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Sample records for pseudomonas exotoxin-based proteins

  1. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chitinase, a Gradually Secreted Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folders, J. (Jindra); Algra, J. (Jon); Roelofs, M.S. (Marc); Loon, L.C. van; Tommassen, J.P.M.; Bitter, Wilbert

    2001-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino

  2. Identification of a Chitin-Binding Protein Secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folders, J. (Jindra); Tommassen, J.P.M.; Loon, L.C. van; Bitter, Wilbert

    1999-01-01

    One of the major proteins secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a 43-kDa protein, which is cleaved by elastase into smaller fragments, including a 30-kDa and a 23-kDa fragment. The N-terminal 23-kDa fragment was previously suggested as corresponding to a staphylolytic protease and was designated

  3. Hybrid proteins between Pseudomonas exotoxin A and poliovirus protease 2Apro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoa, I; Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1994-11-21

    Two hybrid proteins between Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) and poliovirus protease 2Apro have been generated. One hybrid protein contains the poliovirus 2Apro sequence replacing the region of PE corresponding to amino acids 413-607. The other hybrid contains in addition the transforming growth factor sequence. The two hybrid proteins were efficiently synthesized in E. coli cells using the inducible pET vectors. Both hybrid toxins cleaved p220 (eIF-4 gamma) when the recombinant plasmids were transfected in COS cells infected with recombinant vaccinia virus bearing the T7 RNA polymerase gene.

  4. Structure-to-function relationships of bacterial translocator protein (TSPO: a focus on Pseudomonas

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    Charlène eLeneveu-Jenvrin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The translocator protein (TSPO, which was previously designated as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is a 3.5 billion year-old evolutionarily conserved protein expressed by most Eukarya, Archae and Bacteria, but its organization and functions differ remarkably. By taking advantage of the genomic data available on TSPO, we focused on bacterial TSPO and attempted to define functions of TSPO in Pseudomonas via in silico approaches. A tspo ortholog has been identified in several fluorescent Pseudomonas. This protein presents putative binding motifs for cholesterol and PK 11195, which is a specific drug ligand of mitochondrial TSPO. While it is a common surface distribution, the sense of insertion and membrane localization differ between α- and γ-proteobacteria. Experimental published data and STRING analysis of common TSPO partners in fluorescent Pseudomonas indicate a potential role of TSPO in the oxidative stress response, iron homeostasis and virulence expression. In these bacteria, TSPO could also take part in signal transduction and in the preservation of membrane integrity.

  5. Identification and validation of novel small proteins in Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Wulff, Tune

    2016-01-01

    Small proteins of fifty amino acids or less have been understudied due to difficulties that impede their annotation and detection. In order to obtain information on small open reading frames (sORFs) in P. putida, bioinformatic and proteomic approaches were used to identify putative small open rea...... and CysB involved in biofilm formation and cysteine biosynthesis, respectively. The work sheds light on the P. putida small proteome and small protein identification, a necessary first step towards gaining insights into their functions and possible evolutionary implications.......Small proteins of fifty amino acids or less have been understudied due to difficulties that impede their annotation and detection. In order to obtain information on small open reading frames (sORFs) in P. putida, bioinformatic and proteomic approaches were used to identify putative small open...... reading frames (sORFs) in the well-characterized strain KT2440. A plasmid-based system was established for sORF validation, enabling expression of C-terminal sequential peptide affinity (SPA) tagged variants and their detection via protein immunoblotting. Out of 22 tested putative sORFs, the expression...

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide induces CF-like alteration of protein secretion by human tracheal gland cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammouni, W; Figarella, C; Baeza, N; Marchand, S; Merten, M D

    1997-12-18

    Human tracheal gland (HTG) serous cells are now believed to play a major role in the physiopathology of cystic fibrosis. Because of the persistent inflammation and the specific infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lung, we looked for the action of the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of this bacteria on human tracheal gland cells in culture by studying the secretion of the secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) which is a specific serous secretory marker of these cells. Treatment with Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS resulted in a significant dose-dependent increase in the basal production of SLPI (+ 250 +/- 25%) whilst the SLPI transcript mRNA levels remained unchanged. This LPS-induced increase in secretion was inhibited by glucocorticoides. Furthermore, LPS treatment of HTG cells induces a loss of responsiveness to carbachol and isoproterenol but not to adenosine triphosphate. These findings indicate that HTG cells treated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS have the same behavior as those previously observed with CF-HTG cells. Exploration by using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification showed that LPS downregulated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mRNA expression in HTG cells indicative of a link between CFTR function and consequent CF-like alteration in protein secretory process.

  7. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Microbial biofilm formation often causes problems in medical and industrial settings, and knowledge about the factors that are involved in biofilm development and dispersion is useful for creating strategies to control the processes. In this report, we present evidence that proteins with GGDEF...... and EAL domains are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas putida. Overexpression in P. putida of the Escherichia coli YedQ protein, which contains a GGDEF domain, resulted in increased biofilm formation. Overexpression in P. putida of the E. coli Yhj......H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  8. Crystal structure of a bicupin protein HutD involved in histidine utilization in Pseudomonas.

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    Gerth, M L; Liu, Y; Jiao, W; Zhang, X-X; Baker, E N; Lott, J S; Rainey, P B; Johnston, J M

    2017-08-01

    Cupins form one of the most functionally diverse superfamilies of proteins, with members performing a wide range of catalytic, non-catalytic, and regulatory functions. HutD is a predicted bicupin protein that is involved in histidine utilization (Hut) in Pseudomonas species. Previous genetic analyses have suggested that it limits the upper level of Hut pathway expression, but its mechanism of action is unknown. Here, we have determined the structure of PfluHutD at 1.74 Å resolution in several crystallization conditions, and identified N-formyl-l-glutamate (FG, a Hut pathway intermediate) as a potential ligand in vivo. Proteins 2017; 85:1580-1588. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Outer Membrane Protein D Gene in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa and its Role in Antibiotic Resistance

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    Neda Motaghi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of nosocomial infection. OprD protein is a specific protein regulating the uptake of carbapenem antibiotic. Loss of OprD is the main mechanism of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa resistance to carbapenem. In this study, the presence of OprD gene is investigated in isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in burn patients of Ghotboddin hospital in Shiraz. Material & Methods: 66 Pseudomonas Aeruginosa were isolated from wound specimens of 250 burn patients. Strain characteristics were confirmed by biochemical tests. Antibiogram was done via disc diffusion method. Finally, OprD gene was investigated by PCR. Results: Isolated Pseudomonas Aeruginosa showed more sensitivity to chloramphenicol and colicitin and more resistance  to ciprofloxacin, gentamycin, cefotaxim, ceftazidin, imipenem, meropenem, and erythromycin. 61 percent of isolates were positive for OprD gene by PCR. Conclusion: The findings of this study revealed that Colicitin and chloramphenicol are more effective in treatment of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa infections in burn patients, and deletion and mutation in OprD gene cause bacterium resistance to carbapenem antibiotic.

  10. Effect of SPLUNC1 protein on the Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Epstein-Barr virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hou-De; Li, Xiao-Ling; Li, Gui-Yuan; Zhou, Ming; Liu, Hua-Ying; Yang, Yi-Xing; Deng, Tan; Ma, Jian; Sheng, Shou-Rong

    2008-02-01

    Short palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone 1 (SPLUNC1) gene coded a secreted protein found at the surface of nasopharyngeal epithelium, which may be an innate immunity defensive molecular and a risk factor for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Here, we observed the effects of SPLUNC1 on the Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, evaluated the ability of SPLUNC1 protein binding to lipopolysaccharide. To observe the effect of SPLUNC1 protein on Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), we raised three EBV-transformed B-lymphocyte lines and treated the cells by SPLUNC1 protein; cellular disruption, apoptosis, EBV DNA content, and viral oncogene expression were analyzed. We found that SPLUNC1 protein can bind to bacterial lipopolysaccharide, inhibit the growth of P. aeruginosa, enhance the disruption and apoptosis of EBV-infected B-lymphocytes, downregulate protein expression of EBV latent membrane protein 1, while upregulate protein expression of EBV envelope glycoprotein gp350/220. The total EBV DNA in the culture medium was decreased significantly after 7 days of treatment by SPLUNC1. This study shows that SPLUNC1 not only has the role of antibacteria and antivirus, but also inhibits the potential oncogenicity of EBV in respiratory epithelium.

  11. Protein as chemical cue: non-nutritional growth enhancement by exogenous protein in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

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    Hiren Joshi

    Full Text Available Research pertaining to microbe-microbe and microbe-plant interactions has been largely limited to small molecules like quorum sensing chemicals. However, a few recent reports have indicated the role of complex molecules like proteins and polysaccharides in microbial communication. Here we demonstrate that exogenous proteins present in culture media can considerably accelerate the growth of Pseudomonas putida KT2440, even when such proteins are not internalized by the cells. The growth enhancement is observed when the exogenous protein is not used as a source of carbon or nitrogen. The data show non-specific nature of the protein inducing growth; growth enhancement was observed irrespective of the protein type. It is shown that growth enhancement is mediated via increased siderophore secretion in response to the exogenous protein, leading to better iron uptake. We highlight the ecological significance of the observation and hypothesize that exogenous proteins serve as chemical cues in the case of P.putida and are perceived as indicator of the presence of competitors in the environment. It is argued that enhanced siderophore secretion in response to exogenous protein helps P.putida establish numerical superiority over competitors by way of enhanced iron assimilation and quicker utilization of aromatic substrates.

  12. A phosphate-starvation-inducible outermembrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1 as an immunological phosphate-starvation marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leopold, Kristine; Jacobsen, Susanne; Nybroe, Ole

    1997-01-01

    A phosphate-starvation-inducible outer-membrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1, expressed at phosphate concentrations below0.08-0.13 mM, was purified and characterized. The purification method involved separation of outer-membrane proteins by SDS-PAGE andextraction of the protein from...... nitrocellulose or PVDF membranes after electrotransfer of proteins to the membranes. The N-terminal amino acidsequence of the purified protein, called Psi1, did not show homology to any known proteins, and in contrast to the phosphate-specific porin OprP ofP. aeruginosa its mobility in SDS-PAGE was not affected...... by solubilization temperature. An antiserum against Psi1 recognized a protein of M,55,000 in four other P. fluorescens strains among 24 tested strains representing Pseudomonas rRNA homology group I, showing antigenicheterogeneity within this group. A method for immunofluorescence microscopy involving cell...

  13. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

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    Søren Molin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG, which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP reductase (ENR from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent. EGCG treatment was further shown to be able to attenuate the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa.

  14. Evaluation of Enoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase Inhibitors as Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Quenching Reagents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Liang; Liu, Yang; Sternberg, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen which is responsible for a wide range of infections. Production of virulence factors and biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa are partly regulated by cell-to-cell communication quorum-sensing systems. Identification of quorum-quenching reagents...... which block the quorum-sensing process can facilitate development of novel treatment strategies for P. aeruginosa infections. We have used molecular dynamics simulation and experimental studies to elucidate the efficiencies of two potential quorum-quenching reagents, triclosan and green tea...... epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), which both function as inhibitors of the enoyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (ENR) from the bacterial type II fatty acid synthesis pathway. Our studies suggest that EGCG has a higher binding affinity towards ENR of P. aeruginosa and is an efficient quorum-quenching reagent...

  15. Bioactive proteins from Solanaceae as quorum sensing inhibitors against virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Singh, Gurpreet; Tamboli, Ekant; Acharya, Aurovind; Kumarasamy, Chellan; Mala, Kanchana; Raman, Pachaiappan

    2015-06-01

    Cell-to-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS) is a generic event in bacteria that is used to coordinate gene expression among local populations. The phenomenon of QS depends on the fact that presence of sufficient bacteria ascertains a threshold level of autoinducer concentration that allows bacteria to sense a critical cell mass and to activate or repress target genes. Thus, QS has been an attractive target for the development of anti-infective strategies that are not based on the use of antibiotics. Several anti-QS approaches have been demonstrated including natural products from plant-based secondary metabolites. However, the role of plant bioactive proteins as an anti-QS peptide is yet to be deciphered. Against a backdrop of ever-increasing antibiotic resistant pathogens, there is a strong need for development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Thus, our hypothesis is that bioactive proteins from the plant family Solanaceae are quorum quenching molecules that can be exploited to develop a therapeutic strategy against virulence. We presume that bioactive proteins will inactivate or inhibit or degrade QS signals from bacteria to prevent cell-to-cell communication and thus inhibit development of virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further, the use of proteins as quorum quenchers will delay the bacteria to develop resistance against these quenching molecules. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Solution structure of protein synthesis initiation factor 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Hu, Yanmei; Bernal, Alejandra; Bullard, James M; Zhang, Yonghong

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen and a primary cause of nosocomial infection in humans. The rate of antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa is increasing worldwide leading to an unmet need for discovery of new chemical compounds distinctly different from present antimicrobials. Protein synthesis is an essential metabolic process and a validated target for the development of new antibiotics. Initiation factor 1 from P. aeruginosa (Pa-IF1) is the smallest of the three initiation factors that act to establish the 30S initiation complex during initiation of protein biosynthesis. Here we report the characterization and solution NMR structure of Pa-IF1. Pa-IF1 consists of a five-stranded β-sheet with an unusual extended β-strand at the C-terminus and one short α-helix arranged in the sequential order β1-β2-β3-α1-β4-β5. The structure adopts a typical β-barrel fold and contains an oligomer-binding motif. A cluster of basic residues (K39, R41, K42, K64, R66, R70, and R72) located on the surface of strands β4 and β5 near the short α-helix may compose the binding interface with the 30S subunit. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  17. Protein secretion systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an essay on diversity, evolution and function

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    Alain eFILLOUX

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein secretion systems are molecular nanomachines used by Gram-negative bacteria to thrive within their environment. They are used to release enzymes that hydrolyze complex carbon sources into usable compounds, or to release proteins that capture essential ions such as iron. They are also used to colonize and survive within eukaryotic hosts, causing acute or chronic infections, subverting the host cell response and escaping the immune system. In this article, the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is used as a model to review the diversity of secretion systems that bacteria have evolved to achieve these goals. This diversity may result from a progressive transformation of cell envelope complexes that initially may not have been dedicated to secretion. The striking similarities between secretion systems and type IV pili, flagella, bacteriophage tail or efflux pumps is a nice illustration of this evolution. Differences are also needed since various secretion configurations calls for diversity. For example, some proteins are released in the extracellular medium while others are directly injected into the cytosol of eukaryotic cells. Some proteins are folded before being released and transit into the periplasm. Other proteins cross the whole cell envelope at once in an unfolded state. However, the secretion system requires conserved basic elements or features. For example, there is a need for an energy source or for an outer membrane channel. The structure of this review is thus quite unconventional. Instead of listing secretion types one after each other, it presents a melting pot of concepts indicating that secretion types are in constant evolution and use basic principles. In other words, emergence of new secretion systems could be predicted the way Mendeleïev had anticipated characteristics of yet unknown elements.

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Protein A Mediates Interspecies Interactions at the Cell Surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Armbruster, Catherine R; Wolter, Daniel J; Mishra, Meenu; Hayden, Hillary S; Radey, Matthew C; Merrihew, Gennifer; MacCoss, Michael J; Burns, Jane; Wozniak, Daniel J; Parsek, Matthew R; Hoffman, Lucas R

    2016-05-24

    While considerable research has focused on the properties of individual bacteria, relatively little is known about how microbial interspecies interactions alter bacterial behaviors and pathogenesis. Staphylococcus aureus frequently coinfects with other pathogens in a range of different infectious diseases. For example, coinfection by S. aureus with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs commonly in people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with higher lung disease morbidity and mortality. S. aureus secretes numerous exoproducts that are known to interact with host tissues, influencing inflammatory responses. The abundantly secreted S. aureus staphylococcal protein A (SpA) binds a range of human glycoproteins, immunoglobulins, and other molecules, with diverse effects on the host, including inhibition of phagocytosis of S. aureus cells. However, the potential effects of SpA and other S. aureus exoproducts on coinfecting bacteria have not been explored. Here, we show that S. aureus-secreted products, including SpA, significantly alter two behaviors associated with persistent infection. We found that SpA inhibited biofilm formation by specific P. aeruginosa clinical isolates, and it also inhibited phagocytosis by neutrophils of all isolates tested. Our results indicate that these effects were mediated by binding to at least two P. aeruginosa cell surface structures-type IV pili and the exopolysaccharide Psl-that confer attachment to surfaces and to other bacterial cells. Thus, we found that the role of a well-studied S. aureus exoproduct, SpA, extends well beyond interactions with the host immune system. Secreted SpA alters multiple persistence-associated behaviors of another common microbial community member, likely influencing cocolonization and coinfection with other microbes. Bacteria rarely exist in isolation, whether on human tissues or in the environment, and they frequently coinfect with other microbes. However, relatively little is known about how

  19. Penicillin-Binding Protein 3 Is Essential for Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Davies, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) function as transpeptidases, carboxypeptidases, or endopeptidases during peptidoglycan synthesis in bacteria. As the well-known drug targets for β-lactam antibiotics, the physiological functions of PBPs and whether they are essential for growth are of significant interest. The pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa poses a particular risk to immunocompromised and cystic fibrosis patients, and infections caused by this pathogen are difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance. To identify potential drug targets among the PBPs in P. aeruginosa, we performed gene knockouts of all the high-molecular-mass (HMM) PBPs and determined the impacts on cell growth and morphology, susceptibility to β-lactams, peptidoglycan structure, virulence, and pathogenicity. Disruptions of the transpeptidase domains of most HMM PBPs, including double disruptions, had only minimal effects on cell growth. The exception was PBP3, where cell growth occurred only when the protein was conditionally expressed on an integrated plasmid. Conditional deletion of PBP3 also caused a defect in cell division and increased susceptibility to β-lactams. Knockout of PBP1a led to impaired motility, and this observation, together with its localization at the cell poles, suggests its involvement in flagellar function. Overall, these findings reveal that PBP3 represents the most promising target for drug discovery against P. aeruginosa, whereas other HMM PBPs have less potential. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  20. Global analysis of disulfide bond proteins in Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposed to hydrogen peroxide and gamma rays.

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    An, Byung Chull; Lee, Seung Sik; Lee, Eun Mi; Wi, Seung Gon; Park, Woojun; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2010-05-01

    To isolate and characterise the oxidative stress-responsible disulfide bond proteins (DSBP) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, under hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and gamma ray-induced stress conditions. Oxidative stress in P. aeruginosa was induced by H(2)O(2) or (60)Co gamma-rays. DSBP of P. aeruginosa were isolated by using a thiol affinity purification method and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Induction of DSBP and their transcriptional levels were analysed by Western blot and quantitative-polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR), respectively. We isolated and identified 40 DSBP in P. aeruginosa. A comparison of DSBP patterns under different stress conditions, including exposure to 0.5 mM H(2)O(2) and 30 Gy of gamma rays, was carried out. We selected 13 DSBP based on their increased intensity under oxidative stress and investigated their expression levels using q-PCR. Of these 13 proteins, P. aeruginosa (PA) 0126 and PA0277 transcriptional levels were strongly induced (4- to 9-fold) by gamma ray. A corresponding induction in the translational levels of PA0126 was confirmed by Western blot analysis. PA0126 was identified is a hypothetical protein with 206 amino acids and contained three cysteine residues. A shift in molecular weight of PA0126 under oxidised/reduced state indicated its homo-oligomeric structure under non-reducing condition. PA0126, a hypothetical protein with disulfide bonds was identified as a key responder to oxidative stress along with other known DSBP of P. aeruginosa. We determined that all DSBP underwent a redox cycling. Furthermore, our results give deeper insight into the relationship between oxidative stress and DSBP in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Two homologous EF-G proteins from Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibit distinct functions.

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    Stephanie O Palmer

    Full Text Available Genes encoding two proteins corresponding to elongation factor G (EF-G were cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The proteins encoded by these genes are both members of the EFG I subfamily. The gene encoding one of the forms of EF-G is located in the str operon and the resulting protein is referred to as EF-G1A while the gene encoding the other form of EF-G is located in another part of the genome and the resulting protein is referred to as EF-G1B. These proteins were expressed and purified to 98% homogeneity. Sequence analysis indicated the two proteins are 90/84% similar/identical. In other organisms containing multiple forms of EF-G a lower degree of similarity is seen. When assayed in a poly(U-directed poly-phenylalanine translation system, EF-G1B was 75-fold more active than EF-G1A. EF-G1A pre-incubate with ribosomes in the presence of the ribosome recycling factor (RRF decreased polymerization of poly-phenylalanine upon addition of EF-G1B in poly(U-directed translation suggesting a role for EF-G1A in uncoupling of the ribosome into its constituent subunits. Both forms of P. aeruginosa EF-G were active in ribosome dependent GTPase activity. The kinetic parameters (K M for the interaction of EF-G1A and EF-G1B with GTP were 85 and 70 μM, respectively. However, EF-G1B exhibited a 5-fold greater turnover number (observed k cat for the hydrolysis of GTP than EF-G1A; 0.2 s(-1 vs. 0.04 s(-1. These values resulted in specificity constants (k cat (obs/K M for EF-G1A and EF-G1B of 0.5 x 10(3 s(-1 M(-1 and 3.0 x 10(3 s(-1 M(-1, respectively. The antibiotic fusidic acid (FA completely inhibited poly(U-dependent protein synthesis containing P. aeruginosa EF-G1B, but the same protein synthesis system containing EF-G1A was not affected. Likewise, the activity of EF-G1B in ribosome dependent GTPase assays was completely inhibited by FA, while the activity of EF-G1A was not affected.

  2. Lipopolysaccharide Membranes and Membrane Proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Studied by Computer Simulation

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    Straatsma, TP

    2006-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental Gram-negative bacterium with high metabolic versatility and an exceptional ability to adapt to a wide range of ecological environments, including soil, marches, coastal habitats, plant and animal tissues. Gram-negative microbes are characterized by the asymmetric lipopolysaccharide outer membrane, the study of which is important for a number of applications. The adhesion to mineral surfaces plays a central role in characterizing their contribution to the fate of contaminants in complex environmental systems by effecting microbial transport through soils, respiration redox chemistry, and ion mobility. Another important application stems from the fact that it is also a major opportunistic human pathogen that can result in life-threatening infections in many immunocompromised patients, such as lung infections in children with cystic fibrosis, bacteraemia in burn victims, urinary-tract infections in catheterized patients, hospital-acquired pneumonia in patients on respirators, infections in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, and keratitis and corneal ulcers in users of extended-wear soft contact lenses. The inherent resistance against antibiotics which has been linked with the specific interactions in the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa makes these infections difficult to treat. Developments in simulation methodologies as well as computer hardware have enabled the molecular simulation of biological systems of increasing size and with increasing accuracy, providing detail that is difficult or impossible to obtain experimentally. Computer simulation studies contribute to our understanding of the behavior of proteins, protein-protein and protein-DNA complexes. In recent years, a number of research groups have made significant progress in applying these methods to the study of biological membranes. However, these applications have been focused exclusively on lipid bilayer membranes and on membrane proteins in lipid

  3. The outer membrane protein OprQ and adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to human fibronectin.

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    Arhin, Abraham; Boucher, Cliff

    2010-05-01

    Outer membrane proteins of the Gram-negative organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa play a significant role in membrane permeability, antibiotic resistance, nutrient uptake, and virulence in the infection site. In this study, we show that the P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein OprQ, a member of the OprD superfamily, is involved in the binding of human fibronectin (Fn). Some members of the OprD subfamily have been reported to be important in the uptake of nutrients from the environment. Comparison of wild-type and mutant strains of P. aeruginosa revealed that inactivation of the oprQ gene does not reduce the growth rate. Although it does not appear to be involved in nutrient uptake, an increased doubling time was reproducibly observed with the loss of OprQ in P. aeruginosa. Utilizing an oprQ-xylE transcriptional fusion, we determined that the PA2760 gene, encoding OprQ, was upregulated under conditions of decreased iron and magnesium. This upregulation appears to occur in early exponential phase. Insertional inactivation of PA2760 in the P. aeruginosa wild-type background did not produce a significant increase in resistance to any antibiotic tested, a phenotype that is typical of OprD family members. Interestingly, the in trans expression of OprQ in the DeltaoprQ PAO1 mutant resulted in increased sensitivity to certain antibiotics. These findings suggest that OprQ is under dual regulation with other P. aeruginosa genes. Intact P. aeruginosa cells are capable of binding human Fn. We found that loss of OprQ resulted in a reduction of binding to plasmatic Fn in vitro. Finally, we present a discussion of the possible role of the P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein OprQ in adhesion to epithelial cells, thereby increasing colonization and subsequently enhancing lung destruction by P. aeruginosa.

  4. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope proteome by capture of surface-exposed proteins on activated magnetic nanoparticles.

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    Davide Vecchietti

    Full Text Available We report on specific magneto-capturing followed by Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT for the analysis of surface-exposed proteins of intact cells of the bacterial opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The magneto-separation of cell envelope fragments from the soluble cytoplasmic fraction allowed the MudPIT identification of the captured and neighboring proteins. Remarkably, we identified 63 proteins captured directly by nanoparticles and 67 proteins embedded in the cell envelope fragments. For a high number of proteins, our analysis strongly indicates either surface exposure or localization in an envelope district. The localization of most identified proteins was only predicted or totally unknown. This novel approach greatly improves the sensitivity and specificity of the previous methods, such as surface shaving with proteases that was also tested on P. aeruginosa. The magneto-capture procedure is simple, safe, and rapid, and appears to be well-suited for envelope studies in highly pathogenic bacteria.

  5. In vivo functional and molecular characterization of the Penicillin-Binding Protein 4 (DacB) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Aguilera Rossi, Cristian Gustavo; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Ayala Serrano, Juan Alfonso

    2016-10-06

    Community and nosocomial infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa still create a major therapeutic challenge. The resistance of this opportunist pathogen to β-lactam antibiotics is determined mainly by production of the inactivating enzyme AmpC, a class C cephalosporinase with a regulation system more complex than those found in members of the Enterobacteriaceae family. This regulatory system also participates directly in peptidoglycan turnover and recycling. One of the regulatory mechanisms for AmpC expression, recently identified in clinical isolates, is the inactivation of LMM-PBP4 (Low-Molecular-Mass Penicillin-Binding Protein 4), a protein whose catalytic activity on natural substrates has remained uncharacterized until now. We carried out in vivo activity trials for LMM-PBP4 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on macromolecular peptidoglycan of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The results showed a decrease in the relative quantity of dimeric, trimeric and anhydrous units, and a smaller reduction in monomer disaccharide pentapeptide (M5) levels, validating the occurrence of D,D-carboxypeptidase and D,D-endopeptidase activities. Under conditions of induction for this protein and cefoxitin treatment, the reduction in M5 is not fully efficient, implying that LMM-PBP4 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa presents better behaviour as a D,D-endopeptidase. Kinetic evaluation of the direct D,D-peptidase activity of this protein on natural muropeptides M5 and D45 confirmed this bifunctionality and the greater affinity of LMM-PBP4 for its dimeric substrate. A three-dimensional model for the monomeric unit of LMM-PBP4 provided structural information which supports its catalytic performance. LMM-PBP4 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bifunctional enzyme presenting both D,D-carboxypeptidase and D,D-endopeptidase activities; the D,D-endopeptidase function is predominant. Our study provides unprecedented functional and structural information which supports the proposal of this protein as a

  6. Type VI secretion system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: secretion and multimerization of VgrG proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachani, Abderrahman; Lossi, Nadine S; Hamilton, Alexander; Jones, Cerith; Bleves, Sophie; Albesa-Jové, David; Filloux, Alain

    2011-04-08

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Such infections are associated with an active type VI secretion system (T6SS), which consists of about 15 conserved components, including the AAA+ ATPase, ClpV. The T6SS secretes two categories of proteins, VgrG and Hcp. Hcp is structurally similar to a phage tail tube component, whereas VgrG proteins show similarity to the puncturing device at the tip of the phage tube. In P. aeruginosa, three T6SSs are known. The expression of H1-T6SS genes is controlled by the RetS sensor. Here, 10 vgrG genes were identified in the PAO1 genome, among which three are co-regulated with H1-T6SS, namely vgrG1a/b/c. Whereas VgrG1a and VgrG1c were secreted in a ClpV1-dependent manner, secretion of VgrG1b was ClpV1-independent. We show that VgrG1a and VgrG1c form multimers, which confirmed the VgrG model predicting trimers similar to the tail spike. We demonstrate that Hcp1 secretion requires either VgrG1a or VgrG1c, which may act independently to puncture the bacterial envelope and give Hcp1 access to the surface. VgrG1b is not required for Hcp1 secretion. Thus, VgrG1b does not require H1-T6SS for secretion nor does H1-T6SS require VgrG1b for its function. Finally, we show that VgrG proteins are required for secretion of a genuine H1-T6SS substrate, Tse3. Our results demonstrate that VgrG proteins are not only secreted components but are essential for secretion of other T6SS substrates. Overall, we emphasize variability in behavior of three P. aeruginosa VgrGs, suggesting that, although very similar, distinct VgrGs achieve specific functions.

  7. The clonal antibody response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa heat shock protein is highly diverse in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulanova, M; Petersen, T D; Ciofu, O

    1997-01-01

    The GroEL protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa belongs to the bacterial 60-65 kDa heat shock protein family. A strong antibody response to GroEL has been found in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic pulmonary infection caused by P. aeruginosa. Clonotypes of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies against Gro...... antibody clones against GroEL. The appearance of new clones with time reflected the long duration of the chronic infection. A striking addition of new clonotypes during the observation period occurred when a new unrelated bacterium (Burkholderia cepacia) had become established as a cause of the pulmonary...

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase provides an escape from phagocytosis by degrading the pulmonary surfactant protein-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhou Kuang

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes both acute pneumonitis in immunocompromised patients and chronic lung infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis and other bronchiectasis. Over 75% of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa secrete elastase B (LasB, an elastolytic metalloproteinase that is encoded by the lasB gene. Previously, in vitro studies have demonstrated that LasB degrades a number of components in both the innate and adaptive immune systems. These include surfactant proteins, antibacterial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and immunoglobulins. However, the contribution of LasB to lung infection by P. aeruginosa and to inactivation of pulmonary innate immunity in vivo needs more clarification. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying enhanced clearance of the ΔlasB mutant in mouse lungs. The ΔlasB mutant was attenuated in virulence when compared to the wild-type strain PAO1 during lung infection in SP-A+/+ mice. However, the ΔlasB mutant was as virulent as PAO1 in the lungs of SP-A⁻/⁻ mice. Detailed analysis showed that the ΔlasB mutant was more susceptible to SP-A-mediated opsonization but not membrane permeabilization. In vitro and in vivo phagocytosis experiments revealed that SP-A augmented the phagocytosis of ΔlasB mutant bacteria more efficiently than the isogenic wild-type PAO1. The ΔlasB mutant was found to have a severely reduced ability to degrade SP-A, consequently making it unable to evade opsonization by the collectin during phagocytosis. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa LasB protects against SP-A-mediated opsonization by degrading the collectin.

  9. Functional analysis of the protein encoded by the virulence gene psvA of Pseudomonas syringae pv. eriobotryae

    OpenAIRE

    Kamiunten, Hiroshi; Sakamaki, Ikuko; Matsuo, Mitsuhiro

    2011-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae pv. eriobotryae (Pse) virulence gene psvA, (2193 bp), has been isolated but not been functionally characterized. The psvA gene was divided into two parts; the N-terninal region (psvAN, nucleotides (nt) 1-1386), and the C-terminal region (psvAC, nt 1387-2193). Functional analysis of the proteins encoded by psvAN and psvAC was carried out. The PsvAC shows sequence similarity to the Ulp1 endopeptidase family, which includes small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteases....

  10. Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa SECRETION AND MULTIMERIZATION OF VgrG PROTEINS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hachani, Abderrahman; Lossi, Nadine S.; Hamilton, Alexander; Jones, Cerith; Bleves, Sophie; Albesa-Jove, David; Filloux, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Such infections are associated with an active type VI secretion system (T6SS), which consists of about 15 conserved components, including the AAA(+) ATPase, ClpV. The T6SS secretes two

  11. Identification of quorum-sensing regulated proteins in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa by proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arevalo-Ferro, C.; Hentzer, Morten; Reil, G.

    2003-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen which is responsible for severe nosocomial infections in immunocompromised patients and is the major pathogen in cystic fibrosis. The bacterium utilizes two interrelated quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which rely...

  12. Proteomic Detection of Non-Annotated Protein-Coding Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wook; Silby, Mark W.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicoll, Julie S.; Hixson, Kim K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Levy, Stuart B.

    2009-12-24

    Genome sequences are annotated by computational prediction of coding sequences, followed by similarity searches such as BLAST, which provide a layer of (possible) functional information. While the existence of processes such as alternative splicing complicates matters for eukaryote genomes, the view of bacterial genomes as a linear series of closely spaced genes leads to the assumption that computational annotations which predict such arrangements completely describe the coding capacity of bacterial genomes. We undertook a proteomic study to identify proteins expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 from genes which were not predicted during the genome annotation. Mapping peptides to the Pf0-1 genome sequence identified sixteen non-annotated protein-coding regions, of which nine were antisense to predicted genes, six were intergenic, and one read in the same direction as an annotated gene but in a different frame. The expression of all but one of the newly discovered genes was verified by RT-PCR. Few clues as to the function of the new genes were gleaned from informatic analyses, but potential orthologues in other Pseudomonas genomes were identified for eight of the new genes. The 16 newly identified genes improve the quality of the Pf0-1 genome annotation, and the detection of antisense protein-coding genes indicates the under-appreciated complexity of bacterial genome organization.

  13. Identification and characterization of the gltK gene encoding a membrane-associated glucose transport protein of pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewoye, L O; Worobec, E A

    2000-08-08

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa oprB gene encodes the carbohydrate-selective OprB porin, which translocates substrate molecules across the outer membrane to the periplasmic glucose-binding protein. We identified and cloned two open reading frames (ORFs) flanking the oprB gene but are not in operonic arrangement with the oprB gene. The downstream ORF encodes a putative polypeptide homologous to members of a family of transcriptional repressors, whereas the oprB gene is preceded by an ORF encoding a putative product, which exhibits strong homology to several carbohydrate transport ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins. The genomic copy of the upstream ORF was mutagenized by homologous recombination. Analysis of the deletion mutant in comparison with the wild type revealed a significant reduction in [14C] glucose transport activity in the mutant strain, suggesting that this ORF likely encodes the inner membrane component of the glucose ABC transporter. It is thus designated gltK gene to reflect its homology to the Pseudomona fluorescens mtlK and its involvement in the high-affinity glucose transport system. Multiple alignment analysis revealed that the P. aeruginosa gltK gene product is a member of the MalK subfamily of ABC proteins.

