galactic halos by analyzing the halo catalogs at z = 0 from high-resolution N-body simulations for a f(R) gravity model that meets the solar-system constraint. It is shown that the galactic halos in the f(R) gravity model tend to acquire significantly higher specific angular momentum than those in the standard {Lambda}CDM model. The largest difference in the specific angular momentum distribution between these two models occurs for the case of isolated galactic halos with mass less than 10{sup 11} h {sup -1} M {sub Sun }, which are likely least shielded by the chameleon screening mechanism. As the specific angular momentum of galactic halos is rather insensitive to other cosmological parameters, it can in principle be an independent discriminator of modified gravity. We speculate a possibility of using the relative abundance of low surface brightness galaxies (LSBGs) as a test of general relativity given that the formation of the LSBGs occurs in fast spinning dark halos.

  1. Characteristics of Ceramic Fiber Modified Asphalt Mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jiuming; Wu, Shaopeng; Xiao, Yue; Liu, Quantao; Schlangen, Erik

    2016-09-21

    Ceramic fiber, with a major composition of Al₂O₃ and SiO₂, has advantages of stability at relatively high temperature, big specific surface area and resistance to external mechanical vibration. It has the potential contribution of improving the rutting resistance and temperature sensitivity of modified asphalt binder by proper modification design. In this research, ceramic fiber was introduced into both pen 60/80 and pen 80/100 asphalt binder by different weight ratios. An asphalt penetration test, softening point test, ductility test and dynamic viscoelastic behavior were conducted to characterize and predict the ceramic fiber modified asphalt mortar (CFAM). Research results indicated that the ceramic fiber has a great effect on reinforcement of asphalt, which makes the asphalt stiffer so that the asphalt can only undertake less strain under the same stress. The heat insulation effect of the ceramic fiber will improve the temperature stability. Complex modulus and phase angle results indicate that the ceramic fiber can significantly enhance the high temperature resistance of soft binder.

  2. GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD CROPS AND PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acosta Orlando

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The progress made in plant biotechnology has provided an opportunity to new food crops being developed having desirable traits for improving crop yield, reducing the use of agrochemicals and adding nutritional properties to staple crops. However, genetically modified (GM crops have become a subject of intense debate in which opponents argue that GM crops represent a threat to individual freedom, the environment, public health and traditional economies. Despite the advances in food crop agriculture, the current world situation is still characterised by massive hunger and chronic malnutrition, representing a major public health problem. Biofortified GM crops have been considered an important and complementary strategy for delivering naturally-fortified staple foods to malnourished populations. Expert advice and public concern have led to designing strategies for assessing the potential risks involved in cultivating and consuming GM crops. The present critical review was aimed at expressing some conflicting points of view about the potential risks of GM crops for public health. It was concluded that GM food crops are no more risky than those genetically modified by conventional methods and that these GM crops might contribute towards reducing the amount of malnourished people around the world. However, all this needs to be complemented by effective political action aimed at increasing the income of people living below the poverty-line.

  3. Genetic and environmental modifiers of Wilson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Valentina; Weiss, Karl-Heinz

    2017-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is characterized by remarkable variety in its phenotypic presentation. Patients with WD can present with hepatic, neurologic, and psychiatric symptoms combined in different and unpredictable ways. Importantly, no convincing phenotype-genotype correlation has ever been identified, opening the possibility that other genes, aside from ATPase copper-transporting beta (ATP7B), are involved in the pathogenesis of this condition. In addition, modifier genes, or genes that can affect the expression of other genes, may be involved. Clinical and basic science data indicate that environmental and dietary factors can potentially modify gene expression in WD and, consequently, its clinical presentation and course. In particular, previously studied genes include copper metabolism domain-containing 1 (COMMD1), antioxidant 1 copper chaperone (ATOX1), X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP), apolipoprotein E (APOE), hemochromatosis (HFE), and 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). Dietary factors include iron and methyl group donors which could affect methionine metabolism and epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation. Most of the work conducted in this field is in its initial stages but it has the potential to change the diagnosis and treatment of WD. © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. New classes of modified teleparallel gravity models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Bahamonde

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available New classes of modified teleparallel theories of gravity are introduced. The action of this theory is constructed to be a function of the irreducible parts of torsion f(Tax,Tten,Tvec, where Tax,Tten and Tvec are squares of the axial, tensor and vector components of torsion, respectively. This is the most general (well-motivated second order teleparallel theory of gravity that can be constructed from the torsion tensor. Different particular second order theories can be recovered from this theory such as new general relativity, conformal teleparallel gravity or f(T gravity. Additionally, the boundary term B which connects the Ricci scalar with the torsion scalar via R=−T+B can also be incorporated into the action. By performing a conformal transformation, it is shown that the two unique theories which have an Einstein frame are either the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity or f(−T+B=f(R gravity, as expected. Keywords: Modified gravity, Teleparallel gravity, Torsion, Conformal transformations

  5. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  6. Genetically modified viruses: vaccines by design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, J R

    2001-03-01

    Vaccination has been one of the most successful and cost-effective health interventions ever employed. One disease (smallpox) has been eradicated, another (poliomyelitis) should disappear early in the new millennium and a third (measles) should follow shortly after. Conventional vaccines usually depend on one of three development processes, attenuation of virulent organisms (by passage in cell culture and/or experimental animals), killing of virulent organisms (by chemical inactivation) or the purification of immunogenic molecules (either proteins or carbohydrates) from whole organisms. These traditional processes, although serendipitous and poorly understood, have produced effective pharmaceutical products which give excellent protection against diseases such as smallpox, rabies, measles, yellow fever, tetanus and diphtheria. In spite of these successes however, the application of these protocols have failed to produce safe and efficacious vaccines against other infectious diseases which kill or maim tens of millions of people every year. The most important of these are malaria, AIDS, herpes, dengue fever and some forms of viral hepatitis. Consequently, fundamentally new technologies are required to tackle these important infections. One of the most promising has been the development of genetically modified viruses. This process normally involves taking a proven safe and efficacious vaccine virus, such as vaccinia or adenovirus, and modifying its genome to include genes coding for immunogenic proteins from other viruses such as HIV or measles. This review will describe the generation of such novel vaccine vectors and compare their advantages and shortcomings. In addition the literature describing their use as experimental vaccines will also be reviewed.

  7. Genetically Modified (GM) Foods and Ethical Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Francis; Costa, Sarah; Rock, Cheryl; Harris, Amanda; Husk, Cierra; Mei, Jenny

    2016-02-01

    The ability to manipulate and customize the genetic code of living organisms has brought forth the production of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and consumption of genetically modified (GM) foods. The potential for GM foods to improve the efficiency of food production, increase customer satisfaction, and provide potential health benefits has contributed to the rapid incorporation of GM foods into the American diet. However, GM foods and GMOs are also a topic of ethical debate. The use of GM foods and GM technology is surrounded by ethical concerns and situational judgment, and should ideally adhere to the ethical standards placed upon food and nutrition professionals, such as: beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice and autonomy. The future of GM foods involves many aspects and trends, including enhanced nutritional value in foods, strict labeling laws, and potential beneficial economic conditions in developing nations. This paper briefly reviews the origin and background of GM foods, while delving thoroughly into 3 areas: (1) GMO labeling, (2) ethical concerns, and (3) health and industry applications. This paper also examines the relationship between the various applications of GM foods and their corresponding ethical issues. Ethical concerns were evaluated in the context of the code of ethics developed by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (AND) that govern the work of food and nutrition professionals. Overall, there is a need to stay vigilant about the many ethical implications of producing and consuming GM foods and GMOs. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. Dynamic modulus of nanosilica modified porous asphalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, A. K.; Masri, K. A.; Ahmad, J.; Samsudin, M. S.

    2017-11-01

    Porous asphalt (PA) is a flexible pavement layer with high interconnected air void contents and constructed using open-graded aggregates. Due to high temperature environment and increased traffic volume in Malaysia, PA may have deficiencies particularly in rutting and stiffness of the mix. A possible way to improve these deficiencies is to improve the asphalt binder used. Binder is normally modified using polymer materials to improve its properties. However, nanotechnology presently is being gradually used for asphalt modification. Nanosilica (NS), a byproduct of rice husk and palm oil fuel ash is used as additive in this study. The aim of this study is to enhance the rutting resistance and stiffness performance of PA using NS. This study focused on the performance of PA in terms of dynamic modulus with the addition of NS modified binder to produce better and more durable PA. From the result of Dynamic SPT Test, it shows that the addition of NS was capable in enhancing the stiffness and rutting resistance of PA. The addition of NS also increase the dynamic modulus value of PA by 50%.

  9. Modified UMS, Modified SemRep and SemMedDB-UTH | Informatics Technology for Cancer Research (ITCR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modified UMLS, modified SemRep and SemMedDB-UTH – these are resources (UMLS, SemMedDB-UT) and tools (SemRep) created and maintained by National Library of Medicine that we have modified for personalized cancer therapy and returned to the NLM.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Isotactic Polypropylene Modified with Thermoplastic Potato Starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knitter, M.; Dobrzyńska-Mizera, M.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper selected mechanical properties of isotactic polypropylene (iPP) modified with potato starch have been presented. Thermoplastic starch (TPS) used as a modifier in the study was produced from potato starch modified with glycerol. Isotactic polypropylene/thermoplastic potato starch composites (iPP/TPS) that contained 10, 30, 50 wt.% of modified starch were examined using dynamic mechanical-thermal analysis, static tensile, Brinell hardness, and Charpy impact test. The studies indicated a distinct influence of a filler content on the mechanical properties of composites in comparison with non-modified polypropylene.

  11. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Scott; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-01-15

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  12. Chemically modified carbonic anhydrases useful in carbon capture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novick, Scott J; Alvizo, Oscar

    2013-10-29

    The present disclosure relates to chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides and soluble compositions, homogenous liquid formulations comprising them. The chemically modified carbonic anhydrase polypeptides have improved properties relative to the same carbonic anhydrase polypeptide that is not chemically modified including the improved properties of increased activity and/or stability in the presence of amine compounds, ammonia, or carbonate ion. The present disclosure also provides methods of preparing the chemically modified polypeptides and methods of using the chemically modified polypeptides for accelerating the absorption of carbon dioxide from a gas stream into a solution as well as for the release of the absorbed carbon dioxide for further treatment and/or sequestering.

  13. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for pancreatic cancer: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midha, Shallu; Chawla, Saurabh; Garg, Pramod Kumar

    2016-10-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is associated with a poor prognosis and a high case-fatality rate. The reasons for poor prognosis are low rates of curative resection due to local infiltration and distant metastasis. To increase survival rates of patients with pancreatic cancer, early detection through surveillance and screening is important. However, screening could only be cost-effective in high-risk populations. Identification of significant risk factors therefore assumes significance. Risk factors could be non-modifiable or modifiable. Non-modifiable risk factors include increasing age, familial cancer syndromes, Afro-American race, hereditary and other forms of chronic pancreatitis, diabetes, and non-O blood group. Important modifiable risk factors include smoking, obesity, dietary factors such as non-vegetarian diet, and toxins. Preventive strategies at the population level and an effective screening program targeted at high-risk people may help in prevention and early detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Solid-Phase Synthesis of Modified Peptides as Putative Inhibitors of Histone Modifying Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohrt, Anders Emil O'Hanlon

    to be compatible with all 20 naturally occurring amino acids, and were furthermore feasible on several commonly used polymeric supports. By using dilute SnCl4 for N -Boc deprotection, and NaOH for the release of material from the solid support, N -modified peptides were cleanly obtained in excellent yields...

  15. MATERNAL EFFECTS IN ADVANCED HYBRIDS OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED AND NON-GENETICALLY MODIFIED BRASSICA SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of fitness traits potentially impacted by gene flow from genetically modified (GM) crops to compatible relatives is of interest in risk assessments for GM crops. Reciprocal crosses were made between GM canola, Brassica napus cv. RaideRR that expresses CP4 EPSPS fo...

  16. A solidification model for unmodified, Na-modified and Sr-modified Al-Si alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiedje, Niels Skat; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Taylor, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    An addition of small amounts of Na and Sr is commonly used in the industry to modify the eutectic in Al-Si alloys. Both Na and Sr suppress nucleation of the eutectic forcing nucleation and growth to take place at higher undercooling than in the unmodified material. Thus the scale of the eutectic ...

  17. A modified K3M thinning algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabedzki Marek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The K3M thinning algorithm is a general method for image data reduction by skeletonization. It had proved its feasibility in most cases as a reliable and robust solution in typical applications of thinning, particularly in preprocessing for optical character recognition. However, the algorithm had still some weak points. Since then K3M has been revised, addressing the best known drawbacks. This paper presents a modified version of the algorithm. A comparison is made with the original one and two other thinning approaches. The proposed modification, among other things, solves the main drawback of K3M, namely, the results of thinning an image after rotation with various angles.

  18. Lagrangian perturbation theory for modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Alejandro; Cervantes-Cota, Jorge L.

    2017-12-01

    We present a formalism to compute Lagrangian displacement fields for a wide range of cosmologies in the context of perturbation theory up to third order. We emphasize the case of theories with scale-dependent gravitational strengths, such as chameleons, but our formalism can be accommodated to other modified gravity theories. In the nonlinear regime, two qualitative features arise. One, as is well known, is that nonlinearities lead to a screening of the force mediated by the scalar field. The second is a consequence of the transformation of the Klein-Gordon equation from Eulerian to Lagrangian coordinates, producing frame lagging terms that are important especially at large scales, and if not considered, the theory does not reduce to the Λ CDM model in that limit. We apply our formalism to compute the one-loop power spectrum and the correlation function in f (R ) gravity by using different resummation schemes. We further discuss the IR divergences of these formalisms.

  19. Waste Plastic-Modified Bitumen: Rheological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Abdel-Goad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Bitumen blends were prepared for road applications by the introduction of 9% of waste Polyethylene by weight (9 wt%. The relaxation stress, relaxation and retardation spectrum and viscosity of bitumen blends were studied at different temperatures and compared to those of the original pure bitumen. These properties were tested using an ARESRheometer (Rheometric Scientific, Co. equipment. The measurements were performed in the dynamic mode, plate-plate geometry of 8 mm diameter over the temperature range from -10 to 60°C and angular frequency (ω varied from 10-1 to 102 radian/s. The relaxation stress and viscosity were modified by the addition of waste PE. The results also indicate that the incorporation of the waste PE enhances stability of the bitumen blends.

  20. Tulip, a Modified Munsell Color Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Uri

    1990-03-01

    The "Tulip" is a modified Munsell Color Space in which equal hue spacing is converted to variable hue spacing, reflecting the differential sensitivity to hue as a function of value, for a fixed chroma. Number of discernible hues, when plotted on a hue-value plane, results in the proposed tulip shape, with curved lines delineating the boundaries between hues. By means of a signal detection experiment, the tulip for yellow-green and for blue is determined. It is shown that more distinct hues of yellow-green are discernible at a high value than at low value. Conversely, for blue, more distinct hues are discernible at low value than at high value.

  1. Astrophysical black holes in screened modified gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Anne-Christine; Jha, Rahul; Muir, Jessica [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Gregory, Ruth, E-mail: acd@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: r.a.w.gregory@durham.ac.uk, E-mail: r.jha@damtp.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: jlmuir@umich.edu [Centre for Particle Theory, South Road, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    Chameleon, environmentally dependent dilaton, and symmetron gravity are three models of modified gravity in which the effects of the additional scalar degree of freedom are screened in dense environments. They have been extensively studied in laboratory, cosmological, and astrophysical contexts. In this paper, we present a preliminary investigation into whether additional constraints can be provided by studying these scalar fields around black holes. By looking at the properties of a static, spherically symmetric black hole, we find that the presence of a non-uniform matter distribution induces a non-constant scalar profile in chameleon and dilaton, but not necessarily symmetron gravity. An order of magnitude estimate shows that the effects of these profiles on in-falling test particles will be sub-leading compared to gravitational waves and hence observationally challenging to detect.

  2. Waste-moulding dusts modified with polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baliński

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article described problems of the influence of advanced oxidizing process, the supersonic tooling of waste - moulding dusts and their modification with polyelectrolytes, on the technological proprieties of the moulding sands prepared with their participation.Physicochemical characterization of the used polyelectrolytes PSS (poli 4-styreno sodium sulfonate and PEI (poli etyleno imine, in theaspect of their modificatory influences on the waste - moulding dust, was described. Defined the influence of adsorption proprieties ofthe polyelectrolyte PEI on the surface of small parts of the waste - dust, on technological proprieties of the sandmix. Ascertained theprofitable influence of this electrolyte on mechanical proprieties of the moulding sands, that is to say the increase in value of thecompression strength (about 10% and tensile strenght (about 13%, comparatively to analogous proprieties of the moulding sandsprepared with the participation of the not modified waste- dust.

  3. Catalyzed modified clean fractionation of switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Iwona; Brudecki, Grzegorz P; Hankerson, Brett R; Julson, James L; Lei, Hanwu

    2013-01-01

    Switchgrass was used as a lignocellulosic feedstock for second generation ethanol production, after pretreatment using sulfuric acid-catalyzed modified clean fractionation based on NREL's (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) original procedure. Optimization of temperature, catalyst concentration and solvent composition was performed using Response Surface Methodology, and 59.03 ± 7.01% lignin recovery, 84.85 ± 1.34% glucose, and 44.11 ± 3.44% aqueous fraction xylose yields were obtained at 140.00 °C, 0.46% w/w catalyst concentration, 36.71% w/w ethyl acetate concentration, and 25.00% w/w ethanol concentration. The cellulose fraction did not inhibit the fermentation performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and resulted in an ethanol yield of 89.60 ± 2.1%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modified MIMO Cube for Enhanced Channel Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajos Nagy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the optimization of MIMO antenna elements' position in modified MIMO cube for getting maximal channel capacity in indoor environment. The dependence of the channel capacity on the antenna orientation was analyzed by simulations. We have also examined the effect of the frequency dependence of the antenna system (in case of conjugate matching and nonconjugate matching for the channel capacity. Based on the simulation results in the created and measured antenna system, the antennas were at a right angle to each other. At the two chosen different structures, we measured the antenna parameters and the channel capacity. In this paper, we present the results of the measurements which clearly confirm our simulations. We will point out the differences between the two antenna structures.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of genetically modified flax fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymińska, L.; Gągor, A.; Hanuza, J.; Kulma, A.; Preisner, M.; Żuk, M.; Szatkowski, M.; Szopa, J.

    2014-09-01

    The principal goal of this paper is an analysis of flax fiber composition. Natural and genetically modified flax fibers derived from transgenic flax have been analyzed. Development of genetic engineering enables to improve the quality of fibers. Three transgenic plant lines with different modifications were generated based on fibrous flax plants as the origin. These are plants with: silenced cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) gene; overexpression of polygalacturonase (PGI); and expression of three genes construct containing β-ketothiolase (phb A), acetoacetyl-CoA reductase (phb B), and poly-3-hydroxybutyric acid synthase (phb C). Flax fibers have been studied by FT-IR spectroscopy. The integral intensities of the IR bands have been used for estimation of the chemical content of the normal and transgenic flaxes. The spectroscopic data were compared to those obtained from chemical analysis of flax fibers. X-ray studies have been used to characterize the changes of the crystalline structure of the flax cellulose fibers.

