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Sample records for pseudomonas putida ou83

  1. Final screening assessment for Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 31483, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 31800, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 700369

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    "Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on four strains of Pseudomonas putida...

  2. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas putida WLY for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The azoreductase produced by P. putida WLY was extracellular and induced according to electrophoresis experiments and decolorization tests. After purification by ion exchange and gel chromatography, its molecular weight was estimated to be 28,000 Da by SDS-PAGE. Key words: Pseudomonas putida; reactive brilliant ...

  3. Benzoate transport in Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Alpa; Purohit, Hemant; Phale, Prashant S

    2017-07-03

    Pseudomonas putida strain CSV86 metabolizes variety of aromatic compounds as the sole carbon source. Genome analysis revealed the presence of genes encoding putative transporters for benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenylacetate, p-hydroxyphenylacetate and vanillate. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that benzoate transport and metabolism genes are clustered at the ben locus as benK-catA-benE-benF. Protein topology prediction suggests that BenK (aromatic acid-H+ symporter of major facilitator superfamily) has 12 transmembrane α-helices with the conserved motif LADRXGRKX in loop 2, while BenE (benzoate-H+ symporter protein) has 11 predicted transmembrane α-helices. benF and catA encode benzoate specific porin, OprD and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively. Biochemical studies suggest that benzoate was transported by an inducible and active process. Inhibition (90%-100%) in the presence of dinitrophenol suggests that the energy for the transport process is derived from the proton motive force. The maximum rate of benzoate transport was 484 pmole min-1 mg-1 cells with an affinity constant, Kmof 4.5 μM. Transcriptional analysis of the benzoate and glucose-grown cells showed inducible expression of benF, benK and benE, suggesting that besides outer membrane porin, both inner membrane transporters probably contribute for the benzoate transport in P. putida strain CSV86. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Biological production of monoethanolamine by engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foti, M.J.; Médici, R.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered for the production of monoethanolamine (MEA) from glucose via the decarboxylation of the central metabolite l-serine, which is catalyzed by the enzyme l-serine decarboxylase (SDC).The host was first evaluated for its tolerance towards MEA as well as its

  5. The Transcriptional Landscape of the Production Organism Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta

    Bacterial cell factories represent a valid alternative to fossil fuel-based production. A promising bacterium that can be optimized as cell factory is Pseudomonas putida. However, its development in bioproduction applications poses some challenges including a clear understanding of the bacterial ...

  6. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed

  7. TSCA Experimental Release Application Approved for Pseudomonas putida Strains (fact sheet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1998, EPA approved the TERAs R98-0004/5 submitted by the National Explosives Waste Technology & Evaluation Center (NEWTEC) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for field trials of two modified strains of Pseudomonas putida (P.putida).

  8. The sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cases, I.; Ussery, David; de Lorenzo, V.

    2003-01-01

    , the sigma(54) regulon has been studied both in Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and several species of the Rhizobiaceae. Here we present the analysis of the sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) in the complete genome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We have developed an improved method for the prediction......% of the sigma(54)-dependent promoters of P. putida with high confidence. Our analysis has revealed new functions for sigma(54) and, by means of comparative analysis with the previous studies, we have drawn a potential mechanism for the evolution of this regulatory system....

  9. Small Rna Regulatory Networks In Pseudomonas Putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojanovic, Klara; Long, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    chemicals and has a potential to be used as an efficient cell factory for various products. P. putida KT2240 is a genome-sequenced strain and a well characterized pseudomonad. Our major aim is to identify small RNA molecules (sRNAs) and their regulatory networks. A previous study has identified 37 sRNAs...... in this strain, while in other pseudomonads many more sRNAs have been found so far.P. putida KT2440 has been grown in different conditions which are likely to be encountered in industrial fermentations with the aim of using sRNAs for generation of improved cell factories. For that, cells have been grown in LB...... and harvested in different growth phases, as well as osmotic, membrane and oxidative stress conditions. RNA sequencing data has been analysed with the open source software system Rockhopper, and it has revealed over 180 putative sRNAs. Most of them (86%) seem to be novel and uncharacterized. The majority...

  10. Efficient recombinant production of prodigiosin in Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eDomröse

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens and several other bacteria produce the red-colored pigment prodigiosin which possesses bioactivities as an antimicrobial, anticancer and immunosuppressive agent. Therefore, there is a great interest to produce this natural compound. Efforts aiming at its biotechnological production have so far largely focused on the original producer and opportunistic human pathogen S. marcescens. Here, we demonstrate efficient prodigiosin production in the heterologous host Pseudomonas putida. Random chromosomal integration of the 21 kb prodigiosin biosynthesis gene cluster of S. marcescens in P. putida KT2440 was employed to construct constitutive prodigiosin production strains. Standard cultivation parameters were optimized such that titers of 94 mg/L culture were obtained upon growth of P. putida at 20 °C using rich medium under high aeration conditions. Subsequently, a novel, fast and effective protocol for prodigiosin extraction and purification was established enabling the straightforward isolation of prodigiosin from P. putida growth medium. In summary, we describe here a highly efficient method for the heterologous biosynthetic production of prodigiosin which may serve as a basis to produce large amounts of this bioactive natural compound and may provide a platform for further in-depth studies of prodiginine biosynthesis.

  11. De novo production of the monoterpenoid geranic acid by metabolically engineered Pseudomonas putida

    OpenAIRE

    Mi, Jia; Becher, Daniela; Lubuta, Patrice; Dany, Sarah; Tusch, Kerstin; Schewe, Hendrik; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Production of monoterpenoids as valuable chemicals using recombinant microbes is a growing field of interest. Unfortunately, antimicrobial activity of most monoterpenoids hampers a wide application of microorganisms for their production. Strains of Pseudomonas putida, a fast growing and metabolically versatile bacterium, often show an outstanding high tolerance towards organic solvents and other toxic compounds. Therefore, Pseudomonas putida constitutes an attractive alternative ho...

  12. [Mechanism of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by an association of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, N V; Kondrat'eva, T F; Krasil'nikova, E N; Karavaĭko, G I

    2006-01-01

    The intermediate and terminal products of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by individual strains of the genus Pseudomonas, P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18, and by their association were analyzed. The activity of the enzymes of nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in these strains was compared with that of the collection strains P. putida VKM B-2187T and P. stutzeri VKM B-975T. Upon the introduction of CN- and SCN- into cell suspensions of strains 18 and 21 in phosphate buffer (pH 8.8), the production of NH4+ was observed. Due to the high rate of their utilization, NH3, NH4+, and CNO- were absent from the culture liquids of P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18 grown with CN- or SCN-. Both Pseudomonas strains decomposed SCN- via cyanate production. The cyanase activity was 0.75 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. putida strain 21 and 1.26 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. stutzeri strain 18. The cyanase activity was present in the cells grown with SCN- but absent in cells grown with NH4+. Strain 21 of P. putida was a more active CN- decomposer than strain 18 of P. stutzeri. Ammonium and CO2 were the terminal nitrogen and carbon products of CN- and SCN- decomposition. The terminal sulfur products of SCN- decomposition by P. stutzeri strain 18 and P. putida strain 21 were thiosulfate and tetrathionate, respectively. The strains utilized the toxic compounds in the anabolism only, as sources of nitrogen (CN- and SCN-) and sulfur (SCN-). The pathway of thiocyanate decomposition by the association of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas is proposed based on the results obtained.

  13. Microbial production of polyhydroxyalkanoate block copolymer by recombinant Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shi Yan; Dong, Cui Ling; Wang, Shen Yu; Ye, Hai Mu; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2011-04-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) synthesis genes phaPCJ(Ac) cloned from Aeromonas caviae were transformed into Pseudomonas putida KTOY06ΔC, a mutant of P. putida KT2442, resulting in the ability of the recombinant P. putida KTOY06ΔC (phaPCJ(A.c)) to produce a short-chain-length and medium-chain-length PHA block copolymer consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) as one block and random copolymer of 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) and 3-hydroxyheptanoate (3HHp) as another block. The novel block polymer was studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), nuclear magnetic resonance, and rheology measurements. DSC studies showed the polymer to possess two glass transition temperatures (T(g)), one melting temperature (T(m)) and one cool crystallization temperature (T(c)). Rheology studies clearly indicated a polymer chain re-arrangement in the copolymer; these studies confirmed the polymer to be a block copolymer, with over 70 mol% homopolymer (PHB) of 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) as one block and around 30 mol% random copolymers of 3HV and 3HHp as the second block. The block copolymer was shown to have the highest tensile strength and Young's modulus compared with a random copolymer with similar ratio and a blend of homopolymers PHB and PHVHHp with similar ratio. Compared with other commercially available PHA including PHB, PHBV, PHBHHx, and P3HB4HB, the short-chain- and medium-chain-length block copolymer PHB-b-PHVHHp showed differences in terms of mechanical properties and should draw more attentions from the PHA research community. © Springer-Verlag 2010

  14. Chemostat-based proteomic analysis of toluene-affected Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Jong, A.L. de; Hulst, A.G.; Baar, B.L.M. van; Bont, J.A.M. de; Wery, J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cellular response of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 to toluene as the single effector. Proteomic analysis (two-dimensional difference-in-gel-electrophoresis) was used to assess the response of P. putida S12 cultured in chemostats. This approach

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of the Model Naphthalene-Utilizing Organism Pseudomonas putida OUS82

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tay, Martin; Roizman, Dan; Cohen, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida OUS82 was isolated from petrol- and oil-contaminated soil in 1992, and ever since, it has been used as a model organism to study the microbial assimilation of naphthalene and phenanthrene. Here, we report the 6.7-Mb draft genome sequence of P. putida OUS82 and analyze its...

  16. Nosocomial Pseudomonas putida Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef; AbuKamar, Mohammed; Anand, Deshmukh

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of Pseudomonas putida meningitis in a 26-year-old Nepalese man who was admitted to Hamad General Hospital with epidermoid cyst for drainage. Ommaya reservoir was placed into the cyst for drainage and externalventricular drainage (EVD) was performed. After four days, the patient was transferred to the ward in stable condition. His weakness resolved partially and headache severity decreased. After three days, the patient developed fever and headache severity increased with deterioration of consciousness level. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through EVD showed 2 200 leucocytes/µL, protein level of 295 mg/dL, and glucose level of < 1.8 mg/dL. Meropenem was started on the patient. Aspirate from Ommaya reservoir and CSF showed gram-negative rods and cultures yielded P. putida sensitive to cefepime, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin, but resistant to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. EVD was replaced and the patient received cefepime and ciprofloxacin for 21 days after which he improved and was discharged with right sided residual weakness.

  17. Nosocomial Pseudomonas putida Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Pseudomonas putida meningitis in a 26-year-old Nepalese man who was admitted to Hamad General Hospital with epidermoid cyst for drainage. Ommaya reservoir was placed into the cyst for drainage and externalventricular drainage (EVD was performed. After four days, the patient was transferred to the ward in stable condition. His weakness resolved partially and headache severity decreased. After three days, the patient developed fever and headache severity increased with deterioration of consciousness level. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF through EVD showed 2 200 leucocytes/µL, protein level of 295 mg/dL, and glucose level of < 1.8 mg/dL. Meropenem was started on the patient. Aspirate from Ommaya reservoir and CSF showed gram-negative rods and cultures yielded P. putida sensitive to cefepime, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin, but resistant to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. EVD was replaced and the patient received cefepime and ciprofloxacin for 21 days after which he improved and was discharged with right sided residual weakness.

  18. Transcriptome Dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 under Water Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülez, Gamze; Dechesne, Arnaud; Workman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    into water forming thin liquid films in the soil pores. Little is known of how bacteria respond to such conditions, where, in addition to facing water deprivation that might impair their metabolism, they have to adapt their dispersal strategy as swimming motility may be compromised. Using the pressurized...... porous surface model (PPSM), which allows creation of thin liquid films by controlling Ψm, we examined the transcriptome dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We identified the differentially expressed genes in cells exposed to a mild matric stress (–0.4 MPa) for 4, 24, or 72 h. The major response...... 8000), a nonpermeating solute often used to simulate Ψm, on the gene expression profile and detected a different profile than that observed by directly imposing Ψm. This study is the first transcriptome profiling of KT2440 under directly controlled Ψm and also the first to show the difference in gene...

  19. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    .... Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days...

  20. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, M.; Tran, H.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially

  1. Regulation of the biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptides from Pseudomonas putida PCL1445

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubern, Jean-Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain PCL1445 produces two cyclic lipopeptides, named putisolvins I and II, which represent a Novel class of biosurfactants. Putisolvins reduce the surface tension between liquid and air, and disrupt already existing biofilms of several Pseudomonas sp., including those of the

  2. Pseudomonas putida CSV86: A Candidate Genome for Genetic Bioaugmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Vasundhara; Raju, Sajan C.; Modak, Arnab; Phale, Prashant S.; Purohit, Hemant J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86, a plasmid-free strain possessing capability to transfer the naphthalene degradation property, has been explored for its metabolic diversity through genome sequencing. The analysis of draft genome sequence of CSV86 (6.4 Mb) revealed the presence of genes involved in the degradation of naphthalene, salicylate, benzoate, benzylalcohol, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate on the chromosome thus ensuring the stability of the catabolic potential. Moreover, genes involved in the metabolism of phenylpropanoid and homogentisate, as well as heavy metal resistance, were additionally identified. Ability to grow on vanillin, veratraldehyde and ferulic acid, detection of inducible homogentisate dioxygenase and growth on aromatic compounds in the presence of heavy metals like copper, cadmium, cobalt and arsenic confirm in silico observations reflecting the metabolic versatility. In silico analysis revealed the arrangement of genes in the order: tRNAGly, integrase followed by nah operon, supporting earlier hypothesis of existence of a genomic island (GI) for naphthalene degradation. Deciphering the genomic architecture of CSV86 for aromatic degradation pathways and identification of elements responsible for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) suggests that genetic bioaugmentation strategies could be planned using CSV86 for effective bioremediation. PMID:24475028

  3. Pseudomonas putida CSV86: a candidate genome for genetic bioaugmentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhara Paliwal

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida CSV86, a plasmid-free strain possessing capability to transfer the naphthalene degradation property, has been explored for its metabolic diversity through genome sequencing. The analysis of draft genome sequence of CSV86 (6.4 Mb revealed the presence of genes involved in the degradation of naphthalene, salicylate, benzoate, benzylalcohol, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate on the chromosome thus ensuring the stability of the catabolic potential. Moreover, genes involved in the metabolism of phenylpropanoid and homogentisate, as well as heavy metal resistance, were additionally identified. Ability to grow on vanillin, veratraldehyde and ferulic acid, detection of inducible homogentisate dioxygenase and growth on aromatic compounds in the presence of heavy metals like copper, cadmium, cobalt and arsenic confirm in silico observations reflecting the metabolic versatility. In silico analysis revealed the arrangement of genes in the order: tRNA(Gly, integrase followed by nah operon, supporting earlier hypothesis of existence of a genomic island (GI for naphthalene degradation. Deciphering the genomic architecture of CSV86 for aromatic degradation pathways and identification of elements responsible for horizontal gene transfer (HGT suggests that genetic bioaugmentation strategies could be planned using CSV86 for effective bioremediation.

  4. Genome-wide identification of tolerance mechanisms towards p-coumaric acid in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calero, Patricia; Jensen, Sheila I.; Bojanovič, Klara

    2017-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 has gained increasing biotechnological interest due to its ability to tolerate different types of stress. Here, the tolerance of P. putida KT2440 towards eleven toxic chemical compounds was investigated. P. putida was found to be significantly more...... tolerant towards three of the eleven compounds when compared to Escherichia coli. Increased tolerance was for example found towards p-coumaric acid, an interesting precursor for polymerization with a significant industrial relevance. The tolerance mechanism was therefore investigated using the genome....... This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  5. Investigation Of The Primary Transcriptome Of The Production Organism Pseudomonas Putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta; Bojanovic, Klara; Long, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pseudomonas putida is a nonpathogenic, Gram-negative bacterium and an excellent model organism for biotechnological applications. Due to its metabolic versatility, P. putida can grow in different environments including in extreme conditions. It has several genes to degrade xenobiotic...... compounds, a capability that renders the bacterium useful in bioremediation. Finally, P. putida shows a high potential as a cell factory for the production of several compounds. Methods: Here, a differential RNA-sequencing approach (dRNA-seq) is used to gain new insights into the organization of the P...

  6. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms: genetic elements and molecular mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, M.; Nilsson, M.; Yang, Liang

    2010-01-01

    P>Pseudomonas putida OUS82 biofilm dispersal was previously shown to be dependent on the gene PP0164 (here designated lapG). Sequence and structural analysis has suggested that the LapG geneproduct belongs to a family of cysteine proteinases that function in the modification of bacterial surface...... wild-type biofilm but did not disperse P. putida lapG biofilm, indicating that LapG exerts its activity on LapA in response to a decrease in the intracellular c-di-GMP level. In addition, evidence is provided that associated to LapA a cellulase-degradable exopolysaccharide is part of the P. putida...

  7. De novo production of the monoterpenoid geranic acid by metabolically engineered Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Jia; Becher, Daniela; Lubuta, Patrice; Dany, Sarah; Tusch, Kerstin; Schewe, Hendrik; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2014-12-04

    Production of monoterpenoids as valuable chemicals using recombinant microbes is a growing field of interest. Unfortunately, antimicrobial activity of most monoterpenoids hampers a wide application of microorganisms for their production. Strains of Pseudomonas putida, a fast growing and metabolically versatile bacterium, often show an outstanding high tolerance towards organic solvents and other toxic compounds. Therefore, Pseudomonas putida constitutes an attractive alternative host in comparison to conventionally used microorganisms. Here, metabolic engineering of solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida as a novel microbial cell factory for de novo production of monoterpenoids is reported for the first time, exemplified by geranic acid production from glycerol as carbon source. The monoterpenoic acid is an attractive compound for application in the flavor, fragrance, cosmetics and agro industries. A comparison between Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas putida concerning the ability to grow in the presence of geranic acid revealed that the pseudomonad bears a superior resilience compared to the conventionally used microbes. Moreover, Pseudomonas putida DSM 12264 wildtype strain efficiently oxidized externally added geraniol to geranic acid with no further degradation. Omitting external dosage of geraniol but functionally expressing geraniol synthase (GES) from Ocimum basilicum, a first proof-of-concept for de novo biosynthesis of 1.35 mg/L geranic acid in P. putida DSM 12264 was achieved. Doubling the amount of glycerol resulted in twice the amount of product. Co-expression of the six genes of the mevalonate pathway from Myxococcus xanthus to establish flux from acetyl-CoA to the universal terpenoid precursor isopentenylpyrophosphate yielded 36 mg/L geranic acid in shake flask experiments. In the bioreactor, the recombinant strain produced 193 mg/L of geranic acid under fed-batch conditions within 48 h. Metabolic engineering turned Pseudomonas

  8. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Microbial biofilm formation often causes problems in medical and industrial settings, and knowledge about the factors that are involved in biofilm development and dispersion is useful for creating strategies to control the processes. In this report, we present evidence that proteins with GGDEF...... and EAL domains are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas putida. Overexpression in P. putida of the Escherichia coli YedQ protein, which contains a GGDEF domain, resulted in increased biofilm formation. Overexpression in P. putida of the E. coli Yhj......H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  9. Characterization of cell lysis in Pseudomonas putida induced upon expression of heterologous killing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronchel, M.C.; Molina, L.; Witte, A.

    1998-01-01

    upon the induction of expression of two different heterologous killing genes in nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida KT2440 derivatives have been analyzed, P. putida CMC4 and CMC12 carry in their chromosomes a fusion of the PAl-04/03 promoter to the Escherichia coli gef gene and the phi X174 lysis gene E......Active biological containment systems are based on the controlled expression of killing genes. These systems are of interest for the Pseudomonadaceae because of the potential applications of these microbes as bioremediation agents and biopesticides, The physiological effects that lead to cell death......, respectively. Expression of the killing genes is controlled by the LacI protein, whose expression is initiated from the XylS-dependent Pm promoter. Under induced conditions, killing of P. putida CMC12 cells mediated by phi X174 lysis protein E was faster than that observed for P. putida CMC4, for which the Gef...

  10. Marine Pseudomonas putida: a potential source of antimicrobial substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palloma Rodrigues Marinho

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria isolated from marine sponges found off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were screened for the production of antimicrobial substances. We report a new Pseudomonas putida strain (designated P. putida Mm3 isolated from the sponge Mycale microsigmatosa that produces a powerful antimicrobial substance active against multidrug-resistant bacteria. P. putida Mm3 was identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic tests. Molecular typing for Mm3 was performed by RAPD-PCR and comparison of the results to other Pseudomonas strains. Our results contribute to the search for new antimicrobial agents, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  11. Pseudomonas putida as a microbial cell factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth

    expression of the rhlAB operon from Pseudomonas aeruginosa using a synthetic promoter library in P. putida. Since rhamnolipid production is associated with difficulties in conventional bioreactors we have used biofilm encased P. putida to circumvent these problems. We show that biofilm can be used...... of biofilm as a production platform and the usage of glycerol as a feedstock show the potential of using microbial cell factories in the transition toward sustainable production of chemicals. Particularly, the applicability of biofilm as a production platform can emerge as a promising alternative...... for sustainable production of chemicals, which can be achieved by microbial cell factories. The work presented in this PhD thesis elucidates the application of Pseudomonas putida as a microbial cell factory for production of the biosurfactant rhamnolipid. The rhamnolipid production was achieved by heterologous...

  12. Marine Pseudomonas putida: a potential source of antimicrobial substances against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Palloma Rodrigues; Moreira, Ana Paula Barbosa; Pellegrino, Flávia Lúcia Piffano Costa; Muricy, Guilherme; Bastos, Maria do Carmo de Freire; Santos, Kátia Regina Netto dos; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; Laport, Marinella Silva

    2009-08-01

    Bacteria isolated from marine sponges found off the coast of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were screened for the production of antimicrobial substances. We report a new Pseudomonas putida strain (designated P. putida Mm3) isolated from the sponge Mycale microsigmatosa that produces a powerful antimicrobial substance active against multidrug-resistant bacteria. P. putida Mm3 was identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic tests. Molecular typing for Mm3 was performed by RAPD-PCR and comparison of the results to other Pseudomonas strains. Our results contribute to the search for new antimicrobial agents, an important strategy for developing alternative therapies to treat infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  13. Active efflux systems in the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented in this thesis was to study the molecular mechanisms of organic solvent tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12. This bacterium is capable of growth at saturated solvent concentrations, which are lethal to normal bacteria. Organic

  14. Propane and n-Butane Oxidation by Pseudomonas putida GPo1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erika L.; Hyman, Michael R.

    2006-01-01

    Propane and n-butane inhibit methyl tertiary butyl ether oxidation by n-alkane-grown Pseudomonas putida GPo1. Here we demonstrate that these gases are oxidized by this strain and support cell growth. Both gases induced alkane hydroxylase activity and appear to be oxidized by the same enzyme system used for the oxidation of n-octane. PMID:16391142

  15. Redundancy in putrescine catabolism in solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandounas, L.; Ballerstedt, H.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is a promising platform organism for the biological production of substituted aromatic compounds due to its extreme tolerance towards toxic chemicals. Solvent or aromatic stress tolerance may be due to membrane modifications and efflux pumps; however in general, polyamines

  16. C1 compounds as auxiliary substrate for engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.W.; Winde, J.H. de; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to efficiently utilize the C1 compounds methanol and formaldehyde as auxiliary substrate. The hps and phi genes of Bacillus brevis, encoding two key steps of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, were introduced to construct a

  17. Using "Pseudomonas Putida xylE" Gene to Teach Molecular Cloning Techniques for Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xu; Xin, Yi; Ye, Li; Ma, Yufang

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a serial experiment in molecular cloning laboratory course for undergraduate students majored in biotechnology. "Pseudomonas putida xylE" gene, encoding catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase, was manipulated to learn molecular biology techniques. The integration of cloning, expression, and enzyme assay gave students…

  18. In vitro evolution of styrene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida CA-3 for improved epoxide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gursky, Lucas J.; Nikodinovic-Runic, Jasmina; Feenstra, K Anton; O'Connor, Kevin E.

    2010-01-01

    The styAB genes from Pseudomonas putida CA-3, which encode styrene monooxygenase, were subjected to three rounds of in vitro evolution using error-prone polymerase chain reaction with a view to improving the rate of styrene oxide and indene oxide formation. Improvements in styrene monooxygenase

  19. Complete Genome of the Plant Growth-Promoting Rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matilla, M.A.; van der Lelie, D.; Pizarro-Tobias, P.; Roca, A.; Fernandez, M.; Duque, E.; Molina, L.; Wu, X.; Gomez, M. J.; Segura, A.; Ramos, J.-L.

    2011-03-01

    We report the complete sequence of the 5.7-Mbp genome of Pseudomonas putida BIRD-1, a metabolically versatile plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium that is highly tolerant to desiccation and capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and iron and of synthesizing phytohormones that stimulate seed germination and plant growth.

  20. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas Putida, Lysinibacillus Sphaericus and Bacillus Subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Márcia Aiko; Cincotto, Maria Alba; Atencio, Daniel; Gaylarde, Christine C; John, Vanderley M

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of calcium carbonate bioprecipitation by Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida, obtained from the Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saúde (INCQS), as a first step in determining their potential to protect building materials against water uptake. Two culture media were studied: modified B4 containing calcium acetate and 295 with calcium chloride. Calcium consumption in the two media after incubation with and without the bacterial inoculum was determined by atomic absorption analysis. Modified B4 gave the best results and in this medium Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 produced the highest calcium carbonate precipitation, followed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus INQCS 414; the lowest precipitation was produced by Bacillus subtilis INQCS 328. In this culture medium XRD analysis showed that Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis precipitated calcite and vaterite polymorphs while Lysinibacillus sphaericus produced only vaterite. The shape and size of the crystals were affected by culture medium, bacterial strain and culture conditions, static or shaken. In conclusion, of the three strains Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 in modified B4 medium gave the best results precipitating 96% of the calcium, this strain thus has good potential for use on building materials.

  1. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas Putida, Lysinibacillus Sphaericus and Bacillus Subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Aiko Shirakawa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the efficiency of calcium carbonate bioprecipitation by Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida, obtained from the Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Nacional de Controle de Qualidade em Saúde (INCQS, as a first step in determining their potential to protect building materials against water uptake. Two culture media were studied: modified B4 containing calcium acetate and 295 with calcium chloride. Calcium consumption in the two media after incubation with and without the bacterial inoculum was determined by atomic absorption analysis. Modified B4 gave the best results and in this medium Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 produced the highest calcium carbonate precipitation, followed by Lysinibacillus sphaericus INQCS 414; the lowest precipitation was produced by Bacillus subtilis INQCS 328. In this culture medium XRD analysis showed that Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis precipitated calcite and vaterite polymorphs while Lysinibacillus sphaericus produced only vaterite. The shape and size of the crystals were affected by culture medium, bacterial strain and culture conditions, static or shaken. In conclusion, of the three strains Pseudomonas putida INQCS 113 in modified B4 medium gave the best results precipitating 96% of the calcium, this strain thus has good potential for use on building materials.

  2. Ni 2-uptake in Pseudomonas putida strain S4: a possible role of Mg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Essential metal ion homeostasis is based on regulated uptake of metal ions, both during its scarcity and abundance. Pseudomonas putida strain S4, a multimetal resistant bacterium, was employed to investigate Ni2+ entry into cells. It was observed that Mg2+ regulates the entry of Ni2+ and by this plays a protective role to ...

  3. Benzene, toluene and xylene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida CCMI 852 Biodegradação de benzeno, tolueno e xileno pela Pseudomonas putida CCMI 852

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Henrique Otenio

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available A minimal liquid medium containing benzene (B, toluene (T and xylene (X and mixtures thereof, was used to evaluate degradation activity of Pseudomonas putida CCMI 852 containing a TOL plasmid. Experiments were developed with B, T and X (100 mg L-1, with mixtures of BT, BX, and TX (50 + 50 mg L-1 each and BTX (33.3 + 33.3 + 33.3 mg L-1 each, added to 500 mL of medium. After 18 to 24 hours, the inoculum was added and solvent disappearance was determined after 24 to 25 hours by GC. Results showed that P. putida CCMI 852 was able to metabolize T and X, but B was not metabolized. In a BTX mixture, B was not metabolized and T and X degradation rate decreased 50%.Meio mineral líquido contendo benzeno (B ou tolueno (T ou xileno (X a 100 mg L-1 e suas misturas de BT, BX e TX (50 + 50 mg L-1 cada mistura e BTX (33,3 + 33,3 + 33,3 mg L-1 cada mistura foram utilizados para avaliar a atividade de degradação de B, T e X por Pseudomonas putida CCMI 852 contendo um plasmídeo TOL. Após 18 a 24 horas de homogenização da mistura, o inoculo foi adicionado e o decréscimo da concentração dos solventes foi determinado entre 24 e 25 horas por GC. Pseudomonas putida CCMI 852 foi capaz de metabolizar T e X, mas não B. Na mistura BTX, B não foi metabolizado também e a velocidade de degradação de T e X decresceu cerca de 50% comparado com soluções contendo apenas T ou X.

  4. DETECTION OF PHENOL DEGRADING BACTERIA AND PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Movahedyan ، H. Khorsandi ، R. Salehi ، M. Nikaeen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenol is one of the organic pollutants in various industrial wastewaters especially petrochemical and oil refining. Biological treatment is one of the considerable choices for removing of phenol present in these wastewaters. Identification of effective microbial species is considered as one of the important priorities for production of the biomass in order to achieve desirable kinetic of biological reactions. Basic purpose of this research is identification of phenol-degrading Pseudomonas Putida in activated sludge by polymerase chain reaction (PCR that has high speed and specificity. In this research, 10 various colonies of phenol-degrading bacteria were isolated from municipal activated sludge and the rate of phenol removal and growth rate of these bacteria were assessed in different concentrations of phenol (200 – 900 mg/L. Confirmation of the largest subunit of multicomponent phenol hydroxylase (LmPH gene and gene coding the N fragment in Pseudomonas Putida-derived methyl phenol operon (DmpN gene through PCR were used for general identification of phenol-degrading bacteria and Pseudomonas Putida, respectively. Presence of a 600 bp (base pairs bond in all of isolated strains indicated that they contain phenol hydroxylase gene. 6 of 10 isolated bacteria were Pseudomonas Putida because they produced a 199 bp PCR product by DmpN primers. According to PCR results in this study, the best phenol-degrading bacteria that can utilize 500 – 600 mg/L phenol completely after 48 hours incubation, belong to Pseudomonas Putida strains. It is clear that use of isolated bacteria can lead to considerable decrease of treatment time as well as promotion of phenol removal rate.

  5. Manganese (Mn oxidation increases intracellular Mn in Pseudomonas putida GB-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Banh

    Full Text Available Bacterial manganese (Mn oxidation plays an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of Mn and other compounds, and the diversity and prevalence of Mn oxidizers have been well established. Despite many hypotheses of why these bacteria may oxidize Mn, the physiological reasons remain elusive. Intracellular Mn levels were determined for Pseudomonas putida GB-1 grown in the presence or absence of Mn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Mn oxidizing wild type P. putida GB-1 had higher intracellular Mn than non Mn oxidizing mutants grown under the same conditions. P. putida GB-1 had a 5 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to the non Mn oxidizing mutant P. putida GB-1-007 and a 59 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to P. putida GB-1 ∆2665 ∆2447. The intracellular Mn is primarily associated with the less than 3 kDa fraction, suggesting it is not bound to protein. Protein oxidation levels in Mn oxidizing and non oxidizing cultures were relatively similar, yet Mn oxidation did increase survival of P. putida GB-1 when oxidatively stressed. This study is the first to link Mn oxidation to Mn homeostasis and oxidative stress protection.

  6. Engineering mediator-based electroactivity in the obligate aerobic bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eSchmitz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida strains are being developed as microbial production hosts for production of a range of amphiphilic and hydrophobic biochemicals. P. putida’s obligate aerobic growth thereby can be an economical and technical challenge because it requires constant rigorous aeration and often causes reactor foaming. Here, we engineered a strain of P. putida KT2440 that can produce phenazine redox-mediators from Pseudomonas aeruginosa to allow partial redox balancing with an electrode under oxygen-limited conditions. P. aeruginosa is known to employ its phenazine-type redox mediators for electron exchange with an anode in bioelectrochemical systems. We transferred the seven core phenazine biosynthesis genes phzA-G and the two specific genes phzM and phzS required for pyocyanin synthesis from P. aeruginosa on two inducible plasmids into P. putida KT2440. The best clone, P. putida pPhz, produced 45 mg/ L pyocyanin over 25 h of growth, which was visible as blue color formation and is comparable to the pyocyanin production of P. aeruginosa. This new strain was then characterized under different oxygen-limited conditions with electrochemical redox control and changes in central energy metabolism were evaluated in comparison to the unmodified P. putida KT2440. In the new strain, phenazine synthesis with supernatant concentrations up to 33 µg/ mL correlated linearly with the ability to discharge electrons to an anode, whereby phenazine-1-carboxylic acid served as the dominating redox mediator. P. putida pPhz sustained strongly oxygen-limited metabolism for up to 2 weeks at up to 12 µA/ cm² anodic current density. Together, this work lays a foundation for future oxygen-limited biocatalysis with P. putida strains.

  7. Comparative evaluation of the efficacy of Pseudomonas putida in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to compare the efficacy of Рseudomonas putida, contained in the biopreparation «Pseudomin» in the bioremediation of diesel fuel contaminated derno-podzoluivisolic soil of two different horizons. By analyzing the Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) content using IR-spectrometry method under ...

  8. Optimization of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as host for the production of cis, cis-muconate from benzoate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duuren, van J.B.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Optimization of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as host for the production of cis, cis-muconate from benzoate P. putida KT2440 was used as biocatalyst given its versatile and energetically robust metabolism. Therefore, a mutant was generated and a process developed based on which a life cycle assessment

  9. Optimization Production of Biosurfactant by Pseudomonas putida Using Crude Palm Oil (CPO) as Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanti, V.; Handayani, D. S.; Masykur, A.; Lindasari

    2017-07-01

    The production of biosurfactant by Pseudomonas putida has been studied. P. putida FNCC 0071 was grown in the nutrient broth medium supplemented with NaCl and crude palm oil (CPO). The effect of CPO concentration and fermentation time on the biosurfactant production were evaluated. The biosurfactant production was evaluated every 24 h for 10 days by optical density, surface tension and emulsification index. The best culture medium was found to be medium containing 5% v/v of CPO with 5 days of incubation time. The biosurfactant was identified as rhamnolipids.

  10. Biodegradation of Plastics by Pseudomonas putida isolated from Garden Soil Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Ponniah Saminathan

    2014-01-01

    An attempt was made to isolate Pseudomonas putida from garden soil samples and to characterize its degrading ability on plastic material. This work reveals that the garden soil is a good source of microbes capable of degrading plastic materials. P. putida have the ability to convert the complex plastic material was determined in terms of weight loss of the material. It degrades the plastic material up to 75.3% within a month. The plastic samples tested in this study were polythene bag, plasti...

  11. Growth, nitrogen fixation and mineral acquisition of Alnus sieboldiana after inoculation of Frankia together with Gigaspora margarita and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashi Yamanaka; Akio Akama; Ching-Yan Li; Hiroaki. Okabe

    2005-01-01

    The role of tetrapartite associations among Frankia, Gigaspora margarita (an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus), Pseudomonas putida (rhizobacterium), and Alnus sieboldiana in growth, nitrogen fixation, and mineral acquisition of A. sieboldiana was investigated....

  12. Identification and validation of novel small proteins in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Wulff, Tune

    2016-01-01

    Small proteins of fifty amino acids or less have been understudied due to difficulties that impede their annotation and detection. In order to obtain information on small open reading frames (sORFs) in P. putida, bioinformatic and proteomic approaches were used to identify putative small open rea...... and CysB involved in biofilm formation and cysteine biosynthesis, respectively. The work sheds light on the P. putida small proteome and small protein identification, a necessary first step towards gaining insights into their functions and possible evolutionary implications.......Small proteins of fifty amino acids or less have been understudied due to difficulties that impede their annotation and detection. In order to obtain information on small open reading frames (sORFs) in P. putida, bioinformatic and proteomic approaches were used to identify putative small open...... reading frames (sORFs) in the well-characterized strain KT2440. A plasmid-based system was established for sORF validation, enabling expression of C-terminal sequential peptide affinity (SPA) tagged variants and their detection via protein immunoblotting. Out of 22 tested putative sORFs, the expression...

  13. Genetic Characterization of Accumulation of Polyhydroxyalkanoate from Styrene in Pseudomonas putida CA-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Niall D.; O'Connor, Kevin E.; Ward, Patrick; Goff, Miriam; Dobson, Alan D. W.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CA-3 is capable of accumulating medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (MCL-PHAs) when growing on the toxic pollutant styrene as the sole source of carbon and energy. In this study, we report on the molecular characterization of the metabolic pathways involved in this novel bioconversion. With a mini-Tn5 random mutagenesis approach, acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) was identified as the end product of styrene metabolism in P. putida CA-3. Amplified flanking-region PCR was used to clone functionally expressed phenylacetyl-CoA catabolon genes upstream from the sty operon in P. putida CA-3, previously reported to generate acetyl-CoA moieties from the styrene catabolic intermediate, phenylacetyl-CoA. However, the essential involvement of a (non-phenylacetyl-CoA) catabolon-encoded 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase is also reported. The link between de novo fatty acid synthesis and PHA monomer accumulation was investigated, and a functionally expressed 3-hydroxyacyl-acyl carrier protein-CoA transacylase (phaG) gene in P. putida CA-3 was identified. The deduced PhaG amino acid sequence shared >99% identity with a transacylase from P. putida KT2440, involved in 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA MCL-PHA monomer sequestration from de novo fatty acid synthesis under inorganic nutrient-limited conditions. Similarly, with P. putida CA-3, maximal phaG expression was observed only under nitrogen limitation, with concomitant PHA accumulation. Thus, β-oxidation and fatty acid de novo synthesis appear to converge in the generation of MCL-PHA monomers from styrene in P. putida CA-3. Cloning and functional characterization of the pha locus, responsible for PHA polymerization/depolymerization is also reported and the significance and future prospects of this novel bioconversion are discussed. PMID:16085828

  14. Redundancy in putrescine catabolism in solvent tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandounas, Luaine; Ballerstedt, Hendrik; de Winde, Johannes H; Ruijssenaars, Harald J

    2011-06-10

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is a promising platform organism for the biological production of substituted aromatic compounds due to its extreme tolerance towards toxic chemicals. Solvent or aromatic stress tolerance may be due to membrane modifications and efflux pumps; however in general, polyamines have also been implicated in stressed cells. Previous transcriptomics results of P. putida strains producing an aromatic compound, or being exposed to the solvent toluene, indicated differentially expressed genes involved in polyamine transport and metabolism. Therefore, the metabolism of the polyamine, putrescine was investigated in P. putida S12, as no putrescine degradation pathways have been described for this strain. Via transcriptome analysis various, often redundant, putrescine-induced genes were identified as being potentially involved in putrescine catabolism via oxidative deamination and transamination. A series of knockout mutants were constructed in which up to six of these genes were sequentially deleted, and although putrescine degradation was affected in some of these mutants, complete elimination of putrescine degradation in P. putida S12 was not achieved. Evidence was found for the presence of an alternative pathway for putrescine degradation involving γ-glutamylation. The occurrence of multiple putrescine degradation routes in the solvent-tolerant P. putida S12 is indicative of the importance of controlling polyamine homeostasis, as well as of the high metabolic flexibility exhibited by this microorganism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Benzoxazinoids in root exudates of maize attract Pseudomonas putida to the rhizosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew L Neal

    Full Text Available Benzoxazinoids, such as 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H-one (DIMBOA, are secondary metabolites in grasses. In addition to their function in plant defence against pests and diseases above-ground, benzoxazinoids (BXs have also been implicated in defence below-ground, where they can exert allelochemical or antimicrobial activities. We have studied the impact of BXs on the interaction between maize and Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a competitive coloniser of the maize rhizosphere with plant-beneficial traits. Chromatographic analyses revealed that DIMBOA is the main BX compound in root exudates of maize. In vitro analysis of DIMBOA stability indicated that KT2440 tolerance of DIMBOA is based on metabolism-dependent breakdown of this BX compound. Transcriptome analysis of DIMBOA-exposed P. putida identified increased transcription of genes controlling benzoate catabolism and chemotaxis. Chemotaxis assays confirmed motility of P. putida towards DIMBOA. Moreover, colonisation essays in soil with Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP-expressing P. putida showed that DIMBOA-producing roots of wild-type maize attract significantly higher numbers of P. putida cells than roots of the DIMBOA-deficient bx1 mutant. Our results demonstrate a central role for DIMBOA as a below-ground semiochemical for recruitment of plant-beneficial rhizobacteria during the relatively young and vulnerable growth stages of maize.

  16. Pf16 and phiPMW: Expanding the realm of Pseudomonas putida bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Magill

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of two novel Pseudomonas putida phages, pf16 and phiPMW. Pf16 represents a peripherally related T4-like phage, and is the first of its kind infecting a Pseudomonad, with evidence suggesting cyanophage origins. Extensive divergence has resulted in pf16 occupying a newly defined clade designated as the pf16-related phages, lying at the interface of the Schizo T-Evens and Exo T-Evens. Recombination with an ancestor of the P. putida phage AF is likely responsible for the tropism of this phage. phiPMW represents a completely novel Pseudomonas phage with a genome containing substantial genetic novelty through its many hypothetical proteins. Evidence suggests that this phage has been extensively shaped through gene transfer events and vertical evolution. Phylogenetics shows that this phage has an evolutionary history involving FelixO1-related viruses but is in itself highly distinct from this group.

  17. Diabetic foot gangrene patient with multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas putida infection in Karawaci District, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nata Pratama Hardjo Lugito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida is a rod-shaped, non fermenting Gram-negative organism frequently found in the environment that utilizes aerobic metabolism, previously thought to be of low pathogenicity. It had been reported as cause of skin and soft tissue infection, especially in immunocompromised patients. A female green grocer, 51 year-old came to internal medicine out-patient clinic with gangrene and osteomyelitis on her 1 st , 2 nd and 3 rd digit and wound on the sole of the right foot since 1 month prior. The patient had history of uncontrolled diabetes since a year ago. She was given ceftriaxone 2 grams b.i.d, metronidazole 500 mg t.i.d empirically and then amikacin 250 mg b.i.d, followed by amputation of the digits and wound debridement. The microorganism′s culture from pus revealed multi drug resistant Pseudomonas putida. She recovered well after antibiotics and surgery.

  18. The T7-Related Pseudomonas putida Phage ϕ15 Displays Virion-Associated Biofilm Degradation Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelissen, Anneleen; Ceyssens, Pieter-Jan; T'Syen, Jeroen; Van Praet, Helena; Noben, Jean-Paul; Shaburova, Olga V; Krylov, Victor N; Volckaert, Guido; Lavigne, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage phi 15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS) depolymerase. Phage phi 15 forms plaques surrounded by grow...

  19. Conversion of lignin model compounds by Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and isolates from compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Krithika; García-Hidalgo, Javier; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie F; Lidén, Gunnar

    2017-06-01

    Starting from mature vegetable compost, four bacterial strains were selected using a lignin-rich medium. 16S ribosomal RNA identification of the isolates showed high score similarity with Pseudomonas spp. for three out of four isolates. Further characterization of growth on mixtures of six selected lignin model compounds (vanillin, vanillate, 4-hydroxybenzoate, p-coumarate, benzoate, and ferulate) was carried out with three of the Pseudomonas isolates and in addition with the strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440 from a culture collection. The specific growth rates on benzoate, p-coumarate, and 4-hydroxybenzoate were considerably higher (0.26-0.27 h-1) than those on ferulate and vanillate (0.21 and 0.22 h-1), as were the uptake rates. There was no direct growth of P. putida KT2440 on vanillin, but instead, vanillin was rapidly converted into vanillate at a rate of 4.87 mmol (gCDW h)-1 after which the accumulated vanillate was taken up. The growth curve reflected a diauxic growth when mixtures of the model compounds were used as carbon source. Vanillin, 4-hydroxybenzoate, and benzoate were preferentially consumed first, whereas ferulate was always the last substrate to be taken in. These results contribute to a better understanding of the aromatic metabolism of P. putida in terms of growth and uptake rates, which will be helpful for the utilization of these bacteria as cell factories for upgrading lignin-derived mixtures of aromatic molecules.

  20. Production of Polyhydroxyalkanoates from Sludge Palm Oil Using Pseudomonas putida S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Du-Kyeong; Lee, Cho-Ryong; Lee, Sun Hee; Bae, Jung-Hoon; Park, Young-Kwon; Rhee, Young Ha; Sung, Bong Hyun; Sohn, Jung-Hoon

    2017-05-28

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable plastics produced by bacteria, but their use in diverse applications is prohibited by high production costs. To reduce these costs, the conversion by Pseudomonas strains of P HAs from crude s ludge p alm oil ( SPO) a s an inexpensive renewable raw material was tested. Pseudomonas putida S12 was found to produce the highest yield (~41%) of elastomeric medium-chain-length (MCL)-PHAs from SPO. The MCL-PHA characteristics were analyzed by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry, gel permeation chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry. These findings may contribute to more widespread use of PHAs by reducing PHA production costs.

  1. Species-specific repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences in Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Olmedo, Isabel; Tobes, Raquel; Manzanera, Maximino; Ramos, Juan L.; Marqués, Silvia

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a soil bacterium that effectively colonises the roots of many plants and degrades a variety of toxic aromatic compounds. Its genome has recently been sequenced. We describe that a 35 bp sequence with the structure of an imperfect palindrome, originally found repeated three times downstream of the rpoH gene terminator, is detected more than 800 times in the chromosome of this strain. The structure of this DNA segment is analogous to that of the so-called enterobacteriaceae repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) sequences, although its sequence is different. Computer-assisted analysis of the presence and distribution of this repeated sequence in the P.putida chromosome revealed that in at least 80% of the cases the sequence is extragenic, and in 82% of the cases the distance of this extragenic element to the end of one of the neighbouring genes was <100 bp. This 35 bp element can be found either as a single element, as pairs of elements, or sometimes forming clusters of up to five elements in which they alternate orientation. PCR scanning of chromosomes from different isolates of Pseudomonas sp. strains using oligonucleotides complementary to the most conserved region of this sequence shows that it is only present in isolates of the species P.putida. For this reason we suggest that the P.putida 35 bp element is a distinctive REP sequence in P.putida. This is the first time that REP sequences have been described and characterised in a group of non-enterobacteriaceae. PMID:11937637

  2. The Pseudomonas putida Lon protease is involved in N-acyl homoserine lactone quorum sensing regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoni Livia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Pseudomonas putida and Pseduomonas aeruginosa, the similar PpuR/RsaL/PpuI and LasR/RsaL/LasI acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs quorum sensing (QS systems have been shown to be under considerable regulation by other global regulators. A major regulator is the RsaL protein which strongly directly represses the transcription of the P. putida ppuI and P. aeruginosa lasI AHL synthases. In this study we screened a transposon mutant bank of P. putida in order to identify if any other regulators were involved in negative regulation of AHL QS. Results In our screen we identified three Tn5 mutants which displayed overproduction of AHLs in P. putida strain WCS358. Two of the mutants had a Tn5 located in the rsaL gene, whereas in one mutant the transposon was located in the lon protease gene. Lon proteases play important roles in protein quality control via degradation of misfolded proteins. It was determined that in the P. putida lon mutant, AHL levels, PpuR levels and ppuI promoter activity all increased significantly; we therefore postulated that PpuR is a target for Lon. The Lon protease had no effect on AHL production in P. aeruginosa. Conclusion The Lon protease is a negative regulator of AHL production in P. putida WCS358. The Lon protease has also been shown by others to influence AHL QS in Vibrio fischeri and Agrobacterium tumefaciens and can thus become an important regulator of AHL QS timing and regulation in bacteria.

  3. Factors influencing the ability of Pseudomonas putida strains epI and II to degrade the organophosphate ethoprophos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpouzas, D G; Walker, A

    2000-07-01

    Two strains of Pseudomonas putida (epI and epII), isolated previously from ethoprophos-treated soil, were able to degrade ethoprophos (10 mg 1(-1)) in a mineral salts medium plus nitrogen (MSMN) in less than 50 h with a concurrent population growth. Addition of glucose or succinate to MSMN did not influence the degrading ability of Ps. putida epI, but increased the lag phase before rapid degradation commenced with Ps. putida epII. The degrading ability of the two isolates was lost when the pesticide provided the sole source of phosphorus. Degradation of ethoprophos was most rapid when bacterial cultures were incubated at 25 and 37 degrees C. Pseudomonas putida epI was capable of completely degrading ethoprophos at a slow rate at 5 degrees C, compared with Ps. putida epII which could not completely degrade ethoprophos at the same time. Pseudomonas putida epI was capable of degrading ethoprophos when only 60 cells ml(-1) were used as initial inoculum. In contrast, Ps. putida epII was able to totally degrade ethoprophos when inoculum densities of 600 cells ml(-1) or higher were used. In general, longer lag phases accompanied the lower inoculum levels. Both isolates rapidly degraded ethoprophos in MSMN at pHs ranging from 5.5 to 7.6, but not at pH 5 or below.

  4. Metal Inhibition of Growth and Manganese Oxidation in Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, J.; Sposito, G.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (MnO2) are ubiquitous nanoparticulate minerals that contribute to the adsorption of nutrient and toxicant metals, the oxidative degradation of various organic compounds, and the respiration of metal-reducing bacteria in aquatic and terrestrial environments. The formation of these minerals is catalyzed by a diverse and widely-distributed group of bacteria and fungi, often through the enzymatic oxidation of aqueous Mn(II) to Mn(IV). In metal-impacted ecosystems, toxicant metals may alter the viability and metabolic activity of Mn-oxidizing organisms, thereby limiting the conditions under which biogenic MnO2 can form and diminishing their potential as adsorbent materials. Pseudomonas putida GB-1 (P. putida GB-1) is a model Mn-oxidizing laboratory culture representative of freshwater and soil biofilm-forming bacteria. Manganese oxidation in P. putida GB-1 occurs via two single-electron-transfer reactions, involving a multicopper oxidase enzyme found on the bacterial outer membrane surface. Near the onset of the stationary phase of growth, dark brown MnO2 particles are deposited in a matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, thus forming heterogeneous biomineral assemblages. In this study, we assessed the influence of various transition metals on microbial growth and manganese oxidation capacity in a P. putida GB-1 culture propagated in a nutrient-rich growth medium. The concentration-response behavior of actively growing P. putida GB-1 cells was investigated for Fe, Co, Ni, Cu and Zn at pH ≈ 6 in the presence and absence of 1 mM Mn. Toxicity parameters such as EC0, EC50 and Hillslope, and EC100 were obtained from the sigmoidal concentration-response curves. The extent of MnO2 formation in the presence of the various metal cations was documented 24, 50, 74 and 104 h after the metal-amended medium was inoculated. Toxicity values were compared to twelve physicochemical properties of the metals tested. Significant

  5. Expression of recombinant Pseudomonas stutzeri di-heme cytochrome c(4) by high-cell-density fed-batch cultivation of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Nørgaard, Allan; Hansen, Anne Merete

    2003-01-01

    The gene of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri was expressed in Pseudomonas putida. High-yield expression of the protein was achieved by high-cell-density fed-batch cultivation using an exponential glucose feeding strategy. The recombinant cytochrome c(4) protein...

  6. Characterization of a Pseudomonas putida rough variant evolved in a mixed species biofilm with Acinetobacter sp. strain C6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susse Kirkelund; Haagensen, Janus Anders Juul; Gjermansen, Morten

    2007-01-01

    Genetic differentiation by natural selection is readily observed among microbial populations, but a more comprehensive understanding of evolutionary forces, genetic causes, and resulting phenotypic advantages is not often sought. Recently, a surface population of Pseudomonas putida bacteria...... to oxygen starvation. A key factor explaining this conditional, nondispersal phenotype is likely to be the acquired ability of the rough variant to coaggregate specifically with Acinetobacter cells. We further show that the P. putida rough variant displayed enhanced production of a cellulose-like polymer...

  7. Biofiltration of ethyl acetate by Pseudomonas putida immobilized on walnut shell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Hossein; Najafpour, Ghasem; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Tardast, Ali; Gilani, Saeedeh

    2012-11-01

    A biofilter packed with walnut shells was used to eliminate ethyl acetate from an air stream. The shells treated with NaOH were used as medium for immobilization of Pseudomonas putida PTCC 1694. At an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 60s, a removal efficiency of 99% was achieved at inlet concentrations lower than 430ppm of ethyl acetate. The removal efficiency decreased below 80% with an increase in inlet concentration of ethyl acetate. When the EBRT was increased to 75 s, the removal efficiency remained above 80% even though the inlet loading rate was increased to 421g/m(3)h. Michaelis-Menten type and zero-order diffusion limited models were employed and the predicted data perfectly matched the experimental data. Thus P. putida immobilized on walnut shell has potential for the removal of ethyl acetate from air streams. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. In-silico-driven metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas putida for enhanced production of poly-hydroxyalkanoates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poblete-Castro, Ignacio; Binger, Danielle; Rodrigues, Andre; Becker, Judith; Martins Dos Santos, Vitor A P; Wittmann, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present systems metabolic engineering driven by in-silico modeling to tailor Pseudomonas putida for synthesis of medium chain length PHAs on glucose. Using physiological properties of the parent wild type as constraints, elementary flux mode analysis of a large-scale model of the metabolism of P. putida was used to predict genetic targets for strain engineering. Among a set of priority ranked targets, glucose dehydrogenase (encoded by gcd) was predicted as most promising deletion target. The mutant P. putida Δgcd, generated on basis of the computational design, exhibited 100% increased PHA accumulation as compared to the parent wild type, maintained a high specific growth rate and exhibited an almost unaffected gene expression profile, which excluded detrimental side effects of the modification. A second mutant strain, P. putida Δpgl, that lacked 6-phosphogluconolactonase, exhibited a substantially decreased PHA synthesis, as was also predicted by the model. The production potential of P. putida Δgcd was assessed in batch bioreactors. The novel strain showed an increase of the PHA yield (+80%), the PHA titer (+100%) and cellular PHA content (+50%) and revealed almost unaffected growth and diminished by-product formation. It was thus found superior in all relevant criteria towards industrial production. Beyond the contribution to more efficient PHA production processes at reduced costs that might replace petrochemical plastics in the future, the study illustrates the power of computational prediction to tailor microbial strains for enhanced biosynthesis of added-value compounds. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Construction of an efficient biologically contained Pseudomonas putida strain and its survival in outdoor assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina, Lazaro; Rodriguez, Cayo Juan Ramos; Ronchel, Maria C.