  14. Outer membrane targeting of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteins shows variable dependence on the components of Bam and Lol machineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Hanh H; Nickerson, Nicholas N; Lee, Vincent T; Kazimirova, Anastasia; Chami, Mohamed; Pugsley, Anthony P; Lory, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, the Lol and Bam machineries direct the targeting of lipidated and nonlipidated proteins, respectively, to the outer membrane (OM). Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with depleted levels of specific Bam and Lol proteins, we demonstrated a variable dependence of different OM proteins on these targeting pathways. Reduction in the level of BamA significantly affected the ability of the β-barrel membrane protein OprF to localize to the OM, while the targeting of three secretins that are functionally related OM proteins was less affected (PilQ and PscC) or not at all affected (XcpQ). Depletion of LolB affected all lipoproteins examined and had a variable effect on the nonlipidated proteins. While the levels of OprF, PilQ, and PscC were significantly reduced by LolB depletion, XcpQ was unaffected and was correctly localized to the OM. These results suggest that certain β-barrel proteins such as OprF primarily utilize the complete Bam machinery. The Lol machinery participates in the OM targeting of secretins to variable degrees, likely through its involvement in the assembly of lipidated Bam components. XcpQ, but not PilQ or PscC, was shown to assemble spontaneously into liposomes as multimers. This work raises the possibility that there is a gradient of utilization of Bam and Lol insertion and targeting machineries. Structural features of individual proteins, including their β-barrel content, may determine the propensity of these proteins for folding (or misfolding) during periplasmic transit and OM insertion, thereby influencing the extent of utilization of the Bam targeting machinery, respectively. Targeting of lipidated and nonlipidated proteins to the outer membrane (OM) compartment in Gram-negative bacteria involves the transfer across the periplasm utilizing the Lol and Bam machineries, respectively. We show that depletion of Bam and Lol components in Pseudomonas aeruginosa does not lead to a general OM protein translocation defect

  15. Understanding the molecular basis of plant growth promotional effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on rice through protein profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiruvengadam Raguchander

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR, Pseudomonas fluorescens strain KH-1 was found to exhibit plant growth promotional activity in rice under both in-vitro and in-vivo conditions. But the mechanism underlying such promotional activity of P. fluorescens is not yet understood clearly. In this study, efforts were made to elucidate the molecular responses of rice plants to P. fluorescens treatment through protein profiling. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis strategy was adopted to identify the PGPR responsive proteins and the differentially expressed proteins were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Results Priming of P. fluorescens, 23 different proteins found to be differentially expressed in rice leaf sheaths and MS analysis revealed the differential expression of some important proteins namely putative p23 co-chaperone, Thioredoxin h- rice, Ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase large chain precursor, Nucleotide diPhosphate kinase, Proteosome sub unit protein and putative glutathione S-transferase protein. Conclusion Functional analyses of the differential proteins were reported to be directly or indirectly involved in growth promotion in plants. Thus, this study confirms the primary role of PGPR strain KH-1 in rice plant growth promotion.

  16. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Characterization of the Type III Secretion System Tip Chaperone Protein PcrG of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sukanya; Nordhues, Bryce A; Kaur, Kawaljit; Zhang, Na; De Guzman, Roberto N

    2015-11-03

    Lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the leading cause of death among cystic fibrosis patients. To initiate infection, P. aeruginosa assembles a protein nanomachine, the type III secretion system (T3SS), to inject bacterial proteins directly into target host cells. An important regulator of the P. aeruginosa T3SS is the chaperone protein PcrG, which forms a complex with the tip protein, PcrV. In addition to its role as a chaperone to the tip protein, PcrG also regulates protein secretion. PcrG homologues are also important in the T3SS of other pathogens such as Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of bubonic plague. The atomic structure of PcrG or any member of the family of tip protein chaperones is currently unknown. Here, we show by circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy that PcrG lacks a tertiary structure. However, it is not completely disordered but contains secondary structures dominated by two long α-helices from residue 16 to 41 and from residue 55 to 76. The helices of PcrG are partially formed, have similar backbone dynamics, and are flexible. NMR titrations show that the entire length of PcrG residues from position 9 to 76 is involved in binding to PcrV. PcrG adds to the growing list of partially folded or unstructured proteins with important roles in type III secretion.

  17. Crystal structure of the YffB protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggests a glutathione-dependent thiol reductase function

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    Dauter Zbigniew

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yffB (PA3664 gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an uncharacterized protein of 13 kDa molecular weight with a marginal sequence similarity to arsenate reductase from Escherichia coli. The crystal structure determination of YffB was undertaken as part of a structural genomics effort in order to assist with the functional assignment of the protein. Results The structure was determined at 1.0 Å resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. The fold is very similar to that of arsenate reductase, which is an extension of the thioredoxin fold. Conclusion Given the conservation of the functionally important residues and the ability to bind glutathione, YffB is likely to function as a GSH-dependent thiol reductase.

  18. The YebC family protein PA0964 negatively regulates the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quinolone signal system and pyocyanin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Haihua; Li, Lingling; Dong, Zhaolin; Surette, Michael G; Duan, Kangmin

    2008-09-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity is often manifested by the expression of various cell-associated and secreted virulence factors, such as exoenzymes, protease, and toxins. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of virulence genes is coordinately controlled by the global regulatory quorum-sensing systems, which includes the las and rhl systems as well as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) system. Phenazine compounds are among the virulence factors under the control of both the rhl and PQS systems. In this study, regulation of the phzA1B1C1D1E1 (phzA1) operon, which is involved in phenazine synthesis, was investigated. In an initial study of inducing conditions, we observed that phzA1 was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tetracycline. Screening of 13,000 mutants revealed 32 genes that altered phzA1 expression in the presence of subinhibitory tetracycline concentrations. Among them, the gene PA0964, designated pmpR (pqsR-mediated PQS regulator), has been identified as a novel regulator of the PQS system. It belongs to a large group of widespread conserved hypothetical proteins with unknown function, the YebC protein family (Pfam family DUF28). It negatively regulates the quorum-sensing response regulator pqsR of the PQS system by binding at its promoter region. Alongside phzA1 expression and phenazine and pyocyanin production, a set of virulence factors genes controlled by both rhl and the PQS were shown to be modulated by PmpR. Swarming motility and biofilm formation were also significantly affected. The results added another layer of regulation in the rather complex quorum-sensing systems in P. aeruginosa and demonstrated a clear functional clue for the YebC family proteins.

  19. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells.

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    Emily F A van 't Wout

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA. Efficient functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is crucial for cell survival and appropriate immune responses, while an excess of unfolded proteins within the ER leads to "ER stress" and activation of the "unfolded protein response" (UPR. Bacterial infection and Toll-like receptor activation trigger the UPR most likely due to the increased demand for protein folding of inflammatory mediators. In this study, we show that cell-free conditioned medium of the PAO1 strain of P. aeruginosa, containing secreted virulence factors, induces ER stress in primary bronchial epithelial cells as evidenced by splicing of XBP1 mRNA and induction of CHOP, GRP78 and GADD34 expression. Most aspects of the ER stress response were dependent on TAK1 and p38 MAPK, except for the induction of GADD34 mRNA. Using various mutant strains and purified virulence factors, we identified pyocyanin and AprA as inducers of ER stress. However, the induction of GADD34 was mediated by an ER stress-independent integrated stress response (ISR which was at least partly dependent on the iron-sensing eIF2α kinase HRI. Our data strongly suggest that this increased GADD34 expression served to protect against Pseudomonas-induced, iron-sensitive cell cytotoxicity. In summary, virulence factors from P. aeruginosa induce ER stress in airway epithelial cells and also trigger the ISR to improve cell survival of the host.

  20. Expression, purification and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the T6SS effector protein Tse3 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Defen; Shang, Guijun; Yu, Qian; Zhang, Heqiao; Zhao, Yanyu; Cang, Huaixing; Gu, Lichuan; Xu, Sujuan; Huang, Yan

    2013-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses the type VI secretion system (T6SS) to inject effector proteins into rival cells in niche competition. Tse3, one of the effectors of T6SS, is delivered into the periplasm of recipient cells. Tse3 functions as a muramidase that degrades the β-1,4-linkage between N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in peptidoglycan, thus leading to lysis of the recipient cells and providing a competitive advantage to the donor cells. Here, the preliminary crystallographic study of Tse3 is reported. A crystal of Tse3 diffracted to 1.5 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C121, with unit-cell parameters a = 166.99, b = 70.13, c = 41.94 Å, α = 90.00, β = 90.52, γ  = 90.00° and one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  1. Arabidopsis heterotrimeric G-proteins play a critical role in host and nonhost resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pathogens.

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    Seonghee Lee

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G-proteins have been proposed to be involved in many aspects of plant disease resistance but their precise role in mediating nonhost disease resistance is not well understood. We evaluated the roles of specific subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins using knock-out mutants of Arabidopsis Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits in response to host and nonhost Pseudomonas pathogens. Plants lacking functional Gα, Gβ and Gγ1Gγ2 proteins displayed enhanced bacterial growth and disease susceptibility in response to host and nonhost pathogens. Mutations of single Gγ subunits Gγ1, Gγ2 and Gγ3 did not alter bacterial disease resistance. Some specificity of subunit usage was observed when comparing host pathogen versus nonhost pathogen. Overexpression of both Gα and Gβ led to reduced bacterial multiplication of nonhost pathogen P. syringae pv. tabaci whereas overexpression of Gβ, but not of Gα, resulted in reduced bacterial growth of host pathogen P. syringae pv. maculicola, compared to wild-type Col-0. Moreover, the regulation of stomatal aperture by bacterial pathogens was altered in Gα and Gβ mutants but not in any of the single or double Gγ mutants. Taken together, these data substantiate the critical role of heterotrimeric G-proteins in plant innate immunity and stomatal modulation in response to P. syringae.

  2. In silico Analysis and Molecular Modeling of RNA Polymerase, Sigma S (RpoS Protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1

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    Mansour Sedighi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sigma factors are proteins that regulate transcription in bacteria. Sigma factors can be activated in response to different environmental conditions. The rpoS (RNA polymerase, sigma S gene encodes sigma-38 (σ38, or RpoS, a 37.8 kDa protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa strains. RpoS is a central regulator of the general stress response and operates in both retroactive and proactive manners; not only does it allow the cell to survive environmental challenges; it also prepares the cell for subsequent stresses (cross-protection. Methods: The significance of RpoS for stress resistance and protein expression in stationary-phase P. aeruginosa cells was assessed. The goal of the current study was to characterize RpoS of P. aeruginosa PAO1 using bioinformatics tools. Results: The results showed that RpoS is an unstable protein that belongs to the sigma-70 factor family. Secondary structure analysis predicted that random coil is the predominant structure followed by extended alpha helix. The three-dimensional (3D structure was modeled using SWISS-MODEL Workspace. Conclusion: Determination of sequence, function, structure, and predicted epitopes of RpoS is important for modeling of inhibitors that will help in the design of new drugs to combat multi-drug-resistant (MDR strains. Such information may aid in the development of new diagnostic tools, drugs, and vaccines for treatment in endemic regions.

  3. An in silico structural, functional and phylogenetic analysis with three dimensional protein modeling of alkaline phosphatase enzyme of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnendu Pramanik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is a primary macronutrient required for normal plant health, metabolism and survival. It is present in soil in compound insoluble form for which plant cannot uptake it directly from the soil. Some phosphate solubilizing bacteria possess some important enzymes for phosphate solubilization as well as mineralization. Alkaline (or basic phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1 is a type of zinc containing dimeric hydrolase enzyme responsible for removing the phosphate groups from various kinds of molecules including nucleotides, proteins, and alkaloids. Unlike acid phosphatases alkaline phosphatases are most effective in an alkaline environment. Alkaline phosphatases (ALPs are of immense importance in various agricultural industries including dairy industries for testing successful pasteurization process. In this present study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphatase was selected for a detailed computational investigation to exploit its physicochemical characteristics, structural properties including 3D model, model quality analysis, phylogenetic assessment and functional analysis using a number of available standard bioinformatics tools. The protein having average molecular weight about 51 kDa, was found thermostable and alkaline in nature belonging to metalloenzyme superfamily. Specifically, the thermostable behavior of the protein is suitable for the dairy industry. Moreover, this theoretical overview will help researchers to get an idea about the predicted protein structure and it may also help to design genetically engineered phosphate solubilizing bacteria by designing specific primers.

  4. A Mig-14-like protein (PA5003) affects antimicrobial peptide recognition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jochumsen, Nicholas; Liu, Yang; Molin, Søren

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of antibiotic resistance in pathogenic bacteria is a growing global health problem which is gradually making the treatment of infectious diseases less efficient. Antimicrobial peptides are small charged molecules found in organisms from the complete phylogenetic spectrum. The peptides...... are attractive candidates for novel drug development due to their activity against bacteria that are resistant to conventional antibiotics, and reports of peptide resistance are rare in the clinical setting. Paradoxically, many clinically relevant bacteria have mechanisms that can recognize and respond...... to the presence of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAMPs) in the environment by changing the properties of the microbial surface thereby increasing the tolerance of the microbes towards the peptides. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa an essential component of this inducible tolerance mechanism is the lipopolysaccharide...

  5. Radiolabelling of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in intact Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells; consequences of. beta. -lactamase activity by PBP-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livermore, D.M.

    1987-06-01

    The time-course of labelling of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) was compared for intact and sonicated cell preparations of nine Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains, all of which gave identical PBP profiles. Saturation of all the PBPs in cell-sonicates occurred within 2 min of exposure to /sup 14/(C) benzylpenicillin. PBP-5 formed an unstable penicilloyl-complex: the other PBPs formed highly stable complexes. Saturation of PBP-4 in intact cells occurred within 2 min of exposure to the antibiotic, correlating with the high affinity of this protein for penicillin. Labelling of PBPs 1a, 1b and 3 was slow but progressive, suggesting that these proteins were shielded by the permeability barrier(s) of the cell. Labelling of PBP-5 in intact cells achieved 10-20% saturation within 2-10 min of exposure to /sup 14/(C) benzylpenicillin, but did not increase subsequently. This behaviour may indicate that establishment of a steady state between the formation and breakdown of the PBP-5-penicillin complex, suggesting that PBP-5, potentiated by the permeability barrier, functions as a feeble ..beta..-lactamase. Such activity may distort the labelling of other PBPs by reducing the concentration of penicillin in the periplasm.

  6. Fluorescence anisotropy-based measurement of Pseudomonas aeruginosa penicillin-binding protein 2 transpeptidase inhibitor acylation rate constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam B; Gao, Ning; Gu, Rong-Fang; Thresher, Jason

    2014-10-15

    High-molecular-weight penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) are essential integral membrane proteins of the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane responsible for biosynthesis of peptidoglycan. They are the targets of antibacterial β-lactam drugs, including penicillins, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. β-Lactams covalently acylate the active sites of the PBP transpeptidase domains. Because β-lactams are time-dependent inhibitors, quantitative assessment of the inhibitory activity of these compounds ideally involves measurement of their second-order acylation rate constants. We previously described a fluorescence anisotropy-based assay to measure these rate constants for soluble constructs of PBP3 (Anal. Biochem. 439 (2013) 37-43). Here we report the expression and purification of a soluble construct of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBP2 as a fusion protein with NusA. This soluble PBP2 was used to measure second-order acylation rate constants with the fluorescence anisotropy assay. Measurements were obtained for mecillinam, which reacts specifically with PBP2, and for several carbapenems. The assay also revealed that PBP2 slowly hydrolyzed mecillinam and was used to measure the rate constant for this deacylation reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Transcriptomic and Metabolomic Analysis Revealed Multifaceted Effects of Phage Protein Gp70.1 on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Xia Zhao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The impact of phage infection on the host cell is severe. In order to take over the cellular machinery, some phage proteins were produced to shut off the host biosynthesis early in the phage infection. The discovery and identification of these phage-derived inhibitors have a significant prospect of application in antibacterial treatment. This work presented a phage protein, gp70.1, with nonspecific inhibitory effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa and Escherichia coli (E. coli. Gp70.1 was encoded by early gene – orf 70.1 from P. aeruginosa phage PaP3. The P. aeruginosa with a plasmid encoding gp70.1 showed with delayed growth and had the appearance of a small colony. The combination of multifaceted analysis including microarray-based transcriptomic analysis, RT-qPCR, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics and phenotype experiments were performed to investigate the effects of gp70.1 on P. aeruginosa. A total of 178 genes of P. aeruginosa mainly involved in extracellular function and metabolism were differentially expressed in the presence of gp70.1 at 3 examined time points. Furthermore, our results indicated that gp70.1 had an extensive impact on the extracellular phenotype of P. aeruginosa, such as motility, pyocyanin, extracellular protease, polysaccharide, and cellulase. For the metabolism of P. aeruginosa, the main effect of gp70.1 was the reduction of amino acid consumption. Finally, the RNA polymerase sigma factor RpoS was identified as a potential cellular target of gp70.1. Gp70.1 was the first bacterial inhibitor identified from Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP3. It was also the first phage protein that interacted with the global regulator RpoS of bacteria. Our results indicated the potential value of gp70.1 in antibacterial applications. This study preliminarily revealed the biological function of gp70.1 and provided a reference for the study of other phage genes sharing similarities with orf70.1.

  8. Electron transfer patterns of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raffalt, Anders Christer; Schmidt, L.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2009-01-01

    protein structural mobility in the overall two-ET process. We suggest that conformational protein mobility blocks intramolecular interheme ET in bulk homogeneous solution but triggers opening of this gated ET channel in the electrochemical environment or in the membrane environment of natural respiratory...

  9. Anaerobic survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pyruvate fermentation requires an Usp-type stress protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K; Boes, N; Escbach, M

    2006-01-01

    activity was detected in the deeper layers of a P. aeruginosa biofilm using a PPA3309-gfp (green fluorescent protein gene) fusion and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. This is the first description of an Anr-dependent, anaerobically induced, and functional Usp-like protein in bacteria....... the induced synthesis of three enzymes involved in arginine fermentation, ArcA, ArcB, and ArcC, and the outer membrane protein OprL. Moreover, formation of two proteins of unknown function, PA3309 and PA4352, increased by factors of 72- and 22-fold, respectively. Both belong to the group of universal stress...... proteins (Usp). Long-term survival of a PA3309 knockout mutant by pyruvate fermentation was found drastically reduced. The oxygen-sensing regulator Anr controls expression of the PPA3309-lacZ reporter gene fusion after a shift to anaerobic conditions and further pyruvate fermentation. PA3309 expression...

  10. Comparative genomic analysis of two-component regulatory proteins in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavin, J.L.; Kiil, Kristoffer; Resano, O.

    2007-01-01

    requires a complex array of TCS proteins to cope with diverse plant hosts, host responses, and environmental conditions. Results: Based on the genomic data, pattern searches with Hidden Markov Model (HMM) profiles have been used to identify putative HKs and RRs. The genomes of Psy B728a, Pto DC3000 and Pph...... (Pph) 1448A have been recently sequenced providing a major resource for comparative genomic analysis. A mechanism commonly found in bacteria for signal transduction is the two-component system (TCS), which typically consists of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and a response regulator (RR). P. syringae...... 1448A were found to contain a large number of genes encoding TCS proteins, and a core of complete TCS proteins were shared between these genomes: 30 putative TCS clusters, 11 orphan HKs, 33 orphan RRs, and 16 hybrid HKs. A close analysis of the distribution of genes encoding TCS proteins revealed...

  11. Studies on Molecular Characterizations of the Outer Membrane Proteins, Lipids Profile, and Exopolysaccharides of Antibiotic Resistant Strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehia, Hany M.; Hassanein, Wesam A.; Ibraheim, Shimaa M.

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility of the tested Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain to two different antibiotics, tetracycline (TE) and ciprofloxacin (CIP), was carried out using liquid dilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of TE and CIP were 9.0 and 6.0 mg/100 mL, respectively. Some metabolic changes due to both, the mode of action of TE and CIP on P. aeruginosa and its resistance to high concentrations of antibiotics (sub-MIC) were detected. The total cellular protein contents decreased after antibiotic treatment, while outer membrane protein (OMP) contents were approximately constant for both treated and untreated cells. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis of the OMPs for untreated and TE and CIP treated cells indicated that the molecular changes were achieved as; lost in, induction and stability of some protein bands as a result of antibiotics treatment. Five bands (with mol. wt. 71.75, 54.8, 31.72, 28.63, and 20.33 KDa) were stable in both treated and untreated tested strains, while two bands (with mol. wt. 194.8 and 118.3 KDa) were induced and the lost of only one band (with mol. wt. 142.5 KDa) after antibiotics treatment. On the other hand, total lipids and phospholipids increased in antibiotic treated cells, while neutral lipids decreased. Also, there was observable stability in the number of fatty acids in untreated and treated cells (11 fatty acids). The unsaturation index was decreased to 56% and 17.6% in both TE and CIP treatments, respectively. The produced amount of EPSs in untreated cultures of P. aeruginosa was relatively higher than in treated cultures with sub-MICs of TE and CIP antibiotics. It was also observed that the amounts of exopolysaccharides (EPSs) increased by increasing the incubation period up to five days of incubation in case of untreated and antibiotic treated cultures. PMID:25710016

  12. Light Regulation of Swarming Motility in Pseudomonas syringae Integrates Signaling Pathways Mediated by a Bacteriophytochrome and a LOV Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Liang; McGrane, Regina S.; Beattie, Gwyn A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The biological and regulatory roles of photosensory proteins are poorly understood for nonphotosynthetic bacteria. The foliar bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae has three photosensory protein-encoding genes that are predicted to encode the blue-light-sensing LOV (light, oxygen, or voltage) histidine kinase (LOV-HK) and two red/far-red-light-sensing bacteriophytochromes, BphP1 and BphP2. We provide evidence that LOV-HK and BphP1 form an integrated network that regulates swarming motility in response to multiple light wavelengths. The swarming motility of P. syringae B728a deletion mutants indicated that LOV-HK positively regulates swarming motility in response to blue light and BphP1 negatively regulates swarming motility in response to red and far-red light. BphP2 does not detectably regulate swarming motility. The histidine kinase activity of each LOV-HK and BphP1 is required for this regulation based on the loss of complementation upon mutation of residues key to their kinase activity. Surprisingly, mutants lacking both lov and bphP1 were similar in motility to a bphP1 single mutant in blue light, indicating that the loss of bphP1 is epistatic to the loss of lov and also that BphP1 unexpectedly responds to blue light. Moreover, whereas expression of bphP1 did not alter motility under blue light in a bphP1 mutant, it reduced motility in a mutant lacking lov and bphP1, demonstrating that LOV-HK positively regulates motility by suppressing negative regulation by BphP1. These results are the first to show cross talk between the LOV protein and phytochrome signaling pathways in bacteria, and the similarity of this regulatory network to that of photoreceptors in plants suggests a possible common ancestry. PMID:23760465

  13. Structural insights into the UbiD protein family from the crystal structure of PA0254 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agata Jacewicz

    Full Text Available The 3-polyprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate decarboxylase (UbiD catalyzes the conversion of 3-polyprenyl-4-hydroxybenzoate to 2-polyprenylphenol in the biosynthesis of ubiquinone. Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains two genes (PA0254 and PA5237 that are related in sequence to putative UbiD enzymes. A bioinformatics analysis suggests that the UbiD sequence family can be divided into two subclasses, with PA5237 and PA0254 belonging to different branches of this family. The three-dimensional structure of PA0254 has been determined using single wavelength anomalous diffraction and molecular replacement in two different crystal forms to resolutions of 1.95 and 2.3 Å, respectively. The subunit of PA0254 consists of three domains, an N-terminal α/β domain, a split β-barrel with a similar fold of a family of flavin reductases and a C-terminal α/β domain with a topology characteristic for the UbiD protein family. The middle domain contains a metal binding site adjacent to a large open cleft that may represent the active site. The two protein ligands binding a magnesium ion, His188 and Glu229, invariant in the PA0254 subclass, are also conserved in a corresponding metal site found in one of the FMN binding proteins from the split β-barrel fold family. PA0254 forms, in contrast to the hexameric UbiD from E. coli and P. aeruginosa, a homo-dimer. Insertion of four residues in a loop region in the PA0254 type enzymes results in structural differences that are incompatible with hexamer assembly.

  14. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Pyocyanin Biosynthetic Protein PhzM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons,J.; Greenhagen, B.; Shi, K.; Calabrese, K.; Robinson, H.; Ladner, J.

    2007-01-01

    Pyocyanin is a biologically active phenazine produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is thought to endow P. aeruginosa with a competitive growth advantage in colonized tissue and is also thought to be a virulence factor in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and AIDS where patients are commonly infected by pathogenic Pseudomonads due to their immunocompromised state. Pyocyanin is also a chemically interesting compound due to its unusual oxidation-reduction activity. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, the precursor to the bioactive phenazines, is synthesized from chorismic acid by enzymes encoded in a seven-gene cistron in P. aeruginosa and in other Pseudomonads. Phenzine-1-carboxylic acid is believed to be converted to pyocyanin by the sequential actions of the putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent N-methyltransferase PhzM and the putative flavin-dependent hydroxylase PhzS. Here we report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of PhzM determined by single anomalous dispersion. Unlike many methyltransferases, PhzM is a dimer in solution. The 36 kDa PhzM polypeptide folds into three domains. The C-terminal domain exhibits the {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold typical of small molecule methyltransferases. Two smaller N-terminal domains form much of the dimer interface. Structural alignments with known methyltransferases show that PhzM is most similar to the plant O-methyltransferases that are characterized by an unusual intertwined dimer interface. The structure of PhzM contains no ligands, and the active site is open and solvent-exposed when compared to structures of similar enzymes. In vitro experiments using purified PhzM alone demonstrate that it has little or no ability to methylate phenzine-1-carboxylic acid. However, when the putative hydroxylase PhzS is included, pyocyanin is readily produced. This observation suggests that a mechanism has evolved in P. aeruginosa that ensures efficient production of pyocyanin via the prevention of the formation and

  15. Structural and functional analysis of the pyocyanin biosynthetic protein PhzM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, James F; Greenhagen, Bryan T; Shi, Katherine; Calabrese, Kelly; Robinson, Howard; Ladner, Jane E

    2007-02-20

    Pyocyanin is a biologically active phenazine produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is thought to endow P. aeruginosa with a competitive growth advantage in colonized tissue and is also thought to be a virulence factor in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and AIDS where patients are commonly infected by pathogenic Pseudomonads due to their immunocompromised state. Pyocyanin is also a chemically interesting compound due to its unusual oxidation-reduction activity. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, the precursor to the bioactive phenazines, is synthesized from chorismic acid by enzymes encoded in a seven-gene cistron in P. aeruginosa and in other Pseudomonads. Phenzine-1-carboxylic acid is believed to be converted to pyocyanin by the sequential actions of the putative S-adenosylmethionine-dependent N-methyltransferase PhzM and the putative flavin-dependent hydroxylase PhzS. Here we report the 1.8 A crystal structure of PhzM determined by single anomalous dispersion. Unlike many methyltransferases, PhzM is a dimer in solution. The 36 kDa PhzM polypeptide folds into three domains. The C-terminal domain exhibits the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold typical of small molecule methyltransferases. Two smaller N-terminal domains form much of the dimer interface. Structural alignments with known methyltransferases show that PhzM is most similar to the plant O-methyltransferases that are characterized by an unusual intertwined dimer interface. The structure of PhzM contains no ligands, and the active site is open and solvent-exposed when compared to structures of similar enzymes. In vitro experiments using purified PhzM alone demonstrate that it has little or no ability to methylate phenzine-1-carboxylic acid. However, when the putative hydroxylase PhzS is included, pyocyanin is readily produced. This observation suggests that a mechanism has evolved in P. aeruginosa that ensures efficient production of pyocyanin via the prevention of the formation and release of an

  16. Computational discovery of putative quorum sensing inhibitors against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annapoorani, Angusamy; Umamageswaran, Venugopal; Parameswari, Radhakrishnan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2012-09-01

    Drugs have been discovered in the past mainly either by identification of active components from traditional remedies or by unpredicted discovery. A key motivation for the study of structure based virtual screening is the exploitation of such information to design targeted drugs. In this study, structure based virtual screening was used in search for putative quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virtual screening programme Glide version 5.5 was applied to screen 1,920 natural compounds/drugs against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of P. aeruginosa. Based on the results of in silico docking analysis, five top ranking compounds namely rosmarinic acid, naringin, chlorogenic acid, morin and mangiferin were subjected to in vitro bioassays against laboratory strain PAO1 and two more antibiotic resistant clinical isolates, P. aeruginosa AS1 (GU447237) and P. aeruginosa AS2 (GU447238). Among the five compounds studied, except mangiferin other four compounds showed significant inhibition in the production of protease, elastase and hemolysin. Further, all the five compounds potentially inhibited the biofilm related behaviours. This interaction study provided promising ligands to inhibit the quorum sensing (QS) mediated virulence factors production in P. aeruginosa.

  17. Pseudomonas fluorescens filamentous hemagglutinin, an iron-regulated protein, is an important virulence factor that modulates bacterial pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan Sun

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas fluorescens is a common bacterial pathogen to a wide range of aquaculture animals including various species of fish. In this study, we employed proteomic analysis and identified filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA as an iron-responsive protein secreted by TSS, a pathogenic P. fluorescens isolate. In vitro study showed that compared to the wild type, the fha mutant TSSfha (i exhibited a largely similar vegetative growth profile but significantly retarded in the ability of biofilm growth and producing extracellular matrix, (ii displayed no apparent flagella and motility, (iii was defective in the attachment to host cells and unable to form self-aggregation, (iv displayed markedly reduced capacity of hemagglutination and surviving in host serum. In vivo infection analysis revealed that TSSfha was significantly attenuated in the ability of dissemination in fish tissues and inducing host mortality, and that antibody blocking of the natural FHA produced by the wild type TSS impaired the infectivity of the pathogen. Furthermore, when introduced into turbot as a subunit vaccine, recombinant FHA elicited a significant protection against lethal TSS challenge. Taken together, these results indicate for the first time that P. fluorescens FHA is a key virulence factor essential to multiple biological processes associated with pathogenicity.

  18. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen

    2009-01-01

    residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded......2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...

  19. Discovery, characterization and in vivo activity of pyocin SD2, a protein antibiotic from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughey, Laura C; Josts, Inokentijs; Grinter, Rhys; White, Paul; Byron, Olwyn; Tucker, Nicholas P; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kleanthous, Colin; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Walker, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    Increasing rates of antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa means alternative approaches to antibiotic development are urgently required. Pyocins, produced by P. aeruginosa for intraspecies competition, are highly potent protein antibiotics known to actively translocate across the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa. Understanding and exploiting the mechanisms by which pyocins target, penetrate and kill P. aeruginosa is a promising approach to antibiotic development. In this work we show the therapeutic potential of a newly identified tRNase pyocin, pyocin SD2, by demonstrating its activity in vivo in a murine model of P. aeruginosa lung infection. In addition, we propose a mechanism of cell targeting and translocation for pyocin SD2 across the P. aeruginosa outer membrane. Pyocin SD2 is concentrated at the cell surface, via binding to the common polysaccharide antigen (CPA) of P. aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS), from where it can efficiently locate its outer membrane receptor FpvAI. This strategy of utilizing both the CPA and a protein receptor for cell targeting is common among pyocins as we show that pyocins S2, S5 and SD3 also bind to the CPA. Additional data indicate a key role for an unstructured N-terminal region of pyocin SD2 in the subsequent translocation of the pyocin into the cell. These results greatly improve our understanding of how pyocins target and translocate across the outer membrane of P. aeruginosa. This knowledge could be useful for the development of novel anti-pseudomonal therapeutics and will also support the development of pyocin SD2 as a therapeutic in its own right. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Allele-specific virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a type III effector via the Arabidopsis ZAR1 resistance protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jennifer D; Wu, Ronald; Guttman, David S; Desveaux, Darrell

    2010-04-01

    Plant resistance (R) proteins provide a robust surveillance system to defend against potential pathogens. Despite their importance in plant innate immunity, relatively few of the approximately 170 R proteins in Arabidopsis have well-characterized resistance specificity. In order to identify the R protein responsible for recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae type III secreted effector (T3SE) HopZ1a, we assembled an Arabidopsis R gene T-DNA Insertion Collection (ARTIC) from publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana insertion lines and screened it for plants lacking HopZ1a-induced immunity. This reverse genetic screen revealed that the Arabidopsis R protein HOPZ-activated resistance 1 (ZAR1; At3g50950) is required for recognition of HopZ1a in Arabidopsis. ZAR1 belongs to the coiled-coil (CC) class of nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) containing R proteins; however, the ZAR1 CC domain phylogenetically clusters in a clade distinct from other related Arabidopsis R proteins. ZAR1-mediated immunity is independent of several genes required by other R protein signaling pathways, including NDR1 and RAR1, suggesting that ZAR1 possesses distinct signaling requirements. The closely-related T3SE protein, HopZ1b, is still recognized by zar1 Arabidopsis plants indicating that Arabidopsis has evolved at least two independent R proteins to recognize the HopZ T3SE family. Also, in Arabidopsis zar1 plants HopZ1a promotes P. syringae growth indicative of an ancestral virulence function for this T3SE prior to the evolution of recognition by the host resistance protein ZAR1. Our results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis resistance protein ZAR1 confers allele-specific recognition and virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE protein HopZ1a.

  1. Allele-specific virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ1a type III effector via the Arabidopsis ZAR1 resistance protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Lewis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant resistance (R proteins provide a robust surveillance system to defend against potential pathogens. Despite their importance in plant innate immunity, relatively few of the approximately 170 R proteins in Arabidopsis have well-characterized resistance specificity. In order to identify the R protein responsible for recognition of the Pseudomonas syringae type III secreted effector (T3SE HopZ1a, we assembled an Arabidopsis R gene T-DNA Insertion Collection (ARTIC from publicly available Arabidopsis thaliana insertion lines and screened it for plants lacking HopZ1a-induced immunity. This reverse genetic screen revealed that the Arabidopsis R protein HOPZ-activated resistance 1 (ZAR1; At3g50950 is required for recognition of HopZ1a in Arabidopsis. ZAR1 belongs to the coiled-coil (CC class of nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR containing R proteins; however, the ZAR1 CC domain phylogenetically clusters in a clade distinct from other related Arabidopsis R proteins. ZAR1-mediated immunity is independent of several genes required by other R protein signaling pathways, including NDR1 and RAR1, suggesting that ZAR1 possesses distinct signaling requirements. The closely-related T3SE protein, HopZ1b, is still recognized by zar1 Arabidopsis plants indicating that Arabidopsis has evolved at least two independent R proteins to recognize the HopZ T3SE family. Also, in Arabidopsis zar1 plants HopZ1a promotes P. syringae growth indicative of an ancestral virulence function for this T3SE prior to the evolution of recognition by the host resistance protein ZAR1. Our results demonstrate that the Arabidopsis resistance protein ZAR1 confers allele-specific recognition and virulence attenuation of the Pseudomonas syringae T3SE protein HopZ1a.