  6. Economic Dispatch Using Modified Bat Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aadil Latif

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Economic dispatch is an important non-linear optimization task in power systems. In this process, the total power demand is distributed amongst the generating units such that each unit satisfies its generation limit constraints and the cost of power production is minimized. This paper presents an over view of three optimization algorithms namely real coded genetic algorithm, particle swarm optimization and a relatively new optimization technique called bat algorithm. This study will further propose modifications to the original bat. Simulations are carried out for two test cases. First is a six-generator power system with a simplified convex objective function. The second test case is a five-generator system with a non-convex objective function. Finally the results of the modified algorithm are compared with the results of genetic algorithm, particle swarm and the original bat algorithm. The results demonstrate the improvement in the Bat Algorithm.

  7. Cosmological consequences of Modified Gravity (MOG)

    CERN Document Server

    Toth, Viktor T

    2010-01-01

    As an alternative to the LCDM concordance model, Scalar-Tensor-Vector Modified Gravity (MOG) theory reproduces key cosmological observations without postulating the presence of an exotic dark matter component. MOG is a field theory based on an action principle, with a variable gravitational constant and a repulsive vector field with variable range. MOG yields a phenomenological acceleration law that includes strong tensorial gravity partially canceled by a repulsive massive vector force. This acceleration law can be used to model the CMB acoustic spectrum and the matter power spectrum yielding good agreement with observation. A key prediction of MOG is the presence of strong baryonic oscillations, which will be detectable by future surveys. MOG is also consistent with Type Ia supernova data. We also describe on-going research of the coupling between MOG and continuous matter, consistent with the weak equivalence principle and solar system observations.

  8. Leukotriene modifiers in pediatric asthma management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (Cys-LTs) are mediators released in asthma and virus-induced wheezing. Corticosteroids appear to have little or no effect on this release in vivo. Cys-LTs are both direct bronchoconstrictors and proinflammatory substances that mediate several steps in the pathophysiology...... of chronic asthma, including inflammatory cell recruitment, vascular leakage, and possibly airway remodeling. Blocking studies show that Cys-LTs are pivotal mediators in the pathophysiology of asthma. Cys-LTs are key components in the early and late allergic airway response and also contribute to bronchial...... obstruction after exercise and hyperventilation of cold, dry air in asthmatics. LT modifiers reduce airway eosinophil numbers and exhaled nitric oxide levels. Together these findings support an important role for the Cys-LTs in the asthma airway inflammation. Cys-LT receptor antagonists (Cys...

  9. Modified Higgs Physics from Composite Light Flavors

    CERN Document Server

    Delaunay, Cédric; Perez, Gilad

    2013-01-01

    We point out that Higgs rates into gauge bosons can be significantly modified in composite pseudo Nambu--Goldstone boson (pNGB) Higgs models if quarks belonging to the first two generation are relatively composite objects as well. Although the lightness of the latter a priori screen them from the electroweak symmetry breaking sector, we show, in an effective two-site description, that their partners can lead to order one shifts in radiative Higgs couplings to gluons and photons. Moreover, due to the pseudo-Goldstone nature of the Higgs boson, the size of these corrections is completely controlled by the degree of compositeness of the individual light quarks. The current measurements of flavor-blind Higgs decay rates at the LHC thus provide an indirect probe of the flavor structure of the framework of pNGB Higgs compositeness.

  10. New classes of modified teleparallel gravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahamonde, Sebastian; Böhmer, Christian G.; Krššák, Martin

    2017-12-01

    New classes of modified teleparallel theories of gravity are introduced. The action of this theory is constructed to be a function of the irreducible parts of torsion f (Tax ,Tten ,Tvec), where Tax ,Tten and Tvec are squares of the axial, tensor and vector components of torsion, respectively. This is the most general (well-motivated) second order teleparallel theory of gravity that can be constructed from the torsion tensor. Different particular second order theories can be recovered from this theory such as new general relativity, conformal teleparallel gravity or f (T) gravity. Additionally, the boundary term B which connects the Ricci scalar with the torsion scalar via R = - T + B can also be incorporated into the action. By performing a conformal transformation, it is shown that the two unique theories which have an Einstein frame are either the teleparallel equivalent of general relativity or f (- T + B) = f (R) gravity, as expected.

  11. ENZYME RESISTANCE OF GENETICALLY MODIFIED STARCH POTATOES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sh. Mannapova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here in this article the justification of expediency of enzyme resistant starch use in therapeutic food products is presented . Enzyme resistant starch is capable to resist to enzymatic hydrolysis in a small intestine of a person, has a low glycemic index, leads to decrease of postprandial concentration of glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides in blood and insulin reaction, to improvement of sensitivity of all organism to insulin, to increase in sense of fulness and to reduction of adjournment of fats. Resistant starch makes bifidogenшс impact on microflora of a intestine of the person, leads to increase of a quantity of lactobacillus and bifidobacterium and to increased production of butyric acid in a large intestine. In this regard the enzyme resistant starch is an important component in food for prevention and curing of human diseases such as diabetes, obesity, colitis, a cancer of large and direct intestine. One method is specified by authors for imitation of starch digestion in a human body. This method is based on the definition of an enzyme resistance of starch in vitro by its hydrolysis to glucose with application of a glucoamylase and digestive enzyme preparation Pancreatin. This method is used in researches of an enzyme resistance of starch, of genetically modified potato, high amylose corn starch Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII (National Starch Food Innovation, USA, amylopectin and amylose. It is shown that the enzyme resistance of the starch emitted from genetically modified potatoes conforms to the enzyme resistance of the high amylose corn starch “Hi-Maize 1043 and HYLON VII starch”, (National Starch Food Innovation, the USA relating to the II type of enzyme resistant starch. It is established that amylopectin doesn't have the enzyme resistant properties. The results of researches are presented. They allow us to make the following conclusion: amylose in comparison with amylopectin possesses higher enzyme resistance and gives to

  12. Modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Shuangli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To investigate the clinical outcome of modified Blair ankle fusion for ankle arthritis. Methods:Between November 2009 and June 2012, 28 patients with ankle arthritis were treated, among whom 11 had obvious foot varus deformity, and 17 were almost normal in appearance. There were 13 males and 15 females with an average age of 49.4 years (range, 23-67 years. The main symptoms included swelling, pain, and a limited range of motion of the ankles. The ankle joints functions were assessed by American Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score and visual analog scale (VAS preoperatively and at 1 year follow-up. Results:Twenty-eight patients were followed up for 19.8 months on average (range, 1-2 years. Superficial wound infection occurred in 3 cases, and was cured after debridement; the other incisions healed by first intention without complications. All ankles were fused at 1 year follow-up after operation. The symptom was relieved completely in all patients at last follow-up without complication of implant failure, or nonunion. The postoperative AOFAS ankle and hindfoot score was 83.13±3.76, showing significant difference when compared with the preoperative score (45.38±3.21, P<0.01. VAS was significantly decreased from 8.01±0.63 to 2.31±1.05 at 1 year follow-up (P<0.05. Conclusion:Modified Blair ankle fusion has the advantages of high feasiblity, less cost and rigid fixation. It shows high reliability in pain relief and may obtain a good clinical effectiveness. Key words: Ankle; Arthritis; Arthrodesis; Fracture fixation, intramedullary

  13. Medical Doctors Perceptions of Genetically Modified Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Savas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Recombinant DNA and with similar technical changes made on genes or transferred isolated gene the living organisms have been named genetically modified organisms (GMOs. Thanks to advances in genetic technology, the advancement of enzyme and fermentation techniques result obtained by the use of GMOs in food industry products of genetically modified (GM foods are named. In this study, GM foods about the possible harmful effects have information and community advice on this matter to be medical doctors on this issue perceptions, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors aimed to measure.Material and Method: The study was made on including 200 medical doctors aged 23-65, 118 men (59%, 82 women (41%. In the statistical analysis based on the responses of medical doctors, against GM food risk perception, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors were assessed. Results: 80.5% of the participants’ think that GM foods are harmful. 22% of the participants were expressed that their knowledge are ‘’good’’ and ‘’very good’’ about GM food. While 38% of the participants use internet and 23.5% of the participants  use media, only 4.5% of the participants use medical schools as a source of sufficient information about GM foods. Discussion: While the risk perception of medical doctors about GM foods is high, the knowledge on this issue is observed low. Though the consumption and the prevelance of GM foods are increasing, medical doctors should have more information about this issue to enlighten and guide the community.

  14. Candida albicans keratitis modified by steroid application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Araki-Sasaki

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Kaoru Araki-Sasaki1, Hiroko Sonoyama1, Tsutomu Kawasaki1, Nariyasu Kazama1, Hidenao Ideta1, Yoshitsugu Inoue21Ideta Eye Hospital, Kumamoto City, Kumamoto, Japan; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Tottori University, Koyama-Minami, Tottori, Japan Abstract: The paper reports on Candida albicans ocular infection modified by steroid eye drops. A 74-year-old male complained of conjunctival injection and pain in his right eye three months after pterygium and cataract surgery. After treatment with antibiotics and steroid eye drops for three days, he was referred to our hospital. Clear localized corneal endothelial plaque with injection of ciliary body was observed. No erosion of the corneal epithelium, or infiltration of stromal edema was observed, suggesting that the pathological organism derived from the intracameral region. Because ocular infection was suspected, steroid eye drops were stopped, which led immediately to typical infectious keratitis in the pathological region, with epithelial erosion, fluffy abscess, stromal infiltration, and edema. For diagnostic purposes, the plaque was surgically removed with forceps and the anterior chamber was irrigated with antibiotics. The smear and culture examination from the plaque revealed C. albicans surrounded by neutrophils. However, aqueous fluid and fibrous tissue after gonio procedure contained no mycotic organisms. Topical fluconazole, micafungin, and pimaricin with oral itraconazole (150 mg/day were effective. Special attention is needed when prescribing steroid eye drops to treat corneal disease especially postoperatively. Diagnosing infectious keratitis is sometimes difficult because of modification by some factors, such as postoperative conditions, scarring, and drug-induced masking. Here, we report on mycotic keratitis modified by postoperative steroid administration. Keywords: Candida albicans, cataract surgery, steroid, mycotic keratitis

  15. Modified laparoscopic hepatectomy for hepatic hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Dou-Sheng; Chen, Ping; Qian, Jian-Jun; Yao, Jie; Jin, Sheng-Jie; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Jiang, Guo-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Laparoscopic hepatectomy (LH) using many different surgical techniques has become increasingly popular for the management of hepatic tumors. The performance of surgical procedures involving the least possible impairment is expected increasingly more often by both surgeons and patients. We herein describe a clinical cohort of ten patients with hepatic cavernous hemangioma (HCH) who underwent modified LH (MLH) with a new technique. We herein present the advantages of the low level of impairment during performance of this modified procedure and compare the outcomes of MLH with those of traditional LH (TLH) for HCH. We retrospectively evaluated the treatment outcomes in 24 patients with HCH who underwent MLH (n = 10) or TLH (n = 14) from February 2008 to January 2013. Their demographic, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were compared. MLH was successful in all patients. An electromechanical morcellator allowed for easy extraction of the entire HCH without the use of a cumbersome retrieval bag, enlarged incision, or hand-assisted incision. There was no conversion to an open operation or significant perioperative complications. The operation time (P = 0.037), time to removal of the HCH (P < 0.0001), visual analog scale pain score on the first postoperative day (P = 0.012), time to off-bed activity (P = 0.036), and postoperative hospital stay (P = 0.048) were significantly lower in the MLH group than in the TLH group. MLH involving the use of an electromechanical morcellator provides expedient recovery and minimal postoperative pain and scarring. It is a feasible, effective, and safe surgical procedure and embodies all of the benefits of minimally invasive surgery for patients with HCH.

  16. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced. PMID:22551150

  17. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Li; Rachul, Christen

    2012-06-08

    Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND), we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People's Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  18. Chinese newspaper coverage of genetically modified organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Li

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debates persist around the world over the development and use of genetically modified organisms (GMO. News media has been shown to both reflect and influence public perceptions of health and science related debates, as well as policy development. To better understand the news coverage of GMOs in China, we analyzed the content of articles in two Chinese newspapers that relate to the development and promotion of genetically modified technologies and GMOs. Methods Searching in the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Core Newspaper Database (CNKI-CND, we collected 77 articles, including news reports, comments and notes, published between January 2002 and August 2011 in two of the major Chinese newspapers: People’s Daily and Guangming Daily. We examined articles for perspectives that were discussed and/or mentioned regarding GMOs, the risks and benefits of GMOs, and the tone of news articles. Results The newspaper articles reported on 29 different kinds of GMOs. Compared with the possible risks, the benefits of GMOs were much more frequently discussed in the articles. 48.1% of articles were largely supportive of the GM technology research and development programs and the adoption of GM cottons, while 51.9% of articles were neutral on the subject of GMOs. Risks associated with GMOs were mentioned in the newspaper articles, but none of the articles expressed negative tones in regards to GMOs. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the Chinese print media is largely supportive of GMOs. It also indicates that the print media describes the Chinese government as actively pursuing national GMO research and development programs and the promotion of GM cotton usage. So far, discussion of the risks associated with GMOs is minimal in the news reports. The media, scientists, and the government should work together to ensure that science communication is accurate and balanced.

  19. Biotechnology: Two Decades of Experimentation with Genetically Modified Foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Ajami

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Over the recent years, genetically modified food in varieties of corn, soybeans, canola and cotton have been introduced to the global market. This study reviews the health and nutritional value of genetically modified foods in the past two decades.Results and Conclusions: Contrary to the present biotechnological claims, transgenic products did not prove to be so flawless, and actually failed to maintain social satisfaction. Genetically modified foods could not gain an increase in the yield potential. Planting natural products and genetically modified products in parallel lines will absolutely result in genetic infection from the side of genetically modified foods. One of the major anxieties of the anti- genetically modified foods activism is the claim that genetically modified crops would alter the consumable parts of the plant quality and safety. Genetically modified foods have shown to have inadequate efficiency and potential adverse effects in both fields of health and biodiversity. This review has presented studies of genetically modified foods performances in the past two decades, and concludes that the wide application and the over generalization of genetically modified foods are not fundamentally recommended.Conflict of interest: Authors declare that there is no conflict of interest.

  20. DETECTION OF MODIFIED LIPOPROTEINS IN ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESIONS OF HUMAN AORTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Pigarevsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Specific autoantibodies against acetylated, maleylated and malonic dialdehyde-(MDA-modified lipoproteins are detectable in human plasma. Immunization of rabbits with autologous, correspondingly modified low-density lipoproteins (LDLs did induce autoantibodies against acetylated, maleylated and MDA-modified lipoproteins. In atherosclerotic lesions from hyman aorta, the epitopes have been detected that were recognized by the antibodies to acetylated, maleylated, and MDA-modified LDLs. Such antigens were detected at all atherogenesis stages, beginning with the earliest lesions (lipid spots, and their deposition pattern was quite variable.Rabbit and human autoantibodies against acetylated, maleylated and MDA-modified lipoproteins recognized antigens in human atherosclerotic aorta. Modified proteins were localized both intra- and extracellular in tectum, superficial and deep layers of the atherosclerotic lesions. The most typical mode of depositions for all modified proteins si represented by extracellular deposits in the cap of lipid streaks and fibrous plaques, especially in transitional “shoulder” area.The intimal deposits of modified proteins shared similar features with distribution of apo-B-containing lipoproteins, like as of lipids detectable by Oil Red staining. The areas where modified proteins and apo-B-containing lipoproteins were revealed did often coincide with foci of IgG deposits. Modified proteins were not detectable in the non-affected segments of aortic intima.

  1. Modifiable Neighborhood Features Associated With Adolescent Homicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culyba, Alison J; Jacoby, Sara F; Richmond, Therese S; Fein, Joel A; Hohl, Bernadette C; Branas, Charles C

    2016-05-01

    Homicide is a leading cause of adolescent mortality. To our knowledge, relatively little has been studied in terms of the association between environmental neighborhood features, such as streets, buildings, and natural surroundings, and severe violent injury among youth. To assess associations between environmental neighborhood features and adolescent homicide in order to identify targets for future place-based interventions. Population-based case-control study conducted in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from April 15, 2008, to March 31, 2014. We identified adolescents who died by homicide at 13 to 20 years of age from 2010 to 2012 while residing in Philadelphia. We used incidence-density sampling and random-digit dialing to recruit control participants ages 13 to 20 years matched on sex and indoor-outdoor location at the time of each index case participant's homicide. To obtain environmental data about modifiable features that were present in the immediate surroundings of our case and control participants, blinded field researchers used standardized techniques to photograph case and control participant outdoor locations. Photographic data were stitched together to create 360° panoramic images that were coded for 60 elements of the visible environment. Adolescent homicide. We enrolled 143 homicide case participants (mean [SD] age, 18.4 [1.5] years) and 155 matched control participants (mean [SD] age, 17.2 [2.1] years) who were both outdoors at the time of the homicide. In adjusted analyses, multiple features of Philadelphia streets, buildings, and natural surroundings were associated with adolescent homicide. The presence of street lighting (odds ratio [OR], 0.24; 95% CI, 0.09-0.70), illuminated walk/don't walk signs (OR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.03-0.92), painted marked crosswalks (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.04-0.63), public transportation (OR, 0.13; 95% CI, 0.03-0.49), parks (OR, 0.09; 95% CI, 0.01-0.88), and maintained vacant lots (OR, 0.17; 95% CI, 0.03-0.81) were significantly

  2. INFLUENCE OF PARAMETERS OF CRYSTALLIZATION ON MODIFYING OF AN ALLOY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Stetsenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that extent of modifying of an alloy is proportional to overcooling at its hardening, viscosity of fusion and interphase superficial energy of crystals of the leading phase. The key technological parameters of modifying of an alloy are the speed of its hardening, viscosity of fusion and extent of refinement from surface-active elements. Their adsorption on crystals of the leading phase interferes with modifying of an alloy.

  3. Factors Influencing Urban Consumers' Acceptance of Genetically Modified Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Hwan Han; R. Wes Harrison

    2007-01-01

    Linkages between consumer beliefs and attitudes regarding the risks and benefits of genetically modified foods and consumer purchase intentions for these foods are examined. Factors that hinder consumer purchases of genetically modified foods are also tested. Results show that purchase intentions for consumers willing to buy genetically modified crops and meats are primarily affected by their belief that these foods are safe. On the other hand, intentions of consumers who decide not to buy ge...

  4. 21 CFR 184.1063 - Enzyme-modified lecithin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Enzyme-modified lecithin. 184.1063 Section 184.1063... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1063 Enzyme-modified lecithin. (a) Enzyme-modified... accordance with § 184.1(b)(1), the ingredient is used in food with no limitation other than current good...

  5. Genetically modified microorganisms having improved tolerance towards l-serine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention generally relates to the microbiological industry, and specifically to the production of L-serine or L-serine derivatives using genetically modified bacteria. The present invention provides genetically modified microorganisms, such as bacteria, wherein the expression of genes...... tolerant towards higher concentrations of serine. The present invention also provides methods for the production of L-serine or L-serine derivative using such genetically modified microorganisms....

  6. Cost comparisons of modified X̅ chart for autocorrelated observations

    OpenAIRE

    Prajapati D. R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the economic design of modified X̅ chart for autocorrelated data and comparison with the economic design of Shewhart’s X̅ chart. An attempt has been made to counter autocorrelation by designing the modified X̅ chart; as the cost of operating a process control system is an important element in the economic design of control charts. The economic designs of both modified and Shewhart X̅ charts for autocorrelated observations...