    1998-01-01

    Active biological containment systems consist of two components, a killing element designed to induce cell death and a control element which modulates the expression of the killing function. We constructed a mini-Tn5 transposon bearing a fusion of the P(lac) promoter to the gef killing gene...... and a fusion of the Pm promoter to the lad gene plus the positive regulator of the Pm promoter, the xylS gene. This mini-Tn5 transposon was transferred to the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida CMC4, and in culture this strain survived in the presence of 3-methylbenzoate (an XylS effector) and committed suicide...

  10. TOL plasmid carriage enhances biofilm formation and increases extracellular DNA content in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Paul; Sjoholm, O.R.; Yankelevich, T.

    2010-01-01

    Adherent growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 with and without the TOL plasmid (pWWO) at the solid-liquid and air-liquid interface was examined. We compared biofilm formation on glass in flow cells, and assayed pellicle (air-liquid interface biofilm) formation in stagnant liquid cultures by confocal...... laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid-specific stains revealed differences in the production of extracellular polymeric substances...... to increased biofilm formation by production of eDNA....

  11. Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium by starfish and Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jaeyoung [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: jchoi@kist.re.kr; Lee, Ju Young; Yang, Jung-Seok [Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Gangneung Institute, Gangneung 210-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Biosorption of heavy metals and uranium from contaminated wastewaters may represent an innovative purification process. This study investigates the removal ability of unit mass of Pseudomonas putida and starfish for lead, cadmium, and uranium by quantifying the adsorption capacity. The adsorption of heavy metals and uranium by the samples was influenced by pH, and increased with increasing Pb, Cd, and U concentrations. Dead cells adsorbed the largest quantity of all heavy metals than live cells and starfish. The adsorption capacity followed the order: U(VI) > Pb > Cd. The results also suggest that bacterial membrane cells can be used successfully in the treatment of high strength metal-contaminated wastewaters.

  12. Genetic programming of catalytic Pseudomonas putida biofilms for boosting biodegradation of haloalkanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Ilaria; de Lorenzo, Víctor; Nikel, Pablo I

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms outperform planktonic counterparts in whole-cell biocatalysis. The transition between planktonic and biofilm lifestyles of the platform strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is ruled by a regulatory network controlling the levels of the trigger signal cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). This circumstance was exploited for designing a genetic device that over-runs the synthesis or degradation of c-di-GMP--thus making P. putida to form biofilms at user's will. For this purpose, the transcription of either yedQ (diguanylate cyclase) or yhjH (c-di-GMP phoshodiesterase) from Escherichia coli was artificially placed under the tight control of a cyclohexanone-responsive expression system. The resulting strain was subsequently endowed with a synthetic operon and tested for 1-chlorobutane biodegradation. Upon addition of cyclohexanone to the culture medium, the thereby designed P. putida cells formed biofilms displaying high dehalogenase activity. These results show that the morphologies and physical forms of whole-cell biocatalysts can be genetically programmed while purposely designing their biochemical activity. Copyright © 2015 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Antibiotic resistance determinants in a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Molina

    Full Text Available Environmental microbes harbor an enormous pool of antibiotic and biocide resistance genes that can impact the resistance profiles of animal and human pathogens via horizontal gene transfer. Pseudomonas putida strains are ubiquitous in soil and water but have been seldom isolated from humans. We have established a collection of P. putida strains isolated from in-patients in different hospitals in France. One of the isolated strains (HB3267 kills insects and is resistant to the majority of the antibiotics used in laboratories and hospitals, including aminoglycosides, ß-lactams, cationic peptides, chromoprotein enediyne antibiotics, dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors, fluoroquinolones and quinolones, glycopeptide antibiotics, macrolides, polyketides and sulfonamides. Similar to other P. putida clinical isolates the strain was sensitive to amikacin. To shed light on the broad pattern of antibiotic resistance, which is rarely found in clinical isolates of this species, the genome of this strain was sequenced and analysed. The study revealed that the determinants of multiple resistance are both chromosomally-borne as well as located on the pPC9 plasmid. Further analysis indicated that pPC9 has recruited antibiotic and biocide resistance genes from environmental microorganisms as well as from opportunistic and true human pathogens. The pPC9 plasmid is not self-transmissible, but can be mobilized by other bacterial plasmids making it capable of spreading antibiotic resistant determinants to new hosts.

  14. The RNA chaperone Hfq enables the environmental stress tolerance super-phenotype of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Calles, Belén; Nikel, Pablo I; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-10-01

    The natural physiological regime of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida involves incessant exposure to endogenous metabolic conflicts and environmental physicochemical insults. Yet, the role of assisted small RNA-mRNA pairing in the stress tolerance super-phenotype that is the trademark of this bacterium has not been accredited. We have thoroughly explored the physiological consequences -in particular those related to exogenous stress - of deleting the hfq gene of P. putida, which encodes the major RNA chaperone that promotes sRNA-target mRNA interactions. While the overall trend was a general weakening of every robustness descriptor of the Δhfq strain, growth parameters and production of central metabolic enzymes were comparatively less affected than other qualities that depend directly on energy status (e.g. motility, DNA repair). The overall catalytic vigour of the mutant decreased to < 20% than the wild-type strain, as estimated from the specific growth rate of cells carrying the catabolic TOL plasmid pWW0 for m-xylene biodegradation. Several loss-of-function phenotypes could be traced to the effect of the Δhfq deletion on the intracellular contents of the stationary sigma factor RpoS. It thus seems that Hfq, while not indispensable for any essential function, contributes to shape the environmental lifestyle of P. putida. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Multi-substrate growth kinetics of Pseudomonas putida for phenol removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seker, S.; Beyenal, B.; Tanyolac, A. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Salih, B. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

    1997-12-01

    fhe biodegradation of phenol by a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was investigated in a continuously fed stirred-tank reactor, under aerobic conditions. The dilution rate was varied between 0.0174 h{sup -1} and 0.278 h{sup -1}, covering a wide range of dissolved oxygen and the inhibition region of phenol. Through non-linear analysis of the data, a dual-substrate growth kinetics, Haldane kinetics for phenol and Monod kinetics for oxygen, was derived with high correlation coefficients. Respective biokinetic parameters were evaluated as {mu}{sub m}=0.569 h{sup -1}, K{sub p}=18.539 mg/l, K{sub i}=99.374 mg/l, K{sub 0}=0.048 mg/l, Y{sub x/p}=0.521 g microorganism/g phenol and Y{sub x/o}=0.338 g microorganisms/g oxygen, being in good agreement with other studies in the literature. Maintenance factors for both phenol and oxygen were calculated for the first time for P. putida while the saturation coefficient for oxygen, K{sub 0}, was genuinely evaluated from the constructed model, not imported or adapted from other studies as reported in the literature. All pertinent biokinetic parameters for P. putida have been calculated from continuous system data, which are most appropriate for use in continuous bioprocess applications. (orig.)

  16. Utilization of Heterologous Siderophores Enhances Levels of Iron Available to Pseudomonas putida in the Rhizosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loper, Joyce E.; Henkels, Marcella D.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas spp. have the capacity to utilize siderophores produced by diverse species of bacteria and fungi, and the present study was initiated to determine if siderophores produced by rhizosphere microorganisms enhance the levels of iron available to a strain of Pseudomonas putida in this natural habitat. We used a previously described transcriptional fusion (pvd-inaZ) between an iron-regulated promoter (pvd) and the ice nucleation reporter gene (inaZ) to detect alterations in iron availability to P. putida. Ice nucleation activity (INA) expressed from the pvd-inaZ fusion by P. putida N1R or N1R Pvd−, a derivative deficient in the production of a pyoverdine siderophore, was inversely related to the concentration of ferric citrate in a culture medium. In culture, INA expressed by N1R Pvd− (pvd-inaZ) was reduced in the presence of the ferric complex of pseudobactin-358, a pyoverdine siderophore produced by P. putida WCS358 that can be utilized as a source of iron by N1R Pvd−. In the rhizosphere of cucumbers grown in sterilized soil, N1R Pvd− (pvd-inaZ) expressed INA, indicating that iron availability was sufficiently low in that habitat to allow transcription of the iron-regulated pvd promoter. Coinoculation with WCS358 or N1R significantly decreased INA expressed by N1R Pvd− (pvd-inaZ) in the rhizosphere, whereas coinoculation with a pyoverdine-deficient mutant of WCS358 did not reduce INA expressed by N1R Pvd− (pvd-inaZ). These results indicate that iron availability to N1R Pvd− (pvd-inaZ) in the rhizosphere was enhanced by the presence of another strain of P. putida that produces a pyoverdine that N1R Pvd− (pvd-inaZ) was able to utilize as a source of iron. In culture, strain N1R Pvd− also utilized ferric complexes of the siderophores enterobactin and aerobactin as sources of iron. In the rhizosphere of cucumbers grown in sterilized soil, INA expressed by N1R Pvd− (pvd-inaZ) was reduced in the presence of strains of Enterobacter cloacae that

  17. Novel AroA from Pseudomonas putida Confers Tobacco Plant with High Tolerance to Glyphosate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hai-Qin; Chang, Su-Hua; Tian, Zhe-Xian; Zhang, Le; Sun, Yi-Cheng; Li, Yan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Yi-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Glyphosate is a non-selective broad-spectrum herbicide that inhibits 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSPS, also designated as AroA), a key enzyme in the aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathway in microorganisms and plants. Previously, we reported that a novel AroA (PpAroA1) from Pseudomonas putida had high tolerance to glyphosate, with little homology to class I or class II glyphosate-tolerant AroA. In this study, the coding sequence of PpAroA1 was optimized for tobacco. For maturation of the enzyme in chloroplast, a chloroplast transit peptide coding sequence was fused in frame with the optimized aroA gene (PparoA1optimized) at the 5′ end. The PparoA1optimized gene was introduced into the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. W38) genome via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The transformed explants were first screened in shoot induction medium containing kanamycin. Then glyphosate tolerance was assayed in putative transgenic plants and its T1 progeny. Our results show that the PpAroA1 from Pseudomonas putida can efficiently confer tobacco plants with high glyphosate tolerance. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing the PparoA1optimized gene exhibit high tolerance to glyphosate, which suggest that the novel PpAroA1 is a new and good candidate applied in transgenic crops with glyphosate tolerance in future. PMID:21611121

  18. Effect of Genetically Modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r on the Fungal Rhizosphere Microflora of Field-Grown Wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glandorf, D.C.M.; Verheggen, Patrick; Jansen, Timo; Jorritsma, J.-W.; Smit, Eric; Leeflang, Paula; Wernars, Karel; Thomashow, L.S.; Laureijs, Eric; Thomas-Oates, J.E.; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Loon, L.C. van

    2001-01-01

    We released genetically modified Pseudomonas putida WCS358r into the rhizospheres of wheat plants. The two genetically modified derivatives, genetically modified microorganism (GMM) 2 and GMM 8, carried the phz biosynthetic gene locus of strain P. fluorescens 2-79 and constitutively produced the

  19. Construction of phoE-caa, a novel PCR- and immunologically detectable marker gene for Pseudomonas putida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, S. A.; Slegtenhorst-Eegdeman, K.; Tommassen, J.; Geli, V.; Wijffelman, C. A.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe the construction and use in Pseudomonas putida WCS358 of phoE-caa, a novel hybrid marker gene, which allows monitoring both at the protein level by immunological methods and at the DNA level by PCR. The marker is based on the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein gene

  20. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; De Bont, J.A.M.; De Winde, J.H.; Wery, J.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent

  1. TrgI, toluene repressed gene I, a novel gene involved in toluene-tolerance in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volkers, R.J.M.; Ballerstedt, H.; Ruijssenaars, H.; Bont, J.A.M. de; Winde, J.H. de; Wery, J.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is well known for its remarkable solvent tolerance. Transcriptomics analysis of this bacterium grown in toluene-containing chemostats revealed the differential expression of 253 genes. As expected, the genes encoding one of the major solvent tolerance mechanisms, the solvent

  2. Regulation of phenylacetic acid uptake is sigma54 dependent in Pseudomonas putida CA-3.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Leary, Niall D

    2011-10-13

    Abstract Background Styrene is a toxic and potentially carcinogenic alkenylbenzene used extensively in the polymer processing industry. Significant quantities of contaminated liquid waste are generated annually as a consequence. However, styrene is not a true xenobiotic and microbial pathways for its aerobic assimilation, via an intermediate, phenylacetic acid, have been identified in a diverse range of environmental isolates. The potential for microbial bioremediation of styrene waste has received considerable research attention over the last number of years. As a result the structure, organisation and encoded function of the genes responsible for styrene and phenylacetic acid sensing, uptake and catabolism have been elucidated. However, a limited understanding persists in relation to host specific regulatory molecules which may impart additional control over these pathways. In this study the styrene degrader Pseudomonas putida CA-3 was subjected to random mini-Tn5 mutagenesis and mutants screened for altered styrene\\/phenylacetic acid utilisation profiles potentially linked to non-catabolon encoded regulatory influences. Results One mutant, D7, capable of growth on styrene, but not on phenylacetic acid, harboured a Tn5 insertion in the rpoN gene encoding σ54. Complementation of the D7 mutant with the wild type rpoN gene restored the ability of this strain to utilise phenylacetic acid as a sole carbon source. Subsequent RT-PCR analyses revealed that a phenylacetate permease, PaaL, was expressed in wild type P. putida CA-3 cells utilising styrene or phenylacetic acid, but could not be detected in the disrupted D7 mutant. Expression of plasmid borne paaL in mutant D7 was found to fully restore the phenylacetic acid utilisation capacity of the strain to wild type levels. Bioinformatic analysis of the paaL promoter from P. putida CA-3 revealed two σ54 consensus binding sites in a non-archetypal configuration, with the transcriptional start site being resolved by

  3. Growth independent rhamnolipid production from glucose using the non-pathogenic Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittgens Andreas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhamnolipids are potent biosurfactants with high potential for industrial applications. However, rhamnolipids are currently produced with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa during growth on hydrophobic substrates such as plant oils. The heterologous production of rhamnolipids entails two essential advantages: Disconnecting the rhamnolipid biosynthesis from the complex quorum sensing regulation and the opportunity of avoiding pathogenic production strains, in particular P. aeruginosa. In addition, separation of rhamnolipids from fatty acids is difficult and hence costly. Results Here, the metabolic engineering of a rhamnolipid producing Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a strain certified as safety strain using glucose as carbon source to avoid cumbersome product purification, is reported. Notably, P. putida KT2440 features almost no changes in growth rate and lag-phase in the presence of high concentrations of rhamnolipids (> 90 g/L in contrast to the industrially important bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Corynebacterium glutamicum, and Escherichia coli. P. putida KT2440 expressing the rhlAB-genes from P. aeruginosa PAO1 produces mono-rhamnolipids of P. aeruginosa PAO1 type (mainly C10:C10. The metabolic network was optimized in silico for rhamnolipid synthesis from glucose. In addition, a first genetic optimization, the removal of polyhydroxyalkanoate formation as competing pathway, was implemented. The final strain had production rates in the range of P. aeruginosa PAO1 at yields of about 0.15 g/gglucose corresponding to 32% of the theoretical optimum. What's more, rhamnolipid production was independent from biomass formation, a trait that can be exploited for high rhamnolipid production without high biomass formation. Conclusions A functional alternative to the pathogenic rhamnolipid producer P. aeruginosa was constructed and characterized. P. putida KT24C1 pVLT31_rhlAB featured the highest yield and titer reported

  4. Pseudomonas putida response in membrane bioreactors under salicylic acid-induced stress conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Sergio; Rosas, Irene; González, Elena; Gutierrez-Lavin, Antonio; Diaz, Mario, E-mail: mariodiaz@uniovi.es

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • MBR under feed-induced stress conditions: starvation and changing feeding conditions. • High capacity of MBR to withstand high variations in feed loads. • Slow biofilm formation under starvation conditions during the first days. • Observed growth of P. putida for substrate to microorganism ratio higher than 0.6 g/g. • Maximum specific growth rate and growth yield values of around 37.5 h{sup −1} and 0.5 g/g. - Abstract: Starvation and changing feeding conditions are frequently characteristics of wastewater treatment plants. They are typical causes of unsteady-state operation of biological systems and provoke cellular stress. The response of a membrane bioreactor functioning under feed-induced stress conditions is studied here. In order to simplify and considerably amplify the response to stress and to obtain a reference model, a pure culture of Pseudomonas putida was selected instead of an activated sludge and a sole substrate (salicylic acid) was employed. The system degraded salicylic acid at 100–1100 mg/L with a high level of efficiency, showed rapid acclimation without substrate or product inhibition phenomena and good stability in response to unsteady states caused by feed variations. Under starvation conditions, specific degradation rates of around 15 mg/g h were achieved during the adaptation of the biomass to the new conditions and no biofilm formation was observed during the first days of experimentation using an initial substrate to microorganisms ratio lower than 0.1. When substrate was added to the reactor as pulses resulting in rapidly changing concentrations, P. putida growth was observed only for substrate to microorganism ratios higher than 0.6, with a maximum Y{sub X/S} of 0.5 g/g. Biofilm development under changing feeding conditions was fast, biomass detachment only being significant for biomass concentrations on the membrane surface that were higher than 16 g/m{sup 2}.

  5. PH-stat fed-batch process to enhance the production of cis, cis-muconate from benzoate by Pseudomonas putida KT2440-JD1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duuren, J.B.J.H. van; Wijte, D.; Karge, B.; Martins dos Santos, V.A.; Yang, Y.; Mars, A.E.; Eggink, G.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440-JD1 is able to cometabolize benzoate to cis, cis-muconate in the presence of glucose as growth substrate. P. putida KT2440-JD1 was unable to grow in the presence of concentrations above 50 mM benzoate or 600 mM cis, cis-muconate. The inhibitory effects of both compounds

  6. Pseudomonas putida KT2442 as a platform for the biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates with adjustable monomer contents and compositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Wu, Lin-Ping; Dechuan, Meng

    2013-01-01

    The β-oxidation weakened Pseudomonas putida were established as a platform for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) with adjustable monomer compositions and micro-structures. When mutant P. putida KTOYO6ΔC (phaPCJA.c) was cultivated on mixtures of sodium butyrate and sodium hexanoate (C4......HD-co-3HDD) consisting of 49 mol% P3HHx and 51 mol% P(3HD-co-3HDD) [35.25 mol% 3HDD (3-hydroxydodecanoate)], which was characterized by (13)C NMR, HMBC NMR, DSC, GPC and universal testing machine....

  7. Synergic role of the two ars operons in arsenic tolerance in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Matilde; Udaondo, Zulema; Niqui, José-Luis; Duque, Estrella; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2014-10-01

    The chromosome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 carries two clusters of genes, denoted ars1 and ars2, that are annotated as putative arsenic resistance operons. In this work, we present evidence that both operons encode functional arsenic-response regulatory genes as well as arsenic extrusion systems that confer resistance to both arsenite [As(III)] and arsenate [As(V)]. Transcriptional fusions of P(ars1) and P(ars2) to lacZ revealed that expression of both operons was induced by arsenite and arsenate. We generated single mutants in ars1 and ars2, which showed lower resistance to arsenic than the wild-type strain. A double ars1/ars2 was found to be highly sensitive to arsenic. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for single mutants decreased two- to fourfold with respect to the parental strain, while in the double mutant the MIC decreased 128-fold for arsenite and 32-fold for arsenate. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the ars2 resistance operon is part of the core genome of P. putida, while the ars1 operon appears to only occur in the KT2440 strain, suggesting that ars1 was acquired by horizontal gene transfer. The presence of ars1 in KT2440 may explain why it exhibits higher resistance to arsenic than other P. putida strains, which bear only the ars2 operon.

  8. Degradation of waste waters from olive oil mills by Yarrowia lipolytica ATCC 20255 and Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Felice, B.; Pontecorvo, G.; Carfagna, M. [Univ. of Naples, Caserta (Italy). Inst. of Biology

    1997-12-31

    Waste water from olive oil processing may cause severe pollution in the Mediterranean area, since they have a high level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) (100-200 g/l) and contain other organic and inorganic compounds. In all olive oil producing countries, the reduction of pollution in olive oil mill waste waters at reasonable costs and using techniques suitable for most industrial applications is an unsolved problem. For this paper, the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica ATCC 20255 was grown on waste waters from an olive oil mill in a 3.5 l fermenter under batch culture conditions. The results showed that the yeast was capable of reducing the COD value by 80% in 24 h. In this way, a useful biomass of 22.45 g/l as single cell protein (SCP) and enzyme lipase were produced. During this process, most of the organic and inorganic substances were consumed, only aromatic pollutants were still present in the fermentation effluents. Therefore, we used a phenol degrader, namely Pseudomonas putida, to reduce phenolic compounds in the fermentation effluents after removing Yarrowia lipolytica cells. P. putida was effective in reducing phenols in only 12 h. (orig.)

  9. Tracing explosives in soil with transcriptional regulators of Pseudomonas putida evolved for responding to nitrotoluenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmendia, Junkal; de las Heras, Aitor; Galvão, Teca Calcagno; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2008-05-01

    Although different biological approaches for detection of anti-personnel mines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) have been entertained, none of them has been rigorously documented thus far in the scientific literature. The industrial 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) habitually employed in the manufacturing of mines is at all times tainted with a small but significant proportion of the more volatile 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4 DNT) and other nitroaromatic compounds. By using mutation-prone PCR and DNA sequence shuffling we have evolved in vitro and selected in vivo variants of the effector recognition domain of the toluene-responsive XylR regulator of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida that responds to mono-, bi- and trinitro substituted toluenes. Re-introduction of such variants in P. putida settled the transcriptional activity of the cognate promoters (Po and Pu) as a function of the presence of nitrotoluenes in the medium. When strains bearing transcriptional fusions to reporters with an optical output (luxAB, GFP) were spread on soil spotted with nitrotoluenes, the signal triggered by promoter activation allowed localization of the target compounds on the soil surface. Our data provide a proof of concept that non-natural transcription factors evolved to respond to nitroaromatics can be engineered in soil bacteria and inoculated on a target site to pinpoint the presence of explosives. This approach thus opens new ways to tackle this gigantic humanitarian problem. © 2008 The Authors.

  10. Metabolic engineering of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 for the production of para-hydroxy benzoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiqin Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available para-hydroxy benzoic acid (PHBA is the key component for preparing parabens, a common preservatives in food, drugs and personal care products, as well as high performance bioplastics such as liquid crystal polymers (LCP. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was engineered to produce PHBA from glucose via the shikimate pathway intermediate chorismate. To obtain the PHBA production strain, chorismate lyase UbiC from Escherichia coli and a feedback resistant 3-deoxy-D-arabino-heptulosonate-7-phosphate synthase encoded by gene aroGD146N were overexpressed individually and simultaneously. In addition, genes related to product degradation (pobA or competing for the precursor chorismate (pheA and trpE were deleted from the genome. To further improve PHBA production, the glucose metabolism repressor hexR was knocked out in order to increase erythrose-4- phosphate and NAPH supply. The best strain achieved a maximum titre of 1.73 g L-1 and a carbon yield of 18.1 % (C-mol C-mol-1 in a non-optimized fed-batch fermentation. This is to date the highest PHBA concentration produced by P. putida using a chorismate lyase.

  11. Mutation Frequency and Spectrum of Mutations Vary at Different Chromosomal Positions of Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juurik, Triinu; Ilves, Heili; Teras, Riho; Ilmjärv, Tanel; Tavita, Kairi; Ukkivi, Kärt; Teppo, Annika; Mikkel, Katren; Kivisaar, Maia

    2012-01-01

    It is still an open question whether mutation rate can vary across the bacterial chromosome. In this study, the occurrence of mutations within the same mutational target sequences at different chromosomal locations of Pseudomonas putida was monitored. For that purpose we constructed two mutation detection systems, one for monitoring the occurrence of a broad spectrum of mutations and transposition of IS element IS1411 inactivating LacI repressor, and another for detecting 1-bp deletions. Our results revealed that both the mutation frequency and the spectrum of mutations vary at different chromosomal positions. We observed higher mutation frequencies when the direction of transcription of the mutational target gene was opposite to the direction of replisome movement in the chromosome and vice versa, lower mutation frequency was accompanied with co-directional transcription and replication. Additionally, asymmetry of frameshift mutagenesis at homopolymeric and repetitive sequences during the leading and lagging-strand replication was found. The transposition frequency of IS1411 was also affected by the chromosomal location of the target site, which implies that regional differences in chromosomal topology may influence transposition of this mobile element. The occurrence of mutations in the P. putida chromosome was investigated both in growing and in stationary-phase bacteria. We found that the appearance of certain mutational hot spots is strongly affected by the chromosomal location of the mutational target sequence especially in growing bacteria. Also, artificial increasing transcription of the mutational target gene elevated the frequency of mutations in growing bacteria. PMID:23119042

  12. Metabolic engineering to expand the substrate spectrum of Pseudomonas putida toward sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Hannes; Schmauder, Lukas; Hobmeier, Karina; Kremling, Andreas; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina

    2017-08-01

    Sucrose is an important disaccharide used as a substrate in many industrial applications. It is a major component of molasses, a cheap by-product of the sugar industry. Unfortunately, not all industrially relevant organisms, among them Pseudomonas putida, are capable of metabolizing sucrose. We chose a metabolic engineering approach to circumvent this blockage and equip P. putida with the activities necessary to consume sucrose. Therefore, we constructed a pair of broad-host range mini-transposons (pSST - sucrose splitting transposon), carrying either cscA, encoding an invertase able to split sucrose into glucose and fructose, or additionally cscB, encoding a sucrose permease. Introduction of cscA was sufficient to convey sucrose consumption and the additional presence of cscB had no further effect, though the sucrose permease was built and localized to the membrane. Sucrose was split extracellularly by the activity of the invertase CscA leaking out of the cell. The transposons were also used to confer sucrose consumption to Cupriavidus necator. Interestingly, in this strain, CscB acted as a glucose transporter, such that C. necator also gained the ability to grow on glucose. Thus, the pSST transposons are functional tools to extend the substrate spectrum of Gram-negative bacterial strains toward sucrose. © 2017 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a host for biochemicals production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calero Valdayo, Patricia

    The extensive use of cell factories for production of biochemicals is still facing a number of challenges to become economically competitive. One of the problems that need to be overcome is the toxicity of certain chemical products, which prevents yields high enough for their implementation in in...... for alternative microorganisms as well as identifying mechanisms that can be applied in the design and construction of cell factories will assist in the advance of biosustainability, leading us to a future free of petroleum-based industry....... in industry.This thesis aims at contributing to developing and characterizing tools for the use of alternative hosts organisms with high tolerance towards toxic compounds, such as Pseudomonas putida. The thesis also focuses on identifying target compounds that may be relevant to produce in this strain...

  14. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas putida azoreductase - the active site revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Maria D; Mendes, Sónia; de Sanctis, Daniele; Martins, Lígia O; Bento, Isabel

    2013-12-01

    The enzymatic degradation of azo dyes begins with the reduction of the azo bond. In this article, we report the crystal structures of the native azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94 (PpAzoR) (1.60 Å), of PpAzoR in complex with anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (1.50 Å), and of PpAzoR in complex with Reactive Black 5 dye (1.90 Å). These structures reveal the residues and subtle changes that accompany substrate binding and release. Such changes highlight the fine control of access to the catalytic site that is required by the ping-pong mechanism, and in turn the specificity offered by the enzyme towards different substrates. The topology surrounding the active site shows novel features of substrate recognition and binding that help to explain and differentiate the substrate specificity observed among different bacterial azoreductases. © 2013 FEBS.

  15. Novel polyhydroxyalkanoate copolymers produced in Pseudomonas putida by metagenomic polyhydroxyalkanoate synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiujun; Charles, Trevor C

    2016-09-01

    Bacterially produced biodegradable polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) with versatile properties can be achieved using different PHA synthases (PhaCs). This work aims to expand the diversity of known PhaCs via functional metagenomics and demonstrates the use of these novel enzymes in PHA production. Complementation of a PHA synthesis-deficient Pseudomonas putida strain with a soil metagenomic cosmid library retrieved 27 clones expressing either class I, class II, or unclassified PHA synthases, and many did not have close sequence matches to known PhaCs. The composition of PHA produced by these clones was dependent on both the supplied growth substrates and the nature of the PHA synthase, with various combinations of short-chain-length (SCL) and medium-chain-length (MCL) PHA. These data demonstrate the ability to isolate diverse genes for PHA synthesis by functional metagenomics and their use for the production of a variety of PHA polymer and copolymer mixtures.

  16. Genetic and functional characterization of the gene cluster directing the biosynthesis of putisolvin I and II in Pseudomonas putida strain PCL1445

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubern, J.F.; Coppoolse, E.R.; Stiekema, W.J.; Bloemberg, G.V.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida PCL1445 secretes two cyclic lipopeptides, putisolvin I and putisolvin II, which possess a surface-tension-reducing ability, and are able to inhibit biofilm formation and to break down biofilms of Pseudomonas species including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The putisolvin synthetase gene

  17. Pyoverdine synthesis by the Mn(II-oxidizing bacterium Pseudomonas putida GB-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy Lundquist Parker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When iron-starved, the Mn(II-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas putida strains GB-1 and MnB1 produce pyoverdines (PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1, siderophores that both influence iron uptake and inhibit manganese(II oxidation by these strains. To explore the properties and genetics of a PVD that can affect manganese oxidation, LC-MS/MS and various siderotyping techniques were used to identify the peptides of PVDGB-1 and PVDMnB1 as being (for both PVDs: chromophore-Asp-Lys-OHAsp-Ser-Gly-aThr-Lys-cOHOrn, resembling a structure previously reported for P. putida CFML 90-51, which does not oxidize Mn. All three strains also produced an azotobactin and a sulfonated PVD, each with the peptide sequence above, but with unknown regulatory or metabolic effects. Bioinformatic analysis of the sequenced genome of P. putida GB-1 suggested that a particular non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, coded by the operon PputGB1_4083-4086, could produce the peptide backbone of PVDGB-1. To verify this prediction, plasmid integration disruption of PputGB1_4083 was performed and the resulting mutant failed to produce detectable PVD. In silico analysis of the modules in PputGB1_4083-4086 predicted a peptide sequence of Asp-Lys-Asp-Ser-Ala-Thr-Lsy-Orn, which closely matches the peptide determined by MS/MS. To extend these studies to other organisms, various Mn(II-oxidizing and non-oxidizing isolates of P. putida, P. fluorescens, P. marincola, P. fluorescens-syringae group, P. mendocina-resinovorans group and P. stutzerii group were screened for PVD synthesis. The PVD producers (12 out of 16 tested strains were siderotyped and placed into four sets of differing PVD structures, some corresponding to previously characterized PVDs and some to novel PVDs. These results combined with previous studies suggested that the presence of OHAsp or the flexibility of the pyoverdine polypeptide may enable efficient binding of Mn(III.

  18. Isotope fractionation associated with the simultaneous biodegradation of multiple nitrophenol isomers by Pseudomonas putida B2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijker, Reto S; Zeyer, Josef; Hofstetter, Thomas B

    2017-05-24

    Quantifying the extent of biodegradation of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) in contaminated soils and sediments is challenging because of competing oxidative and reductive reaction pathways. We have previously shown that the stable isotope fractionation of NACs reveals the routes of degradation even if it is simultaneously caused by different bacteria. However, it is unclear whether compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) can be applied in situations where multiple pollutants are biodegraded by only one microorganism under multi-substrate conditions. Here we examined the C and N isotope fractionation of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) and 3-nitrophenol (3-NP) during biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida B2 through monooxygenation and partial reductive pathways, respectively, in the presence of single substrates vs. binary substrate mixtures. Laboratory experiments showed that the reduction of 3-NP by Pseudomonas putida B2 is associated with large N and minor C isotope fractionation with C and N isotope enrichment factors, εC and εN, of -0.3 ± 0.1‰ and -22 ± 0.2‰, respectively. The opposite isotope fractionation trends were found for 2-NP monooxygenation. In the simultaneous presence of 2-NP and 3-NP, 2-NP is biodegraded at identical rate constants and εC and εN values (-1.0 ± 0.1‰ and -1.3 ± 0.2‰) to those found for the monooxygenation of 2-NP in single substrate experiments. While the pathway and N isotope fractionation of 3-NP reduction (εN = -24 ± 1.1‰) are independent of the presence of 2-NP, intermediates of 2-NP monooxygenation interfere with 3-NP reduction. Because neither pH, substrate uptake, nor aromatic substituents affected the kinetic isotope effects of nitrophenol biodegradation, our study illustrates that CSIA provides robust scientific evidence for the assessment of natural attenuation processes.

  19. Competition triggers plasmid-mediated enhancement of substrate utilisation in Pseudomonas putida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Joshi

    Full Text Available Competition between species plays a central role in the activity and structure of communities. Stable co-existence of diverse organisms in communities is thought to be fostered by individual tradeoffs and optimization of competitive strategies along resource gradients. Outside the laboratory, microbes exist as multispecies consortia, continuously interacting with one another and the environment. Survival and proliferation of a particular species is governed by its competitive fitness. Therefore, bacteria must be able to continuously sense their immediate environs for presence of competitors and prevailing conditions. Here we present results of our investigations on a novel competition sensing mechanism in the rhizosphere-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, harbouring gfpmut3b-modified Kan(R TOL plasmid. We monitored benzyl alcohol (BA degradation rate, along with GFP expression profiling in mono species and dual species cultures. Interestingly, enhanced plasmid expression (monitored using GFP expression and consequent BA degradation were observed in dual species consortia, irrespective of whether the competitor was a BA degrader (Pseudomonas aeruginosa or a non-degrader (E. coli. Attempts at elucidation of the mechanistic aspects of induction indicated the role of physical interaction, but not of any diffusible compounds emanating from the competitors. This contention is supported by the observation that greater induction took place in presence of increasing number of competitors. Inert microspheres mimicking competitor cell size and concentration did not elicit any significant induction, further suggesting the role of physical cell-cell interaction. Furthermore, it was also established that cell wall compromised competitor had minimal induction capability. We conclude that P. putida harbouring pWW0 experience a competitive stress when grown as dual-species consortium, irrespective of the counterpart being BA degrader or not. The immediate

  20. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules

    OpenAIRE

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture.

  1. Evaluating the efficiency of two phase partitioning stirred tank bio-reactor for treating xylene vapors from the airstreamthrough a bed of Pseudomonas Putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Golbabaei

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Overall, the results of the present research revealed that the application of two phase stirred tank bioreactors (TPPBs containing pure strains of Pseudomonas putida was successful for treatment of air streams with xylene.

  2. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440: iJN746 as a cell factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Juan; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Thiele, Ines

    2008-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida is the best studied pollutant degradative bacteria and is harnessed by industrial biotechnology to synthesize fine chemicals. Since the publication of P. putida KT2440's genome, some in silico analyses of its metabolic and biotechnology capacities have been published. However, global understanding of the capabilities of P. putida KT2440 requires the construction of a metabolic model that enables the integration of classical experimental data along with genomic and high-throughput data. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA) approach has been successfully used to build and analyze in silico genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Results We present a genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida KT2440's metabolism, iJN746, which was constructed based on genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 746 genes, 950 reactions, and 911 metabolites. iJN746 captures biotechnologically relevant pathways, including polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis and catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (e.g., toluene, benzoate, phenylacetate, nicotinate), not described in other metabolic reconstructions or biochemical databases. The predictive potential of iJN746 was validated using experimental data including growth performance and gene deletion studies. Furthermore, in silico growth on toluene was found to be oxygen-limited, suggesting the existence of oxygen-efficient pathways not yet annotated in P. putida's genome. Moreover, we evaluated the production efficiency of polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources and found fatty acids as the most prominent candidates, as expected. Conclusion Here we presented the first genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida, a biotechnologically interesting all-surrounder. Taken together, this work illustrates the utility of iJN746 as i) a knowledge-base, ii) a discovery tool, and iii) an engineering platform to explore P. putida's potential in

  3. A genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of Pseudomonas putida KT2440: iJN746 as a cell factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiele Ines

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida is the best studied pollutant degradative bacteria and is harnessed by industrial biotechnology to synthesize fine chemicals. Since the publication of P. putida KT2440's genome, some in silico analyses of its metabolic and biotechnology capacities have been published. However, global understanding of the capabilities of P. putida KT2440 requires the construction of a metabolic model that enables the integration of classical experimental data along with genomic and high-throughput data. The constraint-based reconstruction and analysis (COBRA approach has been successfully used to build and analyze in silico genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. Results We present a genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida KT2440's metabolism, iJN746, which was constructed based on genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. This manually-curated reconstruction accounts for 746 genes, 950 reactions, and 911 metabolites. iJN746 captures biotechnologically relevant pathways, including polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis and catabolic pathways of aromatic compounds (e.g., toluene, benzoate, phenylacetate, nicotinate, not described in other metabolic reconstructions or biochemical databases. The predictive potential of iJN746 was validated using experimental data including growth performance and gene deletion studies. Furthermore, in silico growth on toluene was found to be oxygen-limited, suggesting the existence of oxygen-efficient pathways not yet annotated in P. putida's genome. Moreover, we evaluated the production efficiency of polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources and found fatty acids as the most prominent candidates, as expected. Conclusion Here we presented the first genome-scale reconstruction of P. putida, a biotechnologically interesting all-surrounder. Taken together, this work illustrates the utility of iJN746 as i a knowledge-base, ii a discovery tool, and iii an engineering platform to explore P

  4. In situ biosurfactant production and hydrocarbon removal by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 in bioaugmented and biostimulated oil-contaminated soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Toledo Ángeles

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ biosurfactant (rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas putida CB-100 was achieved during a bioaugmented and biostimulated treatment to remove hydrocarbons from aged contaminated soil from oil well drilling operations. Rhamnolipid production and contaminant removal were determined for several treatments of irradiated and non-irradiated soils: nutrient addition (nitrogen and phosphorus, P. putida addition, and addition of both (P. putida and nutrients. The results were compared against a control treatment that consisted of adding only sterilized water to the soils. In treatment with native microorganisms (non-irradiated soils supplemented with P. putida, the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH was 40.6%, the rhamnolipid production was 1.54 mg/kg, and a surface tension of 64 mN/m was observed as well as a negative correlation (R = -0.54; p < 0.019 between TPH concentration (mg/kg and surface tension (mN/m, When both bacteria and nutrients were involved, TPH levels were lowered to 33.7%, and biosurfactant production and surface tension were 2.03 mg/kg and 67.3 mN/m, respectively. In irradiated soil treated with P. putida, TPH removal was 24.5% with rhamnolipid generation of 1.79 mg/kg and 65.6 mN/m of surface tension, and a correlation between bacterial growth and biosurfactant production (R = -0.64; p < 0.009 was observed. When the nutrients and P. putida were added, TPH removal was 61.1%, 1.85 mg/kg of biosurfactants were produced, and the surface tension was 55.6 mN/m. In summary, in irradiated and non-irradiated soils, in situ rhamnolipid production by P. putida enhanced TPH decontamination of the soil.

  5. The Role of CzcRS Two-Component Systems in the Heavy Metal Resistance of Pseudomonas putida X4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pulin Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The role of different czcRS genes in metal resistance and the cross-link between czcRS and czcCBA in Pseudomonas putida X4 were studied to advance understanding of the mechanisms by which P. putida copes with metal stress. Similar to P. putida KT2440, two complete czcRS1 and czcRS2 two-component systems, as well as a czcR3 without the corresponding sensing component were amplified in P. putida X4. The histidine kinase genes czcS1 and czcS2 were inactivated and fused to lacZ by homologous recombination. The lacZ fusion assay revealed that Cd2+ and Zn2+ caused a decrease in the transcription of czcRS1, whereas Cd2+ treatment enhanced the transcription of czcRS2. The mutation of different czcRSs showed that all czcRSs are necessary to facilitate full metal resistance in P. putida X4. A putative gene just downstream of czcR3 is related to metal ion resistance, and its transcription was activated by Zn2+. Data from quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR strongly suggested that czcRSs regulate the expression of czcCBA, and a cross-link exists between different czcRSs.

  6. Colony morphology and transcriptome profiling of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its mutants deficient in alginate or all EPS synthesis under controlled matric potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülez, Gamze; Altintas, Ali; Fazli, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a versatile bacterial species adapted to soil and its fluctuations. Like many other species living in soil, P. putida often faces water limitation. Alginate, an exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by P. putida, is known to create hydrated environments and alleviate the effect...... of water limitation. In addition to alginate, P. putida is capable of producing cellulose (bcs), putida exopolysaccharide a (pea), and putida exopolysaccharide b (peb). However, unlike alginate, not much is known about their roles under water limitation. Hence, in this study we examined the role...... of different EPS components under mild water limitation. To create environmentally realistic water limited conditions as observed in soil, we used the Pressurized Porous Surface Model. Our main hypothesis was that under water limitation and in the absence of alginate other exopolysaccharides would be more...

  7. ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A THERMOTOLERANT PLANT GROWTH PROMOTING PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA PRODUCING TREHALOSE SYNTHASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sk.Z.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A thermotolerant plant growth promoting Pseudomonas isolate growing at 40oC producing trehalose synthase (TreS was isolated from rhizosphere soil under semi arid conditions of India. Trehalose synthase was extracted; purified and enzymatic activity was examined at various temperatures and pH. The optimum temperature and pH was 38oC and pH 7.5 and the activity declined at above or below the optimum pH and temperature. The enzyme was active on maltose and trehalose among saccharides tested. The enzyme had a higher catalytic activity for maltose with a trehalose yield of 72% than for trehalose where 30% yield of maltose was achieved, indicating maltose as preferred substrate. The isolate showed multiple plant growth promoting traits (indole acetic acid (IAA, phosphate solubilization, siderophore and ammonia both at ambient (28oC and high temperature (40oC. Based on phenotypic and 16SrRNA analysis the isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida (Accession No. GU396283.

  8. Integrated foam fractionation for heterologous rhamnolipid production with recombinant Pseudomonas putida in a bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuker, Janina; Steier, Anke; Wittgens, Andreas; Rosenau, Frank; Henkel, Marius; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2016-03-01

    Heterologeous production of rhamnolipids in Pseudomonas putida is characterized by advantages of a non-pathogenic host and avoidance of the native quorum sensing regulation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Yet, downstream processing is a major problem in rhamnolipid production and increases in complexity at low rhamnolipid titers and when using chemical foam control. This leaves the necessity of a simple concentrating and purification method. Foam fractionation is an elegant method for in situ product removal when producing microbial surfactants. However, up to now in situ foam fractionation is nearly exclusively reported for the production of surfactin with Bacillus subtilis. So far no cultivation integrated foam fractionation process for rhamnolipid production has been reported. This is probably due to excessive bacterial foam enrichment in that system. In this article a simple integrated foam fractionation process is reported for heterologous rhamnolipid production in a bioreactor with easily manageable bacterial foam enrichments. Rhamnolipids were highly concentrated in the foam during the cultivation process with enrichment factors up to 200. The described process was evaluated at different pH, media compositions and temperatures. Foam fractionation processes were characterized by calculating procedural parameter including rhamnolipid and bacterial enrichment, rhamnolipid recovery, YX/S, YP/X, and specific as well as volumetric productivities. Comparing foam fractionation parameters of the rhamnolipid process with the surfactin process a high effectiveness of the integrated foam fractionation for rhamnolipid production was demonstrated.

  9. Influence of putative exopolysaccharide genes on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilm stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Martin; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Fazli, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    . putida KT2440 biofilm. The gene clusters alg and bcs, which code for proteins mediating alginate and cellulose biosynthesis, were found to play minor roles in P. putida KT2440 biofilm formation and stability under the conditions tested. A P. putida KT2440 derivative devoid of any identifiable...

  10. Biological synthesis of the analgesic hydromorphone, an intermediate in the metabolism of morphine, by Pseudomonas putida M10.

    OpenAIRE

    Hailes, A M; Bruce, N C

    1993-01-01

    The morphine alkaloid hydromorphone (dihydromorphinone) was identified as an intermediary metabolite in the degradation of morphine by Pseudomonas putida M10. A constitutive NADH-dependent morphinone reductase capable of catalyzing the reduction of the 7,8-unsaturated bond of morphinone and codeinone, yielding hydromorphone and hydrocodone, respectively, was shown to be present in cell extracts. The structures have been identified by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry. Morphi...

  11. Isolation of a strain of Pseudomonas putida capable of metabolizing anionic detergent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, V; Kumar, A

    2011-03-01

    Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) is one of the most widely used anionic detergents. The present study deals with isolation and identification of SDS-degrading bacteria from a detergent contaminated pond situated in Varanasi city, India. Employing enrichment technique in minimal medium (PBM), SDS-degrading bacteria were isolated from pond water sample. Rate of degradation of SDS was studied in liquid PBM and also degradation of different concentrations of SDS was also studied to find out maximum concentration of SDS degraded by the potent isolates. Alkyl sulfatase activity (key enzyme in SDS degradation) was estimated in crude cell extracts and multiplicity of alkyl sulfatase was studied by Native PAGE Zymography. The potent isolate was identified by 16S rRNA sequence analysis. Using enrichment technique in minimal medium containing SDS as a sole carbon source, initially three SDS degrading isolates were recovered. However, only one isolate, SP3, was found to be an efficient degrader of SDS. It was observed that this strain could completely metabolize 0.1% SDS in 16 h, 0.2% SDS in 20 h and 0.3% SDS in 24 h of incubation. Specific activity of alkyl sulfatase was 0.087±0.004 µmol SDS/mg protein/min and Native PAGE Zymography showed presence of alkyl sulfatase of Rf value of 0.21. This isolate was identified as Pseudomonas putida strain SP3. This is the report of isolation of SDS-degrading strain of P. putida, which shows high rate of SDS degradation and can degrade up to 0.3% SDS. It appears that this isolate can be exploited for bioremediation of this detergent from water systems.

  12. The T7-related Pseudomonas putida phage φ15 displays virion-associated biofilm degradation properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneleen Cornelissen

    Full Text Available Formation of a protected biofilm environment is recognized as one of the major causes of the increasing antibiotic resistance development and emphasizes the need to develop alternative antibacterial strategies, like phage therapy. This study investigates the in vitro degradation of single-species Pseudomonas putida biofilms, PpG1 and RD5PR2, by the novel phage ϕ15, a 'T7-like virus' with a virion-associated exopolysaccharide (EPS depolymerase. Phage ϕ15 forms plaques surrounded by growing opaque halo zones, indicative for EPS degradation, on seven out of 53 P. putida strains. The absence of haloes on infection resistant strains suggests that the EPS probably act as a primary bacterial receptor for phage infection. Independent of bacterial strain or biofilm age, a time and dose dependent response of ϕ15-mediated biofilm degradation was observed with generally a maximum biofilm degradation 8 h after addition of the higher phage doses (10(4 and 10(6 pfu and resistance development after 24 h. Biofilm age, an in vivo very variable parameter, reduced markedly phage-mediated degradation of PpG1 biofilms, while degradation of RD5PR2 biofilms and ϕ15 amplification were unaffected. Killing of the planktonic culture occurred in parallel with but was always more pronounced than biofilm degradation, accentuating the need for evaluating phages for therapeutic purposes in biofilm conditions. EPS degrading activity of recombinantly expressed viral tail spike was confirmed by capsule staining. These data suggests that the addition of high initial titers of specifically selected phages with a proper EPS depolymerase are crucial criteria in the development of phage therapy.

  13. The Functional Structure of Central Carbon Metabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudarsan, Suresh; Dethlefsen, Sarah; Blank, Lars M.; Siemann-Herzberg, Martin

    2014-01-01

    What defines central carbon metabolism? The classic textbook scheme of central metabolism includes the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway of glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the citric acid cycle. The prevalence of this definition of central metabolism is, however, equivocal without experimental validation. We address this issue using a general experimental approach that combines the monitoring of transcriptional and metabolic flux changes between steady states on alternative carbon sources. This approach is investigated by using the model bacterium Pseudomonas putida with glucose, fructose, and benzoate as carbon sources. The catabolic reactions involved in the initial uptake and metabolism of these substrates are expected to show a correlated change in gene expressions and metabolic fluxes. However, there was no correlation for the reactions linking the 12 biomass precursor molecules, indicating a regulation mechanism other than mRNA synthesis for central metabolism. This result substantiates evidence for a (re)definition of central carbon metabolism including all reactions that are bound to tight regulation and transcriptional invariance. Contrary to expectations, the canonical Entner-Doudoroff and EMP pathways sensu stricto are not a part of central carbon metabolism in P. putida, as they are not regulated differently from the aromatic degradation pathway. The regulatory analyses presented here provide leads on a qualitative basis to address the use of alternative carbon sources by deregulation and overexpression at the transcriptional level, while rate improvements in central carbon metabolism require careful adjustment of metabolite concentrations, as regulation resides to a large extent in posttranslational and/or metabolic regulation. PMID:24951791

  14. Potential of Pseudomonas putida PCI2 for the Protection of Tomato Plants Against Fungal Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Nicolás; Masciarelli, Oscar; Fischer, Sonia; Luna, Virginia; Rovera, Marisa

    2016-09-01

    Tomato is one of the most economically attractive vegetable crops due to its high yields. Diseases cause significant losses in tomato production worldwide. We carried out Polymerase Chain Reaction studies to detect the presence of genes encoding antifungal compounds in the DNA of Pseudomonas putida strain PCI2. We also used liquid chromatography-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry to detect and quantify the production of compounds that increase the resistance of plants to diseases from culture supernatants of PCI2. In addition, we investigated the presence of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase in PCI2. Finally, PCI2 was used for inoculation of tomato seeds to study its potential biocontrol activity against Fusarium oxysporum MR193. The obtained results showed that no fragments for the encoding genes of hydrogen cyanide, pyoluteorin, 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol, pyrrolnitrin, or phenazine-1-carboxylic acid were amplified from the DNA of PCI2. On the other hand, PCI2 produced salicylic acid and jasmonic acid in Luria-Bertani medium and grew in a culture medium containing ACC as the sole nitrogen source. We observed a reduction in disease incidence from 53.33 % in the pathogen control to 30 % in tomato plants pre-inoculated with PCI2 as well as increases in shoot and root dry weights in inoculated plants, as compared to the pathogenicity control. This study suggests that inoculation of tomato seeds with P. putida PCI2 increases the resistance of plants to root rot caused by F. oxysporum and that PCI2 produces compounds that may be involved at different levels in increasing such resistance. Thus, PCI2 could represent a non-contaminating management strategy potentially applicable in vegetable crops such as tomato.

  15. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. Results A bacterial laccase (WlacD) was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ) anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG) 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR) 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu2+- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l) with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h) and 97.1% (18 h), as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l) by 80.5% (3 h) and 89.0% (18 h), was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l). No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved via a subsequent 4-h

  16. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. Results A bacterial laccase (WlacD was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu2+- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h and 97.1% (18 h, as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l by 80.5% (3 h and 89.0% (18 h, was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l. No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved

  17. Decolorization of industrial synthetic dyes using engineered Pseudomonas putida cells with surface-immobilized bacterial laccase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhang, Zhen; Ni, Hong; Yang, Xiaomeng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Lin

    2012-06-11

    Microbial laccases are highly useful in textile effluent dye biodegradation. However, the bioavailability of cellularly expressed or purified laccases in continuous operations is usually limited by mass transfer impediment or enzyme regeneration difficulty. Therefore, this study develops a regenerable bacterial surface-displaying system for industrial synthetic dye decolorization, and evaluates its effects on independent and continuous operations. A bacterial laccase (WlacD) was engineered onto the cell surface of the solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst. Ice nucleation protein (InaQ) anchor was employed, and the ability of 1 to 3 tandemly aligned N-terminal repeats to direct WlacD display were compared. Immobilized WlacD was determined to be surface-displayed in functional form using Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry, and whole-cell enzymatic activity assay. Engineered P. putida cells were then applied to decolorize the anthraquinone dye Acid Green (AG) 25 and diazo-dye Acid Red (AR) 18. The results showed that decolorization of both dyes is Cu(2+)- and mediator-independent, with an optimum temperature of 35°C and pH of 3.0, and can be stably performed across a temperature range of 15°C to 45°C. A high activity toward AG25 (1 g/l) with relative decolorization values of 91.2% (3 h) and 97.1% (18 h), as well as high activity to AR18 (1 g/l) by 80.5% (3 h) and 89.0% (18 h), was recorded. The engineered system exhibited a comparably high activity compared with those of separate dyes in a continuous three-round shake-flask decolorization of AG25/AR18 mixed dye (each 1 g/l). No significant decline in decolorization efficacy was noted during first two-rounds but reaction equilibriums were elongated, and the residual laccase activity eventually decreased to low levels. However, the decolorizing capacity of the system was easily retrieved via a subsequent 4-h cell culturing

  18. Enhanced biodegradation of mixed phenol and sodium salicylate by Pseudomonas putida in membrane contactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Ruey-Shin; Tsai, Shang-Yuan

    2006-11-01

    A polypropylene (PP) hollow fiber membrane contactor was used as a reactor to enhance the biodegradation of equimolar phenol and sodium salicylate (SA) by Pseudomonas putida CCRC 14365 at 30 degrees C and pH 7. Experiments were performed at a fixed initial cell density of 0.025 g/L and in the total substrate level range 5.32-63.8 mM. The degradation experiments by free cells were also studied for comparison. With pristine hydrophobic fibers, the degradation of SA was started only after phenol was completely consumed. Substrate inhibitory effect was avoided due to sufficiently low substrate levels in the cell medium; however, the biodegradation was time consuming. With ethanol-wetted fibers, both substrates were completely degraded much faster than the use of pristine fibers. Although the wetted fibers were unable to prevent movement of substrates through the pores, biofilm formed on the outer surfaces of the fibers could enhance the tolerance limit of substrate toxicity. This greatly extended the treatment range to high-level substrate mixtures, as long as the water was nearly neutral and free of concentrated inorganic salts.