  2. Sequential unfolding of the two-domain protein Pseudomonas stutzeri cytochrome c(4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Niels Højmark; Jensen, Thomas Jon; Nørgaard, Allan

    2002-01-01

    , and different spin states of the oxidised haem groups. We have studied unfolding of oxidised P. stutzeri cyt c(4) induced thermally and by chemical denaturants Horse heart cyt c was a reference molecule. Isothermal unfolding induced by guanidinium chloride and acid was followed by Soret. alpha/beta. and 701-nm...... chloride up to 0.4 M is present. This reflects different chemical action in chemical and thermal unfolding. Acid-induced unfolding kinetics was addressed by pH jumps using diode array stopped-flow techniques, Three kinetic phases in the 701 nm Fe-Met marker band. and four phases in the Soret and alpha/beta......F stutzeri cytochrome c. is a di-haem protein, composed of two globular domains each with His-Met coordinated haem. and a hydrogen bond network between the domains. The domain foldings are highly symmetric but with specific differences including structural differences of ligand coordination...

  3. Expression of the nos operon proteins from Pseudomonas stutzeri in transgenic plants to assemble nitrous oxide reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shen; Mottiar, Yaseen; Johnson, Amanda M; Goto, Kagami; Altosaar, Illimar

    2012-06-01

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) is a stable greenhouse gas that plays a significant role in the destruction of the ozone layer. Soils are a significant source of atmospheric N(2)O. It is important to explore some innovative and effective biology-based strategies for N(2)O mitigation. The enzyme nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), naturally found in soil bacteria, is responsible for catalysing the final step of the denitrification pathway, conversion of N(2)O to dintrogen gas (N(2)). To transfer this catalytic pathway from soil into plants and amplify the abundance of this essential mechanism (to reduce global warming), a mega-cassette of five coding sequences was assembled to produce transgenic plants heterologously expressing the bacterial nos operon in plant leaves. Both the single-gene transformants (nosZ) and the multi-gene transformants (nosFLZDY) produced active recombinant N(2)OR. Enzymatic activity was detected using the methyl viologen-linked enzyme assay, showing that extracts from both types of transgenic plants exhibited N(2)O-reducing activity. Remarkably, the single-gene strategy produced higher reductase capability than the whole-operon approach. The data indicate that bacterial N(2)OR expressed in plants could convert N(2)O into inert N(2) without involvement of other Nos proteins. Silencing by homologous signal sequences, or cryptic intracellular targeting are possible explanations for the low activities obtained. Expressing N(2)OR from Pseudomonas stutzeri in single-gene transgenic plants indicated that such ag-biotech solutions to climate change have the potential to be easily incorporated into existing genetically modified organism seed germplasm.

  4. Functional Characterization of Triclosan-Resistant Enoyl-acyl-carrier Protein Reductase (FabV) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Lin, Jin-Shui; Ma, Jin-Cheng; Wang, Hai-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is extremely resistant to triclosan. Previous studies have shown that P. aeruginosa encodes a triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR), FabV, and that deletion of fabV causes P. aeruginosa to be extremely sensitive to triclosan. In this report, we complemented a P. aeruginosa fabV deletion strain with several triclosan-resistant ENR encoding genes, including Vibrio cholerae fabV, Bacillus subtilis fabL and Enterococcus faecalis fabK. All complemented strains restored triclosan resistance to the level of the wild-type strain, which confirmed that triclosan-resistant ENR allows P. aeruginosa to be extremely resistant to triclosan. Moreover, fabV exhibits pleiotropic effects. Deletion of fabV led P. aeruginosa to show attenuated swarming motility, decreased rhamnolipid, pyoverdine and acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) production. Complementation of the fabV mutant with any one ENR encoding gene could restore these features to some extent, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that addition of exogenous AHLs could restore the fabV mutant strain to swarm on semisolid plates and to produce more virulence factors than the fabV mutant strain. These findings indicate that deletion of fabV reduced the activity of ENR in P. aeruginosa, decreased fatty acid synthesis, and subsequently depressed the production of AHLs and other virulence factors, which finally may led to a reduction in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, fabV should be an ideal target for the control of P. aeruginosa infectivity.

  5. Functional characterization of triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (FabV in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Heng Huang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is extremely resistant to triclosan. Previous studies have shown that P. aeruginosa encodes a triclosan-resistant enoyl-acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR, FabV, and that deletion of fabV causes P. aeruginosa to be extremely sensitive to triclosan. In this report, we complemented a P. aeruginosa fabV deletion strain with several triclosan-resistant ENR encoding genes, including Vibrio cholera fabV, Bacillus subtilis fabL and Enterococcus faecalis fabK. All complemented strains restored triclosan resistance to the level of the wild-type strain, which confirmed that triclosan-resistant ENR allows P. aeruginosa to be extremely resistant to triclosan. Moreover, fabV exhibits pleiotropic effects. Deletion of fabV led P. aeruginosa to show attenuated swarming motility, decreased rhamnolipid, pyoverdine and acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs production. Complementation of the fabV mutant with any one ENR encoding gene could restore these features to some extent, in comparison with the wild-type strain. Furthermore, we found that addition of exogenous AHLs could restore to the fabV mutant strain the ability to swarm on semisolid plates and to produce more virulence factors than the fabV mutant strain. These findings indicate that deletion of fabV reduced the activity of ENR in P. aeruginosa, decreased fatty acid synthesis, and subsequently depressed the production of AHLs and other virulence factors, which finally may led to a reduction in the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa. Therefore, fabV should be an ideal target for the control of P. aeruginosa infectivity.

  6. Colonization Pattern of the Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas chlororaphis MA 342 on Barley Seeds Visualized by Using Green Fluorescent Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombolini, Riccardo; van der Gaag, Dirk Jan; Gerhardson, Berndt; Jansson, Janet K.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis MA 342 is a potent biocontrol agent that can be used against several seed-borne diseases of cereal crops, including net blotch of barley caused by the fungus Drechslera teres. In this study, strain MA 342 was tagged with the gfp gene (encoding the green fluorescent protein) in order to study the fate of cells after seed inoculation. The gfp-tagged strain, MA 342G2, had the same biocontrol efficacy as the wild type when it was applied at high cell concentrations to seeds but was less effective at lower cell concentrations. By comparing cell counts determined by microscopy to the number of CFU, we found that the number of culturable cells was significantly lower than the total number of bacteria on seeds which were inoculated and dried for 20 h. Confocal microscopy and epifluorescence stereomicroscopy were used to determine the pattern of MA 342G2 colonization and cell aggregation on barley seeds. Immediately after inoculation of seeds, bacteria were found mainly under the seed glume, and there was no particular aggregation pattern. However, after the seeds were sown, irregularly distributed areas of bacterial aggregation were found, which reflected epiphytic colonization of glume cells. There was a trend towards bacterial aggregation near the embryo but never within the embryo. Bacterial aggregates were regularly found in the groove of each seed formed by the base of the coleoptile and the scutellum. Based on these results, we suggest that MA 342 colocalizes with the pathogen D. teres, which facilitates the action of the fungistatic compound(s) produced by this strain. PMID:10427065

  7. A full-length Plasmodium falciparum recombinant circumsporozoite protein expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens platform as a malaria vaccine candidate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy R Noe

    Full Text Available The circumsporozoite protein (CSP of Plasmodium falciparum is a major surface protein, which forms a dense coat on the sporozoite's surface. Preclinical research on CSP and clinical evaluation of a CSP fragment-based RTS, S/AS01 vaccine have demonstrated a modest degree of protection against P. falciparum, mediated in part by humoral immunity and in part by cell-mediated immunity. Given the partial protective efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 vaccine in a recent Phase 3 trial, further improvement of CSP-based vaccines is crucial. In this report, we describe the preclinical development of a full-length, recombinant CSP (rCSP-based vaccine candidate against P. falciparum malaria suitable for current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP production. Utilizing a novel high-throughput Pseudomonas fluorescens expression platform, we demonstrated greater efficacy of full-length rCSP as compared to N-terminally truncated versions, rapidly down-selected a promising lead vaccine candidate, and developed a high-yield purification process to express immunologically active, intact antigen for clinical trial material production. The rCSP, when formulated with various adjuvants, induced antigen-specific antibody responses as measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and immunofluorescence assay (IFA, as well as CD4+ T-cell responses as determined by ELISpot. The adjuvanted rCSP vaccine conferred protection in mice when challenged with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites containing the P. falciparum repeat region of CSP. Furthermore, heterologous prime/boost regimens with adjuvanted rCSP and an adenovirus type 35-vectored CSP (Ad35CS showed modest improvements in eliciting CSP-specific T-cell responses and anti-malarial protection, depending on the order of vaccine delivery. Collectively, these data support the importance of further clinical development of adjuvanted rCSP, either as a stand-alone product or as one of the components in a heterologous prime

  8. Specific association of lectin LecB with the surface of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: role of outer membrane protein OprF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Funken

    Full Text Available The fucose binding lectin LecB affects biofilm formation and is involved in pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. LecB resides in the outer membrane and can be released specifically by treatment of an outer membrane fraction with fucose suggesting that it binds to specific ligands. Here, we report that LecB binds to the outer membrane protein OprF. In an OprF-deficient P. aeruginosa mutant, LecB is no longer detectable in the membrane but instead in the culture supernatant indicating a specific interaction between LecB and OprF.

  9. The conserved hypothetical protein PSPTO_3957 is essential for virulence in the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae accounts for substantial crop losses and is considered an important agricultural issue. Although many genes involved in interactions of this pathogen with hosts have been identified and characterized, little is known about processes involving bacterial metabol...

  10. Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Induce Both the Unfolded Protein and Integrated Stress Responses in Airway Epithelial Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Wout, Emily F A; van Schadewijk, Annemarie; van Boxtel, Ria; Dalton, Lucy E; Clarke, Hanna J; Tommassen, J.P.M.; Marciniak, Stefan J; Hiemstra, Pieter S

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection can be disastrous in chronic lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Its toxic effects are largely mediated by secreted virulence factors including pyocyanin, elastase and alkaline protease (AprA). Efficient functioning of the

  11. Construction, expression, purification and characterization of secretin domain of PilQ and triple PilA-related disulfide loop peptides fusion protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faezi, Sobhan; Bahrmand, Ahmad Reza; Siadat, Seyed Davar; Nikokar, Iraj; Sardari, Soroush; Mahdavi, Mehdi

    2017-05-01

    Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been a long-standing obstacle for clinical therapy due to the complexity of the genetics and pathogenesis, as well for widespread resistance to antibiotics, thus attaching great importance to explore effective vaccines for prevention and treatment. This paper focuses on the introduction of novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili (T4P)-based fusion protein containing the secretin domain of PilQ and tandem PilA-related peptides. We surveyed the expression of the PilQ380-705-PilA fusion protein in-frame with pET26b vector in which a rigid linker was used between two polypeptides and flexible linkers were inserted between the three tandem repeats and each pilA domains. The transformants were expressed in Escherichia coli BL21. The reactivity of specific antisera to the fusion protein was assessed by ELISA. The biological activities of this candidate vaccine were evaluated by western blotting, opsonophagocytosis, and twitching inhibition assays. The fusion protein was purified in high yield by osmotic shock method using HisTrap affinity column. The protein was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. The checkerboard titration showed that the optimal dilution of the antibody to react with antigen is 1:128. Results of opsonophagocytosis assay revealed that the antibodies elevated to the fusion protein promoted phagocytosis of the PAO1 and 6266E strains, so that the twitching immobilization test confirmed these results. Due to excellent killing activity mediated by opsonic antibodies and efficient immobilization of the strains, it seems that PilQ380-705-PilA fusion protein could be a reliable candidate vaccine against P. aeruginosa infection.

  12. The Ssr protein (T1E_1405) from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E enables oligonucleotide-based recombineering in platform strain P. putida EM42

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aparicio, Tomás; Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard

    2016-01-01

    of reference strain KT2440) is still a time-consuming endeavor. In this work we have investigated the in vivo activity of the Ssr protein encoded by the open reading frame T1E_1405 from Pseudomonas putida DOT-T1E, a plausible functional homologue of the β protein of the Red recombination system of λ phage...

  13. The LapG protein plays a role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by controlling the presence of the CdrA adhesin on the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten; Berthelsen, Jens; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    formation and biofilm dispersal. The P. aeruginosa LapG protein is shown to be a functional homolog of the Pseudomonas putida LapG protein which has previously been shown to function as a periplasmic protease that targets the surface adhesin LapA. Transposon mutagenesis and characterization of defined...

  14. Multi-functional characteristics of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III needle-tip protein, PcrV; comparison to orthologs in other gram negative bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi eSato

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a type III secretion system (T3SS to intoxicate host cells and evade innate immunity. This virulence-related machinery consists of a molecular syringe and needle assembled on the bacterial surface, which allows delivery of T3 effector proteins into infected cells. To accomplish a one-step effector translocation, a tip protein is required at the top end of the T3 needle structure. Strains lacking expression of the functional tip protein fail to intoxicate host cells.P. aeruginosa encodes a T3S that is highly homologous to the proteins encoded by Yersinia species. The needle tip proteins of Yersinia, LcrV, and P. aeruginosa, PcrV, share 37% identity and 65% similarity. Other known tip proteins are AcrV (Aeromonas, IpaD (Shigella, SipD (Salmonella, BipD (Burkholderia, EspA (EPEC, EHEC, Bsp22 (Bordetella, with additional proteins identified from various Gram negative species, such as Vibrio and Bordetella. The tip proteins can serve as a protective antigen or may be critical for sensing host cells and evading innate immune responses. Recognition of the host microenvironment transcriptionally activates synthesis of T3SS components. The machinery appears to be mechanically controlled by the assemblage of specific junctions within the apparatus. These junctions include the tip and base of the T3 apparatus, the needle proteins and components within the bacterial cytoplasm. The tip proteins likely have chaperone functions for translocon proteins, allowing the proper assembly of translocation channels in the host membrane and completing vectorial delivery of effector proteins into the host cytoplasm. Multifunctional features of the needle-tip proteins appear to be intricately controlled. In this review, we highlight the functional aspects and complex controls of T3 needle-tip proteins with particular emphasis on PcrV and LcrV.

  15. The presence of INA proteins on the surface of single cells of Pseudomonas syringae R10.79 isolated from rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Ling, Meilee; Holm, Stine; Finster, Kai; Boesen, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    One of the important open questions in atmospheric ice nucleation is the impact of bioaerosols on the ice content of mix phase clouds (DeMott and Prenni 2010). Biogenic ice nuclei have a unique capacity of facilitating ice formation at temperatures between -1 and -10 °C. The model biogenic ice nuclei are produced by a few species of plant-surface bacteria, such as Pseudomonas syringae, that are commonly transported through the atmosphere. These bacterial species have highly specialized proteins, the so-called ice nucleation active (INA) proteins, which are exposed at the outer membrane surface of the cell where they promote ice particle formation. The mechanisms behind the onset of INA protein synthesis in single bacterial cells are not well understood. We performed a laboratory study in order to (i) investigate the presence of INA proteins on single bacterial cells and (ii) understand the conditions that induce INA protein production. We previously isolated an INA-positive strain of Pseudomonas syringae from rain samples collected in Denmark. Bacterial cells initiated ice nucleation activity at temperatures ≤-2°C and the cell fragments at temperatures ≤-8°C (Šantl-Temkiv et al 2015). We determined the amino-acid sequence of the INA protein and used the sequence to produce custom-made antibodies (GenScript, Germany). These antibodies were used to specifically stain and visualize the INA protein on the surfaces of single cells, which can then be quantified by a technique called flow cytometry. The synthesis of INA proteins by individual cells was followed during a batch growth experiment. An unusually high proportion of cells that were adapting to the new conditions prior to growth produced INA proteins (~4.4% of all cells). A smaller fraction of actively growing cells was carrying INA proteins (~1.2 % of all cells). The cells that stopped growing due to unfavorable conditions had the lowest fraction of cells carrying INA proteins (~0.5 % of all cells). To

  16. Cloning, expression and characterization of recombinant exotoxin A-flagellin fusion protein as a new vaccine candidate against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanomand, Asghar; Farajnia, Safar; Najar Peerayeh, Shahin; Majidi, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients who suffer from impaired immune responses and chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis. At present, aggressive antibiotic therapy is the only choice for management of P. aeruginosa infections, but emergence of highly resistant strains necessitated the development of novel alternative therapeutics including an effective vaccine. Several P. aeruginosa antigens have been tested for vaccine development, including lipopolysaccharide alone, polysaccharides alginate, extracellular proteins, exotoxin A (exo A) and killed whole cell. However, none of them are currently available clinically. In this research, recombinant exoA-flagellin (fliC) fusion protein as a cocktail antigen was expressed and purified and its antigenic characteristics were evaluated. Expression of recombinant fusion protein by E. coli using pET22b vector resulted in production of exoA-fliC fusion protein in high concentration. Based on Western-blotting results, recombinant fusion protein showed a good antigenic interaction with sera from patients with various P. aeruginosa infections. These results suggested that recombinant exoA-fliC fusion protein can be produced in the laboratory, and tested as a candidate vaccine in P. aeruginosa infections.

  17. The Pseudomonas syringae type III effector AvrRpm1 induces significant defenses by activating the Arabidopsis nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat protein RPS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Gab; Geng, Xueqing; Lee, Sang Yeol; Mackey, David

    2009-02-01

    Plant disease resistance (R) proteins recognize potential pathogens expressing corresponding avirulence (Avr) proteins through 'gene-for-gene' interactions. RPM1 is an Arabidopsis R-protein that triggers a robust defense response upon recognizing the Pseudomonas syringae effector AvrRpm1. Avr-proteins of phytopathogenic bacteria include type III effector proteins that are often capable of enhancing virulence when not recognized by an R-protein. In rpm1 plants, AvrRpm1 suppresses basal defenses induced by microbe-associated molecular patterns. Here, we show that expression of AvrRpm1 in rpm1 plants induced PR-1, a classical defense marker, and symptoms including chlorosis and necrosis. PR-1 expression and symptoms were reduced in plants with mutations in defense signaling genes (pad4, sid2, npr1, rar1, and ndr1) and were strongly reduced in rpm1 rps2 plants, indicating that AvrRpm1 elicits defense signaling through the Arabidopsis R-protein, RPS2. Bacteria expressing AvrRpm1 grew more on rpm1 rps2 than on rpm1 plants. Thus, independent of its classical 'gene-for-gene' activation of RPM1, AvrRpm1 also induces functionally relevant defenses that are dependent on RPS2. Finally, AvrRpm1 suppressed host defenses and promoted the growth of type III secretion mutant bacteria equally well in rps2 and RPS2 plants, indicating that virulence activity of over-expressed AvrRpm1 predominates over defenses induced by weak activation of RPS2.

  18. Protection of immunosuppressed mice against infection with pseudomonas aeruginosa by monoclonal antibodies to outer membrane protein OprI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, R; Eckhardt, A; Duchêne, M; Domdey, H; von Specht, B U

    1990-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) designated 2A1 and 6A4 which had been shown to be directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane lipoprotein I were tested in cyclophosphamide treated mice for their protective ability against P. aeruginosa infection. Pretreatment of mice with either 2 mg of 2A1 or 4 mg of 6A4 in combination with lethally irradiated human leucocytes reduced the mortality after subsequent subcutaneous injection of 100 living P. aeruginosa organisms to 50% of the controls. Without leucocytes only mAb 2A1 (isotype IgG2b) showed protection (47%). Irradiated leucocytes alone without mAb did not protect the mice significantly from fatal P. aeruginosa infection.

  19. Crystal Structure of a Hidden Protein, YcaC, a Putative Cysteine Hydrolase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, with and without an Acrylamide Adduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten K. Grøftehauge

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As part of the ongoing effort to functionally and structurally characterize virulence factors in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, we determined the crystal structure of YcaC co-purified with the target protein at resolutions of 2.34 and 2.56 Å without a priori knowledge of the protein identity or experimental phases. The three-dimensional structure of YcaC adopts a well-known cysteine hydrolase fold with the putative active site residues conserved. The active site cysteine is covalently bound to propionamide in one crystal form, whereas the second form contains an S-mercaptocysteine. The precise biological function of YcaC is unknown; however, related prokaryotic proteins have functions in antibacterial resistance, siderophore production and NADH biosynthesis. Here, we show that YcaC is exceptionally well conserved across both bacterial and fungal species despite being non-ubiquitous. This suggests that whilst YcaC may not be part of an integral pathway, the function could confer a significant evolutionary advantage to microbial life.

  20. Influence of infection of soybean seeds with Peronospora manshurica and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea on protein, oil and fatty acids content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marcinkowska

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of soybean seed infection by Peronospora manshurica and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea on the chemical content of some soybean lines and varieties susceptible to both pathogens was estimated. The amount of protein and oil was determined for soybean seed samples collected from two different localities in 1980. In P. manshurica oospore-encrusted seeds protein content was higher and oil content lower than in healthy ones. It could be seen especially in samples of the 'Acme' variety cultivated in both localities. Seed infection by P. syringae pv. glycinea occasionally influenced the protein, oil and fatty acid content as compared with the control. This was noted only in single cases. Analysis of fatty acid composition demonstrated a higher free fatty acid content in soybean seed infected by P. manshurica. These results showed undoubtedly the influence of pathogens, specially seed-borne fungi on the chemical soybean seed composition. This analysis can be an introduction for more detailed investigations on the effect of these or other pathogens on soybean seed yield quality.

  1. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Pyocyanin Biosynthetic Protein PhzM from Pseudomonas aeruginosa†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, James F.; Greenhagen, Bryan T.; Shi, Katherine; Calabrese, Kelly; Robinson, Howard; Ladner, Jane E.

    2008-01-01

    Pyocyanin is a biologically active phenazine produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is thought to endow P. aeruginosa with a competitive growth advantage in colonized tissue and is also thought to be a virulence factor in diseases such as cystic fibrosis and AIDS where patients are commonly infected by pathogenic Pseudomonads due to their immunocompromised state. Pyocyanin is also a chemically interesting compound due to its unusual oxidation-reduction activity. Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, the precursor to the bioactive phenazines, is synthesized from chorismic acid by enzymes encoded in a seven-gene cistron in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in other Pseudomonads. Phenzine-1-carboxylic acid is believed to be converted to pyocyanin by the sequential actions of the putative S-adenosylmethionine dependent N-methyltransferase PhzM and the putative flavin-dependent hydroxylase PhzS. Here we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of PhzM solved by single anomalous dispersion. Unlike many methyltransferases, PhzM is a dimer in solution. The 36 kDa PhzM polypeptide folds into three domains. The C-terminal domain exhibits the α/β-hydrolase fold typical of small molecule methyltransferases. Two smaller N-terminal domains form much of the dimer interface. Structural alignments with known methyltransferases show that PhzM is most similar to the plant O-methyltransferases that are characterized by an unusual intertwined dimer interface. The structure of PhzM contains no ligands and the active site is open and solvent exposed when compared to structures of similar enzymes. In vitro experiments using purified PhzM alone demonstrate that it has little or no ability to methylate phenzine-1-carboxylic acid. However, when the putative hydroxylase PhzS is included, pyocyanin is readily produced. This observation suggests that a mechanism has evolved in P. aeruginosa that ensures efficient production of pyocyanin by preventing the formation and release of an unstable and

  2. The predicted protein product of a pathogenicity locus from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola is homologous to a highly conserved domain of several procaryotic regulatory proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Grimm, C.; Panopoulos, N J

    1989-01-01

    A ca. 20-kilobase (kb) region (hrp) that controls the interaction of Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola with its host (pathogenicity) and nonhost plants (hypersensitive reaction) was previously cloned and partially characterized. In this study we defined the limits and determined the nucleotide sequence of a hrp locus (hrpS), located near the right end of the hrp cluster. The largest open reading frame (ORF302) in hrpS has a coding capacity for a 302-amino-acid polypeptide. The predicted a...

  3. Proteinase production in Pseudomonas fluorescens ON2 is affected by carbon sources and allows surface-attached but not planktonic cells to utilize protein for growth in lake water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolaisen, Mette Haubjerg; Worm, Jakob; Jørgensen, Niels O. G.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins may be an important carbon and nitrogen source to bacteria in aquatic habitats, yet knowledge on the actual utilization of this substrate by proteolytic bacteria is scarce. In the present study, Pseudomonas fluorescens ON2 produced an alkaline proteinase (AprX) during growth and there wa......Proteins may be an important carbon and nitrogen source to bacteria in aquatic habitats, yet knowledge on the actual utilization of this substrate by proteolytic bacteria is scarce. In the present study, Pseudomonas fluorescens ON2 produced an alkaline proteinase (AprX) during growth...... the proteinase during growth unless a preferred carbon source like citrate is present. Lake water model systems were subsequently used to investigate the ability of proteolytic versus non-proteolytic ON2 strains to utilize protein for growth at moderate cell densities. Only cells forming surface-attached micro...

  4. Pseudomonas pyocyanin inhibits wound repair by inducing premature cellular senescence: role for p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Michael; Li, Zhe; Maitz, Peter K M

    2009-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen of burn wounds. Pyocyanin, a virulence factor produced by the bacterium, induces persistent intracellular oxidative stress and premature senescence in mammalian cells. Our aims were to evaluate pyocyanin levels in infected wound dressings and the potential of the toxin to influence wound repair. Surgical dressings from infected burn patients were examined for pyocyanin and normal primary human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) were treated with comparable concentrations and their replicative ability examined. Pyocyanin was detected in the exudate of infected wound dressings in amounts up to 5.3 microg/g (mean: 2.0+/-2.3 microg/g). HDFs exposed to pyocyanin (1-50 microM; 0.2-10.5 microg/ml) underwent growth arrest at all concentrations and developed morphological characteristics associated with cellular senescence, including expression of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase. Using an in vitro wound repair model, a single exposure to pyocyanin inhibited wound repair in a concentration-dependent manner. Prior treatment with a specific p38(MAPK) inhibitor allowed cells to maintain their replicative ability and pre-senescent morphology indicating pyocyanin operates through the Erk/p38(MAPK) senescence pathway. These data support the hypothesis that bacterial virulence factors capable of inducing persistent low-level oxidative stress play a pivotal role in modulating the tissue repair response to infection by inducing premature cellular senescence.

  5. SuhB is a novel ribosome associated protein that regulates expression of MexXY by modulating ribosome stalling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jing; Jin, Yongxin; Bian, Ting; Li, Kewei; Sun, Ziyu; Cheng, Zhihui; Jin, Shouguang; Wu, Weihui

    2015-10-01

    Translation elongation is modulated by various ribosome-binding proteins. Environmental stresses, such as starvation and antibiotics, can cause stalling of bacterial ribosomes, which may alter gene expression through a transcription or translation attenuation mechanism. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of MexXY multidrug efflux system, which plays a significant role in resistance against aminoglycoside antibiotics, is controlled by a translation surveillance mechanism. Stalling of ribosome at the PA5471 leader peptide (PA5471.1) mRNA leads to transcription of PA5471, which subsequently up-regulates the expression of MexXY. In this study, we found that mutation in a suhB gene leads to decreased susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Transcriptomic analysis revealed an up-regulation of MexXY and PA5471, which were demonstrated to be responsible for the decreased susceptibility of the suhB mutant. We further demonstrated that PA5471.1 is essential for the up-regulation of PA5471 in the suhB mutant. Co-immunoprecipitation assay revealed an interaction between SuhB and ribosome, suggesting a role of SuhB in translation. Indeed, higher amount of PA5471.1 mRNA was found to associate with ribosome isolated from the suhB mutant, indicating increased ribosome stalling. Therefore, this study identified SuhB as a novel ribosome associated protein that is involved in modulating ribosome activity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martínez-Granero

    Full Text Available Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC and one phosphodiesterase (BifA implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  7. Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Biofilm Protein Profile After Exposure to n-Butanolic Cyclamen coum Extract Alone and in Combination with Ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, Morvarid; Abdi-Ali, Ahya; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Vali, Hojatollah; Shahbani Zahiri, Hossein; Akbari Noghabi, Kambiz

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm-related infections are the major cause of premature death in cystic fibrosis patients. Strategies to induce biofilm dispersal are of interest, because of their potential in preventing biofilm-related infections. Our previous work demonstrated that n-butanolic Cyclamen coum extract with ciprofloxacin could eliminate 1- and 3-day-old P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. To gain new insights into the role of C. coum extract and its synergistic effect with ciprofloxacin in eliminating P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) in combination with mass spectrometry-based protein identification were used. Changes in the bacterial protein expression were analyzed when 3-day-old biofilm cells were exposed to the C. coum extract alone and in combination with ciprofloxacin. Proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis, quorum sensing, adaptation/protection, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism showed a weaker expression in the C. coum extract-ciprofloxacin-treated biofilm cells compared to those in the untreated cells. Interestingly, the proteome of C. coum extract-ciprofloxacin-treated biofilm revealed more resemblance to the planktonic phenotype than to the biofilm phenotype. It appears that saponin extract in combination with ciprofloxacin causes biofilm disruption due to several mechanisms such as motility induction, cell envelope integrity perturbation, stress protein expression reduction, and more importantly, signal transduction perturbation. In conclusion, exposure to a combination of biofilm dispersal such as saponin extract and antimicrobial agents may offer a novel strategy to control preestablished, persistent P. aeruginosa biofilms and biofilm-related infections.

  8. Functional Characterization of Key Residues in Regulatory Proteins HrpG and HrpV of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Milija; Waite, Christopher; James, Ellen; Synn, Nicholas; Simpson, Timothy; Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Buck, Martin

    2017-08-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to transfer effector proteins into the host. The expression of T3SS proteins is controlled by the HrpL σ factor. Transcription of hrpL is σ(54)-dependent and bacterial enhancer-binding proteins HrpR and HrpS coactivate the hrpL promoter. The HrpV protein imposes negative control upon HrpR and HrpS through direct interaction with HrpS. HrpG interacts with HrpV and relieves such negative control. The sequence alignments across Hrp group I-type plant pathogens revealed conserved HrpV and HrpG amino acids. To establish structure-function relationships in HrpV and HrpG, either truncated or alanine substitution mutants were constructed. Key functional residues in HrpV and HrpG are found within their C-terminal regions. In HrpG, L101 and L105 are indispensable for the ability of HrpG to directly interact with HrpV and suppress HrpV-dependent negative regulation of HrpR and HrpS. In HrpV, L108 and G110 are major determinants for interactions with HrpS and HrpG. We propose that mutually exclusive binding of HrpS and HrpG to the same binding site of HrpV governs a transition from negative control to activation of the HrpRS complex leading to HrpL expression and pathogenicity of P. syringae.

  9. Arabidopsis HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER protein methylates a glucosinolate breakdown product and functions in resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatoshi, Yukari; Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2009-07-17

    Almost all of the chlorine-containing gas emitted from natural sources is methyl chloride (CH(3)Cl), which contributes to the destruction of the stratospheric ozone layer. Tropical and subtropical plants emit substantial amounts of CH(3)Cl. A gene involved in CH(3)Cl emission from Arabidopsis was previously identified and designated HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER (hereafter AtHOL1) based on the mutant phenotype. Our previous studies demonstrated that AtHOL1 and its homologs, AtHOL2 and AtHOL3, have S-adenosyl-l-methionine-dependent methyltransferase activities. However, the physiological functions of AtHOLs have yet to be elucidated. In the present study, our comparative kinetic analyses with possible physiological substrates indicated that all of the AtHOLs have low activities toward chloride. AtHOL1 was highly reactive to thiocyanate (NCS(-)), a pseudohalide, synthesizing methylthiocyanate (CH(3)SCN) with a very high k(cat)/K(m) value. We demonstrated in vivo that substantial amounts of NCS(-) were synthesized upon tissue damage in Arabidopsis and that NCS(-) was largely derived from myrosinase-mediated hydrolysis of glucosinolates. Analyses with the T-DNA insertion Arabidopsis mutants (hol1, hol2, and hol3) revealed that only hol1 showed increased sensitivity to NCS(-) in medium and a concomitant lack of CH(3)SCN synthesis upon tissue damage. Bacterial growth assays indicated that the conversion of NCS(-) into CH(3)SCN dramatically increased antibacterial activities against Arabidopsis pathogens that normally invade the wound site. Furthermore, hol1 seedlings showed an increased susceptibility toward an Arabidopsis pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola. Here we propose that AtHOL1 is involved in glucosinolate metabolism and defense against phytopathogens. Moreover, CH(3)Cl synthesized by AtHOL1 could be considered a byproduct of NCS(-) metabolism.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sepsis Sharps Safety - CDC Transplant Safety Vaccine Safety Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... aeruginosa . Pseudomonas aeruginosa What types of infections does Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause? Serious Pseudomonas infections usually occur in people ...

  11. Sent packing: protein engineering generates a new crystal form of Pseudomonas aeruginosa DsbA1 with increased catalytic surface accessibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, Roisin M., E-mail: r.mcmahon1@uq.edu.au; Coinçon, Mathieu; Tay, Stephanie; Heras, Begoña [University of Queensland, 306 Carmody Road, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia); Morton, Craig J. [Biota Holdings Limited, Unit 10, 585 Blackburn Road, Notting Hill, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Scanlon, Martin J. [Monash University, 381 Royal Parade, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Martin, Jennifer L. [University of Queensland, 306 Carmody Road, Brisbane, Queensland 4072 (Australia)

    2015-11-26

    The crystal structure of a P. aeruginosa DsbA1 variant is more suitable for fragment-based lead discovery efforts to identify inhibitors of this antimicrobial drug target. In the reported structures the active site of the protein can simultaneously bind multiple ligands introduced in the crystallization solution or via soaking. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen for which new antimicrobial drug options are urgently sought. P. aeruginosa disulfide-bond protein A1 (PaDsbA1) plays a pivotal role in catalyzing the oxidative folding of multiple virulence proteins and as such holds great promise as a drug target. As part of a fragment-based lead discovery approach to PaDsbA1 inhibitor development, the identification of a crystal form of PaDsbA1 that was more suitable for fragment-soaking experiments was sought. A previously identified crystallization condition for this protein was unsuitable, as in this crystal form of PaDsbA1 the active-site surface loops are engaged in the crystal packing, occluding access to the target site. A single residue involved in crystal-packing interactions was substituted with an amino acid commonly found at this position in closely related enzymes, and this variant was successfully used to generate a new crystal form of PaDsbA1 in which the active-site surface is more accessible for soaking experiments. The PaDsbA1 variant displays identical redox character and in vitro activity to wild-type PaDsbA1 and is structurally highly similar. Two crystal structures of the PaDsbA1 variant were determined in complex with small molecules bound to the protein active site. These small molecules (MES, glycerol and ethylene glycol) were derived from the crystallization or cryoprotectant solutions and provide a proof of principle that the reported crystal form will be amenable to co-crystallization and soaking with small molecules designed to target the protein active-site surface.