  7. Modified gravity models of dark energy

    CERN Document Server

    Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2011-01-01

    We review recent progress of modified gravity models of dark energy--based on f(R) gravity, scalar-tensor theories, braneworld gravity, Galileon gravity, and other theories. In f(R) gravity and Brans-Dicke theory it is possible to design viable models consistent with local gravity constraints under a chameleon mechanism, while satisfying conditions for the cosmological viability. The Dvali-Gabadazde-Porrati braneworld model can be compatible with local gravity constraints through a nonlinear field self-interaction arising from a brane-bending mode, but the self-accelerating solution contains a ghost mode in addition to the tension with observational data about the cosmic expansion history. The extension of the field self-interaction to more general forms satisfying a Galilean symmetry in the flat space-time allows a possibility to avoid the appearance of ghosts and Laplacian instabilities, while the late-time cosmic acceleration can be realized by the field kinetic energy. We study the evolution of cosmologic...

  8. Peptide-modified surfaces for enzyme immobilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglin Fu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemistry and particularly enzymology at surfaces is a topic of rapidly growing interest, both in terms of its role in biological systems and its application in biocatalysis. Existing protein immobilization approaches, including noncovalent or covalent attachments to solid supports, have difficulties in controlling protein orientation, reducing nonspecific absorption and preventing protein denaturation. New strategies for enzyme immobilization are needed that allow the precise control over orientation and position and thereby provide optimized activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A method is presented for utilizing peptide ligands to immobilize enzymes on surfaces with improved enzyme activity and stability. The appropriate peptide ligands have been rapidly selected from high-density arrays and when desirable, the peptide sequences were further optimized by single-point variant screening to enhance both the affinity and activity of the bound enzyme. For proof of concept, the peptides that bound to β-galactosidase and optimized its activity were covalently attached to surfaces for the purpose of capturing target enzymes. Compared to conventional methods, enzymes immobilized on peptide-modified surfaces exhibited higher specific activity and stability, as well as controlled protein orientation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A simple method for immobilizing enzymes through specific interactions with peptides anchored on surfaces has been developed. This approach will be applicable to the immobilization of a wide variety of enzymes on surfaces with optimized orientation, location and performance, and provides a potential mechanism for the patterned self-assembly of multiple enzymes on surfaces.

  9. A Modified Approach for Detection of Outliers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iftikhar Hussain Adil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tukey’s boxplot is very popular tool for detection of outliers. It reveals the location, spread and skewness of the data. It works nicely for detection of outliers when the data are symmetric. When the data are skewed it covers boundary away from the whisker on the compressed side while declares erroneous outliers on the extended side of the distribution. Hubert and Vandervieren (2008 made adjustment in Tukey’s technique to overcome this problem. However another problem arises that is the adjusted boxplot constructs the interval of critical values which even exceeds from the extremes of the data. In this situation adjusted boxplot is unable to detect outliers. This paper gives solution of this problem and proposed approach detects outliers properly. The validity of the technique has been checked by constructing fences around the true 95% values of different distributions. Simulation technique has been applied by drawing different sample size from chi square, beta and lognormal distributions. Fences constructed by the modified technique are close to the true 95% than adjusted boxplot which proves its superiority on the existing technique.

  10. Modified kraft lignin for bioremediation applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Diva A Simões; Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Evtuguin, Dmitry V

    2012-01-01

    Kraft lignin (KL) from industrial pulping of E. globulus wood was subjected to the oxidative modification with the aim to produce sorbent mimicking humic matter for the bioremediation purposes. Lignin was oxidized by polyoxometalate Na(5)[PMo(10)V(2)O(40)] (POM), solely or in the presence of laccase, under pre-selected aerobic conditions (50-60°C, 1-2h, oxygen pressure 5 bar). The most pronounced lignin oxidation without its depolymerisation was observed in the reaction system POM/O(2). Modified lignins possessed increased amounts of COOH (up to 15 %) and CO (up to 500 %) groups, when compared to unmodified KL, and significantly higher molecular weights. Sorption capacity of KL before and after modification towards transition metals (cadmium (II) and mercury (II)) and triazine pesticide (atrazine) was assessed in batch experiments under equilibrium conditions. KL oxidation improved sorption capacity towards transition metals (up to 15 %) but not necessarily the uptake of atrazine that was higher for unmodified KL.

  11. CVD carbon powders modified by ball milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazmierczak Tomasz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon powders produced using a plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD methods are an interesting subject of research. One of the most interesting methods of synthesizing these powders is using radio frequency plasma. This method, originally used in deposition of carbon films containing different sp2/sp3 ratios, also makes possible to produce carbon structures in the form of powder. Results of research related to the mechanical modification of these powders have been presented. The powders were modified using a planetary ball mill with varying parameters, such as milling speed, time, ball/powder mass ratio and additional liquids. Changes in morphology and particle sizes were measured using scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Phase composition was analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The influence of individual parameters on the modification outcome was estimated using statistical method. The research proved that the size of obtained powders is mostly influenced by the milling speed and the amount of balls. Powders tend to form conglomerates sized up to hundreds of micrometers. Additionally, it is possible to obtain nanopowders with the size around 100 nm. Furthermore, application of additional liquid, i.e. water in the process reduces the graphitization of the powder, which takes place during dry milling.

  12. Black holes in modified gravity (MOG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moffat, J.W. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2015-04-15

    The field equations for scalar-tensor-vector gravity (STVG) or modified gravity (MOG) have a static, spherically symmetric black hole solution determined by the mass M with two horizons. The strength of the gravitational constant is G = G{sub N} (1 + α) where α is a parameter. A regular singularity-free MOG solution is derived using a nonlinear field dynamics for the repulsive gravitational field component and a reasonable physical energy-momentum tensor. The Kruskal-Szekeres completion of the MOG black hole solution is obtained. The Kerr-MOG black hole solution is determined by the mass M, the parameter α and the spin angular momentum J = Ma. The equations of motion and the stability condition of a test particle orbiting the MOG black hole are derived, and the radius of the black hole photosphere and the shadows cast by the Schwarzschild-MOG and Kerr-MOG black holes are calculated. A traversable wormhole solution is constructed with a throat stabilized by the repulsive component of the gravitational field. (orig.)

  13. Genetically modified crops and food security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaim, Matin; Kouser, Shahzad

    2013-01-01

    The role of genetically modified (GM) crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers' income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the first ex post analysis of food security impacts of GM crops at the micro level. We use comprehensive panel data collected over several years from farm households in India, where insect-resistant GM cotton has been widely adopted. Controlling for other factors, the adoption of GM cotton has significantly improved calorie consumption and dietary quality, resulting from increased family incomes. This technology has reduced food insecurity by 15-20% among cotton-producing households. GM crops alone will not solve the hunger problem, but they can be an important component in a broader food security strategy.

  14. Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified EVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datta, S.K.; Chaki, T.K.; Bhowmick, A.K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Rubber Technology Center; Tikku, V.K.; Pradhan, N.K. [NICCO Corporation Ltd., (Cable Div.), Calcutta (India)

    1997-10-01

    Heat shrinkage of electron beam modified ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) has been investigated over a range of times, temperatures, stretching, irradiation doses and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) levels. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) and stretched (100% elongation) sample shrinks to a maximum level when kept at 453K temperature for 60 s. The heat shrinkage of samples irradiated with radiation doses of 20, 50, 100 and 150 kGy increases sharply with increasing stretching in the initial stage. Amnesia rating decreases with increasing radiation dose and TMPTMA level as well as gel content. The high radiation dose and TMPTMA level lower the heat shrinkage due to the chain scission. The effect of temperature at which extension is carried out on heat shrinkage is marginal. The irradiated (radiation dose 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%) EVA tubes of different dimensions expanded in a laboratory grade tube expander show similar behaviour at 453K and 60 s. The X-ray and DSC studies reveal that the crystallinity increases on stretching due to orientation of chains and it decreases to a considerable extent on heat shrinking. The theoretical and experimental values of heat shrinkage for tubes and rectangular strips are in good accord, when the radiation dose is 50 kGy and TMPTMA level 1%. (author).

  15. Modified kinetics of enzymes interacting with nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Sebastián. A.; Breger, Joyce C.; Malanoski, Anthony; Claussen, Jonathan C.; Walper, Scott A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Brown, Carl W.; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-08-01

    Enzymes are important players in multiple applications, be it bioremediation, biosynthesis, or as reporters. The business of catalysis and inhibition of enzymes is a multibillion dollar industry and understanding the kinetics of commercial enzymes can have a large impact on how these systems are optimized. Recent advances in nanotechnology have opened up the field of nanoparticle (NP) and enzyme conjugates and two principal architectures for NP conjugate systems have been developed. In the first example the enzyme is bound to the NP in a persistent manner, here we find that key factors such as directed enzyme conjugation allow for enhanced kinetics. Through controlled comparative experiments we begin to tease out specific mechanisms that may account for the enhancement. The second system is based on dynamic interactions of the enzymes with the NP. The enzyme substrate is bound to the NP and the enzyme is free in solution. Here again we find that there are many variables , such as substrate positioning and NP selection, that modify the kinetics.

  16. Genetically modified bacteriophages in applied microbiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bárdy, P; Pantůček, R; Benešík, M; Doškař, J

    2016-09-01

    Bacteriophages represent a simple viral model of basic research with many possibilities for practical application. Due to their ability to infect and kill bacteria, their potential in the treatment of bacterial infection has been examined since their discovery. With advances in molecular biology and gene engineering, the phage application spectrum has been expanded to various medical and biotechnological fields. The construction of bacteriophages with an extended host range or longer viability in the mammalian bloodstream enhances their potential as an alternative to conventional antibiotic treatment. Insertion of active depolymerase genes to their genomes can enforce the biofilm disposal. They can also be engineered to transfer various compounds to the eukaryotic organisms and the bacterial culture, applicable for the vaccine, drug or gene delivery. Phage recombinant lytic enzymes can be applied as enzybiotics in medicine as well as in biotechnology for pathogen detection or programmed cell death in bacterial expression strains. Besides, modified bacteriophages with high specificity can be applied as bioprobes in detection tools to estimate the presence of pathogens in food industry, or utilized in the control of food-borne pathogens as part of the constructed phage-based biosorbents. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Health risks of genetically modified foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dona, Artemis; Arvanitoyannis, Ioannis S

    2009-02-01

    As genetically modified (GM) foods are starting to intrude in our diet concerns have been expressed regarding GM food safety. These concerns as well as the limitations of the procedures followed in the evaluation of their safety are presented. Animal toxicity studies with certain GM foods have shown that they may toxically affect several organs and systems. The review of these studies should not be conducted separately for each GM food, but according to the effects exerted on certain organs it may help us create a better picture of the possible health effects on human beings. The results of most studies with GM foods indicate that they may cause some common toxic effects such as hepatic, pancreatic, renal, or reproductive effects and may alter the hematological, biochemical, and immunologic parameters. However, many years of research with animals and clinical trials are required for this assessment. The use of recombinant GH or its expression in animals should be re-examined since it has been shown that it increases IGF-1 which may promote cancer.

  18. Warm modified Chaplygin gas shaft inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Abdul; Ilyas, Amara; Rani, Shamaila [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Mathematics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper, we examine the possible realization of a new inflation family called ''shaft inflation'' by assuming the modified Chaplygin gas model and a tachyon scalar field. We also consider the special form of the dissipative coefficient Γ = a{sub 0}(T{sup 3})/(φ{sup 2}) and calculate the various inflationary parameters in the scenario of strong and weak dissipative regimes. In order to examine the behavior of inflationary parameters, the n{sub s}-φ, n{sub s}-r, and n{sub s}-α{sub s} planes (where n{sub s}, α{sub s}, r, and φ represent the spectral index, its running, tensor-to-scalar ratio, and scalar field, respectively) are being developed, which lead to the constraints r < 0.11, n{sub s} = 0.96 ± 0.025, and α{sub s} = -0.019 ± 0.025. It is quite interesting that these results of the inflationary parameters are compatible with BICEP2, WMAP (7+9) and recent Planck data. (orig.)

  19. The Hydra small ubiquitin-like modifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Umair; Mehere, Prajwalini; Deivasigamani, Senthilkumar; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S

    2013-09-01

    SUMO is a protein posttranslational modifier. SUMO cycle components are believed to be conserved in all eukaryotes. Proteomic analyses have lead to the identification a wealth of SUMO targets that are involved in almost every cellular function in eukaryotes. In this article, we describe the characterization of SUMO Cycle components in Hydra, a Cnidarian with an ability to regenerate body parts. In cells, the translated SUMO polypeptide cannot conjugate to a substrate protein unless the C-terminal tail is cleaved, exposing the di-Glycine motif. This critical task is done by SUMO proteases that in addition to SUMO maturation are also involved in deconjugating SUMO from its substrate. We describe the identification, bioinformatics analysis, cloning, and biochemical characterization of Hydra SUMO cycle components, with a focus on SUMO and SUMO proteases. We demonstrate that the ability of SUMO proteases to process immature SUMO is conserved from Hydra to flies. A transgenic Hydra, expressing a SUMO-GFP fusion protein under a constitutive actin promoter, is generated in an attempt to monitor the SUMO Cycle in vivo as also to purify and identify SUMO targets in Hydra. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Black Holes in Modified Gravity (MOG)

    CERN Document Server

    Moffat, J W

    2014-01-01

    The field equations for Scalar-Tensor-Vector-Gravity (STVG) or modified gravity (MOG) have a static, spherically symmetric black hole solution determined by the mass $M$ with either two horizons or no horizon depending on the strength of the gravitational constant $G=G_N(1+\\alpha)$ where $\\alpha$ is a parameter. A regular singularity-free MOG black hole solution is derived using a nonlinear, repulsive gravitational field dynamics and a reasonable physical energy-momentum tensor. The Kruskal-Szekeres completions of the MOG black hole solutions are obtained. The Kerr-MOG black hole solution is determined by the mass $M$, the parameter $\\alpha$ and the spin angular momentum $J=Ma$. The equations of motion and the stability condition of a test particle orbiting the MOG black hole are derived, and the radius of the black hole photosphere and its shadow cast by the Kerr-MOG black hole are calculated. A traversable wormhole solution is constructed with a throat stabilized by the repulsive gravitational field.

  1. Modified M20 Beam Position Monitor Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koros, Jessica; Musson, John

    2017-09-01

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are used to measure lateral beam position. Two pairs of modified wire BPMs are being evaluated for installation into the injector at Jefferson Lab (JLab). The BPMs were coated with a Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) to aid in pumping at the electron gun, as an ultra-high vacuum is required to protect the gun and to avoid scattering the beam. Beam in the injector has a large diameter, allowing extraction of second moments to give information about beam profile and emittance. The purpose of this project is to determine the effects of NEG coating on the BPMs and to calculate second moments from beam models on the Goubau Line (G-Line). Using the G-Line, scans of the BPMs were taken before and after NEG coating. Each scan produced an electrical field map, which characterizes properties of the BPM, including scale factors and coupling. Second moments were calculated using superposition of previous scan data, and verification of this method was attempted using several beam models. Results show the BPMs responded well to NEG and that measurement of second moments is possible. Once the BPMs are installed, they will enhance gun vacuum and enable monitoring of shape and trajectory of the beam as it exits the electron gun to ensure quality beam for experiments. This work is made possible through support from NSF award 1659177 to Old Dominion University.

  2. Genetically modified foods as global public goods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Herrero Olarte

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available "Genetically modified (GM food has become very important in the field of research, as a result of its expansion in recent decades. As the right to food is a human right, it cannot be left in the hands of private sector developments exclusively, due to the capacity of the public sector to limit or drive it, and in any case, contributing to food safety. To achieve this, and for its cross-border development, GM needs to be treated as Global Public Goods (GPG, defined as pure or impure public goods that cannot be provided or regulated from a national or regional level, but from a global perspective. Its definition as GPG, and the fact of being public goods, assumes greater involvement by the public sector for its supply or regulation. It is therefore necessary to analyze the positive and negative externalities generated by transgenic foods becoming public goods, but from a global perspective. The difficulty is, that according to the author, GMs are positive or negative, so that there is no consensus to restrict and even prevent them or encourage them. But, there is a consensus on some key issues of GM food, such as improving productivity, contributing to the reduction of the species, the dependence of farmers, or monopoly companies with the patent. Identifying these issues can serve to initiate the appropriate regulation."

  3. Genetically modified organisms and visceral leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhajer, Rudra; Ali, Nahid

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniasis namely cutaneous (CL), mucocutaneous (ML), and visceral (VL), caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein, or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis.

  4. Imperfect fluid cosmological model in modified gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Samanta, G C

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we considered the bulk viscous fluid in the formalism of modified gravity in which the general form of a gravitational action is $f(R, T)$ function, where $R$ is the curvature scalar and $T$ is the trace of the energy momentum tensor within the frame of flat FRW space time. The cosmological model dominated by bulk viscous matter with total bulk viscous coefficient expressed as a linear combination of the velocity and acceleration of the expansion of the universe in such a way that $\\xi=\\xi_0+\\xi_1\\frac{\\dot{a}}{a}+\\xi_2\\frac{\\ddot{a}}{\\dot{a}}$, where $\\xi_0$, $\\xi_1$ and $\\xi_2$ are constants. We take $p=(\\gamma-1)\\rho$, where $0\\le\\gamma\\le2$ as an equation of state for perfect fluid. The exact solutions to the corresponding field equations are obtained by assuming a particular model of the form of $f(R, T)=R+2f(T)$, where $f(T)=\\lambda T$, $\\lambda$ is constant. We studied the four possible scenarios for different values of $\\gamma$, such as $\\gamma=0$, $\\gamma=\\frac{2}{3}$, $\\gamma=1$ and...

  5. Encoded libraries of chemically modified peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinis, Christian; Winter, Greg

    2015-06-01

    The use of powerful technologies for generating and screening DNA-encoded protein libraries has helped drive the development of proteins as pharmaceutical ligands. However the development of peptides as pharmaceutical ligands has been more limited. Although encoded peptide libraries are typically several orders of magnitude larger than classical chemical libraries, can be more readily screened, and can give rise to higher affinity ligands, their use as pharmaceutical ligands is limited by their intrinsic properties. Two of the intrinsic limitations include the rotational flexibility of the peptide backbone and the limited number (20) of natural amino acids. However these limitations can be overcome by use of chemical modification. For example, the libraries can be modified to introduce topological constraints such as cyclization linkers, or to introduce new chemical entities such as small molecule ligands, fluorophores and photo-switchable compounds. This article reviews the chemistry involved, the properties of the peptide ligands, and the new opportunities offered by chemical modification of DNA-encoded peptide libraries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Genetically Modified Organisms and Visceral Leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAHID eALI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing infectious diseases. Since the eradication of small pox in 1976, many other potentially life compromising if not threatening diseases have been dealt with subsequently. This event was a major leap not only in the scientific world already burdened with many diseases but also in the mindset of the common man who became more receptive to novel treatment options. Among the many protozoan diseases, the leishmaniases have emerged as one of the largest parasite killers of the world, second only to malaria. There are three types of leishmaniases namely cutaneous (CL, mucocutaneous (ML and visceral (VL, caused by a group of more than 20 species of Leishmania parasites. Visceral leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar is the most severe form and almost fatal if untreated. Since the first attempts at leishmanization, we have killed parasite vaccines, subunit protein or DNA vaccines, and now we have live recombinant carrier vaccines and live attenuated parasite vaccines under various stages of development. Although some research has shown promising results, many more potential genes need to be evaluated as live attenuated vaccine candidates. This mini-review attempts to summarize the success and failures of genetically modified organisms used in vaccination against some of major parasitic diseases for their application in leishmaniasis.