  19. Effect of silver nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida biofilms at different stages of maturity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuptimdang, Pumis, E-mail: pumis.th@gmail.com [International Program in Hazardous Substance and Environmental Management, Graduate School, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Hazardous Substance Management, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Limpiyakorn, Tawan, E-mail: tawan.l@chula.ac.th [Center of Excellence on Hazardous Substance Management, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Department of Environmental Engineering, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Research Unit Control of Emerging Micropollutants in Environment, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); McEvoy, John, E-mail: john.mcevoy@ndsu.edu [Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States); Prüß, Birgit M., E-mail: birgit.pruess@ndsu.edu [Department of Veterinary and Microbiological Sciences, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States); Khan, Eakalak, E-mail: eakalak.khan@ndsu.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58108 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Biofilm stages in static batch conditions were similar to dynamic conditions. • Expression of csgA gene increased earlier than alg8 gene in biofilm maturation. • AgNPs had higher effect on less mature biofilms. • Removal of extracellular polymeric substance made biofilms susceptible to AgNPs. - Abstract: This study determined the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different stages of maturity. Three biofilm stages (1–3, representing early to late stages of development) were identified from bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity under static (96-well plate) and dynamic conditions (Center for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor). Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) levels, measured using crystal violet and total carbohydrate assays, and expression of the EPS-associated genes, csgA and alg8, supported the conclusion that biofilms at later stages were older than those at earlier stages. More mature biofilms (stages 2 and 3) showed little to no reduction in ATP activity following exposure to AgNPs. In contrast, the same treatment reduced ATP activity by more than 90% in the less mature stage 1 biofilms. Regardless of maturity, biofilms with EPS stripped off were more susceptible to AgNPs than controls with intact EPS, demonstrating that EPS is critical for biofilm tolerance of AgNPs. The findings from this study show that stage of maturity is an important factor to consider when studying effect of AgNPs on biofilms.

  20. Daya Tahan Hidup Pseudomonas putida Strain Pf-20 dalam Beberapa Macam Inokulum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yenny Wuryandari

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available For any crop-protection agent, an efficient formulation is a necessity to translate laboratory activity into adequate field performance. There are particular challenges to be faced in formulation of biological control agents, because the active ingredient is a living organism that must be kept relatively immobile and inactive while in storage, but quickly resume its  normal metabolic processes once applied to the target site. The objective of the research was  to study survival of Pseudomonas putida strain Pf-20 in various formulations at the storage  time and germination. The twelve formulations include carriers, additives and concentration  of Pf-20. The efficacy of various formulation in maintaining the population of Pf-20 in storage was assessed. The research result showed that population of Pf 20  in the formulation  number seven was the highest, with the combination peat+talc, CMC+arginin and  concentration of Pf[20 10^10 CFU/ml. In peat+talc, CMC+arginin, Pf-20 10^10  CFU/ml based formulation the bacteria survived even up to 84 days of storage although the population declined. In all formulations, population of Pf-20 increased at the time of seed germination. At the time of seed germination, formulation number seven was the highest too.

  1. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-09-22

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm² in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm² in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10⁻²% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  2. Effect of silver nanoparticles on Pseudomonas putida biofilms at different stages of maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuptimdang, Pumis; Limpiyakorn, Tawan; McEvoy, John; Prüß, Birgit M; Khan, Eakalak

    2015-06-15

    This study determined the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on Pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms at different stages of maturity. Three biofilm stages (1-3, representing early to late stages of development) were identified from bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) activity under static (96-well plate) and dynamic conditions (Center for Disease Control and Prevention biofilm reactor). Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) levels, measured using crystal violet and total carbohydrate assays, and expression of the EPS-associated genes, csgA and alg8, supported the conclusion that biofilms at later stages were older than those at earlier stages. More mature biofilms (stages 2 and 3) showed little to no reduction in ATP activity following exposure to AgNPs. In contrast, the same treatment reduced ATP activity by more than 90% in the less mature stage 1 biofilms. Regardless of maturity, biofilms with EPS stripped off were more susceptible to AgNPs than controls with intact EPS, demonstrating that EPS is critical for biofilm tolerance of AgNPs. The findings from this study show that stage of maturity is an important factor to consider when studying effect of AgNPs on biofilms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synergistic effect of Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ameliorates drought stress in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Mishra, Sankalp; Dixit, Vijaykant; Kumar, Manoj; Agarwal, Lalit; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Two plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) Pseudomonas putida NBRIRA and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NBRISN13 with ability to tolerate abiotic stress along with multiple PGP traits like ACC deaminase activity, minerals solubilisation, hormones production, biofilm formation, siderophore activity were evaluated for their synergistic effect to ameliorate drought stress in chickpea. Earlier we have reported both the strains individually for their PGP attributes and stress amelioration in host plants. The present study explains in detail the possibilities and benefits of utilizing these 2 PGPR in consortium for improving the chickpea growth under control and drought stressed condition. In vitro results clearly demonstrate that both the PGPR strains are compatible to each other and their synergistic growth enhances the PGP attributes. Greenhouse experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of inoculation of both strains individually and consortia in drought tolerant and sensitive cultivars (BG362 and P1003). The growth parameters were observed significantly higher in consortium as compared to individual PGPR. Colonization of both PGPR in chickpea rhizosphere has been visualized by using gfp labeling. Apart from growth parameters, defense enzymes, soil enzymes and microbial diversity were significantly modulated in individually PGPR and in consortia inoculated plants. Negative effects of drought stress has been ameliorated and apparently seen by higher biomass and reversal of stress indicators in chickpea cultivars treated with PGPR individually or in consortia. Findings from the present study demonstrate that synergistic application has better potential to improve plant growth promotion under drought stress conditions.

  4. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dip Majumder

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial fuel cells (MFCs represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059, a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm chemical oxygen demand (COD could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation.

  5. Electricity Generation and Wastewater Treatment of Oil Refinery in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Pseudomonas putida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel platform for treating wastewater and at the same time generating electricity. Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days. Our study indicated that the oil refinery wastewater containing 2213 mg/L (ppm) chemical oxygen demand (COD) could be used as a substrate for electricity generation in the reactor of the MFC. A maximum voltage of 355 mV was obtained with the highest power density of 0.005 mW/cm2 in the third cycle with a maximum current density of 0.015 mA/cm2 in regard to the external resistor of 1000 Ω. A maximum coulombic efficiency of 6 × 10−2% was obtained in the fourth cycle. The removal efficiency of the COD reached 30% as a function of time. Electron transfer mechanism was studied using cyclic voltammetry, which indicated the presence of a soluble electron shuttle in the reactor. Our study demonstrated that oil refinery wastewater could be used as a substrate for electricity generation. PMID:25247576

  6. Environmental stress speeds up DNA replication in Pseudomonas putida in chemostat cultivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieder, Sarah; Jahn, Michael; Koepff, Joachim; Müller, Susann; Takors, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Cellular response to different types of stress is the hallmark of the cell's strategy for survival. How organisms adjust their cell cycle dynamics to compensate for changes in environmental conditions is an important unanswered question in bacterial physiology. A cell using binary fission for reproduction passes through three stages during its cell cycle: a stage from cell birth to initiation of replication, a DNA replication phase and a period of cell division. We present a detailed analysis of durations of cell cycle phases, investigating their dynamics under environmental stress conditions. Applying continuous steady state cultivations (chemostats), the DNA content of a Pseudomonas putida KT2440 population was quantified with flow cytometry at distinct growth rates. Data-driven modeling revealed that under stress conditions, such as oxygen deprivation, solvent exposure and decreased iron availability, DNA replication was accelerated correlated to the severity of the imposed stress (up to 1.9-fold). Cells maintained constant growth rates by balancing the shortened replication phase with extended cell cycle phases before and after replication. Transcriptome data underpin the transcriptional upregulation of crucial genes of the replication machinery. Hence adaption of DNA replication speed appears to be an important strategy to withstand environmental stress. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Andrea; Foladori, Paola; Ponti, Benedetta; Bettinetti, Roberta; Gambino, Michela; Villa, Federica; Cappitelli, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97%) and thickness (−50%), and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition. PMID:24879523

  8. Evaluation of Zosteric Acid for Mitigating Biofilm Formation of Pseudomonas putida Isolated from a Membrane Bioreactor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Polo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study provides data to define an efficient biocide-free strategy based on zosteric acid to counteract biofilm formation on the membranes of submerged bioreactor system plants. 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic analysis showed that gammaproteobacteria was the prevalent taxa on fouled membranes of an Italian wastewater plant. Pseudomonas was the prevalent genus among the cultivable membrane-fouler bacteria and Pseudomonas putida was selected as the target microorganism to test the efficacy of the antifoulant. Zosteric acid was not a source of carbon and energy for P. putida cells and, at 200 mg/L, it caused a reduction of bacterial coverage by 80%. Biofilm experiments confirmed the compound caused a significant decrease in biomass (−97% and thickness (−50%, and it induced a migration activity of the peritrichous flagellated P. putida over the polycarbonate surface not amenable to a biofilm phenotype. The low octanol-water partitioning coefficient and the high water solubility suggested a low bioaccumulation potential and the water compartment as its main environmental recipient and capacitor. Preliminary ecotoxicological tests did not highlight direct toxicity effects toward Daphnia magna. For green algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata an effect was observed at concentrations above 100 mg/L with a significant growth of protozoa that may be connected to a concurrent algal growth inhibition.

  9. Draft genome sequence analysis of a Pseudomonas putida W15Oct28 strain with antagonistic activity to Gram-positive and Pseudomonas sp. pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lumeng Ye

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida is a member of the fluorescent pseudomonads known to produce the yellow-green fluorescent pyoverdine siderophore. P. putida W15Oct28, isolated from a stream in Brussels, was found to produce compound(s with antimicrobial activity against the opportunistic pathogens Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae, an unusual characteristic for P. putida. The active compound production only occurred in media with low iron content and without organic nitrogen sources. Transposon mutants which lost their antimicrobial activity had the majority of insertions in genes involved in the biosynthesis of pyoverdine, although purified pyoverdine was not responsible for the antagonism. Separation of compounds present in culture supernatants revealed the presence of two fractions containing highly hydrophobic molecules active against P. aeruginosa. Analysis of the draft genome confirmed the presence of putisolvin biosynthesis genes and the corresponding lipopeptides were found to contribute to the antimicrobial activity. One cluster of ten genes was detected, comprising a NAD-dependent epimerase, an acetylornithine aminotransferase, an acyl CoA dehydrogenase, a short chain dehydrogenase, a fatty acid desaturase and three genes for a RND efflux pump. P. putida W15Oct28 genome also contains 56 genes encoding TonB-dependent receptors, conferring a high capacity to utilize pyoverdines from other pseudomonads. One unique feature of W15Oct28 is also the presence of different secretion systems including a full set of genes for type IV secretion, and several genes for type VI secretion and their VgrG effectors.

  10. Effects of Pseudomonas putida and Glomusintraradices Inoculations on Morphological and Biochemical Traitsin Trigonellafoenum-graecum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    simin irankhah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fenugreek (Trigonellafoenum-graecum L. is a traditional medicinal plant belonging to the legume family Fabaceae. Diverse groups of microorganisms are symbiotic with Fenugreek roots system. This integration leads to significant increases in the development and production by increasing nitrogen fixation, phytohormones production, siderophores and phosphate solubilization. Plant growth-promoting bacteria increase plant growth byimproving nutrientuptake and phytohormones production. In addition, the beneficial effect of these bacteria could be due totheirinteractionwithArbuscularMycorrhizal fungi(VAM. Drought is one of the major limiting factors for crop production in many parts of the world including Iran. Symbiotic microorganisms can enhance plant tolerance to drought. This experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of Vesicular ArbuscularMycorrhiza (VAM and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR on morphological and biochemical characteristics of Fenugreek in drought stress conditions. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in completely random design with 3 replications.There were four treatments including inoculation with Pseudomonas putida, inoculation with Glomusintraradices, combined association of Pseudomonas putida and Glomusintraradices and untreated as a check under drought stress (40% of field capacity and non-stress conditions (80% of field capacity. In this experiment fiveseeds were sowninplastic pots. Before sowing, seeds were inoculated with microorganisms. In order to inoculation ofseed with Mycorrhizal fungi, for each kilogram of soil, 100 grams of powder containing 10 to 15 thousand spores of fungal soil (produced by the biotech company Toos was added to three centimeters of soil in the pot. For seed inoculation with Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria, the growth curve of the bacteria was drawn at first and then the best time for the growth of bacteria was determined. The bacteria at

  11. Calcium causes multimerization of the large adhesin LapF and modulates biofilm formation by Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gil, Marta; Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2012-12-01

    LapF is a large secreted protein involved in microcolony formation and biofilm maturation in Pseudomonas putida. Its C-terminal domain shows the characteristics of proteins secreted through a type I secretion system and includes a predicted calcium binding motif. We provide experimental evidence of specific binding of Ca(2+) to the purified C-terminal domain of LapF (CLapF). Calcium promotes the formation of large aggregates, which disappear in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA. Immunolocalization of LapF also shows the tendency of this protein to accumulate in vivo in certain extracellular regions. These findings, along with results showing that calcium influences biofilm formation, lead us to propose a model in which P. putida cells interact with each other via LapF in a calcium-dependent manner during the development of biofilms.

  12. An upp-based markerless gene replacement method for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering in Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Chi; Gong, Ting; Zuo, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Fengjie; Fan, Xu; Yang, Chao; Song, Cunjiang

    2015-06-01

    A markerless gene replacement method was adapted by combining a suicide plasmid, pEX18Tc, with a counterselectable marker, the upp gene encoding uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRTase), for the medium-chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA(MCL))-producing strain Pseudomonas mendocina NK-01. An NK-01 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) resistant background strain was first constructed by deleting the chromosomal upp gene. The suicide plasmid pEX18Tc, carrying a functional allele of the upp gene of P. mendocina NK-01, was used to construct the vectors to delete the algA (encoding mannose-1-phosphate guanylyltransferase) and phaZ (encoding PHA(MCL) depolymerase) genes, and a 30 kb chromosomal fragment in the 5-FU resistant background host. The genes were removed efficiently from the genome of P. mendocina NK-01 and left a markerless chromosomal mutant. In addition, two exogenous genes were inserted into the phaC1 (PHA(MCL) polymerase) loci of Pseudomonas putida KT-∆UPP simultaneously. Thus, we constructed a genetically stable and marker-free P. putida KT2440 mutant with integrated mpd (encoding methyl parathion hydrolase (MPH)) and pytH (encoding a pyrethroid-hydrolyzing carboxylesterase (PytH)) gene on the chromosome. The upp-based counterselection system could be further adapted for P. mendocina NK-01 and P. putida KT2440 and used for genome reduction and metabolic pathway engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Ssr protein (T1E_1405) from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E enables oligonucleotide-based recombineering in platform strain P. putida EM42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aparicio, Tomás; Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    of reference strain KT2440) is still a time-consuming endeavor. In this work we have investigated the in vivo activity of the Ssr protein encoded by the open reading frame T1E_1405 from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, a plausible functional homologue of the β protein of the Red recombination system of λ phage...

  14. Phenol biodegradation by immobilized Pseudomonas putida FNCC-0071 cells in alginate beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Lukman Nul; Rochmadi, Sutijan

    2017-06-01

    Phenol is one of industrial liquid waste which is harmful to the environment, so it must be degraded. It can be degraded by immobilized Pseudomonas putida FNCC-0071 cells. It needs the kinetics and mass transfer data to design this process which can be estimated by the proposed dynamic model in this study. This model involves simultaneous diffusion and reaction in the alginate bead and liquid bulk. The preliminary stage of phenol biodegradation process was acclimatization cells. This is the stage where cells were acclimated to phenol as carbon source (substrate). Then the acclimated cells were immobilized in alginate beads by extrusion method. The variation of the initial phenol concentration in the solution is 350 to 850 ppm where 60 g alginate bead contained by cells loaded into its solution in reactor batch, so then biodegradation occurs. In this study, the average radius of alginate bead was 0.152 cm. The occurred kinetic reaction process can be explained by Blanch kinetic model with the decreasing of parameter μmax' while the increasing values of initial phenol concentration in the same time, but the parameters KM, KM', and kt were increasing by the rising values of initial phenol concentration. The value of the parameter β is almost zero. Effective diffusivity of phenol and cells are 1.11 × 10-5±4.5% cm2 s-1 and 1.39 × 10-7± 0.04% cm2 s-1. The partition coefficient of phenol and cells are 0.39 ± 15% and 2.22 ± 18%.

  15. Multiple and interconnected pathways for L-lysine catabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelles, Olga; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; Ramos, Juan L

    2005-11-01

    L-lysine catabolism in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 was generally thought to occur via the aminovalerate pathway. In this study we demonstrate the operation of the alternative aminoadipate pathway with the intermediates D-lysine, L-pipecolate, and aminoadipate. The simultaneous operation of both pathways for the use of L-lysine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source was confirmed genetically. Mutants with mutations in either pathway failed to use L-lysine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source, although they still used L-lysine as the nitrogen source, albeit at reduced growth rates. New genes were identified in both pathways, including the davB and davA genes that encode the enzymes involved in the oxidation of L-lysine to delta-aminovaleramide and the hydrolysis of the latter to delta-aminovalerate, respectively. The amaA, dkpA, and amaB genes, in contrast, encode proteins involved in the transformation of Delta1-piperidine-2-carboxylate into aminoadipate. Based on L-[U-13C, U-15N]lysine experiments, we quantified the relative use of pathways in the wild type and its isogenic mutants. The fate of 13C label of L-lysine indicates that in addition to the existing connection between the D- and L-lysine pathways at the early steps of the catabolism of L-lysine mediated by a lysine racemase, there is yet another interconnection at the lower end of the pathways in which aminoadipate is channeled to yield glutarate. This study establishes an unequivocal relationship between gene and pathway enzymes in the metabolism of L-lysine, which is of crucial importance for the successful colonization of the rhizosphere of plants by this microorganism.

  16. Pseudomonas putida Strain FStm2 Isolated from Shark Skin: A Potential Source of Bacteriocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Asmat; Hamid, Rahimi; Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Usup, Gires

    2013-09-01

    Bacteriocin-producing Pseudomonas putida strain FStm2 isolated from shark showed broad range of antibacterial activity against all pathogens tested except Bacillus subtilis ATCC11774, MRSA N32064, Proteus mirabilis ATCC12453, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC14506, Salmonella typhimurium ATCC51312, Salmonella mutan ATCC25175, and Aeromonas hydrophila Wbf314. Of the three growth media tested in this study, TSB was observed to support the bacteriocin activity the most. While the highest bacteriocin activity was observed for media supplemented with 1 % NaCl, there was an observed reduction in bacteriocin activity with increasing salt concentration. Although the least bacteriocin activity was observed for marine broth, addition of increasing amounts of tryptone, glucose, or yeast extract increased bacteriocin activity. This was, however, contrary to the effect observed when MgSO4 and MnSO4 were added as supplements. In the presence of α-amylase, lipase, DNase, and RNase, a positive effect on bacteriocin production was observed. Proteinase K strongly inhibited bacteriocin production. Furthermore, the bacteriocins produced were heat stable within the temperature range of 30-70 °C. Bacteriocin activity also was not affected within a wide pH range of 3-9. Exposure to detergents did not inhibit the activity of the bacteriocin at the concentrations tested. Instead, a positive effect on the relative activity of produced bacteriocin was observed as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), EDTA, and Tween 20 at 1 % concentration all improved bacteriocin activity when the cell-free supernatant was tested against Serratia marcescens ATCC 13880. The bacteriocin was purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and gel filtration on a Superdex-200 column. SDS-PAGE analysis of the partially purified bacteriocin revealed an apparent molecular weight of ~32 kDa.

  17. Conversion and assimilation of furfural and 5-(hydroxymethylfurfural by Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Guarnieri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The sugar dehydration products, furfural and 5-(hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, are commonly formed during high-temperature processing of lignocellulose, most often in thermochemical pretreatment, liquefaction, or pyrolysis. Typically, these two aldehydes are considered major inhibitors in microbial conversion processes. Many microbes can convert these compounds to their less toxic, dead-end alcohol counterparts, furfuryl alcohol and 5-(hydroxymethylfurfuryl alcohol. Recently, the genes responsible for aerobic catabolism of furfural and HMF were discovered in Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14 to enable complete conversion of these compounds to the TCA cycle intermediate, 2-oxo-glutarate. In this work, we engineer the robust soil microbe, Pseudomonas putida KT2440, to utilize furfural and HMF as sole carbon and energy sources via complete genomic integration of the 12 kB hmf gene cluster previously reported from Burkholderia phytofirmans. The common intermediate, 2-furoic acid, is shown to be a bottleneck for both furfural and HMF metabolism. When cultured on biomass hydrolysate containing representative amounts of furfural and HMF from dilute-acid pretreatment, the engineered strain outperforms the wild type microbe in terms of reduced lag time and enhanced growth rates due to catabolism of furfural and HMF. Overall, this study demonstrates that an approach for biological conversion of furfural and HMF, relative to the typical production of dead-end alcohols, enables both enhanced carbon conversion and substantially improves tolerance to hydrolysate inhibitors. This approach should find general utility both in emerging aerobic processes for the production of fuels and chemicals from biomass-derived sugars and in the biological conversion of high-temperature biomass streams from liquefaction or pyrolysis where furfural and HMF are much more abundant than in biomass hydrolysates from pretreatment.

  18. Metabolic Value Chemoattractants Are Preferentially Recognized at Broad Ligand Range Chemoreceptor of Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Fernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved a wide range of chemoreceptors with different ligand specificities. Typically, chemoreceptors bind ligands with elevated specificity and ligands serve as growth substrates. However, there is a chemoreceptor family that has a broad ligand specificity including many compounds that are not of metabolic value. To advance the understanding of this family, we have used the PcaY_PP (PP2643 chemoreceptor of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a model. Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry we showed here that the recombinant ligand binding domain (LBD of PcaY_PP recognizes 17 different C6-ring containing carboxylic acids with KD values between 3.7 and 138 μM and chemoeffector affinity correlated with the magnitude of the chemotactic response. Mutation of the pcaY_PP gene abolished chemotaxis to these compounds; phenotype that was restored following gene complementation. Growth experiments using PcaY_PP ligands as sole C-sources revealed functional relationships between their metabolic potential and affinity for the chemoreceptor. Thus, only 7 PcaY_PP ligands supported growth and their KD values correlated with the length of the bacterial lag phase. Furthermore, PcaY_PP ligands that did not support growth had significantly higher KD values than those that did. The receptor has thus binds preferentially compounds that serve as C-sources and amongst them those that rapidly promote growth. Tightest binding compounds were quinate, shikimate, 3-dehydroshikimate and protocatechuate, which are at the interception of the biosynthetic shikimate and catabolic quinate pathways. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies showed that ligand free PcaY_PP-LBD is present in a monomer-dimer equilibrium (KD = 57.5 μM. Ligand binding caused a complete shift to the dimeric state, which appears to be a general feature of four-helix bundle LBDs. This study indicates that the metabolic potential of compounds is an important parameter in the molecular recognition

  19. Metabolite profiling reveals abiotic stress tolerance in Tn5 mutant of Pseudomonas putida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasvi Chaudhry

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas is an efficient plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR; however, intolerance to drought and high temperature limit its application in agriculture as a bioinoculant. Transposon 5 (Tn5 mutagenesis was used to generate a stress tolerant mutant from a PGPR Pseudomonas putida NBRI1108 isolated from chickpea rhizosphere. A mutant NBRI1108T, selected after screening of nearly 10,000 transconjugants, exhibited significant tolerance towards high temperature and drought. Southern hybridization analysis of EcoRI and XhoI restricted genomic DNA of NBRI1108T confirmed that it had a single Tn5 insertion. The metabolic changes in the polar and non-polar extracts of NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T were examined using 1H, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Thirty six chemically diverse metabolites consisting of amino acids, fatty acids and phospholipids were identified and quantified. Insertion of Tn5 influenced amino acid and phospholipid metabolism and resulted in significantly higher concentration of aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glycinebetaine, glycerophosphatidylcholine (GPC and putrescine in NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. The concentration of glutamic acid, glycinebetaine and GPC increased by 34%, 95% and 100%, respectively in the NBRI1108T as compared to that in NBRI1108. High concentration of glycerophosphatidylethanolamine (GPE and undetected GPC in NBRI1108 indicates that biosynthesis of GPE may have taken place via the methylation pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis. However, high GPC and low GPE concentration in NBRI1108T suggest that methylation pathway and phosphatidylcholine synthase (PCS pathway of phospholipid biosynthesis are being followed in the NBRI1108T. Application of multivariate principal component analysis (PCA on the quantified metabolites revealed clear variations in NBRI1108 and NBRI1108T in polar and non-polar metabolites. Identification of abiotic

  20. Characterization of a novel blaIMP gene, blaIMP-58, using whole genome sequencing in a Pseudomonas putida isolate detected in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgaard, Dennis Back; Hansen, Frank; Hasman, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    A multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas putida was isolated from the urine of a 65-year-old women hospitalized for serious clinical conditions. Using whole genome sequencing a novel blaIMP gene, blaIMP-58 was discovered and characterized.......A multidrug-resistant strain of Pseudomonas putida was isolated from the urine of a 65-year-old women hospitalized for serious clinical conditions. Using whole genome sequencing a novel blaIMP gene, blaIMP-58 was discovered and characterized....

  1. Protein as chemical cue: non-nutritional growth enhancement by exogenous protein in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Joshi

    Full Text Available Research pertaining to microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions has been largely limited to small molecules like quorum sensing chemicals. However, a few recent reports have indicated the role of complex molecules like proteins and polysaccharides in microbial communication. Here we demonstrate that exogenous proteins present in culture media can considerably accelerate the growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, even when such proteins are not internalized by the cells. The growth enhancement is observed when the exogenous protein is not used as a source of carbon or nitrogen. The data show non-specific nature of the protein inducing growth; growth enhancement was observed irrespective of the protein type. It is shown that growth enhancement is mediated via increased siderophore secretion in response to the exogenous protein, leading to better iron uptake. We highlight the ecological significance of the observation and hypothesize that exogenous proteins serve as chemical cues in the case of P.putida and are perceived as indicator of the presence of competitors in the environment. It is argued that enhanced siderophore secretion in response to exogenous protein helps P.putida establish numerical superiority over competitors by way of enhanced iron assimilation and quicker utilization of aromatic substrates.

  2. The response of aggregated Pseudomonas putida CP1 cells to UV-C and UV-A/B disinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maganha de Almeida, Ana C; Quilty, Bríd

    2016-11-01

    UV radiation is a spread method used worldwide for the disinfection of water. However, much of the research on the disinfection of bacterial cells by UV has focused on planktonic cells. Many bacterial cells in nature are present in clumps or aggregates, and these aggregates, which are more resistant to disinfection than their planktonic counterparts, can be problematic in engineered water systems. The current research used Pseudomonas putida (P. putida) CP1, an environmental and non-pathogenic microorganism which autoaggregates when grown under certain conditions, as a model organism to simulate aggregated cells. The study investigated the response of both the planktonic and the aggregated forms of the bacterium to UV-C (λ = 253.7 nm) and UV-A/B (λ > 300 nm) disinfection at laboratory scale in a minimal medium. The planktonic cells of P. putida CP1 were inactivated within 60 s by UV-C and in 60 min by UV-A/B; however, the aggregated cells required 120 min of UV-C treatment and 240 min of UV-A/B radiation to become inactive. The size of the aggregate was reduced following UV treatment. Although all the cells had lost culturability, viability as measured by the LIVE/DEAD® stain and epifluorescence microscopy was not completely lost and the cells all demonstrated regrowth after overnight incubation in the dark.

  3. Pumping iron to keep fit: modulation of siderophore secretion helps efficient aromatic utilization in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Hiren; Dave, Rachna; Venugopalan, V P

    2014-07-01

    Studies of biotechnology applications of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 have been predominantly focused on regulation and expression of the toluene degradation (TOL) pathway. Unfortunately, there is limited information on the role of other physiological factors influencing aromatic utilization. In this report, we demonstrate that P. putida KT2440 increases its siderophore secretion in response to the availability of benzyl alcohol, a model aromatic substrate. It is argued that accelerated siderophore secretion in response to aromatic substrates provides an iron 'boost' which is required for the effective functioning of the iron-dependent oxygenases responsible for ring opening. Direct evidence for the cardinal role of siderophores in aromatic utilization is provided by evaluation of per capita siderophore secretion and comparative growth assessments of wild-type and siderophore-negative mutant strains grown on an alternative carbon source. Accelerated siderophore secretion can be viewed as a compensatory mechanism in P. putida in the context of its inability to secrete more than one type of siderophore (pyoverdine) or to utilize heterologous siderophores. Stimulated siderophore secretion might be a key factor in successful integration and proliferation of this organism as a bio-augmentation agent for aromatic degradation. It not only facilitates efficient aromatic utilization, but also provides better opportunities for iron assimilation amongst diverse microbial communities, thereby ensuring better survival and proliferation. © 2014 The Authors.

  4. Lead Sorption from Aqueous Solutions by Pseudomonas putida (p168 and its Composites with Palygorskite and Sepiolite Clays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh tavanaei

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Heavy metals contamination due to natural and anthropogenic sources is a global environmental concern. Lead (Pb is one of the very toxic heavy metals. Industrial production processes and their emissions, mining operation, smelting, combustion sources and solid waste incinerators are the primary sources of lead. This heavy metal has aberrant effects on the environment and living organisms. Hence, proper treatment of lead from soil and industrial wastewaters is very important. In order to remove toxic heavy metals from contaminated water systems, conventional methods such as chemical precipitation, coagulation, ion exchange, solvent extraction and filtration, evaporation and membrane methods are being used. These conventional methods generally have high costs and technical problems. Therefore, biosorption processes, in which microorganisms are used as sorbents, have been considered as economical and environmentally friendly options for removal of heavy metals from aqueous solution. Clay minerals are another group of sorbents used in removal of heavy metals from polluted environments. Furthermore, bacterial cells can be attached on clay mineral surfaces and form bacteria-mineral composites. These composites adsorb heavy metals and convert them into forms with low mobility and bioavailability. Pseudomonas putida is a unique microorganism with a high tendency to sorb and/or degrade certain environmental pollutants. Palygorskite and sepiolite are the fibrous clay minerals of arid and semiarid regions; their structures consist of ribbons and channels. These fibrous minerals have various applications in industry and the environment because of its large surface area and high adsorption capacity. The present study was conducted in order to determine the ability of Pseudomonas putida (P168, and its composites with palygorskite and sepiolite in lead sorption. Materials and Methods: The bacterial strain used in the present study was Pseudomonas

  5. Production of Medium Chain Length Polyhydroxyalkanoates From Oleic Acid Using Pseudomonas putida PGA1 by Fed Batch Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidik Marsudi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs are a class of p0lymers currently receiving much attention because of their potential as renewable and biodegradable plastics. A wide variety of bacteria has been reported to produce PHAs including Pseudomonas strains. These strains are known as versatile medium chain length PHAs (PHAs-mcl producers using fatty acids as carbon source. Oleic acid was used to produce PHAs-mcl using Pseudomonas putida PGA 1 by continuous feeding of both nitrogen and carbon source, in a fed batch culture. During cell growth, PHAs also accumulated, indicating that PHA production in this organism is growth associated. Residual cell increased until the nitrogen source was depleted. At the end of fermentation, final cell concentration, PHA content, and roductivity were 30.2 g/L, 44.8 % of cell dry weight, and 0.188 g/l/h, respectively.

  6. Responses of unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 biofilms to environmental stresses in relation to the EPS composition and surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huirong; Chen, Guangcun; Long, Dongyan; Chen, Xincai

    2014-12-01

    The extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and surface properties of unsaturated biofilms of a heavy metal-resistant rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida CZ1, in response to aging, pH, temperature and osmotic stress, were studied by quantitative analysis of EPS and atomic force microscope. It was found that EPS production increased approximately linearly with culture time, cells in the air-biofilm interface enhanced EPS production and decreased cell volume to cope with nutrient depletion during aging. Low pH, high temperature and certain osmotic stress (120 mM NaCl) distinctly stimulated EPS production, and the main component enhanced was extracellular protein. In addition to the enhancement of EPS production in response to high osmotic (328 mM NaCl) stress, cells in the biofilm adhere tightly together to maintain a particular microenvironment. These results indicated the variation of EPS composition and the cooperation of cells in the biofilms is important for the survival of Pseudomonas putida CZ1 from environmental stresses in the unsaturated environments such as rhizosphere.

  7. Endophytic Colonization of Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by a Novel Competent Bacterial Endophyte, Pseudomonas putida Strain P9, and Its Effect on Associated Bacterial Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, F.D.; Araujo, W.L.; Azevedo, J.L.; Elsas, van J.D.; Rocha, da U.N.; Overbeek, van L.S.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain P9 is a novel competent endophyte from potato. P9 causes cultivar-dependent suppression of Phytophthora infestans. Colonization of the rhizoplane and endosphere of potato plants by P9 and its rifampin-resistant derivative P9R was studied. The purposes of this work were to

  8. Endophytic colonization of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) by a novel competent bacterial endophyte, Pseudomonas putida Strain P9, and its effect on associated bacterial communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreote, F.D; De Araujo, W.L.; de Azevedo, J.L.; van Elsas, J.D.; Nunes da Rocha, U.; van Overbeek, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain P9 is a novel competent endophyte from potato. P9 causes cultivar-dependent suppression of Phytophthora infestans. Colonization of the rhizoplane and endosphere of potato plants by P9 and its rifampin-resistant derivative P9R was studied. The purposes of this work were to

  9. Whole-Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas putida Strain UASWS0946, a Highly Ammonia-Tolerant Nitrifying Bacterium Isolated from Sewage Sludge Aerobic Granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crovadore, Julien; Calmin, Gautier; Cochard, Bastien; Chablais, Romain; Grizard, Damien; Berthon, Jean-Yves; Lefort, François

    2015-10-08

    We report here the genome of Pseudomonas putida strain UASWS0946, a highly ammonia-tolerant nitrifying strain isolated from sewage sludge aerobic granules, which displays adequate genetic equipment for soil depollution, sludge treatment, and biological fertilization in agriculture. Copyright © 2015 Crovadore et al.

  10. Nitrogen regulation of the xyl genes of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 propagates into a significant effect of nitrate on m-xylene mineralization in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenningsen, Nanna Bygvraa; Nicolaisen, Mette Haubjerg; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2016-01-01

    The nitrogen species available in the growth medium are key factors determining expression of xyl genes for biodegradation of aromatic compounds by Pseudomonas putida. Nitrogen compounds are frequently amended to promote degradation at polluted sites, but it remains unknown how regulation observed...

  11. Multivariate analysis of microarray data by principal component discriminant analysis: Prioritizing relevant transcripts linked to the degradation of different carbohydrates in Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werf, M.J. van der; Pieterse, B.; Luijk, N. van; Schuren, F.; Werff van der - Vat, B. van der; Overkamp, K.; Jellema, R.H.

    2006-01-01

    The value of the multivariate data analysis tools principal component analysis (PCA) and principal component discriminant analysis (PCDA) for prioritizing leads generated by microarrays was evaluated. To this end, Pseudomonas putida S12 was grown in independent triplicate fermentations on four

  12. Transposon mutations in the flagella biosynthetic pathway of the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida S12 result in a decreased expression of solvent efflux genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kieboom, J; Bruinenberg, R; Keizer-Gunnink, [No Value; de Bont, JAM

    2001-01-01

    Fourteen solvent-sensitive transposon mutants were generated from the solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida strain S12 by applying the TnMOD-KmO mutagenesis system. These mutants were unable to grow in the presence of octanol and toluene. By cloning the region flanking the transposon insertion point a

  13. Carbon Source Influences Population Heterogeneity In Pseudomonas Putida Kt2440 Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Christensen, Anne-Mette; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2015-01-01

    the benefits of biofilm-based production, and knowledge about factors driving the heterogeneity is therefore of importance.Methods: Biofilm flow chamber systems connected to confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study biofilm structures of P. putida KT2440 at different carbon conditions. Subsequent...... appeared. These morphotypes showed a large variation in swimming motility, biofilm formation and growth rate, and whole genome sequencing revealed alterations in cyclic-di-GMP-related genes involved in biofilm development.Conclusions: Low concentrations of glucose seem to allow a more homogenous P. putida...

  14. Small RNA-Controlled Gene Regulatory Networks in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojanovic, Klara

    . Detailed insights into the mechanisms through which P. putida responds to different stress conditions and increased understanding of bacterial adaptation in natural and industrial settings were gained. Additionally, we identified genome-wide transcription start sites, andmany regulatory RNA elements...... such as sRNAs and riboswitches. Further, the sRNAome during the growth of bacteria was investigatedand compared to the strain without Hfq protein. Hfq has a big impact on sRNAs and gene expression in P. putida, hence many Hfq-associated sRNAs and mRNAs were found. Together, the results reported here...

  15. Study on the efficiency of the two phase partitioning stirred tank bioreactor on the toluene filtration from the airstream by Pseudomonas putida via

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There are different methods for controlling gaseous pollutants formed from air pollution sources that one of the most economical and efficient of them, is bio-filtration. The purpose of this study is Toluene removal from airstream by using the pure Pseudomonas putida bacteria as a fluidized bed in a two phase partitioning stirred tank bioreactor.Toluene ( Metyle benzene is one of the aromatic compounds which uses as a chemical solvent.low to moderate concentration of Toluene causes fatigue, dizziness, weakness,unbalance behaviour, memory loss, insomnia, loss of appetite, loss of vision and hearing. .Material and Method: In this experimental study at first, pure Pseudomonas putida in an aqueous phase containing nutrients and trace elements solution was duplicated and accustomed with Toluene. then solution contained microorganisms with 10% silicon oil was entered to bioreactor. The amount of CO2 and pollutant concentrations in the entrance and exhaust of bioreactor containing Pseudomonas putida was studied during 17 days for each variable. .Result: Experimental findings showed that in the 0.06 m3/h and 0.12 m3/h flow rate, the efficiency of bioreactor containing Pseudomonas putida in the concentration ranges of 283 Mg/m3 to 4710 Mg/m3 was at least 97% and 25% respectively. Statistical analysis (ANOVA showed that in two flow rates of 0.06 m3/h and 0.12 m3/h removal efficiency and mineralization percentage had significant differences .(Pvalue =0.01. .Conclusion: Achieving high efficiencies in pollutants removal was because of the prepared optimum conditions for Pseudomonas putida in the two phase partitioning stirred tank bioreactor with 10% organic phase.

  16. Contrasting colonization and plant growth promoting capacity between wild type and gfp-derative of the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 in hybrid poplar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyens N.; van der Lelie D.; Boulet, J.; Adriaensen, D.; Timmermans, J.-P.; Prinsen, E.; Van Oevelen, S.; D" Haen, J.; Smeets, K.; Taghavi, S.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2011-06-09

    This study aims to investigate the colonization of poplar by the endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619 and its capacity to promote plant growth. Poplar cuttings were inoculated with P. putida W619 (wild-type or gfp-labelled). The colonization of both strains was investigated and morphological, physiological and biochemical parameters were analyzed to evaluate plant growth promotion. Inoculation with P. putida W619 (wild-type) resulted in remarkable growth promotion, decreased activities of antioxidative defence related enzymes, and reduced stomatal resistance, all indicative of improved plant health and growth in comparison with the non-inoculated cuttings. In contrast, inoculation with gfp-labelled P. putida W619 did not promote growth; it even had a negative effect on plant health and growth. Furthermore, compared to the wildtype strain, colonization by the gfp-labelled P. putida W619::gfp1 was much lower; it only colonized the rhizosphere and root cortex while the wild-type strain also colonized the root xylem vessels. Despite the strong plant growth promoting capacity of P. putida W619 (wild-type), after gfp labelling its growth promoting characteristics disappeared and its colonization capacity was strongly influenced; for these reasons gfp labelling should be applied with sufficient caution.

  17. Characterization of a marine-isolated mercury-resistant Pseudomonas putida strain SP1 and its potential application in marine mercury reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Chen, Lingxin; Liu, Dongyan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, SD (China). Yantai Inst. of Coastal Zone Research (YICCAS); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yantai, SD (China). Shandong Provincial Key Lab. of Coastal Zone Environmental Processes

    2012-02-15

    The Pseudomonas putida strain SP1 was isolated from marine environment and was found to be resistant to 280 {mu}M HgCl{sub 2}. SP1 was also highly resistant to other metals, including CdCl{sub 2}, CoCl{sub 2}, CrCl{sub 3}, CuCl{sub 2}, PbCl{sub 2}, and ZnSO{sub 4}, and the antibiotics ampicillin (Ap), kanamycin (Kn), chloramphenicol (Cm), and tetracycline (Tc). mer operon, possessed by most mercury-resistant bacteria, and other diverse types of resistant determinants were all located on the bacterial chromosome. Cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry and a volatilization test indicated that the isolated P. putida SP1 was able to volatilize almost 100% of the total mercury it was exposed to and could potentially be used for bioremediation in marine environments. The optimal pH for the growth of P. putida SP1 in the presence of HgCl{sub 2} and the removal of HgCl{sub 2} by P. putida SP1 was between 8.0 and 9.0, whereas the optimal pH for the expression of merA, the mercuric reductase enzyme in mer operon that reduces reactive Hg{sup 2+} to volatile and relatively inert monoatomic Hg{sup 0} vapor, was around 5.0. LD50 of P. putida SP1 to flounder and turbot was 1.5 x 10{sup 9} CFU. Biofilm developed by P. putida SP1 was 1- to 3-fold lower than biofilm developed by an aquatic pathogen Pseudomonas fluorescens TSS. The results of this study indicate that P. putida SP1 is a low virulence strain that can potentially be applied in the bioremediation of HgCl{sub 2} contamination over a broad range of pH. (orig.)

  18. Multiple Modes of Nematode Control by Volatiles of Pseudomonas putida 1A00316 from Antarctic Soil against Meloidogyne incognita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yile Zhai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida 1A00316 isolated from Antarctic soil showed nematicidal potential for biological control of Meloidogyne incognita; however, little was known about whether strain 1A00316 could produce volatile organic compounds (VOCs, and if they had potential for use in biological control against M. incognita. In this study, VOCs produced by a culture filtrate of P. putida 1A00316 were evaluated by in vitro experiments in three-compartment Petri dishes and 96-well culture plates. Our results showed that M. incognita juveniles gradually reduced their movement within 24–48 h of incubation with mortality ranging from 6.49 to 86.19%, and mostly stopped action after 72 h. Moreover, egg hatching in culture filtrates of strain 1A00316 was much reduced compared to that in sterile distilled water or culture medium. Volatiles from P. putida 1A00316 analysis carried out by solid-phase micro-extraction gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (SPME-GC/MS included dimethyl-disulfide, 1-undecene, 2-nonanone, 2-octanone, (Z-hexen-1-ol acetate, 2-undecanone, and 1-(ethenyloxy-octadecane. Of these, dimethyl-disulfide, 2-nonanone, 2-octanone, (Z-hexen-1-ol acetate, and 2-undecanone had strong nematicidal activity against M. incognita J2 larvae by direct-contact in 96-well culture plates, and only 2-undecanone acted as a fumigant. In addition, the seven VOCs inhibited egg hatching of M. incognita both by direct-contact and by fumigation. All of the seven VOCs repelled M. incognita J2 juveniles in 2% water agar Petri plates. These results show that VOCs from strain 1A00316 act on different stages in the development of M. incognita via nematicidal, fumigant, and repellent activities and have potential for development as agents with multiple modes of control of root-knot nematodes.

  19. Genome-scale reconstruction and analysis of the Pseudomonas putida KT2440 metabolic network facilitates applications in biotechnology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Puchałka

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available A cornerstone of biotechnology is the use of microorganisms for the efficient production of chemicals and the elimination of harmful waste. Pseudomonas putida is an archetype of such microbes due to its metabolic versatility, stress resistance, amenability to genetic modifications, and vast potential for environmental and industrial applications. To address both the elucidation of the metabolic wiring in P. putida and its uses in biocatalysis, in particular for the production of non-growth-related biochemicals, we developed and present here a genome-scale constraint-based model of the metabolism of P. putida KT2440. Network reconstruction and flux balance analysis (FBA enabled definition of the structure of the metabolic network, identification of knowledge gaps, and pin-pointing of essential metabolic functions, facilitating thereby the refinement of gene annotations. FBA and flux variability analysis were used to analyze the properties, potential, and limits of the model. These analyses allowed identification, under various conditions, of key features of metabolism such as growth yield, resource distribution, network robustness, and gene essentiality. The model was validated with data from continuous cell cultures, high-throughput phenotyping data, (13C-measurement of internal flux distributions, and specifically generated knock-out mutants. Auxotrophy was correctly predicted in 75% of the cases. These systematic analyses revealed that the metabolic network structure is the main factor determining the accuracy of predictions, whereas biomass composition has negligible influence. Finally, we drew on the model to devise metabolic engineering strategies to improve production of polyhydroxyalkanoates, a class of biotechnologically useful compounds whose synthesis is not coupled to cell survival. The solidly validated model yields valuable insights into genotype-phenotype relationships and provides a sound framework to explore this versatile

  20. Biological production of hydroxylated aromatics : Optimization strategies for Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, A.

    2010-01-01

    To replace environmentally unfriendly petrochemical production processes, the demand for bio-based production of organic chemicals is increasing. This thesis focuses on the biological production of hydroxylated aromatics from renewable substrates by engineered P. putida S12 including several cases

  1. The crystal structure of Pseudomonas putida azoreductase – the active site revisited

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonçalves, Ana Maria D; Mendes, Sónia; Sanctis, Daniele; Martins, Lígia O; Bento, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of azo dyes begins with the reduction of the azo bond. In this article, we report the crystal structures of the native azoreductase from P seudomonas putida   MET 94 ( P p A zo R ) (1.60 Å...

  2. A substrate dependent biological containment systems for Pseudomonas putida based on the Escherichia coli gef gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Ramos, J. L.; Kaneva, Z.

    1993-01-01

    operon (Pm) and the lacI gene, encoding the Lac repressor, plus xylS2, coding for a positive regulator of Pm. In liquid culture under optimal growth conditions and in sterile and nonsterile soil microcosms, P. putida KT2440 (pWWO) bearing the containment system behaves as designed. In the presence...

  3. Genome-wide mapping of transcription start sites yields novel insights into the primary transcriptome of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta; Bojanovič, Klara; Yang, Xiaochen; Holm Rau, Martin; Long, Katherine S

    2016-10-01

    The environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida is an organism endowed with a versatile metabolism and stress tolerance traits that are desirable in an efficient production organism. In this work, differential RNA sequencing was used to investigate the primary transcriptome and RNA regulatory elements of P. putida strain KT2440. A total of 7937 putative transcription start sites (TSSs) were identified, where over two-thirds were located either on the opposite strand or internal to annotated genes. For TSSs associated with mRNAs, sequence analysis revealed a clear Shine-Dalgarno sequence but a lack of conserved overrepresented promoter motifs. These TSSs defined approximately 50 leaderless transcripts and an abundance of mRNAs with long leader regions of which 18 contain RNA regulatory elements from the Rfam database. The thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch upstream of the thiC gene was examined using an in vivo assay with GFP-fusion vectors and shown to function via a translational repression mechanism. Furthermore, 56 novel intergenic small RNAs and 8 putative actuaton transcripts were detected, as well as 8 novel open reading frames (ORFs). This study illustrates how global mapping of TSSs can yield novel insights into the transcriptional features and RNA output of bacterial genomes. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommes Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR.

  5. Toxicities effects of pharmaceutical, olive mill and textile wastewaters before and after degradation by Pseudomonas putida mt-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Hedi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removal of numerous classes of chemical pollutants from the industrial wastewater such as textile, pharmaceutical and olive mill using conventional wastewater treatment, is incomplete and several studies suggested that improvement of this situation would require the application of biological treatment techniques. Dyes, polyphenols and drugs are an environmental pollutants extremely toxics to plants and other living organisms including humans. These effluents were previously treated by Pseudomonas putida. The main of this work was to evaluate the in vivo toxicity of the three wastewaters. Methods Writhes and convulsant effect of effluents were carried out and were compared to the treated effluents. Only pharmaceutical wastewater was exhibited a convulsant effect which observed in mice treated by effluent. On the other hand, all industrial wastewater induced significantly an algogenic effects particularly when mice were treated by the pharmaceutical wastewater (Number of writhes = 44. Conclusion Toxicity was totally removed when mice were treated by the bio remediated effluent. This indicates that P. putida was able to completely detoxify the toxic industrial effluent.

  6. Toxicities effects of pharmaceutical, olive mill and textile wastewaters before and after degradation by Pseudomonas putida mt-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Hedi Ben; Dellai, Afef; Ayed, Yosra

    2012-02-07

    Removal of numerous classes of chemical pollutants from the industrial wastewater such as textile, pharmaceutical and olive mill using conventional wastewater treatment, is incomplete and several studies suggested that improvement of this situation would require the application of biological treatment techniques. Dyes, polyphenols and drugs are an environmental pollutants extremely toxics to plants and other living organisms including humans. These effluents were previously treated by Pseudomonas putida. The main of this work was to evaluate the in vivo toxicity of the three wastewaters. Writhes and convulsant effect of effluents were carried out and were compared to the treated effluents. Only pharmaceutical wastewater was exhibited a convulsant effect which observed in mice treated by effluent. On the other hand, all industrial wastewater induced significantly an algogenic effects particularly when mice were treated by the pharmaceutical wastewater (Number of writhes = 44). Toxicity was totally removed when mice were treated by the bio remediated effluent. This indicates that P. putida was able to completely detoxify the toxic industrial effluent.

  7. Pathway-Consensus Approach to Metabolic Network Reconstruction for Pseudomonas putida KT2440 by Systematic Comparison of Published Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianqian Yuan

    Full Text Available Over 100 genome-scale metabolic networks (GSMNs have been published in recent years and widely used for phenotype prediction and pathway design. However, GSMNs for a specific organism reconstructed by different research groups usually produce inconsistent simulation results, which makes it difficult to use the GSMNs for precise optimal pathway design. Therefore, it is necessary to compare and identify the discrepancies among networks and build a consensus metabolic network for an organism. Here we proposed a process for systematic comparison of metabolic networks at pathway level. We compared four published GSMNs of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and identified the discrepancies leading to inconsistent pathway calculation results. The mistakes in the models were corrected based on information from literature so that all the calculated synthesis and uptake pathways were the same. Subsequently we built a pathway-consensus model and then further updated it with the latest genome annotation information to obtain modelPpuQY1140 for P. putida KT2440, which includes 1140 genes, 1171 reactions and 1104 metabolites. We found that even small errors in a GSMN could have great impacts on the calculated optimal pathways and thus may lead to incorrect pathway design strategies. Careful investigation of the calculated pathways during the metabolic network reconstruction process is essential for building proper GSMNs for pathway design.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the azoreductase PpAzoR from Pseudomonas putida MET94.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Bruno; Chen, Zhenjia; Mendes, Sónia; Martins, Lígia O; Bento, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    PpAzoR, an FMN-dependent NADPH azoreductase from Pseudomonas putida MET94, has been crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The crystals diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and belonged to the orthorhombic space group F222, with unit-cell parameters a=72.1, b=95.5, c=146.1 Å. Data sets were collected from the native protein to 2.2 Å resolution using in-house equipment and to 1.6 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation and the three-dimensional structure was determined by the molecular-replacement method.

  9. Cow Dung Substrate for the Potential Production of Alkaline Proteases by Pseudomonas putida Strain AT in Solid-State Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnuswamy Vijayaraghavan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cow dung and agroresidues were used as the substrates for the production of alkaline proteases by Pseudomonas putida strain AT in solid-state fermentation. Among the various substrates evaluated, cow dung supported maximum (1351±217 U/g protease production. The optimum conditions for the production of alkaline proteases were a fermentation period of 48 h, 120% (v/w moisture, pH 9, and the addition of 6% (v/w inoculum, 1.5% (w/w trehalose, and 2.0% (w/w yeast extract to the cow dung substrate. The enzyme was active over a range of temperatures (50–70°C and pHs (8–10, with maximum activity at 60°C and pH 9. These enzymes showed stability towards surfactants, detergents, and solvent and digested various natural proteins.