  12. The Identification and Validation of Novel Small Proteins in Pseudomonas Putida KT-2440

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Long, Katherine

    2014-01-01

    , total protein samples are prepared, fractionated, and analyzed with mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The MS/MS data are compared to a custom database containing >80000 putative sORF sequences to identify candidates for validation. A total of 56 and 22 putative sORFs were obtained from MS/MS data...

  13. Expression of the translocator protein (TSPO from Pseudomonas fluorescens Pfo-1 requires the stress regulatory sigma factors AlgU and RpoH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlène eLeneveu-Jenvrin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The translocator protein (TSPO, previously designated as peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor, is an evolutionary conserved protein that is found in many Eukarya, Archae and Bacteria, in which it plays several important functions including for example membrane biogenesis, signaling and stress response. A tspo homologue gene has been identified in several members of the Pseudomonas genus, among which the soil bacterium P. fluorescens Pf0-1. In this bacterium, the tspo gene is located in the vicinity of a putative hybrid histidine kinase-encoding gene. Since tspo has been involved in water stress related response in plants, we explored the effects of hyperosmolarity and temperature on P. fluorescens Pf0-1 tspo expression using a strategy based on lux-reporter fusions. We show that the two genes Pfl01_2810 and tspo are co-transcribed forming a transcription unit. The expression of this operon is growth phase-dependent and is increased in response to high concentrations of NaCl, sucrose and to a D-cycloserine treatment, which are conditions leading to activity of the major cell wall stress responsive extracytoplasmic sigma factor AlgU. Interestingly, the promoter region activity is strongly lowered in a P. aeruginosa algU mutant, suggesting that AlgU may be involved at least partly in the molecular mechanism leading to Pfl01_2810-tspo expression. In silico analysis of this promoter region failed to detect an AlgU consensus binding site; however, we detect a putative binding site for the heat shock response RpoH sigma factor. Accordingly, the promoter activity of the region containing this sequence is increased in response to high growth temperature and slightly lowered in a P. aeruginosa rpoH mutant strain. Taken together, our data suggest that P. fluorescens tspo gene may belong at least partly to the cell wall stress response.

  14. Surface display of monkey metallothionein {alpha} tandem repeats and EGFP fusion protein on Pseudomonas putida X4 for biosorption and detection of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Xiaochuan; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun [Huazhong Agricultural Univ., Wuhan (China). State Key Lab. of Agricultural Microbiology

    2012-09-15

    Monkey metallothionein {alpha} domain tandem repeats (4mMT{alpha}), which exhibit high cadmium affinity, have been displayed for the first time on the surface of a bacterium using ice nucleation protein N-domain (inaXN) protein from the Xanthomonas campestris pv (ACCC - 10049) as an anchoring motif. The shuttle vector pIME, which codes for INAXN-4mMT{alpha}-EGFP fusion, was constructed and used to target 4mMT{alpha} and EGFP on the surface of Pseudomonas putida X4 (CCTCC - 209319). The surface location of the INAXN-4mMT{alpha}-EGFP fusion was further verified by western blot analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy. The growth of X4 showed resistance to cadmium presence. The presence of surface-exposed 4mMT{alpha} on the engineered strains was four times higher than that of the wild-type X4. The Cd{sup 2+} accumulation by X4/pIME was not only four times greater than that of the original host bacterial cells but was also remarkably unaffected by the presence of Cu{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+}. Moreover, the surface-engineered strains could effectively bind Cd{sup 2+} under a wide range of pH levels, from 4 to 7. P. putida X4/pIME with surface-expressed 4mMT{alpha}-EGFP had twice the cadmium binding capacity as well as 1.4 times the fluorescence as the cytoplasmic 4mMTa-EGFP. These results suggest that P. putida X4 expressing 4mMT{alpha}-EGFP with the INAXN anchor motif on the surface would be a useful tool for the remediation and biodetection of environmental cadmium contaminants. (orig.)

  15. LapD Is a Bis-(3', 5')-Cyclic Dimeric GMP-Binding Protein That Regulates Surface Attachment by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peter D. Newell; Russell D. Monds; George A. O'Toole; Emil C. Gotschlich

    2009-01-01

    .... For Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1, c-di-GMP impacts the secretion and localization of the adhesin LapA, which is absolutely required for stable surface attachment and biofilm formation by this bacterium...

  16. A draft genome sequence and functional screen reveals the repertoire of type III secreted proteins of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tabaci 11528

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dangl Jeffery L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas syringae is a widespread bacterial pathogen that causes disease on a broad range of economically important plant species. Pathogenicity of P. syringae strains is dependent on the type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of up to about thirty virulence 'effector' proteins into the host cytoplasm where they subvert the eukaryotic cell physiology and disrupt host defences. P. syringae pathovar tabaci naturally causes disease on wild tobacco, the model member of the Solanaceae, a family that includes many crop species as well as on soybean. Results We used the 'next-generation' Illumina sequencing platform and the Velvet short-read assembly program to generate a 145X deep 6,077,921 nucleotide draft genome sequence for P. syringae pathovar tabaci strain 11528. From our draft assembly, we predicted 5,300 potential genes encoding proteins of at least 100 amino acids long, of which 303 (5.72% had no significant sequence similarity to those encoded by the three previously fully sequenced P. syringae genomes. Of the core set of Hrp Outer Proteins that are conserved in three previously fully sequenced P. syringae strains, most were also conserved in strain 11528, including AvrE1, HopAH2, HopAJ2, HopAK1, HopAN1, HopI, HopJ1, HopX1, HrpK1 and HrpW1. However, the hrpZ1 gene is partially deleted and hopAF1 is completely absent in 11528. The draft genome of strain 11528 also encodes close homologues of HopO1, HopT1, HopAH1, HopR1, HopV1, HopAG1, HopAS1, HopAE1, HopAR1, HopF1, and HopW1 and a degenerate HopM1'. Using a functional screen, we confirmed that hopO1, hopT1, hopAH1, hopM1', hopAE1, hopAR1, and hopAI1' are part of the virulence-associated HrpL regulon, though the hopAI1' and hopM1' sequences were degenerate with premature stop codons. We also discovered two additional HrpL-regulated effector candidates and an HrpL-regulated distant homologue of avrPto1. Conclusion The draft genome sequence facilitates the

  17. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa EF-hand protein, EfhP (PA4107, modulates stress responses and virulence at high calcium concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana A Sarkisova

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a facultative human pathogen, and a major cause of nosocomial infections and severe chronic infections in endocarditis and in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Calcium (Ca2+ accumulates in pulmonary fluids of CF patients, and plays a role in the hyperinflammatory response to bacterial infection. Earlier we showed that P. aeruginosa responds to increased Ca2+ levels, primarily through the increased production of secreted virulence factors. Here we describe the role of putative Ca2+-binding protein, with an EF-hand domain, PA4107 (EfhP, in this response. Deletion mutations of efhP were generated in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 and CF pulmonary isolate, strain FRD1. The lack of EfhP abolished the ability of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to maintain intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Quantitative high-resolution 2D-PAGE showed that the efhP deletion also affected the proteomes of both strains during growth with added Ca2+. The greatest proteome effects occurred when the pulmonary isolate was cultured in biofilms. Among the proteins that were significantly less abundant or absent in the mutant strains were proteins involved in iron acquisition, biosynthesis of pyocyanin, proteases, and stress response proteins. In support, the phenotypic responses of FRD1 ΔefhP showed that the mutant strain lost its ability to produce pyocyanin, developed less biofilm, and had decreased resistance to oxidative stress (H2O2 when cultured at high [Ca2+]. Furthermore, the mutant strain was unable to produce alginate when grown at high [Ca2+] and no iron. The effect of the ΔefhP mutations on virulence was determined in a lettuce model of infection. Growth of wild-type P. aeruginosa strains at high [Ca2+] causes an increased area of disease. In contrast, the lack of efhP prevented this Ca2+-induced increase in the diseased zone. The results indicate that EfhP is important for Ca2+ homeostasis and virulence of P. aeruginosa when it encounters host environments with

  18. Effect of Crc and Hfq proteins on the transcription, processing, and stability of the Pseudomonas putida CrcZ sRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arranz, Sofía; Sánchez-Hevia, Dione; Rojo, Fernando; Moreno, Renata

    2016-12-01

    In Pseudomonas putida, the Hfq and Crc proteins regulate the expression of many genes in response to nutritional and environmental cues, by binding to mRNAs that bear specific target motifs and inhibiting their translation. The effect of these two proteins is antagonized by the CrcZ and CrcY small RNAs (sRNAs), the levels of which vary greatly according to growth conditions. The crcZ and crcY genes are transcribed from promoters PcrcZ and PcrcY, respectively, a process that relies on the CbrB transcriptional activator and the RpoN σ factor. Here we show that crcZ can also be transcribed from the promoter of the immediate upstream gene, cbrB, a weak constitutive promoter. The cbrB-crcZ transcript was processed to render a sRNA very similar in size to the CrcZ produced from promoter PcrcZ The processed sRNA, termed CrcZ*, was able to antagonize Hfq/Crc because, when provided in trans, it relieved the deregulated Hfq/Crc-dependent hyperrepressing phenotype of a ΔcrcZΔcrcY strain. CrcZ* may help in attaining basal levels of CrcZ/CrcZ* that are sufficient to protect the cell from an excessive Hfq/Crc-dependent repression. Since a functional sRNA can be produced from PcrcZ, an inducible strong promoter, or by cleavage of the cbrB-crcZ mRNA, crcZ can be considered a 3'-untranslated region of the cbrB-crcZ mRNA. In the absence of Hfq, the processed form of CrcZ was not observed. In addition, we show that Crc and Hfq increase CrcZ stability, which supports the idea that these proteins can form a complex with CrcZ and protect it from degradation by RNases. © 2016 Hernández-Arranz et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  19. Risk factors for and role of OprD protein in increasing minimal inhibitory concentrations of carbapenems in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Aki; Kato, Daizo; Tomita, Yuka; Iguchi, Mitsutaka; Yamada, Keiko; Kouyama, Yuichi; Morioka, Hiroshi; Tetsuka, Nobuyuki; Yagi, Tetsuya

    2017-11-01

    This study examined the risk factors for, and molecular mechanisms underlying, the increase in carbapenem minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Consecutive clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected. The MicroScan WalkAway system detected more than fourfold increases in the MICs of carbapenems in P. aeruginosa isolates serially recovered from some patients during their clinical course. The clinical risk factors associated with this increase were examined by multiple logistic regression analysis. Western blot analysis and nucleotide sequencing of the oprD gene of 19 clonally related and paired P. aeruginosa isolates from the same patients were undertaken to examine the mechanisms underlying the increase in MICs. The results showed that prior use of carbapenems (OR, 2.799; 95 % CI, 1.088-7.200; P=0.033) and the use of ventilators or tracheostomies (OR, 2.648; 95 % CI, 1.051-6.671; P=0.039) were risk factors for increased carbapenem MICs. Analysis of the underlying mechanisms revealed that loss of functional OprD protein due to mutation of the oprD gene tended to occur in P. aeruginosa isolates with imipenem MICs of more than 8 µg ml-1; a reduction in OprD expression was observed in P. aeruginosa isolates with imipenem MICs of 4 or 8 µg ml-1. This difference in the resistance mechanism was not correlated with the MICs of meropenem. This difference in the resistance mechanism of P. aeruginosa indicates a critical breakpoint at an imipenem MIC of 8 µg ml-1, in accordance with EUCAST criteria. Reducing carbapenem use will prevent P. aeruginosa clinical isolates from developing resistance to carbapenems.

  20. The outer membrane protein I of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, a possible pollutant of dialysate in hemodialysis, induces cytokines in mouse bone marrow cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ino, M; Nagase, S; Nagasawa, T; Koyama, A; Tachibana, S

    1999-01-01

    The finding of outer membrane protein I (OprI) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hemodialyzers used by patients with end-stage renal failure led us to study the possible role of OprI as cytokine inducer. However, there are few reports on the biological activity of OprI, because it is difficult to obtain highly purified OprI. In this study, we attempt to establish a procedure for the efficient purification of OprI, which does not include lipopolysaccharide, from the bacterial culture broth, not hemodialyzers, to demonstrate that OprI is a potent cytokine inducer. From bacterial culture broth (1 liter), P. aeruginosa PAO1, which was confirmed previously by the sequence coding, was separated by centrifugation, high-performance liquid chromatography, and disk electrophoresis. Mouse bone marrow cells were stimulated by purified OprI, and the supernatants of the culture were analyzed by several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kits. The tumor necrosis factor alpha production stimulated by purified OprI was confirmed and degraded within 24 h. Furthermore, interleukin (IL) 1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor were also induced by OprI despite the absence of lipopolysaccharide. We conclude that OprI has the potential to induce tumor necrosis factor alpha production in mouse bone marrow cells and that tumor necrosis factor alpha contributes to the induction of inflammatory cytokines, namely IL-1alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6, and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor, while lipopolysaccharide has little effect on these cells. These results suggest the presence of a pathway of inflammatory signal transduction triggered by OprI. In addition, OprI is possibly one of the harmful dialysate pollutants in hemodialysis patients besides the well-known lipopolysaccharide.

  1. Imposed glutathione-mediated redox switch modulates the tobacco wound-induced protein kinase and salicylic acid-induced protein kinase activation state and impacts on defence against Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matern, Sanja; Peskan-Berghoefer, Tatjana; Gromes, Roland; Kiesel, Rebecca Vazquez; Rausch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The role of the redox-active tripeptide glutathione in plant defence against pathogens has been studied extensively; however, the impact of changes in cellular glutathione redox potential on signalling processes during defence reactions has remained elusive. This study explored the impact of elevated glutathione content on the cytosolic redox potential and on early defence signalling at the level of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), as well as on subsequent defence reactions, including changes in salicylic acid (SA) content, pathogenesis-related gene expression, callose depositions, and the hypersensitive response. Wild-type (WT) Nicotiana tabacum L. and transgenic high-glutathione lines (HGL) were transformed with the cytosol-targeted sensor GRX1-roGFP2 to monitor the cytosolic redox state. Surprisingly, HGLs displayed an oxidative shift in their cytosolic redox potential and an activation of the tobacco MAPKs wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK) and SA-induced protein kinase (SIPK). This activation occurred in the absence of any change in free SA content, but was accompanied by constitutively increased expression of several defence genes. Similarly, rapid activation of MAPKs could be induced in WT tobacco by exposure to either reduced or oxidized glutathione. When HGL plants were challenged with adapted or non-adapted Pseudomonas syringae pathovars, the cytosolic redox shift was further amplified and the defence response was markedly increased, showing a priming effect for SA and callose; however, the initial and transient hyperactivation of MAPK signalling was attenuated in HGLs. The results suggest that, in tobacco, MAPK and SA signalling may operate independently, both possibly being modulated by the glutathione redox potential. Possible mechanisms for redox-mediated MAPK activation are discussed. PMID:25628332

  2. Surface thermodynamic and adhesion force evaluation of the role of chitin-binding protein in the physical interaction between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, E.S.; Krom, B.P.; Harapanahalli, A.K.; Busscher, H.J.; van der Mei, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are able to form pathogenic polymicrobial communities. P. aeruginosa colonizes and kills hyphae but is unable to attach to yeast. It is unknown why the interaction of P. aeruginosa is different with yeast than with hyphae. Here we aim to evaluate the role

  3. Initial characterization of a bolA homologue from Pseudomonas fluorescens indicates different roles for BolA-like proteins in em>P. fluorescens and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Nybroe, Ole

    2006-01-01

    The RpoS-regulated bolA gene in Escherichia coli is important for the decrease in cell size during stationary phase or sudden carbon starvation. A Pseudomonas fluorescens strain mutated in a gene with homology to bolA reduced its cell size upon carbon starvation, and RpoS had little effect on bol...

  4. Surface Thermodynamic and Adhesion Force Evaluation of the Role of Chitin-Binding Protein in the Physical Interaction between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are able to form pathogenic polymicrobial communities. P. aeruginosa colonizes and kills hyphae but is unable to attach to yeast. It is unknown why the interaction of P. aeruginosa is different with yeast than with hyphae. Here we aim to evaluate the role

  5. Expression of recombinant Pseudomonas stutzeri di-heme cytochrome c(4) by high-cell-density fed-batch cultivation of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Nørgaard, Allan; Hansen, Anne Merete

    2003-01-01

    The gene of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri was expressed in Pseudomonas putida. High-yield expression of the protein was achieved by high-cell-density fed-batch cultivation using an exponential glucose feeding strategy. The recombinant cytochrome c(4) protein...

  6. Single-molecule study on histone-like nucleoid-structuring protein (H-NS paralogue in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: MvaU bears DNA organization mode similarities to MvaT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricksen S Winardhi

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains two distinct members of H-NS family of nucleoid-structuring proteins: MvaT and MvaU. Together, these proteins bind to the same regions of the chromosome and function coordinately in the regulation of hundreds of genes. Due to their structural similarity, they can associate to form heteromeric complexes. These findings left us wondering whether they bear similar DNA binding properties that underlie their gene-silencing functions. Using single-molecule stretching and imaging experiments, we found striking similarities in the DNA organization modes of MvaU compared to the previously studied MvaT. MvaU can form protective nucleoprotein filaments that are insensitive to environmental factors, consistent with its role as a repressor of gene expression. Similar to MvaT, MvaU filament can mediate DNA bridging while excessive MvaU can cause DNA aggregation. The almost identical DNA organization modes of MvaU and MvaT explain their functional redundancy, and raise an interesting question regarding the evolutionary benefits of having multiple H-NS paralogues in the Pseudomonas genus.

  7. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  8. Ribosomal protein S1 specifically binds to the 5' untranslated region of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa stationary-phase sigma factor rpoS mRNA in the logarithmic phase of growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevo, Milica; Buratti, Emanuele; Venturi, Vittorio

    2004-08-01

    The rpoS gene encodes the stationary-phase sigma factor (RpoS or sigma(s)), which was identified in several gram-negative bacteria as a central regulator controlling the expression of genes involved in cell survival in response to cessation of growth (stationary phase) and providing cross-protection against various stresses. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the levels of sigma(s) increase dramatically at the onset of the stationary phase and are regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The P. aeruginosa rpoS gene is transcribed as a monocistronic rpoS mRNA transcript comprised of an unusually long 373-bp 5' untranslated region (5' UTR). In this study, the 5' UTR and total protein extracts from P. aeruginosa logarithmic and stationary phases of growth were used in order to investigate the protein-RNA interactions that may modulate the translational process. It was observed that a 69-kDa protein, which corresponded to ribosomal protein S1, preferentially binds the 5' UTR of the rpoS mRNA in the logarithmic phase and not in the stationary phase. This is the first report of a protein-rpoS mRNA 5' UTR interaction in P. aeruginosa, and the possible involvement of protein S1 in translation regulation of rpoS is discussed.

  9. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...... in biofilm formation, however, detailed studies of these roles have not yet been carried out. The overall aim of this PhD project was therefore to elucidate in more depth the roles played by Pseudomonas lipopetides in pollutant biodegradation and biofilm formation. This study investigated the effect...... of the Pseudomonas lipopeptides belonging to different structural groups on important biodegradation parameters, mainly; solubilization and emulsification of hydrophobic pollutants (alkanes and PAHs) and increase of cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial degraders. Ultimately, it was tested if these parameters led...

  10. Phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN) from Pseudomonas sp. strain PUP6 selectively induced apoptosis in lung (A549) and breast (MDA MB-231) cancer cells by inhibition of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R Kamaraj; Veena, V; Naik, P Ravindra; Lakshmi, Pragna; Krishna, R; Sudharani, S; Sakthivel, N

    2015-06-01

    Phenazine-1-carboxamide (PCN), a naturally occurring simple phenazine derivative isolated from Pseudomonas sp. strain PUP6, exhibited selective cytotoxic activity against lung (A549) and breast (MDA-MB-231) cancer cell lines in differential and dose-dependent manner compared to normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PCN-treated cancer cells showed the induction of apoptosis as evidenced by the release of low level of LDH, morphological characteristics, production of reactive oxygen species, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and induction of caspase-3. At molecular level, PCN instigates apoptosis by mitochondrial intrinsic apoptotic pathway via the overexpression of p53, Bax, cytochrome C release and activation of caspase-3 with the inhibition of oncogenic anti-apoptotic proteins such as PARP and Bcl-2 family proteins (Bcl-2, Bcl-w and Bcl-xL). The in silico docking studies of PCN targeted against the anti-apoptotic members of Bcl-2 family proteins revealed the interaction of PCN with the BH3 domain, which might lead to the induction of apoptosis due to the inhibition of antiapoptotic proteins. Due to its innate inhibition potential of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family proteins, PCN may be used as potent anticancer agent against both lung and breast cancer.

  11. Proteomics of the oxidative stress response induced by hydrogen peroxide and paraquat reveals a novel AhpC-like protein in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Nathan J; Scott, Nichollas E; Shin, Eun Hye H

    2011-01-01

    hypothetical antioxidant protein (PA3450) that shares sequence similarity with 1-Cys peroxiredoxins. Other induced proteins included known oxidative stress proteins (superoxide dismutase and catalase), as well as those involved in iron acquisition (siderophore biosynthesis and receptor proteins FpvA and Fpt...

  12. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex.

  13. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  14. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... of oxygen limitation in the biofilm. Oxygen microelectrode measurements showed that oxygen only penetrated approximately 50 mum into the biofilm. P. aeruginosa was incapable of anaerobic growth in the medium used for this investigation. These results show that while mature P. aeruginosa biofilms contain...

  15. Tripartite Motif 8 (TRIM8) Positively Regulates Pro-inflammatory Responses in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Induced Keratitis Through Promoting K63-Linked Polyubiquitination of TAK1 Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Litao; Dong, Weili; Fu, Xiaoxiao; Lin, Jing; Dong, Zhijun; Tan, Xiaobo; Zhang, Tiemin

    2017-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA)-induced keratitis is a rapidly progressive ocular infectious disease that often leads to inflammatory epithelial edema, stromal infiltration, tissue destruction, corneal ulceration, and vision loss. In this study, we investigate the role of tripartite motif 8 (TRIM8) in regulating the inflammatory process of PA-induced keratitis. The expression of TRIM8 was increased in mouse corneas and in vitro-cultured macrophages after PA infection. Knockdown of the expression of TRIM8 significantly inhibited the activation of NF-κB signaling and decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines both in vivo and in vitro after infected with PA. Furthermore, we investigated the potential mechanism and we found after PA infection that TRIM8 could promote K63-linked polyubiquitination of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), leading to the activation of TAK1 and enhanced inflammatory responses. Taken together, we demonstrated that TRIM8 has pro-inflammatory effect on PA-induced keratitis and suggest TRIM8 as a potential therapeutic target for keratitis.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif protein enhances the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and reduces major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M; Ely, Kenneth H; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A; Green, William R; Enelow, Richard I; Stanton, Bruce A

    2014-01-03

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8(+) T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Cif Protein Enhances the Ubiquitination and Proteasomal Degradation of the Transporter Associated with Antigen Processing (TAP) and Reduces Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) Class I Antigen Presentation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomberger, Jennifer M.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Bangia, Naveen; Ye, Siying; Green, Kathy A.; Green, William R.; Enelow, Richard I.; Stanton, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Cif (PA2934), a bacterial virulence factor secreted in outer membrane vesicles by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, increases the ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation of some, but not all, plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABC), including the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and P-glycoprotein. The goal of this study was to determine whether Cif enhances the ubiquitination and degradation of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP1 and TAP2), members of the ABC transporter family that play an essential role in antigen presentation and intracellular pathogen clearance. Cif selectively increased the amount of ubiquitinated TAP1 and increased its degradation in the proteasome of human airway epithelial cells. This effect of Cif was mediated by reducing USP10 deubiquitinating activity, resulting in increased polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of TAP1. The reduction in TAP1 abundance decreased peptide antigen translocation into the endoplasmic reticulum, an effect that resulted in reduced antigen available to MHC class I molecules for presentation at the plasma membrane of airway epithelial cells and recognition by CD8+ T cells. Cif is the first bacterial factor identified that inhibits TAP function and MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:24247241

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing response in the absence of functional LasR and LasI proteins: the case of strain 148, a virulent dolphin isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Estefanía; González-Valdez, Abigail; Servín-González, Luis; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria

    2017-07-03

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that presents a complex regulatory network called 'quorum-sensing', which is responsible for the transcription of genes coding for several traits implicated in its pathogenicity. Strain 148 is a dolphin isolate that has been shown to produce quorum-sensing-regulated virulence traits and to be virulent in a mouse model, despite the fact that it contains a 20-kbp deletion that eliminates from the chromosome the lasR gene and the lasI promoter. LasR is a key quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator that, when coupled with the autoinducer 3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3O-C12-HSL) produced by LasI, activates transcription of genes coding for some virulence-associated traits such as elastase, lasI, rhlI and rhlR. RhlR is also a key quorum-sensing transcriptional regulator that, when interacting with the autoinducer butanoyl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) that is produced by the synthase RhlI, activates the genes involved in the synthesis of some virulence-associated traits, as rhamnolipids and pyocyanin. We describe that in P. aeruginosa 148, the LasR/3O-C12-HSL-independent rhlR transcriptional activation is due to the release of the negative effect of Vfr (a CRP-ortholog) caused by the insertion of an IS element in vfr, and that rhlI transcription is driven from the rhlR promoter, forming the rhlR-I operon. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Population Structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz Wiehlmann; Gerd Wagner; Nina Cramer; Benny Siebert; Peter Gudowius; Gracia Morales; Thilo Köhler; Christian van Delden; Christian Weinel; Peter Slickers; Burkhard Tümmler

    2007-01-01

    The metabolically versatile Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhabits terrestrial, aquatic, animal-, human-, and plant-host-associated environments and is an important causative agent...

  20. Structural insights into the T6SS effector protein Tse3 and the Tse3-Tsi3 complex from Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveal a calcium-dependent membrane-binding mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Defen; Shang, Guijun; Zhang, Heqiao; Yu, Qian; Cong, Xiaoyan; Yuan, Jupeng; He, Fengjuan; Zhu, Chunyuan; Zhao, Yanyu; Yin, Kun; Chen, Yuanyuan; Hu, Junqiang; Zhang, Xiaodan; Yuan, Zenglin; Xu, Sujuan; Hu, Wei; Cang, Huaixing; Gu, Lichuan

    2014-06-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses the type VI secretion system (T6SS) to deliver the muramidase Tse3 into the periplasm of rival bacteria to degrade their peptidoglycan (PG). Concomitantly, P. aeruginosa uses the periplasm-localized immunity protein Tsi3 to prevent potential self-intoxication caused by Tse3, and thus gains an edge over rival bacteria in fierce niche competition. Here, we report the crystal structures of Tse3 and the Tse3-Tsi3 complex. Tse3 contains an annexin repeat-like fold at the N-terminus and a G-type lysozyme fold at the C-terminus. One loop in the N-terminal domain (Loop 12) and one helix (α9) from the C-terminal domain together anchor Tse3 and the Tse3-Tsi3 complex to membrane in a calcium-dependent manner in vitro, and this membrane-binding ability is essential for Tse3's activity. In the C-terminal domain, a Y-shaped groove present on the surface likely serves as the PG binding site. Two calcium-binding motifs are also observed in the groove and these are necessary for Tse3 activity. In the Tse3-Tsi3 structure, three loops of Tsi3 insert into the substrate-binding groove of Tse3, and three calcium ions present at the interface of the complex are indispensable for the formation of the Tse3-Tsi3 complex. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Studies on the mechanism of action of imipenem (N-formimidoylthienamycin) in vitro: binding to the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) in Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and inhibition of enzyme activities due to the PBPs in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, T; Ishino, F; Nakagawa, J; Tamaki, S; Matsuhashi, M

    1984-04-01

    The binding affinities of imipenem (N- formimidoylthienamycin ) to penicillin-binding proteins ( PBSs ) of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were determined by two different methods in which competition with [14C]benzylpenicillin for the binding sites was measured. By both methods imipenem was shown to have very high binding affinities to PBPs-2 and -4 in E. coli and P. aeruginosa, and appreciable affinities to most of their other major PBPs. But higher concentrations of imipenem were required for binding to the PBPs-3 in these bacteria. More direct information about the antibacterial activity of imipenem was obtained by measuring its inhibition of the peptidoglycan-synthetic enzyme activities of E. coli PBPs. The results of enzyme inhibitions were compatible with those obtained in binding experiments. The antibiotic inhibited the transpeptidase activities of PBPs-1A, -1B and -2, and the D-alanine carboxypeptidase activities of PBPs-4 and -5. The antibiotic also seemed to cause strong inhibition of the transglycosylase activity of PBP-1A by some unknown mechanism. It inhibited the transpeptidase activity of PBP-3 only weakly, which is consistent with the findings that it had low binding affinity to PBP-3 and did not inhibit septum formation by the cells.

  2. Regulation of pqs quorum sensing via catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Gao, Qingguo; Chen, Wanying

    2013-01-01

    that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolite repression control protein regulates the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing, which further controls synthesis of virulence factor pyocyanin, biofilm formation and survival during infection models. Our study suggests that deregulation of the catabolite repression by P...

  3. Characterization of quorum sensing-controlled transcriptional regulator MarR and Rieske (2Fe-2S) cluster-containing protein (Orf5), which are involved in resistance to environmental stresses in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Fumiko; Inoue, Yuko; Suzuki, Tomoko; Inagaki, Yoshishige; Yamamoto, Mikihiro; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Noutoshi, Yoshiteru; Shiraishi, Tomonori; Ichinose, Yuki

    2015-05-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci 6605 (Pta6605) produces acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), quorum sensing (QS) molecules that are indispensable for virulence in host tobacco infection. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of several QS-defective mutants revealed that the expression of the genes encoding the MarR family transcriptional regulator (MarR) and a Rieske 2Fe-2S cluster-containing protein (Orf5) located adjacent to psyI, a gene encoding AHL synthetase, are significantly repressed. Exogenous application of AHL recovered the expression of both marR and orf5 genes in the ΔpsyI mutant, indicating that AHL positively regulates the expression of these genes. To investigate the role of these genes in the virulence of Pta6605, ΔmarR and Δorf5 mutants were generated. Both mutants showed decreased swimming and swarming motilities, decreased survival ability under oxidative and nitrosative stresses and, consequently, reduced virulence on host tobacco plants. Transmission electron micrographs showed that the structure of the cell membranes of ΔmarR and Δorf5 mutants was severely damaged. Furthermore, not only the ratio of dead cells, but also the amount of flagella, extracellular DNA and protein released into the culture supernatant, was significantly increased in both mutants, indicating that the disruption of marR and orf5 genes might induce structural changes in the membrane and cell lysis. Because both mutants showed partly similar expression profiles, both gene products might be involved in the same regulatory cascades that are required for QS-dependent survival under environmentally stressed conditions. © 2014 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is implicated in many chronic infections and is readily isolated from chronic wounds, medical devices, and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa is believed to persist in the host organism due to its capacity to form...... biofilms, which protect the aggregated, biopolymer-embedded bacteria from the detrimental actions of antibiotic treatments and host immunity. A key component in the protection against innate immunity is rhamnolipid, which is a quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factor. QS is a cell-to-cell signaling...

  5. The multifaceted proteins MvaT and MvaU, members of the H-NS family, control arginine metabolism, pyocyanin synthesis, and prophage activation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Congran; Wally, Hassan; Miller, Shearman J; Lu, Chung-Dar

    2009-10-01

    The MvaT and MvaU proteins belonging to the H-NS family were identified as DNA-binding proteins that interact with the regulatory region of the aotJQMOP-argR operon for arginine uptake and regulation. Recombinant MvaT and MvaU proteins were purified, and binding of these purified proteins to the aotJ regulatory region was demonstrated using electromobility shift assays. Polyclonal antibodies against purified MvaT and MvaU were prepared and employed in supershift assays to support these observations. Knockout mutations resulting in a single lesion in mvaT or mvaU, as well as knockout mutations resulting in double lesions, were constructed using biparental conjugation, and the absence of MvaT and MvaU in the resulting mutants was confirmed by immunoblot analysis. Using measurements of the beta-galactosidase activities from aotJ::lacZ fusions in the mutants and the parental strain, it was found that MvaT and MvaU serve as repressors in control of aotJ expression. The effects of MvaT and MvaU on pyocyanin synthesis and CupA fimbrial expression in these mutants were also analyzed. Pyocyanin synthesis was induced in the single mutants but was completely abolished in the double mutant, suggesting that there is a complicated regulatory scheme in which MvaT and MvaU are essential elements. In comparison, MvaT had a more profound role than MvaU as a repressor of cupA expression; however, a combination of MvaT depletion and MvaU depletion had a strong synergistic effect on cupA. Moreover, prophage Pf4 integrated into the chromosome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 was activated in an mvaT mvaU double mutant but not in a single mutant. These results were supported by purification and nucleotide sequencing of replicative-form DNA and by the release of phage particles in plaque assays. In summary, the mvaT mvaU double mutant was viable, and depletion of MvaT and MvaU had serious effects on a variety of physiological functions in P. aeruginosa.

  6. Cell-Surface Displayed Expression of Trehalose Synthase from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 47054 in Pichia Pastoris Using Pir1p as an Anchor Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojie Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Yeast cell-surface display technologies have been widely applied in the fields of food, medicine, and feed enzyme production, including lipase, α-amylase, and endoglucanase. In this study, a treS gene was fused with the yeast cell-surface anchor protein gene Pir1p by overlap PCR, the Pir1p-treS fusion gene was ligated into pPICZαA and pGAPZαA and transformed into P. pastoris GS115 to obtain recombinant yeast strains that displays trehalose synthase(TreS on its cell surface as an efficient and recyclable whole-cell biocatalyst. Firstly, the enhanced green fluorescence protein gene (egfp was used as the reporter protein to fusion the Pir1p gene and treS gene to construct the recombinant plasmids containing treS-egfg-Pir1p fusion gene, and electrotransformed into P. pastoris GS115 to analyze the surface display characteristics of fusion gene by Western blot, fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. The analysis shown that the treS-egfg-Pir1p fusion protein can be successfully displayed on the surface of yeast cell, and the expression level increased with the extension of fermentation time. These results implied that the Pir1p-treS fusion gene can be well displayed on the cell surface. Secondly, in order to obtain surface active cells with high enzyme activity, the enzymatic properties of TreS displayed on the cell surface was analyzed, and the fermentation process of recombinant P. patoris GS115 containing pPICZαA-Pir1p-treS and pGAPZαA-Pir1p-treS was studied respectively. The cell surface display TreS was stable over a broad range of temperatures (10–45°C and pH (6.0–8.5. The activity of TreS displayed on cell surface respectively reached 1,108 Ug−1 under PAOX1 control for 150 h, and 1,109 Ug−1 under PGAP control for 75h in a 5 L fermenter, respectively. Lastly, the cell-surface displayed TreS was used to product trehalose using high maltose syrup as substrate at pH 8.0 and 15°C. The surface display TreS cells can be recycled for

  7. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Pseudomonas cepacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Monrás, Miriam Fina; Batlle Almodóvar, María del Carmen; González, Cernero; Tamargo Martínez, Isis; Meneses, Félix Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    A case of meningoencephalitis of bacterial etiology caused by Pseudomonas cepacia was described. The strain was received at the Reference Laboratory of Bacterial Acute Respiratory Infections of "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine, where its microbiological identification was confirmed. This isolation was a finding in an adult immunocompetent patient. The evolution was favourable with no sequelae for his future life. Pseudomona cepacia has been associated with respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Patients with Pseudomonas cepacia may be asymptomatic or present fatal acute and fulminant infection.