  7. Genetically modified crops and food security.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matin Qaim

    Full Text Available The role of genetically modified (GM crops for food security is the subject of public controversy. GM crops could contribute to food production increases and higher food availability. There may also be impacts on food quality and nutrient composition. Finally, growing GM crops may influence farmers' income and thus their economic access to food. Smallholder farmers make up a large proportion of the undernourished people worldwide. Our study focuses on this latter aspect and provides the first ex post analysis of food security impacts of GM crops at the micro level. We use comprehensive panel data collected over several years from farm households in India, where insect-resistant GM cotton has been widely adopted. Controlling for other factors, the adoption of GM cotton has significantly improved calorie consumption and dietary quality, resulting from increased family incomes. This technology has reduced food insecurity by 15-20% among cotton-producing households. GM crops alone will not solve the hunger problem, but they can be an important component in a broader food security strategy.

  8. Modified dispersion relations in extra dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Sefiedgar, A S; Sepangi, H R

    2010-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the thermodynamics of a FRW universe can be fully derived using the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) in extra dimensions as a primary input. There is a phenomenologically close relation between the GUP and Modified Dispersion Relations (MDR). However, the form of the MDR in theories with extra dimensions is as yet not known. The purpose of this letter is to derive the MDR in extra dimensional scenarios. To achieve this goal, we focus our attention on the thermodynamics of a FRW universe within a proposed MDR in an extra dimensional model universe. We then compare our results with the well-known results for the thermodynamics of a FRW universe in an extra dimensional GUP setup. The result shows that the entropy functionals calculated in these two approaches are the same, pointing to a possible conclusion that these approaches are equivalent. In this way, we derive the MDR form in a model universe with extra dimensions that would have interesting implications on the constr...

  9. Renormalized Wick expansion for a modified PQCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabo Montes de Oca, Alejandro [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica, Group of Theoretical Physics, Vedado, La Habana (Cuba); Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    The renormalization scheme for the Wick expansion of a modified version of the perturbative QCD introduced in previous works is discussed. Massless QCD is considered by implementing the usual multiplicative scaling of the gluon and quark wave functions and vertices. However, also massive quark and gluon counterterms are allowed in this massless theory since the condensates are expected to generate masses. A natural set of expansion parameters of the physical quantities is introduced: the coupling itself and the two masses m{sub q} and m{sub g} associated to quarks and gluons, respectively. This procedure allows one to implement a dimensional transmutation effect through these new mass scales. A general expression for the new generating functional in terms of the mass parameters m{sub q} and m{sub g} is obtained in terms of integrals over arbitrary but constant gluon or quark fields in each case. Further, the one loop potential is evaluated in more detail in the case when only the quark condensate is retained. This lowest order result again indicates the dynamical generation of quark condensates in the vacuum. (orig.)

  10. [Nutrition and health--genetically modified food].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuiper, H A; Kleter, G A; Kok, E J

    2003-01-11

    The genetically modified (GM) crops cultivated at present have new properties of benefit to agriculture. It is expected that in the future GM crops will also be cultivated with more complex genetic modifications that are aimed at improving the nutritional and health value to the consumer. The safety assessment of GM foods before market approval is based on a comparison of the characteristics of the GM food with those of the conventional counterpart. Identified differences are thoroughly tested for their toxicological and nutritional consequences. Supplementary modern analytical techniques are being developed for the assessment of future complex GM foods. No cases of adverse health or nutritional effects in consumers have been reported for the existing generation of GM foods. The feasibility of post-market surveillance of (GM) foods, in order to identify small or chronic effects that have not been noticed in the pre-market phase, is being investigated, yet its value should not be overestimated. Surveillance can be informative in case of specific questions concerning certain products as long as the consumer intake is well documented. To this end traceability and labelling systems must be set up.

  11. Modifying factors in urinary bladder carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Nobuyuki; Fukushima, Shoji; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Nakanishi, Keisuke; Hasegawa, Ryohei; Imaida, Katsumi

    1983-01-01

    N-Butyl-N-(4-hydroxybutyl)nitrosamine (BBN) is a potent carcinogen in the urinary bladder of animals. The BBN model of bladder cancer is an excellent model of human urinary bladder cancer and has already led to a greater knowledge of its pathogenesis. In our studies, histogenesis and morphological characteristics of BBN urinary bladder cancer were analyzed in different animal species such as rats, mice, hamsters and guinea pigs and also in different rat strains. Papillary or nodular hyperplasia (PN hyperplasia) is found to be a preneoplastic lesion of the rat urinary bladder. Therefore, the promoting and inhibitory effects of various chemicals in two-stage urinary bladder carcinogenesis were judged by measuring PN hyperplasia in rats. Dose-dependent and organ-specific effects of the urinary bladder promoter, saccharin, in the induction of PN hyperplasia were shown in rats after initiation by BBN. The promoting effect of saccharin was seen more clearly in the urinary bladder of rats after potent initiation. A strain difference in susceptibility of the urinary bladder to the promoter was also shown. These results suggest that the above various factors may also have modifying activities on urinary bladder carcinogenesis in man. PMID:6832095

  12. Stroke Prevention: Managing Modifiable Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Di Legge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prevention plays a crucial role in counteracting morbidity and mortality related to ischemic stroke. It has been estimated that 50% of stroke are preventable through control of modifiable risk factors and lifestyle changes. Antihypertensive treatment is recommended for both prevention of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. The use of antiplatelets and statins has been shown to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other vascular events. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs are indicated in stroke prevention because they also promote vascular health. Effective secondary-prevention strategies for selected patients include carotid revascularization for high-grade carotid stenosis and vitamin K antagonist treatment for atrial fibrillation. The results of recent clinical trials investigating new anticoagulants (factor Xa inhibitors and direct thrombin inhibitors clearly indicate alternative strategies in stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper describes the current landscape and developments in stroke prevention with special reference to medical treatment in secondary prevention of ischemic stroke.

  13. Modified betatron for ion beam fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostoker, N.; Fisher, A.

    1986-01-01

    An intense neutralized ion beam can be injected and trapped in magnetic mirror or tokamak geometry. The details of the process involve beam polarization so that the beam crosses the fringing fields without deflection and draining the polarization when the beam reaches the plasma. Equilibrium requires that a large betatron field be added in tokamak geometry. In mirror geometry a toroidal field must be added by means of a current along the mirror axis. In either case, the geometry becomes that of the modified betatron which has been studied experimentally and theoretically in recent years. We consider beams of d and t ions with a mean energy of 500 kev and a temperature of about 50 kev. The plasma may be a proton plasma with cold ions. It is only necessary for beam trapping or to carry currents. The ion energy for slowing down is initially 500 kev and thermonuclear reactions depend only on the beam temperature of 50 kev which changes very slowly. This new configuration for magnetic confinement fusion leads to an energy gain of 10--20 for d-t reactions whereas previous studies of beam target interaction predicted a maximum energy gain of 3--4. The high beam energy available with pulsed ion diode technology is also essential for advanced fuels. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  14. The integrated bispectrum in modified gravity theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Dipak

    2017-01-01

    Gravity-induced non-Gaussianity can provide important clues to Modified Gravity (MG) Theories. Several recent studies have suggested using the Integrated Bispectrum (IB) as a probe for squeezed configuration of bispectrum. Extending previous studies on the IB, we include redshift-space distortions to study a class of (parametrised) MG theories that include the string-inspired Dvali, Gabadadze & Porrati (DGP) model. Various contributions from redshift-space distortions are derived in a transparent manner, and squeezed contributions from these terms are derived separately. Results are obtained using the Zel'dovich Approximation (ZA). Results are also presented for projected surveys (2D). We use the Press-Schechter (PS) and Sheth-Tormen (ST) mass functions to compute the IB for collapsed objects that can readily be extended to peak-theory based approaches. The cumulant correlators (CCs) generalise the ordinary cumulants and are known to probe collapsed configurations of higher order correlation functions. We generalise the concept of CCs to halos of different masses. We also introduce a generating function based approach to analyse more general non-local biasing models. The Fourier representations of the CCs, the skew-spectrum, or the kurt-spctra are discussed in this context. The results are relevant for the study of the Minkowski Functionals (MF) of collapsed tracers in redshift-space.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Adsorption Behavior of Modified HKUST-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lan; Tang, Huamin; Zhou, Chaohua; Zhang, Hongpeng; Yan, Chunxiao; Hu, Xiaochun; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weiwei; Li, Yuming; He, Dehua

    2014-12-01

    A kind of typical metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) material, HKUST-1 was prepared by hydrothermal method and characterized by XRD and SEM. The results of characterizations manifested that HKUST-1 showed a regular octahedral crystal structure. The as-prepared HKUST-1 was modified by several kinds of organic base materials and the CO2 adsorption behaviors of modified HKUST-1 materials were evaluated. The CO2 adsorption capacities of different base modified HKUST-1 varied with the base intensity of modified organic base materials.

  16. Vehicle Modifications for Persons with Disabilities - Modifier List

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — Contain information that identifies, and provides contact information for, businesses modifying vehicles to enable persons with disabilities to operate the vehicle,...

  17. Preparation, Characterization, and Photocatalytic Properties of Modified Red Mud

    OpenAIRE

    Mingjie Ma; Guanyu Wang; Zhengpeng Yang; Shanxiu Huang; Weijie Guo; Yuxia Shen

    2015-01-01

    Solid waste red mud was modified by HCl leaching. The structure property and composition of modified red mud were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). Under UV irradiation, methyl orange (MO) aqueous solution was photodegraded by modified red mud. The obtained results showed that the specific surface area of modified red mud was 317.14 m2/g, which was about 40 times higher than tha...

  18. Incorporation of therapeutically modified bacteria into gut microbiota inhibits obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen, Zhongyi; Guo, Lilu; Zhang, Yongqin; Walzem, Rosemary L; Pendergast, Julie S; Printz, Richard L; Morris, Lindsey C; Matafonova, Elena; Stien, Xavier; Kang, Li; Coulon, Denis; McGuinness, Owen P; Niswender, Kevin D; Davies, Sean S

    2014-01-01

    ...; therefore, altering a person's microbiota may ameliorate disease. One potential microbiome-altering strategy is the incorporation of modified bacteria that express therapeutic factors into the gut microbiota...

  19. Transglutaminase catalysis of modified whey protein dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clare, Debra A; Daubert, Christopher R

    2010-05-01

    Transglutaminase (TGase) cross-linking reactions were accomplished using a heat-modified whey protein concentrate (mWPC) substrate after pH adjustment to 8. Based on earlier reports, the degree of lactosylation with respect to beta-lactoglobulin was lower in mWPC dispersions than measured in commercial whey concentrate (cWPC) protein solutions. In this study, a higher concentration of free sulfhydryl groups was detected in soluble supernatant fractions. Both factors potentially impact the availability of reactive lysine/glutaminyl residues required for TGase reactivity. The addition of 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) to the substrate mix, CBZ-glutaminyl glycine and hydroxylamine, revealed a 3.6-fold increase in TGase activity, likely due in part to maintenance of the catalytic cysteine residue in a reduced state. Furthermore, inclusion of DTT to mWPC dispersions significantly raised the apparent viscosity, independently of enzyme modification, while the rate of polymerization increased 2-fold based on OPA assay measurements. Limited cross-linking slightly increased the apparent viscosity, whereas extensive coupling lowered these values compared to equivalent nonenzyme-treated mWPC samples. Carbohydrate-staining revealed formation of glyco-polymers due to covalent linkages between glucosamine and mWPC proteins after TGase processing. Again, the apparent viscosity decreased after extensive enzymatic modification. Larger particles, sized 11.28 mum, were observed in the structural matrix of TGase-mWPC-fixed samples compared to 8 mum particles in control mWPC samples as viewed in scanning electron micrographs. Ultimately, the functional characteristics of TGase-mWPC ingredients may be custom-designed to deliver alternative functional attributes by adjusting the experimental reaction conditions under which catalysis is achieved. Taken together, these results suggest that unique TGase-mWPC and/or TGase-mWPC-glucosamine ingredients may be designed to provide novel, value

  20. The Protein-Sparing Modified Fast Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Bakhach MD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The protein-sparing modified fast (PSMF is a rigorous way of rapidly losing a large amount of weight. Although adult studies have shown the PSMF to be effective, data in adolescents are lacking. The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of the PSMF in severely obese adolescents. Methods: 12 subjects who were evaluated in the Obesity Management Program at the Cleveland Clinic from 2011 to 2014 were included. The subjects were initiated on the PSMF after failing other conventional methods of weight loss. Once the goal weight was achieved, subjects were transitioned to the refeeding phase for weight maintenance. Results: Follow-up was scheduled at 3-month (11 patients and 6-month (6 patients intervals. At the 6-month follow-up visit, the average weight loss was 11.19 kg (95% confidence interval = -5.4, -27.8, P = .028, with average of 9.8% from baseline. Fifty percent of subjects had >5% weight loss and 20% had >10% weight loss. Four patients were lost to the follow-up (40%. An improvement was noted in total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein. Due to a small sample size these results were not statistically significant. Side effects reported by subjects were mild dehydration due to nausea (2 patients, decreased energy (1 patient, and transient labile mood (1 patient. No life-threatening side effects were reported. Conclusion: Our results show that the PSMF diet can be used as an effective and safe method in the outpatient setting for rapid weight loss in adolescents with severe obesity.

  1. Miocene Current-Modified Submarine Fans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce Perez, L. E.; Snedden, J.; Fisher, W. L.

    2016-12-01

    In the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, new and newly reprocessed seismic data has revealed a series of large bedforms, with set thicknesses of 130 to 250 meters. These exhibit hummocky, oblique and shingled to parallel seismic clinoform reflections. This seismic package has a paleowater depth of 450 meters. Those shingled seismic reflections in offshore east Mexico are interpreted as contourite drift deposits. These Miocene-age contourites may be related to strong ocean bottom currents that modified submarine fans and transported sediment to the north. Those contourites were identified on older seismic data, but are better imaged and interpreted on this new data. Plans are to map out and investigate the origin and extent of fans and contourites that extends over a large area of the Gulf of Mexico. In the Early Miocene several submarine fans systems were formed by the sediment input related to orogenic activity in Mexico. Submarine fan development persisted into the Middle Miocene due to continued uplift and erosion of the Mexican landmass. Initial, contourites are small and close proximity to the deep-water fan. In the Late Miocene time, contourite drift field reached its maximum extent in the Mexican deepwater area, anchored on its southern end by a submarine mound. This mounded submarine fan is located in the offshore northeast Veracruz and can be linked to increased uplift and erosion of the Trans-Mexican volcanic belt. In the Miocene-Pliocene, the large contourite drift begins to diminish in size and scale and is moribund by the Pliocene, with establishment of oceanic circulation similar to the present day. This research is important to understand more about the Gulf of Mexico and also for the Miocene timeframe that is a key phase in the earth's history. The role of the change in bottom water flow during progressive closure of the equatorial seaway separating North and South America will also be investigated.

  2. Modifiers of radiation effects in the eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiman, Norman J.; Stewart, Fiona A.; Hall, Eric J.

    2017-11-01

    World events, including the threat of radiological terrorism and the fear of nuclear accidents, have highlighted an urgent need to develop medical countermeasures to prevent or reduce radiation injury. Similarly, plans for manned spaceflight to a near-Earth asteroid or journey to Mars raise serious concerns about long-term effects of space radiation on human health and the availability of suitable therapeutic interventions. At the same time, the need to protect normal tissue from the deleterious effects of radiotherapy has driven considerable research into the design of effective radioprotectors. For more than 70 years, animal models of radiation cataract have been utilized to test the short and long-term efficacy of various radiation countermeasures. While some compounds, most notably the Walter Reed (WR) class of radioprotectors, have reported limited effectiveness when given before exposure to low-LET radiation, the human toxicity of these molecules at effective doses limits their usefulness. Furthermore, while there has been considerable testing of eye responses to X- and gamma irradiation, there is limited information about using such models to limit the injurious effects of heavy ions and neutrons on eye tissue. A new class of radioprotector molecules, including the sulfhydryl compound PrC-210, are reported to be effective at much lower doses and with far less side effects. Their ability to modify ocular radiation damage has not yet been examined. The ability to non-invasively measure sensitive, radiation-induced ocular changes over long periods of time makes eye models an attractive option to test the radioprotective and radiation mitigating abilities of new novel compounds.

  3. The modified Gibson approach to the acetabulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moed, B R

    2014-12-01

    Providing a surgical approach similar to the Kocher-Langenbeck but having improved anterosuperior access, less risk of injury to branches of the inferior gluteal nerve supplying the anterior portion of the gluteus maximus muscle, and improved cosmesis. Any surgery that would otherwise call for the Kocher-Langenbeck approach. Fractures of the anterior column and/or wall; transtectal T-shaped fractures. Transverse fractures and infra/juxtatectal T-shaped fractures having the major displacement anteriorly at the pelvic brim with only minor posterior displacement. Exposure of the acetabulum fracture through a straight skin incision, developing the plane between the anterior border of the gluteus maximus muscle and the tensor fasciae latae. The gluteus maximus is reflected posteriorly to reveal the underlying deep anatomic structures. Thromboprophylaxis and prophylaxis as indicated for the prevention of heterotopic ossification are instituted. The patient is mobilized as quickly as the associated injuries will allow. Toe-touch weight-bearing is continued for 10-12 weeks. However, progression to full weight-bearing should be individualized. Between 1996 and 2000, 16 patients having a fracture of the acetabulum were operated on through the modified Gibson approach with 15 patients followed up for 1 year or more. Fracture types were posterior wall in eight patients, transverse in one, posterior column and wall in two, transverse and posterior wall in four, and T-shaped in one. There were no intraoperative or immediate postoperative complications. Clinical outcome was determined using a modification of the method developed by Merle d'Aubigné and Postel and was good-to-excellent in 14 patients and poor in one (a patient who developed osteonecrosis of the femoral head unrelated to the approach).

  4. Genetically modified crops: Brazilian law and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, C D; Martins, F J O; Amaral Júnior, A T; Gonçalves, L S A; dos Santos, O J A P; Alves, D P; Brasileiro, B P; Peternelli, L A

    2014-07-07

    In Brazil, the first genetically modified (GM) crop was released in 1998, and it is estimated that 84, 78, and 50% of crop areas containing soybean, corn, and cotton, respectively, were transgenic in 2012. This intense and rapid adoption rate confirms that the choice to use technology has been the main factor in developing national agriculture. Thus, this review focuses on understanding these dynamics in the context of farmers, trade relations, and legislation. To accomplish this goal, a survey was conducted using the database of the National Cultivar Registry and the National Service for Plant Variety Protection of the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply [Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento (MAPA)] between 1998 and October 13, 2013. To date, 36 events have been released: five for soybeans, 18 for corn, 12 for cotton, and one for beans. From these events, 1395 cultivars have been developed and registered: 582 for soybean, 783 for corn and 30 for cotton. Monsanto owns 73.05% of the technologies used to develop these cultivars, while the Dow AgroScience - DuPont partnership and Syngenta have 16.34 and 4.37% ownership, respectively. Thus, the provision of transgenic seeds by these companies is an oligopoly supported by legislation. Moreover, there has been a rapid replacement of conventional crops by GM crops, whose technologies belong almost exclusively to four multinational companies, with the major ownership by Monsanto. These results reflect a warning to the government of the increased dependence on multinational corporations for key agricultural commodities.