  10. The davDT operon of Pseudomonas putida, involved in lysine catabolism, is induced in response to the pathway intermediate delta-aminovaleric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revelles, O.; Espinosa-Urgel, M.; Molin, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a soil microorganism that attaches to seeds and efficiently colonizes the plant's rhizosphere. Lysine is one of the major compounds in root exudates, and P. putida KT2440 uses this amino acid as a source of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. Lysine is channeled to delta......-aminovaleric acid and then further degraded to glutaric acid via the action of the davDT gene products. We show that the davDT genes form an operon transcribed from a single sigma(70)-dependent promoter. The relatively high level of basal expression from the davD promoter increased about fourfold in response...... to the addition of exogenous lysine to the culture medium. However, the true inducer of this operon seems to be delta-aminovaleric acid because in a mutant unable to metabolize lysine to delta-aminovaleric acid, this compound, but not lysine, acted as an effector. Effective induction of the P. putida P...

  11. Combination of pseudomonas putida and EK method to reduce the amount of mercury on landfill soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabila, A. T. A.; Azhar, A. T. S.; Nurshuhaila, M. S.; Azim, M. A. M.; Amirah, S. N.

    2017-11-01

    Landfills usually lack of environment measures especially on soil. There are no guarantee that the landfill soil is free from being contaminated. It may cause harm for humans, animals and plants at surrounding area. In order to solve this problem, advance remediation technique is essential such as the electrokinetic combined with microorganisms known as electrokinetic bioremediation technique. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of P.putida with 15 volt electric current supply (Ek-bio) and without electric current (Bio) in removal of mercury in landfill soil. Both treatments were running throughout 14 days. The P.putida was placed at anode compartment meanwhile sterile distilled water poured at cathode compartment. According to the both results, Ek-bio was removed mercury up to 48 % but by using standard bioremediation treatment, the removal only 32 %. Besides that, the migration of P.putida react more aggressively during the present of electric current compared with bioremediation. As the results, it was proven that by using Ek-bio technique can increase the activity of bacteria beside and the removal of mercury. Therefore, Ek-bio method can be commercialized to the parties concerned to solve the contaminated soil by mercury.

  12. Global transcriptional response of solvent-sensitive and solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida strains exposed to toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Gómez-Lozano, María; Molin, Soren; Ramos, Juan-Luis

    2017-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida strains are generally recognized as solvent tolerant, exhibiting varied sensitivity to organic solvents. Pan-genome analysis has revealed that 30% of genes belong to the core-genome of Pseudomonas. Accessory and unique genes confer high degree of adaptability and capabilities for the degradation and synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. For the use of these microbes in bioremediation and biocatalysis, it is critical to understand the mechanisms underlying these phenotypic differences. In this study, RNA-seq analysis compared the short- and long-term responses of the toluene-sensitive KT2440 strain and the highly tolerant DOT-T1E strain. The sensitive strain activates a larger number of genes in a higher magnitude than DOT-T1E. This is expected because KT2440 bears one toluene tolerant pump, while DOT-T1E encodes three of these pumps. Both strains activate membrane modifications to reduce toluene membrane permeability. The KT2440 strain activates the TCA cycle to generate energy, while avoiding energy-intensive processes such as flagellar biosynthesis. This suggests that KT2440 responds to toluene by focusing on survival mechanisms. The DOT-T1E strain activates toluene degradation pathways, using toluene as source of energy. Among the unique genes encoded by DOT-T1E is a 70 kb island composed of genes of unknown function induced in response to toluene. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Characterization and Genome Analysis of a Nicotine and Nicotinic Acid-Degrading Strain Pseudomonas putida JQ581 Isolated from Marine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiwen Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of nicotine and nicotinic acid (NA in the marine environment has caused great harm to human health and the natural environment. Therefore, there is an urgent need to use efficient and economical methods to remove such pollutants from the environment. In this study, a nicotine and NA-degrading bacterium—strain JQ581—was isolated from sediment from the East China Sea and identified as a member of Pseudomonas putida based on morphology, physio-biochemical characteristics, and 16S rDNA gene analysis. The relationship between growth and nicotine/NA degradation suggested that strain JQ581 was a good candidate for applications in the bioaugmentation treatment of nicotine/NA contamination. The degradation intermediates of nicotine are pseudooxynicotine (PN and 3-succinoyl-pyridine (SP based on UV, high performance liquid chromatography, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. However, 6-hydroxy-3-succinoyl-pyridine (HSP was not detected. NA degradation intermediates were identified as 6-hydroxynicotinic acid (6HNA. The whole genome of strain JQ581 was sequenced and analyzed. Genome sequence analysis revealed that strain JQ581 contained the gene clusters for nicotine and NA degradation. This is the first report where a marine-derived Pseudomonas strain had the ability to degrade nicotine and NA simultaneously.

  14. Effect of silver nanoparticles and silver ions on growth and adaptive response mechanisms of Pseudomonas putida mt-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachicho, Nancy; Hoffmann, Philipp; Ahlert, Kristin; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2014-06-01

    The distribution and use of nanoparticles increased rapidly during the last years, while the knowledge about mode of action, ecological tolerance and biodegradability of these chemicals is still insufficient. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNP) and free silver ions (Ag(+) , AgNO3 ) on Pseudomonas putida mt-2 as one of the best described bacterial strains for stress response were investigated. The effective concentration (EC50) causing 50% growth inhibition for AgNP was about 250 mg L(-1) , whereas this was only 0.175 mg L(-1) for AgNO3 . However, when calculating the amount of free silver ions released from AgNP both tested compounds showed very similar results. Therefore, the antibacterial activity of AgNP can be explained and reduced, respectively, to the amount of silver ions released from the nanoparticles. Both tested compounds showed a strong activation of the unique membrane adaptive response of Pseudomonas strains, the cis-trans isomerization of unsaturated fatty acids, whereas another important adaptive response of these bacteria, changes in cell surface hydrophobicity, measured as water contact angle, was not activated. These results are important informations for the estimation of environmental tolerance of newly developed, active ingredients like silver nanoparticles. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dual Infection by Burkholderia Cepaciaand Pseudomonas Putida in an Infective Endocarditis Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria; Lalani, Farida Khurram; Ikram, Aamer; Zaman, Gohar; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-06-01

    Infective endocarditis is rarely caused by Burkholderia cepacia. Pseudomonas putidahas not been reported to cause infective endocarditis so far. This is the first case of infective endocarditis being reported, that is caused by Pseudomonas putidaand Burkholderia cepaciain an immunocompetent host with no predisposing factors. Aortic valve replacement surgery was carried out and antibiotics were given, to which the patient responded well and recovered.

  16. In-vitro antibacterial activities of the essential oils of aromatic plants against Erwinia herbicola (Lohnis) and pseudomonas putida (Kris Hamilton)

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey Abhay K.; Singh Pooja; Palni Uma T.; Tripathi N.N.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine in vitro antibacterial activities of essential oils extracted from 53 aromatic plants of Gorakhpur Division (UP, INDIA) for the control of two phytopathogenic bacteria namely Erwinia herbicola and Pseudomonas putida causing several post-harvest diseases in fruits and vegetables. Out of 53 oils screened, 8 oils such as Chenopodium ambrosioides, Citrus aurantium, Clausena pentaphylla, Hyptis suaveolens, Lippia alba, Mentha arvensis, Ocimum sanctum and Vi...

  17. Fructose 1-phosphate is the one and only physiological effector of the Cra (FruR) regulator of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarría, Max; Durante-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Krell, Tino; Santiago, César; Brezovsky, Jan; Damborsky, Jiri; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2014-01-01

    Fructose-1-phosphate (F1P) is the preferred effector of the catabolite repressor/activator (Cra) protein of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida but its ability to bind other metabolic intermediates in vivo is unclear. The Cra protein of this microorganism (Cra(PP)) was submitted to mobility shift assays with target DNA sequences (the PfruB promoter) and candidate effectors fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), glucose 6-phosphate (G6P), and fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). 1 mM F1P was sufficient to release most of the Cra protein from its operators but more than 10 mM of FBP or G6P was required to free the same complex. However, isothermal titration microcalorimetry failed to expose any specific interaction between Cra(PP) and FBP or G6P. To solve this paradox, transcriptional activity of a PfruB-lacZ fusion was measured in wild-type and ΔfruB cells growing on substrates that change the intracellular concentrations of F1P and FBP. The data indicated that PfruB activity was stimulated by fructose but not by glucose or succinate. This suggested that Cra(PP) represses expression in vivo of the cognate fruBKA operon in a fashion dependent just on F1P, ruling out any other physiological effector. Molecular docking and dynamic simulations of the Cra-agonist interaction indicated that both metabolites can bind the repressor, but the breach in the relative affinity of Cra(PP) for F1P vs FBP is three orders of magnitude larger than the equivalent distance in the Escherichia coli protein. This assigns the Cra protein of P. putida the sole role of transducing the presence of fructose in the medium into a variety of direct and indirect physiological responses.

  18. Fructose 1-phosphate is the one and only physiological effector of the Cra (FruR regulator of Pseudomonas putida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Chavarría

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructose-1-phosphate (F1P is the preferred effector of the catabolite repressor/activator (Cra protein of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida but its ability to bind other metabolic intermediates in vivo is unclear. The Cra protein of this microorganism (CraPP was submitted to mobility shift assays with target DNA sequences (the PfruB promoter and candidate effectors fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP, glucose 6-phosphate (G6P, and fructose-6-phosphate (F6P. 1 mM F1P was sufficient to release most of the Cra protein from its operators but more than 10 mM of FBP or G6P was required to free the same complex. However, isothermal titration microcalorimetry failed to expose any specific interaction between CraPP and FBP or G6P. To solve this paradox, transcriptional activity of a PfruB-lacZ fusion was measured in wild-type and ΔfruB cells growing on substrates that change the intracellular concentrations of F1P and FBP. The data indicated that PfruB activity was stimulated by fructose but not by glucose or succinate. This suggested that CraPP represses expression in vivo of the cognate fruBKA operon in a fashion dependent just on F1P, ruling out any other physiological effector. Molecular docking and dynamic simulations of the Cra-agonist interaction indicated that both metabolites can bind the repressor, but the breach in the relative affinity of CraPP for F1P vs FBP is three orders of magnitude larger than the equivalent distance in the Escherichia coli protein. This assigns the Cra protein of P. putida the sole role of transducing the presence of fructose in the medium into a variety of direct and indirect physiological responses.

  19. Functional Characterization of the Mannitol Promoter of Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 50106 and Its Application for a Mannitol-Inducible Expression System for Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Hoffmann

    Full Text Available A new pBBR1MCS-2-derived vector containing the Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM10506 mannitol promoter PmtlE and mtlR encoding its AraC/XylS type transcriptional activator was constructed and optimized for low basal expression. Mannitol, arabitol, and glucitol-inducible gene expression was demonstrated with Pseudomonas putida and eGFP as reporter gene. The new vector was applied for functional characterization of PmtlE. Identification of the DNA binding site of MtlR was achieved by in vivo eGFP measurement with PmtlE wild type and mutants thereof. Moreover, purified MtlR was applied for detailed in vitro investigations using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNaseI footprinting experiments. The obtained data suggest that MtlR binds to PmtlE as a dimer. The proposed DNA binding site of MtlR is AGTGC-N5-AGTAT-N7-AGTGC-N5-AGGAT. The transcription activation mechanism includes two binding sites with different binding affinities, a strong upstream binding site and a weaker downstream binding site. The presence of the weak downstream binding site was shown to be necessary to sustain mannitol-inducibility of PmtlE. Two possible functions of mannitol are discussed; the effector might stabilize binding of the second monomer to the downstream half site or promote transcription activation by inducing a conformational change of the regulator that influences the contact to the RNA polymerase.

  20. Functional Characterization of the Mannitol Promoter of Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM 50106 and Its Application for a Mannitol-Inducible Expression System for Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Jana; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2015-01-01

    A new pBBR1MCS-2-derived vector containing the Pseudomonas fluorescens DSM10506 mannitol promoter PmtlE and mtlR encoding its AraC/XylS type transcriptional activator was constructed and optimized for low basal expression. Mannitol, arabitol, and glucitol-inducible gene expression was demonstrated with Pseudomonas putida and eGFP as reporter gene. The new vector was applied for functional characterization of PmtlE. Identification of the DNA binding site of MtlR was achieved by in vivo eGFP measurement with PmtlE wild type and mutants thereof. Moreover, purified MtlR was applied for detailed in vitro investigations using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and DNaseI footprinting experiments. The obtained data suggest that MtlR binds to PmtlE as a dimer. The proposed DNA binding site of MtlR is AGTGC-N5-AGTAT-N7-AGTGC-N5-AGGAT. The transcription activation mechanism includes two binding sites with different binding affinities, a strong upstream binding site and a weaker downstream binding site. The presence of the weak downstream binding site was shown to be necessary to sustain mannitol-inducibility of PmtlE. Two possible functions of mannitol are discussed; the effector might stabilize binding of the second monomer to the downstream half site or promote transcription activation by inducing a conformational change of the regulator that influences the contact to the RNA polymerase. PMID:26207762

  1. Activation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in Pseudomonas putida by triggering dissociation of the propeptide-enzyme complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, P; Bitter, W; Tommassen, J

    2000-01-01

    The propeptide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase functions both as an intramolecular chaperone required for the folding of the enzyme and as an inhibitor that prevents activity of the enzyme before its secretion into the extracellular medium. Since expression of the lasB gene, which encodes

  2. Potential of the TCE-degrading endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE to improve plant growth and reduce TCE phytotoxicity and evapotranspiration in poplar cuttings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Truyens, S.; Dupae, J.; Newman, L.; Taghavi, S.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2010-09-01

    The TCE-degrading poplar endophyte Pseudomonas putida W619-TCE was inoculated in poplar cuttings, exposed to 0, 200 and 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, that were grown in two different experimental setups. During a short-term experiment, plants were grown hydroponically in half strength Hoagland nutrient solution and exposed to TCE for 3 days. Inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE promoted plant growth, reduced TCE phytotoxicity and reduced the amount of TCE present in the leaves. During a mid-term experiment, plants were grown in potting soil and exposed to TCE for 3 weeks. Here, inoculation with P. putida W619-TCE had a less pronounced positive effect on plant growth and TCE phytotoxicity, but resulted in strongly reduced amounts of TCE in leaves and roots of plants exposed to 400 mg l{sup -1} TCE, accompanied by a lowered evapotranspiration of TCE. Dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), which are known intermediates of TCE degradation, were not detected. The endophyte P. putida W619-TCE degrades TCE during its transport through the xylem, leading to reduced TCE concentrations in poplar, and decreased TCE evapotranspiration.

  3. Medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates synthesis by Pseudomonas putida KT2440 relA/spoT mutant: bioprocess characterization and transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozejko-Ciesielska, Justyna; Dabrowska, Dorota; Szalewska-Palasz, Agnieszka; Ciesielski, Slawomir

    2017-12-01

    Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a model bacteria used commonly for medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs) production using various substrates. However, despite many studies conducted on P. putida KT2440 strain, the molecular mechanisms of leading to mcl-PHAs synthesis in reaction to environmental stimuli are still not clear. The rearrangement of the metabolism in response to environmental stress could be controlled by stringent response that modulates the transcription of many genes in order to promote survival under nutritional deprivation conditions. Therefore, in this work we investigated the relation between mcl-PHAs synthesis and stringent response. For this study, a relA/spoT mutant of P. putida KT2440, unable to induce the stringent response, was used. Additionally, the transcriptome of this mutant was analyzed using RNA-seq in order to examine rearrangements of the metabolism during cultivation. The results show that the relA/spoT mutant of P. putida KT2440 is able to accumulate mcl-PHAs in both optimal and nitrogen limiting conditions. Nitrogen starvation did not change the efficiency of mcl-PHAs synthesis in this mutant. The transition from exponential growth to stationary phase caused significant upregulation of genes involved in transport system and nitrogen metabolism. Transcriptional regulators, including rpoS, rpoN and rpoD, did not show changes in transcript abundance when entering the stationary phase, suggesting their limited role in mcl-PHAs accumulation during stationary phase.

  4. U(VI) biosorption by bi-functionalized Pseudomonas putida @ chitosan bead: Modeling and optimization using RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohbatzadeh, Hozhabr; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Safdari, Jaber; Fatemi, Faezeh

    2016-08-01

    In this work, Pseudomonas putida cells immobilized into chitosan beads (PICB) were synthesized to investigate the impact of microorganism entrapment on biosorption capacity of prepared biosorbent for U(VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on Central Composite Design (CCD) was utilized to evaluate the performance of the PICB in comparison with chitosan beads (CB) under batch mode. Performing experiments under optimal condition sets viz. pH 5, initial U(VI) concentration 500mg/L, biosorbent dosage 0.4g/L and 20wt.% bacterial cells showed that the observed biosorption capacity enhanced by 1.27 times from 398mg/g (CB) to 504mg/g (PICB) that confirmed the effectiveness of cells immobilization process. FTIR and potentiometric titration were then utilized to characterize the prepared biosorbents. While the dominant functional group in the binding process was NH3(+) (4.78meq/g) in the CB, the functional groups of NH3(+), NH2, OH, COOH (6.00meq/g) were responsible for the PICB. The equilibrium and kinetic studies revealed that the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model were in better fitness with the CB and PICB experimental data. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the PICB could be a suitable biosorbent for uranium (VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Growth kinetics, effect of carbon substrate in biosynthesis of mcl-PHA by Pseudomonas putida Bet001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Gumel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Growth associated biosynthesis of medium chain length poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA in Pseudomonas putida Bet001 isolated from palm oil mill effluent was studied. Models with substrate inhibition terms described well the kinetics of its growth. Selected fatty acids (C8:0 to C18:1 and ammonium were used as carbon and nitrogen sources during growth and PHA biosynthesis, resulting in PHA accumulation of about 50 to 69% (w/w and PHA yields ranging from 10.12 g L-1 to 15.45 g L-1, respectively. The monomer composition of the PHA ranges from C4 to C14, and was strongly influenced by the type of carbon substrate fed. Interestingly, an odd carbon chain length (C7 monomer was also detected when C18:1 was fed. Polymer showed melting temperature (Tm of 42.0 (± 0.2 °C, glass transition temperature (Tg of -1.0 (± 0.2 °C and endothermic melting enthalpy of fusion (ΔHf of 110.3 (± 0.1 J g-1. The molecular weight (Mw range of the polymer was relatively narrow between 55 to 77 kDa.

  6. Growth stimulation of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas putida using nanostructured ZnO thin film as transducer element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loukanov, Alexandre, E-mail: loukanov@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp [Saitama University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science (Japan); Filipov, Chavdar [University of Forestry, Department of Infectious pathology, hygiene, technology and control of food stuffs of animal origin, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Bulgaria); Valcheva, Violeta [Bulgarian Academy of Science, Department of Infectious Diseases, Institute of microbiology (Bulgaria); Lecheva, Marta [University of Mining and Geology “St. Ivan Rilski”, Laboratory of Engineering NanoBiotechnology, Department of Engineering Geoecology (Bulgaria); Emin, Saim [University of Nova Gorica, Materials Research Laboratory (Slovenia)

    2015-04-15

    The semiconductor zinc oxide nanomaterial (ZnO or ZnO:H) is widely used in advanced biosensor technology for the design of highly-sensitive detector elements for various applications. In the attempt to evaluate its effect on common microorganisms, two types of nanostructured transducer films have been used (average diameter 600–1000 nm). They have been prepared by using both wet sol–gel method and magnetron sputtering. Their polycrystalline structure and specific surface features have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope. The assessment of growth stimulation of bacteria was determined using epifluorescent microscope by cell staining with Live/Dead BacLight kit. In our experiments, the growth stimulation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on nanostructured ZnO film is demonstrated by Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas putida. These two bacterial species have been selected, because they are well known and studied in biosensor technologies, with structural difference of their cell walls. These pathogens are easy for with common source in the liquid food or some commercial products. Our data has revealed that the method of transducer film preparation influences strongly bacterial inhibition and division. These results present the transforming signal precisely, when ZnO is used in biosensor applications.

  7. Metabolism of toluene and xylenes by Pseudomonas (putida (arvilla) mt-2: evidence for a new function of the TOL plasmid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsey, M J; Williams, P A

    1975-10-01

    Pseudomonas putida (arvilla) mt-2 carries genes for the catabolism of toluene, m-xylene, and p-xylene on a transmissible plasmid, TOL. These compounds are degraded by oxidation of one of the methyl substituents via the corresponding alcohols and aldehydes to benzoate and m- and p-toluates, respectively, which are then further metabolised by the meta pathway, also coded for by the TOL plasmid. The specificities of the benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and the benzaldehyde dehydrogenase for their three respective substrates are independent of the carbon source used for growth, suggesting that a single set of nonspecific enzymes is responsible for the dissimilation of the breakdown products of toluene and m- and p-xylene. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase are coincidently and possible coordinately induced by toluene and the xylenes, and by the corresponding alcohols and aldehydes. They are not induced in cells grown on m-toluate but catechol 2,3-oxygenase can be induced by m-xylene.

  8. Growth stimulation of Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas putida using nanostructured ZnO thin film as transducer element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukanov, Alexandre; Filipov, Chavdar; Valcheva, Violeta; Lecheva, Marta; Emin, Saim

    2015-04-01

    The semiconductor zinc oxide nanomaterial (ZnO or ZnO:H) is widely used in advanced biosensor technology for the design of highly-sensitive detector elements for various applications. In the attempt to evaluate its effect on common microorganisms, two types of nanostructured transducer films have been used (average diameter 600-1000 nm). They have been prepared by using both wet sol-gel method and magnetron sputtering. Their polycrystalline structure and specific surface features have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope, and atomic force microscope. The assessment of growth stimulation of bacteria was determined using epifluorescent microscope by cell staining with Live/Dead BacLight kit. In our experiments, the growth stimulation of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria on nanostructured ZnO film is demonstrated by Bacillus cereus and Pseudomonas putida. These two bacterial species have been selected, because they are well known and studied in biosensor technologies, with structural difference of their cell walls. These pathogens are easy for with common source in the liquid food or some commercial products. Our data has revealed that the method of transducer film preparation influences strongly bacterial inhibition and division. These results present the transforming signal precisely, when ZnO is used in biosensor applications.

  9. Flavin-Dependent Redox Transfers by the Two-Component Diketocamphane Monooxygenases of Camphor-Grown Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Willetts

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The progressive titres of key monooxygenases and their requisite native donors of reducing power were used to assess the relative contribution of various camphor plasmid (CAM plasmid- and chromosome-coded activities to biodegradation of (rac-camphor at successive stages throughout growth of Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007 on the bicylic monoterpenoid. A number of different flavin reductases (FRs have the potential to supply reduced flavin mononucleotide to both 2,5- and 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase, the key isoenzymic two-component monooxygenases that delineate respectively the (+- and (−-camphor branches of the convergent degradation pathway. Two different constitutive chromosome-coded ferric reductases able to act as FRs can serve such as role throughout all stages of camphor-dependent growth, whereas Fred, a chromosome-coded inducible FR can only play a potentially significant role in the relatively late stages. Putidaredoxin reductase, an inducible CAM plasmid-coded flavoprotein that serves an established role as a redox intermediate for plasmid-coded cytochrome P450 monooxygenase also has the potential to serve as an important FR for both diketocamphane monooxygenases (DKCMOs throughout most stages of camphor-dependent growth.

  10. Genome-wide mapping of transcription start sites yields novel insights into the primary transcriptome of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta; Bojanovic, Klara; Yang, Xiaochen

    2016-01-01

    elements of P. putida strain KT2440. A total of 7937 putative transcription start sites (TSSs) were identified, where over two-thirds were located either on the opposite strand or internal to annotated genes. For TSSs associated with mRNAs, sequence analysis revealed a clear Shine–Dalgarno sequence......The environmental bacterium Pseudomonas putida is an organism endowed with a versatile metabolism and stress tolerance traits that are desirable in an efficient production organism. In this work, differential RNA sequencing was used to investigate the primary transcriptome and RNA regulatory...... was examined using an in vivo assay with GFP-fusion vectors and shown to function via a translational repression mechanism. Furthermore, 56 novel intergenic small RNAs and 8 putative actuaton transcripts were detected, as well as 8 novel open reading frames (ORFs). This study illustrates how global mapping...

  11. Photoautotrophic production of polyhydroxyalkanoates in a synthetic mixed culture ofSynechococcus elongatus cscBandPseudomonas putida cscAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Hannes; Hobmeier, Karina; Moos, Manuel; Kremling, Andreas; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    One of the major challenges for the present and future generations is to find suitable substitutes for the fossil resources we rely on today. Cyanobacterial carbohydrates have been discussed as an emerging renewable feedstock in industrial biotechnology for the production of fuels and chemicals, showing promising production rates when compared to crop-based feedstock. However, intrinsic capacities of cyanobacteria to produce biotechnological compounds are limited and yields are low. Here, we present an approach to circumvent these problems by employing a synthetic bacterial co-culture for the carbon-neutral production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from CO 2 . The co-culture consists of two bio - modules : Bio - module I , in which the cyanobacterial strain Synechococcus elongatus cscB fixes CO 2 , converts it to sucrose, and exports it into the culture supernatant; and bio - module II , where this sugar serves as C-source for Pseudomonas putida cscAB and is converted to PHAs that are accumulated in the cytoplasm. By applying a nitrogen-limited process, we achieved a maximal PHA production rate of 23.8 mg/(L day) and a maximal titer of 156 mg/L. We will discuss the present shortcomings of the process and show the potential for future improvement. These results demonstrate the feasibility of mixed cultures of S. elongatus cscB and P. putida cscAB for PHA production, making room for the cornucopia of possible products that are described for P. putida . The construction of more efficient sucrose-utilizing P. putida phenotypes and the optimization of process conditions will increase yields and productivities and eventually close the gap in the contemporary process. In the long term, the co-culture may serve as a platform process, in which P. putida is used as a chassis for the implementation of synthetic metabolic pathways for biotechnological production of value-added products.

  12. DETECTION OF PHENOL DEGRADING BACTERIA AND PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE BY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION

    OpenAIRE

    H. Movahedyan ، H. Khorsandi ، R. Salehi ، M. Nikaeen

    2009-01-01

    Phenol is one of the organic pollutants in various industrial wastewaters especially petrochemical and oil refining. Biological treatment is one of the considerable choices for removing of phenol present in these wastewaters. Identification of effective microbial species is considered as one of the important priorities for production of the biomass in order to achieve desirable kinetic of biological reactions. Basic purpose of this research is identification of phenol-degrading Pseudomonas Pu...

  13. A newly isolated Pseudomonas putida S-1 strain for batch-mode-propanethiol degradation and continuous treatment of propanethiol-containing waste gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dong-Zhi, E-mail: cdz@zjut.edu.cn [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Sun, Yi-Ming; Han, Li-Mei [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Chen, Jing [College of Food and Pharmacy, Zhejiang Ocean University, Zhoushan 316004 (China); Ye, Jie-Xu; Chen, Jian-Meng [College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

    2016-01-25

    Highlights: • A novel strain capable of effectively degrading 1-propanethiol (PT) was isolated. • Cells could be feasibly cultured in nutrition-rich media for PT degradation. • A possible pathway for PT degradation was proposed. • Pseudomonas putida S-1 could degrade mixed pollutants with diauxic growth. • Continuous removal of gaseous PT with or without isopropanol was demonstrated. - Abstract: Pseudomonas putida S-1 was isolated from activated sludge. This novel strain was capable of degrading malodorous 1-propanethiol (PT). PT degradation commenced with no lag phase by cells pre-grown in nutrition-rich media, such as Luria–Bertani (LB), and PT-contained mineral medium at specific growth rates of 0.10–0.19 h{sup −1}; this phenomenon indicated the operability of a large-scale cell culture. A possible PT degradation pathway was proposed on the basis of the detected metabolites, including dipropyl disulfide, 3-hexanone, 2-hexanone, 3-hexanol, 2-hexanol, S{sup 0}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2−}, and CO{sub 2}. P. putida S-1 could degrade mixed pollutants containing PT, diethyl disulfide, isopropyl alcohol, and acetaldehyde, and LB-pre-cultured cells underwent diauxic growth. Waste gas contaminated with 200–400 mg/m{sup 3} PT was continuously treated by P. putida S-1 pre-cultured in LB medium in a completely stirred tank reactor. The removal efficiencies exceeded 88% when PT stream was mixed with 200 mg/m{sup 3} isopropanol; by contrast, the removal efficiencies decreased to 60% as the empty bed residence time was shortened from 40 s to 20 s.

  14. Spatial Pattern of Copper Phosphate Precipitation Involves in Copper Accumulation and Resistance of Unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangcun; Lin, Huirong; Chen, Xincai

    2016-12-28

    Bacterial biofilms are spatially structured communities that contain bacterial cells with a wide range of physiological states. The spatial distribution and speciation of copper in unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 biofilms that accumulated 147.0 mg copper per g dry weight were determined by transmission electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and micro-X-ray fluorescence microscopy coupled with micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES) analysis. It was found that copper was mainly precipitated in a 75 μm thick layer as copper phosphate in the middle of the biofilm, while there were two living cell layers in the air-biofilm and biofilm-medium interfaces, respectively, distinguished from the copper precipitation layer by two interfaces. The X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of biofilm revealed that species resembling Cu₃(PO₄)₂ predominated in biofilm, followed by Cu-Citrate- and Cu-Glutathione-like species. Further analysis by micro-XANES revealed that 94.4% of copper were Cu₃(PO₄)₂-like species in the layer next to the air interface, whereas the copper species of the layer next to the medium interface were composed by 75.4% Cu₃(PO₄)₂, 10.9% Cu-Citrate-like species, and 11.2% Cu-Glutathione-like species. Thereby, it was suggested that copper was initially acquired by cells in the biofilm-air interface as a citrate complex, and then transported out and bound by out membranes of cells, released from the copper-bound membranes, and finally precipitated with phosphate in the extracellular matrix of the biofilm. These results revealed a clear spatial pattern of copper precipitation in unsaturated biofilm, which was responsible for the high copper tolerance and accumulation of the biofilm.

  15. Thermal effects on the activity and structural conformation of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase from Pseudomonas putida SH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shir-Ly; Hsu, Yuan-Chang; Wu, Chun-Ming; Lynn, Jeffrey W; Li, Wen-Hsien

    2010-01-21

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas putida SH1, which can catabolize phenol, naphthalene, or cresol as the sole carbon and energy source, was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated site in Taiwan. The catechol 2,3-dioxygenase (C23O) was purified from this bacterial strain when grown on naphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. The enzyme is composed of four identical subunits with a native molecular weight of 128 +/- 5 kD. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) techniques were employed to study the thermal effects on the structural conformation of this enzyme in solution. The SANS measurements revealed distinct changes in the size of the enzyme between 50 and 80 degrees C, and the size was not restored during the subsequent cooling. The enzyme started to denature at 55 degrees C, and the structure was destroyed by the time the temperature reached 80 degrees C, at which the enzyme had become more than twice the original size. The optimal catalytic temperature of the enzyme was at 50 degrees C. The half-life of the activity at this temperature was 45 min. The enzyme activity increases starting from 25 degrees C and reaches its maximum at 50 degrees C, below which no obvious change in the size of the enzyme is found. Noticeable enlargement of the enzyme is revealed when the enzymatic activity starts to fall. By combination of SANS measurement and biochemical properties of the enzyme, this study demonstrates the correlation of enzyme size in solution and catalytic activity upon a heat treatment. In addition, for a protein composed of multiple subunits, the shape of the enzyme and the dissociation of the enzyme subunits in a thermal cycle were also demonstrated by SANS methodology.

  16. Genetic analysis of plant endophytic Pseudomonas putida BP25 and chemo-profiling of its antimicrobial volatile organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheoran, Neelam; Valiya Nadakkakath, Agisha; Munjal, Vibhuti; Kundu, Aditi; Subaharan, Kesavan; Venugopal, Vibina; Rajamma, Suseelabhai; Eapen, Santhosh J; Kumar, Aundy

    2015-04-01

    Black pepper associated bacterium BP25 was isolated from root endosphere of apparently healthy cultivar Panniyur-5 that protected black pepper against Phytophthora capsici and Radopholus similis - the major production constraints. The bacterium was characterized and mechanisms of its antagonistic action against major pathogens are elucidated. The polyphasic phenotypic analysis revealed its identity as Pseudomonas putida. Multi locus sequence typing revealed that the bacterium shared gene sequences with several other isolates representing diverse habitats. Tissue localization assays exploiting green fluorescence protein expression clearly indicated that PpBP25 endophytically colonized not only its host plant - black pepper, but also other distantly related plants such as ginger and arabidopsis. PpBP25 colonies could be enumerated from internal tissues of plants four weeks post inoculation indicated its stable establishment and persistence in the plant system. The bacterium inhibited broad range of pathogens such as Phytophthora capsici, Pythium myriotylum, Giberella moniliformis, Rhizoctonia solani, Athelia rolfsii, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and plant parasitic nematode, Radopholus similis by its volatile substances. GC/MS based chemical profiling revealed presence of Heneicosane; Tetratetracontane; Pyrrolo [1,2-a] pyrazine-1,4-dione, hexahydro-3-(2-methylpropyl); Tetracosyl heptafluorobutyrate; 1-3-Eicosene, (E)-; 1-Heneicosanol; Octadecyl trifluoroacetate and 1-Pentadecene in PpBP25 metabolite. Dynamic head space GC/MS analysis of airborne volatiles indicated the presence of aromatic compounds such as 1-Undecene;Disulfide dimethyl; Pyrazine, methyl-Pyrazine, 2,5-dimethyl-; Isoamyl alcohol; Pyrazine, methyl-; Dimethyl trisulfide, etc. The work paved way for profiling of broad spectrum antimicrobial VOCs in endophytic PpBP25 for crop protection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, W.F.; Boyd, S.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 nad NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measureable levels int he pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with {sup 14}C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with {sup 35}S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Deciphering the genetic determinants for aerobic nicotinic acid degradation: the nic cluster from Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, José I; Canales, Angeles; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Rychlewski, Leszek; García, José L; Díaz, Eduardo

    2008-08-12

    The aerobic catabolism of nicotinic acid (NA) is considered a model system for degradation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds, some of which are major environmental pollutants; however, the complete set of genes as well as the structural-functional relationships of most of the enzymes involved in this process are still unknown. We have characterized a gene cluster (nic genes) from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 responsible for the aerobic NA degradation in this bacterium and when expressed in heterologous hosts. The biochemistry of the NA degradation through the formation of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine and maleamic acid has been revisited, and some gene products become the prototype of new types of enzymes with unprecedented molecular architectures. Thus, the initial hydroxylation of NA is catalyzed by a two-component hydroxylase (NicAB) that constitutes the first member of the xanthine dehydrogenase family whose electron transport chain to molecular oxygen includes a cytochrome c domain. The Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenase (NicX) converts 2,5-dihydroxypyridine into N-formylmaleamic acid, and it becomes the founding member of a new family of extradiol ring-cleavage dioxygenases. Further conversion of N-formylmaleamic acid to formic and maleamic acid is catalyzed by the NicD protein, the only deformylase described so far whose catalytic triad is similar to that of some members of the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold superfamily. This work allows exploration of the existence of orthologous gene clusters in saprophytic bacteria and some pathogens, where they might stimulate studies on their role in virulence, and it provides a framework to develop new biotechnological processes for detoxification/biotransformation of N-heterocyclic aromatic compounds.

  19. Inhibited transport of graphene oxide nanoparticles in granular quartz sand coated with Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian-Zhou; Wang, Deng-Jun; Fang, Huan; Fu, Qing-Long; Zhou, Dong-Mei

    2017-02-01

    Increasing production and use of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) boost their wide dissemination in the subsurface environments where biofilms occur ubiquitously, representative of the physical and chemical heterogeneities. This study aimed at investigating the influence of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis (BS) and Gram-negative Pseudomonas putida (PP) biofilms on the transport of GONPs under different ionic strengths (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 mM CaCl2) at neutral pH 7.2 in water-saturated porous media. Particularly, the X-ray micro-computed tomography was used to quantitatively characterize the pore structures of sand columns in the presence and absence of biofilms. Our results indicated that the presence of biofilms reduced the porosity and narrowed down the pore sizes of packed columns. Transport experiments in biofilm-coated sand showed that biofilms, irrespective of bacterial species, significantly inhibited the mobility of GONPs compared to that in cleaned sand. This could be due to the Ca2+ complexation, increased surface roughness and charge heterogeneities of collectors, and particularly enhanced physical straining caused by biofilms. The two-site kinetic retention model-fitted value of maximum solid-phase concentration (Smax2) for GONPs was higher for biofilm-coated sand than for cleaned sand, demonstrating that biofilms act as favorable sites for GONPs retention. Our findings presented herein are important to deepen our current understanding on the nature of particle-collector interactions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Two Distinct Pathways for Metabolism of Theophylline and Caffeine Are Coexpressed in Pseudomonas putida CBB5▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chi Li; Louie, Tai Man; Summers, Ryan; Kale, Yogesh; Gopishetty, Sridhar; Subramanian, Mani

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CBB5 was isolated from soil by enrichment on caffeine. This strain used not only caffeine, theobromine, paraxanthine, and 7-methylxanthine as sole carbon and nitrogen sources but also theophylline and 3-methylxanthine. Analyses of metabolites in spent media and resting cell suspensions confirmed that CBB5 initially N demethylated theophylline via a hitherto unreported pathway to 1- and 3-methylxanthines. NAD(P)H-dependent conversion of theophylline to 1- and 3-methylxanthines was also detected in the crude cell extracts of theophylline-grown CBB5. 1-Methylxanthine and 3-methylxanthine were subsequently N demethylated to xanthine. CBB5 also oxidized theophylline and 1- and 3-methylxanthines to 1,3-dimethyluric acid and 1- and 3-methyluric acids, respectively. However, these methyluric acids were not metabolized further. A broad-substrate-range xanthine-oxidizing enzyme was responsible for the formation of these methyluric acids. In contrast, CBB5 metabolized caffeine to theobromine (major metabolite) and paraxanthine (minor metabolite). These dimethylxanthines were further N demethylated to xanthine via 7-methylxanthine. Theobromine-, paraxanthine-, and 7-methylxanthine-grown cells also metabolized all of the methylxanthines mentioned above via the same pathway. Thus, the theophylline and caffeine N-demethylation pathways converged at xanthine via different methylxanthine intermediates. Xanthine was eventually oxidized to uric acid. Enzymes involved in theophylline and caffeine degradation were coexpressed when CBB5 was grown on theophylline or on caffeine or its metabolites. However, 3-methylxanthine-grown CBB5 cells did not metabolize caffeine, whereas theophylline was metabolized at much reduced levels to only methyluric acids. To our knowledge, this is the first report of theophylline N demethylation and coexpression of distinct pathways for caffeine and theophylline degradation in bacteria. PMID:19447909

  1. A reduction in growth rate of Pseudomonas putida KT2442 counteracts productivity advances in medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate production from gluconate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinn Manfred

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The substitution of plastics based on fossil raw material by biodegradable plastics produced from renewable resources is of crucial importance in a context of oil scarcity and overflowing plastic landfills. One of the most promising organisms for the manufacturing of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHA is Pseudomonas putida KT2440 which can accumulate large amounts of polymer from cheap substrates such as glucose. Current research focuses on enhancing the strain production capacity and synthesizing polymers with novel material properties. Many of the corresponding protocols for strain engineering rely on the rifampicin-resistant variant, P. putida KT2442. However, it remains unclear whether these two strains can be treated as equivalent in terms of mcl-PHA production, as the underlying antibiotic resistance mechanism involves a modification in the RNA polymerase and thus has ample potential for interfering with global transcription. Results To assess PHA production in P. putida KT2440 and KT2442, we characterized the growth and PHA accumulation on three categories of substrate: PHA-related (octanoate, PHA-unrelated (gluconate and poor PHA substrate (citrate. The strains showed clear differences of growth rate on gluconate and citrate (reduction for KT2442 > 3-fold and > 1.5-fold, respectively but not on octanoate. In addition, P. putida KT2442 PHA-free biomass significantly decreased after nitrogen depletion on gluconate. In an attempt to narrow down the range of possible reasons for this different behavior, the uptake of gluconate and extracellular release of the oxidized product 2-ketogluconate were measured. The results suggested that the reason has to be an inefficient transport or metabolization of 2-ketogluconate while an alteration of gluconate uptake and conversion to 2-ketogluconate could be excluded. Conclusions The study illustrates that the recruitment of a pleiotropic mutation, whose effects might

  2. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals the Participation of Efflux Pumps and Ornithine in the Response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cells to Challenge with Propranolol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Sayqal

    Full Text Available Efflux pumps are critically important membrane components that play a crucial role in strain tolerance in Pseudomonas putida to antibiotics and aromatic hydrocarbons that result in these toxicants being expelled from the bacteria. Here, the effect of propranolol on P. putida was examined by sudden addition of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg mL-1 of this β-blocker to several strains of P. putida, including the wild type DOT-T1E and the efflux pump knockout mutants DOT-T1E-PS28 and DOT-T1E-18. Bacterial viability measurements reveal that the efflux pump TtgABC plays a more important role than the TtgGHI pump in strain tolerance to propranolol. Mid-infrared (MIR spectroscopy was then used as a rapid, high-throughput screening tool to investigate any phenotypic changes resulting from exposure to varying levels of propranolol. Multivariate statistical analysis of these MIR data revealed gradient trends in resultant ordination scores plots, which were related to the concentration of propranolol. MIR illustrated phenotypic changes associated with the presence of this drug within the cell that could be assigned to significant changes that occurred within the bacterial protein components. To complement this phenotypic fingerprinting approach metabolic profiling was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS to identify metabolites of interest during the growth of bacteria following toxic perturbation with the same concentration levels of propranolol. Metabolic profiling revealed that ornithine, which was only produced by P. putida cells in the presence of propranolol, presents itself as a major metabolic feature that has important functions in propranolol stress tolerance mechanisms within this highly significant and environmentally relevant species of bacteria.

  3. Co-culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a dual-species biofilm community strongly increases resistance of Pseudomonas putida to benzalkonium chloride.

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    Efstathios Giaouris

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS, as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC used in inadequate (sub-lethal concentration (50 ppm. The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90% of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation.

  4. Co-Culture with Listeria monocytogenes within a Dual-Species Biofilm Community Strongly Increases Resistance of Pseudomonas putida to Benzalkonium Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaouris, Efstathios; Chorianopoulos, Nikos; Doulgeraki, Agapi; Nychas, George-John

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is a phenomenon occurring almost wherever microorganisms and surfaces exist in close proximity. This study aimed to evaluate the possible influence of bacterial interactions on the ability of Listeria monocytogenes and Pseudomonas putida to develop a dual-species biofilm community on stainless steel (SS), as well as on the subsequent resistance of their sessile cells to benzalkonium chloride (BC) used in inadequate (sub-lethal) concentration (50 ppm). The possible progressive adaptability of mixed-culture biofilms to BC was also investigated. To accomplish these, 3 strains per species were left to develop mixed-culture biofilms on SS coupons, incubated in daily renewable growth medium for a total period of 10 days, under either mono- or dual-species conditions. Each day, biofilm cells were exposed to disinfection treatment. Results revealed that the simultaneous presence of L. monocytogenes strongly increased the resistance of P. putida biofilm cells to BC, while culture conditions (mono-/dual-species) did not seem to significantly influence the resistance of L. monocytogenes biofilm cells. BC mainly killed L. monocytogenes cells when this was applied against the dual-species sessile community during the whole incubation period, despite the fact that from the 2nd day this community was mainly composed (>90%) of P. putida cells. No obvious adaptation to BC was observed in either L. monocytogenes or P. putida biofilm cells. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that the different strains behaved differently with regard to biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Such knowledge on the physiological behavior of mixed-culture biofilms could provide the information necessary to control their formation. PMID:24130873

  5. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals the Participation of Efflux Pumps and Ornithine in the Response of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E Cells to Challenge with Propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayqal, Ali; Xu, Yun; Trivedi, Drupad K; AlMasoud, Najla; Ellis, David I; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-01-01

    Efflux pumps are critically important membrane components that play a crucial role in strain tolerance in Pseudomonas putida to antibiotics and aromatic hydrocarbons that result in these toxicants being expelled from the bacteria. Here, the effect of propranolol on P. putida was examined by sudden addition of 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6 mg mL-1 of this β-blocker to several strains of P. putida, including the wild type DOT-T1E and the efflux pump knockout mutants DOT-T1E-PS28 and DOT-T1E-18. Bacterial viability measurements reveal that the efflux pump TtgABC plays a more important role than the TtgGHI pump in strain tolerance to propranolol. Mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy was then used as a rapid, high-throughput screening tool to investigate any phenotypic changes resulting from exposure to varying levels of propranolol. Multivariate statistical analysis of these MIR data revealed gradient trends in resultant ordination scores plots, which were related to the concentration of propranolol. MIR illustrated phenotypic changes associated with the presence of this drug within the cell that could be assigned to significant changes that occurred within the bacterial protein components. To complement this phenotypic fingerprinting approach metabolic profiling was performed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify metabolites of interest during the growth of bacteria following toxic perturbation with the same concentration levels of propranolol. Metabolic profiling revealed that ornithine, which was only produced by P. putida cells in the presence of propranolol, presents itself as a major metabolic feature that has important functions in propranolol stress tolerance mechanisms within this highly significant and environmentally relevant species of bacteria.

  6. Toxicity of fungal-generated silver nanoparticles to soil-inhabiting Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a rhizospheric bacterium responsible for plant protection and bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Indarchand R. [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Department of Biotechnology, Institute of Science, Nipat Niranjan Nagar, Caves Road, Aurangabad 431004, Maharashtra (India); Anderson, Anne J. [Department of Biology, Utah State University, Logan, Utah 84321 (United States); Rai, Mahendra, E-mail: mahendrarai@sgbau.ac.in [Nanobiotechnology Laboratory, Department of Biotechnology, S.G.B. Amravati University, Amravati 444602, Maharashtra (India); Laboratório de Química Biológica, Instituto de Química, UNICAMP, Cidade Universitária “Zefferino Vaz” Barão Geraldo, CEP 13083-970, Caixa Postal 6150, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-04-09

    Highlights: • This study incorporates the mycosynthesis of AgNPs and their characterisation by various methods. • A first attempt demonstrating the toxicity assessment of AgNPs on beneficial soil microbe. • Use of biosensor in Pseudomonas putida KT2440, gave accurate antimicrobial results. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles have attracted considerable attention due to their beneficial properties. But toxicity issues associated with them are also rising. The reports in the past suggested health hazards of silver nanoparticles at the cellular, molecular, or whole organismal level in eukaryotes. Whereas, there is also need to examine the exposure effects of silver nanoparticle to the microbes, which are beneficial to humans as well as environment. The available literature suggests the harmful effects of physically and chemically synthesised silver nanoparticles. The toxicity of biogenically synthesized nanoparticles has been less studied than physically and chemically synthesised nanoparticles. Hence, there is a greater need to study the toxic effects of biologically synthesised silver nanoparticles in general and mycosynthesized nanoparticles in particular. In the present study, attempts have been made to assess the risk associated with the exposure of mycosynthesized silver nanoparticles on a beneficial soil microbe Pseudomonas putida. KT2440. The study demonstrates mycosynthesis of silver nanoparticles and their characterisation by UV–vis spectrophotometry, FTIR, X-ray diffraction, nanosight LM20 – a particle size distribution analyzer and TEM. Silver nanoparticles obtained herein were found to exert the hazardous effect at the concentration of 0.4 μg/ml, which warrants further detailed investigations concerning toxicity.

  7. ABILITY OF BACTERIAL CONSORTIUM: Bacillus coagulans, Bacilus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Nitrosomonas sp. and Pseudomonas putida IN BIOREMEDIATION OF WASTE WATER IN CISIRUNG WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratu SAFITRI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in order to determine the ability of bacterial consortium: Bacillus coagulans, Bacilus licheniformis, Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Nitrosomonas sp., and Pseudomonas putida in bioremediation of wastewater origin Cisirung WWTP. This study uses an experimental method completely randomized design (CRD, which consists of two treatment factors (8x8 factorial design. The first factor is a consortium of bacteria (K, consisting of 8 level factors (k1, k2, k3, k4, k5, k6, k7, and k8. The second factor is the time (T, consisting of a 7 level factors (t0, t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, and t7. Test parameters consist of BOD (Biochemical Oxygen Demand, COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand, TSS (Total Suspended Solid, Ammonia and Population of Microbes during bioremediation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, followed by Duncan test. The results of this study showed that the consortium of Bacillus pumilus, Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus coagulans, Nitrosomonas sp., and Pseudomonas putida with inoculum concentration of 5% (k6 is a consortium of the most effective in reducing BOD 71.93%, 64.30% COD, TSS 94.85%, and 88.58% of ammonia.

  8. Display of a thermostable lipase on the surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730, and its applications in whole-cell biocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Seok-Joon

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole-cell biocatalysis in organic solvents has been widely applied to industrial bioprocesses. In two-phase water-solvent processes, substrate conversion yields and volumetric productivities can be limited by the toxicity of solvents to host cells and by the low mass transfer rates of the substrates from the solvent phase to the whole-cell biocatalysts in water. Results To solve the problem of solvent toxicity, we immobilized a thermostable lipase (TliA from Pseudomonas fluorescens on the cell surface of a solvent-resistant bacterium, Pseudomonas putida GM730. Surface immobilization of enzymes eliminates the mass-transfer limitation imposed by the cell wall and membranes. TliA was successfully immobilized on the surface of P. putida cells using the ice-nucleation protein (INP anchoring motif from Pseudomonas syrinage. The surface location was confirmed by flow cytometry, protease accessibility and whole-cell enzyme activity using a membrane-impermeable substrate. Three hundred and fifty units of whole-cell hydrolytic activity per gram dry cell mass were obtained when the enzyme was immobilized with a shorter INP anchoring motif (INPNC. The surface-immobilized TliA retained full enzyme activity in a two-phase water-isooctane reaction system after incubation at 37°C for 12 h, while the activity of the free form enzyme decreased to 65% of its initial value. Whole cells presenting immobilized TliA were shown to catalyze three representative lipase reactions: hydrolysis of olive oil, synthesis of triacylglycerol and chiral resolution. Conclusion In vivo surface immobilization of enzymes on solvent-resistant bacteria was demonstrated, and appears to be useful for a variety of whole-cell bioconversions in the presence of organic solvents.

  9. Production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates by sequential feeding of xylose and octanoic acid in engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Meur Sylvaine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is able to synthesize large amounts of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs. To reduce the substrate cost, which represents nearly 50% of the total PHA production cost, xylose, a hemicellulose derivate, was tested as the growth carbon source in an engineered P. putida KT2440 strain. Results The genes encoding xylose isomerase (XylA and xylulokinase (XylB from Escherichia coli W3110 were introduced into P. putida KT2440. The recombinant KT2440 exhibited a XylA activity of 1.47 U and a XylB activity of 0.97 U when grown on a defined medium supplemented with xylose. The cells reached a maximum specific growth rate of 0.24 h-1 and a final cell dry weight (CDW of 2.5 g L-1 with a maximal yield of 0.5 g CDW g-1 xylose. Since no mcl-PHA was accumulated from xylose, mcl-PHA production can be controlled by the addition of fatty acids leading to tailor-made PHA compositions. Sequential feeding strategy was applied using xylose as the growth substrate and octanoic acid as the precursor for mcl-PHA production. In this way, up to 20% w w-1 of mcl-PHA was obtained. A yield of 0.37 g mcl-PHA per g octanoic acid was achieved under the employed conditions. Conclusions Sequential feeding of relatively cheap carbohydrates and expensive fatty acids is a practical way to achieve more cost-effective mcl-PHA production. This study is the first reported attempt to produce mcl-PHA by using xylose as the growth substrate. Further process optimizations to achieve higher cell density and higher productivity of mcl-PHA should be investigated. These scientific exercises will undoubtedly contribute to the economic feasibility of mcl-PHA production from renewable feedstock.

  10. Surface display of monkey metallothionein {alpha} tandem repeats and EGFP fusion protein on Pseudomonas putida X4 for biosorption and detection of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaochuan; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun [Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Agricultural Microbiology

    2012-09-15

    Monkey metallothionein {alpha} domain tandem repeats (4mMT{alpha}), which exhibit high cadmium affinity, have been displayed for the first time on the surface of a bacterium using ice nucleation protein N-domain (inaXN) protein from the Xanthomonas campestris pv (ACCC - 10049) as an anchoring motif. The shuttle vector pIME, which codes for INAXN-4mMT{alpha}-EGFP fusion, was constructed and used to target 4mMT{alpha} and EGFP on the surface of Pseudomonas putida X4 (CCTCC - 209319). The surface location of the INAXN-4mMT{alpha}-EGFP fusion was further verified by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. The growth of X4 showed resistance to cadmium presence. The presence of surface-exposed 4mMT{alpha} on the engineered strains was four times higher than that of the wild-type X4. The Cd{sup 2+} accumulation by X4/pIME was not only four times greater than that of the original host bacterial cells but was also remarkably unaffected by the presence of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. Moreover, the surface-engineered strains could effectively bind Cd{sup 2+} under a wide range of pH levels, from 4 to 7. P. putida X4/pIME with surface-expressed 4mMT{alpha}-EGFP had twice the cadmium binding capacity as well as 1.4 times the fluorescence as the cytoplasmic 4mMTa-EGFP. These results suggest that P. putida X4 expressing 4mMT{alpha}-EGFP with the INAXN anchor motif on the surface would be a useful tool for the remediation and biodetection of environmental cadmium contaminants. (orig.)