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  9. The cytotoxin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa : Cytotoxicity requires proteolytic activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlik-Eisel, Gabriele; Lutz, Frieder; Henschen, Agnes; Eisel, Ulrich; Struckmeier, Martin; Kräuter, Josef; Niemann, Heiner

    The primary structure of a cytotoxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was determined by sequencing of the structural gene. The cytotoxin (31,700 Mr) lacks an N-terminal signal sequence for bacterial secretion but contains a pentapeptide consensus sequence commonly found in prokaryotic proteins which

  10. Allantoinase from Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. Purification, Properties and Immunochemical Characterization of Its In Vivo Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Smits, Rob A.M.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The catabolic enzyme allantoinase is rapidly inactivated in cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa when the stationary phase of growth is reached. This process is irreversible since the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol completely blocked the reappearance of allantoinase activity that is observed

  11. Pseudomonas folliculitis in Arabian baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ruigomez, Maria

    2013-07-14

    A 35-year-old man presented with a painful cutaneous skin eruption that was localized on the upper trunk. He stated that the previous weekend he had attended an Arabian bath. The physical examination revealed multiple hair follicle-centered papulopustules surrounded by an erythematous halo. A clinical diagnosis of pseudomonas folliculitis was made and treatment was prescribed. Afterwards Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a pustule culture. Pseudomonas folliculitis is a bacterial infection of the hair follicles. The most common reservoirs include facilities with hot water and complex piping systems that are difficult to clean, such as hot tubs and bathtubs. Despite adequate or high chlorine levels, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow within a biofilm.

  12. Final screening assessment for Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 31483, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 31800, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 700369

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    "Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on four strains of Pseudomonas putida...

  13. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  14. Cloning and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa flagellin in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K; Montie, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    The flagellin gene was isolated from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genomic bank by conjugation into a PA103 Fla- strain. Flagellin DNA was transferred from motile recipient PA103 Fla+ cells by transformation into Escherichia coli. We show that transformed E. coli expresses flagellin protein. Export of flagellin to the E. coli cell surface was suggested by positive colony blots of unlysed cells and by isolation of flagellin protein from E. coli supernatants.

  15. [Mechanism of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by an association of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, N V; Kondrat'eva, T F; Krasil'nikova, E N; Karavaĭko, G I

    2006-01-01

    The intermediate and terminal products of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by individual strains of the genus Pseudomonas, P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18, and by their association were analyzed. The activity of the enzymes of nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in these strains was compared with that of the collection strains P. putida VKM B-2187T and P. stutzeri VKM B-975T. Upon the introduction of CN- and SCN- into cell suspensions of strains 18 and 21 in phosphate buffer (pH 8.8), the production of NH4+ was observed. Due to the high rate of their utilization, NH3, NH4+, and CNO- were absent from the culture liquids of P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18 grown with CN- or SCN-. Both Pseudomonas strains decomposed SCN- via cyanate production. The cyanase activity was 0.75 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. putida strain 21 and 1.26 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. stutzeri strain 18. The cyanase activity was present in the cells grown with SCN- but absent in cells grown with NH4+. Strain 21 of P. putida was a more active CN- decomposer than strain 18 of P. stutzeri. Ammonium and CO2 were the terminal nitrogen and carbon products of CN- and SCN- decomposition. The terminal sulfur products of SCN- decomposition by P. stutzeri strain 18 and P. putida strain 21 were thiosulfate and tetrathionate, respectively. The strains utilized the toxic compounds in the anabolism only, as sources of nitrogen (CN- and SCN-) and sulfur (SCN-). The pathway of thiocyanate decomposition by the association of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas is proposed based on the results obtained.

  16. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa...

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    of mutations, slow growth and adaptation of the bacteria to the conditions in the lungs, and to antibiotic therapy. Low bacterial metabolic activity and increase of doubling times of the bacterial cells in CF lungs are responsible for some of the tolerance to antibiotics. Conventional resistance mechanisms......, such as chromosomal ß-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps, and mutations of antibiotic target molecules in the bacteria, also contribute to the survival of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy.......The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...

  18. Phylogenomics and systematics in Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGomila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Pseudomonas currently contains 144 species, making it the genus of Gram-negative bacteria that contains the largest number of species. Currently, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA is the preferred method for establishing the phylogeny between species and genera. Four partial gene sequences of housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD were obtained from 112 complete or draft genomes of strains related to the genus Pseudomonas that were available in databases. These genes were analyzed together with the corresponding sequences of 133 Pseudomonas type strains of validly published species to assess their correct phylogenetic assignations. We confirmed that 30% of the sequenced genomes of non-type strains were not correctly assigned at the species level in the accepted taxonomy of the genus and that 20% of the strains were not identified at the species level. Most of these strains had been isolated and classified several years ago, and their taxonomic status has not been updated by modern techniques. MLSA was also compared with indices based on the analysis of whole-genome sequences that have been proposed for species delineation, such as tetranucleotide usage patterns (TETRA, average nucleotide identity (ANIm, based on MUMmer and ANIb, based on BLAST and genome-to-genome distance (GGDC. TETRA was useful for discriminating Pseudomonas from other genera, whereas ANIb and GGDC clearly separated strains of different species. ANIb showed the strongest correlation with MLSA. The correct species classification is a prerequisite for most diversity and evolutionary studies. This work highlights the necessity for complete genomic sequences of type strains to build a phylogenomic taxonomy and that all new genome sequences submitted to databases should be correctly assigned to species to avoid taxonomic inconsistencies.

  19. Pseudomonas-follikulitis efter badning i spabad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of folliculitis. Pseudomonas folliculitis can develop after contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, hot tubs and spa baths. Systemic therapy may be indicated in patients with widespread lesions, systemic symptoms or in immunosuppressed patients....... We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect....

  20. Benzoate transport in Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Alpa; Purohit, Hemant; Phale, Prashant S

    2017-07-03

    Pseudomonas putida strain CSV86 metabolizes variety of aromatic compounds as the sole carbon source. Genome analysis revealed the presence of genes encoding putative transporters for benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenylacetate, p-hydroxyphenylacetate and vanillate. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that benzoate transport and metabolism genes are clustered at the ben locus as benK-catA-benE-benF. Protein topology prediction suggests that BenK (aromatic acid-H+ symporter of major facilitator superfamily) has 12 transmembrane α-helices with the conserved motif LADRXGRKX in loop 2, while BenE (benzoate-H+ symporter protein) has 11 predicted transmembrane α-helices. benF and catA encode benzoate specific porin, OprD and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively. Biochemical studies suggest that benzoate was transported by an inducible and active process. Inhibition (90%-100%) in the presence of dinitrophenol suggests that the energy for the transport process is derived from the proton motive force. The maximum rate of benzoate transport was 484 pmole min-1 mg-1 cells with an affinity constant, Kmof 4.5 μM. Transcriptional analysis of the benzoate and glucose-grown cells showed inducible expression of benF, benK and benE, suggesting that besides outer membrane porin, both inner membrane transporters probably contribute for the benzoate transport in P. putida strain CSV86. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Petroleum-hydrocarbons biodegradation by Pseudomonas strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. In this study, two bacterial strains were isolated from a contaminated soil of a refinery of Arzew (Oran). The isolated strains were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P3) and Pseudomonas fluoresens (P4).

  2. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as. Pseudomonas ... Key words: Alkaline protease, casein agar, meat waste contaminated soil, Pseudomonas fluorescens. INTRODUCTION ... advent of new frontiers in biotechnology, the spectrum of protease ...

  3. Effects of atmospheric conditions on ice nucleation activity of Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Glaux

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although ice nuclei from bacterial origin are known to be efficient at the highest temperatures known for ice catalysts, quantitative data are still needed to assess their role in cloud processes. Here we studied the effects of three typical cloud conditions (i acidic pH (ii NO2 and O3 exposure and (iii UV-A exposure on the ice nucleation activity (INA of four Pseudomonas strains. Three of the Pseudomonas syringae strains were isolated from cloud water and the phyllosphere and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CGina-01 was isolated from Antarctic glacier ice melt. Among the three conditions tested, acidic pH caused the most significant effects on INA likely due to denaturation of the ice nucleation protein complex. Exposure to NO2 and O3 gases had no significant or only weak effects on the INA of two P. syringae strains whereas the INA of P. fluorescens CGina-01 was significantly affected. The INA of the third P. syringae strain showed variable responses to NO2 and O3 exposure. These differences in the INA of different Pseudomonas suggest that the response to atmospheric conditions could be strain-specific. After UV-A exposure, a substantial loss of viability of all four strains was observed whereas their INA decreased only slightly. This corroborates the notion that under certain conditions dead bacterial cells can maintain their INA. Overall, the negative effects of the three environmental factors on INA were more significant at the warmer temperatures. Our results suggest that in clouds where temperatures are near 0 °C, the importance of bacterial ice nucleation in precipitation processes could be reduced by some environmental factors.

  4. HOPM1 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-11-15

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein HopM1.sub.1-300 mediated protection is enhanced, such as increased protection to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1 and/or there is an increase in activity of an ATMIN associated plant protection protein, such as ATMIN7. Reagents of the present invention further provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  5. Methods of detecting and controlling mucoid Pseudomonas biofilm production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongwei D. (Inventor); Qiu, Dongru (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Compositions and methods for detecting and controlling the conversion to mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are disclosed. The present invention provides for detecting the switch from nonmucoid to mucoid state of P. aeruginosa by measuring mucE expression or MucE protein levels. The interaction between MucE and AlgW controls the switch to mucoidy in wild type P. aeruginosa. Also disclosed is an alginate biosynthesis heterologous expression system for use in screening candidate substances that inhibit conversion to mucoidy.

  6. [Pseudomonas genus bacteria on weeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdiak, R I; Iakovleva, L M; Pasichnik, L A; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown in the work that the weeds (couch-grass and ryegrass) may be affected by bacterial diseases in natural conditions, Pseudomonas genus bacteria being their agents. The isolated bacteria are highly-aggressive in respect of the host-plant and a wide range of cultivated plants: wheat, rye, oats, barley, apple-tree and pear-tree. In contrast to highly aggressive bacteria isolated from the affected weeds, bacteria-epi phytes isolated from formally healthy plants (common amaranth, orache, flat-leaved spurge, field sow thistle, matricary, common coltsfoot, narrow-leaved vetch) and identified as P. syringae pv. coronafaciens, were characterized by weak aggression. A wide range of ecological niches of bacteria evidently promote their revival and distribution everywhere in nature.

  7. TOPOLOGY OF THE MEMBRANE-BOUND ALKANE HYDROXYLASE OF PSEUDOMONAS-OLEOVORANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.B.; PENNINGA, D; Witholt, Bernard

    1992-01-01

    The Pseudomonas oleovorans alkane hydroxylase is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein that is expressed and active in both Escherichia coli and P. oleovorans. Its primary sequence contains eight hydrophobic stretches that could span the membrane as alpha-helices. The topology of alkane

  8. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, Kathrin; Rasmussen, Thomas B

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR by expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp)....

  9. Molecular monolayers and interfacial electron transfer of pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Nielsen, Jens Ulrik

    2000-01-01

    We provide a comprehensive approach to the formation and characterization of molecular monolayers of the blue copper protein Pseudomonas aeruginosa azurin on Au(111) in aqueous ammonium acetate solution. Main issues are adsorption patterns, reductive desorption, properties of the double layer...

  10. Topological characterization and modeling of the 3D structure of lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Ransac, Stéphane; Koch, Heinrich B.; Ferrato, Francine; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    1993-01-01

    Lipase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a M(r) 29 kDa protein with a single functional disulfide bond as shown by a shift in electrophoretic mobility after treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Limited proteolysis of lipase with Staphylococcus aureus protease V8 resulted in cleavage after

  11. CLONING AND SEQUENCING OF PSEUDOMONAS GENES DETERMINING SODIUM DODECYL-SULFATE BIODEGRADATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAVISON, J; BRUNEL, F; PHANOPOULOS, A; PROZZI, D; TERPSTRA, P

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of two genes involved in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) degradation, by Pseudomonas, have been determined. One of these, sdsA, codes for an alkyl sulfatase (58 957 Da) and has similarity (31.8% identity over a 201-amino acid stretch) to the N terminus of a predicted protein of

  12. Characterization of the epoxide hydrolase from an epichlorohydrin-degrading Pseudomonas sp.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Mariken H.J.; van den Wijngaard, Abraham; Pentenga, Marjan; Janssen, Dick B.

    1991-01-01

    An epoxide hydrolase was purified to homogeneity from the epichlorohydrin-utilizing bacterium Pseudomonas sp. strain AD1. The enzyme was found to be a monomeric protein with a molecular mass of 35 kDa. With epichlorohydrin as the substrate, the enzyme followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a Km

  13. Multilocus sequence typing of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple drug resistance with increasing frequency, especially to carbapenems making patient treatment difficult. Carbapenem-resistance may be caused by porin gene mutations, active drug efflux, and carbapenemase production.

  14. Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genome Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalai Mathee; Giri Narasimhan; Camilo Valdes; Xiaoyun Qiu; Jody M. Matewish; Michael Koehrsen; Antonis Rokas; Chandri N. Yandava; Reinhard Engels; Erliang Zeng; Raquel Olavarietta; Melissa Doud; Roger S. Smith; Philip Montgomery; Jared R. White; Paul A. Godfrey; Chinnappa Kodira; Bruce Birren; James E. Galagan; Stephen Lory

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to thrive in diverse environments that includes humans with a variety of debilitating diseases or immune deficiencies...

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: resistance to the max

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism...

  16. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an obligate aerobic, motile, gram negative bacillus.which is able to grow and survive in almost any environment and resistant to temperature extremes. It is involved in the etiology of several diseases i.

  18. Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachani, Abderrahman; Lossi, Nadine S.; Hamilton, Alexander; Jones, Cerith; Bleves, Sophie; Albesa-Jové, David; Filloux, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Such infections are associated with an active type VI secretion system (T6SS), which consists of about 15 conserved components, including the AAA+ ATPase, ClpV. The T6SS secretes two categories of proteins, VgrG and Hcp. Hcp is structurally similar to a phage tail tube component, whereas VgrG proteins show similarity to the puncturing device at the tip of the phage tube. In P. aeruginosa, three T6SSs are known. The expression of H1-T6SS genes is controlled by the RetS sensor. Here, 10 vgrG genes were identified in the PAO1 genome, among which three are co-regulated with H1-T6SS, namely vgrG1a/b/c. Whereas VgrG1a and VgrG1c were secreted in a ClpV1-dependent manner, secretion of VgrG1b was ClpV1-independent. We show that VgrG1a and VgrG1c form multimers, which confirmed the VgrG model predicting trimers similar to the tail spike. We demonstrate that Hcp1 secretion requires either VgrG1a or VgrG1c, which may act independently to puncture the bacterial envelope and give Hcp1 access to the surface. VgrG1b is not required for Hcp1 secretion. Thus, VgrG1b does not require H1-T6SS for secretion nor does H1-T6SS require VgrG1b for its function. Finally, we show that VgrG proteins are required for secretion of a genuine H1-T6SS substrate, Tse3. Our results demonstrate that VgrG proteins are not only secreted components but are essential for secretion of other T6SS substrates. Overall, we emphasize variability in behavior of three P. aeruginosa VgrGs, suggesting that, although very similar, distinct VgrGs achieve specific functions. PMID:21325275

  19. Complete genome sequence of the lytic cold-active Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage VSW-3 from Napahai plateau wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunjing; Zhang, Zhongyao; Li, Jiankai; Qin, Kunhao; Wei, Yunlin; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Lianbing; Ji, Xiuling

    2017-02-01

    The lytic cold-active bacteriophage VSW-3, belonging to the Podoviridae family and infecting the host Pseudomonas fluorescens SW-3, was isolated from the Napahai plateau wetland in China. With the development of sequencing technology, the study of Pseudomonas genomic diversity has increased; however, knowledge of cold-active phages infecting Pseudomonas is limited. The newly sequenced phage VSW-3 was classified based on virion morphology by transmission electron microscope. Sequence analysis revealed that the genome size was 40,556 bp with an overall GC content of 57.54 % and 46 open reading frames. The genome was organized into several modules containing genes for packaging, structural proteins, replication/transcription, and phage lysis. The sequence contained 45 potential promoters, 3 transcription terminators, and yet no tRNAs. This is the first report of cold-active Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteriophage genome sequencing.

  20. Construction of phoE-caa, a novel PCR- and immunologically detectable marker gene for Pseudomonas putida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaat, S. A.; Slegtenhorst-Eegdeman, K.; Tommassen, J.; Geli, V.; Wijffelman, C. A.; Lugtenberg, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we describe the construction and use in Pseudomonas putida WCS358 of phoE-caa, a novel hybrid marker gene, which allows monitoring both at the protein level by immunological methods and at the DNA level by PCR. The marker is based on the Escherichia coli outer membrane protein gene

  1. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Nicolas; Bergsson, Gudmundur; Butler, Marcus W.; Greene, Catherine M.; Weldon, Sinead; Kessler, Efrat; Levine, Rodney L.; O’Neill, Shane J.; Taggart, Clifford C.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2012-01-01

    Elafin is a 6 kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases (neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3) with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), were able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaved elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin. PMID:20370321

  2. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guyot, Nicolas

    2010-06-01

    Elafin is a 6-kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases [neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3] with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), are able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaves elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond, resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin.

  3. Active Immunization with Lipopolysaccharide Pseudomonas Antigen for Chronic Pseudomonas Bronchopneumonia in Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, James E.; Hickey, William F.; Blackwood, Linda L.; Arnaut, M. Amin

    1981-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading clinical problem among patients with cystic fibrosis. Because antimicrobial agents are usually ineffective in eradicating these infections, additional therapeutic or prophylactic measures should be considered. In this study, an experimental guinea pig model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bronchopneumonia was utilized to determine whether active immunization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) P. aeruginosa antigen may favorab...

  4. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Pseudomonas cuatrocienegasensis sp. nov., isolated from an evaporating lagoon in the Cuatro Cienegas valley in Coahuila, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Ana E; Caballero-Mellado, Jesús; Martínez-Aguilar, Lourdes; Rodríguez-Verdugo, Alejandra; González-González, Andrea; Toribio-Jiménez, Jeiry; Souza, Valeria

    2009-06-01

    Nine Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming isolates with identical or very similar repetitive-sequence-based PCR profiles were recovered from an evaporative lagoon in Mexico. Two strains, designated 1N(T) and 3N, had virtually identical 16S rRNA gene sequences and, on the basis of these sequences, were identified as members of the genus Pseudomonas, with Pseudomonas peli R-20805(T) as the closest relative. All nine isolates had practically identical whole-cell protein profiles. The major fatty acids [C(16 : 0,) C(18 : 1)omega7c and summed feature a (C(16 : 1)omega7 and/or C(16 : 1)omega6c)] of strains 1N(T) and 3N supported their affiliation with the genus Pseudomonas. The DNA-DNA reassociation values with respect to P. peli LMG 23201(T) and other closely related Pseudomonas species were <15 %. Physiological and biochemical tests allowed phenotypic differentiation of the strains analysed, including strain 1N(T), from the five phylogenetically closest Pseudomonas species. On the basis of the data obtained by using this polyphasic taxonomic approach, the nine strains represent a novel species, for which the name Pseudomonas cuatrocienegasensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is 1N(T) (=LMG 24676(T)=CIP 109853(T)).

  6. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  7. Diversity of small RNAs expressed in Pseudomonas species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Lozano, Mara; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molina-Santiago, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revealed several hundreds of previously undetected small RNAs (sRNAs) in all bacterial species investigated, including strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas syringae. Nonetheless, only little is known about the extent of conservation of...

  8. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... genus Pseudomonas. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, and has been..., abscesses, and meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes). Pseudomonas pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a chronic pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the...

  9. Expression, purification, and characterization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangluo; Chen, Shuai; Liao, Yuanping; Wang, Dingli; Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Yingming; Ran, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Daru; Zhu, Huaxing

    2013-12-01

    As a member of zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) can oxidize toxic formaldehyde to less active formate with NAD(+) as a cofactor and exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Most FDHs are well known to be glutathione-dependent in the catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation, but the enzyme from Pseudomonas putida is an exception, which is independent of glutathione. To identify novel glutathione-independent FDHs from other bacterial strains and facilitate the corresponding structural and enzymatic studies, high-level soluble expression and efficient purification of these enzymes need to be achieved. Here, we present molecular cloning, expression, and purification of the FDH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium causing opportunistic human infection. The FDH of P. aeruginosa shows high sequence identity (87.97%) with that of P. putida. Our results indicated that coexpression with molecular chaperones GroES, GroEL, and Tig has significantly attenuated inclusion body formation and improved the solubility of the recombinant FDH in Escherichiacoli cells. A purification protocol including three chromatographic steps was also established to isolate the recombinant FDH to homogeneity with a yield of ∼3.2 mg from 1L of cell culture. The recombinant P. aeruginosa FDH was properly folded and biologically functional, as demonstrated by the mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and enzymatic characterizations of the purified proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria...... on product spoilage and shelf-life remains poorly described. The present study used a quantitative microbial ecology approach to model and predict the effect of product characteristics and storage conditions on growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in cottage cheese. The effect of temperature (5-15˚C) and p...

  11. Ferric Uptake Regulator Fur Is Conditionally Essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqua, Martina; Visaggio, Daniela; Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Genah, Shirley; Banin, Ehud; Visca, Paolo; Imperi, Francesco

    2017-11-15

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein controls both metabolism and virulence in response to iron availability. Differently from other bacteria, attempts to obtain fur deletion mutants of P. aeruginosa failed, leading to the assumption that Fur is an essential protein in this bacterium. By investigating a P. aeruginosa conditional fur mutant, we demonstrate that Fur is not essential for P. aeruginosa growth in liquid media, biofilm formation, and pathogenicity in an insect model of infection. Conversely, Fur is essential for growth on solid media since Fur-depleted cells are severely impaired in colony formation. Transposon-mediated random mutagenesis experiments identified pyochelin siderophore biosynthesis as a major cause of the colony growth defect of the conditional fur mutant, and deletion mutagenesis confirmed this evidence. Impaired colony growth of pyochelin-proficient Fur-depleted cells does not depend on oxidative stress, since Fur-depleted cells do not accumulate higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are not rescued by antioxidant agents or overexpression of ROS-detoxifying enzymes. Ectopic expression of pch genes revealed that pyochelin production has no inhibitory effects on a fur deletion mutant of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, suggesting that the toxicity of the pch locus in Fur-depleted cells involves a P. aeruginosa-specific pathway(s).IMPORTANCE Members of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein family are bacterial transcriptional repressors that control iron uptake and storage in response to iron availability, thereby playing a crucial role in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. While fur null mutants of many bacteria have been obtained, Fur appears to be essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa for still unknown reasons. We obtained Fur-depleted P. aeruginosa cells by conditional mutagenesis and showed that Fur is dispensable for planktonic growth, while it is required for colony formation. This is

  12. Characterization of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar ribicola NCPPB 963.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, C

    1998-01-01

    In 1939, a bacterial spot caused severe defoliation of Ribes aureum (Golden Currant) The causal agent is now recognized as Pseudomonas syringae pathovar ribicola. This communication extends the phenotype of the only identified strain of P. syringae pv. ribicola, which is reminiscent of those of other pathovars, and provides a molecular biological characterization. A minimum size of 5.55 Mb for the bacterial genome was obtained using pulsed-field electrophoresis. The SDS-PAGE outer-membrane profile contained seven major bands, and has obvious similarities to that of P. aeruginosa. SDS-PAGE of concentrated mid-log phase culture supernatants revealed large amounts of a single, cryptic 24.0 kD protein. The amino acid composition and 57 residues in the N-terminus of this protein. were determined. The protein sequence was nearly identical to the translation of a region of unknown function in the P. aeruginosa genome. Extensive similarity in N-terminal sequence, composition and subunit size to a secreted hydrophilic Vibrio cholerae protein of unknown function was also found. Neither protein has been directly associated with disease development.

  13. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Jaenicke, Elmar [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Jakob Welder Weg 26, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Schnell, Robert [Karolinska Institutet, 17 177 Stockholm (Sweden); Hunter, William N., E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 4EH, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brenk, Ruth, E-mail: w.n.hunter@dundee.ac.uk [Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Staudinger Weg 5, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  14. Plant growth promotion by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative rod shaped bacterium that has a versatile metabolism and is widely spread in soil and water. P. fluorescens strain SBW25 (Pf.SBW25) is a well-known model strain to study bacterial evolution, plant colonization and biocontrol of plant diseases. It produces

  15. Antibiograms of Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While there was no bacterial growth after 48hrs incubation recorded for group one, only 5(13.9%) samples yielded growth of Staphylococcus aureus for group two with 31(86.1%) yielding no bacterial growth. All group three samples yielded profuse growth of which 11(36.7%) yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

  16. Transesterification of Jatropha oil using immobilized Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mild transesterification has become of much current interest for alternative fuel production. In the present study the ability of a commercial immobilized Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC 103 to catalyze the transesterification of Jatropha oil and methanol was investigated. The cell of P. fluorescens was easily immobilized ...

  17. Behavioral response of resistant and sensitive Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... Key words: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cadmium stress, heavy metal resistance. INTRODUCTION. The release of .... plasmids located in the bacterial strains isolated from agricultural and industrial soils ..... esteraromaticum S51 with other strains of non-flocculating sludge bacteria. IWA's Water Environ.

  18. Evaluation of gamma irradiation effect and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens and influence of gamma irradiation on the development of Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of postharvest disease on apple fruit was studied. P. fluorescens was originally isolated from rhizosphere of the apple trees. Suspension of P. fluorescens and P. expansum ...

  19. Bacteriocinogenicity and production of pyocins from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptible organisms include Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Klebsiella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Proteus spp. and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The results of this study have provided evidence for broadspectrum antibacterial activity of pyocins elicited by Pseudomonas species from Nigeria ...

  20. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... indicates its potential application in biological treatment of wastewaters contaminated with arsenic. Key words: Arsenic, wastewater, Pseudomonas lubricans, bioremediation. INTRODUCTION. Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic metal and is first on the superfund list of hazardous substances.

  1. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wounds of patients attending Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria-Nigeria. One hundred Isolates were characterized and identified from the specimens using standard ...

  2. Characterization of drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the fact that they remain asymptomatic in many cases, they nevertheless play significant roles in the epidemiology of these pathogens through their dissemination to the public, sometimes through the food chain. Four multidrug resistant Gram negative pathogens including: 2 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 2 Proteus ...

  3. Growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Cassava Starch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This involved hydrolysis of starch extracted from freshly harvested cassava tubers using enzyme-enzyme method of hydrolysis, followed by aerobic fermentation of Pseudomonas fluorescens on a mixture of the hydrolysate and nutrient media in a fermentor in batch cultures. The reducing sugar hydrolysate served as the ...

  4. Characterization of rhodanese produced by Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic remediation of polluted environment presents advantages over traditional technologies and also over microbial remediation. Extracellular rhodanese of strains of Pseudomonas aerugionosa and Bacillus brevis isolated from soil of cassava processing site were studied. Biochemical characteristics of the purified ...

  5. Production and characterization of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this present study, biosurfactant-producing microorganisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBSC1, was isolated from mangrove ecosystem in Pichavaram (Boat house), Tamil Nadu, India. The biosurfactant production was done using a minimal salt medium (MSM) with crude oil as the hydrocarbon. The microbial growths ...

  6. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximum protease production was carried out. The culture conditions like inoculum concentration, incubation time, pH, temperature, carbon sources, ...

  7. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hot Tub Rash > Remove swimsuits and shower with soap after getting out of the water. > Clean swimsuits after getting out of the water. ... in locations that have been closed because of pollution. Pseudomonas can multiply quickly when water disinfectant levels drop, so testing your pool or ...

  8. Occurrence of Fusarium Oxysporum and Ralstonia (Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microflora associated with the root-surface of five tomato cultivars commonly cultivated in Edo State Nigeria, was investigated by inoculating serially washed 5 mm tomato root segments on potato dextrose agar (PDA) incubated at room temperature (28-30oC). Fusarium oxysporum and Ralstonia (pseudomonas) ...

  9. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  10. Native tandem and ion mobility mass spectrometry highlight structural and modular similarities in clustered-regularly-interspaced shot-palindromic-repeats (CRISPR)-associated protein complexes from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijn, Esther; Barbu, Ioana M; Barendregt, Arjan; Jore, Matthijs M; Wiedenheft, Blake; Lundgren, Magnus; Westra, Edze R; Brouns, Stan J J; Doudna, Jennifer A; van der Oost, John; Heck, Albert J R

    2012-11-01

    The CRISPR/Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated genes) immune system of bacteria and archaea provides acquired resistance against viruses and plasmids, by a strategy analogous to RNA-interference. Key components of the defense system are ribonucleoprotein complexes, the composition of which appears highly variable in different CRISPR/Cas subtypes. Previous studies combined mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and small angle x-ray scattering to demonstrate that the E. coli Cascade complex (405 kDa) and the P. aeruginosa Csy-complex (350 kDa) are similar in that they share a central spiral-shaped hexameric structure, flanked by associating proteins and one CRISPR RNA. Recently, a cryo-electron microscopy structure of Cascade revealed that the CRISPR RNA molecule resides in a groove of the hexameric backbone. For both complexes we here describe the use of native mass spectrometry in combination with ion mobility mass spectrometry to assign a stable core surrounded by more loosely associated modules. Via computational modeling subcomplex structures were proposed that relate to the experimental IMMS data. Despite the absence of obvious sequence homology between several subunits, detailed analysis of sub-complexes strongly suggests analogy between subunits of the two complexes. Probing the specific association of E. coli Cascade/crRNA to its complementary DNA target reveals a conformational change. All together these findings provide relevant new information about the potential assembly process of the two CRISPR-associated complexes.

  11. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  12. ANTAGONISTIC POTENTIAL OF FLUORESCENT Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Thus, Pf5 the powerful siderophore producer (866 µg mg-1 protein) has the potential to suppress the activity of pathogens and enhance the plant growth. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT. The financial support provided for this work by the University Grants Commission, South Eastern. Regional Office, Hyderabad [File No. MRP-658/.

  13. Cloning and sequencing of Pseudomonas genes determining sodium dodecyl sulfate biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, J; Brunel, F; Phanopoulos, A; Prozzi, D; Terpstra, P

    1992-05-01

    The nucleotide sequences of two genes involved in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) degradation, by Pseudomonas, have been determined. One of these, sdsA, codes for an alkyl sulfatase (58,957 Da) and has similarity (31.8% identity over a 201-amino acid stretch) to the N terminus of a predicted protein of unknown function from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The other gene, sdsB, codes for a positive activator protein (33,600 Da) that has extensive similarity with the lysR family of helix-turn-helix DNA-binding activator proteins.

  14. Description of Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov., a Novel Psychrotrophic Bacterium from James Ross Island, Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosina, Marcel; Švec, Pavel; Černohlávková, Jitka; Barták, Miloš; Snopková, Kateřina; De Vos, Paul; Sedláček, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    During the microbiological research performed within the scope of activities of Czech expeditions based at the Johann Gregor Mendel Station at James Ross Island, Antarctica, two psychrotrophic gram-stain negative non-fluorescent strains CCM 8506T and CCM 8507 from soil were extensively characterized using genotypic and phenotypic methods. Initial characterization using ribotyping with HindIII restriction endonuclease and phenotyping implies that both isolates belong to a single Pseudomonas species. Sequencing of rrs, rpoB, rpoD and glnA genes of strain CCM 8506(T) confirmed affiliation of investigated strains within the genus Pseudomonas. Further investigation using automated ribotyping with EcoRI (RiboPrinter(®) Microbial Characterisation System), whole-cell protein profiling using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer system, extensive biochemical testing and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed that both investigated strains are members of a single taxon which is clearly separated from all hitherto described Pseudomonas spp. Based on all findings, we describe a novel species Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov. with the type strain CCM 8506(T) (=LMG 28632T).

  15. Pyocyanin degradation by a tautomerizing demethylase inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kyle C; Glasser, Nathaniel R; Conway, Stuart J; Newman, Dianne K

    2017-01-13

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces colorful redox-active metabolites called phenazines, which underpin biofilm development, virulence, and clinical outcomes. Although phenazines exist in many forms, the best studied is pyocyanin. Here, we describe pyocyanin demethylase (PodA), a hitherto uncharacterized protein that oxidizes the pyocyanin methyl group to formaldehyde and reduces the pyrazine ring via an unusual tautomerizing demethylation reaction. Treatment with PodA disrupts P. aeruginosa biofilm formation similarly to DNase, suggesting interference with the pyocyanin-dependent release of extracellular DNA into the matrix. PodA-dependent pyocyanin demethylation also restricts established biofilm aggregate populations experiencing anoxic conditions. Together, these results show that modulating extracellular redox-active metabolites can influence the fitness of a biofilm-forming microorganism. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  17. Effect of Formalin Toxoiding on Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Toxin A: Biological Chemical and Immunochemical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin A. Formalin treatment alone resulted in a 1,000-fold decrease in toxin-induced cell cytotoxicity and altered the antigenicity of...1,000-fold decrease in toxin-induced cell cytotoxicity and altered the antigenicity of the toxin A molecule without adversely affecting enzymatic...inhib- both Formalin and glutaraldehyde treatments, itor of eucaryotic protein synthesis (21, 25, 27), the nature of the chemically induced altera

  18. Conformational Changes in Azurin from Pseudomona aeruginosa Induced through Chemical and Physical Protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes, Lymari; Oyola, Jessica; Fernández, Mónica; Quiñones, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    Azurin from Pseudomona aeruginosa is a small copper protein with a single tryptophan (Trp) buried in the structure. The Gibbs free energies associated with the folding of holo azurin, calculated monitoring Trp fluorescence and changes in absorbance on the ligand-to-metal band, are different because these techniques probe their local environments, thereby being able to probe different conformational changes. The presence of an intermediate state was observed during the chemical denaturation of...