  5. 7 CFR 58.235 - Modified dry milk products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Modified dry milk products. 58.235 Section 58.235... Materials § 58.235 Modified dry milk products. Dry milk products to which approved neutralizing agents or... AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION...

  6. A study of nanostructured gold modified glassy carbon electrode for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    A study of nanostructured gold modified glassy carbon electrode for the determination of trace Cr(VI). BENZHI ... The method was applied to determine levels of chromium(VI) in tap water and sewage water. Keywords. Nanostructured gold modified ... analytical reagent-grade and double distilled water was used throughout.

  7. Lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotide anchored to nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cogoi, S; Jakobsen, U; Pedersen, E B

    2016-01-01

    factor essential for KRAS transcription. It is based on the use of palmitoyl-oleyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) liposomes functionalized with lipid-modified G4-decoy oligonucleotides and a lipid-modified cell penetrating TAT peptide. The potency of the strategy in pancreatic cancer cells is demonstrated...

  8. Study of Antiultraviolet Asphalt Modifiers and Their Antiageing Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxuan Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV radiation causes serious ageing problems on pavement surface. In recent years, different UV blocking materials have been used as modifiers to prevent asphalt ageing during the service life of the pavement. In this study, three different materials have been used as modifiers in base asphalt to test their UV blocking effects: layered double hydroxides (LDHs, organomontmorillonite (OMMT, and carbon black (CB. UV ageing was applied to simulate the ageing process and softening point, penetration, ductility, DSR (Dynamic Shear Rheometer test, and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR test were conducted to evaluate the anti-UV ageing effects of the three UV blocking modifiers. Physical property tests show that base asphalt was influenced more seriously by UV radiation compared to the modified asphalt. DSR test results indicate that the complex modulus of asphalt before UV ageing is increased because of modifiers, while the complex modulus of base asphalt after UV ageing is higher than that of the modified asphalt, which shows that the UV blocking modifiers promote the antiageing effects of asphalt. FTIR test reveals that the increment of carbonyl groups and sulfoxide groups of modified asphalt is less than that in base asphalt. Tests indicate the best UV blocking effect results for samples with LDHs and the worst UV blocking effect results for samples with CB.

  9. 46 CFR 54.15-3 - Definitions (modifies Appendix 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions (modifies Appendix 3). 54.15-3 Section 54.15-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Pressure-Relief Devices § 54.15-3 Definitions (modifies Appendix 3). (a) Definitions applicable to...

  10. Hedge fund portfolio selection with modified expected shortfall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boudt, K.; Peterson, Brian G.; Carl, P.

    2008-01-01

    Modified Value-at-Risk (VaR) and Expected Shortfall (ES) are recently introduced downside risk estimators based on the Cornish-Fisher expansion for assets such as hedge funds whose returns are non-normally distributed. Modified VaR has been widely implemented as a portfolio selection criterion.We

  11. Modified structure of graphene oxide by investigation of structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 38; Issue 7. Modified structure of graphene ... In this regard, GO was produced using the modified Hummers method and was investigated using X-ray diffraction pattern, Fourier transform infrared analysis and Boehm titration method. Based on the obtained results, ...

  12. Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging under Ice Cooling on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging under Ice Cooling on the Postharvest Storage Life and Quality of Spinach ( Spinacea oleracea L) Leaves. ... In addition, this treatment reduced loss of ascorbic acid and soluble protein (10% compared to 30% under ambient conditions). Modified atmosphere packaging plus ice ...

  13. Modified Mathieu repair for failed surgery for hypospadias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To present our experience with the use of modified Mathieu urethroplasty for failed hypospadias repair. Patients and methods: Thirty-eight patients aged between 2 and 10 (mean 5) years underwent modified Mathieu urethroplasty for salvage hypospadias repair. Modifications included a wide subdermal ...

  14. Comparative performance evaluation of an existing and modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparative performance evaluation of an existing and modified acha dehuller was carried out. The modifications undertaken on the existing dehuller were for the cylinder type, cylinder-concave clearance, cylinder speed and hopper opening. The modified acha dehuller was run at a higher cylinder and fan speeds of ...

  15. Core-modified octaphyrins: Syntheses and anion-binding properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    -binding properties of core-modified octaphyrins is presented. It has been shown that the core-modified octaphyrins exhibit aromaticity both in solution and in solid state, confirming the validity of the (4n + 2) Huckel rule for larger π-electron ...

  16. Entropy Spectrum of Modified Schwarzschild Black Hole via an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Abstract. The entropy spectrum of a modified Schwarzschild black hole in the gravity's rainbow are investigated. By utilizing an action invariance of the black hole with the help of Bohr–Sommerfield quantization rule, the entropy spectrum for the modified black hole are calculated. The result of the equally ...

  17. Cobalt oxide nanoparticle-modified carbon nanotubes as an ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rage particle size of 25 nm. The electrocatalysis of OER at modified electrodes with CoOx−MWNT has been examined using LSV. The OER is significantly enhanced upon modi- fication of the electrodes with CoOx−MWNT, as demon- strated by a negative shift in the LSV curves at the. CoOx−MWNT-modified electrodes ...

  18. A comparison of efficacy between conventional and modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to develop and compare the efficacy of a modified versus conventional rat model of chronic myocardial ischemia/reperfusion. Sixty Sprague Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into two groups, a modified group (mask respiratory support and short-time chest-opening) and a conventional ...

  19. 40 CFR 721.4565 - Modified hydroxystyrene homopolymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified hydroxystyrene homopolymer (generic). 721.4565 Section 721.4565 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4565 Modified hydroxystyrene homopolymer (generic). (a) Chemical...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9513 - Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). 721.9513 Section 721.9513 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9513 Modified magnesium silicate polymer (generic). (a) Chemical...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3710 - Polyether modified fatty acids (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyether modified fatty acids (generic). 721.3710 Section 721.3710 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3710 Polyether modified fatty acids (generic). (a) Chemical substance...

  2. 40 CFR 721.10084 - Modified thionocarbamate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified thionocarbamate (generic). 721.10084 Section 721.10084 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED...

  3. 40 CFR 721.6493 - Amidoamine modified polyethylene glycol (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amidoamine modified polyethylene glycol (generic). 721.6493 Section 721.6493 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.6493 Amidoamine modified polyethylene glycol (generic). (a) Chemical...

  4. 40 CFR 721.10128 - Modified imidazole (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified imidazole (PMN P-06-752... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified imidazole (generic). 721.10128 Section 721.10128 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...

  5. 40 CFR 721.2540 - Diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) modified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) modified. 721.2540 Section 721.2540 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.2540 Diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI) modified. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10151 - Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic). 721.10151 Section 721.10151 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10151 Modified styrene, divinylbenzene polymer (generic). (a) Chemical...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10082 - Amine modified monomer acrylate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Amine modified monomer acrylate (generic). 721.10082 Section 721.10082 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10082 Amine modified monomer acrylate (generic). (a) Chemical substance...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10144 - Modified thiocarbamate (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as modified thiocarbamate (PMN P... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified thiocarbamate (generic). 721.10144 Section 721.10144 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC...

  9. MAIN PROBLEMS OF MODERN MODIFYING OF ALLOYS. SOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Yu. Stetsenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is shown that the main problems of modern modifying of alloys are connected with the air atmosphere and use of impurity modifiers. For the solution of these problems it is necessary to use the accelerated hardening, fine-crystalline furnace charge and protection against atmospheric vapors of water. 

  10. Measuring AT Usability with the Modified System Usability Scale (SUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Emma L

    2017-01-01

    The modified System Usability Scale (SUS) is a widely used generic measure of product usability. This study concerns the usability of mobile shower commodes using correlations between the SUS and AT device-specific measures. Results suggest the modified SUS, and corresponding adjective-anchored rating scale, are appropriate for measuring MSC usability, and have potential for use with other AT devices.

  11. Organically modified clays as binders of fumonisins in feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baglieri, Andrea; Reyneri, Amedeo; Gennari, Mara; Nègre, Michèle

    2013-01-01

    This study reports an investigation on the ability of organically modified clays to bind mycotoxins, fumonisins B1 (FB1) and B2 (FB2). Organically modified clays are commercia materials prepared from natural clays, generally montmorillonite, by exchanging the inorganic cation with an ammonium organic cation. A screening experiment conducted on 13 organically modified clays and 3 nonmodified clays, used as controls, has confirmed that the presence of an organic cation in the clay interlayer promoted the adsorption of both fumonisins. On the basis of the results of the screening test, four modified clays and a Na-montmorillonite were selected for the determination of the adsorption kinetics and isotherms. On all the tested materials adsorption took place within one hour of contact with fumonisins solutions. Adsorption isotherms have pointed out that the modified clays exhibited a higher adsorptive capacity than the unmodified clay. It was also demonstrated that, notwithstanding the reduced structural difference between FB1 and FB2, they were differently adsorbed on the modified clays. Addition of 2% modified clays to contaminated maize allowed a reduction of more than 70% and 60% of the amount of FB1and FB2 released in solution. Although in vivo experiments are required to confirm the effectiveness of the organically modified clays, these preliminary results suggest that these materials are promising as fumonisins binders.

  12. An investigation about the effect of oxazolidine on modified valonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study is aimed at combining the usage of valonia and modified valonia extracts with oxazolidine to obtain an increase in hydrothermal stability, and thus to develop tanning efficiency and to produce leathers that have better properties then the ones tanned with valonia extract only. Natural and three modified valonia ...

  13. Modified Mathieu repair for failed surgery for hypospadias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A.Z.M. Anwar

    Abstract. Objectives: To present our experience with the use of modified Mathieu urethroplasty for failed hypospadias repair. Patients and methods: Thirty-eight patients aged between 2 and 10 (mean 5) years underwent modified. Mathieu urethroplasty for salvage hypospadias repair. Modifications included a wide ...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10073 - Modified alkyl acrylamide (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified alkyl acrylamide (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10073 Modified alkyl acrylamide (generic). (a) Chemical substance and... acrylamide (PMN P-05-536) is subject to reporting under this section for the significant new uses described...

  15. Proposal for a Test Protocol for Genetically Modified Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandberg, B.; Kjær, C.

    1999-01-01

    The report contains the proceedings from the conference Genetically Modified Organisms in Nordic Habitats - Sustainable Use or Loss of Diversity? in Helsinki, 1998......The report contains the proceedings from the conference Genetically Modified Organisms in Nordic Habitats - Sustainable Use or Loss of Diversity? in Helsinki, 1998...

  16. Prospects of genetic modified maize crop in Africa | Mwamahonje ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic modified maize crop increases annually as a result of food insecurity and limited land caused by rapid population increase of over seven billion in the world. Scientists have been playing their role to address this food insecurity problem. The use of genetically modified (GM) maize crop to feed people is one of the ...

  17. Modified calcium oxide as stable solid base catalyst for Aldol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was found that modified CaO can effectively catalyse the Aldol condensation of cyclohexanone and benzaldehyde, as well as various benzaldehydes, to produce 2-benzylidenecyclohexanone with a good selectivity and high yield. Higher yield of 95.8% was obtained over modified CaO after 3 h, which is short compared ...

  18. Hip Hemiarthroplasty for Femoral Neck Fractures Using the Modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Key words: Femoral neck fractures, hip hemiarthroplasty, modified stracathro approach. DOI: 10.4103/2006- ... using the modified Stracathro approach following fracture of the neck of the femur and have been .... Superior rim of the acetabulum and remnant of the fractured neck and head; 2 = The distal end of the fractured ...

  19. Solar system constraints on multifield theories of modified dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, R. H.

    2006-01-01

    Any viable theory of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) as modified gravity is likely to require fields in addition to the usual tensor field of General Relativity. For these theories, the MOND phenomenology emerges as an effective fifth force probably associated with a scalar field. Here, I

  20. 2 modified electrodes electrooxidation of borohydride as probe ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    potential cycling of modified electrode with the above complex in alkali. (2) By thermal decomposition of the precursor complex (NTN/C) to form metallic nickel followed by cycling in alkali. Ni(OH)2 modified electrodes formed using both methods were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and also by Fourier transform infrared.

  1. Acid-degradable and bioerodible modified polyhydroxylated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frechet, Jean M. J.; Bachelder, Eric M.; Beaudette, Tristan T.; Broaders, Kyle E.

    2017-05-09

    Compositions and methods of making a modified polyhydroxylated polymer comprising a polyhydroxylated polymer having reversibly modified hydroxyl groups, whereby the hydroxyl groups are modified by an acid-catalyzed reaction between a polydroxylated polymer and a reagent such as acetals, aldehydes, vinyl ethers and ketones such that the modified polyhydroxylated polymers become insoluble in water but freely soluble in common organic solvents allowing for the facile preparation of acid-sensitive materials. Materials made from these polymers can be made to degrade in a pH-dependent manner. Both hydrophobic and hydrophilic cargoes were successfully loaded into particles made from the present polymers using single and double emulsion techniques, respectively. Due to its ease of preparation, processability, pH-sensitivity, and biocompatibility, of the present modified polyhydroxylated polymers should find use in numerous drug delivery applications.

  2. Labeling of genetically modified food and consumers' rights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujisić Dragan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The legal regulation of genetically modified food directly affects consumers, since they are the ones who encounter genetically modified food on the shelves every day. At the beginning, authors indicate that there are huge differences between legal regulation of genetically modified food in the United States and in the European Union. These differences result in different labeling regimes in those two systems of genetically modified food regulation. Authors consider several factors from which depend efficiency of the labeling regime, and labels' influence on the actual realization of basic consumers' rights. Authors will analyze these factors in the paper, such as: label complexity, opting for positive or negative labeling regime, whether labeling regime is mandatory or voluntary, etc. In the conclusion authors give recommendations to the Serbian legislator, and propositions for changes in current domestic legal regulation, which would improve realization of basic consumers' rights in relation with genetically modified food.

  3. Modified Einstein and Finsler Like Theories on Tangent Lorentz Bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Stavrinos, Panayiotis; Vacaru, Sergiu I.

    2014-01-01

    We study modifications of general relativity, GR, with nonlinear dispersion relations which can be geometrized on tangent Lorentz bundles. Such modified gravity theories, MGTs, can be modeled by gravitational Lagrange density functionals $f(\\mathbf{R},\\mathbf{T},F)$ with generalized/ modified scalar curvature $\\mathbf{R}$, trace of matter field tensors $\\mathbf{T}$ and modified Finsler like generating function $F$. In particular, there are defined extensions of GR with extra dimensional "velocity/ momentum" coordinates. For four dimensional models, we prove that it is possible to decouple and integrate in very general forms the gravitational fields for $f(\\mathbf{R},\\mathbf{T},F)$--modified gravity using nonholonomic 2+2 splitting and nonholonomic Finsler like variables $F$. We study the modified motion and Newtonian limits of massive test particles on nonlinear geodesics approximated with effective extra forces orthogonal to the four-velocity. We compute the constraints on the magnitude of extra-acceleration...

  4. Synthesis and Enzymatic Incorporation of Modified Deoxyuridine Triphosphates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkai Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To expand the chemical functionality of DNAzymes and aptamers, several new modified deoxyuridine triphosphates have been synthesized. An important precursor that enables this aim is 5-aminomethyl dUTP, whereby the pendent amine serves as a handle for further synthetic functionalization. Five functional groups were conjugated to 5-aminomethyl dUTP. Incorporation assays were performed on several templates that demand 2–5 sequential incorporation events using several commercially available DNA polymerases. It was found that Vent (exo- DNA polymerase efficiently incorporates all five modified dUTPs. In addition, all nucleoside triphosphates were capable of supporting a double-stranded exponential PCR amplification. Modified PCR amplicons were PCR amplified into unmodified DNA and sequenced to verify that genetic information was conserved through incorporation, amplification, and reamplification. Overall these modified dUTPs represent new candidate substrates for use in selections using modified nucleotide libraries.

  5. A modified failure criterion for transversely isotropic rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Saeidi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A modified failure criterion is proposed to determine the strength of transversely isotropic rocks. Mechanical properties of some metamorphic and sedimentary rocks including gneiss, slate, marble, schist, shale, sandstone and limestone, which show transversely isotropic behavior, were taken into consideration. Afterward, introduced triaxial rock strength criterion was modified for transversely isotropic rocks. Through modification process an index was obtained that can be considered as a strength reduction parameter due to rock strength anisotropy. Comparison of the parameter with previous anisotropy indexes in literature showed reasonable results for the studied rock samples. The modified criterion was compared to modified Hoek-Brown and Ramamurthy criteria for different transversely isotropic rocks. It can be concluded that the modified failure criterion proposed in this study can be used for predicting the strength of transversely isotropic rocks.

  6. Modifier effects on chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaonong; Zhang, Xifeng; Yin, Hengbo; Wang, Aili; Xu, Yiqing

    2006-12-01

    Size-controlled chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured Cu was studied in the presence of a single modifier such as polyethylene glycols, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, sodium dodecyl sulfate or a mixture of two different types of modifiers. The Cu nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average particle size and particle size distribution of the nanostructured Cu depend upon the type of modifiers and the modifier effect follows the order: PEG-2000 > SDBS > PEG-600 > SDS > PEG-6000. The experimental results indicate that due to the existence of a synergistic action, a mixture of two types of modifiers has a significant effect on the particle size and the size distribution of Cu nanoparticles.

  7. Modifier effects on chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng Xiaonong [School of Material Science and Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang Xifeng [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)]. E-mail: zhangxf_chzh@163.com; Yin Hengbo [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Wang Aili [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Xu Yiqing [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China)

    2006-12-30

    Size-controlled chemical reduction synthesis of nanostructured Cu was studied in the presence of a single modifier such as polyethylene glycols, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate, sodium dodecyl sulfate or a mixture of two different types of modifiers. The Cu nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The average particle size and particle size distribution of the nanostructured Cu depend upon the type of modifiers and the modifier effect follows the order: PEG-2000 > SDBS > PEG-600 > SDS > PEG-6000. The experimental results indicate that due to the existence of a synergistic action, a mixture of two types of modifiers has a significant effect on the particle size and the size distribution of Cu nanoparticles.

  8. Synthesis of a boron modified phenolic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resin has long been used as matrix for composites mainly because of its flame retardant behavior and high char yield after pyrolysis, which results in a self supporting structure. The addition of ceramic powders, such as SiC and B4C, as fillers to the phenolic resin, results in better thermo-oxidative stability, but as drawbacks, it has poor homogeneity, adhesion and processing difficulties during molding of the composites. The addition of single elements, such as boron, silicon and phosphorus in the main backbone of the thermo-set resin is a new strategy to obtain special high performance resins, which results in higher mechanical properties, avoiding the drawbacks of simply adding fillers, which results in enhanced thermo-oxidative stability compared to conventional phenol-formaldehyde resins. Therefore, the product can have several applications, including the use as ablative thermal protection for thermo-structural composites. This work describes the preparation of a boron-modified phenolic resin (BPR using salicyl alcohol and boric acid. The reaction was performed in refluxing toluene for a period of four hours, which produced a very high viscosity amber resin in 90% yield.The final structure of the compound, the boric acid double, substituted at the hydroxyl group of the aromatic ring, was determined with the help of the Infrared Spectroscopy, ¹H-NMR, TGA-DSC and boron elemental analysis. The absorption band of the group B-O at 1349 cm ˉ¹ can be visualized at the FT-IR spectrum. ¹H-NMR spectra showed peaks at 4.97-5.04 ppm and 3.60-3.90 ppm assigned to belong to CH2OH groups from the alcohol. The elemental analysis was also performed for boron determination.The product has also been tested in carbon and silicon fibers composite for the use in thermal structure. The results of the tests showed composites with superior mechanical properties when compared with the conventional phenolic resin.