  11. Control of Phytophthora nicotianae disease, induction of defense responses and genes expression of papaya fruits treated with Pseudomonas putida MGP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jingying; Liu, Aiyuan; Li, Xueping; Chen, Weixin

    2013-02-01

    Biological control is a potential strategy to reduce post-harvest decay in several fruits. Little research has been carried out on the effects of endophytic bacterium on post-harvest blight caused by Phytophthora nicotianae in papaya. In this work, the biocontrol activity of Pseudomonas putida MGP1 on this disease and its possible mechanisms, including changes of defensive enzyme activities, total phenolic content and mRNA levels of two important genes, were investigated. Fruits treated with MGP1 showed a significant lower disease index and demonstrated increases in chitinase, β-1,3-glucanase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and catalase activities and total phenolic content. In addition, the expression levels of pathogenesis related protein 1 gene (PR1) and non-expressor of PR1 gene (NPR1) in papaya fruits were elevated by MGP1 treatment. CONCLUSION The results indicated that papaya fruits were responsive to the endophytic bacterium Ps. putida, which could activate defensive enzymes and genes and thereby induce host disease resistance. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 Strain Metabolizes Glucose through a Cycle Formed by Enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff, Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas, and Pentose Phosphate Pathways*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikel, Pablo I.; Chavarría, Max; Fuhrer, Tobias; Sauer, Uwe; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    The soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 lacks a functional Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway, and glycolysis is known to proceed almost exclusively through the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) route. To investigate the raison d'être of this metabolic arrangement, the distribution of periplasmic and cytoplasmic carbon fluxes was studied in glucose cultures of this bacterium by using 13C-labeled substrates, combined with quantitative physiology experiments, metabolite quantification, and in vitro enzymatic assays under both saturating and non-saturating, quasi in vivo conditions. Metabolic flux analysis demonstrated that 90% of the consumed sugar was converted into gluconate, entering central carbon metabolism as 6-phosphogluconate and further channeled into the ED pathway. Remarkably, about 10% of the triose phosphates were found to be recycled back to form hexose phosphates. This set of reactions merges activities belonging to the ED, the EMP (operating in a gluconeogenic fashion), and the pentose phosphate pathways to form an unforeseen metabolic architecture (EDEMP cycle). Determination of the NADPH balance revealed that the default metabolic state of P. putida KT2440 is characterized by a slight catabolic overproduction of reducing power. Cells growing on glucose thus run a biochemical cycle that favors NADPH formation. Because NADPH is required not only for anabolic functions but also for counteracting different types of environmental stress, such a cyclic operation may contribute to the physiological heftiness of this bacterium in its natural habitats. PMID:26350459

  13. Medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates biosynthesis in Pseudomonas putida mt-2 is enhanced by co-metabolism of glycerol/octanoate or fatty acids mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, Paul; Mosrati, Ridha; Corroler, David

    2017-05-01

    The synthesis of medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoates (mcl-PHAs) by Pseudomonas putida mt-2 was investigated under nitrogen-rich then deficient conditions with glycerol/octanoate or long-chain fatty acids (LCFAs) as carbon sources. When mixed, glycerol and octanoate were co-assimilated regardless of nitrogen availability but provided that glycerol uptake has been already triggered under non-limiting nutrient conditions. This concomitant consumption allowed to enhance mcl-PHAs accumulation (up to 57% of cell dry weight (CDW)) under both non-limiting and nitrogen deficient conditions. Octanoate then mostly drove anabolism of the polyester with 3-hydroxyoctanoate (3HO) synthesized as the main monomer (83%). If the preferred PHA precursor octanoate was supplied, glycerol was mainly involved in cell growth and/or maintenance but very little in PHA production even under nitrogen starvation. P. putida cells accumulated higher amounts of mcl-PHAs when grown on mixtures of LCFAs compared to LCFAs supplied as single substrate (25% and 9% of CDW, respectively). However, only a weak enrichment of the polyester was observed after transfer of cells in a fresh nitrogen-free medium containing the same combination of LCFAs. Some typical units within the polyester were related to the LCFAs ratio supplied in the medium indicating that tailor-made monomers could be synthesized. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In-vitro antibacterial activities of the essential oils of aromatic plants against Erwinia herbicola (Lohnis and pseudomonas putida (Kris Hamilton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Abhay K.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine in vitro antibacterial activities of essential oils extracted from 53 aromatic plants of Gorakhpur Division (UP, INDIA for the control of two phytopathogenic bacteria namely Erwinia herbicola and Pseudomonas putida causing several post-harvest diseases in fruits and vegetables. Out of 53 oils screened, 8 oils such as Chenopodium ambrosioides, Citrus aurantium, Clausena pentaphylla, Hyptis suaveolens, Lippia alba, Mentha arvensis, Ocimum sanctum and Vitex negundo completely inhibited the growth of test bacteria. Furthermore MIC & MBC values of C. ambrosioides oil were least for Erw. herbicola (0.25 & 2.0 μl/ml and Ps. putida (0.12 & 1.0 μl/ml respectively than other 7 oils as well as Agromycin and Streptomycin drugs used in current study. GC and GC-MS analysis of Chenopodium oil revealed presence of 125 major and minor compounds, out of them, 14 compounds were recognized. The findings concluded that Chenopodium oil may be regarded as safe antibacterial agent for the management of post-harvest diseases of fruits and vegetables.

  15. Synthesis of Diblock copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate -block-poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate [PHB-b-PHHx] by a β-oxidation weakened Pseudomonas putida KT2442

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Lakshmi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Block polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA were reported to be resistant against polymer aging that negatively affects polymer properties. Recently, more and more attempts have been directed to make PHA block copolymers. Diblock copolymers PHB-b-PHHx consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB block covalently bonded with poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHHx block were for the first time produced successfully by a recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. Results The chloroform extracted polymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR, thermo- and mechanical analysis. NMR confirmed the existence of diblock copolymers consisting of 58 mol% PHB as the short chain length block with 42 mol% PHHx as the medium chain length block. The block copolymers had two glass transition temperatures (Tg at 2.7°C and −16.4°C, one melting temperature (Tm at 172.1°C and one cool crystallization temperature (Tc at 69.1°C as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, respectively. This is the first microbial short-chain-length (scl and medium-chain-length (mcl PHA block copolymer reported. Conclusions It is possible to produce PHA block copolymers of various kinds using the recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. In comparison to a random copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate (P(HB-co-HHx and a blend sample of PHB and PHHx, the PHB-b-PHHx showed improved structural related mechanical properties.

  16. Synthesis of Diblock copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate -block-poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate [PHB-b-PHHx] by a β-oxidation weakened Pseudomonas putida KT2442.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Wu, Lin-Ping; Chen, Jinchun; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2012-04-05

    Block polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) were reported to be resistant against polymer aging that negatively affects polymer properties. Recently, more and more attempts have been directed to make PHA block copolymers. Diblock copolymers PHB-b-PHHx consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) block covalently bonded with poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHHx) block were for the first time produced successfully by a recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. The chloroform extracted polymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermo- and mechanical analysis. NMR confirmed the existence of diblock copolymers consisting of 58 mol% PHB as the short chain length block with 42 mol% PHHx as the medium chain length block. The block copolymers had two glass transition temperatures (Tg) at 2.7°C and -16.4°C, one melting temperature (Tm) at 172.1°C and one cool crystallization temperature (Tc) at 69.1°C as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. This is the first microbial short-chain-length (scl) and medium-chain-length (mcl) PHA block copolymer reported. It is possible to produce PHA block copolymers of various kinds using the recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. In comparison to a random copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate (P(HB-co-HHx)) and a blend sample of PHB and PHHx, the PHB-b-PHHx showed improved structural related mechanical properties.

  17. Synthesis of Diblock copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate -block-poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate [PHB-b-PHHx] by a β-oxidation weakened Pseudomonas putida KT2442

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Block polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) were reported to be resistant against polymer aging that negatively affects polymer properties. Recently, more and more attempts have been directed to make PHA block copolymers. Diblock copolymers PHB-b-PHHx consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) block covalently bonded with poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate (PHHx) block were for the first time produced successfully by a recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. Results The chloroform extracted polymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), thermo- and mechanical analysis. NMR confirmed the existence of diblock copolymers consisting of 58 mol% PHB as the short chain length block with 42 mol% PHHx as the medium chain length block. The block copolymers had two glass transition temperatures (Tg) at 2.7°C and −16.4°C, one melting temperature (Tm) at 172.1°C and one cool crystallization temperature (Tc) at 69.1°C as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. This is the first microbial short-chain-length (scl) and medium-chain-length (mcl) PHA block copolymer reported. Conclusions It is possible to produce PHA block copolymers of various kinds using the recombinant Pseudomonas putida KT2442 with its β-oxidation cycle deleted to its maximum. In comparison to a random copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyhexanoate (P(HB-co-HHx)) and a blend sample of PHB and PHHx, the PHB-b-PHHx showed improved structural related mechanical properties. PMID:22480145

  18. pSY153-MDR, a p12969-DIM-related mega plasmid carrying blaIMP-45 and armA, from clinical Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Min; Chen, Hai; Zhu, Xiong; Feng, Jiao; Zhan, Zhe; Zhang, Defu; Chen, Xia; Zhao, Xiaofei; Lu, Jinxing; Xu, Jianguo; Zhou, Dongsheng; Li, Juan

    2017-09-15

    This work characterized mega plasmid pSY153-MDR, carrying blaIMP-45 and armA, from a multidrug-resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas putida isolate from the urine of a cerebral infarction patient in China. The backbone of pSY153-MDR was closely related to Pseudomonas plasmids p12969-DIM, pOZ176, pBM413, pTTS12, and pRBL16, and could not be assigned to any of the known incompatibility groups. The accessory modules of pSY153-MDR were composed of 10 individual insertion sequence elements and two different MDR regions, and differed dramatically from the above plasmids. Fifteen non-redundant resistance markers were identified to be involved in resistance to at least eight distinct classes of antibiotics. All of these resistance genes were associated with mobile elements, and were embedded within the two MDR regions. blaIMP-45 and armA coexisted in a Tn1403-Tn1548 region, which was generated from homologous recombination of Tn1403- and Tn1548-like transposons. The second copy of armA was a component of the ISCR28-armA-∆ISCR28 structure, representing a novel armA vehicle. This vehicle was located within In48, which was related to In363 and In1058. Data presented here provide a deeper insight into the evolutionary history of SY153, especially in regard to how it became extensively drug-resistant.

  19. Optimización de un medio de cultivo para la producción de biomasa de la cepa Pseudomonas putida UA 44 aislada del suelo bananero de Uraba –Antioquia

    OpenAIRE

    Becerra Mejía, Camilo Andrés

    2007-01-01

    En el presente trabajo se diseñó y optimizó un medio de cultivo químicamente definido para la bacteria Pseudomonas putida UA44 con potencial PGPR aislada del suelo de la zona bananera de Uraba por Ramirez (2004). Los resultados obtenidos en el medio químicamente definido (MD) se compararon con los hallados en un medio de cultivo semicomplejo (TSB: Triptic Soy Broth por sus siglas en Ingles).

  20. Evaluation of nutrients removal (NO3-N, NH3-N and PO4-P) with Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus cereus and a consortium of these microorganisms in the treatment of wastewater effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Guzmán, Abril; Jiménez-Magaña, Sergio; Guerra-Rentería, A Suggey; Gómez-Hermosillo, César; Parra-Rodríguez, F Javier; Velázquez, Sergio; Aguilar-Uscanga, Blanca Rosa; Solis-Pacheco, Josue; González-Reynoso, Orfil

    2017-07-01

    In this research removal of NH3-N, NO3-N and PO4-P nutrients from municipal wastewater was studied, using Chlorella vulgaris, Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus cereus and an artificial consortium of them. The objective is to analyze the performance of these microorganisms and their consortium, which has not been previously studied for nutrient removal in municipal wastewater. A model wastewater was prepared simulating the physicochemical characteristics found at the wastewater plant in Chapala, Mexico. Experiments were carried out without adding an external carbon source. Results indicate that nutrient removal with Chlorella vulgaris was the most efficient with a removal of 24.03% of NO3-N, 80.62% of NH3-N and 4.30% of PO4-P. With Bacillus cereus the results were 8.40% of NO3-N, 28.80% of NH3-N and 3.80% of PO4-P. The removals with Pseudomonas putida were 2.50% of NO3-N, 41.80 of NH3-N and 4.30% of PO4-P. The consortium of Chlorella vulgaris-Bacillus cereus-Pseudomonas putida removed 29.40% of NO3-N, 4.2% of NH3-N and 8.4% of PO4-P. The highest biomass production was with Bacillus cereus (450 mg/l) followed by Pseudomonas putida (444 mg/l), the consortium (205 mg/l) and Chlorella vulgaris (88.9 mg/l). This study highlights the utility of these microorganisms for nutrient removal in wastewater treatments.

  1. Prediction of the adaptability of Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E to a second phase of a solvent for economically sound two-phase biotransformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Grit; Kabelitz, Nadja; Zehnsdorf, Andreas; Miltner, Anja; Lippold, Holger; Meyer, Daniel; Schmid, Andreas; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2005-11-01

    The strain Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E was tested for its ability to tolerate second phases of different alkanols for their use as solvents in two-liquid-phase biotransformations. Although 1-decanol showed an about 10-fold higher toxicity to the cells than 1-octanol, the cells were able to adapt completely to 1-decanol only and could not be adapted in order to grow stably in the presence of a second phase of 1-octanol. The main explanation for this observation can be seen in the higher water and membrane solubility of 1-octanol. The hydrophobicity (log P) of a substance correlates with a certain partitioning of that compound into the membrane. Combining the log P value with the water solubility, the maximum membrane concentration of a compound can be calculated. With this simple calculation, it is possible to predict the property of an organic chemical for its potential applicability as a solvent for two-liquid-phase biotransformations with solvent-tolerant P. putida strains. Only compounds that show a maximum membrane concentration of less than 400 mM, such as 1-decanol, seem to be tolerated by these bacterial strains when applied in supersaturating concentrations to the medium. Taking into consideration that a solvent for a two-liquid-phase system should possess partitioning properties for potential substrates and products of a fine chemical synthesis, it can be seen that 1-decanol is a suitable solvent for such biotransformation processes. This was also demonstrated in shake cultures, where increasing amounts of a second phase of 1-decanol led to bacteria tolerating higher concentrations of the model substrate 3-nitrotoluene. Transferring this example to a 5-liter-scale bioreactor with 10% (vol/vol) 1-decanol, the amount of 3-nitrotoluene tolerated by the cells is up to 200-fold higher than in pure aqueous medium. The system demonstrates the usefulness of two-phase biotransformations utilizing solvent-tolerant bacteria.

  2. Functional Role of Lanthanides in Enzymatic Activity and Transcriptional Regulation of Pyrroloquinoline Quinone-Dependent Alcohol Dehydrogenases in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Wehrmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of alcohols and aldehydes is crucial for detoxification and efficient catabolism of various volatile organic compounds (VOCs. Thus, many Gram-negative bacteria have evolved periplasmic oxidation systems based on pyrroloquinoline quinone-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases (PQQ-ADHs that are often functionally redundant. Here we report the first description and characterization of a lanthanide-dependent PQQ-ADH (PedH in a nonmethylotrophic bacterium based on the use of purified enzymes from the soil-dwelling model organism Pseudomonas putida KT2440. PedH (PP_2679 exhibits enzyme activity on a range of substrates similar to that of its Ca2+-dependent counterpart PedE (PP_2674, including linear and aromatic primary and secondary alcohols, as well as aldehydes, but only in the presence of lanthanide ions, including La3+, Ce3+, Pr3+, Sm3+, or Nd3+. Reporter assays revealed that PedH not only has a catalytic function but is also involved in the transcriptional regulation of pedE and pedH, most likely acting as a sensory module. Notably, the underlying regulatory network is responsive to as little as 1 to 10 nM lanthanum, a concentration assumed to be of ecological relevance. The present study further demonstrates that the PQQ-dependent oxidation system is crucial for efficient growth with a variety of volatile alcohols. From these results, we conclude that functional redundancy and inverse regulation of PedE and PedH represent an adaptive strategy of P. putida KT2440 to optimize growth with volatile alcohols in response to the availability of different lanthanides.

  3. Molecular level biodegradation of phenol and its derivatives through dmp operon of Pseudomonas putida: A bio-molecular modeling and docking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Sujay; Banerjee, Arundhati

    2015-10-01

    Participation of Pseudomonas putida-derived methyl phenol (dmp) operon and DmpR protein in the biodegradation of phenol or other harmful, organic, toxic pollutants was investigated at a molecular level. Documentation documents that P. putida has DmpR protein which positively regulates dmp operon in the presence of inducers; like phenols. From the operon, phenol hydroxylase encoded by dmpN gene, participates in degrading phenols after dmp operon is expressed. For the purpose, the 3-D models of the four domains from DmpR protein and of the DNA sequences from the two Upstream Activation Sequences (UAS) present at the promoter region of the operon were demonstrated using discrete molecular modeling techniques. The best modeled structures satisfying their stereo-chemical properties were selected in each of the cases. To stabilize the individual structures, energy optimization was performed. In the presence of inducers, probable interactions among domains and then the two independent DNA structures with the fourth domain were perused by manifold molecular docking simulations. The complex structures were made to be stable by minimizing their overall energy. Responsible amino acid residues, nucleotide bases and binding patterns for the biodegradation, were examined. In the presence of the inducers, the biodegradation process is initiated by the interaction of phe50 from the first protein domain with the inducers. Only after the interaction of the last domain with the DNA sequences individually, the operon is expressed. This novel residue level study is paramount for initiating transcription in the operon; thereby leading to expression of phenol hydroxylase followed by phenol biodegradation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Oxidation of methyl tert-butyl ether by alkane hydroxylase in dicyclopropylketone-induced and n-octane-grown Pseudomonas putida GPo1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christy A; Hyman, Michael R

    2004-08-01

    The alkane hydroxylase enzyme system in Pseudomonas putida GPo1 has previously been reported to be unreactive toward the gasoline oxygenate methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). We have reexamined this finding by using cells of strain GPo1 grown in rich medium containing dicyclopropylketone (DCPK), a potent gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase activity. Cells grown with DCPK oxidized MTBE and generated stoichiometric quantities of tert-butyl alcohol (TBA). Cells grown in the presence of DCPK also oxidized tert-amyl methyl ether but did not appear to oxidize either TBA, ethyl tert-butyl ether, or tert-amyl alcohol. Evidence linking MTBE oxidation to alkane hydroxylase activity was obtained through several approaches. First, no TBA production from MTBE was observed with cells of strain GPo1 grown on rich medium without DCPK. Second, no TBA production from MTBE was observed in DCPK-treated cells of P. putida GPo12, a strain that lacks the alkane-hydroxylase-encoding OCT plasmid. Third, all n-alkanes that support the growth of strain GPo1 inhibited MTBE oxidation by DCPK-treated cells. Fourth, two non-growth-supporting n-alkanes (propane and n-butane) inhibited MTBE oxidation in a saturable, concentration-dependent process. Fifth, 1,7-octadiyne, a putative mechanism-based inactivator of alkane hydroxylase, fully inhibited TBA production from MTBE. Sixth, MTBE-oxidizing activity was also observed in n-octane-grown cells. Kinetic studies with strain GPo1 grown on n-octane or rich medium with DCPK suggest that MTBE-oxidizing activity may have previously gone undetected in n-octane-grown cells because of the unusually high K(s) value (20 to 40 mM) for MTBE.

  5. Kinetics studies of p-cresol biodegradation by using Pseudomonas putida in batch reactor and in continuous bioreactor packed with calcium alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, A K; Bala, Shashi; Majumder, C B; Sarkar, S

    2010-01-01

    Present study deals with the biodegradation of p-cresol by using Pseudomonas putida in a batch reactor and a continuous bioreactor packed with calcium alginate beads. The maximum specific growth rate of 0.8121 h(-1) was obtained at 200 mg L(-1) concentration of p-cresol in batch reactor. The maximum p-cresol degradation rate was obtained 6.598 mg L(-1) h(-1) at S(o)=200 mg L(-1) and 62.8 mg L(-1) h(-1) at S(o)=500 mg L(-1) for batch reactor and a continuous bioreactor, respectively. The p-cresol degradation rate of continuous bioreactor was 9 to 10-fold higher than those of the batch reactor. It shows that the continuous bioreactor could tolerate a higher concentration of p-cresol. A Haldane model was also used for p-cresol inhibition in batch reactor and a modified equation similar to Haldane model for continuous bioreactor. The Haldane parameters were obtained as µ(max) 0.3398 h(-1), K(s) 110.9574 mg L(-1), and K(I) 497.6169 mg L(-1) in batch reactor. The parameters used in continuous bioreactor were obtained as D(max) 91.801 mg L(-1) h(-1), K(s) 131.292 mg L(-1), and K(I) 1217.7 mg L(-1). The value K(I) of continuous bioreactor is approximately 2.5 times higher than the batch reactor. Higher K(I) value of continuous bioreactor indicates P. putida can grow at high range of p-cresol concentration. The ability of tolerance of higher p-cresol concentrations may be one reason for biofilm attachment on the packed bed in the continuous operation.

  6. Forage Quantity and Quality of Berseem Clover (Trifolium ‎alexandrinum L. as Affected by Uses of Pseudomonas putida ‎Strains and Phophorus Fertilizer in the Second Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Ansari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects of phosphate fertilizer and pseudomonas putida strains on the quantity and quality of forage of berseem clover as a second crop was studied in a factorial field experiment using randomized complete block design with three replications at Fooman, Guilan province, Iran. Treatments consisted of phosphate fertilizer with three levels (0, 75 and 150 kg/ha as triple super phosphate and Pseudomonas putida strains with four levels (M21, M5, M168 and control. The results showed that use of phosphate fertilizers increased the soil pH during growing season while bacterial inoculation adjusted soil pH. The bacterial inoculation increased amount of crude protein, digestible protein, acidic and alkaline phosphatase activity compared to non-inoculated treatment, but it decreased crude fiber of the forage. Clover forage yield, protein yield and phosphorus content of foliage also were influenced by the interaction of bacterial strains and phosphate fertilizer. The highest forage and protein yield were obtained by using strain M5+150 kg P ha-1. Significant increases in forage and protein yield were found to be 16.49% and 8.01%, respectively, as compared with non-inoculated treatment. Based on the result of this experiment, application of 150 kg P ha-1 and Pseudomonas putida strain M5 inoculation can be used to obtain highest forage yield and quality of berseem clover as second crop in the experimental site.

  7. Biofilm as a production platform for heterologous production of rhamnolipids by the non‑pathogenic strain Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigneswaran, Vinoth; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Sternberg, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Background Although a transition toward sustainable production of chemicals is needed, the physiochemical properties of certain biochemicals such as biosurfactants make them challenging to produce in conventional bioreactor systems. Alternative production platforms such as surface-attached biofilm...... is tightly regulated in P. aeruginosa a heterologous production of rhamnolipids in a safe organism can relive the production from many of these limitations and alternative substrates could be used. Results In the present study, heterologous production of biosurfactants was investigated using rhamnolipids...... of the rhlAB operon resulting in different levels of rhamnolipid production. Biosynthesis of rhamnolipids in P. putida decreased bacterial growth rate but stimulated biofilm formation by enhancing cell motility. Continuous rhamnolipid production in a biofilm was achieved using flow cell technology...

  8. Functional characterization and application of a tightly regulated MekR/P mekA expression system in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Nadja; Altenbuchner, Josef

    2013-09-01

    A methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)-inducible system based on the broad-host-range plasmid pBBR1MCS2 and on the P mekA promoter region of the MEK degradation operon of Pseudomonas veronii MEK700 was characterized in Escherichia coli JM109 and Pseudomonas putida KT2440. For validation, β-galactosidase (lacZ) was used as a reporter. The novel system, which is positively regulated by MekR, a member of the AraC/XylS family of regulators, was shown to be subject to carbon catabolite repression by glucose, which, however, could not be attributed to the single action of the global regulators Crc and PtsN. An advantage is its extremely tight regulation accompanied with three magnitudes of fold increase of gene expression after treatment with MEK. The transcriptional start site of P mekA was identified by primer extension, thereby revealing a potential stem-loop structure at the 5' end of the mRNA. Since MekR was highly insoluble, its putative binding site was identified through sequence analysis. The operator seems to be composed of a 15-bp tandem repeat (CACCN5CTTCAA) separated by a 6-bp spacer region, which resembles known binding patterns of other members of the AraC/XylS family. Subsequent mutational modifications of the putative operator region confirmed its importance for transcriptional activation. As the -35 promoter element seems to be overlapped by the putative operator, a class II activation mechanism is assumed.

  9. Decaffeination and measurement of caffeine content by addicted Escherichia coli with a refactored N-demethylation operon from Pseudomonas putida CBB5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quandt, Erik M; Hammerling, Michael J; Summers, Ryan M; Otoupal, Peter B; Slater, Ben; Alnahhas, Razan N; Dasgupta, Aurko; Bachman, James L; Subramanian, Mani V; Barrick, Jeffrey E

    2013-06-21

    The widespread use of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) and other methylxanthines in beverages and pharmaceuticals has led to significant environmental pollution. We have developed a portable caffeine degradation operon by refactoring the alkylxanthine degradation (Alx) gene cluster from Pseudomonas putida CBB5 to function in Escherichia coli. In the process, we discovered that adding a glutathione S-transferase from Janthinobacterium sp. Marseille was necessary to achieve N 7 -demethylation activity. E. coli cells with the synthetic operon degrade caffeine to the guanine precursor, xanthine. Cells deficient in de novo guanine biosynthesis that contain the refactored operon are ″addicted″ to caffeine: their growth density is limited by the availability of caffeine or other xanthines. We show that the addicted strain can be used as a biosensor to measure the caffeine content of common beverages. The synthetic N-demethylation operon could be useful for reclaiming nutrient-rich byproducts of coffee bean processing and for the cost-effective bioproduction of methylxanthine drugs.

  10. Numerical modelling of biophysicochemical effects on multispecies reactive transport in porous media involving Pseudomonas putida for potential microbial enhanced oil recovery application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasankar, P; Rajesh Kanna, A; Suresh Kumar, G; Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N

    2016-07-01

    pH and resident time of injected slug plays a critical role in characterizing the reservoir for potential microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) application. To investigate MEOR processes, a multispecies (microbes-nutrients) reactive transport model in porous media was developed by coupling kinetic and transport model. The present work differs from earlier works by explicitly determining parametric values required for kinetic model by experimental investigations using Pseudomonas putida at different pH conditions and subsequently performing sensitivity analysis of pH, resident time and water saturation on concentrations of microbes, nutrients and biosurfactant within reservoir. The results suggest that nutrient utilization and biosurfactant production are found to be maximum at pH 8 and 7.5 respectively. It is also found that the sucrose and biosurfactant concentrations are highly sensitive to pH rather than reservoir microbial concentration, while at larger resident time and water saturation, the microbial and nutrient concentrations were lesser due to enhanced dispersion. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, Ab31, a chimera formed from temperate phage PAJU2 and P. putida lytic phage AF: characteristics and mechanism of bacterial resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libera Latino

    Full Text Available A novel temperate bacteriophage of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, phage vB_PaeP_Tr60_Ab31 (alias Ab31 is described. Its genome is composed of structural genes related to those of lytic P. putida phage AF, and regulatory genes similar to those of temperate phage PAJU2. The virion structure resembles that of phage AF and other lytic Podoviridae (S. enterica Epsilon 15 and E. coli phiv10 with similar tail spikes. Ab31 was able to infect P. aeruginosa strain PA14 and two genetically related strains called Tr60 and Tr162, out of 35 diverse strains from cystic fibrosis patients. Analysis of resistant host variants revealed different phenotypes, including induction of pigment and alginate overproduction. Whole genome sequencing of resistant variants highlighted the existence of a large deletion of 234 kbp in two strains, encompassing a cluster of genes required for the production of CupA fimbriae. Stable lysogens formed by Ab31 in strain Tr60, permitted the identification of the insertion site. During colonization of the lung in cystic fibrosis patients, P. aeruginosa adapts by modifying its genome. We suggest that bacteriophages such as Ab31 may play an important role in this adaptation by selecting for bacterial characteristics that favor persistence of bacteria in the lung.

  12. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F. [University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD (United Kingdom); Lau, Peter C. [National Research Council Canada, 6100 Royalmount Avenue, Montreal, QC H4P 2R2 (Canada); Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki [Kansai University (Japan); Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T. [Greifswald University, Felix-Hausdorff-Strasse 4, 17487 Greifswald (Germany); Bourenkov, Gleb [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Hamburg Outstation, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Littlechild, Jennifer A., E-mail: j.a.littlechild@exeter.ac.uk [University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter EX4 4QD (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  13. Dynamic Response of Pseudomonas putida S12 to Sudden Addition of Toluene and the Potential Role of the Solvent Tolerance Gene trgI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkers, Rita J M; Snoek, L Basten; Ruijssenaars, Harald J; de Winde, Johannes H

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 is exceptionally tolerant to various organic solvents. To obtain further insight into this bacterium's primary defence mechanisms towards these potentially harmful substances, we studied its genome wide transcriptional response to sudden addition of toluene. Global gene expression profiles were monitored for 30 minutes after toluene addition. During toluene exposure, high oxygen-affinity cytochrome c oxidase is specifically expressed to provide for an adequate proton gradient supporting solvent efflux mechanisms. Concomitantly, the glyoxylate bypass route was up-regulated, to repair an apparent toluene stress-induced redox imbalance. A knock-out mutant of trgI, a recently identified toluene-repressed gene, was investigated in order to identify TrgI function. Remarkably, upon addition of toluene the number of differentially expressed genes initially was much lower in the trgI-mutant than in the wild-type strain. This suggested that after deletion of trgI cells were better prepared for sudden organic solvent stress. Before, as well as after, addition of toluene many genes of highly diverse functions were differentially expressed in trgI-mutant cells as compared to wild-type cells. This led to the hypothesis that TrgI may not only be involved in the modulation of solvent-elicited responses but in addition may affect basal expression levels of large groups of genes.

  14. The impact of succinate trace on pWW0 and ortho-cleavage pathway transcription in Pseudomonas putida mt-2 during toluene biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsipa, Argyro; Koutinas, Michalis; Vernardis, Spyros I; Mantalaris, Athanasios

    2017-06-01

    Toluene is a pollutant catabolised through the interconnected pWW0 (TOL) and ortho-cleavage pathways of Pseudomonas putida mt-2, while upon succinate and toluene mixtures introduction in batch cultures grown on M9 medium, succinate was previously reported as non-repressing. The effect of a 40 times lower succinate concentration, as compared to literature values, was explored through systematic real-time qPCR monitoring of transcriptional kinetics of the key TOL Pu, Pm and ortho-cleavage PbenR, PbenA promoters in mixed-substrate experiments. Even succinate trace inhibited transcription leading to bi-modal promoters expression. Potential carbon catabolite repression mechanisms and novel expression patterns of promoters were unfolded. Lag phase was shortened and biomass growth levels increased compared to sole toluene biodegradation suggesting enhanced pollutant removal efficiency. The study stressed the noticeable effect of a preferred compound's left-over on the main route of a bioprocess, revealing the beneficiary supply of low preferred substrates concentrations to design optimal bioremediation strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxicity of synthetic herbicides containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties towards Pseudomonas putida mt-2 and its response at the level of membrane fatty acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, Aleksandra; Syguda, Anna; Chrzanowski, Łukasz; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-02-01

    One of the attempts to create more effective herbicidal compounds includes the use of ionic liquids. Herbicidal ionic liquids have more effective biological activity, they are less volatile, more thermally stable, and exhibit superior efficiency in comparison to typically employed herbicides, allowing the reduction of the herbicide dose applied per hectare. However, studies on the environmental toxicity of this group of compounds are very rarely available. Environmental toxicity is an important factor, showing the concentration of compounds that has negative effects on soil bacteria including those responsible for biodegradation processes. Therefore, potential toxicity of four herbicidal ionic liquids (HILs) precursors containing 2,4-D and MCPA moieties was tested with the well investigated model organism for toxicity and adaptation, Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Results were compared to those obtained for commercial 2,4-D and MCPA herbicides. Next to growth inhibition, given as EC50, changes in the isomerisation of cis to trans unsaturated fatty acids were applied as proxy for cellular stress adaptation to toxic substances. The results revealed that all investigated precursors of HILs showed lower toxicity compared to commercialized synthetic herbicides 2,4-D and MCPA. The collected data on toxicity of HILs together with their physico-chemical properties might be useful for assessing the potential risk of the environmental pollution as well as guidelines for setting the legislation for their future use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Crc global regulator binds to an unpaired A-rich motif at the Pseudomonas putida alkS mRNA coding sequence and inhibits translation initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Renata; Marzi, Stefano; Romby, Pascale; Rojo, Fernando

    2009-12-01

    Crc is a key global translational regulator in Pseudomonads that orchestrates the hierarchy of induction of several catabolic pathways for amino acids, sugars, hydrocarbons or aromatic compounds. In the presence of amino acids, which are preferred carbon sources, Crc inhibits translation of the Pseudomonas putida alkS and benR mRNAs, which code for transcriptional regulators of genes required to assimilate alkanes (hydrocarbons) and benzoate (an aromatic compound), respectively. Crc binds to the 5'-end of these mRNAs, but the sequence and/or structure recognized, and the way in which it inhibits translation, were unknown. We have determined the secondary structure of the alkS mRNA 5'-end through its sensitivity to several ribonucleases and chemical reagents. Footprinting and band-shift assays using variant alkS mRNAs have shown that Crc specifically binds to a short unpaired A-rich sequence located adjacent to the alkS AUG start codon. This interaction is stable enough to prevent formation of the translational initiation complex. A similar Crc-binding site was localized at benR mRNA, upstream of the Shine-Dalgarno sequence. This allowed predicting binding sites at other Crc-regulated genes, deriving a consensus sequence that will help to validate new Crc targets and to discriminate between direct and indirect effects of this regulator.

  17. Colony morphology and transcriptome profiling of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its mutants deficient in alginate or all EPS synthesis under controlled matric potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülez, Gamze; Altintas, Ali; Fazli, Mustafa

    2014-01-01

    of water limitation. In addition to alginate, P. putida is capable of producing cellulose (bcs), putida exopolysaccharide a (pea), and putida exopolysaccharide b (peb). However, unlike alginate, not much is known about their roles under water limitation. Hence, in this study we examined the role...... active to maintain homeostasis. To test our hypothesis, we investigated colony morphologies and whole genome transcriptomes of P. putida KT2440 wild type and its mutants deficient in synthesis of either alginate or all known EPS. Overall our results support that alginate is an important exopolysaccharide...

  18. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm efficacy of self-cleaning surfaces functionalized by TiO2 photocatalytic nanoparticles against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalvo, Blanca; Faraldos, Marisol; Bahamonde, Ana; Rosal, Roberto

    2017-10-15

    A photocatalytic sol of TiO2 nanoparticles has been used for creating self-cleaning antimicrobial flat and porous glass surfaces. The substrates were irradiated to study their photocatalytic properties and behavior in the presence of biofilm-forming bacteria. Smooth glass surfaces and glass microfiber filters were covered with 1.98×10-3±1.5×10-4gcm-2 and 8.55×10-3±3.0×10-4gcm-2 densities, respectively. Self-cleaning properties were analyzed using the methylene blue 365nm UV-A photodegradation test. TiO2-coated filters achieved rapid and complete photodegradation of methylene blue because of the better TiO2 dispersion with respect to the glass slides. The effect of functionalized surfaces on the growth and viability of bacteria was studied using the strains Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas putida. After irradiation (2h, 11.2Wm-2, 290-400nm), the initially hydrophobic surface turned hydrophilic. The antibacterial effect led to extensive membrane damage and significant production of intracellular reactive oxygen species in all TiO2-loaded irradiated specimens. The reduction of cell viability was over 99.9% (>3-log) for TiO2 on glass surfaces. However, the polymeric extracellular matrix formed before the irradiation treatment was not removed. This study highlights the importance of bacterial colonization during dark periods and the difficulty of removing the structure of biofilms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Complex Interplay between FleQ, Cyclic Diguanylate and Multiple σ Factors Coordinately Regulates Flagellar Motility and Biofilm Development in Pseudomonas putida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Jiménez-Fernández

    Full Text Available Most bacteria alternate between a free living planktonic lifestyle and the formation of structured surface-associated communities named biofilms. The transition between these two lifestyles requires a precise and timely regulation of the factors involved in each of the stages that has been likened to a developmental process. Here we characterize the involvement of the transcriptional regulator FleQ and the second messenger cyclic diguanylate in the coordinate regulation of multiple functions related to motility and surface colonization in Pseudomonas putida. Disruption of fleQ caused strong defects in flagellar motility, biofilm formation and surface attachment, and the ability of this mutation to suppress multiple biofilm-related phenotypes associated to cyclic diguanylate overproduction suggests that FleQ mediates cyclic diguanylate signaling critical to biofilm growth. We have constructed a library containing 94 promoters potentially involved in motility and biofilm development fused to gfp and lacZ, screened this library for FleQ and cyclic diguanylate regulation, and assessed the involvement of alternative σ factors σN and FliA in the transcription of FleQ-regulated promoters. Our results suggest a dual mode of action for FleQ. Low cyclic diguanylate levels favor FleQ interaction with σN-dependent promoters to activate the flagellar cascade, encompassing the flagellar cluster and additional genes involved in cyclic diguanylate metabolism, signal transduction and gene regulation. On the other hand, characterization of the FleQ-regulated σN- and FliA-independent PlapA and PbcsD promoters revealed two disparate regulatory mechanisms leading to a similar outcome: the synthesis of biofilm matrix components in response to increased cyclic diguanylate levels.

  20. Increasing signal specificity of the TOL network of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 by rewiring the connectivity of the master regulator XylR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aitor de Las Heras

    Full Text Available Prokaryotic transcription factors (TFs that bind small xenobiotic molecules (e.g., TFs that drive genes that respond to environmental pollutants often display a promiscuous effector profile for analogs of the bona fide chemical signals. XylR, the master TF for expression of the m-xylene biodegradation operons encoded in the TOL plasmid pWW0 of Pseudomonas putida, responds not only to the aromatic compound but also, albeit to a lesser extent, to many other aromatic compounds, such as 3-methylbenzylalcohol (3MBA. We have examined whether such a relaxed regulatory scenario can be reshaped into a high-capacity/high-specificity regime by changing the connectivity of this effector-sensing TF within the rest of the circuit rather than modifying XylR structure itself. To this end, the natural negative feedback loop that operates on xylR transcription was modified with a translational attenuator that brings down the response to 3MBA while maintaining the transcriptional output induced by m-xylene (as measured with a luxCDABE reporter system. XylR expression was then subject to a positive feedback loop in which the TF was transcribed from its own target promoters, each known to hold different input/output transfer functions. In the first case (xylR under the strong promoter of the upper TOL operon, Pu, the reporter system displayed an increased transcriptional capacity in the resulting network for both the optimal and the suboptimal XylR effectors. In contrast, when xylR was expressed under the weaker Ps promoter, the resulting circuit unmistakably discriminated m-xylene from 3MBA. The non-natural connectivity engineered in the network resulted both in a higher promoter activity and also in a much-increased signal-to-background ratio. These results indicate that the working regimes of given genetic circuits can be dramatically altered through simple changes in the way upstream transcription factors are self-regulated by positive or negative feedback loops.

  1. Effect of Crc and Hfq proteins on the transcription, processing, and stability of the Pseudomonas putida CrcZ sRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arranz, Sofía; Sánchez-Hevia, Dione; Rojo, Fernando; Moreno, Renata

    2016-12-01

    In Pseudomonas putida, the Hfq and Crc proteins regulate the expression of many genes in response to nutritional and environmental cues, by binding to mRNAs that bear specific target motifs and inhibiting their translation. The effect of these two proteins is antagonized by the CrcZ and CrcY small RNAs (sRNAs), the levels of which vary greatly according to growth conditions. The crcZ and crcY genes are transcribed from promoters PcrcZ and PcrcY, respectively, a process that relies on the CbrB transcriptional activator and the RpoN σ factor. Here we show that crcZ can also be transcribed from the promoter of the immediate upstream gene, cbrB, a weak constitutive promoter. The cbrB-crcZ transcript was processed to render a sRNA very similar in size to the CrcZ produced from promoter PcrcZ The processed sRNA, termed CrcZ*, was able to antagonize Hfq/Crc because, when provided in trans, it relieved the deregulated Hfq/Crc-dependent hyperrepressing phenotype of a ΔcrcZΔcrcY strain. CrcZ* may help in attaining basal levels of CrcZ/CrcZ* that are sufficient to protect the cell from an excessive Hfq/Crc-dependent repression. Since a functional sRNA can be produced from PcrcZ, an inducible strong promoter, or by cleavage of the cbrB-crcZ mRNA, crcZ can be considered a 3'-untranslated region of the cbrB-crcZ mRNA. In the absence of Hfq, the processed form of CrcZ was not observed. In addition, we show that Crc and Hfq increase CrcZ stability, which supports the idea that these proteins can form a complex with CrcZ and protect it from degradation by RNases. © 2016 Hernández-Arranz et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. Catabolism of caffeine and purification of a xanthine oxidade responsible for methyluric acids production in Pseudomonas putida L Catabolismo de cafeína e purificação de xantina oxidase responsável pela produção de ácidos metilúricos em Pseudomonas putida L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce Mithico Yamaoka-Yano

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine catabolism and a xanthine oxidase involved in the alkaloid breakdown were studied in Pseudomonas putida L, a strain displaying high ability to grow on this substrate. Cells cultured with unlabelled caffeine and 14C labeled caffeine and xanthine showed that this alkaloid was broken-down via theobromine/paraxanthine -> 7-methylxanthine -> xanthine -> uric acid -> allantoin -> allantoic acid. Methyluric acids were formed from the oxidation of theobromine, paraxanthine and 7-methylxanthine, although no bacterial growth was observed on these compounds, indicating that this might be due to a wide substrate specificity of xanthine oxidase. This was confirmed by activity staining in PAGE where activity was observed with theophylline and 3-methylxanthine, which are not involved in the alkaloid breakdown. A single band of activity was detected without addition of NAD+, showing an oxidase form of the enzyme. The enzyme optimum temperature and pH were 30oC and 7.0, respectively. The determined Km was 169 µM, and the pI 3.1 - 4.0. The molecular weight determined by side by side comparison of activity staining of the enzyme in PAGE and PAGE of BSA was 192 kDa, which was coincident with the sum (198.4 kDa of three subunits (71, 65.6 and 61.8 kDa of the purified protein.O catabolismo de cafeína e a enzima xantina oxidase, envolvida na sua degradação, foram estudados em Pseudomonas putida L, uma linhagem com alta capacidade para utilizar este substrato como fonte de energia. Células crescidas na presença de cafeína e xantina marcadas com 14C, e cafeína não marcada, mostraram que este alcalóide foi degradado via teobromina/paraxantina -> 7-metilxantina -> xantina -> ácido úrico -> alantoína -> ácido alantóico. Ácidos metilúricos foram formados a partir de teobromina, paraxantina e 7-metilxantina, embora nenhum crescimento bacteriano ter sido observado quando estes compostos foram usados como substratos, indicando que a xantina oxidase

  3. Overlapping substrate specificities of benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (the xylC gene product) and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (the xylG gene product) encoded by TOL plasmid pWW0 of Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, J; Shaw, J P; Rekik, M; Harayama, S

    1995-03-01

    Two aldehyde dehydrogenases involved in the degradation of toluene and xylenes, namely, benzaldehyde dehydrogenase and 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase, are encoded by the xylC and xylG genes, respectively, on TOL plasmid pWW0 of Pseudomonas putida. The nucleotide sequence of xylC was determined in this study. A protein exhibiting benzaldehyde dehydrogenase activity had been purified from cells of P. putida (pWW0) (J. P. Shaw and S. Harayama, Eur. J. Biochem. 191:705-714, 1990); however, the amino-terminal sequence of this protein does not correspond to that predicted from the xylC sequence but does correspond to that predicted from the xylG sequence. The protein purified in the earlier work was therefore 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (the xylG gene product). This conclusion was confirmed by the fact that this protein oxidized 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde (kcat/Km = 1.6 x 10(6) s-1 M-1) more efficiently than benzaldehyde (kcat/Km = 3.2 x 10(4) s-1 M-1). The xylC product, the genuine benzaldehyde dehydrogenase, was purified from extracts of P. putida (pWW0-161 delta rylG) which does not synthesize 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. The amino-terminal sequence of the purified protein corresponds to the amino-terminal sequence deduced from the xylC sequence. This enzyme efficiently oxidized benzaldehyde (kcat/Km = 1.7 x 10(7) s-1 M-1) and its analogs but did not oxidize 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde or its analogs.

  4. Identification and characterization of an N-acylhomoserine lactone-dependent quorum-sensing system in Pseudomonas putida strain IsoF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steidle, A.; Allesen-Holm, M.; Riedel, K.

    2002-01-01

    cloned a genomic region of the plant growth-promoting P. putida strain IsoF that, when present in trans, provoked induction of a bioluminescent AHL reporter plasmid. Sequence analysis identified a gene cluster consisting of four genes: ppuI and ppuR, whose predicted amino acid sequences are highly...

  5. Binary combination of epsilon-poly-L-lysine and isoeugenol affect progression of spoilage microbiota in fresh turkey meat, and delay onset of spoilage in Pseudomonas putida challenged meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyldgaard, Morten; Meyer, Rikke L; Peng, Min; Hibberd, Ashley A; Fischer, Jana; Sigmundsson, Arnar; Mygind, Tina

    2015-12-23

    Proliferation of microbial population on fresh poultry meat over time elicits spoilage when reaching unacceptable levels, during which process slime production, microorganism colony formation, negative organoleptic impact and meat structure change are observed. Spoilage organisms in raw meat, especially Gram-negative bacteria can be difficult to combat due to their cell wall composition. In this study, the natural antimicrobial agents ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL) and isoeugenol were tested individually and in combinations for their activities against a selection of Gram-negative strains in vitro. All combinations resulted in additive interactions between ε-PL and isoeugenol towards the bacteria tested. The killing efficiency of different ratios of the two antimicrobial agents was further evaluated in vitro against Pseudomonas putida. Subsequently, the most efficient ratio was applied to a raw turkey meat model system which was incubated for 96 h at spoilage temperature. Half of the samples were challenged with P. putida, and the bacterial load and microbial community composition was followed over time. CFU counts revealed that the antimicrobial blend was able to lower the amount of viable Pseudomonas spp. by one log compared to untreated samples of challenged turkey meat, while the single compounds had no effect on the population. However, the compounds had no effect on Pseudomonas spp. CFU in unchallenged meat. Next-generation sequencing offered culture-independent insight into population diversity and changes in microbial composition of the meat during spoilage and in response to antimicrobial treatment. Spoilage of unchallenged turkey meat resulted in decreasing species diversity over time, regardless of whether the samples received antimicrobial treatment. The microbiota composition of untreated unchallenged meat progressed from a Pseudomonas spp. to a Pseudomonas spp., Photobacterium spp., and Brochothrix thermosphacta dominated food matrix on the expense of low

  6. RECUPERACIÓN DE POLI-b-HIDROXIHEXANOATOCO- OCTANOATO SINTETIZADO POR Pseudomonas putida MEDIANTE EL USO DE DISPERSIONES HIPOCLORITO-CLOROFORMO

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Sarmiento, N.; Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Malagón Romero, D.; Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Cortázar, J.; Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia; Espinosa Hernández, A.; Instituto de Biotecnología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    2006-01-01

    Se estandarizó una técnica de recuperación de poli-3-hidroxihexanoato-co-hidroxioctanoato a partir de P. putida. El método emplea dispersiones de hipoclorito de sodio-cloroformo para la digestión del material celular y solubilización del polímero, respectivamente. Se evaluó el efecto de la concentración de hipoclorito, la temperatura y el tiempo sobre el porcentaje de recuperación, pureza, peso molecular y temperatura de fusión. Las mejores condiciones para recuperar este polímero fueron: hip...

  7. Expression of Fap amyloids in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. fluorescens, and P. putida results in aggregation and increased biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueholm, Morten S; Søndergaard, Mads; Nilsson, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The fap operon, encoding functional amyloids in Pseudomonas (Fap), is present in most pseudomonads, but so far the expression and importance for biofilm formation has only been investigated for P. fluorescens strain UK4. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of P. aeruginosa PAO1, P. fluores...

  8. Interactive effects of phosphorus and Pseudomonas putida on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) growth, nutrient uptake, antioxidant enzymes and organic acids exudation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israr, Dania; Mustafa, Ghulam; Khan, Khalid Saifullah; Shahzad, Muhammad; Ahmad, Niaz; Masood, Sajid

    2016-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) availability in alkaline soils of arid and semi-arid regions is a major constraint for decreased crop productivity. Use of plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) may enhance plant growth through the increased plant antioxidation activity. Additionally, PGPR may increase nutrient uptake by plants as a result of induced root exudation and rhizosphere acidification. The current study was aimed to investigate combined effects of P and Pesudomonas putida (PGPR) on chickpea growth with reference to antioxidative enzymatic activity and root exudation mediated plant nutrient uptake, particularly P. Half of the seeds were soaked in PGPR solution, whereas others in sterile water and latter sown in soils. Plants were harvested 8 weeks after onset of experiment and analyzed for leaf nutrient contents, antioxidant enzymes activities and organic acids concentrations. Without PGPR, P application (+P) increased various plant growth attributes, plant uptake of P and Ca, soil pH, citric acid and oxalic acid concentrations, whereas decreased the leaf POD enzymatic activity as compared to the P-deficiency. PGPR supply both under -P and +P improved the plant growth, plant uptake of N, P, and K, antioxidative activity of SOD and POD enzymes and concentrations of organic acids, whereas reduced the rhizosphere soil pH. Growth enhancement by PGPR supply was related to higher plant antioxidation activity as well as nutrient uptake of chickpea including P as a result of root exudation mediated rhizosphere acidification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A microbial biosensor using Pseudomonas putida cells immobilized in an expanded bed reactor for the on-line monitoring of phenolic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandakumar, R.; Mattiasson, B. [Lund Univ. (Sweden)

    1999-09-01

    A cell based biosensor for phenolic substances has been developed. The set up is based on a flow injection system with an expanded bed column with immobilized Pseudomonas cells. The cells were immobilized on glass particles pretreated with poly (ethylene diamine). The system responds to a range of phenolic substances. Storage and operational stabilities are good. The expanded bed concept makes the system reliable also when treating samples with particulate matter.