  19. Alkaline protease contributes to pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Eigo; Lee, Jae Man; Mon, Hiroaki; Morishita, Mai; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2017-04-01

    The role of the alkaline protease (AprA) in pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. AprA was overproduced when a plasmid carrying the aprA gene was introduced to an aprA-deletion mutant strain, EG03; thus, aprA-complemented EG03 was used as an overproducing strain. The complemented strain produced higher pyocyanin than the mutant strain in all commercially available media evaluated. Particularly, pyocyanin production was higher in the complemented than in the parental strain in brain-heart infusion and tryptic soy broths. These results suggested that protein degradation products by AprA were utilized for pyocyanin production. Protein-rich media were used in subsequent validation studies. Similar results were obtained when the basal medium was supplemented with casein or skim milk as the sole organic nitrogen source. However, gelatin failed to induce abundant pyocyanin production in the complemented strain, despite the presence of protein degradation products by AprA as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Thus, gelatin degradation products may not be suitable for pyocyanin synthesis. In conclusion, AprA could contribute to pyocyanin production in the presence of several proteins or peptides. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Structure, function and regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa porins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Sylvie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Bodilis, Josselin; Maillot, Olivier; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Cornelis, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the γ-proteobacteria. Like other members of the Pseudomonas genus, it is known for its metabolic versatility and its ability to colonize a wide range of ecological niches, such as rhizosphere, water environments and animal hosts, including humans where it can cause severe infections. Another particularity of P. aeruginosa is its high intrinsic resistance to antiseptics and antibiotics, which is partly due to its low outer membrane permeability. In contrast to Enterobacteria, pseudomonads do not possess general diffusion porins in their outer membrane, but rather express specific channel proteins for the uptake of different nutrients. The major outer membrane 'porin', OprF, has been extensively investigated, and displays structural, adhesion and signaling functions while its role in the diffusion of nutrients is still under discussion. Other porins include OprB and OprB2 for the diffusion of glucose, the two small outer membrane proteins OprG and OprH, and the two porins involved in phosphate/pyrophosphate uptake, OprP and OprO. The remaining nineteen porins belong to the so-called OprD (Occ) family, which is further split into two subfamilies termed OccD (8 members) and OccK (11 members). In the past years, a large amount of information concerning the structure, function and regulation of these porins has been published, justifying why an updated review is timely. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase cleaves a C-terminal peptide from human thrombin that inhibits host inflammatory responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Plas, Mariena J A; Bhongir, Ravi K V; Kjellström, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen known for its immune evasive abilities amongst others by degradation of a large variety of host proteins. Here we show that digestion of thrombin by P. aeruginosa elastase leads to the release of the C-terminal thrombin-derived peptide FYT21...

  2. PA0305 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a quorum quenching acylhomoserine lactone acylase belonging to the Ntn hydrolase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahjudi, Mariana; Papaioannou, Evelina; Hendrawati, Oktavia; van Assen, Aart H. G.; van Merkerk, Ronald; Cool, Robbert H.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.; Quax, Wim

    The Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genome has at least two genes, pvdQ and quiP, encoding acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) acylases. Two additional genes, pa 1893 and pa0305, have been predicted to encode penicillin acylase proteins, but have not been characterized. Initial studies on a pa0305 transposon

  3. Catabolite repression control of pyocyanin biosynthesis at an intersection of primary and secondary metabolism in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiaofang; Sonnleitner, Elisabeth; Ren, Bin; Xu, Yuquan; Haas, Dieter

    2012-07-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the catabolite repression control (Crc) protein repressed the formation of the blue pigment pyocyanin in response to a preferred carbon source (succinate) by interacting with phzM mRNA, which encodes a key enzyme in pyocyanin biosynthesis. Crc bound to an extended imperfect recognition sequence that was interrupted by the AUG translation initiation codon.

  4. Short ROSE-like RNA thermometers control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie S Krajewski

    Full Text Available The bacterial small heat shock protein IbpA protects client proteins from aggregation. Due to redundancy in the cellular chaperone network, deletion of the ibpA gene often leads to only a mild or no phenotypic defect. In this study, we show that a Pseudomonas putida ibpA deletion mutant has a severe growth defect under heat stress conditions and reduced survival during recovery revealing a critical role of IbpA in heat tolerance. Transcription of the ibpA gene depends on the alternative heat shock sigma factor σ(32. Production of IbpA protein only at heat shock temperatures suggested additional translational control. We conducted a comprehensive structural and functional analysis of the 5' untranslated regions of the ibpA genes from P. putida and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Both contain a ROSE-type RNA thermometer that is substantially shorter and simpler than previously reported ROSE elements. Comprised of two hairpin structures only, they inhibit translation at low temperature and permit translation initiation after a temperature upshift. Both elements regulate reporter gene expression in Escherichia coli and ribosome binding in vitro in a temperature-dependent manner. Structure probing revealed local melting of the second hairpin whereas the first hairpin remained unaffected. High sequence and structure conservation of pseudomonal ibpA untranslated regions and their ability to confer thermoregulation in vivo suggest that short ROSE-like thermometers are commonly used to control IbpA synthesis in Pseudomonas species.

  5. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantas, Emmanouil A; Licciardello, Grazia; Almeida, Nalvo F; Witek, Kamil; Strano, Cinzia P; Duxbury, Zane; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E; Jones, Jonathan D G; Guttman, David S; Catara, Vittoria; Sarris, Panagiotis F

    2015-01-01

    The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor) and P. mediterranea (Pmed), are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for genes that encode proteins involved in commercially important chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of type III secretion system and known type III effector-encoding genes from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes. Genome-mining also revealed the presence of gene clusters for biosynthesis of siderophores, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and hydrogen cyanide. A highly conserved quorum sensing system was detected in all strains, although species specific differences were observed. Our study provides the basis for in-depth investigations regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence strategies in the battle between plants and microbes.

  6. Characterization of the arcD Arginine : Ornithine Exchanger of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Localization in the Cytoplasmic Membrane and a Topological Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourdineaud, Jean-Paul; Heierli, Daniel; Gamper, Marianne; Verhoogt, Hans J.C.; Driessen, Arnold J.M.; Konings, Wil N.; Lazdunski, Claude; Haas, Dieter

    1993-01-01

    The arcDABC operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes the enzymes of the arginine deiminase pathway and is induced by oxygen limitation. The arcD gene specifies a 53-kDa protein with arginine: ornithine exchange activity. The ArcD protein of P. aeruginosa, like the LysI lysine transporter of

  7. Biodegradation Of 4-Chlorobiphenyl By Pseudomonas synxantha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanjal Noorpreet Inder Kaur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The stabilization and disposal of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs from soil environment and wetland areas is of great concern for health and safety. Wetland remediation with microorganisms is an approach for treating PCBs. A bacterial strain was isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil of Ropar, Punjab, able to degrade PCBs under aerobic conditions. The percentage of degradation with 100 mM/ml of 4-chlorobiphenyl was up to 90%. Degradation was monitored by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometrically, showing that 4-chlorobiphenyl was degraded almost completely. The bacterial strain was identified as Pseudomonas synxantha by 16sRNA sequencing method. This is the first report of 4-chlorobiphenyl degradation by Pseudomonas synxantha.

  8. Pseudomonas spp. convert metmyoglobin into deoxymyoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Michiyo; Kobayashi, Miho; Sasaki, Keisuke; Nomura, Masaru; Mitsumoto, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    Meat 'reddening' by bacteria was observed in chilled beef. To identify the reddening bacteria, isolates were inoculated onto beef and the changes in CIE L*a*b* values monitored. As a result, two Pseudomonas spp., including Pseudomonas fragi which is commonly observed in raw meat, were selected and identified as reddening bacteria. The reddening was coincidentally occurred with the appearance of slime, and the increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) was simultaneously suppressed. In myoglobin-containing nutrient broth, it is shown spectroscopically that P. fragi converted metmyoglobin into deoxymyoglobin. It was concluded that the meat reddening was due to the formation of deoxymyoglobin, induced by the very-low-oxygen tension brought about by Pseudomonad's oxygen consumption: This oxygen depletion simultaneously suppressed TBARS increase.

  9. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared...... the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  10. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Kristoffer; Oguiza, J.A.; Ussery, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF s...... sigma factor that is an interesting target for future studies because of its potential role in the adaptation of P. syringae to its specialized phytopathogenic lifestyle....

  11. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas lubricans, isolated from heavy metal laden industrial wastewater, has been shown to tolerate multiple heavy metals suggesting its importance in bioremediation of industrial effluents. P. lubricans tolerated As(III) up to 3 mg ml-1, Cu2+ up to 0.7 mg ml-1, Hg2+ up to 0.4 mg ml-1, Ni2+ up to 0.4 mg ...

  12. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I; Valencia, R; Torres, M J; Cantos, A; Conde, M; Aznar, J

    2006-11-01

    We describe an outbreak of nosocomial endophthalmitis due to a common source, which was determined to be trypan blue solution prepared in the hospital's pharmacy service. We assume that viable bacteria probably gained access to the trypan blue stock solution during cooling after autoclaving. The temporal cluster of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis was readily perceived on the basis of clinical and microbiological findings, and an exogenous source of contamination was unequivocally identified by means of DNA fingerprinting.

  13. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients Referring to Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynab Golshani

    2012-11-01

    units as part of the Canadian National Intensive Care Unit study. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 2008;61(2:217-21. 13. Livermore DM. Of Pseudomonas , porins, pumps and carbapenems. J Antimicrob Chemother 2001;47(3:247-50. 14. Navneeth BV, Sridaran D, Sahay D, Belwadi MR. A preliminary study on metalloβ- lactamase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in hospitalized patients. Indian J Med Res 2002;116:26, 4-7. 15. Büscher KH, Cullmann W, Dick W, Opferkuch W. Imipenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa resulting from diminished expression of an outer membrane protein. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 1987;31(5:703–8. 16. Strateva T, Ouzounova-Raykova V, Markova B, Todorova A, Marteva-Proevska Y, Mitov I. Problematic clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the university hospitals in Sofia, Bulgaria: current status of antimicrobial resistance and prevailing resistance mechanisms. J Med Microbiol 2007;56(7:956-63. 17. Mohajeri P. Antibiotic susceptibility and resistance patterns of pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from different clinical specimens in patients referred to the teaching hospitals in Kermanshah (2001-2. Behbood Res J Kermanshah Univ Med Sci 2004;7(4:11-20. (Full Text in Persian 18. Streit JM, Jones RN, Sader HS, Fritsche TR. Assessment of pathogen occurrences and resistance profiles among infected patients in the intensive care unit: report from the Sentry Antimicrobial Surveillance Program (North America, 2001. Int J Antimicrob Agents 2004;24(2:111-8. 19. Shacheraghi F, Shakibaie MR, Noveiri H. Molecular Identification of ESBL Genes blaGES-1, blaVEB-1, blaCTX-M blaOXA-1, blaOXA-4, blaOXA-10 and blaPER-1 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Strains Isolated from Burn Patients by PCR, RFLP and Sequencing Techniques. Int J Biol life Sci 2010;3(6:138-42. 20. Fazeli H, Moslehi Tekantapeh Z, Irajian GHR, Salehi M. Determination of drug resistance patterns and detection of bla-vim gene in pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from burned patients in the Imam Mosa

  14. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by Vitexin: A combinatorial study with azithromycin and gentamicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Manash C.; Sandhu, Padmani; Gupta, Priya; Rudrapaul, Prasenjit; de, Utpal C.; Tribedi, Prosun; Akhter, Yusuf; Bhattacharjee, Surajit

    2016-03-01

    Microbial biofilm are communities of surface-adhered cells enclosed in a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. Extensive use of antibiotics to treat biofilm associated infections has led to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is recognised as a model biofilm forming pathogenic bacterium. Vitexin, a polyphenolic group of phytochemical with antimicrobial property, has been studied for its antibiofilm potential against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin. Vitexin shows minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) at 260 μg/ml. It’s antibiofilm activity was evaluated by safranin staining, protein extraction, microscopy methods, quantification of EPS and in vivo models using several sub-MIC doses. Various quorum sensing (QS) mediated phenomenon such as swarming motility, azocasein degrading protease activity, pyoverdin and pyocyanin production, LasA and LasB activity of the bacteria were also evaluated. Results showed marked attenuation in biofilm formation and QS mediated phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in presence of 110 μg/ml vitexin in combination with azithromycin and gentamicin separately. Molecular docking of vitexin with QS associated LuxR, LasA, LasI and motility related proteins showed high and reasonable binding affinity respectively. The study explores the antibiofilm potential of vitexin against P. aeruginosa which can be used as a new antibiofilm agent against microbial biofilm associated pathogenesis.

  15. Pf16 and phiPMW: Expanding the realm of Pseudomonas putida bacteriophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Magill

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of two novel Pseudomonas putida phages, pf16 and phiPMW. Pf16 represents a peripherally related T4-like phage, and is the first of its kind infecting a Pseudomonad, with evidence suggesting cyanophage origins. Extensive divergence has resulted in pf16 occupying a newly defined clade designated as the pf16-related phages, lying at the interface of the Schizo T-Evens and Exo T-Evens. Recombination with an ancestor of the P. putida phage AF is likely responsible for the tropism of this phage. phiPMW represents a completely novel Pseudomonas phage with a genome containing substantial genetic novelty through its many hypothetical proteins. Evidence suggests that this phage has been extensively shaped through gene transfer events and vertical evolution. Phylogenetics shows that this phage has an evolutionary history involving FelixO1-related viruses but is in itself highly distinct from this group.

  16. Phosphatidylcholine synthesis is essential for HrpZ harpin secretion in plant pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae and non-pathogenic Pseudomonas sp. 593.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Min; Long, Deliang; He, Huoguang; Li, Yang; Li, Yadong; Wang, Xingguo

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae van Hall is important phytopathogenic bacterium of stone fruit trees, and able to elicit hypersensitive response (HR) in nonhost plants. The HrpZ, secreted via type III secretion system (T3SS) to the extracellular space of the plant, is a T3SS-dependent protein and a sole T3SS effector able to induce the host defense response outside host cells. We deleted the phosphatidylcholine synthase gene (pcs) of P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall CFCC 1336, and found that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to synthesize phosphatidylcholine and elicit a typical HR in soybean. Further studies showed that the 1336 pcs(-) mutant was unable to secrete HrpZ harpin but could express HrpZ protein in cytoplasm as effectively as the wild type. To confirm if phosphatidylcholine affects HrpZ harpin secretion, we introduced the hrpZ gene into the soil-dwelling bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 593 and the 593 pcs(-) mutant, which were unable to express HrpZ harpin and elicit HR in tobacco or soybean. Western blotting and HR assay showed that the 593H not only secreted HrpZ harpin but also caused a strong HR in tobacco and soybean. In contrast, the 593 pcs(-)H only expressed HrpZ protein in its cytoplasm at the wild type level, but did not secrete HrpZ harpin or elicit HR reaction. Our results demonstrate that phosphatidylcholine is essential for the secretion of HrpZ harpin in P. syringae pv. syringae van Hall and other Pseudomonas strains. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. A bacteria-specific 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin is essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diallinas George

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ferredoxins are small iron-sulfur proteins belonging to all domains of life. A sub-group binds two [4Fe-4S] clusters with unequal and extremely low values of the reduction potentials. These unusual properties are associated with two specific fragments of sequence. The functional importance of the very low potential ferredoxins is unknown. Results A bioinformatic screening of the sequence features defining very low potential 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins has revealed the almost exclusive presence of the corresponding fdx gene in the Proteobacteria phylum, without occurrence in Archaea and Eukaryota. The transcript was found to be monocistronic in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and not part of an operon in most bacteria. Only fdx genes of bacteria which anaerobically degrade aromatic compounds belong to operons. As this pathway is not present in all bacteria having very low potential 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxins, these proteins cannot exclusively be reductants of benzoyl CoA reductases. Expression of the ferredoxin gene did not change in response to varying growth conditions, including upon macrophage infection or aerobic growth with 4-hydroxy benzoate as carbon source. However, it increased along the growth curve in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in Escherichia coli. The sequence immediately 5' upstream of the coding sequence contributed to the promotor activity. Deleting the fdx gene in Pseudomonas aeruginosa abolished growth, unless a plasmid copy of the gene was provided to the deleted strain. Conclusions The gene of the very low potential 2[4Fe-4S] ferredoxin displays characteristics of a housekeeping gene, and it belongs to the minority of genes that are essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These data identify a new potential antimicrobial target in this and other pathogenic Proteobacteria.

  18. METABOLIC PECULIARITIES AT EXPERIMENTAL GENERALIZED PROCESS CAUSED BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov М. М.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available System of free radical oxidation is a non-specific link of most of pathologic processes formation in organism. Enzimological studies allowing the definition of both organospecific violations and the state of biological membranes are of great interest in complex approach to the estimation of structural and metabolic peculiarities of organism in conditions of inflammatory pathology. Thus the purpose of the given study is the definition of metabolic state peculiarities at experimental generalized process caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. According to the results of the carried out studies the activity of the processes of lipids peroxidation in myocardium of infected animals rises: the content of MDA and DC is increased in comparison with intact animals while SH-groups content and catalase activity are decreased, i.e. the oxidative stress takes place in myocardium of infected animals which leads to energy-hungry state process which is also proved by AF – enzyme activity increase which implements hydrolysis of monophosphoric esteris and LDH – enzyme of anaerobic glуcolysis. Activity of AsAT, AlAT and γ-GTP is reliably higher which proves about the activation of protein biosynthesis into tissues which is connected with accelerated enzyme synthesis under the influence of inflammation mediators, i.e. compensatory reaction activation takes place. The similar picture is found in kidneys and liver: LPO under insufficiency of AOS, power-hungry state. The level of МСВ – integrated indicator of intoxication as well as LPO products grows in blood of infected experimental animals which proves about high level of inflammatory process and organism intoxication. Increasing of protein concentration of acute phase – haptoglobulin – also proves about high level of inflammatory process. High activity of LDG (cytoplasmatic enzyme proves about cytoplasmic membranes injury. The decrease of catalase activity and level of SH-groups of blood are found in

  19. The genome of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa generalized transducing bacteriophage F116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michaela; Kropinski, Andrew M

    2005-02-14

    F116 is a temperate, pilus-specific, generalized transducing phage belonging to the Podoviridae virus family. Its genome is linear, ds, TR, and CP DNA with a GC content of 63.2%. The 65 195-bp genome contains 70 putative ORFs, only 16 of which showed sequence similarity to Pseudomonas genomic or phage genes. While the current literature suggests that F116 is a non-integrating phage that maintains itself as a plasmid during the lysogenic life cycle, a putative int gene was identified. Of the phage structural genes, only the portal protein could be identified by homology. Analysis of F116 structural protein by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE revealed approximately 15 bands. MALDI-TOF MS analysis identified the gene encoding the major capsid protein. This protein appears to undergo posttranslational cleavage giving rise to a smaller capsid protein.

  20. Chemistry and biology of pyoverdines, Pseudomonas primary siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cézard, C; Farvacques, N; Sonnet, P

    2015-01-01

    Pyoverdine is the generic name given to a vast family of fluorescent green-yellowish pigments produced by Pseudomonas species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, particularly infecting humans with compromised natural defenses. These infections result in significantly higher morbidity, longer hospitalization, increased mortality rates and excess health care costs. P. aeruginosa is very difficult to eradicate because of an intrinsic coupled with an adaptive resistance to a wide variety of classical antibiotics. When subjected to iron starvation conditions, Pseudomonas bacteria synthesize pyoverdines, their primary siderophores, to acquire iron from the extracellular medium. These molecules are not only powerful iron(III) scavengers but efficient iron(III) transporters as well. Three distinct structural parts constitute pyoverdines, i.e. (i) the fluorescent chromophore, deriving from a dihydroxyquinoline, attached via its carbonyl group to (ii) a type-specific peptide composed of 6 to 14 amino acids and (iii) a small side chain corresponding to a carboxylic acid derivative. Their chemical structure show three bidentate chelating sites including a catechol and two hydroxamates, leading to an octahedral geometry when complexed to iron(III). While the chromophore group is common to all pyoverdines, their peptide moiety differs among strains and species by the number, length, composition and configuration of amino acids. Following chelation with iron(III), the newly formed pyoverdine-Fe complex is recognized by a specific outer membrane transporter, namely FpvA, and reenters the cell where the iron is released from the pyoverdine into the periplasm for further incorporation into bacterial proteins. The remaining apo-pyoverdine is then recycled and secreted back to the extracellular medium by efflux pumps. Besides, the role of pyoverdines in P. aeruginosa is not only limited to scavenge iron from the bacterial environment. Indeed, these siderophores act

  1. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  2. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  3. Subversion of mucosal barrier polarity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanne eEngel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The lumenal surfaces of human body are lined by a monolayer of epithelia that together with mucus secreting cells and specialized immune cells form the mucosal barrier. This barrier is one of the most fundamental components of the innate immune system, protecting organisms from the vast environmental microbiota. The mucosal epithelium is comprised of polarized epithelial cells with distinct apical and basolateral surfaces that are defined by unique set of protein and lipid composition and are separated by tight junctions. The apical surface serves as a barrier to the outside world and is specialized for the exchange of materials with the lumen. The basolateral surface is adapted for interaction with other cells and for exchange with the bloodstream. A wide network of proteins and lipids regulates the formation and maintenance of the epithelium polarity. Many human pathogens have evolved virulence mechanisms that target this network and interfere with epithelial polarity to enhance binding to the apical surface, enter into cells, and/or cross the mucosal barrier. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of how Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen that preferentially infects damaged epithelial tissues, exploits the epithelial cell polarization machinery to enhance infection.

  4. The effect of pseudomonas exotoxin A on cytokine production in whole blood exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M. J.; Speelman, P.; Zaat, S. A.; Hack, C. E.; van Deventer, S. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (P-ExA) on cytokine production, we studied cytokine release induced by heat-killed P. aeruginosa (HKPA) in human whole blood in the presence or absence of P-ExA. P-ExA (0.01-1 microgram ml(-1)) caused a dose-dependent decrease in

  5. Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov., a halophilic member of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahinpei, Azadeh; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Seyedmahdi, Shima Sadat; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated GBPy5(T), was isolated from aquatic plants of the Gomishan wetland, Iran. Cells of strain GBPy5(T) were motile. Growth occurred with between 1 and 10% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0 and a temperature range of 4-35 °C. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain GBPy5(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas forming a monophyletic branch. The novel strain exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.4% with type strains of Pseudomonas guariconensis PCAVU11(T) and Pseudomonas sabulinigri J64(T), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C18:1ω7c (37.8%), C16:0 (14.9%), C16:1ω7c (12.9%), C12:0 3-OH (7.1%) and C12:0 (7.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain GBPy5(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain GBPy5(T) was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain GBPY5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GBPy5(T) ( = IBRC-M 10762(T) = CECT 8338(T)). IUMS.

  6. Antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas and its impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  7. Genetic detection of Pseudomonas spp. in commercial Amazonian fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardura, Alba; Linde, Ana R; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2013-08-29

    Brazilian freshwater fish caught from large drainages like the River Amazon represent a million ton market in expansion, which is of enormous importance for export to other continents as exotic seafood. A guarantee of bacteriological safety is required for international exports that comprise a set of different bacteria but not any Pseudomonas. However, diarrhoea, infections and even septicaemia caused by some Pseudomonas species have been reported, especially in immune-depressed patients. In this work we have employed PCR-based methodology for identifying Pseudomonas species in commercial fish caught from two different areas within the Amazon basin. Most fish caught from the downstream tributary River Tapajòs were contaminated by five different Pseudomonas species. All fish samples obtained from the River Negro tributary (Manaus markets) contained Pseudomonas, but a less diverse community with only two species. The most dangerous Pseudomonas species for human health, P. aeruginosa, was not found and consumption of these fish (from their Pseudomonas content) can be considered safe for healthy consumers. As a precautionary approach we suggest considering Pseudomonas in routine bacteriological surveys of imported seafood.

  8. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa’s...

  9. Interleukin-18 impairs the pulmonary host response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marc J.; Knapp, Sylvia; Florquin, Sandrine; Pater, Jennie; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a potent cytokine with many different proinflammatory activities. To study the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas pneumonia, IL-18-deficient (IL-18(-/-)) and wild-type mice were intranasally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-18 deficiency was

  10. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot disease of black

  11. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and

  12. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...... between cystic fibrosis patients has occurred....

  13. Energetics of binary mixed culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioenergetic analysis of the growth of the binary mixed culture (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescence) on phenol chemostat culture was carried out. The data were checked for consistency using carbon and available electron balances. When more than the minimum number of variables are measured, ...

  14. Energetics of binary mixed culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... Bioenergetic analysis of the growth of the binary mixed culture (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and. Pseudomonas fluorescence) on ... biological system is widely gaining recognition (Yang et al., 1984; Solomon et al., .... Thus, by application of the covariate adjustment technique. (Solomon et al., 1985, 1994) in ...

  15. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  16. 33 original article infections a pseudomonas aeruginosa dans un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    institution of effective resistance surveillance and infection control measures. . Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, National Hospital Abuja, Susceptibility. INFECTIONS A PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA DANS UN HOPITAL TERTIAIRE. AU NIGERIA. *Iregbu KC, Eze SO,. Département de Microbiologie Médicale and ...

  17. A Natural Chimeric Pseudomonas Bacteriocin with Novel Pore-Forming Activity Parasitizes the Ferrichrome Transporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten G. K. Ghequire

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Modular bacteriocins represent a major group of secreted protein toxins with a narrow spectrum of activity, involved in interference competition between Gram-negative bacteria. These antibacterial proteins include a domain for binding to the target cell and a toxin module at the carboxy terminus. Self-inhibition of producers is provided by coexpression of linked immunity genes that transiently inhibit the toxin’s activity through formation of bacteriocin-immunity complexes or by insertion in the inner membrane, depending on the type of toxin module. We demonstrate strain-specific inhibitory activity for PmnH, a Pseudomonas bacteriocin with an unprecedented dual-toxin architecture, hosting both a colicin M domain, potentially interfering with peptidoglycan synthesis, and a novel colicin N-type domain, a pore-forming module distinct from the colicin Ia-type domain in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocin S5. A downstream-linked gene product confers PmnH immunity upon susceptible strains. This protein, ImnH, has a transmembrane topology similar to that of Pseudomonas colicin M-like and pore-forming immunity proteins, although homology with either of these is essentially absent. The enhanced killing activity of PmnH under iron-limited growth conditions reflects parasitism of the ferrichrome-type transporter for entry into target cells, a strategy shown here to be used as well by monodomain colicin M-like bacteriocins from pseudomonads. The integration of a second type of toxin module in a bacteriocin gene could offer a competitive advantage against bacteria displaying immunity against only one of both toxic activities.

  18. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  19. Hypoxia Reduces the Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Decreasing the Expression of Multiple Virulence Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Bettina; Rodriguez, Javier; Garcia, Amaya; von Kriegsheim, Alexander; McClean, Siobhán; Hickey, Caitríona; Keogh, Ciara E; Brown, Eric; Schaffer, Kirsten; Broquet, Alexis; Taylor, Cormac T

    2017-05-01

    Our understanding of how the course of opportunistic bacterial infection is influenced by the microenvironment is limited. We demonstrate that the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains derived from acute clinical infections is higher than that of strains derived from chronic infections, where tissues are hypoxic. Exposure to hypoxia attenuated the pathogenicity of strains from acute (but not chronic) infections, implicating a role for hypoxia in regulating bacterial virulence. Mass spectrometric analysis of the secretome of P. aeruginosa derived from an acute infection revealed hypoxia-induced repression of multiple virulence factors independent of altered bacterial growth. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lacking the Pseudomonas prolyl-hydroxylase domain-containing protein, which has been implicated in bacterial oxygen sensing, displays reduced virulence factor expression. Furthermore, pharmacological hydroxylase inhibition reduces virulence factor expression and pathogenicity in a murine model of pneumonia. We hypothesize that hypoxia reduces P. aeruginosa virulence at least in part through the regulation of bacterial hydroxylases. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Effect of a Pseudomonas fluorescens tailocin against phytopathogenic Xanthomonas observed by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Maricruz; Godino, Agustina; Príncipe, Analía; Morales, Gustavo M; Fischer, Sonia

    2017-08-20

    Phage tail-like bacteriocins, called tailocins, represent a class of protein complexes produced by a multitude of bacteria. Pseudomonas fluorescens SF4c, a strain isolated from wheat rhizosphere, produces a bacteriocin similar to phage tail-like pyocins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This tailocin has antimicrobial activity against several phytopathogenic strains of the genus Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas. In this work, the effect of the SF4c tailocin on the phytopathogenic strain X. axonopodis pv vesicatoria Xcv Bv5-4a was analyzed through Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). We demonstrated that tailocins adhere and cause damage to the cell envelope of strain Xcv Bv5-4a. This results in a rapid leakage of intracellular materials, with the subsequent decrease of cell volume. Finally, lysis of sensitive bacteria occurs. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence about the effect of a tailocin analyzed by AFM. Further studies are in progress to evaluate the use of SF4c tailocin in the biocontrol of bacterial spot on tomato. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The complete genome sequence of the plant growth-promoting bacterium Pseudomonas sp. UW4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Duan

    Full Text Available The plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB Pseudomonas sp. UW4, previously isolated from the rhizosphere of common reeds growing on the campus of the University of Waterloo, promotes plant growth in the presence of different environmental stresses, such as flooding, high concentrations of salt, cold, heavy metals, drought and phytopathogens. In this work, the genome sequence of UW4 was obtained by pyrosequencing and the gaps between the contigs were closed by directed PCR. The P. sp. UW4 genome contains a single circular chromosome that is 6,183,388 bp with a 60.05% G+C content. The bacterial genome contains 5,423 predicted protein-coding sequences that occupy 87.2% of the genome. Nineteen genomic islands (GIs were predicted and thirty one complete putative insertion sequences were identified. Genes potentially involved in plant growth promotion such as indole-3-acetic acid (IAA biosynthesis, trehalose production, siderophore production, acetoin synthesis, and phosphate solubilization were determined. Moreover, genes that contribute to the environmental fitness of UW4 were also observed including genes responsible for heavy metal resistance such as nickel, copper, cadmium, zinc, molybdate, cobalt, arsenate, and chromate. Whole-genome comparison with other completely sequenced Pseudomonas strains and phylogeny of four concatenated "housekeeping" genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD of 128 Pseudomonas strains revealed that UW4 belongs to the fluorescens group, jessenii subgroup.

  2. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Elham

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ultraviolet (UV analysis, gas chromatography (GC, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0% and α-terpineol (7.7% and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5% and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%, with a total yield of 88.8%.

  3. Structural Characterization of Novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IV Pilins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Y.; Jackson, S; Aidoo, F; Junop, M; Burrows, L

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili, composed of PilA subunits, are used for attachment and twitching motility on surfaces. P. aeruginosa strains express one of five phylogenetically distinct PilA proteins, four of which are associated with accessory proteins that are involved either in pilin posttranslational modification or in modulation of pilus retraction dynamics. Full understanding of pilin diversity is crucial for the development of a broadly protective pilus-based vaccine. Here, we report the 1.6-{angstrom} X-ray crystal structure of an N-terminally truncated form of the novel PilA from strain Pa110594 (group V), which represents the first non-group II pilin structure solved. Although it maintains the typical T4a pilin fold, with a long N-terminal {alpha}-helix and four-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet connected to the C-terminus by a disulfide-bonded loop, the presence of an extra helix in the {alpha}{beta}-loop and a disulfide-bonded loop with helical character gives the structure T4b pilin characteristics. Despite the presence of T4b features, the structure of PilA from strain Pa110594 is most similar to the Neisseria gonorrhoeae pilin and is also predicted to assemble into a fiber similar to the GC pilus, based on our comparative pilus modeling. Interactions between surface-exposed areas of the pilin are suggested to contribute to pilus fiber stability. The non-synonymous sequence changes between group III and V pilins are clustered in the same surface-exposed areas, possibly having an effect on accessory protein interactions. However, based on our high-confidence model of group III PilA{sub PA14}, compensatory changes allow for maintenance of a similar shape.

  4. Pseudomonas spp.: contamination sources in bulk tanks of dairy farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M.C. Vidal

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study focused on isolating Pseudomonas spp. during milking process in ten dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking systems during dry and rainy seasons, and evaluating DNA homology and patterns of distribution between isolates, in order to identify main sources of milk contamination by Pseudomonas spp. A total of 167 isolates of Pseudomonas spp. were obtained from water, milkers’ hands, cows’ teats, teat cups, cooling tanks and raw milk. Bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. genus were isolated from 85 and 82 sampling points in dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking system, respectively. A significant difference (p=0.02 on Pseudomonas spp. isolation was observed among samples of surface of cows’ teats before and after pre-dipping, but no significant difference (p>0.05 was observed among milking systems or seasons. The possibility of the same Pseudomonas spp. patterns are distributed in different farms and seasons using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP technique was demonstrated. Milkers’ hands, surface of cows’ teats, teat cups and cooling tanks were associated with raw milk contamination with Pseudomonas spp. on farms with manual and mechanical milking system, showing that regardless of the type of milking system and season, proper hygiene procedures of equipment, utensils and workers’ hands are essential to avoid contamination of the milk and, therefore, improve milk quality.

  5. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is a......BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  6. Production of Poly-β-Hydroxyalkanoic Acid by Pseudomonas cepacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Bruce A.; Ramsay, Juliana A.; Cooper, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using the nutritionally versatile bacterium Pseudomonas cepacia to produce poly-β-hydroxyalkanoic acid was evaluated. Chemostat culture showed that growth of P. cepacia became nitrogen limited when the molar carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of the medium fed into the fermentor was above 15. When grown under nitrogen limitation in batch culture with fructose as the sole source of carbon, P. cepacia accumulated poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) in excess of 50% of the dry weight of its biomass. In batch culture, almost no PHB was produced until the onset of nitrogen limitation. After this point, PHB was produced at a linear rate of 0.12 g liter−1 h−1 (from a constant value of 1.6 g of cellular protein liter−1). PHB produced by P. cepacia had a weight-average molecular weight of 5.37 × 105 g mol−1 and a polydispersivity index of 3.9. Poly(β-hydroxybutyric acid-β-hydroxyvaleric acid) copolymer was produced with a poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid-poly-β-hydroxyvaleric acid ratio of up to 30% by weight when propionic acid was added to the medium. PMID:16347867

  7. Macrolides protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection via inhibition of inflammasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li-Chao; Lin, Jie-Lu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Mao, Bei; Lu, Hai-Wen; Ge, Bao-Xue; Choi, Augustine M K; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2017-10-01

    Macrolides antibiotics have been effectively used in many chronic diseases, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection. The mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of macrolides in these diseases remain poorly understood. We established a mouse model of chronic lung infection using P. aeruginosa agar-beads, with azithromycin treatment or placebo. Lung injury, bacterial clearance, and inflammasome-related proteins were measured. In vitro, the inflammasomes activation induced by flagellin or ATP were assessed in LPS-primed macrophages with or without macrolides treatment. Plasma IL-18 levels were determined from patients who were diagnosed with bronchiectasis isolated with or without P. aeruginosa and treated with azithromycin for 3-5 days. Azithromycin treatment enhanced bacterial clearance and attenuated lung injury in mice chronically infected with P. aeruginosa, which resulted from the inhibition of caspase-1-dependent IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. In vitro, azithromycin and erythromycin inhibited NLRC4 and NLRP3 inflammasomes activation. Plasma IL-18 levels were higher in bronchiectasis patients with P. aeruginosa isolation compared with healthy controls. Azithromycin administration markedly decreased IL-18 secretion in bronchiectasis patients. The results of this study reveal that azithromycin and erythromycin exert a novel anti-inflammatory effect by attenuating inflammasomes activation, which suggests potential treatment options for inflammasome-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Biosurfactant Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavasi, R; Subramanyam Nambaru, V R M; Jayalakshmi, S; Balasubramanian, T; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with production and characterization of biosurfactant from renewable resources by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biosurfactant production was carried out in 3L fermentor using waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake. Maximum biomass (11.6 mg/ml) and biosurfactant production (8.6 mg/ml) occurred with peanut oil cake at 120 and 132 h respectively. Characterization of the biosurfactant revealed that, it is a lipopeptide with chemical composition of protein (50.2%) and lipid (49.8%). The biosurfactant (1 mg/ml) was able to emulsify waste motor lubricant oil, crude oil, peanut oil, kerosene, diesel, xylene, naphthalene and anthracene, comparatively the emulsification activity was higher than the activity found with Triton X-100 (1 mg/ml). Results obtained in the present study showed the possibility of biosurfactant production using renewable, relatively inexpensive and easily available resources. Emulsification activity found with the biosurfactant against different hydrocarbons showed its possible application in bioremediation of environments polluted with various hydrocarbons.