  9. Energy potential of the modified excess sludge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zawieja Iwona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the SCOD value of excess sludge it is possible to estimate an amount of energy potentially obtained during the methane fermentation process. Based on a literature review, it has been estimated that from 1 kg of SCOD it is possible to obtain 3.48 kWh of energy. Taking into account the above methane and energy ratio (i.e. 10 kWh/1Nm3 CH4, it is possible to determine the volume of methane obtained from the tested sludge. Determination of potential energy of sludge is necessary for the use of biogas as a source of power generators as cogeneration and ensure the stability of this type of system. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the energy potential of excess sludge subjected to the thermal and chemical disintegration. In the case of thermal disintegration, test was conducted in the low temperature 80°C. The reagent used for the chemical modification was a peracetic acid, which in an aqueous medium having strong oxidizing properties. The time of chemical modification was 6 hours. Applied dose of the reagent was 1.0 ml CH3COOOH/L of sludge. By subjecting the sludge disintegration by the test methods achieved an increase in the SCOD value of modified sludge, indicating the improvement of biodegradability along with a concomitant increase in their energy potential. The obtained experimental production of biogas from disintegrated sludge confirmed that it is possible to estimate potential intensity of its production. The SCOD value of 2576 mg O2/L, in the case of chemical disintegration, was obtained for a dose of 1.0 ml CH3COOH/L. For this dose the pH value was equal 6.85. In the case of thermal disintegration maximum SCOD value was 2246 mg O2/L obtained at 80°C and the time of preparation 6 h. It was estimated that in case of thermal disintegration as well as for the chemical disintegration for selected parameters, the potential energy for model digester of active volume of 5L was, respectively, 0.193 and 0,118 kWh.

  10. The Edinburgh modified cage for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, M C; Hughes, B O

    1995-12-01

    1. Behaviour, production and welfare of ISA Brown medium hybrids were assessed in 2 trials (each from 20 to 44 weeks of age) of a novel design of cage for laying hens: the Edinburgh Modified Cage (EMC). 2. The EMC was 600 mm wide, 450 mm deep and 450 mm high at the rear; it had a softwood perch and at one side a 250 mm wide nest box (containing litter or artificial turf) with a dust bath directly above. It housed 4 birds and provided 675 cm2/bird in the main cage with an additional 281 cm2/bird in the nest box. The nest box and dust bath had automatically controlled doors which were closed at night. There were 18 EMC; in the first trial these were compared with 6 control cages with perch but without next box or dust bath. 3. Hens spent 32 to 37% of day time on the perch, 5 to 7% in the dust bath and 5 to 6% in the nest. At night 92 to 98% roosted on the perch. 4. Initially only 55 to 70% of eggs were laid in the nest box partly because some eggs were laid before dawn. Once the door was retimed to open 3h before lights-on the proportion rose to 91 to 96%. Very few eggs were laid in the dust bath. Pre-laying behaviour lasted longer in treatments with nest boxes (55 to 76min) than in control cages (48min); disturbance was slight in all treatments, but lowest in control cages. 5. Dust baths were well used, with on average 61% of hens dust bathing during a 3-h afternoon observation period compared with only 17% in control cages. Two birds could use the dust bath simultaneously. 6. It was concluded that although a number of minor design features still required attention the EMC has potential to reduce the disadvantages of conventional cages for welfare while retaining their advantages and has possible commercial application.

  11. Gene flow in genetically modified wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvan Rieben

    Full Text Available Understanding gene flow in genetically modified (GM crops is critical to answering questions regarding risk-assessment and the coexistence of GM and non-GM crops. In two field experiments, we tested whether rates of cross-pollination differed between GM and non-GM lines of the predominantly self-pollinating wheat Triticum aestivum. In the first experiment, outcrossing was studied within the field by planting "phytometers" of one line into stands of another line. In the second experiment, outcrossing was studied over distances of 0.5-2.5 m from a central patch of pollen donors to adjacent patches of pollen recipients. Cross-pollination and outcrossing was detected when offspring of a pollen recipient without a particular transgene contained this transgene in heterozygous condition. The GM lines had been produced from the varieties Bobwhite or Frisal and contained Pm3b or chitinase/glucanase transgenes, respectively, in homozygous condition. These transgenes increase plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. Although the overall outcrossing rate in the first experiment was only 3.4%, Bobwhite GM lines containing the Pm3b transgene were six times more likely than non-GM control lines to produce outcrossed offspring. There was additional variation in outcrossing rate among the four GM-lines, presumably due to the different transgene insertion events. Among the pollen donors, the Frisal GM line expressing a chitinase transgene caused more outcrossing than the GM line expressing both a chitinase and a glucanase transgene. In the second experiment, outcrossing after cross-pollination declined from 0.7-0.03% over the test distances of 0.5-2.5 m. Our results suggest that pollen-mediated gene flow between GM and non-GM wheat might only be a concern if it occurs within fields, e.g. due to seed contamination. Methodologically our study demonstrates that outcrossing rates between transgenic and other lines within crops can be assessed using a phytometer

  12. Energy potential of the modified excess sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawieja, Iwona

    2017-11-01

    On the basis of the SCOD value of excess sludge it is possible to estimate an amount of energy potentially obtained during the methane fermentation process. Based on a literature review, it has been estimated that from 1 kg of SCOD it is possible to obtain 3.48 kWh of energy. Taking into account the above methane and energy ratio (i.e. 10 kWh/1Nm3 CH4), it is possible to determine the volume of methane obtained from the tested sludge. Determination of potential energy of sludge is necessary for the use of biogas as a source of power generators as cogeneration and ensure the stability of this type of system. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the energy potential of excess sludge subjected to the thermal and chemical disintegration. In the case of thermal disintegration, test was conducted in the low temperature 80°C. The reagent used for the chemical modification was a peracetic acid, which in an aqueous medium having strong oxidizing properties. The time of chemical modification was 6 hours. Applied dose of the reagent was 1.0 ml CH3COOOH/L of sludge. By subjecting the sludge disintegration by the test methods achieved an increase in the SCOD value of modified sludge, indicating the improvement of biodegradability along with a concomitant increase in their energy potential. The obtained experimental production of biogas from disintegrated sludge confirmed that it is possible to estimate potential intensity of its production. The SCOD value of 2576 mg O2/L, in the case of chemical disintegration, was obtained for a dose of 1.0 ml CH3COOH/L. For this dose the pH value was equal 6.85. In the case of thermal disintegration maximum SCOD value was 2246 mg O2/L obtained at 80°C and the time of preparation 6 h. It was estimated that in case of thermal disintegration as well as for the chemical disintegration for selected parameters, the potential energy for model digester of active volume of 5L was, respectively, 0.193 and 0,118 kWh.

  13. Gas Associated with Heavily Modified Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Blair D.

    In the 9th year of IUE, we initiated a program to study the strength, width and central wavelength of the 2175 A extinction bump in a sample of stars known from ANS photometric data to have anomalous extinction. A major result from that program (Cardelli and Savage, "A study of the Fundamental characteristics of the 2175 A Extinction Feature ") is the discovery of the line of sight to HD 62542 which exhibits a UV extinction curve which is the most extreme of any so far found in the Milky Way. The HD 62542 extinction curve has a very weak and very broad UV extinction bump which is centered at 2110 A rather than the normal 2175 A (see Figure 1). Both the bump width and position are well outside the range found for any extinction curve yet observed, including those for the LMC and SMC. The far UV portion of the curve is higher than for any Milky Way sight line for which published data exists. HD 62542 exists in a star forming region of densely packed, swept up interstellar as and dust in the region of the Gum nebula near two stars which exhibit strong stellar winds (zeta Pup and gamma2 Vel). The region appears so extreme that the anomalous extinction may be produced by a combination of shock processing of grains, by grain cogulation, and by mantle growth. In any event the dust toward this star has been so severely modified, it is very likely that the gas phase of the ISM is also extremely anomalous. We therefore propose to obtain high dispersion SWP and LWP spectra of HD 62542 to study the gas-dust interaction along this exceedingly interesting line of sight. Some specific questions we will try to answer include: 1. Are the abundances of molecules anomalous? If the anomalous extinction is produced in a dense interstellar environment either by grain coagulation or mantle growth, the conditions may be favorable for molecule formation. The survival of molecules near HD 62542 may be enhanced by the high far UV extinction of the dust. The HD 62542 sight line may represent

  14. Restoring Environmental Flows by Modifying Dam Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Richter

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The construction of new dams has become one of the most controversial issues in global efforts to alleviate poverty, improve human health, and strengthen regional economies. Unfortunately, this controversy has overshadowed the tremendous opportunity that exists for modifying the operations of existing dams to recover many of the environmental and social benefits of healthy ecosystems that have been compromised by present modes of dam operation. The potential benefits of dam "re-operation" include recovery of fish, shellfish, and other wildlife populations valued both commercially and recreationally, including estuarine species; reactivation of the flood storage and water purification benefits that occur when floods are allowed to flow into floodplain forests and wetlands; regaining some semblance of the naturally dynamic balance between river erosion and sedimentation that shapes physical habitat complexity, and arresting problems associated with geomorphic imbalances; cultural and spiritual uses of rivers; and many other socially valued products and services. This paper describes an assessment framework that can be used to evaluate the benefits that might be restored through dam re-operation. Assessing the potential benefits of dam re-operation begins by characterizing the dam's effects on the river flow regime, and formulating hypotheses about the ecological and social benefits that might be restored by releasing water from the dam in a manner that more closely resembles natural flow patterns. These hypotheses can be tested by implementing a re-operation plan, tracking the response of the ecosystem, and continually refining dam operations through adaptive management. The paper highlights a number of land and water management strategies useful in implementing a dam re-operation plan, with reference to a variety of management contexts ranging from individual dams to cascades of dams along a river to regional energy grids. Because many of the

  15. Live virus-free or die: coupling of antivirus immunity and programmed suicide or dormancy in prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The virus-host arms race is a major theater for evolutionary innovation. Archaea and bacteria have evolved diverse, elaborate antivirus defense systems that function on two general principles: i) immune systems that discriminate self DNA from nonself DNA and specifically destroy the foreign, in particular viral, genomes, whereas the host genome is protected, or ii) programmed cell suicide or dormancy induced by infection. Presentation of the hypothesis Almost all genomic loci encoding immunity systems such as CRISPR-Cas, restriction-modification and DNA phosphorothioation also encompass suicide genes, in particular those encoding known and predicted toxin nucleases, which do not appear to be directly involved in immunity. In contrast, the immunity systems do not appear to encode antitoxins found in typical toxin-antitoxin systems. This raises the possibility that components of the immunity system themselves act as reversible inhibitors of the associated toxin proteins or domains as has been demonstrated for the Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC that interacts with the PrrI restriction-modification system. We hypothesize that coupling of diverse immunity and suicide/dormancy systems in prokaryotes evolved under selective pressure to provide robustness to the antivirus response. We further propose that the involvement of suicide/dormancy systems in the coupled antivirus response could take two distinct forms: 1) induction of a dormancy-like state in the infected cell to ‘buy time’ for activation of adaptive immunity; 2) suicide or dormancy as the final recourse to prevent viral spread triggered by the failure of immunity. Testing the hypothesis This hypothesis entails many experimentally testable predictions. Specifically, we predict that Cas2 protein present in all cas operons is a mRNA-cleaving nuclease (interferase) that might be activated at an early stage of virus infection to enable incorporation of virus-specific spacers into the CRISPR locus or to trigger cell suicide when the immune function of CRISPR-Cas systems fails. Similarly, toxin-like activity is predicted for components of numerous other defense loci. Implications of the hypothesis The hypothesis implies that antivirus response in prokaryotes involves key decision-making steps at which the cell chooses the path to follow by sensing the course of virus infection. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Etienne Joly and Nick Grishin. For complete reviews, go to the Reviewers’ reports section. PMID:23151069

  16. Live virus-free or die: coupling of antivirus immunity and programmed suicide or dormancy in prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova Kira S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The virus-host arms race is a major theater for evolutionary innovation. Archaea and bacteria have evolved diverse, elaborate antivirus defense systems that function on two general principles: i immune systems that discriminate self DNA from nonself DNA and specifically destroy the foreign, in particular viral, genomes, whereas the host genome is protected, or ii programmed cell suicide or dormancy induced by infection. Presentation of the hypothesis Almost all genomic loci encoding immunity systems such as CRISPR-Cas, restriction-modification and DNA phosphorothioation also encompass suicide genes, in particular those encoding known and predicted toxin nucleases, which do not appear to be directly involved in immunity. In contrast, the immunity systems do not appear to encode antitoxins found in typical toxin-antitoxin systems. This raises the possibility that components of the immunity system themselves act as reversible inhibitors of the associated toxin proteins or domains as has been demonstrated for the Escherichia coli anticodon nuclease PrrC that interacts with the PrrI restriction-modification system. We hypothesize that coupling of diverse immunity and suicide/dormancy systems in prokaryotes evolved under selective pressure to provide robustness to the antivirus response. We further propose that the involvement of suicide/dormancy systems in the coupled antivirus response could take two distinct forms: 1 induction of a dormancy-like state in the infected cell to ‘buy time’ for activation of adaptive immunity; 2 suicide or dormancy as the final recourse to prevent viral spread triggered by the failure of immunity. Testing the hypothesis This hypothesis entails many experimentally testable predictions. Specifically, we predict that Cas2 protein present in all cas operons is a mRNA-cleaving nuclease (interferase that might be activated at an early stage of virus infection to enable incorporation of virus-specific spacers into the CRISPR locus or to trigger cell suicide when the immune function of CRISPR-Cas systems fails. Similarly, toxin-like activity is predicted for components of numerous other defense loci. Implications of the hypothesis The hypothesis implies that antivirus response in prokaryotes involves key decision-making steps at which the cell chooses the path to follow by sensing the course of virus infection. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Arcady Mushegian, Etienne Joly and Nick Grishin. For complete reviews, go to the Reviewers’ reports section.

  17. Immunization with inactivated Middle East Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus vaccine leads to lung immunopathology on challenge with live virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anurodh Shankar; Tao, Xinrong; Algaissi, Abdullah; Garron, Tania; Narayanan, Krishna; Peng, Bi-Hung; Couch, Robert B; Tseng, Chien-Te K

    2016-09-01

    To determine if a hypersensitive-type lung pathology might occur when mice were given an inactivated MERS-CoV vaccine and challenged with infectious virus as was seen with SARS-CoV vaccines, we prepared and vaccinated mice with an inactivated MERS-CoV vaccine. Neutralizing antibody was induced by vaccine with and without adjuvant and lung virus was reduced in vaccinated mice after challenge. Lung mononuclear infiltrates occurred in all groups after virus challenge but with increased infiltrates that contained eosinophils and increases in the eosinophil promoting IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines only in the vaccine groups. Inactivated MERS-CoV vaccine appears to carry a hypersensitive-type lung pathology risk from MERS-CoV infection that is similar to that found with inactivated SARS-CoV vaccines from SARS-CoV infection.

  18. Insights into aqueous carbofuran removal by modified and non-modified rice husk biochars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayakaduwa, S S; Herath, Indika; Ok, Yong Sik; Mohan, Dinesh; Vithanage, Meththika

    2017-10-01

    Biochar has been considered as a potential sorbent for removal of frequently detected pesticides in water. In the present study, modified and non-modified rice husk biochars were used for aqueous carbofuran removal. Rice husk biochars were produced at 300, 500, and 700 °C in slow pyrolysis and further exposed to steam activation. Biochars were physicochemically characterized using proximate, ultimate, FTIR methods and used to examine equilibrium and dynamic adsorption of carbofuran. Increasing pyrolysis temperature led to a decrease of biochar yield and increase of porosity, surface area, and adsorption capacities which were further enhanced by steam activation. Carbofuran adsorption was pH-dependant, and the maximum (161 mg g-1) occurred in the vicinity of pH 5, on steam-activated biochar produced at 700 °C. Freundlich model best fitted the sorption equilibrium data. Both chemisorption and physisorption interactions on heterogeneous adsorbent surface may involve in carbofuran adsorption. Langmuir kinetics could be applied to describe carbofuran adsorption in a fixed bed. A higher carbofuran volume was treated in a column bed by a steam-activated biochar versus non-activated biochars. Overall, steam-activated rice husk biochar can be highlighted as a promising low-cost sustainable material for aqueous carbofuran removal.

  19. Modified-Gravity-GADGET: a new code for cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchwein, Ewald; Baldi, Marco; Springel, Volker

    2013-11-01

    We present a new massively parallel code for N-body and cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of modified gravity models. The code employs a multigrid-accelerated Newton-Gauss-Seidel relaxation solver on an adaptive mesh to efficiently solve for perturbations in the scalar degree of freedom of the modified gravity model. As this new algorithm is implemented as a module for the P-GADGET3 code, it can at the same time follow the baryonic physics included in P-GADGET3, such as hydrodynamics, radiative cooling and star formation. We demonstrate that the code works reliably by applying it to simple test problems that can be solved analytically, as well as by comparing cosmological simulations to results from the literature. Using the new code, we perform the first non-radiative and radiative cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of an f (R)-gravity model. We also discuss the impact of active galactic nucleus feedback on the matter power spectrum, as well as degeneracies between the influence of baryonic processes and modifications of gravity.

  20. Concentrated polymer brush-modified silica particle coating confers biofouling-resistance on modified materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Chiaki; Qiu, Jun; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Huang, Chih-Feng; Gelling, Onko-Jan; van den Bosch, Edith

    2017-01-01

    Biofouling, an undesired adsorption of biological material to otherwise inert surfaces, is detrimental in medical, pharmaceutical, and other sectors. Concentrated polymer brushes (CPB) confer non-biofouling properties on modified surfaces but are cumbersome to fabricate. Here, a simple and versatile method of fabricating non-biofouling coatings for various substrates was developed using CPB-modified silica nanoparticles (SiPs). Concentrated poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PPEGMA) brushes were grafted on SiPs by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. CPB-SiPs were spin-coated onto silicon wafers or quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor chips with phenyl azido cross-linkers. SiP cross-linking was then performed by ultra violet irradiation for 20s, or by heating at 120°C for 12h. Protein adsorption to coatings was studied by QCM approach and human umbilical vein endothelial cell adhesion to coatings was examined. SiP to cross-linker weight ratios were varied from 2.0/0.5 to 9.0/0.5 (wt/wt%) and the coatings almost completely suppressed protein adsorption and cell adhesion to treated surfaces. The coating was also applied to polymeric films, rendering these materials biofouling-resistant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of the amount of fluoride release from nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer, conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Sumitha; Rao, Arathi; Shenoy, Ramya

    2013-03-01

    To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements. Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37°C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II) was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance) using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at pglass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 days. The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  2. Thermal oxidative degradation of wood modified with aminophenylborates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klyachenkova Olga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Comparative thermal analysis in the presence of oxygen was carried out for samples of native pine wood and wood samples modified with aminophenylborates. Significant decrease in the amount of heat released during thermal decomposition of the modified samples was established, which is due to the increase of carbonaceous residues on the surface. Reduction of heat release during decomposition of the modified samples may be explained by the lower yield of combustible volatile products as well as by thin film of boron oxide, formed on the surface of the modified wood, that partially reflects heat flow. Produced upon the modifier decomposition water vapor and inert nitrogen oxides dilute gaseous mixture near the wood surface and isolate it from oxygen. This enhances fire-resistance of wood modified with mono- and diethanolamine(N→Bphenylborates. Hydroxyl group at the sixth carbon atom of the glucopyranose ring of cellulose participates in reactions of cellulose modification, which prevents formation of flammable levoglucosan and, consequently, improves the fire-resistance of the modified wood.