  10. Chronic ecotoxic effects to Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri, and cytostatic and genotoxic effects to the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) of ofloxacin photo(cata)lytically treated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.I. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Garcia-Käufer, M. [University Medical Centre Freiburg, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, 115 B, Breisacher Straße, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Hapeshi, E. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Menz, J. [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Kostarelos, K.; Fatta-Kassinos, D. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Kümmerer, K., E-mail: Klaus.Kuemmerer@uni.leuphana.de [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Ofloxacin (OFL), a broad-spectrum and widespread-used photolabile fluoroquinolone, is frequently found in treated wastewaters, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems leading to increasing concern during the past decades regarding its effects to the environment and human health. The elimination of OFL and other xenobiotics by the application of advanced oxidation processes using photolytic (PL) and photocatalytic (PC) treatments seems promising. However, an integrated assessment scheme is needed, in which, not only the removal of the parent compound, but also the effects of the photo-transformation products (PTPs) are investigated. For this purpose, in the present study, a chronic ecotoxic assessment using representative bacteria of marine and terrestrial ecosystems and a cytostatic and genotoxic evaluation using hepatoma cell line were performed. PL and PC treatments of OFL were applied using UV radiation. The photo-transformation of OFL during the treatments was monitored by DOC measurements and UPLC–MS/MS analysis. The chronic ecotoxicity of OFL and treated samples was evaluated using Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri; whereas the cytostasis and genotoxicity were estimated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). The main results suggest that photo-transformation of OFL took place during these treatments since the concentration of OFL decreased when the irradiation time increased, as quantified by UPLC–MS/MS analysis, and this was not coupled with an analogous DOC removal. Furthermore, nine compounds were identified as probable PTPs formed through piperazinyl dealkylation and decarboxylation. The ecotoxicity of treated solutions to the bacteria studied decreased while the cytostasis to the hepatoma cell line remained at low levels during both treatments. However, the genotoxicity to the hepatoma cell line demonstrated a different pattern in which treated samples induced a greater number of MNi for the 4–16 min of irradiation (p < 0.05) during

  11. The role of the fatty acid beta-oxidation multienzyme complex from Pseudomonas oleovorans in polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis: molecular characterization of the fadBA operon from P. oleovorans and of the enoyl-CoA hydratase genes phaJ from P. oleovorans and Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Silke; Steinbüchel, Alexander; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2002-08-01

    In order to investigate the role of the putative epimerase function of the beta-oxidation multienzyme complex (FadBA) in the provision of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA thioesters for medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA(MCL)) biosynthesis, the fadBA(Po) operon of Pseudomonas oleovorans was cloned and characterized. The fadBA(Po) operon and a class-II PHA synthase gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were heterologously co-expressed in Escherichia coli to determine whether the putative epimerase function of FadBA(Po) has the ability to provide precursors for PHA accumulation in a non-PHA-accumulating bacterium. Cultivation studies with fatty acids as carbon source revealed that FadBA(Po) did not mediate PHA(MCL) biosynthesis in the E. coli wild-type strain harboring a PHA synthase gene. However, PHA accumulation was strongly impaired in a recombinant E. coli fadB mutant, which harbored a PHA synthase gene. These data indicate that in pseudomonads FadBA does not possess the inherent property, based on a putative epimerase function, to provide the ( R)-enantiomer of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA efficiently and that other linking enzymes are required to efficiently channel intermediates of beta-oxidation towards PHA(MCL) biosynthesis. However, the phaJ gene from P. oleovorans and from Pseudomonas putida, both of which encoded a 3- Re enoyl-CoA hydratase, was identified. The co-expression of phaJ(Po/Pp) with either a class-II PHA synthase gene or the PHA synthase gene from Aeromonas punctata in E. coli revealed that PhaJ(Po/Pp) mediated biosynthesis of either PHA(MCL), contributing to about 1% of cellular dry mass, or of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate- co-3-hydroxyhexanoate), contributing to 3.6% of cellular dry mass, when grown on decanoate. These data indicate that FadBA(Po)does not mediate the provision of (R)-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA, which resembles FadBA of non-PHA-accumulating bacteria, and that 3- Re enoyl-CoA hydratases are required to divert intermediates of fatty acid beta

  12. Comparison of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenases and benzaldehyde dehydrogenases from the benzyl alcohol and mandelate pathways in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and from the TOL-plasmid-encoded toluene pathway in Pseudomonas putida. N-terminal amino acid sequences, amino acid compositions and immunological cross-reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, R M; Keen, J N; Fewson, C A

    1991-01-01

    1. N-Terminal sequences were determined for benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus N.C.I.B. 8250, benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase encoded by the TOL plasmid pWW53 in Pseudomonas putida MT53 and yeast K(+)-activated aldehyde dehydrogenase. Comprehensive details of the sequence determinations have been deposited as Supplementary Publication SUP 50161 (5 pages) at the British Library Document Supply Centre, Boston Spa. Wetherby. West Yorkshire LS23 7BQ, U.K., from whom copies can be obtained on the terms indicated in Biochem. J. (1991) 273. 5. The extent of sequence similarity suggests that the benzyl alcohol dehydrogenases are related to each other and also to established members of the family of long-chain Zn2(+)-dependent alcohol dehydrogenases. Benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter appears to be related to the Pseudomonas TOL-plasmid-encoded benzaldehyde dehydrogenase. The yeast K(+)-activated aldehyde dehydrogenase has similarity of sequence with the mammalian liver cytoplasmic class of aldehyde dehydrogenases but not with any of the Acinetobacter or Pseudomonas enzymes. 2. Antisera were raised in rabbits against the three Acinetobacter enzymes and both of the Pseudomonas enzymes, and the extents of the cross-reactions were determined by immunoprecipitation assays with native antigens and by immunoblotting with SDS-denatured antigens. Cross-reactions were detected between the alcohol dehydrogenases and also among the aldehyde dehydrogenases. This confirms the interpretation of the N-terminal sequence comparisons and also indicates that benzaldehyde dehydrogenase I from Acinetobacter may be related to the other two benzaldehyde dehydrogenases. 3. The amino acid compositions of the Acinetobacter and the Pseudomonas enzymes were determined and the numbers of amino acid residues per subunit were calculated to be: benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase

  13. Diversity of small RNAs expressed in Pseudomonas species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Lozano, Mara; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molina-Santiago, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revealed several hundreds of previously undetected small RNAs (sRNAs) in all bacterial species investigated, including strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas syringae. Nonetheless, only little is known about the extent of conservation of...

  14. RECUPERACIÓN DE POLI-b-HIDROXIHEXANOATO- CO-OCTANOATO SINTETIZADO POR Pseudomonas putida MEDIANTE EL USO DE DISPERSIONES H I P O C LO R I TO - C LO RO F O R M O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Espinosa-Hernández

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se estandarizó una técnica de recuperación de poli-3-hidroxihexanoato-co-hidroxioctanoato a partir de P. putida. El método emplea dispersiones de hipoclorito de sodio-cloroformo para la digestión delmaterial celular y solubilización del polímero, respectivamente. Se evaluó el efecto de la concentración de hipoclorito, la temperatura y el tiempo sobre el porcentaje de recuperación, pureza, peso molecular y temperatura de fusión. Las mejores condiciones para recuperar este polímero fueron: hipoclorito al 5.25% (p/v a 60°C durante 1 hora. Empleando estas condiciones fue posible mantener el peso molecularpor encima del 87% con respecto al obtenido mediante extracción con cloroformo. La temperatura de fusión del polímero fue 57.7°C y 56.4°C para dos muestras al azar. La pureza del material recuperado esde 96%.

  15. 3-Fluorophenmetrazine, a fluorinated analogue of phenmetrazine: Studies on in vivo metabolism in rat and human, in vitro metabolism in human CYP isoenzymes and microbial biotransformation in Pseudomonas Putida and wastewater using GC and LC coupled to (HR)-MS techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardal, Marie; Miserez, Bram; Bade, Richard; Portolés, Tania; Bischoff, Markus; Hernández, Félix; Meyer, Markus R

    2016-09-05

    Wastewater-based epidemiology (WBE) as means to estimate illicit drug and new psychoactive substance (NPS) consumption with spatial and temporal resolution is gaining increasing attention. In order to evaluate a given NPS using WBE, in vivo metabolism and microbial biotransformation of excretion products and unchanged compounds need evaluation. The aims of this study were to identify in vivo phase I and II metabolites of the NPS 3-fluorophenmetrazine (3-FPM) in human and rat urine and study the in vitro contribution of Cytochrome P450 (CYP) isoenzymes in phase I metabolism. Additionally, to study microbial biotransformation products (MBPs) of 3-FPM from incubations in wastewater and in a wastewater isolated Pseudomonas Putida strain. To these aims gas chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry were applied. Metabolites and MBPs were isolated from urine and microbial incubations after solid phase extraction and precipitation with or without enzymatic conjungate cleaving. The main transformation pathways were N-oxidation, aryl hydroxylation and subsequent O-methylation, alkyl hydroxylation, oxidation, and degradation of the ethyl-bridge yielding the O/N-bis-dealkylated metabolite, combinations thereof and further glucuronidation or sulfations. The main excretion products in the human urine sample were the unchanged compound and the N-oxide, and the main MBPs were the N-oxide and hydroxylation with subsequent oxidations on the alpha-methyl position. Based on these findings, the proposed strategy for WBE analysis of 3-FPM is quantitative determination of unchanged 3-FPM together with qualitative verification of a number of selected metabolites to verify consumption and rule out discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The loss of function of PhaC1 is a survival mechanism that counteracts the stress caused by the overproduction of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates in Pseudomonas putidaΔfadBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, José I; Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M; Olivera, Elías R; Luengo, José M

    2015-09-01

    The poly-3-hydroxylkanoate (PHA)-overproducing mutant Pseudomonas putida U ΔfadBA (PpΔfadBA) lacks the genes encoding the main β-oxidation pathway (FadBA). This strain accumulates enormous amounts of bioplastics when cultured in chemically defined media containing PHA precursors (different n-alkanoic or n-aryl-alkanoic acids) and an additional carbon source. In medium containing glucose or 4-hydroxy-phenylacetate, the mutant does not accumulate PHAs and grows just as the wild type (P. putida U). However, when the carbon source is octanoate, growth is severely impaired, suggesting that in PpΔfadBA, the metabolic imbalance resulting from a lower rate of β-oxidation, together with the accumulation of bioplastics, causes severe physiological stress. Here, we show that PpΔfadBA efficiently counteracts this latter effect via a survival mechanism involving the introduction of spontaneous mutations that block PHA accumulation. Surprisingly, genetic analyses of the whole pha cluster revealed that these mutations occurred only in the gene encoding one of the polymerases (phaC1) and that the loss of PhaC1 function was enough to prevent PHA synthesis. The influence of these mutations on the structure of PhaC1 and the existence of a protein-protein (PhaC1-PhaC2) interaction that explains the functionality of the polymerization system are discussed herein. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex.

  18. Whole-cell bio-oxidation of n-dodecane using the alkane hydroxylase system of P. putida GPo1 expressed in E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Chris; Woodley, John; Baganz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The alkane-1-monoxygenase (alkB) complex of Pseudomonas putida GPo1 has been extensively studied in the past and shown to be capable of oxidising aliphatic C5–C12 alkanes to primary alcohols both in the wild-type organism by growth on C5–C12 alkanes as sole carbon source and in vitro. Despite thi...

  19. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Sternberg, Claus

    2005-01-01

    The biofilm lifestyle, where microbial cells are aggregated because of expression of cell-to-cell interconnecting compounds, is believed to be of paramount importance to microbes in the environment. Because microbes must be able to alternate between sessile and planktonic states, it is anticipated...

  20. Selection of hyperadherent mutants in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yousef-Coronado, Fatima; Soriano, María Isabel; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    A number of genetic determinants required for bacterial colonization of solid surfaces and biofilm formation have been identified in different micro-organisms. There are fewer accounts of mutations that favour the transition to a sessile mode of life. Here we report the isolation of random transp...

  1. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria...... on product spoilage and shelf-life remains poorly described. The present study used a quantitative microbial ecology approach to model and predict the effect of product characteristics and storage conditions on growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in cottage cheese. The effect of temperature (5-15˚C) and p...

  2. Insights into the mechanisms of Promysalin, a secondary metabolite with genus-specific antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promysalin, a secondary metabolite produced by Pseudomonas putida RW10S1, has antibacterial activity against a wide variety of Pseudomonas sp., including both human and plant pathogens. Promysalin induces swarming and biofilm formation in the producing species, and inhibits growth of susceptible sp...

  3. Biodegradation of phenol with immobilized Pseuodomonas putida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Comparative study on adsorption and simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (SAB) of phenol using Pseuodomonas putida (MTCC 1194) in a biofilter tower packed with fresh granular activated carbon (GAC) or biological activated carbon (BAC) showed 37% higher breakthrough point in case of SAB. Maximum ...

  4. Pseudomona sp-ren bidez kate ertaineko gantz azidoen esterasa ekoizteko bio-erreaktore baten operazio baldintzen eta zinetikaren azterketa

    OpenAIRE

    Manso Fraile, Mireia

    2016-01-01

    [EUS] Proiektu honen helburua esterasaren lorpena aztertzeaz gain, lorpenerako erabilitako Pseudomona putida mikroorganismoaren hartzidura aztertzea da, ondoren mikroorganismo horri dagokion parametro zinetikoak lortzeko eta erreaktore baten diseinua egin ahal izateko. Horrekin batera, hartziduran eragin dezaketen faktoreak aztertuko dira (tenperatura, aparra, aireztapena, pH …) kontrol eta monitoriazioan kontutan izateko. Horrez guztiaz gain eta prozesua erreaktorean aztertzeaz gain, matraze...

  5. Effect of osmotic stress on plant growth promoting Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, V; Ali, Sk Z; Venkateswarlu, B; Reddy, Gopal; Grover, Minakshi

    2010-10-01

    In this study we isolated and screened drought tolerant Pseudomonas isolates from arid and semi arid crop production systems of India. Five isolates could tolerate osmotic stress up to -0.73 MPa and possessed multiple PGP properties such as P-solubilization, production of phytohormones (IAA, GA and cytokinin), siderophores, ammonia and HCN however under osmotic stress expression of PGP traits was low compared to non-stressed conditions. The strains were identified as Pseudomonas entomophila, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas monteilli respectively on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Osmotic stress affected growth pattern of all the isolates as indicated by increased mean generation time. An increase level of intracellular free amino acids, proline, total soluble sugars and exopolysaccharides was observed under osmotic stress suggesting bacterial response to applied stress. Further, strains GAP-P45 and GRFHYTP52 showing higher levels of EPS and osmolytes (amino acids and proline) accumulation under stress as compared to non-stress conditions, also exhibited higher expression of PGP traits under stress indicating a relationship between stress response and expression of PGP traits. We conclude that isolation and screening of indigenous, stress adaptable strains possessing PGP traits can be a method for selection of efficient stress tolerant PGPR strains.

  6. Decolorization of irgalite dye by immobilized Pseuodomonas putida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A carbon sorbent derived from an agriculture waste, mustard straw was applied to study the removal of irgalite dye from aqueous solution. Comparative study on adsorption and simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (+) of irgalite dye using Pseuodomonas putida (MTCC 1194) with activated carbon prepared from ...

  7. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the plant growth promoting efficiency of combined inoculation of rhizobacteria on Vanilla plants. Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential. The maximum percentage of growth enhancement were observed in the combination of Trichoderma harzianum with Pseudomonas fluorescens treatment followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas putida and Trichoderma virens, respectively in decreasing order. Combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens registered the maximum length of vine (82.88 cm), highest number of leaves (26.67/plant), recorded the highest fresh weight of shoots (61.54 g plant(-1)), fresh weight of roots (4.46 g plant(-1)) and dry weight of shoot (4.56 g plant(-1)) where as the highest dry weight of roots (2.0806 g plant(-1)) were achieved with treatments of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the inoculated strains, combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens recorded the maximum nitrogen uptake (61.28 mg plant(-1)) followed by the combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (std) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (std) (55.03 mg plant(-1)) and the highest phosphorus uptake (38.80 mg plant(-1)) was recorded in dual inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  8. The LapG protein plays a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by controlling the presence of the CdrA adhesin on the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Berthelsen, Jens; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    formation and biofilm dispersal. The P. aeruginosa LapG protein is shown to be a functional homolog of the Pseudomonas putida LapG protein which has previously been shown to function as a periplasmic protease that targets the surface adhesin LapA. Transposon mutagenesis and characterization of defined...

  9. Expression, purification, and characterization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangluo; Chen, Shuai; Liao, Yuanping; Wang, Dingli; Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Yingming; Ran, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Daru; Zhu, Huaxing

    2013-12-01

    As a member of zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) can oxidize toxic formaldehyde to less active formate with NAD(+) as a cofactor and exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Most FDHs are well known to be glutathione-dependent in the catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation, but the enzyme from Pseudomonas putida is an exception, which is independent of glutathione. To identify novel glutathione-independent FDHs from other bacterial strains and facilitate the corresponding structural and enzymatic studies, high-level soluble expression and efficient purification of these enzymes need to be achieved. Here, we present molecular cloning, expression, and purification of the FDH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium causing opportunistic human infection. The FDH of P. aeruginosa shows high sequence identity (87.97%) with that of P. putida. Our results indicated that coexpression with molecular chaperones GroES, GroEL, and Tig has significantly attenuated inclusion body formation and improved the solubility of the recombinant FDH in Escherichiacoli cells. A purification protocol including three chromatographic steps was also established to isolate the recombinant FDH to homogeneity with a yield of ∼3.2 mg from 1L of cell culture. The recombinant P. aeruginosa FDH was properly folded and biologically functional, as demonstrated by the mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and enzymatic characterizations of the purified proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Elham

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ultraviolet (UV analysis, gas chromatography (GC, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0% and α-terpineol (7.7% and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5% and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%, with a total yield of 88.8%.

  11. A Pseudomonas putida strain genetically engineered for 1,2,3-trichloropropane bioremediation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samin, Ghufrana; Pavlova, Martina; Arif, Muhammad; Postema, Christiaan P; Damborsky, Jiri; Janssen, Dick B

    1,2,3-Trichloropropane (TCP) is a toxic compound that is recalcitrant to biodegradation in the environment. Attempts to isolate TCP-degrading organisms using enrichment cultivation have failed. A potential biodegradation pathway starts with hydrolytic dehalogenation to 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol (DCP),

  12. Ni -uptake in Pseudomonas putida strain S4: a possible role of Mg ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    Smith and Maguire 1998; Chamnongpol and Groisman. 2002) can be utilized by other divalent ions like Ni2+, Co2+,. Zn2+ and Mn2+ along with Mg2+ with different efficiencies. (Webb 1970a; Nelson and Kennedy 1971; Blackwell et al. 1997).

  13. Conversion and assimilation of furfural and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural by Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guarnieri, Michael T; Ann Franden, Mary; Johnson, Christopher W; Beckham, Gregg T

    2017-01-01

    The sugar dehydration products, furfural and 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF), are commonly formed during high-temperature processing of lignocellulose, most often in thermochemical pretreatment, liquefaction, or pyrolysis...

  14. Caracterización del papel regulador de CbrB en "Pseudomonas putida"

    OpenAIRE

    Amador, Cristina I.

    2012-01-01

    Programa de doctorado en Biotecnología y Tecnología Química Los sistemas de dos componentes son elementos reguladores ampliamente representados en bacterias, empleados como mecanismos para adecuar el programa celular a las condiciones externas, sometidas a continuo cambio en el caso de bacterias ambientales. A través de estos sistemas, la bacteria detecta una señal y genera una respuesta para adaptarse a las nuevas condiciones, ya sea a nivel nutricional, de movilidad, etc. El trabajo pre...

  15. Transcriptional regulation of pWW0 transfer genes in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, L.M.; Molin, Søren; Kroer, N.

    2004-01-01

    The conjugative IncP-9 plasmid pWW0 (TOL) carries transfer genes, many of whose functions can be predicted from sequence similarities to the well-studied IncW and IncP-1 plasmids, and that are clustered with the replication and maintenance genes of the plasmid core. In this study we show...... that the IncP-9 transfer genes are transcribed from at least three promoter regions. The promoters for traA and traD act divergently from the region found to encode the origin of transfer, oriT. These promoters regulate expression of traA, B, and perhaps traC in one direction and traD in the other, all...... are, as in pWWO, transcribed divergently from an operon for replication and/or stable inheritance functions, MpfR is not related to the known regulatory proteins of these other transfer systems outside those of the IncP-9 family and indeed the regulators tend to be specific for each plasmid family...

  16. Tracing explosives in soil with transcriptional regulators of Pseudomonas putida evolved for responding to nitrotoluenes

    OpenAIRE

    Garmendia, Junkal; De Las Heras, Aitor; Galvão, Teca Calcagno; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although different biological approaches for detection of anti‐personnel mines and other unexploded ordnance (UXO) have been entertained, none of them has been rigorously documented thus far in the scientific literature. The industrial 2,4,6 trinitrotoluene (TNT) habitually employed in the manufacturing of mines is at all times tainted with a small but significant proportion of the more volatile 2,4 dinitrotoluene (2,4 DNT) and other nitroaromatic compounds. By using mutation‐prone PC...

  17. Differential transcriptional response to antibiotics by Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Gómez Lozano, María

    2015-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a major threat to humanity, especially because the current battery of known antibiotics is not sufficient to combat infections produced by these microbes. Therefore, the study of how current antibiotics act and how bacteria defend themselves against antibiotics i...

  18. A two-column flash chromatography approach to pyoverdin production from Pseudomonas putida GB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Owen W; Markarian, Dawn S; Parker, Dorothy L; Harrington, James M

    2017-04-01

    Our knowledge of the biological and environmental reactivity of siderophores is limited by the difficulty and cost of obtaining reasonable quantities by purification or synthesis. In this note, we describe a modified procedure for the low-cost, mg-scale purification of pyoverdin-type siderophores using a dual-flash chromatography (reverse-phase absorption and size exclusion) approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gene expression dynamics of pseudomonas putida KT2440 biofilms under water deprivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulez, Gamze; Dechesne, Arnaud; Workman, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    In soil, bacteria can form colonies that are exposed to changing hydration conditions, exerting a stress to which the bacteria should adjust. Some of the phenotypes associated with water deprivation, such as the production extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and the limitation of motility, have...... stress flagellar and EPS genes would be significantly differentially expressed, the former being down- and the latter being up-regulated. The novel Pressurized Porous Surface Model (PPSM) was used to expose KT2440 colonies to -0.4 MPa water stress for 4, 24, and 72 hours. Agilent whole genome 1-color c......DNA-microarray was used for gene expression profiling. The genes with log2-fold change >=1.5 and adjusted P-value...

  20. Repetitive Inductions of Bioluminescence of Pseudomonas putida TVA8 Immobilized by Adsorption on Optical Fibre.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zajíc, J.; Bittner, M.; Brányik, T.; Solovyev, Andrey; Šabata, Stanislav; Kuncová, Gabriela; Pospíšilová, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 7 (2016), s. 877-887 ISSN 0366-6352 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : whole-cell biosensor * bioluminiscent bioreporter * optical fibre sensor Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.258, year: 2016

  1. TOL Plasmid Carriage Enhances Biofilm Formation and Increases Extracellular DNA Content in Pseudomonas Putida KT2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smets, Barth F.; D'Alvise, Paul; Yankelovich, T.

    laser scanning microscopy. The TOL-carrying strains formed pellicles and thick biofilms, whereas the same strains without the plasmid displayed little adherent growth. Microscopy using fluorescent nucleic acid- specific stains (cytox orange, propidium iodide) revealed differences in production...... by production of eDNA....

  2. Solvent-tolerant bioconversion : Construction and analysis of a phenol producing Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierckx, N.J.P.

    2009-01-01

    Organic chemicals play a fundamental role in modern civilization. Today, almost all of these chemicals are produced from oil. This leads to pollution and creates a dependency on often politically unstable oil producing countries. It is possible to make the same chemicals from sugar, using

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sepsis Sharps Safety - CDC Transplant Safety Vaccine Safety Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... aeruginosa . Pseudomonas aeruginosa What types of infections does Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause? Serious Pseudomonas infections usually occur in people ...

  4. Glyphosate-Induced Specific and Widespread Perturbations in the Metabolome of Soil Pseudomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla Aristilde

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported adverse effects of glyphosate on crop-beneficial soil bacterial species, including several soil Pseudomonas species. Of particular interest is the elucidation of the metabolic consequences of glyphosate toxicity in these species. Here we investigated the growth and metabolic responses of soil Pseudomonas species grown on succinate, a common root exudate, and glyphosate at different concentrations. We conducted our experiments with one agricultural soil isolate, P. fluorescens RA12, and three model species, P. putida KT2440, P. putida S12, and P. protegens Pf-5. Our results demonstrated both species- and strain-dependent growth responses to glyphosate. Following exposure to a range of glyphosate concentrations (up to 5 mM, the growth rate of both P. protegens Pf-5 and P. fluorescens RA12 remained unchanged whereas the two P. putida strains exhibited from 0 to 100% growth inhibition. We employed a 13C-assisted metabolomics approach using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to monitor disruptions in metabolic homeostasis and fluxes. Profiling of the whole-cell metabolome captured deviations in metabolite levels involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, ribonucleotide biosynthesis, and protein biosynthesis. Altered metabolite levels specifically in the biosynthetic pathway of aromatic amino acids (AAs, the target of toxicity for glyphosate in plants, implied the same toxicity target in the soil bacterium. Kinetic flux experiments with 13C-labeled succinate revealed that biosynthetic fluxes of the aromatic AAs were not inhibited in P. fluorescens Pf-5 in the presence of low and high glyphosate doses but these fluxes were inhibited by up to 60% in P. putida KT2440, even at sub-lethal glyphosate exposure. Notably, the greatest inhibition was found for the aromatic AA tryptophan, an important precursor to secondary metabolites. When the growth medium was supplemented with aromatic AAs, P. putida S12 exposed to a lethal

  5. Microcalorimetric and potentiometric titration studies on the adsorption of copper by P. putida and B. thuringiensis and their composites with minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang Linchuan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agriculture and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Cai Peng; Li Pengxiang; Wu Huayong; Liang Wei; Rong Xingmin [Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agriculture and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Chen Wenli [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Huang Qiaoyun, E-mail: qyhuang@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Key Laboratory of Subtropical Agriculture and Environment, Ministry of Agriculture, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2010-09-15

    In order to have a better understanding of the interactions of heavy metals with bacteria and minerals in soil and associated environments, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), potentiometric titration and equilibrium sorption experiments were conducted to investigate the adsorption behavior of Cu(II) by Bacillus thuringiensis, Pseudomonas putida and their composites with minerals. The interaction of montmorillonite with bacteria increased the reactive sites and resulted in greater adsorption for Cu(II) on their composites, while decreased adsorption sites and capacities for Cu(II) were observed on goethite-bacteria composites. A gram-positive bacterium B. thuringiensis played a more important role than a gram-negative bacterium P. putida in determining the properties of the bacteria-minerals interfaces. The enthalpy changes ({Delta}H{sub ads}) from endothermic (6.14 kJ mol{sup -1}) to slightly exothermic (-0.78 kJ mol{sup -1}) suggested that Cu(II) is complexed with the anionic oxygen ligands on the surface of bacteria-mineral composites. Large entropies (32.96-58.89 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}) of Cu(II) adsorption onto bacteria-mineral composites demonstrated the formation of inner-sphere complexes in the presence of bacteria. The thermodynamic data implied that Cu(II) mainly bound to the carboxyl and phosphoryl groups as inner-sphere complexes on bacteria and mineral-bacteria composites.

  6. Short ROSE-like RNA thermometers control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie S Krajewski

    Full Text Available The bacterial small heat shock protein IbpA protects client proteins from aggregation. Due to redundancy in the cellular chaperone network, deletion of the ibpA gene often leads to only a mild or no phenotypic defect. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas putida ibpA deletion mutant has a severe growth defect under heat stress conditions and reduced survival during recovery revealing a critical role of IbpA in heat tolerance. Transcription of the ibpA gene depends on the alternative heat shock sigma factor σ(32. Production of IbpA protein only at heat shock temperatures suggested additional translational control. We conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the 5' untranslated regions of the ibpA genes from P. putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both contain a ROSE-type RNA thermometer that is substantially shorter and simpler than previously reported ROSE elements. Comprised of two hairpin structures only, they inhibit translation at low temperature and permit translation initiation after a temperature upshift. Both elements regulate reporter gene expression in Escherichia coli and ribosome binding in vitro in a temperature-dependent manner. Structure probing revealed local melting of the second hairpin whereas the first hairpin remained unaffected. High sequence and structure conservation of pseudomonal ibpA untranslated regions and their ability to confer thermoregulation in vivo suggest that short ROSE-like thermometers are commonly used to control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

  7. Engineering Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 for nitrogen fixation and its application to improve plant growth under nitrogen-deficient conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Setten

    Full Text Available Nitrogen is the second most critical factor for crop production after water. In this study, the beneficial rhizobacterium Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 was genetically modified to fix nitrogen using the genes encoding the nitrogenase of Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501 via the X940 cosmid. Pf-5 X940 was able to grow in L medium without nitrogen, displayed high nitrogenase activity and released significant quantities of ammonium to the medium. Pf-5 X940 also showed constitutive expression and enzymatic activity of nitrogenase in ammonium medium or in nitrogen-free medium, suggesting a constitutive nitrogen fixation. Similar to Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas veronii and Pseudomonas taetrolens but not Pseudomonas balearica and Pseudomonas stutzeri transformed with cosmid X940 showed constitutive nitrogenase activity and high ammonium production, suggesting that this phenotype depends on the genome context and that this technology to obtain nitrogen-fixing bacteria is not restricted to Pf-5. Interestingly, inoculation of Arabidopsis, alfalfa, tall fescue and maize with Pf-5 X940 increased the ammonium concentration in soil and plant productivity under nitrogen-deficient conditions. In conclusion, these results open the way to the production of effective recombinant inoculants for nitrogen fixation on a wide range of crops.

  8. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants. PMID:26519390

  9. The metabolism of thymol by a Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Enid M.; Dagley, S.

    1968-01-01

    1. Pseudomonas putida when grown with thymol contained a meta-fission dioxygenase, which required ferrous ions and readily cleaved the benzene nucleus of catechols between adjacent carbon atoms bearing hydroxyl and isopropyl groups. 2. 3-Hydroxythymo-1,4-quinone was excreted towards the end of exponential growth and later was slowly metabolized. This compound was oxidized by partially purified extracts only when NADH was supplied; the substrate for the dioxygenase appeared to be 3-hydroxythymo-1,4-quinol, which was readily and non-enzymically oxidized to the quinone. 3. 2-Oxobutyrate (0·9 mole) was formed from 1 mole of 3-hydroxythymo-1,4-quinone with the consumption of 1 mole of oxygen; acetate, isobutyrate and 2-hydroxybutyrate (which arose from the enzymic reduction of 2-oxobutyrate) were also formed. 4. These products, which were produced only when the catechol substrate contained a third hydroxyl group, appeared to result from the enzymic hydrolysis of the ring-fission product. PMID:4303067

  10. Pseudomonas alkylphenolica sp. nov., a bacterial species able to form special aerial structures when grown on p-cresol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulet, Magdalena; Sánchez, David; Lalucat, Jorge; Lee, Kyoung; García-Valdés, Elena

    2015-11-01

    Pseudomonas sp. KL28T is an aerobic, rod-shaped bacterium that was isolated from the soil of Changwon, South Korea, based on its ability to grow in the presence of linear alkylphenols (C1-C5). Despite several studies on strain KL28T, it could not be assigned to any known species in the genus Pseudomonas. The name 'Pseudomonas alkylphenolia' was proposed for KL28T, but the strain had not until now been characterized taxonomically and the name currently has no standing in the bacterial nomenclature. A 16S rRNA gene sequence based phylogenetic analysis suggested an affiliation of strain KL28T with the Pseudomonas putida group, with Pseudomonas vranovensis DSM 16006T as the most closely related type strain (99.1 % similarity). A multilocus phylogenetic sequence analysis performed by concatenating 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoD and rpoB partial gene sequences showed that isolate KL28T could be differentiated from P. vranovensis DSM 16006T (sequence similarity 93.7 %). Genomic comparisons of strain KL28T with the type strains of the species in the P. putida group using average nucleotide index based on blast (ANIb) and genome-to genome distances (GGDC) revealed 87.06 % and 32.20 % similarities with P. vranovensis DSM 16006T, respectively, as the closest type strain. Both values are far from the thresholds established for species differentiation. These results, together with differences in phenotypic features and chemotaxonomic analyses [fatty acids and whole-cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS], support the proposal of strain KL28T ( = JCM 16553T = KCTC 22206T) as the type strain of a novel species, for which the formerly proposed name, 'P. alkylphenolia', is correctly latinized as Pseudomonas alkylphenolica sp. nov.

  11. Antibiotic resistance patterns of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the River Danube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens eKittinger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spread and persistence of antibiotic resistance pose a severe threat to human health, yet there is still lack of knowledge about reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. We took the opportunity of the Joint Danube Survey 3 (JDS3, the world's biggest river research expedition of its kind in 2013, to analyse samples originating from different sampling points along the whole length of the river. Due to its high clinical relevance, we concentrated on the characterization of Pseudomonas spp. and evaluated the resistance profiles of Pseudomonas spp. which were isolated from eight sampling points. In total, 520 Pseudomonas isolates were found, 344 (66.0% isolates were identified as Pseudomonas putida, and 141 (27.1% as Pseudomonas fluorescens, all other Pseudomonas species were represented by less than five isolates, among those two P. aeruginosa isolates. Thirty seven percent (37% of all isolated Pseudomonas species showed resistance to at least one out of eleven tested antibiotics. The most common resistance was against meropenem (30.4% / 158 isolates piperacillin/tazobactam (10.6% / 55 isolates and ceftazidime (4.2% / 22 isolates. 16 isolates (3.1% / 16 isolates were multi-resistant. For each tested antibiotic at least one resistant isolate could be detected. Sampling points from the upper stretch of the River Danube showed more resistant isolates than downriver. Our results suggest that antibiotic resistance can be acquired by and persists even in Pseudomonas species that are normally not in direct contact with humans. A possible scenario is that these bacteria provide a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes that can spread to related human pathogens by horizontal gene transfer.

  12. Pengaruh konsentrasi nitrogen dan fosfor terhadap potensi pseudomonas pendegradasi alkilbenzen sulfonat liniar (LAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Suharjono

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate (LAS concentration over 0.5 mg/L has toxic effect on organisms in river ecosystem. Some indigenous Pseudomonas strains on detergent polluted river have capacity to degraded LAS. The objective of the research was to study the effect of increasing of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P concentration in minimum mineral medium on growth and LAS biodegradation potency of Pseudomonas strains using batch culture. The experiment was carried out by Randomized Block Design and three replications. Each three milliliter of strain starter contain 108 cell/ml was inoculated into 27 ml of each media formulation. Each culture was incubated aerobically at 30 oC on shaker incubator. Amount of bacteria cell and LAS residue concentration were observed on 0, 3rd, 6th, 9th and 12th day incubation. Data was analyzed using variance analyze and followed by Honesty Significance Difference test on 5% significance level. The result of the research showed that Pseudomonas putida FNCC071, Pseudomonas sp. strain R, and Pseudomonas sp. strain J was capable to degrade LAS about 89.0%, 87.0% and 80.0% respectively in 12 days incubation. The highest increasing of N and P concentration in media gives the highest potency of bacteria strains to degrade LAS (p > 0.05.

  13. Assessment of Qualitative and Quantitative Characters of Two Persian Clover Ecotypes Inoculated by Rhizobium leguminosarum biovartrifoli and Pesudomonas putida Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Azamei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Over the past decades, world attitude has changed towards the reduction of environmental pollutants. Harmful effects of synthetic fertilizers on environment have been identified. Bio-fertilizers are not harmful to the environment, but also they have favorable effects on plant growth processes. Soil biotechnology can be defined as the study of soil organisms and their metabolic processes which may have positive effects on plant yields. The main goal of this study is to asess the biotechnology fertilizers beneficial effects on soil organisms and their subsequently to maximize the yield. It is also our desire conside the soil quality, hygiene and environmental protection along this process. Among the strain of nitrogen-fixing bacteria, symbiotic bacteria such as rhizobium bacteria are important and essential in planning the sustainable farming systems. Several studies have shown that crop varieties which inoculated with rhizobium and pseudomonas were superior in yield production and performance. Material and Methods An experiment was designed as factorial performed in randomized complete block design (RCBD with three replications in Agricultural Research Center of Golpayegan (Isfahan during 2010 – 2011. the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of inoculation of two ecotypes of Persian clover by various strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum. Biovar trifoli bacteria accompanied with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR Pseudomonas putida was employed to find certain qualitative and quantitative characteristics of clover yield, The main plots included two local ecotypes of Persian clover; Arak Haft Chin (V1 and Isfahan Haft Chin (V2, the subplots included inoculation by two strain of Rhizobium; Rb-3, Rb-13 and one strain of Pseudomonas; PS -168.4 cuts were performed during the experiment and 60 kg/ha seed was used for cultivation based on local knowledge. According to recommendations of the Institute of Soil and Water

  14. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  15. Commensal Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Wastewater and Freshwater Milieus in the Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, as Reservoir of Antibiotic Resistant Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony I. Okoh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas species are opportunistic pathogens with implications in a wide range of diseases including cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anaemia. Because of their status as multidrug resistant (MDR and extremely drug resistant (XDR bacteria Pseudomonas species represent a threat to public health. Prevalence, antibiogram and associated antibiotic resistant genes of Pseudomonas species isolated from freshwater and mixed liquor environments in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa were assessed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR based technique was used to identify the isolates and screen for antibiotic resistant genes. The result shows occurrence of Pseudomonas spp. in freshwater and mixed liquor as follows: 71.42% and 37.5% (P. putida, 14.28% and 31.25% (P. flourescens, 7.14% and 6.25% (P. aeruginosa and 7.14% and 25% for other Pseudomonas species respectively. Disk diffusion antibiogram of the Pseudomonas isolates from the two locations showed 100% resistance to penicillin, oxacillin, clindamycin, rifampicin and 100% susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin with varied percentage resistances to cephalothin, nalidixic acid, tetracycline, and ampicillin. The blaTEM antibiotic resistant gene was detected in 12.5% of P. putida, 57.14% of P. fluorescens, 100% P. aeruginosa and 40% in other Pseudomonas species. Similarly, Integrons conserved segment were detected in 12.5% of P. putida, 57.14% of P. fluorescens, 100% of P. aeruginosa and 40% of other Pseudomonas species. The presence of blaTEM gene and integrons conserved segment in some of the isolates is worrisome and suggest Pseudomonas species as important reservoirs of multidrug resistance genes in the Eastern Cape Province environment.

  16. Determination Pattern of Antimicrobial Resistance of Pseudomonas Isolated from Patients in a University Tertiary Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Hasani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas are ubiquitous bacteria widely present in nature. However, they have emerged as an opportunistic pathogen for humans. This bacterium is accountable for many localized and disseminated diseases, especially wounds in burn patients, respiratory infections, septicemia and bacteremia. Among all Pseudomonas species, P. aeruginosa is one of the important and most virulent species in hospital settings, while other pathogenic species include stutzeri, putida and fluorescence. The aim of this study was to assess pattern of antibiotic resistance in these bacteria isolated from a University teaching and treatment center. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 99 Pseudomonas strains (68 strains P. aeruginosa and 31 other Pseudomonas species isolated from various clinical specimens. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility test was performed using the disc agar diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. In this study, among various clinical specimens sent to microbiology laboratory, wound (59.59% was found as a major source of Pseudomonas spp. Among various wards, Pseudomonas spp. was isolated more from patients admitted to burns ward (48.48%. Antibiotic susceptibility assay results revealed non susceptibility pattern towards most of the antibiotics; however, among all antibiotics tested, most common resistance was observed towards ceftazidime (76.76%. The results of this study shows the presence of Pseudomonas infection in the hospital setting and their developed resistance towards many conventional antibiotics, which is a concern at this treatment center. Thus, there exist a need for evaluation of careful and accurate measurement of resistance and assessment of exact drug administration policies. Therefore, to control the infection and prevent from increased prevalence of resistant strains appropriate resolution should be followed.

  17. The metabolic response of P. putida KT2442 producing high levels of polyhydroxyalkanoate under single- and multiple-nutrient-limited growth: Highlights from a multi-level omics approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Pseudomonas putida KT2442 is a natural producer of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), which can substitute petroleum-based non-renewable plastics and form the basis for the production of tailor-made biopolymers. However, despite the substantial body of work on PHA production by P. putida strains, it is not yet clear how the bacterium re-arranges its whole metabolism when it senses the limitation of nitrogen and the excess of fatty acids as carbon source, to result in a large accumulation of PHAs within the cell. In the present study we investigated the metabolic response of KT2442 using a systems biology approach to highlight the differences between single- and multiple-nutrient-limited growth in chemostat cultures. Results We found that 26, 62, and 81% of the cell dry weight consist of PHA under conditions of carbon, dual, and nitrogen limitation, respectively. Under nitrogen limitation a specific PHA production rate of 0.43 (g·(g·h)-1) was obtained. The residual biomass was not constant for dual- and strict nitrogen-limiting growth, showing a different feature in comparison to other P. putida strains. Dual limitation resulted in patterns of gene expression, protein level, and metabolite concentrations that substantially differ from those observed under exclusive carbon or nitrogen limitation. The most pronounced differences were found in the energy metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, as well as stress proteins and enzymes belonging to the transport system. Conclusion This is the first study where the interrelationship between nutrient limitations and PHA synthesis has been investigated under well-controlled conditions using a system level approach. The knowledge generated will be of great assistance for the development of bioprocesses and further metabolic engineering work in this versatile organism to both enhance and diversify the industrial production of PHAs. PMID:22433058

  18. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...... in biofilm formation, however, detailed studies of these roles have not yet been carried out. The overall aim of this PhD project was therefore to elucidate in more depth the roles played by Pseudomonas lipopetides in pollutant biodegradation and biofilm formation. This study investigated the effect...... of the Pseudomonas lipopeptides belonging to different structural groups on important biodegradation parameters, mainly; solubilization and emulsification of hydrophobic pollutants (alkanes and PAHs) and increase of cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial degraders. Ultimately, it was tested if these parameters led...

  19. Construction of a Pseudomonas hybrid strain that mineralizes 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duque, E; Haidour, A; Godoy, F; Ramos, J L

    1993-01-01

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas sp. strain C1S1, able to grow on 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, and 2-nitrotoluene as N sources, was isolated. The bacterium grew at 30 degrees C with fructose as a C source and accumulated nitrite. Through batch culture enrichment, we isolated a derivative strain, called Pseudomonas sp. clone A, which grew faster on TNT and did not accumulate nitrite in the culture medium. Use of TNT by these two strains as an N source involved the successive removal of nitro groups to yield 2,4- and 2,6-dinitrotoluene, 2-nitrotoluene, and toluene. Transfer of the Pseudomonas putida TOL plasmid pWW0-Km to Pseudomonas sp. clone A allowed the transconjugant bacteria to grow on TNT as the sole C and N source. All bacteria in this study, in addition to removing nitro groups from TNT, reduced nitro groups on the aromatic ring via hydroxylamine to amino derivatives. Azoxy dimers probably resulting from the condensation of partially reduced TNT derivatives were also found. PMID:8468288

  20. Antimicrobial Activity of Various Plant Extracts on Pseudomonas Species Associated with Spoilage of Chilled Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osan Bahurmiz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of various plant extracts on Pseudomonas bacteria isolated from spoiled chilled tilapia (Oreochromis sp. was evaluated in this study. In the first stage of this study, red tilapia was subjected to chilled storage (4°C for 3 weeks, and spoilage bacteria were isolated and identified from the spoiled fish. Pseudomonas was the dominant bacteria isolated from the spoiled fish and further identification revealed that P. putida, P. fluorescens and Pseudomonas spp. were the main species of this group. In the second stage, methanolic extracts of 15 selected plant species were screened for their antimicrobial activity, by agar disc diffusion method, against the Pseudomonas isolates. Results indicated that most of the extracts had different degrees of activity against the bacterial isolates. The strongest activity was exhibited by bottlebrush flower (Callistemon viminalis extract. This was followed by extracts from guava bark (Psidium guajava and henna leaf (Lawsonia inermis. Moderate antimicrobial activities were observed in extracts of clove (Syzygium aromaticum, leaf and peel of tamarind (Tamarindus indica, cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum, wild betel leaf (Piper sarmentosum and fresh thyme (Thymus spp.. Weak or no antimicrobial activity was observed from the remaining extracts. The potential antimicrobial activity shown by some plant extracts in this study could significantly contribute to the fish preservation.

  1. Metabolic engineering of bacteria for environmental applications: construction of Pseudomonas strains for biodegradation of 2-chlorotoluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haro, M A; de Lorenzo, V

    2001-02-13

    In this article, we illustrate the challenges and bottlenecks in the metabolic engineering of bacteria destined for environmental bioremediation, by reporting current efforts to construct Pseudomonas strains genetically designed for degradation of the recalcitrant compound 2-chlorotoluene. The assembled pathway includes one catabolic segment encoding the toluene dioxygenase of the TOD system of Pseudomonas putida F1 (todC1C2BA), which affords the bioconversion of 2-chlorotoluene into 2-chlorobenzaldehyde by virtue of its residual methyl-monooxygenase activity on o-substituted substrates. A second catabolic segment encoded the entire upper TOL pathway from pWW0 plasmid of P. putida mt-2. The enzymes, benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase (encoded by xylB) and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase (xylC) of this segment accept o-chloro-substituted substrates all the way down to 2-chlorobenzoate. These TOL and TOD segments were assembled in separate mini-Tn5 transposon vectors, such that expression of the encoded genes was dependent on the toluene-responsive Pu promoter of the TOL plasmid and the cognate XylR regulator. Such gene cassettes (mini-Tn5 [UPP2] and mini-Tn5 [TOD2]) were inserted in the chromosome of the 2-chlorobenzoate degraders Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA142 and P. aeruginosa JB2. GC-MS analysis of the metabolic intermediates present in the culture media of the resulting strains verified that these possessed, not only the genetic information, but also the functional ability to mineralise 2-chlorotoluene. However, although these strains did convert the substrate into 2-chlorobenzoate, they failed to grow on 2-chlorotoluene as the only carbon source. These results pinpoint the rate of the metabolic fluxes, the non-productive spill of side-metabolites and the physiological control of degradative pathways as the real bottlenecks for degradation of certain pollutants, rather than the theoretical enzymatic and genetic fitness of the recombinant bacteria to the process. Choices to

  2. Identification of anthranilate and benzoate metabolic operons of Pseudomonas fluorescens and functional characterization of their promoter regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Vincent D

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an effort to identify alternate recombinant gene expression systems in Pseudomonas fluorescens, we identified genes encoding two native metabolic pathways that were inducible with inexpensive compounds: the anthranilate operon (antABC and the benzoate operon (benABCD. Results The antABC and benABCD operons were identified by homology to the Acinetobacter sp. anthranilate operon and Pseudomonas putida benzoate operon, and were confirmed to be regulated by anthranilate or benzoate, respectively. Fusions of the putative promoter regions to the E. coli lacZ gene were constructed to confirm inducible gene expression. Each operon was found to be controlled by an AraC family transcriptional activator, located immediately upstream of the first structural gene in each respective operon (antR or benR. Conclusion We have found the anthranilate and benzoate promoters to be useful for tightly controlling recombinant gene expression at both small (

  3. Effect of Pseudomonas and Bacillus bacteria on Yield and Nutrient Uptake in Comparison with Chemical and Organic Fertilizers in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fallah Nosrat Abad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The high cost of fertilizers in farming systems, soil pollution and degradation of soil are factors that caused to full use of available renewable nutrient sources of plant (organic and biological with optimal application of fertilizers in order to maintain fertility, structure, biological activity, exchange capacity and water-holding capacity of the water in soil. Therefore, in recent years, according to investigators biofertilizers and organic farming as an alternative to chemical fertilizers has been drawn. Through this study, we examined the effects of triple superphosphate, organic matters and phosphate solubilizing microorganisms on quantitative and qualitative yield of wheat and nutrient uptake. The experiment was carried out in the factorial based on randomized complete block design. The factors were: 1-phosphate solubilizing bacteria in three levels including control, Pseudomonas Putida and Bacillus Coagulans bacteria, 2- triple superphosphate in five levels of 0, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100% and 3-organic matter in 2 levels of 0 and 15 ton/ha in the soil with high phosphorous accessibility (13 mg/kg soil but lower than sufficient limit for plant 15 mg/kg soil. The results showed that the highest amount of yield has been recorded in Pseudomonas Putida bacteria treatment with organic matter and 25% phosphate fertilizer. As a result, at the conditions of this experiment phosphate solubilizing bacteria and organic matter significantly had higher yield than control and their combination with phosphate fertilizer had significant effect on reducing phosphate fertilizer use.

  4. Oxygen mass transfer and shear stress effects on Pseudomonas putida BCRC 14365 growth to improve bioreactor design and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhani, Hamed; Izadkhah, Mir-Shahabeddin; Anarjan, Navideh; Abdi, Abolfazl

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the experimental evidence is presented for two basic issues including oxygen mass transfer and shear analysis on the microorganism containing medium on the most prominent sections of the bioreactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology reproduces shear rate values for specific impeller designs using the commercial code (Fluent 6.2). CFD calculates volumetric mass transfer coefficient based on the Higbie's penetration theory. Four types of impeller are used. The spherical probe is used to measure flow hydrodynamic parameters to obtain shear rate by electro-diffusion (ED) method. The obtained results are validated experimentally and it is shown that a fully axial pattern impeller represents more enhanced results than partially axial and radial. In this regard, experimental results for volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k l a) confirm CFD predictions by acceptable deviations of 2.65, 8.90, and 9.20 for 0.15, 0.2, and 0.3 VVM, respectively. These results collaboratively indicate that LIGHTNIN-C 200 type operates more efficiently by reflecting the flow to the bottom corner stagnation areas with the minimum tolerable shear and the most velocity distribution uniformity. Furthermore, the values of k l a improve by aeration rate. Conversely, increasing the rotational speed of impeller creates difficulties for cell growth due to the generated harsh shear condition. CFD provide a better understanding of how operational and geometrical variables may be manipulated to achieve a moderate shear rate and acceptable level of mass transfer.

  5. Activity of toluene-degrading Pseudomonas putida in the early growth phase of a biofilm for waste gas treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.R.; Møller, S.; Molin, S.

    1997-01-01

    A biological trickling filter for treatment of toluene-containing waste gas was studied. The overall kinetics of the biofilm growth was followed in the early growth phase. A rapid initial colonization took place during the first three days. The biofilm thickness increased exponentially, whereas...

  6. Global transcriptional response of solvent-sensitive and solvent-tolerant Pseudomonas putida strains exposed to toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molina-Santiago, Carlos; Udaondo, Zulema; Gómez Lozano, María

    2017-01-01

    for the degradation and synthesis of a wide range of chemicals. For the use of these microbes in bioremediation and biocatalysis, it is critical to understand the mechanisms underlying these phenotypic differences. In this study, RNA-seq analysis compared the short- and long-term responses of the toluene-sensitive KT......2440 strain and the highly-tolerant DOT-T1E strain. The sensitive strain activates a larger number of genes in a higher magnitude than DOT-T1E. This is expected because KT2440 bears one toluene tolerant pump, while DOT-T1E encodes three of these pumps. Both strains activate membrane modifications...... to reduce toluene membrane permeability. The KT2440 strain activates the TCA cycle to generate energy, while avoiding energy-intensive processes such as flagellar biosynthesis. This suggests that KT2440 responds to toluene by focusing on survival mechanisms. The DOT-T1E strain activates toluene degradation...

  7. The Identification and Validation of Novel Small Proteins in Pseudomonas Putida KT-2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Long, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    , total protein samples are prepared, fractionated, and analyzed with mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The MS/MS data are compared to a custom database containing >80000 putative sORF sequences to identify candidates for validation. A total of 56 and 22 putative sORFs were obtained from MS/MS data...

  8. The Repetitive Detection of Toluene with Bioluminescence Bioreporter Pseudomonas putida TVA8 Encapsulated in Silica Hydrogel on an Optical Fiber.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuncová, Gabriela; Ishizaki, Takayuki; Solovyev, Andrey; Trögl, J.; Ripp, S.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2016), s. 467 ISSN 1996-1944 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : bioluminescent biosensor * silica gel * encapsulation Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.654, year: 2016

  9. Pseudomonas cichorii as the causal agent of midrib rot, an emerging disease of greenhouse-grown butterhead lettuce in Flanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottyn, Bart; Heylen, Kim; Heyrman, Jeroen; Vanhouteghem, Katrien; Pauwelyn, Ellen; Bleyaert, Peter; Van Vaerenbergh, Johan; Höfte, Monica; De Vos, Paul; Maes, Martine

    2009-05-01

    Bacterial midrib rot of greenhouse-grown butterhead lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. var. capitata) is an emerging disease in Flanders (Belgium) and fluorescent pseudomonads are suspected to play an important role in the disease. Isolations from infected lettuces, collected from 14 commercial greenhouses in Flanders, yielded 149 isolates that were characterized polyphasically, which included morphological characteristics, pigmentation, pathogenicity tests by both injection and spraying of lettuce, LOPAT characteristics, FAME analysis, BOX-PCR fingerprinting, 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequencing, as well as DNA-DNA hybridization. Ninety-eight isolates (66%) exhibited a fluorescent pigmentation and were associated with the genus Pseudomonas. Fifty-five of them induced an HR+ (hypersensitive reaction in tobacco leaves) response. The other 43 fluorescent isolates were most probably saprophytic bacteria and about half of them were able to cause rot on potato tuber slices. BOX-PCR genomic fingerprinting was used to assess the genetic diversity of the Pseudomonas midrib rot isolates. The delineated BOX-PCR patterns matched quite well with Pseudomonas morphotypes defined on the basis of colony appearance and variation in fluorescent pigmentation. 16S rRNA and rpoB gene sequence analyses allowed most of the fluorescent isolates to be allocated to Pseudomonas, and they belonged to either the Pseudomonas fluorescens group, Pseudomonas putida group, or the Pseudomonas cichorii/syringae group. In particular, the isolates allocated to this latter group constituted the vast majority of HR+ isolates and were identified as P. cichorii by DNA-DNA hybridization. They were demonstrated by spray-inoculation tests on greenhouse-grown lettuce to induce the midrib rot disease and could be re-isolated from lesions of inoculated plants. Four HR+ non-fluorescent isolates associated with one sample that showed an atypical midrib rot were identified as Dickeya sp.

  10. Toxicity of phenol and monochlorophenols to growth and metabolic activities of Pseudomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, D.S.; Tseng, I.C. [National Cheng-Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-07-01

    Phenolic compounds are toxic to many organisms and are often present in the effluents from oil refineries, the petrochemical, pesticide, and color and textile industries. Several authors have demonstrated a characteristic pattern of behavioral responses in fishes during phenol exposure. Others have also evaluated the toxicity of halogenated phenolic compounds by screening for effects on the specific growth rates (SGR) and the dehydrogenase activity (DHA) of Escherichia coli. However, little work has been done to determine the effects on biota from short exposures at relatively high concentrations of phenol or monochlorophenols that might occur following a deliberate or accidental discharge to a receiving water. Microorganisms with phenol-degrading capacity have been studied intensively, including cyanobacteria such as Nostoc linckia, yeast such as Trichosporon cutaneum, bacteria such as Pseudomonas putida, and other unidentified species. Among these Pseudomonas has received the most attention and several mutants have been prepared to degrade substituted phenols. This study investigates the initial response of Pseudomonas upon exposure to high concentrations of phenol and chlorophenols by measuring the oxygen uptake rates. A series growth experiment was also conducted in order to compare the kinetic results with standard microbial tests. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Arsenic-contaminated soils. Genetically modified Pseudomonas spp. and their arsenic-phytoremediation potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizova, O.I.; Kochetkov, V.V.; Validov, S.Z.; Boronin, A.M. [Inst. of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kosterin, P.V.; Lyubun, Y.V. [Inst. of Biochemistry and Physiology of Plants and Microorganisms, Russian Academy of Sciences, Saratov (Russian Federation)

    2002-07-01

    Sorghum was inoculated with Pseudomonas bacteria, including strains harboring an As-resistance plasmid, pBS3031, to enhance As-extraction by the plants. Pseudomonas strains (P. fluorescens 38a, P. putida 53a, and P. aureofaciens BS1393) were chosen because they are antagonistic to a wide range of phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria, and they can stimulate plant growth. The resistance of natural rhizospheric pseudomonads to sodium arsenite was assessed. Genetically modified Pseudomonas strains resistant to As(III)/As(V) were obtained via conjugation or transformation. The effects of the strains on the growth of sorghum on sodium-arsenite-containing soils were assessed. The conclusions from this study are: (1) It is possible to increase the survivability of sorghum growing in sodium-arsenite-containing soil by using rhizosphere pseudomonads. (2) The presence of pBS3031 offers the strains a certain selective advantage in arsenite-contaminated soil. (3) The presence of pBS3031 impairs plant growth, due to the As-resistance mechanism determined by this plasmid: the transformation of the less toxic arsenate into the more toxic, plant-root-available arsenite by arsenate reductase and the active removal of arsenite from bacterial cells. (4) Such a mechanism makes it possible to develop a bacteria-assisted phytoremediation technology for the cleanup of As-contaminated soils and is the only possible way of removing the soil-sorbed arsenates from the environment. (orig.)