  9. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen catalyzed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournet, Amandine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)] [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Berge, Mathieu; Roques, Christine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Delia, Marie-Line, E-mail: marieline.delia@ensiacet.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has already been shown to catalyze oxidation processes in the anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell. The present study focuses on the reverse capacity of the bacterium, i.e. reduction catalysis. Here we show that P. aeruginosa is able to catalyze the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The use of cyclic voltammetry showed that, for a given range of potential values, the current generated in the presence of bacteria could reach up to four times the current obtained without bacteria. The adhesion of bacteria to the working electrode was necessary for the catalysis to be observed but was not sufficient. The electron transfer between the working electrode and the bacteria did not involve mediator metabolites like phenazines. The transfer was by direct contact. The catalysis required a certain contact duration between electrodes and live bacteria but after this delay, the metabolic activity of cells was no longer necessary. Membrane-bound proteins, like catalase, may be involved. Various strains of P. aeruginosa, including clinical isolates, were tested and all of them, even catalase-defective mutants, presented the same catalytic property. P. aeruginosa offers a new model for the analysis of reduction catalysis and the protocol designed here may provide a basis for developing an interesting tool in the field of bacterial adhesion.

  10. Pyocyanin promotes extracellular DNA release in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Theerthankar; Manefield, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are both dependent on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) mainly composed of polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). eDNA promotes biofilm establishment in a wide range of bacterial species. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is major component of biofilms and is essential for biofilm formation and stability. In this study we report that production of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PA14 batch cultures is responsible for promotion of eDNA release. A phzSH mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 that overproduces pyocyanin displayed enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generation, cell lysis, and eDNA release in comparison to its wildtype strain. A ΔphzA-G mutant of P. aeruginosa PA14 deficient in pyocyanin production generated negligible amounts of H(2)O(2) and released less eDNA in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. Exogenous addition of pyocyanin or incubation with H(2)O(2) was also shown to promote eDNA release in low pyocyanin producing (PAO1) and pyocynain deficient (PA14) strains. Based on these data and recent findings in the biofilm literature, we propose that the impact of pyocyanin on biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa occurs via eDNA release through H(2)O(2) mediated cell lysis.

  11. Pyocyanin promotes extracellular DNA release in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theerthankar Das

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are both dependent on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS mainly composed of polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and extracellular DNA (eDNA. eDNA promotes biofilm establishment in a wide range of bacterial species. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is major component of biofilms and is essential for biofilm formation and stability. In this study we report that production of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PA14 batch cultures is responsible for promotion of eDNA release. A phzSH mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 that overproduces pyocyanin displayed enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 generation, cell lysis, and eDNA release in comparison to its wildtype strain. A ΔphzA-G mutant of P. aeruginosa PA14 deficient in pyocyanin production generated negligible amounts of H(2O(2 and released less eDNA in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. Exogenous addition of pyocyanin or incubation with H(2O(2 was also shown to promote eDNA release in low pyocyanin producing (PAO1 and pyocynain deficient (PA14 strains. Based on these data and recent findings in the biofilm literature, we propose that the impact of pyocyanin on biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa occurs via eDNA release through H(2O(2 mediated cell lysis.

  12. Nosocomial Pseudomonas putida Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef; AbuKamar, Mohammed; Anand, Deshmukh

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of Pseudomonas putida meningitis in a 26-year-old Nepalese man who was admitted to Hamad General Hospital with epidermoid cyst for drainage. Ommaya reservoir was placed into the cyst for drainage and externalventricular drainage (EVD) was performed. After four days, the patient was transferred to the ward in stable condition. His weakness resolved partially and headache severity decreased. After three days, the patient developed fever and headache severity increased with deterioration of consciousness level. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through EVD showed 2 200 leucocytes/µL, protein level of 295 mg/dL, and glucose level of < 1.8 mg/dL. Meropenem was started on the patient. Aspirate from Ommaya reservoir and CSF showed gram-negative rods and cultures yielded P. putida sensitive to cefepime, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin, but resistant to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. EVD was replaced and the patient received cefepime and ciprofloxacin for 21 days after which he improved and was discharged with right sided residual weakness.

  13. Nosocomial Pseudomonas putida Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Pseudomonas putida meningitis in a 26-year-old Nepalese man who was admitted to Hamad General Hospital with epidermoid cyst for drainage. Ommaya reservoir was placed into the cyst for drainage and externalventricular drainage (EVD was performed. After four days, the patient was transferred to the ward in stable condition. His weakness resolved partially and headache severity decreased. After three days, the patient developed fever and headache severity increased with deterioration of consciousness level. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF through EVD showed 2 200 leucocytes/µL, protein level of 295 mg/dL, and glucose level of < 1.8 mg/dL. Meropenem was started on the patient. Aspirate from Ommaya reservoir and CSF showed gram-negative rods and cultures yielded P. putida sensitive to cefepime, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin, but resistant to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. EVD was replaced and the patient received cefepime and ciprofloxacin for 21 days after which he improved and was discharged with right sided residual weakness.

  14. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willcox MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mark DP WillcoxSchool of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms "Pseudomonas" + "Keratitis" limit to "2007–2012", and ["Ulcerative" or "Microbial"] + "Keratitis" + "Contact lenses" limit to "2007–2012". These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin. In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95% were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%.Keywords: Pseudomonas, keratitis, contact lens

  15. Rice-Infecting Pseudomonas Genomes Are Highly Accessorized and Harbor Multiple Putative Virulence Mechanisms to Cause Sheath Brown Rot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Lorenzo Quibod

    Full Text Available Sheath rot complex and seed discoloration in rice involve a number of pathogenic bacteria that cannot be associated with distinctive symptoms. These pathogens can easily travel on asymptomatic seeds and therefore represent a threat to rice cropping systems. Among the rice-infecting Pseudomonas, P. fuscovaginae has been associated with sheath brown rot disease in several rice growing areas around the world. The appearance of a similar Pseudomonas population, which here we named P. fuscovaginae-like, represents a perfect opportunity to understand common genomic features that can explain the infection mechanism in rice. We showed that the novel population is indeed closely related to P. fuscovaginae. A comparative genomics approach on eight rice-infecting Pseudomonas revealed heterogeneous genomes and a high number of strain-specific genes. The genomes of P. fuscovaginae-like harbor four secretion systems (Type I, II, III, and VI and other important pathogenicity machinery that could probably facilitate rice colonization. We identified 123 core secreted proteins, most of which have strong signatures of positive selection suggesting functional adaptation. Transcript accumulation of putative pathogenicity-related genes during rice colonization revealed a concerted virulence mechanism. The study suggests that rice-infecting Pseudomonas causing sheath brown rot are intrinsically diverse and maintain a variable set of metabolic capabilities as a potential strategy to occupy a range of environments.

  16. The pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS balances life and death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Häussler

    Full Text Available When environmental conditions deteriorate and become inhospitable, generic survival strategies for populations of bacteria may be to enter a dormant state that slows down metabolism, to develop a general tolerance to hostile parameters that characterize the habitat, and to impose a regime to eliminate damaged members. Here, we provide evidence that the pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS mediates induction of all of these phenotypes. For individual cells, PQS, an interbacterial signaling molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has both deleterious and beneficial activities: on the one hand, it acts as a pro-oxidant and sensitizes the bacteria towards oxidative and other stresses and, on the other, it efficiently induces a protective anti-oxidative stress response. We propose that this dual function fragments populations into less and more stress tolerant members which respond differentially to developing stresses in deteriorating habitats. This suggests that a little poison may be generically beneficial to populations, in promoting survival of the fittest, and in contributing to bacterial multi-cellular behavior. It further identifies PQS as an essential mediator of the shaping of the population structure of Pseudomonas and of its response to and survival in hostile environmental conditions.

  17. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-07-26

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  18. Physical, chemical and immunological properties of the bacterioferritins of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Azotobacter vinelandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, S C; Findlay, J B; Guest, J R; Harrison, P M; Keen, J N; Smith, J M

    1991-05-30

    The 70-amino-acid-residue N-terminal sequence of the bacterioferritin (BFR) of Azotobacter vinelandii was determined and shown to be highly similar to the N-terminal sequences of the Escherichia coli and Nitrobacter winogradskyi bacterioferritins. Electrophoretic and immunological analyses further indicate that the bacterioferritins of E. coli, A. vinelandii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are closely related. A novel, two-subunit assembly state that predominates over the 24-subunit form of BFR at low pH was demonstrated. The results indicate that the bacterioferritins form a family of proteins that are distinct from the ferritins of plants and animals.

  19. Characterization of a novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage, KPP25, of the family Podoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Reina; Yamaguchi, Kotoe; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Shigehisa, Ryu; Takemura-Uchiyama, Iyo; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Ujihara, Takako; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Daibata, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu

    2014-08-30

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phages belonging to the family Podoviridae are one of the well-characterized phage groups. In this study, a novel P. aeruginosa phage, KPP25, was isolated and characterized. Phage KPP25's morphology was indicative of the family Podoviridae; however, analyses of the whole genome and the virion proteins suggested that it did not belong to any of the known podophage genera. Based on these analyses, phage KPP25 appears to be a novel podophage infecting P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Production of alkaline protease by Pseudomonas aeruginosa using proteinaceous solid waste generated from leather manufacturing industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh Kumar, A; Swarnalatha, S; Sairam, B; Sekaran, G

    2008-04-01

    Animal fleshing (ANFL), the major proteinaceous solid waste discharged from leather manufacturing industries was used as the substrate for the production of alkaline protease by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The strain isolated from the tannery wastewater was selected for its ability to produce protease of activity in the range 1160-1175 U ml(-1). The selective removal of non-fibrillar proteins such as albumin and globulin from ANFL by the protease enzyme during the progress of hydrolysis was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The breakdown of ANFL was also confirmed from the amino acid release into the fermentation medium by P. aeruginosa using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

  1. Molecular cloning, characterisation and ligand-bound structure of an azoreductase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chan-Ju; Hagemeier, Christoph; Rahman, Nawreen; Lowe, Edward; Noble, Martin; Coughtrie, Michael; Sim, Edith; Westwood, Isaac

    2007-11-09

    The gene PA0785 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, which is annotated as a probable acyl carrier protein phosphodiesterase (acpD), has been cloned and heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant enzyme exhibits activity corresponding to that of azoreductase but not acpD. Each recombinant protein molecule has an estimated molecular mass of 23,050 Da and one non-covalently bound FMN as co-factor. This enzyme, now identified as azoreductase 1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (paAzoR1), is a flavodoxin-like protein with an apparent molecular mass of 110 kDa as determined by gel-filtration chromatography, indicating that the protein is likely to be tetrameric in solution. The three-dimensional structure of paAzoR1, in complex with the substrate methyl red, was solved at a resolution of 2.18 A by X-ray crystallography. The protein exists as a dimer of dimers in the crystal lattice, with two spatially separated active sites per dimer, and the active site of paAzoR1 was shown to be a well-conserved hydrophobic pocket formed between two monomers. The paAzoR1 enzyme is able to reduce different classes of azo dyes and activate several azo pro-drugs used in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). During azo reduction, FMN serves as a redox centre in the electron-transferring system by mediating the electron transfer from NAD(P)H to the azo substrate. The spectral properties of paAzoR1 demonstrate the hydrophobic interaction between FMN and the active site in the protein. The structure of the ligand-bound protein also highlights the pi-stacking interactions between FMN and the azo substrate.

  2. Dansyl chloride labeling of Pseudomonas aeruginosa treated with pyocin R1: change in permeability of the cell envelope.

    OpenAIRE

    Uratani, Y

    1982-01-01

    Pyocin R1, a bacteriocin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, caused an increase in binding of fluorescent label, 1-dimethylaminonaphthalene-5-sulfonyl chloride (dansyl chloride), to sensitive cells. In pyocin R1-treated cells, cytoplasmic soluble proteins and crude ribosomes as well as cell envelopes were labeled by dansyl chloride. The amount of bound dye was proportional to the multiplicity of pyocin R1 and reached a maximal level at high multiplicity. In addition, pyocin R1 rapidly caused an increa...

  3. Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers associated with contaminated eye mascaras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L A; Ahearn, D G

    1977-07-01

    Seven Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers were associated with the use of four brands of mascara contaminated with P. aeruginosa. In laboratory studies, preservative systems of three of the four brands were inadequate in comparison with a control mascara of known antimicrobial activity. If the corneal epithelium is scratched during the application of mascara, particularly if the applicator is old, the cornea should be treated immediately and the mascara cultured to detect Pseudomonas. The high incidence of recurrent corneal ulceration in cases of Pseudomonas-induced keratitis indicates that initial chemotherapy should be intensive and maintained until the lesion stabilizes.

  4. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... systems involved in the process known as quorum sensing regulate coordinated expression of virulence with immune shielding mechanisms and antibiotic resistance. For two decades, the potential of interference with quorum sensing by small chemical compounds has been investigated with the aim of developing...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  5. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  6. Rhamnolipid Biosurfactants Produced by Pseudomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Kaskatepe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Surfactants are chemical products widely used in our daily life in toothpaste and other personal hygiene and cosmetic products, and in several industries. Biosurfactants are surfactants of biological origin that can be produced by microorganisms and have many advantages, such as low toxicity and high biodegradability, compared to synthetic counterparts. Unfortunately, high production costs limit the use of biosurfactants. Low-cost production is the most important factor for biosurfactants to be able to compete in the global market place. This review presents general information on rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas species, as well as on their production and applications. In addition, industrial products and their wastes used for rhamnolipid production are reviewed in detail based on recent studies.

  7. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  8. Cooperative production of siderophores by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Freya; Buckling, Angus

    2009-01-01

    The production of iron-scavenging siderophores by the opportunistic animal pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a textbook example of public goods cooperation. This trait provides an excellent model system with which to study cooperation. Further, the links between siderophore production and P. aeruginosa virulence allow us to investigate how pathogen ecology, social behaviour and pathology might be connected. We present here the results of basic research on the evolution and ecology of siderophore cooperation in this species. In particular, we explore the effects of population and community structure, iron regime and genomic mutation rate on the relative success of siderophore cooperators and cheats. We also present preliminary data on the links between siderophore production and another clinically-relevant social trait, biofilm formation. It is our hope that more realistic laboratory studies of siderophore cooperation in P. aeruginosa will eventually cast light on the roles played by social traits in long-term microbial infections.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  10. Identification of C-terminal hydrophobic residues important for dimerization and all known functions of ParB of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mierzejewska, J.; Bartosik, A.A.; Macioszek, M.; Plochocka, D.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Jagura-Burdzy, G.

    2012-01-01

    The ParB protein of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is important for growth, cell division, nucleoid segregation and different types of motility. To further understand its function we have demonstrated a vital role of the hydrophobic residues in the C terminus of ParB(P.a.). By in silico modelling of the

  11. Statistical Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Development: Impact of Mutations in Genes Involved in Twitching Motility, Cell-to-Cell Signaling, and Stationary-Phase Sigma Factor Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, Arne; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær; Kato, Junichi

    2002-01-01

    Four strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (wild type, DeltapilHIJK mutant, lasI mutant, and rpoS mutant) were genetically tagged with the green fluorescent protein, and the development of flow chamber-grown biofilms by each of them was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The structur...

  12. Pseudomonas Pyocyanin Increases Interleukin-8 Expression by Human Airway Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Gerene M.; Wollenweber, Laura A.; Railsback, Michelle A.; Cox, Charles D.; Stoll, Lynn L.; Britigan, Bradley E.

    1998-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic human pathogen, causes acute pneumonia in patients with hospital-acquired infections and is commonly associated with chronic lung disease in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Evidence suggests that the pathophysiological effects of P. aeruginosa are mediated in part by virulence factors secreted by the bacterium. Among these factors is pyocyanin, a redox active compound that increases intracellular oxidant stress. We find that pyocyanin increases release of interleukin-8 (IL-8) by both normal and CF airway epithelial cell lines and by primary airway epithelial cells. Moreover, pyocyanin synergizes with the inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha and IL-1α. RNase protection assays indicate that increased IL-8 release is accompanied by increased levels of IL-8 mRNA. The antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine, general inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinases, and specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinases diminish pyocyanin-dependent increases in IL-8 release. Conversely, inhibitors of protein kinases C (PKC) and PKA have no effect. In contrast to its effects on IL-8 expression, pyocyanin inhibits cytokine-dependent expression of the monocyte/macrophage/T-cell chemokine RANTES. Increased release of IL-8, a potent neutrophil chemoattractant, in response to pyocyanin could contribute to the marked infiltration of neutrophils and subsequent neutrophil-mediated tissue damage that are observed in Pseudomonas-associated lung disease. PMID:9826354

  13. Biosynthesis of pyocyanin pigment by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. El-Fouly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-three isolates belonging to the genus Pseudomonas were isolated from different environmental sources including; soil, water and clinical specimens. Twenty out of them were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and individually screened for pyocyanin production. P. aeruginosa R1; isolated from rice-cultivated soil and P. aeruginosa U3 selected from clinical specimen (Urinary tract infection were the highest pyocyanin producers; pyocyanin production reached 9.3 and 5.9 μg/ml, respectively on synthetic glucose supplemented nutrient medium (GSNB. The identification of both selected strains (P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 was confirmed by 16S rRNA, the similarity with other strains available in database was 97% (with P. aeruginosa FPVC 14 and 94% (with P. aeruginosa 13.A, respectively. P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 are accessed at gene bank with accession numbers KM924432 and KM603511, in the same order. Pyocyanin was extracted by standard methods, purified by column chromatography and characterized by UV-Vis absorption, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The antimicrobial activity of purified pyocyanin against multi-drug resistant microbes was investigated; the efficiency of pyocyanin was more obvious in Gram +ve bacteria than Gram−ve bacteria and yeast. To reduce the cost of pyocyanin production, a new conventional medium based on cotton seed meal supplemented with peptone was designed. The pyocyanin production of both selected strains P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 using the new medium is increased by 30.1% and 17.2%, respectively in comparison with synthetic GSNB medium, while the cost of production process is reduced by 56.7%.

  14. Computational prediction of the Crc regulon identifies genus-wide and species-specific targets of catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas bacteria

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, Patrick

    2010-11-25

    Abstract Background Catabolite repression control (CRC) is an important global control system in Pseudomonas that fine tunes metabolism in order optimise growth and metabolism in a range of different environments. The mechanism of CRC in Pseudomonas spp. centres on the binding of a protein, Crc, to an A-rich motif on the 5\\' end of an mRNA resulting in translational down-regulation of target genes. Despite the identification of several Crc targets in Pseudomonas spp. the Crc regulon has remained largely unexplored. Results In order to predict direct targets of Crc, we used a bioinformatics approach based on detection of A-rich motifs near the initiation of translation of all protein-encoding genes in twelve fully sequenced Pseudomonas genomes. As expected, our data predict that genes related to the utilisation of less preferred nutrients, such as some carbohydrates, nitrogen sources and aromatic carbon compounds are targets of Crc. A general trend in this analysis is that the regulation of transporters is conserved across species whereas regulation of specific enzymatic steps or transcriptional activators are often conserved only within a species. Interestingly, some nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) such as HU and IHF are predicted to be regulated by Crc. This finding indicates a possible role of Crc in indirect control over a subset of genes that depend on the DNA bending properties of NAPs for expression or repression. Finally, some virulence traits such as alginate and rhamnolipid production also appear to be regulated by Crc, which links nutritional status cues with the regulation of virulence traits. Conclusions Catabolite repression control regulates a broad spectrum of genes in Pseudomonas. Some targets are genus-wide and are typically related to central metabolism, whereas other targets are species-specific, or even unique to particular strains. Further study of these novel targets will enhance our understanding of how Pseudomonas bacteria integrate

  15. PURIFIKASI DAN KARAKTERISASI PROTEASE DARI BAKTERI PATOGEN Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Purification and Characterization of Protease from Pathogenic Bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ace Baehaki1

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, concern on protease as medical target for overcoming bacterial diseases and viral diseases has been rapidly increased because of the obvious involvement of this enzyme in the molecular of the diseases. The purpose of this research was to purify and characterize protease from pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bacteria were grown in media containing triptone 1%, NaCl 1% and Yeast extract 0,5%. Protease of P.aeruginosa was purified using column chromatography with Sephadex G-100 gel. There were three peaks of enzyme protein, which were detected on fractions 14, 17 and 30. The optimum pH of the extracelluler protease from P. aeruginosa was 8. The optimum temperature of P.aeruginosa protease was 300C. Fe3+ (1dan 5 mM was strong activator and Co2+ was strong inhibitor. Study on the effect of metals ion and spesific inhibitors indicated that protease from P. aeruginosa was serin metaloprotease. The apparent moleculer weights, as determined by SDS-PAGE and zymogram technique, 36 kD and 42 kD.

  16. Copper homeostasis networks in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Julia; Novoa-Aponte, Lorena; Argüello, José M

    2017-09-22

    Bacterial copper (Cu+) homeostasis enables both precise metallation of diverse cuproproteins and control of variable metal levels. To this end, protein networks mobilize Cu+ to cellular targets with remarkable specificity. However, the understanding of these processes is rather fragmented. Here, we use genome-wide transcriptomic analysis by RNA-Seq to characterize the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to external 0.5 mm CuSO4, a condition that did not generate pleiotropic effects. Pre-steady-state (5-min) and steady-state (2-h) Cu+ fluxes resulted in distinct transcriptome landscapes. Cells quickly responded to Cu2+ stress by slowing down metabolism. This was restored once steady state was reached. Specific Cu+ homeostasis genes were strongly regulated in both conditions. Our system-wide analysis revealed induction of three Cu+ efflux systems (a P1B-ATPase, a porin, and a resistance-nodulation-division (RND) system) and of a putative Cu+-binding periplasmic chaperone and the unusual presence of two cytoplasmic CopZ proteins. Both CopZ chaperones could bind Cu+ with high affinity. Importantly, novel transmembrane transporters probably mediating Cu+ influx were among those largely repressed upon Cu+ stress. Compartmental Cu+ levels appear independently controlled; the cytoplasmic Cu+ sensor CueR controls cytoplasmic chaperones and plasma membrane transporters, whereas CopR/S responds to periplasmic Cu+ Analysis of ΔcopR and ΔcueR mutant strains revealed a CopR regulon composed of genes involved in periplasmic Cu+ homeostasis and its putative DNA recognition sequence. In conclusion, our study establishes a system-wide model of a network of sensors/regulators, soluble chaperones, and influx/efflux transporters that control the Cu+ levels in P. aeruginosa compartments. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Genome diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 laboratory strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockgether, Jens; Munder, Antje; Neugebauer, Jens; Davenport, Colin F; Stanke, Frauke; Larbig, Karen D; Heeb, Stephan; Schöck, Ulrike; Pohl, Thomas M; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2010-02-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 is the most commonly used strain for research on this ubiquitous and metabolically versatile opportunistic pathogen. Strain PAO1, a derivative of the original Australian PAO isolate, has been distributed worldwide to laboratories and strain collections. Over decades discordant phenotypes of PAO1 sublines have emerged. Taking the existing PAO1-UW genome sequence (named after the University of Washington, which led the sequencing project) as a blueprint, the genome sequences of reference strains MPAO1 and PAO1-DSM (stored at the German Collection for Microorganisms and Cell Cultures [DSMZ]) were resolved by physical mapping and deep short read sequencing-by-synthesis. MPAO1 has been the source of near-saturation libraries of transposon insertion mutants, and PAO1-DSM is identical in its SpeI-DpnI restriction map with the original isolate. The major genomic differences of MPAO1 and PAO1-DSM in comparison to PAO1-UW are the lack of a large inversion, a duplication of a mobile 12-kb prophage region carrying a distinct integrase and protein phosphatases or kinases, deletions of 3 to 1,006 bp in size, and at least 39 single-nucleotide substitutions, 17 of which affect protein sequences. The PAO1 sublines differed in their ability to cope with nutrient limitation and their virulence in an acute murine airway infection model. Subline PAO1-DSM outnumbered the two other sublines in late stationary growth phase. In conclusion, P. aeruginosa PAO1 shows an ongoing microevolution of genotype and phenotype that jeopardizes the reproducibility of research. High-throughput genome resequencing will resolve more cases and could become a proper quality control for strain collections.

  18. Raloxifene attenuates Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin production and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Sui, Shannan J; Lo, Raymond; Fernandes, Aalton R; Caulfield, Mackenzie D G; Lerman, Joshua A; Xie, Lei; Bourne, Philip E; Baillie, David L; Brinkman, Fiona S L

    2012-09-01

    There has been growing interest in disrupting bacterial virulence mechanisms as a form of infectious disease control through the use of 'anti-infective' drugs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen noted for its intrinsic antibiotic resistance that causes serious infections requiring new therapeutic options. In this study, an analysis of the P. aeruginosa PAO1 deduced proteome was performed to identify pathogen-associated proteins. A computational screening approach was then used to discover drug repurposing opportunities, i.e. identifying approved drugs that bind and potentially disrupt the pathogen-associated protein targets. The selective oestrogen receptor modulator raloxifene, a drug currently used in the prevention of osteoporosis and/or invasive breast cancer in post-menopausal women, was predicted from this screen to bind P. aeruginosa PhzB2. PhzB2 is involved in production of the blue pigment pyocyanin produced via the phenazine biosynthesis pathway. Pyocyanin is toxic to eukaryotic cells and has been shown to play a role in infection in a mouse model, making it an attractive target for anti-infective drug discovery. Raloxifene was found to strongly attenuate P. aeruginosa virulence in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection. Treatment of P. aeruginosa wild-type strains PAO1 and PA14 with raloxifene resulted in a dose-dependent reduction in pyocyanin production in vitro; pyocyanin production and virulence were also reduced for a phzB2 insertion mutant. These results suggest that raloxifene may be suitable for further development as a therapeutic for P. aeruginosa infection and that such already approved drugs may be computationally screened and potentially repurposed as novel anti-infective/anti-virulence agents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Alginate Biosynthesis Factories in Pseudomonas fluorescens: Localization and Correlation with Alginate Production Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Susan; Almaas, Eivind; Zotchev, Sergey; Valla, Svein

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is able to produce the medically and industrially important exopolysaccharide alginate. The proteins involved in alginate biosynthesis and secretion form a multiprotein complex spanning the inner and outer membranes. In the present study, we developed a method by which the porin AlgE was detected by immunogold labeling and transmission electron microscopy. Localization of the AlgE protein was found to depend on the presence of other proteins in the multiprotein complex. No correlation was found between the number of alginate factories and the alginate production level, nor were the numbers of these factories affected in an algC mutant that is unable to produce the precursor needed for alginate biosynthesis. Precursor availability and growth phase thus seem to be the main determinants for the alginate production rate in our strain. Clustering analysis demonstrated that the alginate multiprotein complexes were not distributed randomly over the entire outer cell membrane surface. PMID:26655760

  20. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB112 (JN996498 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB112 (JN996498) isolated from infected Labeo bata (Hamilton) by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Somerita Panda, PK Bandyopadhyay, SN Chatterjee ...

  1. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen

  2. Resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative bacilli in patients with impaired host defences emphasizes the need for information on the antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms that infects such patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly resistant to ...

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans reveals novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    The susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to different virulent phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes the worms an excellent model for studying host-pathogen interactions. Including the recently described liquid killing, five different killing assays are now available offering superb

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  5. Pseudomonas Folliculitis Associated with Use of Hot Tubs and Spas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history, etiology, diagnosis, histopathology, treatment, and prevention of Pseudomonas Folliculitis, an increasingly common skin infection contracted in hot tubs and, to some extent, in swimming pools. (Author/SM)

  6. Sequencing and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage JG004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garbe, Julia; Bunk, Boyke; Rohde, Manfred; Schobert, Max

    2011-01-01

    .... Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For an effective use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology but also genes of the bacterial host essential for phage infection...

  7. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com...

  8. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  9. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  10. Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Mitamura, Sayaka; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE...

  11. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation

  12. Isolation of chlorhexidine-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, H; Kozukue, H

    1982-01-01

    The chlorhexidine resistance of 317 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospital patients was determined. The distribution pattern of their susceptibility to chlorhexidine clearly revealed two peaks, and the frequency of resistance to chlorhexidine was 84.2%.

  13. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility of biof...

  14. A study on nitrogen removal efficiency of Pseudomonas stutzeri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... 1College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher. Education Mega Centre, Panyu District, ... Key words: Anaerobic/anoxic/oxic treatment process, reaction condition, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen removal, Pseudomonas stutzeri.

  15. Plant perceptions of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas.

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, Gail M

    2004-01-01

    Plant-associated Pseudomonas live as saprophytes and parasites on plant surfaces and inside plant tissues. Many plant-associated Pseudomonas promote plant growth by suppressing pathogenic micro-organisms, synthesizing growth-stimulating plant hormones and promoting increased plant disease resistance. Others inhibit plant growth and cause disease symptoms ranging from rot and necrosis through to developmental dystrophies such as galls. It is not easy to draw a clear distinction between pathoge...

  16. Biodegradasi Petroleum dan Hidrokarbon Eikosana oleh Isolat Bakteri Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Faiqah Umar

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum and hydrocarbon eicosane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate. Hydrocarbon are important environmental contaminants in soil and water. These compounds have a potential risk to human health, as many of them are carsinogenic and toxic to marine organisms such as diatome, gasthrophode, mussel, and fish. The purpose of this research was to know the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to degradate the hydrocarbon (petroleum Hundill and eicosane) substrate. Growing test used ...

  17. Effect of osmotic stress on plant growth promoting Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, V; Ali, Sk Z; Venkateswarlu, B; Reddy, Gopal; Grover, Minakshi

    2010-10-01

    In this study we isolated and screened drought tolerant Pseudomonas isolates from arid and semi arid crop production systems of India. Five isolates could tolerate osmotic stress up to -0.73 MPa and possessed multiple PGP properties such as P-solubilization, production of phytohormones (IAA, GA and cytokinin), siderophores, ammonia and HCN however under osmotic stress expression of PGP traits was low compared to non-stressed conditions. The strains were identified as Pseudomonas entomophila, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas monteilli respectively on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Osmotic stress affected growth pattern of all the isolates as indicated by increased mean generation time. An increase level of intracellular free amino acids, proline, total soluble sugars and exopolysaccharides was observed under osmotic stress suggesting bacterial response to applied stress. Further, strains GAP-P45 and GRFHYTP52 showing higher levels of EPS and osmolytes (amino acids and proline) accumulation under stress as compared to non-stress conditions, also exhibited higher expression of PGP traits under stress indicating a relationship between stress response and expression of PGP traits. We conclude that isolation and screening of indigenous, stress adaptable strains possessing PGP traits can be a method for selection of efficient stress tolerant PGPR strains.

  18. The nucleotide sequence of a carboxymethylcellulase gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J; Gilbert, H J

    1988-07-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for one of the carboxymethylcellulases (CMCase), expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, has been determined. The structural gene consists of an open reading frame, commencing with an ATG start codon, of 2886 base pairs followed by a TAA stop codon. The gene was shown to code for a signal peptide which closely resembles the signal peptides of other secreted proteins. Unlike most Pseudomonas genes, the CMCase sequence does not have a high G + C (51%) content and there is no marked preference for codons ending in G or C. Upstream of the structural gene there are no sequences which bear a strong resemblance to consensus Escherichia coli promoters. A sequence is present, however, which exhibits homology to the consensus DNA sequence that binds the catabolic activator protein (CAP). Bal31 deletions of the structural gene revealed the extent by which the gene could be modified and still encode a functional CMCase. Subclones of the cellulase gene have been constructed in pUC18 and pUC19. One of the resultant plasmids, pJHS1 directs a 20-fold increase in CMCase synthesis, when compared to the original construct, pJHH2. Analysis of cells harbouring pJHS1 showed the cellulase polypeptide to have a molecular weight of 106000. This is in close agreement with the predicted size of the enzyme deduced from the nucleotide sequence data.

  19. A Boolean model of the Pseudomonas syringae hrp regulon predicts a tightly regulated system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel MacLean

    Full Text Available The Type III secretion system (TTSS is a protein secretion machinery used by certain gram-negative bacterial pathogens of plants and animals to deliver effector molecules to the host and is at the core of the ability to cause disease. Extensive molecular and biochemical study has revealed the components and their interactions within this system but reductive approaches do not consider the dynamical properties of the system as a whole. In order to gain a better understanding of these dynamical behaviours and to create a basis for the refinement of the experimentally derived knowledge we created a Boolean model of the regulatory interactions within the hrp regulon of Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato strain DC3000 Pseudomonas syringae. We compared simulations of the model with experimental data and found them to be largely in accordance, though the hrpV node shows some differences in state changes to that expected. Our simulations also revealed interesting dynamical properties not previously predicted. The model predicts that the hrp regulon is a biologically stable two-state system, with each of the stable states being strongly attractive, a feature indicative of selection for a tightly regulated and responsive system. The model predicts that the state of the GacS/GacA node confers control, a prediction that is consistent with experimental observations that the protein has a role as master regulator. Simulated gene "knock out" experiments with the model predict that HrpL is a central information processing point within the network.