  3. Modified stethoscope for auscultation of temporomandibular joint sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagar, Sanjiv Rajender Singh; Turakiya, Viral; Pakhan, Ashok J; Jaggi, Nitin; Kalra, Amit; Vaidya, Vidya

    2014-04-01

    Purpose of this study was to modify the stethoscope which can auscultate the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds more precisely than conventional stethoscope, and fabrication of stethoscope compatible software which analyses the auscultated sound and gives documentary evidence of that analysis in the form of graph. The conventional stethoscope was modified by attaching a custom made soundscope with a recording device which can be placed in external auditory meatus (EAM) for auscultation of TMJ sounds. When this small and smooth end of custom made soundscope of modified stethoscope is placed in EAM & connected with specially developed software it records the TMJ sounds & analyzes them in form of graph. Fabrication of modified stethoscope with software records the auscultated sound as a sound wave in form of graph and analyses this sound wave graph to give graphic evidence of prominent intensity at prominent frequency as spectrum analysis graph, and duration of that sound as a sound length graph. The use of modified stethoscope with software increases the accuracy of auscultation of TMJ sounds without any patient's discomfort and helps in diagnosis of TMJ disorders. The modified stethoscope with software for auscultation of TMJ sounds results in more precise auscultation & analysis of TMJ for sounds even of low intensity & frequency. How to cite the article: Dagar SR, Turakiya V, Pakhan AJ, Jaggi N, Kalra A, Vaidya V. Modified stethoscope for auscultation of temporomandibular joint sounds. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(2):40-4.

  4. Removing ammonium from water using modified corncob-biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Thi Mai; Trinh, Van Tuyen; Doan, Dinh Phuong; Van, Huu Tap; Nguyen, Tien Vinh; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu; Ngo, Huu Hao

    2017-02-01

    Ammonium pollution in groundwater and surface water is of major concern in many parts of the world due to the danger it poses to the environment and people's health. This study focuses on the development of a low cost adsorbent, specifically a modified biochar prepared from corncob. Evaluated here is the efficiency of this new material for removing ammonium from synthetic water (ammonium concentration from 10 to 100mg/L). The characteristics of the modified biochar were determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) test, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). It was found that ammonium adsorption on modified biochar strongly depended on pH. Adsorption kinetics of NH4(+)-N using modified biochar followed the pseudo-second order kinetic model. Both Langmuir and Sips adsorption isotherm models could simulate well the adsorption behavior of ammonium on modificated biochar. The highest adsorption capacity of 22.6mg NH4(+)-N/g modified biochar was obtained when the biochar was modified by soaking it in HNO3 6M and NaOH 0.3M for 8h and 24h, respectively. The high adsorption capacity of the modified biochar suggested that it is a promising adsorbent for NH4(+)-N remediation from water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure effect on graphene-modified enzyme electrode glucose sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Liao, Qingliao; Chu, Mingming; Liu, Shuo; Zhang, Yue

    2014-02-15

    Using structural characterizations and electrochemical measurements, we explored and investigated the effect of the structure of enzyme electrodes with glucose oxidase (GOD) that were modified by reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets. The rGO sheets with different defect density, layers, and oxygen concentrations were chosen to modify the enzyme electrode, and all the modified enzyme electrodes exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activities and performances towards glucose. The abundant defects in rGO induce easy absorption of GOD. At a low oxygen concentration, rGO sheets help to induce the direct electron transfer (DET) on the rGO-modified electrode, and at a higher oxygen concentration, the reduction of H2O2 occurred instead of DET on the surface of the rGO-modified electrode. When rGO modified the enzyme electrode under the working model of H2O2 reduction, an increase in the number of the oxygen functional groups could lead to an increase in the absorption of GOD, resulting in the improvement of the affinity and sensitivity of the biosensor. The rGO-modified enzyme electrode can provide faster response, higher sensitivity, and better affinity by optimizing and controlling the structure of graphene and its derivatives. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metallurgical Properties and Phase Transformations of Barium-Strontium Modifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platonov, M. A.; Sulimova, I. S.; Rozhikhina, I. D.; Dmitrienko, V. I.; Horoshun, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallurgical properties and phase transformations of barium-strontium modifier were tested in laboratory conditions resembling steel processing in furnace and ladle. When heating barium-strontium modifier start of melting, kinetics of decomposition, phase and structure transformation were studied. The concentrate under consideration has been revealed to be a complex mineral compound containing barytocalcite, calcite, calciostrontianite, dolomite and siderite. The reaction kinetics of decomposing mineral components of barium-strontium modifier to oxides does not considerably affect slag formation in conditions of out-of-furnace steel processing.

  7. Desorption of toluene from modified clays using supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro D. G. P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to study the regeneration capacity of modified clays using supercritical fluid. These modified clays are used as organic compound adsorvents. The experimental step was done using a packed column with the clay contaminated by toluene. The results obtained showed the influence of the density of the supercritical CO2 and of the organic modifier in the desorption process. These data were modeled with first- and second-order models. Better results were obtained using the second-order model. This study makes possible the scale-up of the desorption process for regeneration of solid matrices using supercritical fluids.

  8. Modified Chebyshev Collocation Method for Solving Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ziaul Arif

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents derivation of alternative numerical scheme for solving differential equations, which is modified Chebyshev (Vieta-Lucas Polynomial collocation differentiation matrices. The Scheme of modified Chebyshev (Vieta-Lucas Polynomial collocation method is applied to both Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs and Partial Differential Equations (PDEs cases. Finally, the performance of the proposed method is compared with finite difference method and the exact solution of the example. It is shown that modified Chebyshev collocation method more effective and accurate than FDM for some example given.

  9. A modified multitarget adaptive array algorithm for wireless CDMA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun-hui; Yang, Yu-hang

    2004-11-01

    The paper presents a modified least squares despread respread multitarget constant modulus algorithm (LS-DRMTCMA). The cost function of the original algorithm was modified by the minimum bit error rate (MBER) criterion. The novel algorithm tries to optimize weight vectors by directly minimizing bit error rate (BER) of code division multiple access (CDMA) mobile communication system. In order to achieve adaptive update of weight vectors, a stochastic gradient adaptive algorithm was developed by a kernel density estimator of possibility density function based on samples. Simulation results showed that the modified algorithm remarkably improves the BER performance, capacity and near-far effect resistance of a given CDMA communication system.

  10. Phase transition in a modified square Josephson-junction array

    CERN Document Server

    Han, J

    1999-01-01

    We study the phase transition in a modified square proximity-coupled Josephson-junction array with small superconducting islands at the center of each plaquette. We find that the modified square array undergoes a Kosterlitz-Thouless-Berezinskii-like phase transition, but at a lower temperature than the simple square array with the same single-junction critical current. The IV characteristics, as well as the phase transition, resemble qualitatively those of a disordered simple square array. The effects of the presence of the center islands in the modified square array are discussed.

  11. Template-Assisted Formation of Nanostructured Dopamine-Modified Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Zhu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine-modified alginate and gelatin were prepared. The polymers were characterized and the properties of their aqueous solutions were investigated. Aqueous solutions of dopamine-modified alginate and gelatin with a concentration exceeding 20 mg/mL naturally formed gels after 16 h. Although polydopamine itself was not used for template-assisted nanostructure formation, the modified polymers could be used with dopamine. Mixing with dopamine allowed the precise shape of the template to be maintained in the resulting material, allowing nanopatterned surfaces and nanotubes to be prepared.

  12. Modified Static Floor Field and Exit Choice for Pedestrian Evacuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Huang, Hai-Jun; Yong, Gui

    2012-08-01

    An improved floor field model is proposed to simulate the pedestrian evacuation behavior in a room with multiple exits by modifying the static floor field. The modified static floor field is determined additionally by two cognitive coefficients of exit width and congestion degree around the exits. The logit-based discrete choice principle is used to govern the initial exit selection strategy based on the modified static floor field in such a scenario that pedestrians are distributed in the room's specified zone. Simulation results show that the proposed model can better perform the evacuation process. Sensitivity analyses of the model parameters are also presented.

  13. A novel fractional technique for the modified point kinetics equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Aboanber

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A fractional model for the modified point kinetics equations is derived and analyzed. An analytical method is used to solve the fractional model for the modified point kinetics equations. This methodical technique is based on the representation of the neutron density as a power series of the relaxation time as a small parameter. The validity of the fractional model is tested for different cases of step, ramp and sinusoidal reactivity. The results show that the fractional model for the modified point kinetics equations is the best representation of neutron density for subcritical and supercritical reactors.

  14. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF POLYMER MODIFIED BITUMEN USED IN WATERPROOFING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria RATAJCZAK

    Full Text Available Asphalt is one of the most commonly used building material. The first attempts at modifying asphalt were made at the beginning of the twentieth century. Nowadays the most popular asphalt modifier is the styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS. This thermoplastic elastomer increases the thermal resistance of bitumen, widens the range of plasticity and amends rheological properties. IR spectroscopy is by far the most common instrumental method used in analytical chemistry. The popularity of this method results from its simple measurement technique, universality and high precision. That is why IR spectroscopy applies to the analysis of polymer modified binder (PMB used in waterproofing.

  15. [Assessment of allergenicity of genetically modified food crops].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauzu, M; Pöting, A; Rubin, D; Lampen, A

    2012-03-01

    The placing on the European Union's market of genetically modified crops requires authorization by the European Commission which is based on the proof that the derived foods are as safe as their conventional counterparts. The assessment of potential allergenicity is part of the necessary investigations recommended in the updated Guidance Document of the Scientific Panel on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), which is based on internationally agreed recommendations. All genetically modified crops which so far have been authorized in the European Union were evaluated by the EFSA GMO Panel which considered it unlikely that their overall allergenicity has been altered.

  16. Modified Numerical Simulation Model of Blood Flow in Bend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Zhou, X; Hao, X; Sang, X

    2015-12-01

    The numerical simulation model of blood flow in bend is studied in this paper. The curvature modification is conducted for the blood flow model in bend to obtain the modified blood flow model in bend. The modified model is verified by U tube. By comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained by measuring the flow data in U tube, it was found that the modified blood flow model in bend can effectively improve the prediction accuracy of blood flow data affected by the curvature effect.

  17. Ammonia synthesis on Au modified Fe(111) and Ag and Cu modified Fe(100) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lytken, Ole; Waltenburg, Hanne Neergaard; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2003-01-01

    and a high-pressure cell. Ammonia was synthesized from a stoichiometric (N-2:3H(2)) gas mixture at a pressure of 2 bar. By deposition of small amounts of An, the ammonia production activity of the Fe(1 1 1) surface can be enhanced. More important, for the gold modified surface, the reaction order in ammonia...... to lifting of the nitrogen induced reconstruction of the Fe(I 11). On the Fe(l 00) surface strong effects were expected from modification with Cu and Ag since the in general more reactive atomic steps always present on such surfaces would be blocked. However, only minor and modest negative effects were found....... The Cu and Ag were found to be inefficient step blockers as they were forced away from the surface by the formation of the much more stable surface nitrogen....

  18. Reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale and Modified Tardieu Scale in patients with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, P; Atici, A; Ozkan, F U; Aktas, I; Kulcu, D G; Sarı, A; Durmus, B

    2017-10-01

    Psychometrics study. To assess the reliability of the Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) and Modified Tardieu Scale (MTS) in patients with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Inpatient rehabilitation clinics at two state hospitals. The study included 65 participants aged between 18 and 88 years with SCI with spasticity. All participants were at least 6 months after injury and had an American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale grade of A-D. The MAS and MTS scores were collected from the right hip adductor and hip extensor muscles, right knee extensor and knee flexor muscles and right plantar flexor muscles. Each participant was assessed twice by two experienced physiatrists 1 week apart. The raters were blinded to each other's scores. Inter-rater and test-retest agreement for the MAS scores (κ=0.531-0.774) was moderate to substantial. Inter-rater and test-retest agreement for the MTS X scores (κ=0.692-0.917) was substantial to almost perfect. Inter-rater reliability and test-retest reliability of the MTS R2-R1 was excellent (intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.874-0.973, confidence interval (CI): 0.79-0.98) for all muscles tested. Inter-rater reliability of the MTS R2 for the hip adductor and knee extensor muscles was poor (ICC 0.248, CI: -0.00 to 0.47 and ICC 0.094, CI: -0.16 to 0.34, respectively). The test-retest reliability of the MTS R2 was also poor for the knee extensor muscles (ICC 0.318, CI: -0.06 to 0.53). MAS has adequate reliability for determining lower-extremity spasticity in patients with SCI. The demonstration of excellent inter-rater reliability and test-retest reliability of the MTS R2-R1 suggests its utility as a complementary tool for informing treatment decisions in patients with SCI.

  19. A novel application of modified bamboo charcoal to treat oil-containing wastewater and its modified mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cui; Zou, Xiaoming; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Shucong; Feng, Yi; Huang, Xiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    Three conventional coalescence filters including walnut shells (WS), polystyrene resin particles (PR), and quartz sand (QS) were compared with bamboo charcoal (BC) to treat oily wastewater in a coalescence system process. The results showed the order of oil removal efficiency was QS>BC>WS>PR. To improve the oil removal efficiency of BC further, six types of modified BC were prepared. The results showed that the modified BC using silane coupling agent (SCA) significantly increased oil removal efficiency, but the other types (including the use of NaOH, HNO3, H2O2, FeCl3 and ultrasound) of modified BC exhibited nearly the same level of efficiency as that of pure BC. Infra-red, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and the contact angle for modified BC were measured to reveal the modified mechanism. It was found that the higher oil removal efficiency of the SCA-modified BC occurred due to the changed crystal structure of the BC and the increase in its surface hydrophobicity, which resulted in higher oil removal efficiency. Therefore, modified bamboo charcoal is an attractive filter candidate for oil removal in a coalescence system process.

  20. Copper modified carbon molecular sieves for selective oxygen removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Seshan, Panchalam K. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Carbon molecular sieves modified by the incorporation of finely divided elemental copper useful for the selective sorption of oxygen at elevated temperatures. The carbon molecular sieves can be regenerated by reduction with hydrogen. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of a copper-containing material and polyfunctional alcohol to form a sorbent precursor. The sorbent precursors are then heated and reduced to produce copper modified carbon molecular sieves. The copper modified carbon molecular sieves are useful for sorption of all concentrations of oxygen at temperatures up to about 200.degree. C. They are also useful for removal of trace amount of oxygen from gases at temperatures up to about 600.degree. C.

  1. The role of modified food starches in baby food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciers, S; Mehta, D I; Blecker, U; Lebenthal, E

    1997-06-01

    Modified food starches were developed as a stabilizer, suspending the food particles and providing a desirable consistency, texture, and storage ability. They are used primarily in strained and junior foods and to a minor extent in infant formulas. This review discusses modified food starches because of four principal concerns. The first relates to the bioavailability of the starch itself. The second is the potential that indigestible starch may have for producing diarrheal symptoms, malabsorption, and changes in gastrointestinal flora. The third is the possibility that modified food starches might be implicated in gastrointestinal disease like Crohn's ileocolitis. The fourth is the toxicological effect of the chemicals used to modify the starch and their possible mutagenic and carcinogenic properties.

  2. Modified Twin-Spot Laser Welding of Complex Phase Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Różański; M. Morawiec; A. Grajcar; S. Stano

    2016-01-01

    The work addresses modified methods of twin-spot laser welding of complex phase steel sheets and investigates the effects of laser beam distribution on the macrostructure, microstructure and hardness...

  3. Modified broken rice starch as fat substitute in sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Maria Limberger

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The demand for low-fat beef products has led the food industry to use fat substitutes such as modified starch. About 14% of broken rice is generated during processing. Nevertheless, this by-product contains high levels of starch; being therefore, great raw material for fat substitution. This study evaluated the applicability of chemically and physically modified broken rice starch as fat substitute in sausages. Extruded and phosphorylated broken rice was used in low-fat sausage formulation. All low-fat sausages presented about 55% reduction in the fat content and around 28% reduction in the total caloric value. Fat replacement with phosphorylated and extruded broken rice starch increased the texture acceptability of low-fat sausages, when compared to low-fat sausages with no modified broken rice. Results suggest that modified broken rice can be used as fat substitute in sausage formulations, yielding lower caloric value products with acceptable sensory characteristics.

  4. Solution of Lie' nard Equations using Modified Initial Guess ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We also demonstrate the superiority of MIGVIM over the decomposition method and the variational iteration method for this type of equations by providing numerical comparisons. Keywords: Variational Iteration, Lagrange multiplier, Lie' nard equations, Adomian decomposition, Modified initial guess variational iteration.

  5. Modifier genes in Mendelian disorders: the example of cystic fibrosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cutting, Garry R

    2010-01-01

    .... While the identification of such genetic variants has informed our knowledge of the etiologic bases of diseases, there continues to be a substantial gap in our understanding of the factors that modify disease severity...

  6. Modified gravity from the quantum part of the metric

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhunushaliev, Vladimir [KazNU, Department of Theoretical and Nuclear Physics, Almaty (Kazakhstan); IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan). Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science; Universitaet Oldenburg, Institut fuer Physik, Oldenburg (Germany); Folomeev, Vladimir [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Almaty (Kazakhstan); NAS of the Kyrgyz Republic, Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan). Institute of Physicotechnical Problems and Material Science; Kleihaus, Burkhard; Kunz, Jutta [Universitaet Oldenburg, Institut fuer Physik, Oldenburg (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    It is shown that if a metric in quantum gravity can be decomposed as a sum of classical and quantum parts, then Einstein quantum gravity looks approximately like modified gravity with a nonminimal interaction between gravity and matter. (orig.)

  7. Generalized second law of thermodynamic in modified teleparallel theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubair, M.; Bahamonde, Sebastian; Jamil, Mubasher

    2017-07-01

    This study is conducted to examine the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) in flat FRW for modified teleparallel gravity involving coupling between a scalar field with the torsion scalar T and the boundary term B=2\

  8. Entropy relations and bounds of horizons in modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Meng, Xin-he; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Bin

    2017-07-01

    We first give some entropy relations for black holes in modified gravity models, which are introduced as an elegant technique trick for handling various entropy bounds. For these entropy relations, some are mass-independent and universal, while others are not. Then we study the entropy bound of horizons in modified gravity, including Horava-Lifshitz gravity, massive gravity and Einstein-dilaton gravity. We focus on black holes with two or three physical horizons, containing the event horizon, Cauchy horizon and negative horizon which is physical for the observers in the negative radial coordinate region. In these modified gravity, entropy bounds are geometrical bounds which are related close to the cosmological radius for asymptotically (A)dS black holes, while they are Penrose-like inequalities for asymptotically flat black holes. Moreover, they depend on the constants characterizing the strength of modified terms in the actions. We also present the first law of thermodynamics and Smarr relations for horizons.