  12. Molecular tools and emerging strategies for deep genetic/genomic refactoring of Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-García, Esteban; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2017-10-01

    The interest of the genus Pseudomonas largely relies on the virulence of some of its species for plants and animals (including humans). Yet, pathogenic features of some isolates coexist with others often present in environmental variants that promote plant growth and degrade chemical pollutants. Many of these traits can be traced to the intrinsic properties of the genomic chassis of this genus along with distinct genetic parts and devices. With the tools of Synthetic Biology these can be enhanced and/or repurposed for the sake of biological control, environmental remediation and whole-cell biocatalysis. In this article we take stock of both conceptual and technological developments that have allowed the virtual domestication of Pseudomonas (in particular P. putida) as a major biotechnological workhorse with a range of applications of industrial interest. Adoption of a suite of compositional and measurement standards is advocated for bringing Pseudomonas-based genetic engineering to a superior level of development. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Virulence Attributes and Host Response Assays for Determining Pathogenic Potential of Pseudomonas Strains Used in Biotechnology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam F Tayabali

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas species are opportunistically pathogenic to humans, yet closely related species are used in biotechnology applications. In order to screen for the pathogenic potential of strains considered for biotechnology applications, several Pseudomonas strains (P.aeruginosa (Pa, P.fluorescens (Pf, P.putida (Pp, P.stutzeri (Ps were compared using functional virulence and toxicity assays. Most Pa strains and Ps grew at temperatures between 28°C and 42°C. However, Pf and Pp strains were the most antibiotic resistant, with ciprofloxacin and colistin being the most effective of those tested. No strain was haemolytic on sheep blood agar. Almost all Pa, but not other test strains, produced a pyocyanin-like chromophore, and caused cytotoxicity towards cultured human HT29 cells. Murine endotracheal exposures indicated that the laboratory reference strain, PAO1, was most persistent in the lungs. Only Pa strains induced pro-inflammatory and inflammatory responses, as measured by elevated cytokines and pulmonary Gr-1 -positive cells. Serum amyloid A was elevated at ≥ 48 h post-exposure by only some Pa strains. No relationship was observed between strains and levels of peripheral leukocytes. The species designation or isolation source may not accurately reflect pathogenic potential, since the clinical strain Pa10752 was relatively nonvirulent, but the industrial strain Pa31480 showed comparable virulence to PAO1. Functional assays involving microbial growth, cytotoxicity and murine immunological responses may be most useful for identifying problematic Pseudomonas strains being considered for biotechnology applications.

  14. A novel nicotine catabolic plasmid pMH1 in Pseudomonas sp. strain HF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meizhen; Yang, Guiqin; Min, Hang; Lv, Zhenmei

    2009-03-01

    Attempts were made to acquire a plasmid-loss mutant via various methods (spontaneous mutation, SDS, and mitomycin C), among which the method involving mitomycin C (10 microg/mL) has been proven successful. Concomitant with the loss of the plasmid in Pseudomonas sp. strain HF-1, the cured derivative was identified as having a nicotine-negative (Nic-) phenotype, named mutant strain 6-13 (Nic-). After plasmids were transferred from strain HF-1 (named plasmid pMH1) to the mutant strain 6-13, the mutant strain acquired nicotine-degrading ability, called 6-13 transformant (Nic+). There were no differences in growth or nicotine-degrading efficiency between strain HF-1 (wild-type strain) and strain 6-13 transformant. After pMH1 was transferred to Escherichia coli strain Top10 (Nic-), a distant relative of Pseudomonas, it also gained nicotine-degrading ability, showing the highest nicotine degradation efficiency at pH 7.0, the optimal pH for growth of E. coli. The hsp gene, which encodes 6-hydroxy-3-succinoylpyridine hydroxylase, is involved in nicotine degradation in Pseudomonas putida strain S16 and was present in pMH1 but not in pAO1, the well-known nicotine degradation plasmid in Arthrobacter nicotinovorans. It was demonstrated that plasmid pMH1 is a novel nicotine-degrading plasmid.

  15. Population Structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz Wiehlmann; Gerd Wagner; Nina Cramer; Benny Siebert; Peter Gudowius; Gracia Morales; Thilo Köhler; Christian van Delden; Christian Weinel; Peter Slickers; Burkhard Tümmler

    2007-01-01

    The metabolically versatile Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhabits terrestrial, aquatic, animal-, human-, and plant-host-associated environments and is an important causative agent...

  16. Chromosomal insertion of the entire Escherichia coli lactose operon, into two strains of Pseudomonas, using a modified mini-Tn5 delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Sørensen, S. J.; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    A 12-kb PstI fragment including the entire E. coli lactose operon (lacIPOZYA) was inserted in one copy into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and an E. coli strain with lac(-) phenotype. This was made possible by improvements of an already existing mini-Tn5 transposon...... flanked by NotI sites needed in the mini-Tn5 delivery system; (b) the generation of E. coli nonlysogenic strains expressing the pi protein thus being capable of maintaining and delivering R6K-based mini-Tn5 vectors to other E. coli strains; (c) the successful insertion of the E. coli lactose operon...... into the P. fluorescens chromosome giving P. fluorescens the ability to grow on lactose; (d) evidence from Southern blotting that contradicts the assumption that the mini-Tn5 delivery system always creates one-copy inserts. These improvements allow insertion of large DNA fragments encoding highly expressed...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is implicated in many chronic infections and is readily isolated from chronic wounds, medical devices, and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa is believed to persist in the host organism due to its capacity to form...... biofilms, which protect the aggregated, biopolymer-embedded bacteria from the detrimental actions of antibiotic treatments and host immunity. A key component in the protection against innate immunity is rhamnolipid, which is a quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factor. QS is a cell-to-cell signaling...

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa MdaB and WrbA are water-soluble two-electron quinone oxidoreductases with the potential to defend against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Laura K; La Flamme, Anne C; Ackerley, David F

    2014-09-01

    Water-soluble quinone oxidoreductases capable of reducing quinone substrates via a concerted two-electron mechanism have been implicated in bacterial antioxidant defence. Twoelectron transfer avoids formation of dangerously reactive semi-quinone intermediates, moreover previous work in Pseudomonas putida indicated a direct protective effect for the quinols generated by an over-expressed oxidoreductase. Here, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa orthologs of five quinone oxidoreductases--MdaB, ChrR, WrbA, NfsB, and NQO1--were tested for their possible role in defending P. aeruginosa against H2O2 challenge. In in vitro assays, each enzyme was shown to reduce quinone substrates with only minimal semiquinone formation. However, when each was individually over-expressed in P. aeruginosa no overt H2O2-protective phenotype was observed. It was shown that this was due to a masking effect of the P. aeruginosa catalase, KatA; in a katA mutant, H2O2 challenged strains over-expressing the WrbA and MdaB orthologs grew significantly better than the empty plasmid control. A growth advantage was also observed for H2O2 challenged P. putida strains over-expressing P. aeruginosa wrbA, mdaB or katA. Despite not conferring a growth advantage to wild type P. aeruginosa, it is possible that these quinone oxidoreductases defend against H2O2 toxicity at lower concentrations.

  19. Inhibition of Cell Differentiation in Bacillus subtilis by Pseudomonas protegens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Matthew J.; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Bowers, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interspecies interactions have been described for numerous bacterial systems, leading to the identification of chemical compounds that impact bacterial physiology and differentiation for processes such as biofilm formation. Here, we identified soil microbes that inhibit biofilm formation and sporulation in the common soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We did so by creating a reporter strain that fluoresces when the transcription of a biofilm-specific gene is repressed. Using this reporter in a coculture screen, we identified Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas protegens as bacteria that secrete compounds that inhibit biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. The active compound produced by P. protegens was identified as the antibiotic and antifungal molecule 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). Colonies of B. subtilis grown adjacent to a DAPG-producing P. protegens strain had altered colony morphologies relative to B. subtilis colonies grown next to a DAPG-null P. protegens strain (phlD strain). Using a subinhibitory concentration of purified DAPG in a pellicle assay, we saw that biofilm-specific gene transcription was delayed relative to transcription in untreated samples. These transcriptional changes also corresponded to phenotypic alterations: both biofilm biomass and spore formation were reduced in B. subtilis liquid cultures treated with subinhibitory concentrations of DAPG. Our results add DAPG to the growing list of antibiotics that impact bacterial development and physiology at subinhibitory concentrations. These findings also demonstrate the utility of using coculture as a means to uncover chemically mediated interspecies interactions between bacteria. IMPORTANCE Biofilms are communities of bacteria adhered to surfaces by an extracellular matrix; such biofilms can have important effects in both clinical and agricultural settings. To identify chemical compounds that inhibited biofilm formation, we used a fluorescent reporter to screen for bacteria that

  20. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Pseudomonas cepacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Monrás, Miriam Fina; Batlle Almodóvar, María del Carmen; González, Cernero; Tamargo Martínez, Isis; Meneses, Félix Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    A case of meningoencephalitis of bacterial etiology caused by Pseudomonas cepacia was described. The strain was received at the Reference Laboratory of Bacterial Acute Respiratory Infections of "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine, where its microbiological identification was confirmed. This isolation was a finding in an adult immunocompetent patient. The evolution was favourable with no sequelae for his future life. Pseudomona cepacia has been associated with respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Patients with Pseudomonas cepacia may be asymptomatic or present fatal acute and fulminant infection.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  2. Enhancement of the potential to utilize octopine in the nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gill, S.S.; Boivin, R.; Dion, P. (Univ. Laval, Quebec City, Quebec (Canada))

    1991-08-01

    The nonfluorescent Pseudomonas sp. strain 92 requires the presence of a supplementary carbon source for growth on octopine, whereas the spontaneous mutant RB100 has acquired the capacity to utilize this opine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Insertional mutagenesis of RB100 with transposon Tn5 generated mutants which were unable to grow on octopine and others which grew slowly on this substrate. Both types of mutants yielded revertants that had regained the ability to utilize octopine. Some of the revertants had lost the transposon, whereas in others the transposon was retained but with rearrangements of the insertion site. Genes of octopine catabolism from strain 92 were cloned on a cosmid vector to generate pK3. The clone pK3 conferred the ability to utilize octopine as the sole carbon and nitrogen source on the host Pseudomonas putida KT2440. Although they conferred an equivalent growth phenotype, the mutant genes carried by RB100 and the cloned genes on pK3 differed in their regulation. Utilization of ({sup 14}C)octopine was inducible by octopine in RB100 and was constitutive in KT2440(pK3).

  3. Diversity and activity of biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas in the rhizosphere of black pepper in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, H; Kruijt, M; Raaijmakers, J M

    2008-03-01

    Phytophthora capsici is a major pathogen of black pepper and zoospores play an important role in the infection process. Fluorescent pseudomonads that produce biosurfactants with zoosporicidal activities were isolated from the black pepper rhizosphere in Vietnam, and their genotypic diversity and potential to control Phy. capsici root rot was determined. Biosurfactant-producing pseudomonads were genotypically and biochemically characterized by BOX-polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 16S-rDNA sequencing, reverse-phase-high-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Biosurfactant-producing fluorescent pseudomonads make up c. 1.3% of the culturable Pseudomonas population in the rhizosphere of black pepper. Although BOX-PCR revealed substantial genotypic diversity, the isolates were shown to produce the same biosurfactants and were all identified as Pseudomonas putida. When applied to black pepper stem cuttings, several of the biosurfactant-producing strains provided significant disease control. In absence of the disease, several of the bacterial strains promoted shoot and root growth of black pepper stem cuttings. Biosurfactant-producing pseudomonads indigenous to the rhizosphere of black pepper plants are genotypically diverse and provide a novel resource for the control of Phy. capsici root rot and growth promotion of black pepper stem cuttings. The results of this study provide a strong basis for further development of supplementary strategies with antagonistic bacteria to control foot and root rot of black pepper and to promote plant growth.

  4. Toluene-degrading Antarctic Pseudomonas strains from fuel-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Roberta L; Rhodes, Phillippa L; Aislabie, Jackie

    2003-12-05

    Two psychrotolerant toluene-degrading Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from JP8 jet-fuel-contaminated soils, Scott Base, Antarctica. Isolates metabolized meta-toluate as sole carbon source at temperatures ranging from 6 to 30 degrees C. Large plasmids (>64kb) were isolated from both isolates. Sequence analysis of PCR products amplified using xylB (the gene encoding benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase) primers revealed that isolates 7/167 and 8/46 were 100% and 92% homologous, respectively, to the xylB gene of the meta-cleavage toluene degradative pathway encoded by the TOL plasmid (pWWO) of Pseudomonas putida mt-2. Assays of cell-free extracts of 7/167 and 8/46 demonstrated activity of catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase, and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase, indicating that the isolates use the meta-cleavage pathway enzymes of toluene degradation typical of TOL type plasmids. As both isolates are able to grow at 6 degrees C ex situ it is feasible that they would be able to metabolize toluene in the Antarctic soils from where they were originally isolated.

  5. Intracellular excision and reintegration dynamics of the ICEclc genomic island of Pseudomonas knackmussii sp. strain B13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchilo, Vladimir; Czechowska, Kamila; Pradervand, Nicolas; Minoia, Marco; Miyazaki, Ryo; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2009-06-01

    Genomic islands are DNA elements acquired by horizontal gene transfer that are common to a large number of bacterial genomes, which can contribute specific adaptive functions, e.g. virulence, metabolic capacities or antibiotic resistances. Some genomic islands are still self-transferable and display an intricate life-style, reminiscent of both bacteriophages and conjugative plasmids. Here we studied the dynamical process of genomic island excision and intracellular reintegration using the integrative and conjugative element ICEclc from Pseudomonas knackmussii B13 as model. By using self-transfer of ICEclc from strain B13 to Pseudomonas putida and Cupriavidus necator as recipients, we show that ICEclc can target a number of different tRNA(Gly) genes in a bacterial genome, but only those which carry the GCC anticodon. Two conditional traps were designed for ICEclc based on the attR sequence, and we could show that ICEclc will insert with different frequencies in such traps producing brightly fluorescent cells. Starting from clonal primary transconjugants we demonstrate that ICEclc is excising and reintegrating at detectable frequencies, even in the absence of recipient. Recombination site analysis provided evidence to explain the characteristics of a larger number of genomic island insertions observed in a variety of strains, including Bordetella petri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia.

  6. Class 1 integrons and tetracycline resistance genes in Alcaligenes, Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas spp. isolated from pigsties and manured soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Sandvang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    The presence of tetracycline resistance (Tc-r) genes and class I integrons (in-1), and their ability to cotransfer were investigated in Tc-r gram-negative (185 strains) and gram-positive (72 strains) bacteria from Danish farmland and pigsties. The isolates belonged to the groups or species...... tet(33). No isolates contained more than one tet gene. The in-l-positive isolates were tested for resistance to selected antimicrobial agents and showed resistance to three to nine drugs. Filter-mating experiments showed cotransfer of Tc-r and class I integrons from soil isolates to Escherichia coli...... and/or Pseudomonas putida. We conclude that soil bacteria in close contact to manure or pigsty environment may thus have an important role in horizontal spread of resistance. Use of tetracyclines in food animal production may increase not only Tc-r but also multidrug resistance (caused by the presence...

  7. Pseudomonas folliculitis in Arabian baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ruigomez, Maria

    2013-07-14

    A 35-year-old man presented with a painful cutaneous skin eruption that was localized on the upper trunk. He stated that the previous weekend he had attended an Arabian bath. The physical examination revealed multiple hair follicle-centered papulopustules surrounded by an erythematous halo. A clinical diagnosis of pseudomonas folliculitis was made and treatment was prescribed. Afterwards Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a pustule culture. Pseudomonas folliculitis is a bacterial infection of the hair follicles. The most common reservoirs include facilities with hot water and complex piping systems that are difficult to clean, such as hot tubs and bathtubs. Despite adequate or high chlorine levels, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow within a biofilm.

  8. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  9. Phosphorylcholine Phosphatase: A Peculiar Enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Domenech

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP when grown on choline, betaine, dimethylglycine or carnitine. In the presence of Mg2+ or Zn2+, PchP catalyzes the hydrolysis of p-nitrophenylphosphate (p-NPP or phosphorylcholine (Pcho. The regulation of pchP gene expression is under the control of GbdR and NtrC; dimethylglycine is likely the metabolite directly involved in the induction of PchP. Therefore, the regulation of choline metabolism and consequently PchP synthesis may reflect an adaptive response of P. aeruginosa to environmental conditions. Bioinformatic and biochemistry studies shown that PchP contains two sites for alkylammonium compounds (AACs: one in the catalytic site near the metal ion-phosphoester pocket, and another in an inhibitory site responsible for the binding of the alkylammonium moiety. Both sites could be close to each other and interact through the residues 42E, 43E and 82YYY84. Zn2+ is better activator than Mg2+ at pH 5.0 and it is more effective at alleviating the inhibition produced by the entry of Pcho or different AACs in the inhibitory site. We postulate that Zn2+ induces at pH 5.0 a conformational change in the active center that is communicated to the inhibitory site, producing a compact or closed structure. However, at pH 7.4, this effect is not observed because to the hydrolysis of the [Zn2+L2−1L20(H2O2] complex, which causes a change from octahedral to tetrahedral in the metal coordination geometry. This enzyme is also present in P. fluorescens, P. putida, P. syringae, and other organisms. We have recently crystallized PchP and solved its structure.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa displays an altered phenotype in vitro when grown in the presence of mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J E; Rendall, J C; Downey, D G

    2015-01-01

    D-mannitol has been approved in dry powder formulation as an effective antimucolytic agent in patients with cystic fibrosis. What is not known is the effect of adding a metabolisable sugar on the biology of chronic bacterial pathogens in the CF lung. Therefore, a series of simple in vitro experiments were performed to examine the effect of adding D-mannitol on the phenotype of the CF respiratory pathogens Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Burkholderia cenocepacia. Clinical isolates (n = 86) consisting of P. aeruginosa (n = 51), B. cenocepacia (n = 26), P. putida (n = 4), Stenotrophomonas maltophila (n = 3) and Pseudomonas spp. (n = 2) were examined by supplementing basal nutrient agar with varying concentrations of D-mannitol (0-20% [w/v]) and subsequently examining for any change in microbial phenotype. The effect of supplementation with mannitol was four-fold, namely i) To increase the proliferation and increase in cell density of all CF organisms examined, with an optimal concentration of 2-4% (w/v) D-mannitol. No such increase in cell proliferation was observed when mannitol was substituted with sodium chloride. ii) Enhanced pigment production was observed in 2/51 (3.9%) of the P. aeruginosa isolates examined, in one of the P. putida isolates, and in 3/26 (11.5%) of the B. cenocepacia isolates examined. iii). When examined at 4.0% (w/v) supplementation with mannitol, 11/51 (21.6%) P. aeruginosa isolates and 3/26 (11.5%) B. cenocepacia isolates were seen to exhibit the altered adhesion phenotype. iv). With respect to the altered mucoid phenotype, 5/51 (9.8%) P. aeruginosa produced this phenotype when grown at 4% mannitol. Mucoid production was greatest at 4%, was poor at 10% and absent at 20% (w/v) mannitol. The altered mucoid phenotype was not observed in the B. cenocepacia isolates or any of the other clinical taxa examined. Due consideration therefore needs to be given, where there is altered physiology within the small airways, leading to a potentially altered

  11. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa...

  12. Phylogenomics and systematics in Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGomila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Pseudomonas currently contains 144 species, making it the genus of Gram-negative bacteria that contains the largest number of species. Currently, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA is the preferred method for establishing the phylogeny between species and genera. Four partial gene sequences of housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD were obtained from 112 complete or draft genomes of strains related to the genus Pseudomonas that were available in databases. These genes were analyzed together with the corresponding sequences of 133 Pseudomonas type strains of validly published species to assess their correct phylogenetic assignations. We confirmed that 30% of the sequenced genomes of non-type strains were not correctly assigned at the species level in the accepted taxonomy of the genus and that 20% of the strains were not identified at the species level. Most of these strains had been isolated and classified several years ago, and their taxonomic status has not been updated by modern techniques. MLSA was also compared with indices based on the analysis of whole-genome sequences that have been proposed for species delineation, such as tetranucleotide usage patterns (TETRA, average nucleotide identity (ANIm, based on MUMmer and ANIb, based on BLAST and genome-to-genome distance (GGDC. TETRA was useful for discriminating Pseudomonas from other genera, whereas ANIb and GGDC clearly separated strains of different species. ANIb showed the strongest correlation with MLSA. The correct species classification is a prerequisite for most diversity and evolutionary studies. This work highlights the necessity for complete genomic sequences of type strains to build a phylogenomic taxonomy and that all new genome sequences submitted to databases should be correctly assigned to species to avoid taxonomic inconsistencies.

  13. Role of the novel OprD family of porins in nutrient uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamber, Sandeep; Ochs, Martina M; Hancock, Robert E W

    2006-01-01

    To circumvent the permeability barrier of its outer membrane, Pseudomonas aeruginosa has evolved a series of specific porins. These channels have binding sites for related classes of molecules that facilitate uptake under nutrient-limited conditions. Here, we report on the identification of a 19-member family of porins similar to the basic-amino-acid-specific porin OprD. The members of this family fell into one of two phylogenetically distinct clusters, one bearing high similarity to OprD and the other bearing most similarity to the putative phenylacetic acid uptake porin PhaK of Pseudomonas putida. Analysis of the genome context, operon arrangement, and regulation of the PhaK-like porin OpdK indicated that it might be involved in vanillate uptake. This result was confirmed by demonstrating that an opdK mutant had a deficiency in the ability to grow on vanillate as a carbon source. To extrapolate these data to other paralogues within this family, the substrate specificities of 6 of the 17 remaining OprD homologues were inferred using an approach similar to that used with opdK. The specificities determined were as follows: OpdP, glycine-glutamate; OpdC, histidine; OpdB, proline; OpdT, tyrosine; OpdH, cis-aconitate; and OpdO, pyroglutamate. Thus, members of the OprD subfamily took up amino acids and related molecules, and those characterized members most similar to PhaK were responsible for the uptake of a diverse array of organic acids. These results imply that there is a functional basis for the phylogenetic clustering of these proteins and provide a framework for studying OprD homologues in other organisms.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation by biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas sp. IR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, M. [Unidad de Biotecnologia del Petroleo, Centro de Biotecnologia, Fundacion Inst. de Estudios Avanzados (IDEA), Caracas (Venezuela); Synthesis and Biotics Div., Indian Oil Corp., Research and Development Center, Haryana (India); Leon, V.; Materano, A.D.S.; Ilzins, O.A.; Galindo-Castro, I.; Fuenmayor, S.L. [Unidad de Biotecnologia del Petroleo, Centro de Biotecnologia, Fundacion Inst. de Estudios Avanzados (IDEA), Caracas (Venezuela)

    2006-03-15

    We characterized a newly isolated bacterium, designated as IR1, with respect to its ability to degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and to produce biosurfactants. Isolated IR1 was identified as Pseudomonas putida by analysis of 16S rRNA sequences (99.6% homology). It was capable of utilizing two-, three- and four-ring PAHs but not hexadecane and octadecane as a sole carbon and energy source. PCR and DNA hybridization studies showed that enzymes involved in PAH metabolism were related to the naphthalene dioxygenase pathway. Observation of both tensio-active and emulsifying activities indicated that biosurfactants were produced by IR1 during growth on both water miscible and immiscible substrates. The biosurfactants lowered the surface tension of medium from 54.9 dN cm{sup -1} to 35.4 dN cm{sup -1} and formed a stable and compact emulsion with an emulsifying activity of 74% with diesel oil, when grown on dextrose. These findings indicate that this isolate may be useful for bioremediation of sites contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. (orig.)

  15. Genetically engineered Pseudomonas: a factory of new bioplastics with broad applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivera, E R; Carnicero, D; Jodra, R; Miñambres, B; García, B; Abraham, G A; Gallardo, A; Román, J S; García, J L; Naharro, G; Luengo, J M

    2001-10-01

    New bioplastics containing aromatic or mixtures of aliphatic and aromatic monomers have been obtained using genetically engineered strains of Pseudomonas putida. The mutation (-) or deletion (Delta) of some of the genes involved in the beta-oxidation pathway (fadA(-), fadB(-) Delta fadA or Delta fad BA mutants) elicits a strong intracellular accumulation of unusual homo- or co-polymers that dramatically alter the morphology of these bacteria, as more than 90% of the cytoplasm is occupied by these macromolecules. The introduction of a blockade in the beta-oxidation pathway, or in other related catabolic routes, has allowed the synthesis of polymers other than those accumulated in the wild type (with regard to both monomer size and relative percentage), the accumulation of certain intermediates that are rapidly catabolized in the wild type and the accumulation in the culture broths of end catabolites that, as in the case of phenylacetic acid, phenylbutyric acid, trans-cinnamic acid or their derivatives, have important medical or pharmaceutical applications (antitumoral, analgesic, radiopotentiators, chemopreventive or antihelmintic). Furthermore, using one of these polyesters (poly 3-hydroxy-6-phenylhexanoate), we obtained polymeric microspheres that could be used as drug vehicles.

  16. Characterization of molecular mechanisms controlling fabAB transcription in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert P Schweizer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The FabAB pathway is one of the unsaturated fatty acid (UFA synthesis pathways for Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was previously noted that this operon was upregulated in biofilms and repressed by exogenous UFAs. Deletion of a 30 nt fabA upstream sequence, which is conserved in P. aeruginosa, P. putida, and P. syringae, led to a significant decrease in fabA transcription, suggesting positive regulation by an unknown positive regulatory mechanism. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, genetic and biochemical approaches were employed to identify a potential fabAB activator. Deletion of candidate genes such as PA1611 or PA1627 was performed to determine if any of these gene products act as a fabAB activator. However, none of these genes were involved in the regulation of fabAB transcription. Use of mariner-based random mutagenesis to screen for fabA activator(s showed that several genes encoding unknown functions, rpoN and DesA may be involved in fabA regulation, but probably via indirect mechanisms. Biochemical attempts performed did fail to isolate an activator of fabAB operon. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The data suggest that fabA expression might not be regulated by protein-binding, but by a distinct mechanism such as a regulatory RNA-based mechanism.

  17. Thiamethoxam degradation by Pseudomonas and Bacillus strains isolated from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Shivnam; Jindal, Vikas; Mandal, Kousik; Kaur, Gurpreet; Gupta, V K

    2015-05-01

    Twelve bacterial species were evaluated to know the degradation pattern of thiamethoxam in liquid medium. All the bacterial species could actively degrade phorate in a mineral salt medium containing phorate (50 μg ml(-1)) as sole carbon source. As these species have ability to degrade, we used these for the degradation of thiamethoxam--a neonicoitinoids. Screening of 12 active phorate-metabolizing bacterial species resulted in selection of Bacillus aeromonas strain IMBL 4.1 and Pseudomonas putida strain IMBL 5.2 causing 45.28 and 38.23 % thiamethoxam (50 μg ml(-1)) reduction, respectively, in 15 days as potential thiamethoxam degrading species. These two bacterial species grew optimally at 37 °C under shake culture conditions in MSMT medium raised with initial pH of 6.0-6.5 and use of these optimum cultural conditions resulted in improved thiamethoxam degradation by these bacterial species. These species caused maximum thiamethoxam degradation only in the presence of thiamethoxam as sole source of carbon and energy and the same was reduced in the presence of easily metabolize able carbon (C₀ and C₁) and nitrogen ((N₀, N₁ and N₂) sources. This could be attributed to involvement of repressible metabolic pathways, reactions of which are inhibited by the presence of easily available nutrients for growth. Besides above, qualitative analysis of thiamethoxam residues by gas liquid chromatography revealed complete metabolization of thiamethoxam without detectable accumulation of any known thiamethoxam metabolites.

  18. Pseudomonas-follikulitis efter badning i spabad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of folliculitis. Pseudomonas folliculitis can develop after contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, hot tubs and spa baths. Systemic therapy may be indicated in patients with widespread lesions, systemic symptoms or in immunosuppressed patients....... We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect....

  19. Cell-Surface Displayed Expression of Trehalose Synthase from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 47054 in Pichia Pastoris Using Pir1p as an Anchor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojie Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cell-surface display technologies have been widely applied in the fields of food, medicine, and feed enzyme production, including lipase, α-amylase, and endoglucanase. In this study, a treS gene was fused with the yeast cell-surface anchor protein gene Pir1p by overlap PCR, the Pir1p-treS fusion gene was ligated into pPICZαA and pGAPZαA and transformed into P. pastoris GS115 to obtain recombinant yeast strains that displays trehalose synthase(TreS on its cell surface as an efficient and recyclable whole-cell biocatalyst. Firstly, the enhanced green fluorescence protein gene (egfp was used as the reporter protein to fusion the Pir1p gene and treS gene to construct the recombinant plasmids containing treS-egfg-Pir1p fusion gene, and electrotransformed into P. pastoris GS115 to analyze the surface display characteristics of fusion gene by Western blot, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The analysis shown that the treS-egfg-Pir1p fusion protein can be successfully displayed on the surface of yeast cell, and the expression level increased with the extension of fermentation time. These results implied that the Pir1p-treS fusion gene can be well displayed on the cell surface. Secondly, in order to obtain surface active cells with high enzyme activity, the enzymatic properties of TreS displayed on the cell surface was analyzed, and the fermentation process of recombinant P. patoris GS115 containing pPICZαA-Pir1p-treS and pGAPZαA-Pir1p-treS was studied respectively. The cell surface display TreS was stable over a broad range of temperatures (10–45°C and pH (6.0–8.5. The activity of TreS displayed on cell surface respectively reached 1,108 Ug−1 under PAOX1 control for 150 h, and 1,109 Ug−1 under PGAP control for 75h in a 5 L fermenter, respectively. Lastly, the cell-surface displayed TreS was used to product trehalose using high maltose syrup as substrate at pH 8.0 and 15°C. The surface display TreS cells can be recycled for three times and the weight conversion rate of trehalose was more than 60%. This paper revealed that the TreS can display on the P. pastoris cell surface and still had a higher catalytic activity after recycled three times, which was suitable for industrial application, especially the preparation of pharmaceutical grade trehalose products.

  20. Crystal structures reveal metal-binding plasticity at the metallo-β-lactamase active site of PqqB from Pseudomonas putida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Xiongying; Latham, John A.; Klema, Valerie J.; Evans, Robert L.; Li, Chao; Klinman, Judith P.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2017-08-19

    PqqB is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of pyrroloquinoline quinone and a distal member of the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. PqqB lacks two residues in the conserved signature motif HxHxDH that makes up the key metal-chelating elements that can bind up to two metal ions at the active site of MBLs and other members of its superfamily. Here, we report crystal structures of PqqB bound to Mn2+, Mg2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+. These structures demonstrate that PqqB can still bind metal ions at the canonical MBL active site. The fact that PqqB can adapt its side chains to chelate a wide spectrum of metal ions with different coordination features on a uniform main chain scaffold demonstrates its metal-binding plasticity. This plasticity may provide insights into the structural basis of promiscuous activities found in ensembles of metal complexes within this superfamily. Furthermore, PqqB belongs to a small subclass of MBLs that contain an additional CxCxxC motif that binds a structural Zn2+. Our data support a key role for this motif in dimerization.

  1. Improving the prediction of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 growth kinetics with the use of a gene expression regulation model of the TOL plasmid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutinas, M.; Kiparissides, A.; Lam, M.C.; Silva-Rocha, R.; Lorenzo, de V.; Godinho, M.; Martins Dos Santos, V.A.P.; Pistikopoulos, E.N.; Mantalaris, A.

    2011-01-01

    The molecular and genetic events responsible for the growth kinetics of a microorganism can be extensively influenced by the presence of mixtures of substrates leading to unusual growth patterns, which cannot be accurately predicted by mathematical models developed using analogies to enzyme

  2. Synthesis of Diblock copolymer poly-3-hydroxybutyrate -block-poly-3-hydroxyhexanoate [PHB-b-PHHx] by a β-oxidation weakened Pseudomonas putida KT2442

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tripathi, Lakshmi; Wu, Lin-Ping; Chen, Jinchun

    2012-01-01

    ), thermo- and mechanical analysis. NMR confirmed the existence of diblock copolymers consisting of 58 mol% PHB as the short chain length block with 42 mol% PHHx as the medium chain length block. The block copolymers had two glass transition temperatures (Tg) at 2.7°C and -16.4°C, one melting temperature...... (Tm) at 172.1°C and one cool crystallization temperature (Tc) at 69.1°C as revealed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), respectively. This is the first microbial short-chain-length (scl) and medium-chain-length (mcl) PHA block copolymer reported. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to produce PHA......BACKGROUND: Block polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) were reported to be resistant against polymer aging that negatively affects polymer properties. Recently, more and more attempts have been directed to make PHA block copolymers. Diblock copolymers PHB-b-PHHx consisting of poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB...

  3. Petroleum-hydrocarbons biodegradation by Pseudomonas strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. In this study, two bacterial strains were isolated from a contaminated soil of a refinery of Arzew (Oran). The isolated strains were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P3) and Pseudomonas fluoresens (P4).

  4. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as. Pseudomonas ... Key words: Alkaline protease, casein agar, meat waste contaminated soil, Pseudomonas fluorescens. INTRODUCTION ... advent of new frontiers in biotechnology, the spectrum of protease ...

  5. [Pseudomonas genus bacteria on weeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdiak, R I; Iakovleva, L M; Pasichnik, L A; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown in the work that the weeds (couch-grass and ryegrass) may be affected by bacterial diseases in natural conditions, Pseudomonas genus bacteria being their agents. The isolated bacteria are highly-aggressive in respect of the host-plant and a wide range of cultivated plants: wheat, rye, oats, barley, apple-tree and pear-tree. In contrast to highly aggressive bacteria isolated from the affected weeds, bacteria-epi phytes isolated from formally healthy plants (common amaranth, orache, flat-leaved spurge, field sow thistle, matricary, common coltsfoot, narrow-leaved vetch) and identified as P. syringae pv. coronafaciens, were characterized by weak aggression. A wide range of ecological niches of bacteria evidently promote their revival and distribution everywhere in nature.

  6. Pseudomonas induces salinity tolerance in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) and resistance to Fusarium root rot through the modulation of indole-3-acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egamberdieva, Dilfuza; Jabborova, Dilfuza; Hashem, Abeer

    2015-11-01

    Abiotic stresses cause changes in the balance of phytohormones in plants and result in inhibited root growth and an increase in the susceptibility of plants to root rot disease. The aim of this work was to ascertain whether microbial indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) plays a role in the regulation of root growth and microbially mediated control of root rot of cotton caused by Fusarium solani. Seed germination and seedling growth were improved by both NaCl and Mg2SO4 (100 mM) solutions when treated with root-associated bacterial strains Pseudomonas putida R4 and Pseudomonas chlororaphis R5, which are able to produce IAA. These bacterial strains were also able to reduce the infection rate of cotton root rot (from 70 to 39%) caused by F. solani under gnotobiotic conditions. The application of a low concentration of IAA (0.01 and 0.001 μg/ml) stimulated plant growth and reduced disease incidence caused by F. solani (from 70 to 41-56%, respectively). Shoot and root growth and dry matter increased significantly and disease incidence was reduced by bacterial inoculants in natural saline soil. These results suggest that bacterial IAA plays a major role in salt stress tolerance and may be involved in induced resistance against root rot disease of cotton.

  7. Multilocus sequence typing of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple drug resistance with increasing frequency, especially to carbapenems making patient treatment difficult. Carbapenem-resistance may be caused by porin gene mutations, active drug efflux, and carbapenemase production.

  8. Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genome Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalai Mathee; Giri Narasimhan; Camilo Valdes; Xiaoyun Qiu; Jody M. Matewish; Michael Koehrsen; Antonis Rokas; Chandri N. Yandava; Reinhard Engels; Erliang Zeng; Raquel Olavarietta; Melissa Doud; Roger S. Smith; Philip Montgomery; Jared R. White; Paul A. Godfrey; Chinnappa Kodira; Bruce Birren; James E. Galagan; Stephen Lory

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to thrive in diverse environments that includes humans with a variety of debilitating diseases or immune deficiencies...

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: resistance to the max

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism...

  10. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an obligate aerobic, motile, gram negative bacillus.which is able to grow and survive in almost any environment and resistant to temperature extremes. It is involved in the etiology of several diseases i.

  12. Regulation of synthesis of key naphthalene catabolism enzymes in Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas fluorescens carrying biodegradation plasmids NAH, pBS3, pBS2 and NPL-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starovoytov, I.I.

    A study was made of the regulation of catabolism of naphthalene in pseudomonada containing several biodegradation plasmids. Bacteria were grown on a minimal medium. Induction experiments were performed on a circular rocking device in 750 ml flasks containing 100 ml of medium. Salicylic acid is found to induce key naphthalene catabolism enzymes controlled by the NAH plasmid. Of the key enzymes controlled by NAH plasmid, the synthesis of naphthalene oxygen as salicylate hydroxylase is regulated in a coordinated manner, indicating that these enzymes are included in a single regulatory unit. The presence of proportionality in changes in specific activities of salicylate dehydroxylase and KO2, 3 with induction by salicylate, anthranylate and 3-methylsalicylate indicate that the synthesis of these enzymes is regulated in coordination. The differences in coordination of regulation of the synthesis of naphthalene catabolism enzymes in microorganisms belonging to the same genus and even species probably reflects an independent evolution of the genetic material. The genetic environment of the host cell probably also influences expression of the plasmids. 15 references, 5 figures.

  13. Effects of some organic pollutants on the exopolysaccharides (EPSs) produced by some Pseudomonas spp. strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onbasli, Dilsad, E-mail: donbasili@kastamonu.edu.tr [Kastamonu University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Biology, 37100 Kastamonu (Turkey); Aslim, Belma [Gazi University, Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Biology, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2009-08-30

    In this study, isolation and characterization of exopolysaccharides produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa B1, P. fluorescens B5, P. stutzeri B11 and P. putida B15 which had been seen to produce exopolymers of potential interest in biotechnological applications were examined. To initiate the observation of the organic pollutants-polymer interactions, the yield and properties of their extracellular polysaccharide were researched. The exopolysaccharide production by these strains during growth in nutrient broth medium (control) was 41-75 mg L{sup -1}. Also, P. aeruginosa B1, P. fluorescens B5, P. stutzeri B11 and P. putida B15 had exhibited high production of EPSs in presence of various organic pollutants (2,4-D, benzene, BTX and gasoline, respectively) in mineral salt medium (MSM) as a sole carbon source. EPS production by the 4 strains ranged from 40 mg L{sup -1} to 8 mg L{sup -1}. Monosaccharide composition of EPS produced by these cultures were analyzed by HPLC. Results indicated that EPSs of strains contained neutral sugars and acetylated amino sugars. The neutral sugars in the EPS were mainly composed of glucose, arabinose, glycerol, ribose. The presence of galactronic acid, N-acetyl-D-galactosamin and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine indicated the acidic nature of the polysaccharide. Glycerol was the basic structural unit of EPS produced by the strains except P. stutzeri B11 (MSM with 1% BTX). Strain B1 (in NB medium) was found to be composed of neutral sugars (100%) while strain B1 [in MSM medium with 0.2% (v/v) 2.4-D] contained neutral sugars (70.0%), acetylated amino sugars (30.0%). Also, EPS content of strain B5 (in the NB medium) was neutral sugars (99.8%), acetylated amino sugars (0.2%) while the strain B5 [in MSM medium containing the 1% (v/v) benzene] was found to contain neutral sugars (99.9%), acetylated amino sugars (0.1%). However, EPS monomer composition by strain B11 was detected as neutral sugars (99.77%), acetylated amino sugars (0.23%) in NB medium while

  14. Influencia de la concentración salina y la temperatura en la composición de ácidos grasos de membrana de Pseudomonas fluorescens GNP-OHP-3 Influence of salinity and temperature on fatty acid composition of Pseudomonas fluorescens GNP-OHP-3 membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Pucci

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Las bacterias responden a los cambios ambientales modificando su composición, para evitar el daño que dichos cambios podrían ejercer. Una de las modificaciones más importantes es la variación de la composición de los ácidos grasos de las membranas celulares, que le permite mantener la homeoviscosidad ante situaciones de estrés. Trabajos previos han estudiado la acción de la temperatura, presión hidrostática y diferentes solventes sobre cepas de Pseudomonas putida. En este trabajo se estudió la acción conjunta de la temperatura y la salinidad sobre la composición de ácidos grasos de membranas celulares de Pseudomonas fluorescens GNP-OHP-3, una cepa bacteriana aislada de un hábitat contaminado con petróleo. Pseudomonas fluorescens GNP-OHP-3 respondió a las variaciones de temperatura modificando los ácidos grasos de sus membranas de manera similar a lo descripto en otros integrantes de su género: ante el aumento de temperatura se observó un incremento de ácidos grasos saturados y una disminución de los ácidos grasos insaturados. En el rango de concentraciones salinas ensayadas las variaciones de los ácidos grasos mayoritarios fueron en general erráticas. La respuesta de los ácidos grasos ciclo propano pudo expresarse con ecuaciones matemáticas que permitieron predecir el porcentaje de estos ácidos en relación a la concentración de cloruro de sodio.The bacteria respond to environmental changes modifying their composition. One of the most important modifications is the variation on fatty acid composition of cellular membranes to maintain the homeoviscosity. The action of temperature, hydrostatic pressure and solvents on Pseudomonas putida has been thoroughly studied. In this paper, the combined action of the temperature and salinity on fatty acid composition of cellular membranes of Pseudomonas fluorescens GNP-OHP-3, a bacterial strain isolated from a petroleum contaminated habitat, was studied. The modifications in the

  15. Active Immunization with Lipopolysaccharide Pseudomonas Antigen for Chronic Pseudomonas Bronchopneumonia in Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, James E.; Hickey, William F.; Blackwood, Linda L.; Arnaut, M. Amin

    1981-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading clinical problem among patients with cystic fibrosis. Because antimicrobial agents are usually ineffective in eradicating these infections, additional therapeutic or prophylactic measures should be considered. In this study, an experimental guinea pig model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bronchopneumonia was utilized to determine whether active immunization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) P. aeruginosa antigen may favorab...

  16. Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus HD100 guards against Pseudomonas tolaasii brown-blotch lesions on the surface of post-harvest Agaricus bisporus supermarket mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, Emma B; Jackson, Robert W; Bhumbra, Shobita; Smith, Tim; Sockett, R Elizabeth

    2014-06-20

    Pseudomonas tolaasii is a problematic pathogen of cultured mushrooms, forming dark brown 'blotches' on mushroom surfaces and causing spoilage during crop growth and post-harvest . Treating P. tolaasii infection is difficult, as other, commensal bacterial species such as Pseudomonas putida are necessary for mushroom growth, so treatments must be relatively specific. We have found that P. tolaasii is susceptible to predation in vitro by the δ-proteobacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus. This effect also occurred in funga, where B. bacteriovorus was administered to post-harvest mushroom caps before and after administration of the P. tolaasii pathogen. A significant, visible improvement in blotch appearance, after incubation, was observed on administration of Bdellovibrio. A significant reduction in viable P. tolaasii cell numbers, recovered from the mushroom tissue, was detected. This was accompanied by a more marked reduction in blotch severity on Bdellovibrio administration. We found that there was in some cases an accompanying overgrowth of presumed-commensal, non-Pseudomonas bacteria on post-harvest mushroom caps after Bdellovibrio-treatment. These bacteria were identified (by 16SrRNA gene sequencing) as Enterobacter species, which were seemingly resistant to predation. We visualised predatory interactions occuring between B. bacteriovorus and P. tolaasii on the post-harvest mushroom cap surface by Scanning Electron Microscopy, seeing predatory invasion of P. tolaasii by B. bacteriovorus in funga. This anti-P. tolaasii effect worked well in post-harvest supermarket mushrooms, thus Bdellovibrio was not affected by any pre-treatment of mushrooms for commercial/consumer purposes. The soil-dwelling B. bacteriovorus HD100 preys upon and kills P. tolaasii, on mushroom surfaces, and could therefore be applied to prevent spoilage in post-harvest situations where mushrooms are stored and packaged for sale.

  17. The N-Acetylmuramic Acid 6-Phosphate Phosphatase MupP Completes the Pseudomonas Peptidoglycan Recycling Pathway Leading to Intrinsic Fosfomycin Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Borisova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cells are encased in and stabilized by a netlike peptidoglycan (PGN cell wall that undergoes turnover during bacterial growth. PGN turnover fragments are frequently salvaged by the cells via a pathway referred to as PGN recycling. Two different routes for the recycling of the cell wall sugar N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc have been recognized in bacteria. In Escherichia coli and related enterobacteria, as well as in most Gram-positive bacteria, MurNAc is recovered via a catabolic route requiring a MurNAc 6-phosphate etherase (MurQ in E. coli enzyme. However, many Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas species, lack a MurQ ortholog and use an alternative, anabolic recycling route that bypasses the de novo biosynthesis of uridyldiphosphate (UDP-MurNAc, the first committed precursor of PGN. Bacteria featuring the latter pathway become intrinsically resistant to the antibiotic fosfomycin, which targets the de novo biosynthesis of UDP-MurNAc. We report here the identification and characterization of a phosphatase enzyme, named MupP, that had been predicted to complete the anabolic recycling pathway of Pseudomonas species but has remained unknown so far. It belongs to the large haloacid dehalogenase family of phosphatases and specifically converts MurNAc 6-phosphate to MurNAc. A ΔmupP mutant of Pseudomonas putida was highly susceptible to fosfomycin, accumulated large amounts of MurNAc 6-phosphate, and showed lower levels of UDP-MurNAc than wild-type cells, altogether consistent with a role for MupP in the anabolic PGN recycling route and as a determinant of intrinsic resistance to fosfomycin.

  18. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  19. Antimicrobial activity of gallic acid against food-related Pseudomonas strains and its use as biocontrol tool to improve the shelf life of fresh black truffles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Elena; Succi, Mariantonietta; Tipaldi, Luca; Pannella, Gianfranco; Maiuro, Lucia; Sturchio, Marina; Coppola, Raffaele; Tremonte, Patrizio

    2018-02-02

    Refrigeration alone or in combination with other technologies represents the main tool used in the last decades to preserve the freshness of black truffles. This is principally due to the delicateness and vulnerability of this edible hypogeous fungus, so that other invasive preservation practices cannot be adopted. However, the proliferation of some microbial species during the cold storage still represents an unsolved problem. Pseudomonads are among the main spoiler bacteria responsible for the deterioration of refrigerated black truffles. Their growth ability at low temperatures requires the use of additional hurdles to prolong the shelf-life of truffles without altering their major features. The use of natural compounds may represent an alternative system for the biocontrol of this kind of product. Specifically, gallic acid (GA) is a phenolic acid naturally present in different foods, whose effectiveness was in vitro demonstrated against Pseudomonas spp. In our study, we reported the antimicrobial activity expressed by GA not only in vitro, using as target bacteria Pseudomonas putida DSMZ 291 T , P. fluorescens DSMZ 50090 T , P. fragi DSMZ 3456 T and Pseudomonas spp. P30-4, previously isolated from black truffles, but also in situ on fresh black truffles stored at 4°C for 28days. Our results showed Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MIC) of 2.5mg/mL GA for all tested strains, except for P. fluorescens DSMZ 50090 T , having a MIC corresponding to 5mg/mL GA. The Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) was 10mg/mL for all strains. The analysis of kinetic parameters showed that the survival declined passing from 2.5 to 10mg/mL GA concentrations, with P. fluorescens confirmed to be the most resistant strain. Moreover, images obtained from Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed that Pseudomonas cells were strongly injured by the treatment with GA at 2.5mg/mL concentration, displaying visible pores on the cellular surfaces, absence of flagella and lysis with loss of

  20. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  1. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... genus Pseudomonas. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, and has been..., abscesses, and meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes). Pseudomonas pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a chronic pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the...

  2. Antibiotic resistant Pseudomonas spp. in the aquatic environment: A prevalence study under tropical and temperate climate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Naresh; Köhler, Thilo; Sivalingam, Periyasamy; van Delden, Christian; Mulaji, Crispin K; Mpiana, Pius T; Ibelings, Bastiaan W; Poté, John

    2017-05-15

    Microbial populations which are resistant to antibiotics are an emerging environmental concern with potentially serious implications for public health. Thus, there is a growing concern in exploring the occurrence of antibiotic resistance in the environment with no limitations to the factors that contribute to their emergence. The aquatic environment is considered to be a hot-spot for the acquisition and spread of antibiotic resistance due to pollution with emerging contaminants derived from anthropogenic activities. In this study, we report on the isolation and characterization of 141 Pseudomonas spp. from aquatic sediments receiving partially (un)treated hospital and communal effluents from three distinct geographical locations: Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), India (IN), and Switzerland (CH). P. putida (42%) and P. aeruginosa (39%) were the dominant Pseudomonas species. The highest frequency of antibiotic resistance against eight anti-pseudomonas agents was found among IN isolates (35-60%), followed by DRC (18-50%) and CH (12-54%). CTX-M was the most frequent β-lactamase found in CH (47% of isolates), while VIM-1 was dominant in isolates from DRC (61%) and IN (29%). NDM-1 was found in 29% of the total IN isolates and surprisingly also in 6% of CH isolates. Chromosomally-encoded efflux mechanisms were overexpressed in P. aeruginosa isolates from all three geographic locations. In vitro conjugative transfers of antibiotic resistance plasmids occurred more frequently under tropical temperatures (30 and 37 °C) than under temperate conditions (10 °C). The presence of Extended Spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and Metallo β-lactamases (MBLs) in the isolates from environmental samples has important implications for humans who depend on public water supply and sanitation facilities. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate a comparison between treated/untreated effluents from urban and hospital settings as a source of microbial resistance

  3. Plant growth promotion by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative rod shaped bacterium that has a versatile metabolism and is widely spread in soil and water. P. fluorescens strain SBW25 (Pf.SBW25) is a well-known model strain to study bacterial evolution, plant colonization and biocontrol of plant diseases. It produces

  4. Antibiograms of Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While there was no bacterial growth after 48hrs incubation recorded for group one, only 5(13.9%) samples yielded growth of Staphylococcus aureus for group two with 31(86.1%) yielding no bacterial growth. All group three samples yielded profuse growth of which 11(36.7%) yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

  5. Transesterification of Jatropha oil using immobilized Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mild transesterification has become of much current interest for alternative fuel production. In the present study the ability of a commercial immobilized Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC 103 to catalyze the transesterification of Jatropha oil and methanol was investigated. The cell of P. fluorescens was easily immobilized ...

  6. Behavioral response of resistant and sensitive Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... Key words: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cadmium stress, heavy metal resistance. INTRODUCTION. The release of .... plasmids located in the bacterial strains isolated from agricultural and industrial soils ..... esteraromaticum S51 with other strains of non-flocculating sludge bacteria. IWA's Water Environ.

  7. Evaluation of gamma irradiation effect and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens and influence of gamma irradiation on the development of Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of postharvest disease on apple fruit was studied. P. fluorescens was originally isolated from rhizosphere of the apple trees. Suspension of P. fluorescens and P. expansum ...

  8. Bacteriocinogenicity and production of pyocins from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptible organisms include Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Klebsiella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Proteus spp. and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The results of this study have provided evidence for broadspectrum antibacterial activity of pyocins elicited by Pseudomonas species from Nigeria ...

  9. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... indicates its potential application in biological treatment of wastewaters contaminated with arsenic. Key words: Arsenic, wastewater, Pseudomonas lubricans, bioremediation. INTRODUCTION. Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic metal and is first on the superfund list of hazardous substances.

  10. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wounds of patients attending Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria-Nigeria. One hundred Isolates were characterized and identified from the specimens using standard ...

  11. Characterization of drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the fact that they remain asymptomatic in many cases, they nevertheless play significant roles in the epidemiology of these pathogens through their dissemination to the public, sometimes through the food chain. Four multidrug resistant Gram negative pathogens including: 2 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 2 Proteus ...

  12. Growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Cassava Starch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This involved hydrolysis of starch extracted from freshly harvested cassava tubers using enzyme-enzyme method of hydrolysis, followed by aerobic fermentation of Pseudomonas fluorescens on a mixture of the hydrolysate and nutrient media in a fermentor in batch cultures. The reducing sugar hydrolysate served as the ...

  13. Characterization of rhodanese produced by Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic remediation of polluted environment presents advantages over traditional technologies and also over microbial remediation. Extracellular rhodanese of strains of Pseudomonas aerugionosa and Bacillus brevis isolated from soil of cassava processing site were studied. Biochemical characteristics of the purified ...

  14. Production and characterization of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this present study, biosurfactant-producing microorganisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBSC1, was isolated from mangrove ecosystem in Pichavaram (Boat house), Tamil Nadu, India. The biosurfactant production was done using a minimal salt medium (MSM) with crude oil as the hydrocarbon. The microbial growths ...

  15. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximum protease production was carried out. The culture conditions like inoculum concentration, incubation time, pH, temperature, carbon sources, ...

  16. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hot Tub Rash > Remove swimsuits and shower with soap after getting out of the water. > Clean swimsuits after getting out of the water. ... in locations that have been closed because of pollution. Pseudomonas can multiply quickly when water disinfectant levels drop, so testing your pool or ...

  17. Occurrence of Fusarium Oxysporum and Ralstonia (Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microflora associated with the root-surface of five tomato cultivars commonly cultivated in Edo State Nigeria, was investigated by inoculating serially washed 5 mm tomato root segments on potato dextrose agar (PDA) incubated at room temperature (28-30oC). Fusarium oxysporum and Ralstonia (pseudomonas) ...

  18. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  19. Biodegradation Of 4-Chlorobiphenyl By Pseudomonas synxantha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanjal Noorpreet Inder Kaur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The stabilization and disposal of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs from soil environment and wetland areas is of great concern for health and safety. Wetland remediation with microorganisms is an approach for treating PCBs. A bacterial strain was isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil of Ropar, Punjab, able to degrade PCBs under aerobic conditions. The percentage of degradation with 100 mM/ml of 4-chlorobiphenyl was up to 90%. Degradation was monitored by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometrically, showing that 4-chlorobiphenyl was degraded almost completely. The bacterial strain was identified as Pseudomonas synxantha by 16sRNA sequencing method. This is the first report of 4-chlorobiphenyl degradation by Pseudomonas synxantha.

  20. Pseudomonas spp. convert metmyoglobin into deoxymyoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Michiyo; Kobayashi, Miho; Sasaki, Keisuke; Nomura, Masaru; Mitsumoto, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    Meat 'reddening' by bacteria was observed in chilled beef. To identify the reddening bacteria, isolates were inoculated onto beef and the changes in CIE L*a*b* values monitored. As a result, two Pseudomonas spp., including Pseudomonas fragi which is commonly observed in raw meat, were selected and identified as reddening bacteria. The reddening was coincidentally occurred with the appearance of slime, and the increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) was simultaneously suppressed. In myoglobin-containing nutrient broth, it is shown spectroscopically that P. fragi converted metmyoglobin into deoxymyoglobin. It was concluded that the meat reddening was due to the formation of deoxymyoglobin, induced by the very-low-oxygen tension brought about by Pseudomonad's oxygen consumption: This oxygen depletion simultaneously suppressed TBARS increase.

  1. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared...... the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  2. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Kristoffer; Oguiza, J.A.; Ussery, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF s...... sigma factor that is an interesting target for future studies because of its potential role in the adaptation of P. syringae to its specialized phytopathogenic lifestyle....

  3. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas lubricans, isolated from heavy metal laden industrial wastewater, has been shown to tolerate multiple heavy metals suggesting its importance in bioremediation of industrial effluents. P. lubricans tolerated As(III) up to 3 mg ml-1, Cu2+ up to 0.7 mg ml-1, Hg2+ up to 0.4 mg ml-1, Ni2+ up to 0.4 mg ...

  4. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I; Valencia, R; Torres, M J; Cantos, A; Conde, M; Aznar, J

    2006-11-01

    We describe an outbreak of nosocomial endophthalmitis due to a common source, which was determined to be trypan blue solution prepared in the hospital's pharmacy service. We assume that viable bacteria probably gained access to the trypan blue stock solution during cooling after autoclaving. The temporal cluster of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis was readily perceived on the basis of clinical and microbiological findings, and an exogenous source of contamination was unequivocally identified by means of DNA fingerprinting.

  5. Analysis of plant growth-promoting effects of fluorescent Pseudomonas strains isolated from Mentha piperita rhizosphere and effects of their volatile organic compounds on essential oil composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricel Valeria Santoro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Many species or strains of the genus Pseudomonas have been characterized as plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR. We used a combination of phenotypic and genotypic techniques to analyze the community of fluorescent Pseudomonas strains in the rhizosphere of commercially grown Mentha piperita (peppermint. Biochemical techniques, Amplified rDNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the majority of the isolated native fluorescent strains were P. putida. Use of two Repetitive Sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR techniques, BOX-PCR and ERIC-PCR, allowed us to evaluate diversity among the native strains and to more effectively distinguish among them. PGPR activity was tested for the native strains and reference strain P. fluorescens WCS417r. Micropropagated M. piperita plantlets were exposed to microbial volatile organic compounds (mVOCs emitted by the bacterial strains, and plant biomass parameters and production of essential oils (EOs were measured. mVOCs from 11 of the native strains caused an increase in shoot fresh weight. mVOCs from three native strains (SJ04, SJ25,SJ48 induced changes in M. pierita EO composition. The mVOCs caused a reduction of metabolites in the monoterpene pathway, for example menthofuran, and an increase in menthol production. Menthol production is the primary indicator of EO quality. The mVOCs produced by native strains SJ04, SJ25,SJ48 and strain WCS417r were analyzed. The obtained mVOC chromatographic profiles were unique for each of the three native strains analyzed, containing varying hydrocarbon, aromatic, and alogenic compounds. The differential effects of the strains were most likely due to the specific mixtures of mVOCs emitted by each strain, suggesting a synergistic effect occurs among the compounds present.

  6. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martínez-Granero

    Full Text Available Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC and one phosphodiesterase (BifA implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  7. The effect of pseudomonas exotoxin A on cytokine production in whole blood exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M. J.; Speelman, P.; Zaat, S. A.; Hack, C. E.; van Deventer, S. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (P-ExA) on cytokine production, we studied cytokine release induced by heat-killed P. aeruginosa (HKPA) in human whole blood in the presence or absence of P-ExA. P-ExA (0.01-1 microgram ml(-1)) caused a dose-dependent decrease in

  8. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... of oxygen limitation in the biofilm. Oxygen microelectrode measurements showed that oxygen only penetrated approximately 50 mum into the biofilm. P. aeruginosa was incapable of anaerobic growth in the medium used for this investigation. These results show that while mature P. aeruginosa biofilms contain...

  9. Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov., a halophilic member of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahinpei, Azadeh; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Seyedmahdi, Shima Sadat; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated GBPy5(T), was isolated from aquatic plants of the Gomishan wetland, Iran. Cells of strain GBPy5(T) were motile. Growth occurred with between 1 and 10% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0 and a temperature range of 4-35 °C. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain GBPy5(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas forming a monophyletic branch. The novel strain exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.4% with type strains of Pseudomonas guariconensis PCAVU11(T) and Pseudomonas sabulinigri J64(T), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C18:1ω7c (37.8%), C16:0 (14.9%), C16:1ω7c (12.9%), C12:0 3-OH (7.1%) and C12:0 (7.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain GBPy5(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain GBPy5(T) was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain GBPY5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GBPy5(T) ( = IBRC-M 10762(T) = CECT 8338(T)). IUMS.

  10. Antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas and its impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  11. Genetic detection of Pseudomonas spp. in commercial Amazonian fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardura, Alba; Linde, Ana R; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2013-08-29

    Brazilian freshwater fish caught from large drainages like the River Amazon represent a million ton market in expansion, which is of enormous importance for export to other continents as exotic seafood. A guarantee of bacteriological safety is required for international exports that comprise a set of different bacteria but not any Pseudomonas. However, diarrhoea, infections and even septicaemia caused by some Pseudomonas species have been reported, especially in immune-depressed patients. In this work we have employed PCR-based methodology for identifying Pseudomonas species in commercial fish caught from two different areas within the Amazon basin. Most fish caught from the downstream tributary River Tapajòs were contaminated by five different Pseudomonas species. All fish samples obtained from the River Negro tributary (Manaus markets) contained Pseudomonas, but a less diverse community with only two species. The most dangerous Pseudomonas species for human health, P. aeruginosa, was not found and consumption of these fish (from their Pseudomonas content) can be considered safe for healthy consumers. As a precautionary approach we suggest considering Pseudomonas in routine bacteriological surveys of imported seafood.

  12. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa’s...

  13. Interleukin-18 impairs the pulmonary host response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marc J.; Knapp, Sylvia; Florquin, Sandrine; Pater, Jennie; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a potent cytokine with many different proinflammatory activities. To study the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas pneumonia, IL-18-deficient (IL-18(-/-)) and wild-type mice were intranasally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-18 deficiency was

  14. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot disease of black

  15. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and

  16. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...... between cystic fibrosis patients has occurred....

  17. Energetics of binary mixed culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioenergetic analysis of the growth of the binary mixed culture (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescence) on phenol chemostat culture was carried out. The data were checked for consistency using carbon and available electron balances. When more than the minimum number of variables are measured, ...

  18. Energetics of binary mixed culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... Bioenergetic analysis of the growth of the binary mixed culture (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and. Pseudomonas fluorescence) on ... biological system is widely gaining recognition (Yang et al., 1984; Solomon et al., .... Thus, by application of the covariate adjustment technique. (Solomon et al., 1985, 1994) in ...

  19. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  20. 33 original article infections a pseudomonas aeruginosa dans un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    institution of effective resistance surveillance and infection control measures. . Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, National Hospital Abuja, Susceptibility. INFECTIONS A PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA DANS UN HOPITAL TERTIAIRE. AU NIGERIA. *Iregbu KC, Eze SO,. Département de Microbiologie Médicale and ...

  1. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  2. Contribution of the distal pocket residue to the acyl-chain-length specificity of (R)-specific enoyl-coenzyme A hydratases from Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuge, Takeharu; Sato, Shun; Hiroe, Ayaka; Ishizuka, Koya; Kanazawa, Hiromi; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Hisano, Tamao

    2015-12-01

    (R)-Specific enoyl-coenzyme A (enoyl-CoA) hydratases (PhaJs) are capable of supplying monomers from fatty acid β-oxidation to polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) biosynthesis. PhaJ1Pp from Pseudomonas putida showed broader substrate specificity than did PhaJ1Pa from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, despite sharing 67% amino acid sequence identity. In this study, the substrate specificity characteristics of two Pseudomonas PhaJ1 enzymes were investigated by site-directed mutagenesis, chimeragenesis, X-ray crystallographic analysis, and homology modeling. In PhaJ1Pp, the replacement of valine with isoleucine at position 72 resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-coenzyme A (CoA) elements with shorter chain lengths. Conversely, at the same position in PhaJ1Pa, the replacement of isoleucine with valine resulted in an increased preference for enoyl-CoAs with longer chain lengths. These changes suggest a narrowing and broadening in the substrate specificity range of the PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa mutants, respectively. However, the substrate specificity remains broader in PhaJ1Pp than in PhaJ1Pa. Additionally, three chimeric PhaJ1 enzymes, composed from PhaJ1Pp and PhaJ1Pa, all showed significant hydratase activity, and their substrate preferences were within the range exhibited by the parental PhaJ1 enzymes. The crystal structure of PhaJ1Pa was determined at a resolution of 1.7 Å, and subsequent homology modeling of PhaJ1Pp revealed that in the acyl-chain binding pocket, the amino acid at position 72 was the only difference between the two structures. These results indicate that the chain-length specificity of PhaJ1 is determined mainly by the bulkiness of the amino acid residue at position 72, but that other factors, such as structural fluctuations, also affect specificity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Pseudomonas spp.: contamination sources in bulk tanks of dairy farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M.C. Vidal

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study focused on isolating Pseudomonas spp. during milking process in ten dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking systems during dry and rainy seasons, and evaluating DNA homology and patterns of distribution between isolates, in order to identify main sources of milk contamination by Pseudomonas spp. A total of 167 isolates of Pseudomonas spp. were obtained from water, milkers’ hands, cows’ teats, teat cups, cooling tanks and raw milk. Bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. genus were isolated from 85 and 82 sampling points in dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking system, respectively. A significant difference (p=0.02 on Pseudomonas spp. isolation was observed among samples of surface of cows’ teats before and after pre-dipping, but no significant difference (p>0.05 was observed among milking systems or seasons. The possibility of the same Pseudomonas spp. patterns are distributed in different farms and seasons using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP technique was demonstrated. Milkers’ hands, surface of cows’ teats, teat cups and cooling tanks were associated with raw milk contamination with Pseudomonas spp. on farms with manual and mechanical milking system, showing that regardless of the type of milking system and season, proper hygiene procedures of equipment, utensils and workers’ hands are essential to avoid contamination of the milk and, therefore, improve milk quality.

  4. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is a......BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  5. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willcox MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mark DP WillcoxSchool of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms "Pseudomonas" + "Keratitis" limit to "2007–2012", and ["Ulcerative" or "Microbial"] + "Keratitis" + "Contact lenses" limit to "2007–2012". These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin. In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95% were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%.Keywords: Pseudomonas, keratitis, contact lens

  6. The pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS balances life and death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Häussler

    Full Text Available When environmental conditions deteriorate and become inhospitable, generic survival strategies for populations of bacteria may be to enter a dormant state that slows down metabolism, to develop a general tolerance to hostile parameters that characterize the habitat, and to impose a regime to eliminate damaged members. Here, we provide evidence that the pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS mediates induction of all of these phenotypes. For individual cells, PQS, an interbacterial signaling molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has both deleterious and beneficial activities: on the one hand, it acts as a pro-oxidant and sensitizes the bacteria towards oxidative and other stresses and, on the other, it efficiently induces a protective anti-oxidative stress response. We propose that this dual function fragments populations into less and more stress tolerant members which respond differentially to developing stresses in deteriorating habitats. This suggests that a little poison may be generically beneficial to populations, in promoting survival of the fittest, and in contributing to bacterial multi-cellular behavior. It further identifies PQS as an essential mediator of the shaping of the population structure of Pseudomonas and of its response to and survival in hostile environmental conditions.

  7. Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers associated with contaminated eye mascaras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L A; Ahearn, D G

    1977-07-01

    Seven Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers were associated with the use of four brands of mascara contaminated with P. aeruginosa. In laboratory studies, preservative systems of three of the four brands were inadequate in comparison with a control mascara of known antimicrobial activity. If the corneal epithelium is scratched during the application of mascara, particularly if the applicator is old, the cornea should be treated immediately and the mascara cultured to detect Pseudomonas. The high incidence of recurrent corneal ulceration in cases of Pseudomonas-induced keratitis indicates that initial chemotherapy should be intensive and maintained until the lesion stabilizes.

  8. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... systems involved in the process known as quorum sensing regulate coordinated expression of virulence with immune shielding mechanisms and antibiotic resistance. For two decades, the potential of interference with quorum sensing by small chemical compounds has been investigated with the aim of developing...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  9. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  10. Rhamnolipid Biosurfactants Produced by Pseudomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Kaskatepe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Surfactants are chemical products widely used in our daily life in toothpaste and other personal hygiene and cosmetic products, and in several industries. Biosurfactants are surfactants of biological origin that can be produced by microorganisms and have many advantages, such as low toxicity and high biodegradability, compared to synthetic counterparts. Unfortunately, high production costs limit the use of biosurfactants. Low-cost production is the most important factor for biosurfactants to be able to compete in the global market place. This review presents general information on rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas species, as well as on their production and applications. In addition, industrial products and their wastes used for rhamnolipid production are reviewed in detail based on recent studies.

  11. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  12. Cooperative production of siderophores by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Freya; Buckling, Angus

    2009-01-01

    The production of iron-scavenging siderophores by the opportunistic animal pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a textbook example of public goods cooperation. This trait provides an excellent model system with which to study cooperation. Further, the links between siderophore production and P. aeruginosa virulence allow us to investigate how pathogen ecology, social behaviour and pathology might be connected. We present here the results of basic research on the evolution and ecology of siderophore cooperation in this species. In particular, we explore the effects of population and community structure, iron regime and genomic mutation rate on the relative success of siderophore cooperators and cheats. We also present preliminary data on the links between siderophore production and another clinically-relevant social trait, biofilm formation. It is our hope that more realistic laboratory studies of siderophore cooperation in P. aeruginosa will eventually cast light on the roles played by social traits in long-term microbial infections.

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    of mutations, slow growth and adaptation of the bacteria to the conditions in the lungs, and to antibiotic therapy. Low bacterial metabolic activity and increase of doubling times of the bacterial cells in CF lungs are responsible for some of the tolerance to antibiotics. Conventional resistance mechanisms......, such as chromosomal ß-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps, and mutations of antibiotic target molecules in the bacteria, also contribute to the survival of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy.......The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...

  15. Biosynthesis of pyocyanin pigment by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. El-Fouly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-three isolates belonging to the genus Pseudomonas were isolated from different environmental sources including; soil, water and clinical specimens. Twenty out of them were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and individually screened for pyocyanin production. P. aeruginosa R1; isolated from rice-cultivated soil and P. aeruginosa U3 selected from clinical specimen (Urinary tract infection were the highest pyocyanin producers; pyocyanin production reached 9.3 and 5.9 μg/ml, respectively on synthetic glucose supplemented nutrient medium (GSNB. The identification of both selected strains (P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 was confirmed by 16S rRNA, the similarity with other strains available in database was 97% (with P. aeruginosa FPVC 14 and 94% (with P. aeruginosa 13.A, respectively. P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 are accessed at gene bank with accession numbers KM924432 and KM603511, in the same order. Pyocyanin was extracted by standard methods, purified by column chromatography and characterized by UV-Vis absorption, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The antimicrobial activity of purified pyocyanin against multi-drug resistant microbes was investigated; the efficiency of pyocyanin was more obvious in Gram +ve bacteria than Gram−ve bacteria and yeast. To reduce the cost of pyocyanin production, a new conventional medium based on cotton seed meal supplemented with peptone was designed. The pyocyanin production of both selected strains P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 using the new medium is increased by 30.1% and 17.2%, respectively in comparison with synthetic GSNB medium, while the cost of production process is reduced by 56.7%.

  16. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB112 (JN996498 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB112 (JN996498) isolated from infected Labeo bata (Hamilton) by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Somerita Panda, PK Bandyopadhyay, SN Chatterjee ...

  17. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen

  18. Resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative bacilli in patients with impaired host defences emphasizes the need for information on the antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms that infects such patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly resistant to ...

  19. Caenorhabditis elegans reveals novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    The susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to different virulent phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes the worms an excellent model for studying host-pathogen interactions. Including the recently described liquid killing, five different killing assays are now available offering superb

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  1. Pseudomonas Folliculitis Associated with Use of Hot Tubs and Spas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history, etiology, diagnosis, histopathology, treatment, and prevention of Pseudomonas Folliculitis, an increasingly common skin infection contracted in hot tubs and, to some extent, in swimming pools. (Author/SM)

  2. Sequencing and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage JG004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garbe, Julia; Bunk, Boyke; Rohde, Manfred; Schobert, Max

    2011-01-01

    .... Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For an effective use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology but also genes of the bacterial host essential for phage infection...

  3. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com...

  4. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  5. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  6. Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Mitamura, Sayaka; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE...

  7. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation

  8. Isolation of chlorhexidine-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, H; Kozukue, H

    1982-01-01

    The chlorhexidine resistance of 317 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospital patients was determined. The distribution pattern of their susceptibility to chlorhexidine clearly revealed two peaks, and the frequency of resistance to chlorhexidine was 84.2%.

  9. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility of biof...

  10. A study on nitrogen removal efficiency of Pseudomonas stutzeri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... 1College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher. Education Mega Centre, Panyu District, ... Key words: Anaerobic/anoxic/oxic treatment process, reaction condition, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen removal, Pseudomonas stutzeri.

  11. Plant perceptions of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas.

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, Gail M

    2004-01-01

    Plant-associated Pseudomonas live as saprophytes and parasites on plant surfaces and inside plant tissues. Many plant-associated Pseudomonas promote plant growth by suppressing pathogenic micro-organisms, synthesizing growth-stimulating plant hormones and promoting increased plant disease resistance. Others inhibit plant growth and cause disease symptoms ranging from rot and necrosis through to developmental dystrophies such as galls. It is not easy to draw a clear distinction between pathoge...

  12. Biodegradasi Petroleum dan Hidrokarbon Eikosana oleh Isolat Bakteri Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Faiqah Umar

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum and hydrocarbon eicosane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate. Hydrocarbon are important environmental contaminants in soil and water. These compounds have a potential risk to human health, as many of them are carsinogenic and toxic to marine organisms such as diatome, gasthrophode, mussel, and fish. The purpose of this research was to know the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to degradate the hydrocarbon (petroleum Hundill and eicosane) substrate. Growing test used ...

  13. H2-driven biotransformation of n-octane to 1-octanol by a recombinant Pseudomonas putida strain co-synthesizing an O2-tolerant hydrogenase and a P450 monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Thomas H; Lauterbach, Lars; Honda Malca, Sumire; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Lenz, Oliver

    2015-11-21

    An in vivo biotransformation system is presented that affords the hydroxylation of n-octane to 1-octanol on the basis of NADH-dependent CYP153A monooxygenase and NAD(+)-reducing hydrogenase heterologously synthesized in a bacterial host. The hydrogenase sustains H2-driven NADH cofactor regeneration even in the presence of O2, the co-substrate of monooxygenase.

  14. Biosorpsi Logam Zn Pada Limbah Sintetik Menggunakan Biomassa Campuran Pseudomonas aeruginosa dan Pseudomonas sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayati Hidayati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is one of the heavy metals that could be harmful for environment. This metal usually arises from industrial activities. Biosorption of zinc in synthetic waste was conducted using biomass mixture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas sp. This research aims to determine the zinc adsorption capacity of the biomass in synthetic waste water. Zinc biosorption was performed at pH 4, room temperature and stirring 800 rpm. Variation of contact time used was 30, 60 and 120 min; and the amount of biomass used was 0.01 g, 0.02 g, 0.03 g, 0.04 g and 0.05 g. The highest zinc biosorption capacity was obtained 25.43% at the time of 120 minutes and the amount of biomass used 0.01 g. The optimum condition for biomass biosorption and removal capacity based on the correlation between experimental data and mathematical models was obtained with the addition of 0.04 g of biomass with correlation coefficient (R 1 and 0,965 respectively.ABSTRAK Salah satu logam berat yang berbahaya dari hasil kegiatan industri adalah logam Zn (seng. Biosorpsi logam Zn pada limbah sintetik dilakukan dengan menggunakan biomassa campuran Pseudomonas aeruginosa dan Pseudomonas sp. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kapasitas biomassa dalam mengadsorpsi logam Zn pada limbah sintetik. Biosorpsi logam Zn dilakukan pada kondisi pH 4, temperatur ruang dan pengadukan 800 rpm. Variasi waktu kontak dilakukan pada 30, 60 dan 120 menit  dan menggunakan jumlah biomassa 0,01 g, 0,02 g, 0,03 g, 0,04 g  dan 0,05 g. Kapasitas biosorpsi logam Zn tertinggi diperoleh sebesar 25,43% pada waktu 120 menit dengan jumlah biomassa 0,01 g. Kondisi optimum biosorpsi logam Zn berdasarkan korelasi antara data eksperimen dan model matematika diperoleh pada penambahan jumlah biomassa sebesar 0,04 g baik untuk kapasitas biosorpsi logam Zn maupun efisiensi removal logam Zn dengan nilai koefisien korelasi (R2 masing-masing adalah 1 dan 0,965.

  15. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  16. Bioadsorption characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kőnig-Péter Anikó

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II ions from aqueous solution using lyophilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAOI cells were observed under various experimental conditions. The effect of pH, initial metal concentration, equilibration time and temperature on bioadsorption was investigated. The optimum pH value for Pb(II adsorption was found to be 5.0, and for Cd(II 5.0 − 6.0. The Pb(II and Cd(II bioadsorption equilibrium were analyzed by using Freundlich and Langmuir model using nonlinear least-squares estimation. The experimental maximum uptake capacity of Pb(II and Cd(II was estimated to be 164 mg g-1 and 113 mg g-1, respectively. For biosorption kinetic study the pseudo second-order kinetic model was applied at various temperatures. The temperature had no significant effect on Pb(II bioadsorption. In case of Cd(II bioadsorption the adsorbed amount decreased with increasing temperature.

  17. Indagine epidemiologica locale sulle infezioni sostenute da Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia e sensibilità agli antibiotici di questi microrganismi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Di Marcello

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this local surveillance study was to determine the distribution of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia in our geographic area, their impact in the hospital and community acquired infections and their resistance to antimicrobial agents currently used in the treatment of infections due to these microrganisms. Materials and Methods: During the period January 2001 - June 2003, 14.200 clinical isolates were collected from urine,wounds, catheters, body fluids, blood, respiratory tract specimens. Bacterial identifications were performed according to the standard methods (Murray, 2003 and antibiotic susceptibility tests were carry out in microassay by the automated system MicroScan (Dade Behring, Milano, Italy.The following antimicrobial agents were tested: piperacillin (PIP, ticarcillin (TIC, piperacillin-tazobactam (TZP, ticarcillin-clavulanic acid (TTC, ceftazidime (CAZ, ceftriaxone (CRO, aztreonam (ATM, imipenem (IPM, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT, gentamicin (CN, amikacin (AK, tobramycin (TOB, ciprofloxacin (CIP. Results: A total of 994 Pseudomonadaceae were isolated from in- (67% and out-patients (33%.They were P.aeruginosa (81%, other Pseudomonas species as P.fluorescens and P.putida (8%, S.maltophilia (9% and B.cepacia (2%.The great majority of the strains were collected from respiratory tract specimens (70% and urine (15%.The divisions from which derived the greater quantity of isolates were pediatric (33.8%, intensive care (22.7% and pneumology (10% units.Antibiotics more active against P. aeruginosa were IPM, CAZ,AK and TZP. IPM was effective against B. cepacia also.The other drugs, except SXT, displayed against this microrganism high rates of resistance. Even S. maltophilia was not susceptible to much antimicrobial agents, whereas SXT was the drug more active against this germ. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa was the microrganism more frequently isolated among non-fermenting Gram

  18. Degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by two strains of Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna C. Nwinyi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The goal of this investigation was to isolate competent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons degraders that can utilize polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons of former industrial sites at McDoel Switchyard in Bloomington, Indiana. Using conventional enrichment method based on soil slurry, we isolated, screened and purified two bacterial species strains PB1 and PB2. Applying the ribotyping technique using the 16S rRNA gene analysis, the strains were assigned to the genus Pseudomonas (Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2. Both isolates showed promising metabolic capacity on pyrene sprayed MS agar plates during the preliminary investigations. Using time course studies in the liquid cultures at calculated concentrations 123, 64, 97 and 94 ppm for naphthalene, chrysene, fluroanthene and pyrene, P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 showed partial utilization of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Naphthalene was degraded between 26% and 40%, chrysene 14% and 16%, fluroanthene 5% and 7%; pyrene 8% and 13% by P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 respectively. Based on their growth profile, we developed a model R2 = 1 to predict the degradation rate of slow polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders where all the necessary parameters are constant. From this investigation, we confirm that the former industrial site soil microbial communities may be explored for the biorestoration of the industrial site.

  19. Pseudomonas fluorescens' view of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2008-01-01

    Growth in a biofilm modulates microbial metal susceptibility, sometimes increasing the ability of microorganisms to withstand toxic metal species by several orders of magnitude. In this study, a high-throughput metal toxicity screen was initiated with the aim of correlating biological toxicity data in planktonic and biofilm cells to the physiochemical properties of metal ions. To this end, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 was grown in the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) and biofilms and planktonic cells of this microorganism were exposed to gradient arrays of different metal ions. These arrays included 44 different metals with representative compounds that spanned every group of the periodic table (except for the halogens and noble gases). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values were obtained after exposing the biofilms to metal ions for 4 h. Using these values, metal ion toxicity was correlated to the following ion-specific physicochemical parameters: standard reduction-oxidation potential, electronegativity, the solubility product of the corresponding metal-sulfide complex, the Pearson softness index, electron density and the covalent index. When the ions were grouped according to outer shell electron structure, we found that heavy metal ions gave the strongest correlations to these parameters and were more toxic on average than the other classes of the ions. Correlations were different for biofilms than for planktonic cells, indicating that chemical mechanisms of metal ion toxicity differ between the two modes of growth. We suggest that biofilms can specifically counter the toxic effects of certain physicochemical parameters, which may contribute to the increased ability of biofilms to withstand metal toxicity.

  20. Aflatoxin B₁ degradation by a Pseudomonas strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, Lancine; Zhao, Yueju; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Chang, Jinghua; Li, Jinhan; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-23

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), one of the most potent naturally occurring mutagens and carcinogens, causes significant threats to the food industry and animal production. In this study, 25 bacteria isolates were collected from grain kernels and soils displaying AFB1 reduction activity. Based on its degradation effectiveness, isolate N17-1 was selected for further characterization and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa N17-1 could degrade AFB₁, AFB₂ and AFM₁ by 82.8%, 46.8% and 31.9% after incubation in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium at 37 °C for 72 h, respectively. The culture supernatant of isolate N17-1 degraded AFB₁ effectively, whereas the viable cells and intra cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Maximum degradation was observed at 55 °C. Ions Mn²⁺ and Cu²⁺ were activators for AFB1 degradation, however, ions Mg²⁺, Li⁺, Zn²⁺, Se²⁺, Fe³⁺ were strong inhibitors. Treatments with proteinase K and proteinase K plus SDS significantly reduced the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. No degradation products were observed based on preliminary LC-QTOF/MS analysis, indicating AFB₁ was metabolized to degradation products with chemical properties different from that of AFB₁. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB₁ by P. aeruginosa N17-1 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications. This is the first report indicating that the isolate of P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to degrade aflatoxin.

  1. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  2. Therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections with tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, D C; Fekety, F R; Bruce, B; Silva, J; Archer, G

    1975-07-01

    The efficacy of tobramycin in doses of 2.7 to 5.6 mg/kg per day in 29 courses of therapy in 25 hospitalized patients with serious Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was studied. Eighty-three percent of the P. aeruginosa strains showed zones of inhibition of 16 mm or more around a 10-mug tobramycin disk in the Bauer-Kirby disk method. Tobramycin minimal inhibitory concentration ranged from <0.05 to 1.5 mug/ml (microtiter twofold dilution method); for gentamicin they ranged from 0.05 to 6.2 mug/ml; corresponding geometric means were 0.19 and 0.49 mug/ml. Therapy was given for a median of 10 days (mean 19, range 1 to 83). The clinically satisfactory response rate for the 29 courses of therapy was 52%: critically ill, 44%; seriously ill, 50%; moderately ill, 80%. The response rates for various sites of infection were bone and cartilage, 100%; urinary tract infection, 56%; wound, 50%; respiratory tract, 67%; septicemia, 40%; abscess, 0%; burns, 44%. No adverse reactions were seen. Serum concentration (mug/ml +/- standard deviation) of tobramycin determined by an agar-well plate method, were 4.81 +/- 2.17 (1 h); 3.24 +/- 1.43 (2 h); 2.35 +/- 1.30 (4 h); and 1.40 +/- 1.09 (8 h). Tobramycin appears to be as effacacious as gentamicin in the treatment of serious P. aeruginosa infections and has a theoretical advantage of lower minimal inhibitory concentration for P. aeruginosa. The data suggest that, for life-threatening infections, dosages of tobramycin may need to be increased over those used in this study.

  3. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  4. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  5. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    drinking water industry, very little has been reported regarding the role of P. aeruginosa in biofilms. Tap water appears to be a significant route of transmission in hospitals, from colonization of plumbing fixtures. It is still not clear if the colonization results from the water in the distribution system, or personnel use within the hospital. Infections and colonization can be significantly reduced by placement of filters on the water taps. The oral dose of P. aeruginosa required to establish colonization in a healthy subject is high (George et al. 1989a). During dose-response studies, even when subjects (mice or humans) were colonized via ingestion, there was no evidence of disease. P. aeruginosa administered by the aerosol route at levels of 10(7) cells did cause disease symptoms in mice, and was lethal in aerosolized doses of 10(9) cells. Aerosol dose-response studies have not been undertaken with human subjects. Human health risks associated with exposure to P. aeruginosa via drinking water ingestion were estimated using a four-step risk assessment approach. The risk of colonization from ingesting P. aeruginosa in drinking water is low. The risk is slightly higher if the subject is taking an antibiotic resisted by P. aeruginosa. The fact that individuals on ampicillin are more susceptible to Pseudomonas gastrointestinal infection probably results from suppression of normal intestinal flora, which would allow Pseudomonas to colonize. The process of estimating risk was significantly constrained because of the absence of specific (quantitative) occurrence data for Pseudomonas. Sensitivity analysis shows that the greatest source of variability/uncertainty in the risk assessment is from the density distribution in the exposure rather than the dose-response or water consumption distributions. In summary, two routes appear to carry the greatest health risks from contacting water contaminated with P. aeruginosa (1) skin exposure in hot tubs and (2) lung exposure from

  6. Uji produksi biosurfaktan oleh Pseudomonas sp. pada substrat yang berbeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Fatimah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactant, microbial metabolite whose properties like surfactant, was suggested to replace chemically synthesized surfactant for take in hand environtmental pollution by petroleum hydrocarbon. This work was done to examine potency of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from Tanjung Perak Harbor to produce biosurfactant. Also, to know the effect of different substrates (glucose + yeast extract, lubricating oil and hexadecane toward biosurfactant production. Pseudomonas sp. grown in mineral synthetic water and biosurfactant production was measured on stationary phase. Biosurfactant production based on emulsification activity and surface tension reduction of supernatant (using Du Nouy tensiometer. Solar, lubricating oil, and hexadecane were used to examine emulsification activity. Results indicated that Pseudomonas sp. have a potency to produce biosurfactant. Surface tension of supernatant decreased up to 20 dyne/cm, when grown on hexadecane substrate. Hexadecane is the best growing substrate for biosurfactant production than others.

  7. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...

  8. Effects of ambroxol on alginate of mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Hua; Wan, Zhenyan; Bai, Dan

    2008-07-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated newborns, which can cause life-threatening infections. Alginate of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is considered an important virulence factor which contributes to the resistance to antibiotics. Traditionally, ambroxol is widely used in newborns with lung problems as a mucolytic agent and antioxidant agent as well. And there are few studies that demonstrated the anti-biofilm activity of ambroxol. In this study, we found that ambroxol can affect the structure of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Further, we found that ambroxol reduces the production of alginate, the expression of the important genes and the activity of key enzyme guanosine diphospho-D-mannose dehydrogenase (GDP-mannose dehydrogenase; GMD) which were involved in alginate biosynthesis.

  9. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino sinusitis in mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S.; Hammer, A. S.; Høiby, N.

    2017-01-01

    The nasal and sinus cavities in children may serve as reservoirs for microorganisms that cause recurrent and chronic lung infections. This study evaluates whether the mink can be used as an animal model for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis since there is no suitable...... in the infected mink shows features of carbohydrate expression comparable to what has been described in the respiratory system after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in humans. It is suggested that the mink is suitable for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis....... traditional animal model for this disease. Nasal tissue samples from infected and control mink were fixed in formalin, demineralized, and embedded in paraffin. A histological examination of sections from the infected animals revealed disintegration of the respiratory epithelium lining the nasal turbinates...

  10. Conservation of the response regulator gene gacA in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Mazzola, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The response regulator gene gacA influences the production of several secondary metabolites in both pathogenic and beneficial Pseudomonas spp. In this study, we developed primers and a probe for the gacA gene of Pseudomonas species and sequenced a 425 bp fragment of gacA from ten Pseudomonas strains

  11. Information Management of Genome Enabled Data Streams for Pseudomonas syringae on the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalen Lindeberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome enabled research has led to a large and ever-growing body of data on Pseudomonas syringae genome variation and characteristics, though systematic capture of this information to maximize access by the research community remains a significant challenge. Major P. syringae data streams include genome sequence data, newly identified type III effectors, biological characterization data for type III effectors, and regulatory feature characterization. To maximize data access, the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI website [1] is primarily focused on categorization of type III effectors and curation of effector functional data represented in the Hop database and Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction Resource, respectively. The PPI website further serves as a conduit for incorporation of new genome characterization data into the annotation records at NCBI and other data repositories, and clearinghouse for additional data sets and updates in response to the evolving needs of the research community.

  12. Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachani, Abderrahman; Lossi, Nadine S.; Hamilton, Alexander; Jones, Cerith; Bleves, Sophie; Albesa-Jové, David; Filloux, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Such infections are associated with an active type VI secretion system (T6SS), which consists of about 15 conserved components, including the AAA+ ATPase, ClpV. The T6SS secretes two categories of proteins, VgrG and Hcp. Hcp is structurally similar to a phage tail tube component, whereas VgrG proteins show similarity to the puncturing device at the tip of the phage tube. In P. aeruginosa, three T6SSs are known. The expression of H1-T6SS genes is controlled by the RetS sensor. Here, 10 vgrG genes were identified in the PAO1 genome, among which three are co-regulated with H1-T6SS, namely vgrG1a/b/c. Whereas VgrG1a and VgrG1c were secreted in a ClpV1-dependent manner, secretion of VgrG1b was ClpV1-independent. We show that VgrG1a and VgrG1c form multimers, which confirmed the VgrG model predicting trimers similar to the tail spike. We demonstrate that Hcp1 secretion requires either VgrG1a or VgrG1c, which may act independently to puncture the bacterial envelope and give Hcp1 access to the surface. VgrG1b is not required for Hcp1 secretion. Thus, VgrG1b does not require H1-T6SS for secretion nor does H1-T6SS require VgrG1b for its function. Finally, we show that VgrG proteins are required for secretion of a genuine H1-T6SS substrate, Tse3. Our results demonstrate that VgrG proteins are not only secreted components but are essential for secretion of other T6SS substrates. Overall, we emphasize variability in behavior of three P. aeruginosa VgrGs, suggesting that, although very similar, distinct VgrGs achieve specific functions. PMID:21325275

  13. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  14. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-1337 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-1337 ref|NP_744515.1| antibiotic MFS transporter, putative [Pseudomona...s putida KT2440] gb|AAN67979.1|AE016430_3 antibiotic MFS transporter, putative [Pseudomonas putida KT2440] NP_744515.1 3e-97 62% ...

  15. Defining the Pseudomonas Genus: Where Do We Draw the Line with Azotobacter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, Asli Ismihan; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    genome family trees based on conserved gene families also show A. vinelandii to be more closely related to Pseudomonas than other related organisms. Third, exhaustive BLAST comparisons demonstrate that the fraction of shared genes between A. vinelandii and Pseudomonas genomes is similar...... using three genomic sequence-based methods. First, using 16S rRNA trees, it is shown that A. vinelandii groups within the Pseudomonas close to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genomes from other related organisms (Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter, and Cellvibrio) are outside the Pseudomonas cluster. Second, pan...

  16. Prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in surgical units of Ahmadu Bello University teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria: An ... The antibiotic susceptibility of isolates and a standard strain to ceftazidime, amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and perfloxacin was determined by the ...

  17. Utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas sp. and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This phenotype was not transformed to Pseudomonas by conjugation even with lysozyme treatment, however the petroleum oil and octadecane utilization were transformed to E. coli by lysozyme treatment. The transformed E. coli lost the ability to use octadecane after three subcultures on nutrient broth and 34 generations.

  18. Genomic and metabolic characterization of spoilage-associated Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanborough, Tamsyn; Fegan, Narelle; Powell, Shane M; Singh, Tanoj; Tamplin, Mark; Chandry, P Scott

    2018-03-02

    Pseudomonas are common spoilage agents of aerobically stored fresh foods. Their ability to cause spoilage is species- and may be strain-specific. To improve our understanding of the meat and milk spoilage agents Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas lundensis, we sequenced the genomes of 12 P. fragi and seven P. lundensis isolates. These genomes provided a dataset for genomic analyses. Key volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced or metabolised by the isolates were determined during their growth on a beef paste and where possible, metabolic activity was associated with gene repertoire. Genome analyses showed that the isolates included in this work may belong to more than two Pseudomonas species with possible spoilage potential. Pan-genome analyses demonstrated a high degree of diversity among the P. fragi and genetic flexibility and diversity may be traits of both species. Growth of the P. lundensis isolates was characterised by the production of large amounts of 1-undecene, 5-methyl-2-hexanone and methyl-2-butenoic acid. P. fragi isolates produced extensive amounts of methyl and ethyl acetate and the production of methyl esters predominated over ethyl esters. Some of the P. fragi produced extremely low levels of VOCs, highlighting the importance of strain-specific studies in food matrices. Furthermore, although usually not considered to be denitrifiers, all isolates generated molecular nitrogen, indicating that at least some steps of this pathway are intact. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype.

  20. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P. ...

  1. extracts of senna siamea (lam) on pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2009-05-30

    May 30, 2009 ... convulsion in children (Alli – Smith, 2009). In an attempt to rationally identify which pathogen to screen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was epidemiologically identified as the hardiest bacterium that constitutes problems to researchers and clinicians. As literature showed, the hardy nature of Ps aeruginosa is ...

  2. an tibiotic resistance trend of pseudomonas aeruginosa'in port

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AN TIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TREND OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA'IN PORT. HARCOURT oaursca. 0. K}. ONYEJEPU, N 1. 1. Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology. University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Port Harcourt. 2. Nigerian Institute of Medical Research. 6 Edmond Crescent, Yabl. Lagos.

  3. Secretion of elastinolytic enzymes and their propeptides by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, P; de Groot, A; Bitter, W; Tommassen, J

    Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The signal sequence is cleaved ol during transport across the inner membrane and, in the periplasm, proelastase is further processed. We demonstrate that the propeptide and the mature elastase are both secreted but that the

  4. Induction of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Jensen, E T; Høiby, N

    1991-01-01

    Imipenem induced high levels of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Piperacillin also induced beta-lactamase production in these biofilms but to a lesser degree. The combination of beta-lactamase production with other protective properties of the biofilm mode of growth...

  5. The cytotoxin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa : Cytotoxicity requires proteolytic activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlik-Eisel, Gabriele; Lutz, Frieder; Henschen, Agnes; Eisel, Ulrich; Struckmeier, Martin; Kräuter, Josef; Niemann, Heiner

    The primary structure of a cytotoxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was determined by sequencing of the structural gene. The cytotoxin (31,700 Mr) lacks an N-terminal signal sequence for bacterial secretion but contains a pentapeptide consensus sequence commonly found in prokaryotic proteins which

  6. Heavy Metal uptake Potentials of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uptake of heavy metals, silver and cadmium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a Gram negative bacterium) and Micrococcus luteus (a Gram positive bacterium) was investigated in Cadmium and Silver stock solution using ion selective electrodes. Silver and cadmium uptake by the two organisms was described by Langmuir ...

  7. Dechlorination of 1,2– dichloroethane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of our attempt at isolating and stocking some indigenous microbial species, we isolated a bacterium from a waste dumpsite with appreciable dechlorination activity. 16S rDNA profiling revealed the isolate to be a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the sequence has been deposited in the NCBI nucleotide ...

  8. Antibiotic sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern of antibiotic sensitivity of 229 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated between June 1998 and May 2000 at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu was studied. The isolates were recovered from various clinical specimens by culturing on standard media viz: blood agar, ...

  9. Rhamnolipid stimulates uptake of hydrophobic compounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, WH; Janssen, DB

    The biodegradation of hexadecane by five biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG1, Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43066, R. erythropolis ATCC 19558, and strain BCG112) was determined in the presence and absence of exogenously added

  10. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    degrading microorganisms in oil-polluted site. (Atlas, 1981). Crude oil biodegradation can occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions (Zengler et al., 1999). This research was aimed at investigating the effects of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and. Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ...

  11. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Contreras, R; Lira-Silva, E; Jasso-Chávez, R; Hernández-González, I.L.; Maeda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Boogerd, F.C.; Sheng, L; Wood, TK; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed

  12. Decrease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by food waste materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maděrová, Z.; Horská, K.; Kim, S.-R.; Lee, Ch.-H.; Pospíšková, K.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 9 (2016), s. 2143-2149 ISSN 0273-1223 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biofilm * food waste materials * magnetic spent grain * Pseudomonas aeruginosa Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.197, year: 2016

  13. Characterization of Pseudomonas species causing brown blotch of Agaricus bisporis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Kastelein, P.; Krijger, M.C.; Hendriks, M.J.A.; Baars, J.J.P.; Amsing, J.G.M.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Warris, S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial blotch is occasionally causing damage in the production of common mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). The disease is found worldwide and can be caused by different fluorescent Pseudomonas species present in casing material. For identification of the causative agents of blotch in the Netherlands

  14. dichloroethane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa OK1 isolated from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    chlorinated organics such as monochloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, dichloromethane, trichloromethane and tetrachloromethane at pH 7.5 and 9.0. Optimum temperature for dehalogenase activity against 1, 2 – DCE was 35oC. Key words: Dechlorination, 16S rDNA, bioremediation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa OK1.

  15. Unraveling root developmental programs initiated by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamioudis, C.; Mastranesti, P.; Dhonukshe, P.; Blilou, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant roots are colonized by an immense number of microbes, referred to as the root microbiome. Selected strains of beneficial soil-borne bacteria can protect against abiotic stress and prime the plant immune system against a broad range of pathogens. Pseudomonas spp. rhizobacteria represent one of

  16. Unraveling Root Developmental Programs Initiated by Beneficial Pseudomonas spp. Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamioudis, C.; Mastranesti, P.; Dhonukshe, P.; Blilou, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant roots are colonized by an immense number of microbes, referred to as the root microbiome. Selected strains of beneficial soil-borne bacteria can protect against abiotic stress and prime the plant immune system against a broad range of pathogens. Pseudomonas spp. rhizobacteria represent one of

  17. Screening of thermophilic neutral lipase-producing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From oil-contaminated soil, three lipase-producing microorganisms were selected as good lipase producers using rhodamine B-olive oil plate agar and they were identified as from Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Klebsiella genera by morphology, biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the ...

  18. Enhanced alpha-galactosidase expression in pseudomonas chlororaphis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis is a non-pathogenic bacterium useful for fermentative production of biopolymer (i.e., poly(hydroxyalkanoates); PHA) and biosurfactant (i.e., rhamnolipid; RhL). In order to enable P. chlororaphis to better fermentatively utilize the residual soy sugars in soy molasses – a lo...

  19. Effect of biosurfactant from two strains of Pseudomonas on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two Pseudomonas strains isolated from oil-contaminated soil which produce biosurfactant were studied. The biosurfactant containing broth formed stable emulsions with liquid light paraffin, cooking medium vegetable oil and toluene. The strains under study produce extra cellular biosurfactant in the culture media.

  20. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chitinase, a Gradually Secreted Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folders, J. (Jindra); Algra, J. (Jon); Roelofs, M.S. (Marc); Loon, L.C. van; Tommassen, J.P.M.; Bitter, Wilbert

    2001-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino

  1. Effect of alternating and direct currents on Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... studies must be done so as to reach optimum voltage and currents. The test media were Muller-Hinton agar and eosin methylene blue (EMB) agar. In this research Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was isolated from patients׳ wounds was examined with levels of alternating and direct current (AC and DC).

  2. Effect of alternating and direct currents on Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was isolated from patients wounds was examined with levels of alternating and direct current (AC and DC) electrical stimulation (1.5V, 3.5V, 5.5V and 10V) to see if these currents could inhibit P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. The experiment was performed in two forms: The first ...

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  4. Utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas sp. and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pseudomonas isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil was instable. In this work, t is shown that when the isolates are immobilized on Perlite, they are more stable for oil egradation. Although the isolate did not have any chemotaxis to ...

  5. High Temperature Induced Antibiotic Sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    aeruginosa ATCC 9027 was maintained on Pseudomonas P agar slants (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, MI.). The organism was cultivated at 37°C or 46°C in a proteose...Studies on the permeability change produced in coliform bacteria by ethylene diamine tetracetate. J. Biol. Chem. 243: 2372 - 2380. 7. 9. Lowry, O.H., N.J

  6. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas resistant to heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas resistant to heavy metals and poly aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) from Persian Gulf sediments. ... Among 10 bacterial species isolated from marine sediment, one strain represented high potential to grow in medium supplemented with copper and phenanthrene. Isolated ...

  7. Detection of Pseudomonas fluorescens from broth, water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loop mediated isothermal amplification is rapid, highly sensitive and specifically developed method for detection of bacterial infections. AprX gene for alkaline metalloprotease of Pseudomonas fluorescens was used to design four primers and loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) conditions were standardized for ...

  8. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were

  9. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas , Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  10. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  11. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    Abstract. The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic ...

  12. Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) indices of Pseudomonas and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objectives: Pseudomonas and Klebsiella infections are important nosocomial infections because of the attendant significant morbidity, mortality and socio-economic impact. These infections are difficult to treat due to the innate and acquired resistance mediated by the organisms' genome and other transferable ...

  13. Production of a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant by Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The work herewith investigated the effect of the culture medium composition on rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LBM10, previously isolated from an estuarine environment in Southern Brazil. Experimental design and surface response methodology were used in order to improve biosurfactant ...

  14. Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... Isolate Ps5 showed the highest lipase activity which was later identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of ..... Identification and characterization of a locally isolated lipolytic microfungus Geotrichum candidum. Malaysian J. Microbiol. 2: 22-29. Martinelle M, Hult K (1995).Kinetics of acyl transfer ...

  15. [Activity of doripenem against Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. rods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Deptuła, Aleksander; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Doripenem, the newest carbapenem was approved in 2008 by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections and complicated urinary tract infections. Its spectrum of activity is similar to that of meropenem and imipenem/cilastatin. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro activity of doripenem against nonfermentative Gram-negative rods. A total of 235 strains of Pseudomonas spp. (74.9%) and Acinetobacter spp. (25.1%) were included into the study. Strains were isolated in The Department of Clinical Microbiology of the University Hospital No 1 in Bydgoszcz and identified using ID GN tests (bioMérieux). To determine susceptibility to doripenem and other carbapenems disc-diffusion method was applied. Percentage of doripenem resistant strains reached 28.4% and 39.0% for Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp, respectively. All doripenem sensitive or intermediate Acinetobacter spp. strains were simultaneously sensitive to imipenem and meropenem. Activity of imipenem and meropenem among doripenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. were represented by 60.9% and 56.5% strains, respectively. Activity of imipenem and meropenem among doripenem resistant Pseudomonas spp. strains were represented by 12.0% and 18.0%, respectively. Occurence of one doripenem sensitive Pseudomonas spp. strain simultaneously resistant to imipenem and meropenem was observed.

  16. Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six isolates (Ps1, Ps2, Ps3, Ps4, Ps5 and Ps6) producing lipase were screened from wastewater on a selective medium agar containing Tween 80 or olive oil as the only source of carbon. Isolate Ps5 showed the highest lipase activity which was later identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of media composition ...

  17. Interaction between fish spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas sp and Shewanella putrefaciens in fish extracts and on fish tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1996-01-01

    , supernatant fluids from siderophore- negative Pseudomonas isolates did not inhibit growth of S. putrefaciens. The inhibitory effect was, except for one strain of Pseudomonas, not seen in supernatant fluids from iron- enriched cultures of Pseudomonas sp. Finally, siderophore- producing Pseudomonas sp. lowered...

  18. Pseudomonas guariconensis sp. nov., isolated from rhizospheric soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Marcia; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, Maria José; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2013-12-01

    We isolated a bacterial strain designated PCAVU11(T) in the course of a study of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria occurring in rhizospheric soil of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. in Guárico state, Venezuela. The 16S rRNA gene sequence had 99.2 % sequence similarity with respect to the most closely related species, Pseudomonas taiwanensis, and 99.1 % with respect to Pseudomonas entomophila, Pseudomonas plecoglossicida and Pseudomonas monteilii, on the basis of which PCAVU11(T) was classified as representing a member of the genus Pseudomonas. Analysis of the housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed the phylogenetic affiliation and showed sequence similarities lower than 95 % in all cases with respect to the above-mentioned closest relatives. Strain PCAVU11(T) showed two polar flagella. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0 (25.7 %), 18 : 1ω7c (20.4 %), 17 : 0 cyclo (11.5 %) and 16 : 1ω7c/15 : 0 iso 2-OH in summed feature 3 (10.8 %). The strain was oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive, the arginine dihydrolase system was present but nitrate reduction, β-galactosidase production and aesculin hydrolysis were negative. Strain PCAVU11(T) grew at 44 °C and at pH 10. The DNA G+C content was 61.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values lower than 56 % relatedness with respect to the type strains of the four most closely related species. Therefore, the results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses support the classification of strain PCAVU11(T) as representing a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, which we propose to name Pseudomonas guariconensis sp. nov. The type strain is PCAVU11(T) ( = LMG 27394(T) = CECT 8262(T)).

  19. Specific Genomic Fingerprints of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas Strains Generated by Box Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2014-01-01

    Primers corresponding to conserved bacterial repetitive of BOX elements were used to show that BOX-DNA sequences are widely distributed in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains. Phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas was isolated from oil palm fields (tropical soil) in Malaysia. BOX elements were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Pseudomonas isolates to identify strains that were not distinguishable by other classification methods. BOX-PCR, that derived genomic fingerprints, was generated from whole purified genomic DNA by liquid culture of phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas. BOX-PCR generated the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas specific fingerprints to identify the relationship between these strains. This suggests that distribution of BOX elements' sequences in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains is the mirror image of their genomic structure. Therefore, this method appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains and it may be useful tool for fast identification of potential biofertilizer strains. PMID:25580434

  20. Microbiological study of cosmetic products during their use by consumers: health risk and efficacy of preservative systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campana, R; Scesa, C; Patrone, V; Vittoria, E; Baffone, W

    2006-01-01

    ...) were contaminated by Staphylococcus warneri , Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas putida . The efficacy of the preservative systems of two cosmetic products, tested against standard micro‐organisms...