  9. Self-interstitial configuration in molybdenum studied by modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    SIA) in a model representing Mo has been investigated using the modified analytical embedded atom method (MAEAM). The lattice relaxations are treated with the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at absolute zero of ...

  10. Efficiency of surface modified Ti coated with copper nanoparticles to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Efficiency of surface modified Ti coated with copper nanoparticles to control marine bacterial adhesion under laboratory simulated conditions. CHOKKALINGAM PRIYA, GANESSIN ARAVIND and WILSON RICHARD THILAGARAJ. ∗. Department of Biotechnology, School of Bioengineering, SRM University, Chennai 603 ...

  11. MODIFIED ARMIJO RULE ON GRADIENT DESCENT AND CONJUGATE GRADIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZURAIDAH FITRIAH

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Armijo rule is an inexact line search method to determine step size in some descent method to solve unconstrained local optimization. Modified Armijo was introduced to increase the numerical performance of several descent algorithms that applying this method. The basic difference of Armijo and its modified are in existence of a parameter and estimating the parameter that is updated in every iteration. This article is comparing numerical solution and time of computation of gradient descent and conjugate gradient hybrid Gilbert-Nocedal (CGHGN that applying modified Armijo rule. From program implementation in Matlab 6, it's known that gradient descent was applying modified Armijo more effectively than CGHGN from one side: iteration needed to reach some norm of the gradient  (input by the user. The amount of iteration was representing how long the step size of each algorithm in each iteration. In another side, time of computation has the same conclusion.

  12. INCREASE OF EFFICIENCY OF MODIFIERS FOR GRAY CAST-IRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. S. Komarov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is established that for the purpose of increase of modifying efficiency of the melt from gray cast iron it is possible to use mechanically alloyed aluminum powder with superdispersed particles of aluminum and graphite oxide.

  13. Effect of 1-methylcyclopropene and modified atmosphere packaging ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-07-11

    Jul 11, 2011 ... 1Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, Ministry of Education, Tianjin University of Science and ... Key words: 1-MCP, chilling injuries, modified atmosphere packaging, sweet pepper. ... The experimental design was.

  14. Applications of Graphene-Modified Electrodes in Microbial Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Graphene-modified materials have captured increasing attention for energy applications due to their superior physical and chemical properties, which can significantly enhance the electricity generation performance of microbial fuel cells (MFC. In this review, several typical synthesis methods of graphene-modified electrodes, such as graphite oxide reduction methods, self-assembly methods, and chemical vapor deposition, are summarized. According to the different functions of the graphene-modified materials in the MFC anode and cathode chambers, a series of design concepts for MFC electrodes are assembled, e.g., enhancing the biocompatibility and improving the extracellular electron transfer efficiency for anode electrodes and increasing the active sites and strengthening the reduction pathway for cathode electrodes. In spite of the challenges of MFC electrodes, graphene-modified electrodes are promising for MFC development to address the reduction in efficiency brought about by organic waste by converting it into electrical energy.

  15. Why should modified Atkins diet be encouraged for treating epilepsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Why should modified Atkins diet be encouraged for treating epilepsy in emerging countries? Amal Satte, Eric Heath Kossoff, Mohamed Belghiti, Abderrahim Zerhouni, Hamid Ouhabi, Hassania Guerinech, Jamal Mounach ...

  16. The Prevalence of Dental Anxiety and Validation of the Modified ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , not much work has been documented on dental anxiety. The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of dental anxiety and determine the reliability and validity of the Modified Dental Anxiety Scale (MDAS) in screening for ...

  17. RSW Node Centered Coarse Grid w/ Split Walls Modified

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dr. Chwalowski, We just generated a modified version of the coarse node centered grid with split walls. Here the red and green sections you highlighted in the email...

  18. Preparation, Characterization, and Photocatalytic Properties of Modified Red Mud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingjie Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid waste red mud was modified by HCl leaching. The structure property and composition of modified red mud were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET. Under UV irradiation, methyl orange (MO aqueous solution was photodegraded by modified red mud. The obtained results showed that the specific surface area of modified red mud was 317.14 m2/g, which was about 40 times higher than that of the normal red mud. After UV irradiation for 50 min, the removal percentage of MO reached 94.2%. The study provided a novel way for the application of red mud to the photocatalytic degradation of organic wastes.

  19. [Advance of gene-modified non-human primate models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Cai, Yijun; Sun, Qiang

    2017-10-25

    Non-human primates would be particularly valuable in life sciences and biomedical research area. Gene-modified monkeys with gene overexpression or loss of function have been successfully generated with the rapid advance in gene manipulation technology such as lentivirus infection and programmable nucleases (ZFN, TALEN, CRISPR-Cas9). Here we review the recent development on gene-modified monkey generation by lentivirus and programmable nucleases. Then we discuss three concerns, the long time for sexual maturation, the off target and the mosaicism of founders, which limit the wide application of gene-modified non-human-primates. At last, hotspots and future trend for gene-modified non-human-primates generation are proposed.

  20. Modifiable Risk factors of Hypertension and Socio‑demographic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    communicable diseases. Keywords: ... Ibekwe: Correlation between modifiable risk factors of hypertension and socio‑demographic profile in Oghara, Delta State. 72. Annals of .... entered into the spread‑sheet of SPSS version 16.0 (Chicago. II, USA) ...

  1. Genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, Rylie M; Alexander, Matthew S

    2018-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is defined as the progressive wasting of skeletal muscles that is caused by inherited or spontaneous genetic mutations. Next-generation sequencing has greatly improved the accuracy and speed of diagnosis for different types of muscular dystrophy. Advancements in depth of coverage, convenience, and overall reduced cost have led to the identification of genetic modifiers that are responsible for phenotypic variability in affected patients. These genetic modifiers have been postulated to explain key differences in disease phenotypes, including age of loss of ambulation, steroid responsiveness, and the presence or absence of cardiac defects in patients with the same form of muscular dystrophy. This review highlights recent findings on genetic modifiers of Duchenne and facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophies based on animal and clinical studies. These genetic modifiers hold great promise to be developed into novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Muscle Nerve 57: 6-15, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Further studies on marine fish stored under modified atmosphere packaging

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cann, D.C; Smith, G.L; Houston, N.C

    1983-01-01

    .... Unfortunately, modified atmosphere packaging of fish products (MAP) has been introduced without the necessary technological support, leading to the use of a wide variety of gas mixes and conflicting reports as to its...

  3. Humoral and cellular immune responses to modified hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Humoral and cellular immune responses to modified hepatitis B plasmid DNA vaccine in mice. Mounir M Salem-Bekhit, Mohamed Osman Gad El Rab, Mahmoud M Tawfick, Mohammad Raish, Mohamed Dahmani Fathallah, Mohsen Bayomi ...

  4. Chemically modified field effect transistors with nitrite or fluoride selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    Polysiloxanes with different types of polar substituents are excellent membrane materials for nitrite and fluoride selective chemically modified field effect transistors (CHEMFETs). Nitrite selectivity has been introduced by incorporation of a cobalt porphyrin into the membrane; fluoride selectivity

  5. Cell surface analysis and adhesion of chemically modified streptococci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, HC; van de Belt-Gritter, B; Doyle, RJ; Busscher, HJ

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, streptococcal cell surfaces are chemically modified, and the effects of the modification on cell surface hydrophobicity and charge, together with adhesion to hexadecane are determined. Acetic and succinic anhydrides, neutralizing or converting ammonium groups into negatively charged

  6. Modified Theories of Gravitation behind the Spacetime Deformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagik Ter-Kazarian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of proposed theory of spacetime deformation/distortion, we have a way to deform the spacetime through a nontrivial choice of the distortion-complex, displaying different connections, which may reveal different post-Riemannian spacetime structures as corollary. We extend this theory to address, in particular, the gauge model of the most general metric-affine gravity carrying both nontrivial torsion and nonmetricity. This model is constructed in the framework of the first order Lagrangian expressed in terms of the gauge potentials and their first derivatives. The equations of the standard theory, which have no propagating modes for torsion, can be equivalently replaced in modified framework by the modified equations, which in the limit of reducing the affine group leads to the modified Einstein-Cartan theory with dynamical torsion and beyond. In testing the modified framework for various particular cases, we use the Lagrange multipliers for extinguishing nonmetricity and torsion.

  7. Variable modified Chaplygin gas in the holographic dark energy scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Debnath, Ujjal

    2012-07-01

    The holographic principle emerged in the context of black-holes, where it was noted that a local quantum field theory can not fully describe the black holes [1]. Some long standing debates regarding the time evolution of a system, where a black hole forms and then evaporates, played the key role in the development of the holographic principle [2,3,4]. The Chaplygin gas is characterized by an exotic equation of state p=-B/ρ. where B is a positive constant. Role of Chaplygin gas in the accelerated universe has been studied by several authors. The above mentioned equation of state has been modified to p=-B/ρ^{α}, where α lies between 0 and 1. This equation has been further modified to p=-A+B/ρ^{α}. This is called the modified Chaplygin gas. Debnath [5] introduced a variable modified Chaplygin gas by considering B as a function of scale factor a. In this work, we have considered that the universe is filled with normal matter and variable modified Chaplygin gas. Also we have considered the interaction between normal matter and variable modified Chaplygin gas in FRW universe. Then we have considered a correspondence between the holographic dark energy density and interacting variable modified Chaplygin gas energy density. Then we have reconstructed the potential of the scalar field which describes the variable modified Chaplygin cosmology References: [1] K. Enqvist, S. Hannested and M. S. Sloth, JCAP 2, 004 (2005). [2] L. Thorlocius, hep-th/0404098. [3] G. T. Hooft, gr-qc/9310026. [4] L. Susskind, J. Math. Phys. 36, 6377 (1995). [5] U. Debnath, Astrophys. Space Sci. 312, 295 (2007).

  8. ASPECTS ON CONSUMERS ATTITUDE TOWARD GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOODS AMONG YOUTH

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandrina, SÎRBU; Carmen-Maria, IORDACHE

    2014-01-01

    Advances in food biotechnology and food science in the early 1990s have opened the gates of new markets for genetically modified foods. A broad dispute over the use of foods derived from genetically modified organisms and other uses of genetic engineering in food production in terms of key scientific researches, their impact on health and eco-systems, food safety and food security, labelling and regulations, traceability is still lasting. Beside the scientifically, technical, ethical and regu...

  9. Modified decomposition method for nonlinear Volterra-Fredholm integral equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bildik, Necdet [Department of Mathematics, Celal Bayar University, 45030 Manisa (Turkey)]. E-mail: necdet.bildik@bayar.edu.tr; Inc, Mustafa [Department of Mathematics, Firat University, 23119 Elazig (Turkey)]. E-mail: minc@firat.edu.tr

    2007-07-15

    In this paper, the nonlinear Volterra-Fredholm integral equations are solved by using the modified decomposition method (MDM). The approximate solution of this equation is calculated in the form of a series with easily computable components. The accuracy of the proposed numerical scheme is examined by comparison with other analytical and numerical results. Two test problems are presented to illustrate the reliability and the performance of the modified decomposition method.

  10. Constraining Relativistic Generalizations of Modified Newtonian Dynamics with Gravitational Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M.; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-07-01

    In the weak-field limit of general relativity, gravitational waves obey linear equations and propagate at the speed of light. These properties of general relativity are supported by the observation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays as well as by LIGO's recent detection of gravitation waves. We argue that two existing relativistic generalizations of modified Newtonian dynamics, namely, the generalized Einstein-aether theory and bimetric modified Newtonian dynamics, display fatal inconsistencies with these observations.

  11. Constraining Relativistic Generalizations of Modified Newtonian Dynamics with Gravitational Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesler, Paul M; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-07-21

    In the weak-field limit of general relativity, gravitational waves obey linear equations and propagate at the speed of light. These properties of general relativity are supported by the observation of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays as well as by LIGO's recent detection of gravitation waves. We argue that two existing relativistic generalizations of modified Newtonian dynamics, namely, the generalized Einstein-aether theory and bimetric modified Newtonian dynamics, display fatal inconsistencies with these observations.

  12. Alcohol selective oxidation over modified foam-silver catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Pestryakov, Alexeij N.; Bogdanchikova, Nina. E.; Knop-Gericke, Axel

    2004-01-01

    Catalysts based on silver supported on foam ceramics and modified by Zr, Ce and La oxides have been studied in the process of partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde. The foam catalysts exhibit high catalytic, mechanical and gas-dynamic properties exceeding the characteristics of conventional crystalline and supported silver samples. Modifying additives of Zr and Ce oxides raise activity and selectivity of the supported foam-silver catalyst as well as its stability during the prolonged ...

  13. Biomechanical Measurement of Rabbit Cornea by a Modified Scheimpflug Device

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Zhang; Jianjun Gu; Xiaoxiao Zhang; Bin Yang; Zheng Wang; Danying Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To explore the probability and variation in biomechanical measurements of rabbit cornea by a modified Scheimpflug device. Methods. A modified Scheimpflug device was developed by imaging anterior segment of the model imitating the intact eye at various posterior pressures. The eight isolated rabbit corneas were mounted on the Barron artificial chamber and images of the anterior segment were taken at posterior pressures of 15, 30, 45, 60, and 75 mmHg by the device. The repeatability an...

  14. A modified function of the formula of double iodometric titration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wu Ming; Chen, J.; Jin, X.

    1997-02-01

    Double iodometric titration is the most useful method to determine oxygen content of high Tc superconductors. Its traditional calculating formula is not accurate enough, and a new calculating formula has just been put forward. To understand which relationship of the traditional formula depends on the new one is an important problem. On studying the new formula, we find a modified function F relating the traditional formula to the new one, and also find that the value of F depends only on molar weight of the superconductor. For Y, Bi, and Hg systems, a group of curves of the modified function are put forward here. Since many results about average copper valence and oxygen content have been published, to correct those results one can modify them by means of the corresponding F. As a sample, we modify two published data of average copper valence and oxygen content of Y and Bi systems. After comparing the unmodified with the modified data, we find that it is necessary to modify the published data for quantitative research.

  15. Introducing Modified Degree 4 Chordal Rings with Two Chord Lengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an analysis of modified degree 4 Chordal Rings with two chord lengths named CHRm is presented and compared to similar topologies: Chordal Rings, N2R and modified N2R. Formulas for approximating diameters and average path lengths are provided and verified, and it is shown that the di......In this paper an analysis of modified degree 4 Chordal Rings with two chord lengths named CHRm is presented and compared to similar topologies: Chordal Rings, N2R and modified N2R. Formulas for approximating diameters and average path lengths are provided and verified, and it is shown...... that the distances in CHRm are significantly smaller than in traditional Chordal Rings and N2R, and also smaller than modified N2R for topologies with up to 1500 nodes. Despite the proposed CHRm being of degree 4, and the modified N2R of degree 3, CHRm may be better suited for the optical level of fiber rings, due...

  16. Effects of Modifier Type on Properties of in Situ Organo-Montmorillonite Modified Wood Flour/Poly(lactic acid) Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ru; Chen, Yu; Cao, Jinzhen

    2016-01-13

    Wood flour (WF) was modified with sodium-montmorillonite (Na-MMT) and two types of surfactant modifiers, namely, didecyl dimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) though a two-step process inside WF. The thus-modified WFs were characterized, and the effects of MMT type on physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of their composites with poly(lactic acid) (PLA) were investigated. The results showed: (1) either DDAC or SDS could modified Na-MMT into OMMT, and then uniformly distributed in WF cell walls; (2) OMMT improved the physical properties, most mechanical properties, and thermal properties of the composites except for the impact strength; and (3) compared with SDS, DDAC seemed to perform better in properties of composites. However, DDAC showed some negative effect on the early stage of composite thermal decomposition.

  17. Role of organically modified layered silicate both as an active interfacial modifier and nanofiller for immiscible polymer blends.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ray, SS

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available ) revealed efficient mixing of the polymers in the presence of organically modified layered silicate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) observations showed that silicate layers were either intercalated or exfoliated...

  18. Comparison of the Amount of Fluoride Release from Nanofilled Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Conventional and Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumitha Upadhyay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate and compare the amount of fluoride release of conventional, resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cements.Materials and Methods: Tablets of glass-ionomer cements were immersed in deionized water and incubated at 37◦C. After 1, 2, 7, 15 and 30 days, fluoride ion was measured under normal atmospheric conditions by fluoride ion selective electrode. Buffer (TISAB II was used to decomplex the fluoride ion and to provide a constant background ionic strength and to maintain the pH of water between 5.0 and 5.5 as the fluoride electrode is sensitive to changes in pH. Statistical evaluation was carried out by one way ANOVA (Analysis of Variance using SPSS 11.0. The significance level was set at p< 0.05.Results: The release of fluoride was highest on day 1 and there was a sudden fall on day 2 in all three groups. Initially fluoride release from conven-tional glass-ionomer cement was highest compared to the other two glass-ionomer cements, but the amount drastically reduced over the period. Although the amount of fluoride release was less than both the resin modified and nanofilled resin modified glass-ionomer cement, the release was sustained consistently for 30 daysConclusion: The cumulative fluoride release of nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement was very less compared to the conventional and resin modified glass ionomer cements and Nanofilled resin modified glass ionomer cement released less but steady fluoride as compared to other resin modified glass ionomer cements.

  19. Position of modifying groups on starch chains of octenylsuccinic anhydride-modified waxy maize starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanjie; Kaufman, Rhett C; Wilson, Jeff D; Shi, Yong-Cheng

    2014-06-15

    Octenylsuccinic anhydride (OSA)-modified starches with a low (0.018) and high (0.092) degree of substitution (DS) were prepared from granular native waxy maize starch in aqueous slurry. The position of OS substituents along the starch chains was investigated by enzyme hydrolysis followed by chromatographic analysis. Native starch and two OS starches with a low and high DS had β-limit values of 55.9%, 52.8%, and 34.4%, respectively. The weight-average molecular weight of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a low DS was close to that of the β-limit dextrin from native starch but lower than that of the β-limit dextrin from the OS starch with a high DS. Debranching of OS starches was incomplete compared with native starch. OS groups in the OS starch with a low DS were located on the repeat units near the branching points, whereas the OS substituents in the OS starch with a high DS occurred both near the branching points and the non-reducing ends. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Allelopathic effect of methanolic extracts of genetically modified and non-genetically modified canola on soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Kashmala; Shinwari, Zabta Khan

    2016-03-01

    This study on the effect of genetically modified (GM) and non-GM canola on soybean was carried out for physiological and biochemical biosafety assessment of GM canola. Methanolic extracts of GM and non-GM canola were assessed on seed germination and growth of soybean (Glycine max L.) under sterilized conditions. The extracts applied were of 3, 5, and 10% concentrations. The results showed that methanolic extracts of both GM and non-GM canola improved the germination percentage. However, germination rate index was significantly decreased with concomitant increase in mean germination time of soybean. A significant rate of decrease was observed in root fresh weight while increase in shoot length took place; when treatment of GM canola extracts were applied, however, no effect was observed in shoot fresh weight. A significant increase in protein contents, as well as phenolic, carotenoids, proline, and chlorophyll a content, was observed when different GM canola treatments (3, 5, and 10%) were applied to soybean; however, a significant rate of reduction in chlorophyll b content was observed by the application of GM canola treatment. Similar results were observed for superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, and catalase activities. A significant increase in the sugar content levels was observed when GM canola treatments (3, 5, and 10%) were applied to soybean. © The Author(s) 2013.