  20. Biosorpsi Logam Zn Pada Limbah Sintetik Menggunakan Biomassa Campuran Pseudomonas aeruginosa dan Pseudomonas sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayati Hidayati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is one of the heavy metals that could be harmful for environment. This metal usually arises from industrial activities. Biosorption of zinc in synthetic waste was conducted using biomass mixture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas sp. This research aims to determine the zinc adsorption capacity of the biomass in synthetic waste water. Zinc biosorption was performed at pH 4, room temperature and stirring 800 rpm. Variation of contact time used was 30, 60 and 120 min; and the amount of biomass used was 0.01 g, 0.02 g, 0.03 g, 0.04 g and 0.05 g. The highest zinc biosorption capacity was obtained 25.43% at the time of 120 minutes and the amount of biomass used 0.01 g. The optimum condition for biomass biosorption and removal capacity based on the correlation between experimental data and mathematical models was obtained with the addition of 0.04 g of biomass with correlation coefficient (R 1 and 0,965 respectively.ABSTRAK Salah satu logam berat yang berbahaya dari hasil kegiatan industri adalah logam Zn (seng. Biosorpsi logam Zn pada limbah sintetik dilakukan dengan menggunakan biomassa campuran Pseudomonas aeruginosa dan Pseudomonas sp. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kapasitas biomassa dalam mengadsorpsi logam Zn pada limbah sintetik. Biosorpsi logam Zn dilakukan pada kondisi pH 4, temperatur ruang dan pengadukan 800 rpm. Variasi waktu kontak dilakukan pada 30, 60 dan 120 menit  dan menggunakan jumlah biomassa 0,01 g, 0,02 g, 0,03 g, 0,04 g  dan 0,05 g. Kapasitas biosorpsi logam Zn tertinggi diperoleh sebesar 25,43% pada waktu 120 menit dengan jumlah biomassa 0,01 g. Kondisi optimum biosorpsi logam Zn berdasarkan korelasi antara data eksperimen dan model matematika diperoleh pada penambahan jumlah biomassa sebesar 0,04 g baik untuk kapasitas biosorpsi logam Zn maupun efisiensi removal logam Zn dengan nilai koefisien korelasi (R2 masing-masing adalah 1 dan 0,965.

  1. Phosphatidylcholine affects the secretion of the alkaline phosphatase PhoA in Pseudomonas strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Long, Deliang; You, Heng; Yang, Dingpeng; Zhou, Shuang; Zhang, Shuting; Li, Mengqiu; He, Miao; Xiong, Min; Wang, Xingguo

    2016-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Pseudomonas sp. 593 use the phosphatidylcholine synthase pathway (Pcs-pathway) for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PC). Both bacterial strains contain the phoA and lapA genes encoding alkaline phosphatases (ALP) and display strong ALP activities. The PhoA and LapA enzymes are thought to be independently secreted via the Xcp and Hxc type II secretion system (T2SS) subtypes, in which the Hxc system may act as a complementary mechanism when the Xcp pathway becomes limiting. Inactivation of the pcs gene in both bacteria abolished PC synthesis and resulted in approximately 50% less ALP activity in the cell-free culture. Analysis by western blotting showed that LapA protein content in the wild type and the pcs- mutant was unchanged in the cytoplasmic, periplasmic or extracellular protein fractions. In contrast, the PhoA protein in the pcs- mutant was less prevalent among extracellular proteins but was more abundant in the periplasmic protein fraction compared to the wild type. Semi- quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that phoA, lapA and 12 xcp genes were equally expressed at the transcriptional level in both the wild types and the pcs- mutants. Our results demonstrate that the absence of PC in bacterial membrane phospholipids does not interfere with the transcription of the phoA and lapA genes but primarily affects the export of PhoA from the cytoplasm to the extracellular environment via the Xcp T2SS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Biodegradation of 2,4'-dichlorobiphenyl, a congener of polychlorinated biphenyl, by Pseudomonas isolates GSa and GSb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, D; Shobha, K J

    2015-08-01

    Bioegradation of 2,4'-dichlorobiphenyl (2,4 CB), by two isolates of Pseudomonas (GSa and GSb) was compared using GC-MS. Transformer oil polluted soil was used for the isolation of 2,4 CB degrading bacteria. GC-MS analysis of the solvent extracts obtained from Pseudomonas sp. GSa spent culture indicated the presence of Phenol 2,6-bis (1,1-dimethyl)-4-methyl (C15H24O). Further, the enzyme analysis of the cell free extracts showed the presence of 2,4'-dichlorobiphenyl dehalogenase (CBD), 2,4'-dichlorobiphenyl-NADPH-oxido-reductase (2,4 CBOR) and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-NADPH-oxido-reductase (2,3 DHOR) with specific activity of 6.00, 0.4 and 0.22 pmol/min/mg of protein, suggesting that dechlorination as an important step during 2,4 CB catabolism. Further, the cell free extract of GSb showed only 2,4'-dichlorobiphenyl-NADPH-oxido-reductase (2,4 CBOR) and 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl-NADPH-oxido-reductase (2,3 DHOR), with specific activity of 0.3 and 0.213 μmol/min/mg of protein, suggesting attack on non-chlorinated aromatic ring of 2,4 CB, releasing chlorinated intermediates which are toxic to the environment. Although, both the isolated bacteria (GSa and GSb) belong to Pseudomonas spp., they exhibited different metabolic potential.

  3. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  4. Bioadsorption characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kőnig-Péter Anikó

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II ions from aqueous solution using lyophilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAOI cells were observed under various experimental conditions. The effect of pH, initial metal concentration, equilibration time and temperature on bioadsorption was investigated. The optimum pH value for Pb(II adsorption was found to be 5.0, and for Cd(II 5.0 − 6.0. The Pb(II and Cd(II bioadsorption equilibrium were analyzed by using Freundlich and Langmuir model using nonlinear least-squares estimation. The experimental maximum uptake capacity of Pb(II and Cd(II was estimated to be 164 mg g-1 and 113 mg g-1, respectively. For biosorption kinetic study the pseudo second-order kinetic model was applied at various temperatures. The temperature had no significant effect on Pb(II bioadsorption. In case of Cd(II bioadsorption the adsorbed amount decreased with increasing temperature.

  5. The metabolism of thymol by a Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Enid M.; Dagley, S.

    1968-01-01

    1. Pseudomonas putida when grown with thymol contained a meta-fission dioxygenase, which required ferrous ions and readily cleaved the benzene nucleus of catechols between adjacent carbon atoms bearing hydroxyl and isopropyl groups. 2. 3-Hydroxythymo-1,4-quinone was excreted towards the end of exponential growth and later was slowly metabolized. This compound was oxidized by partially purified extracts only when NADH was supplied; the substrate for the dioxygenase appeared to be 3-hydroxythymo-1,4-quinol, which was readily and non-enzymically oxidized to the quinone. 3. 2-Oxobutyrate (0·9 mole) was formed from 1 mole of 3-hydroxythymo-1,4-quinone with the consumption of 1 mole of oxygen; acetate, isobutyrate and 2-hydroxybutyrate (which arose from the enzymic reduction of 2-oxobutyrate) were also formed. 4. These products, which were produced only when the catechol substrate contained a third hydroxyl group, appeared to result from the enzymic hydrolysis of the ring-fission product. PMID:4303067

  6. Toxicogenomic response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ortho-phenylphenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toghrol Freshteh

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is the most common opportunistic pathogen implicated in nosocomial infections and in chronic lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Ortho-phenylphenol (OPP is an antimicrobial agent used as an active ingredient in several EPA registered disinfectants. Despite its widespread use, there is a paucity of information on its target molecular pathways and the cellular responses that it elucidates in bacteria in general and in P. aeruginosa in particular. An understanding of the OPP-driven gene regulation and cellular response it elicits will facilitate more effective utilization of this antimicrobial and possibly lead to the development of more effective disinfectant treatments. Results Herein, we performed a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the cellular responses of P. aeruginosa exposed to 0.82 mM OPP for 20 and 60 minutes. Our data indicated that OPP upregulated the transcription of genes encoding ribosomal, virulence and membrane transport proteins after both treatment times. After 20 minutes of exposure to 0.82 mM OPP, genes involved in the exhibition of swarming motility and anaerobic respiration were upregulated. After 60 minutes of OPP treatment, the transcription of genes involved in amino acid and lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis were upregulated. Further, the transcription of the ribosome modulation factor (rmf and an alternative sigma factor (rpoS of RNA polymerase were downregulated after both treatment times. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that after 20 minutes of exposure to OPP, genes that have been linked to the exhibition of anaerobic respiration and swarming motility were upregulated. This study also suggests that the downregulation of the rmf and rpoS genes may be indicative of the mechanism by which OPP causes decreases in cell viability in P. aeruginosa. Consequently, a protective response involving the upregulation of translation leading to the

  7. The action of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in intrinsic drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Jia, Wen-xiang; Zeng, Wei; Yang, Wei-qing; Cheng, Xi; Li, Xue-ru; Wang, Lan-lan; Kang, Mei; Zhang, Zai-rong

    2005-10-05

    There is a growing interest in studying the relationship between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance to drugs. However, the relationship still remains unclear in the macroscopic bacterial growth. Our study is to illuminate the change of bacterial drug resistance of gyrA mutant and active efflux pump during the development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) biofilms. The strains of type II topoisomerase gene mutant (gyrA mutant) and multidrug resistance (MDR) efflux pump were clinical isolates and detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The process of bacterial biofilms development was observed by scanning electron microscope. Triparental mating experiments were performed to transfer report gene of green fluorescent protein (GFP) into P. aeruginosa biofilms strains and followed by analysis of bacterial survival rate between intrinsic resistance and biofilms resistance. The fluorescent strains with pGFPuv could develop mature biofilms on Teflon surface. Before a period of 72 hours, the survival rate of biofilms bacteria and intrinsic resistance strains in ciprofloxacin solution was significantly different (P 0.05). The carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and azithromycin could significantly reduce the drug resistance of biofilm strains and efflux pump strains. In the development of P. aeruginosa biofilms, the strains of gyrA mutation and MDR efflux could be conferred with new level of drug resistance. When co-cultured mutated strains with biofilm strains, biofilms may play a major role in bacterial resistance. But after 72 hours incubation (a mature biofilms had been developed), there was no clearly difference between the number of mutant strains and biofilm strains.

  8. Assembly and development of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm matrix.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luyan Ma

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Virtually all cells living in multicellular structures such as tissues and organs are encased in an extracellular matrix. One of the most important features of a biofilm is the extracellular polymeric substance that functions as a matrix, holding bacterial cells together. Yet very little is known about how the matrix forms or how matrix components encase bacteria during biofilm development. Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms environmentally and clinically relevant biofilms and is a paradigm organism for the study of biofilms. The extracellular polymeric substance of P. aeruginosa biofilms is an ill-defined mix of polysaccharides, nucleic acids, and proteins. Here, we directly visualize the product of the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl exopolysaccharide at different stages of biofilm development. During attachment, Psl is anchored on the cell surface in a helical pattern. This promotes cell-cell interactions and assembly of a matrix, which holds bacteria in the biofilm and on the surface. Chemical dissociation of Psl from the bacterial surface disrupted the Psl matrix as well as the biofilm structure. During biofilm maturation, Psl accumulates on the periphery of 3-D-structured microcolonies, resulting in a Psl matrix-free cavity in the microcolony center. At the dispersion stage, swimming cells appear in this matrix cavity. Dead cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA are also concentrated in the Psl matrix-free area. Deletion of genes that control cell death and autolysis affects the formation of the matrix cavity and microcolony dispersion. These data provide a mechanism for how P. aeruginosa builds a matrix and subsequently a cavity to free a portion of cells for seeding dispersal. Direct visualization reveals that Psl is a key scaffolding matrix component and opens up avenues for therapeutics of biofilm-related complications.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-associated Diarrheal Diseases in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chih-Hsien; Janapatla, Rajendra Prasad; Wang, Yi-Hsin; Chang, Hsin-Ju; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun

    2017-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract is not the common infection site of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The role of P. aeruginosa as a causative agent for diarrhea in children without preexisting disease is controversial. From 2003 to 2012, we reviewed the records of 259 diarrheal patients less than 5 years of age whose stool culture grew P. aeruginosa. Virulence phenotypes of bacterial isolates were determined in vitro, including cytotoxicity, penetration and adherence to epithelial cells. The presence of P. aeruginosa in children with diarrhea less than 5 years old is 0.91%. P. aeruginosa-associated diarrheal diseases were classified into 4 groups: Shanghai fever (enteric infection and sepsis) (5%), P. aeruginosa enterocolitis (15%), P. aeruginosa-related diarrhea (19%) and antibiotic-associated diarrhea (43%). The remaining patients had coinfection with other pathogens (18%). Shanghai fever was the most severe enteric disease with invasive infection and complications. The clinical features of P. aeruginosa enterocolitis were prolonged fever with bloody or mucoid diarrhea mimicking bacterial enterocolitis. The clinical features of P. aeruginosa-related diarrhea and antibiotic-associated diarrhea were similar to viral or toxin-mediated diarrhea. Compared with other P. aeruginosa-associated diarrheal diseases, patients with Shanghai fever were younger, usually infants, and the characteristic laboratory findings included leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, high C-reactive protein, hyponatremia and hyperglycemia. Except for Shanghai fever, antibiotic treatment is not recommended. Isolates from Shanghai fever were more cytotoxic and adherent than isolates from uncomplicated diarrheal patients. P. aeruginosa could be an enteric pathogen even in healthy children. Young age and highly virulent bacterial strains were risk factors for Shanghai fever.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lifestyle: A Paradigm for Adaptation, Survival, and Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradali, M. Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H. A.

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen affecting immunocompromised patients. It is known as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and as one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections. Due to a range of mechanisms for adaptation, survival and resistance to multiple classes of antibiotics, infections by P. aeruginosa strains can be life-threatening and it is emerging worldwide as public health threat. This review highlights the diversity of mechanisms by which P. aeruginosa promotes its survival and persistence in various environments and particularly at different stages of pathogenesis. We will review the importance and complexity of regulatory networks and genotypic-phenotypic variations known as adaptive radiation by which P. aeruginosa adjusts physiological processes for adaptation and survival in response to environmental cues and stresses. Accordingly, we will review the central regulatory role of quorum sensing and signaling systems by nucleotide-based second messengers resulting in different lifestyles of P. aeruginosa. Furthermore, various regulatory proteins will be discussed which form a plethora of controlling systems acting at transcriptional level for timely expression of genes enabling rapid responses to external stimuli and unfavorable conditions. Antibiotic resistance is a natural trait for P. aeruginosa and multiple mechanisms underlying different forms of antibiotic resistance will be discussed here. The importance of each mechanism in conferring resistance to various antipseudomonal antibiotics and their prevalence in clinical strains will be described. The underlying principles for acquiring resistance leading pan-drug resistant strains will be summarized. A future outlook emphasizes the need for collaborative international multidisciplinary efforts to translate current knowledge into strategies to prevent and treat P. aeruginosa infections while reducing the rate of antibiotic resistance

  11. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Hernández-González, Ismael L; Maeda, Toshinari; Hashimoto, Takahiro; Boogerd, Fred C; Sheng, Lili; Wood, Thomas K; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2013-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed 4- to 12-fold higher Ga minimal inhibitory growth concentrations and a greater than 8-fold increase in the minimum biofilm eliminating Ga concentration. Both types of mutants produced Ga resistant biofilms whereas the formation of wild-type biofilms was strongly inhibited by Ga. The gene interrupted in the transposon mutant was hitA, which encodes a periplasmic iron binding protein that delivers Fe³⁺ to the HitB iron permease; complementation of the mutant with the hitA gene restored the Ga sensitivity. This hitA mutant showed a 14-fold decrease in Ga internalization versus the wild-type strain, indicating that the HitAB system is also involved in the Ga uptake. Ga uptake in the spontaneous mutant was also lower, although no mutations were found in the hitAB genes. Instead, this mutant harbored 64 non-silent mutations in several genes including those of the phenazine pyocyanin biosynthesis. The spontaneous mutant produced 2-fold higher pyocyanin basal levels than the wild-type; the addition of this phenazine to wild-type cultures protected them from the Ga bacteriostatic effect. The present data indicate that mutations affecting Ga transport and probably pyocyanin biosynthesis enable cells to develop resistance to Ga. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of mutation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim C R Conibear

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The survival of bacteria in nature is greatly enhanced by their ability to grow within surface-associated communities called biofilms. Commonly, biofilms generate proliferations of bacterial cells, called microcolonies, which are highly recalcitrant, 3-dimensional foci of bacterial growth. Microcolony growth is initiated by only a subpopulation of bacteria within biofilms, but processes responsible for this differentiation remain poorly understood. Under conditions of crowding and intense competition between bacteria within biofilms, microevolutionary processes such as mutation selection may be important for growth; however their influence on microcolony-based biofilm growth and architecture have not previously been explored. To study mutation in-situ within biofilms, we transformed Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells with a green fluorescent protein gene containing a +1 frameshift mutation. Transformed P. aeruginosa cells were non-fluorescent until a mutation causing reversion to the wildtype sequence occurs. Fluorescence-inducing mutations were observed in microcolony structures, but not in other biofilm cells, or in planktonic cultures of P. aeruginosa cells. Thus microcolonies may represent important foci for mutation and evolution within biofilms. We calculated that microcolony-specific increases in mutation frequency were at least 100-fold compared with planktonically grown cultures. We also observed that mutator phenotypes can enhance microcolony-based growth of P. aeruginosa cells. For P. aeruginosa strains defective in DNA fidelity and error repair, we found that microcolony initiation and growth was enhanced with increased mutation frequency of the organism. We suggest that microcolony-based growth can involve mutation and subsequent selection of mutants better adapted to grow on surfaces within crowded-cell environments. This model for biofilm growth is analogous to mutation selection that occurs during neoplastic progression and tumor

  13. Crystal structure of the flavoenzyme PA4991 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacewicz, Agata; Schnell, Robert; Lindqvist, Ylva; Schneider, Gunter, E-mail: gunter.schneider@ki.se [Karolinska Institutet, S-171 77 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2016-01-22

    PA4991 is a FAD-dependent oxidoreductase from the pathogen P. aeruginosa that is essential for virulence and survival in the infected host. The structure of this enzyme, determined to 2.4 Å resolution, reveals that PA4991 belongs to the GR{sub 2} family of flavoenzymes. The locus PA4991 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an open reading frame that has been identified as essential for the virulence and/or survival of this pathogenic organism in the infected host. Here, it is shown that this gene encodes a monomeric FAD-binding protein of molecular mass 42.2 kDa. The structure of PA4991 was determined by a combination of molecular replacement using a search model generated with Rosetta and phase improvement by a low-occupancy heavy-metal derivative. PA4991 belongs to the GR{sub 2} family of FAD-dependent oxidoreductases, comprising an FAD-binding domain typical of the glutathione reductase family and a second domain dominated by an eight-stranded mixed β-sheet. Most of the protein–FAD interactions are via the FAD-binding domain, but the isoalloxazine ring is located at the domain interface and interacts with residues from both domains. A comparison with the structurally related glycine oxidase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase shows that in spite of very low amino-acid sequence identity (<18%) several active-site residues involved in substrate binding in these enzymes are conserved in PA4991. However, enzymatic assays show that PA4991 does not display amino-acid oxidase or glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, suggesting that it requires different substrates for activity.

  14. Glycan involvement in the adhesion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kautto, Liisa; Nguyen-Khuong, Terry; Everest-Dass, Arun; Leong, Andrea; Zhao, Zhenjun; Willcox, Mark D P; Packer, Nicolle H; Peterson, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    The human eye is constantly bathed by tears, which protect the ocular surface via a variety of mechanisms. The O-linked glycans of tear mucins have long been considered to play a role in binding to pathogens and facilitating their removal in the tear flow. Other conjugated glycans in tears could similarly contribute to pathogen binding and removal but have received less attention. In the work presented here we assessed the contribution of glycan moieties, in particular the protein attached N-glycans, presented by the broad complement of tear proteins to the adhesion of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a leading cause of microbial keratitis and ulceration of the cornea. Our adhesion assay involved immobilising the macromolecular components of tears into the wells of a polyvinyl difluoride (PVDF) microtitre filter plate and probing the binding of fluorescently labelled bacteria. Three P. aeruginosa strains were studied: a cytotoxic strain (6206) and an invasive strain (6294) from eye infections, and an invasive strain (320) from a urinary tract infection (UTI). The ocular isolates adhered two to three times more to human tears than to human saliva or porcine gastric mucin, suggesting ocular niche-specific adaptation. Support for the role of the N-glycans carried by human tear proteins in the binding and removal of P. aeruginosa from the eye was shown by: 1) pre-incubation of the bacteria with free component sugars, galactose, mannose, fucose and sialyl lactose (or combination thereof) inhibiting adhesion of all the P. aeruginosa strains to the immobilised tear proteins, with the greatest inhibition of binding of the ocular cytotoxic 6206 and least for the invasive 6294 strain; 2) pre-incubation of the bacteria with N-glycans released from the commercially available human milk lactoferrin, an abundant protein that carries N-linked glycans in tears, inhibiting the adhesion to tears of the ocular bacteria by up to 70%, which was significantly more

  15. Inhibition of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm bacteria by a halogenated furanone compound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Riedel, K.; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg

    2002-01-01

    Novel molecular tools have been constructed which allow for in situ detection of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The reporter responds to AHL activation of LasR lay expression of an unstable version of the green-fluorescent protein (Gfp......). Gfp-based reporter technology has been applied for non-destructive, single-cell-level detection of quorum sensing in laboratory-based P. aeruginosa biofilms. It is reported that a synthetic halogenated furanone compound, which is a derivative of the secondary metabolites produced by the Australian...... macroalga Delisea pulchra, is capable of interfering with AHL-mediated quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa. It is demonstrated that the furanone compound specifically represses expression of a PlasB-gfp reporter fusion without affecting growth or protein synthesis. In addition, it reduces the production...

  16. Characterization of cell lysis in Pseudomonas putida induced upon expression of heterologous killing genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronchel, M.C.; Molina, L.; Witte, A.

    1998-01-01

    upon the induction of expression of two different heterologous killing genes in nonpathogenic Pseudomonas putida KT2440 derivatives have been analyzed, P. putida CMC4 and CMC12 carry in their chromosomes a fusion of the PAl-04/03 promoter to the Escherichia coli gef gene and the phi X174 lysis gene E......Active biological containment systems are based on the controlled expression of killing genes. These systems are of interest for the Pseudomonadaceae because of the potential applications of these microbes as bioremediation agents and biopesticides, The physiological effects that lead to cell death......, respectively. Expression of the killing genes is controlled by the LacI protein, whose expression is initiated from the XylS-dependent Pm promoter. Under induced conditions, killing of P. putida CMC12 cells mediated by phi X174 lysis protein E was faster than that observed for P. putida CMC4, for which the Gef...

  17. phoU Inactivation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Enhances Accumulation of ppGpp and Polyphosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Luiz Gustavo; Ortiz, Julia Helena; Schneider, René P.

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear polymer composed of several molecules of orthophosphate (Pi) linked by energy-rich phosphoanhydride bonds. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pi is taken up by the ABC transporter Pst, encoded by an operon consisting of five genes. The first four genes encode proteins involved in the transport of Pi and the last gene of the operon, phoU, codes for a protein which exact function is unknown. We show here that the inactivation of phoU in P. aeruginosa enhanced Pi removal from the medium and polyP accumulation. The phoU mutant also accumulated high levels of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), which in turn increased the buildup of polyP. In addition, phoU inactivation had several pleiotropic effects, such as reduced growth rate and yield and increased sensitivity to antibiotics and stresses. However, biofilm formation was not affected by the phoU mutation. PMID:25710363

  18. Purification and properties of a new beta-lactamase from Pseudomonas cepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, K; Iyobe, S; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1980-03-01

    An inducible beta-lactamase was purified from a beta-lactam antibiotic-resistant strain (GN11164) of Pseudomonas cepacia. The purified enzyme preparation gave a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The specific enzyme activity for the hydrolysis of cephalothin as a substrate was 314.5 U/mg of protein. The optimal pH was about 8.0, and the optimal temperature was 45 degrees C. The isoelectric point was 9.3, and the molecular weight was estimated to be about 22,000 to 24,000 from gel filtration on a Sephadex G-200 column and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzyme activity was inhibited by iodine, p-chloromercuribenzoate, clavulanic acid, CP 45899, and cloxacillin. The beta-lactamase showed a unique substrate profile by hydrolyzing most of the cephalosporins, including cefuroxime, cefotaxime (HR 756), ampicillin, and penicillin G, at a high rate.

  19. Fast and economic immobilization methods described for non-commercial Pseudomonas lipases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an increasing interest to seek new enzyme preparations for the development of new products derived from bioprocesses to obtain alternative bio-based materials. In this context, four non-commercial lipases from Pseudomonas species were prepared, immobilized on different low-cost supports, and examined for potential biotechnological applications. Results To reduce costs of eventual scaling-up, the new lipases were obtained directly from crude cell extracts or from growth culture supernatants, and immobilized by simple adsorption on Accurel EP100, Accurel MP1000 and Celite®545. The enzymes evaluated were LipA and LipC from Pseudomonas sp. 42A2, a thermostable mutant of LipC, and LipI.3 from Pseudomonas CR611, which were produced in either homologous or heterologous hosts. Best immobilization results were obtained on Accurel EP100 for LipA and on Accurel MP1000 for LipC and its thermostable variant. Lip I.3, requiring a refolding step, was poorly immobilized on all supports tested (best results for Accurel MP1000). To test the behavior of immobilized lipases, they were assayed in triolein transesterification, where the best results were observed for lipases immobilized on Accurel MP1000. Conclusions The suggested protocol does not require protein purification and uses crude enzymes immobilized by a fast adsorption technique on low-cost supports, which makes the method suitable for an eventual scaling up aimed at biotechnological applications. Therefore, a fast, simple and economic method for lipase preparation and immobilization has been set up. The low price of the supports tested and the simplicity of the procedure, skipping the tedious and expensive purification steps, will contribute to cost reduction in biotechnological lipase-catalyzed processes. PMID:24755191

  20. Degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by two strains of Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna C. Nwinyi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The goal of this investigation was to isolate competent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons degraders that can utilize polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons of former industrial sites at McDoel Switchyard in Bloomington, Indiana. Using conventional enrichment method based on soil slurry, we isolated, screened and purified two bacterial species strains PB1 and PB2. Applying the ribotyping technique using the 16S rRNA gene analysis, the strains were assigned to the genus Pseudomonas (Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2. Both isolates showed promising metabolic capacity on pyrene sprayed MS agar plates during the preliminary investigations. Using time course studies in the liquid cultures at calculated concentrations 123, 64, 97 and 94 ppm for naphthalene, chrysene, fluroanthene and pyrene, P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 showed partial utilization of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Naphthalene was degraded between 26% and 40%, chrysene 14% and 16%, fluroanthene 5% and 7%; pyrene 8% and 13% by P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 respectively. Based on their growth profile, we developed a model R2 = 1 to predict the degradation rate of slow polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders where all the necessary parameters are constant. From this investigation, we confirm that the former industrial site soil microbial communities may be explored for the biorestoration of the industrial site.

  1. Pseudomonas fluorescens' view of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2008-01-01

    Growth in a biofilm modulates microbial metal susceptibility, sometimes increasing the ability of microorganisms to withstand toxic metal species by several orders of magnitude. In this study, a high-throughput metal toxicity screen was initiated with the aim of correlating biological toxicity data in planktonic and biofilm cells to the physiochemical properties of metal ions. To this end, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 was grown in the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) and biofilms and planktonic cells of this microorganism were exposed to gradient arrays of different metal ions. These arrays included 44 different metals with representative compounds that spanned every group of the periodic table (except for the halogens and noble gases). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values were obtained after exposing the biofilms to metal ions for 4 h. Using these values, metal ion toxicity was correlated to the following ion-specific physicochemical parameters: standard reduction-oxidation potential, electronegativity, the solubility product of the corresponding metal-sulfide complex, the Pearson softness index, electron density and the covalent index. When the ions were grouped according to outer shell electron structure, we found that heavy metal ions gave the strongest correlations to these parameters and were more toxic on average than the other classes of the ions. Correlations were different for biofilms than for planktonic cells, indicating that chemical mechanisms of metal ion toxicity differ between the two modes of growth. We suggest that biofilms can specifically counter the toxic effects of certain physicochemical parameters, which may contribute to the increased ability of biofilms to withstand metal toxicity.

  2. Aflatoxin B₁ degradation by a Pseudomonas strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, Lancine; Zhao, Yueju; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Chang, Jinghua; Li, Jinhan; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-23

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), one of the most potent naturally occurring mutagens and carcinogens, causes significant threats to the food industry and animal production. In this study, 25 bacteria isolates were collected from grain kernels and soils displaying AFB1 reduction activity. Based on its degradation effectiveness, isolate N17-1 was selected for further characterization and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa N17-1 could degrade AFB₁, AFB₂ and AFM₁ by 82.8%, 46.8% and 31.9% after incubation in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium at 37 °C for 72 h, respectively. The culture supernatant of isolate N17-1 degraded AFB₁ effectively, whereas the viable cells and intra cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Maximum degradation was observed at 55 °C. Ions Mn²⁺ and Cu²⁺ were activators for AFB1 degradation, however, ions Mg²⁺, Li⁺, Zn²⁺, Se²⁺, Fe³⁺ were strong inhibitors. Treatments with proteinase K and proteinase K plus SDS significantly reduced the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. No degradation products were observed based on preliminary LC-QTOF/MS analysis, indicating AFB₁ was metabolized to degradation products with chemical properties different from that of AFB₁. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB₁ by P. aeruginosa N17-1 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications. This is the first report indicating that the isolate of P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to degrade aflatoxin.

  3. Therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections with tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, D C; Fekety, F R; Bruce, B; Silva, J; Archer, G

    1975-07-01

    The efficacy of tobramycin in doses of 2.7 to 5.6 mg/kg per day in 29 courses of therapy in 25 hospitalized patients with serious Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was studied. Eighty-three percent of the P. aeruginosa strains showed zones of inhibition of 16 mm or more around a 10-mug tobramycin disk in the Bauer-Kirby disk method. Tobramycin minimal inhibitory concentration ranged from <0.05 to 1.5 mug/ml (microtiter twofold dilution method); for gentamicin they ranged from 0.05 to 6.2 mug/ml; corresponding geometric means were 0.19 and 0.49 mug/ml. Therapy was given for a median of 10 days (mean 19, range 1 to 83). The clinically satisfactory response rate for the 29 courses of therapy was 52%: critically ill, 44%; seriously ill, 50%; moderately ill, 80%. The response rates for various sites of infection were bone and cartilage, 100%; urinary tract infection, 56%; wound, 50%; respiratory tract, 67%; septicemia, 40%; abscess, 0%; burns, 44%. No adverse reactions were seen. Serum concentration (mug/ml +/- standard deviation) of tobramycin determined by an agar-well plate method, were 4.81 +/- 2.17 (1 h); 3.24 +/- 1.43 (2 h); 2.35 +/- 1.30 (4 h); and 1.40 +/- 1.09 (8 h). Tobramycin appears to be as effacacious as gentamicin in the treatment of serious P. aeruginosa infections and has a theoretical advantage of lower minimal inhibitory concentration for P. aeruginosa. The data suggest that, for life-threatening infections, dosages of tobramycin may need to be increased over those used in this study.

  4. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  6. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    drinking water industry, very little has been reported regarding the role of P. aeruginosa in biofilms. Tap water appears to be a significant route of transmission in hospitals, from colonization of plumbing fixtures. It is still not clear if the colonization results from the water in the distribution system, or personnel use within the hospital. Infections and colonization can be significantly reduced by placement of filters on the water taps. The oral dose of P. aeruginosa required to establish colonization in a healthy subject is high (George et al. 1989a). During dose-response studies, even when subjects (mice or humans) were colonized via ingestion, there was no evidence of disease. P. aeruginosa administered by the aerosol route at levels of 10(7) cells did cause disease symptoms in mice, and was lethal in aerosolized doses of 10(9) cells. Aerosol dose-response studies have not been undertaken with human subjects. Human health risks associated with exposure to P. aeruginosa via drinking water ingestion were estimated using a four-step risk assessment approach. The risk of colonization from ingesting P. aeruginosa in drinking water is low. The risk is slightly higher if the subject is taking an antibiotic resisted by P. aeruginosa. The fact that individuals on ampicillin are more susceptible to Pseudomonas gastrointestinal infection probably results from suppression of normal intestinal flora, which would allow Pseudomonas to colonize. The process of estimating risk was significantly constrained because of the absence of specific (quantitative) occurrence data for Pseudomonas. Sensitivity analysis shows that the greatest source of variability/uncertainty in the risk assessment is from the density distribution in the exposure rather than the dose-response or water consumption distributions. In summary, two routes appear to carry the greatest health risks from contacting water contaminated with P. aeruginosa (1) skin exposure in hot tubs and (2) lung exposure from

  7. Uji produksi biosurfaktan oleh Pseudomonas sp. pada substrat yang berbeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Fatimah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactant, microbial metabolite whose properties like surfactant, was suggested to replace chemically synthesized surfactant for take in hand environtmental pollution by petroleum hydrocarbon. This work was done to examine potency of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from Tanjung Perak Harbor to produce biosurfactant. Also, to know the effect of different substrates (glucose + yeast extract, lubricating oil and hexadecane toward biosurfactant production. Pseudomonas sp. grown in mineral synthetic water and biosurfactant production was measured on stationary phase. Biosurfactant production based on emulsification activity and surface tension reduction of supernatant (using Du Nouy tensiometer. Solar, lubricating oil, and hexadecane were used to examine emulsification activity. Results indicated that Pseudomonas sp. have a potency to produce biosurfactant. Surface tension of supernatant decreased up to 20 dyne/cm, when grown on hexadecane substrate. Hexadecane is the best growing substrate for biosurfactant production than others.

  8. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...

  9. Effects of ambroxol on alginate of mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Hua; Wan, Zhenyan; Bai, Dan

    2008-07-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated newborns, which can cause life-threatening infections. Alginate of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is considered an important virulence factor which contributes to the resistance to antibiotics. Traditionally, ambroxol is widely used in newborns with lung problems as a mucolytic agent and antioxidant agent as well. And there are few studies that demonstrated the anti-biofilm activity of ambroxol. In this study, we found that ambroxol can affect the structure of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Further, we found that ambroxol reduces the production of alginate, the expression of the important genes and the activity of key enzyme guanosine diphospho-D-mannose dehydrogenase (GDP-mannose dehydrogenase; GMD) which were involved in alginate biosynthesis.

  10. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino sinusitis in mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S.; Hammer, A. S.; Høiby, N.

    2017-01-01

    The nasal and sinus cavities in children may serve as reservoirs for microorganisms that cause recurrent and chronic lung infections. This study evaluates whether the mink can be used as an animal model for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis since there is no suitable...... in the infected mink shows features of carbohydrate expression comparable to what has been described in the respiratory system after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in humans. It is suggested that the mink is suitable for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis....... traditional animal model for this disease. Nasal tissue samples from infected and control mink were fixed in formalin, demineralized, and embedded in paraffin. A histological examination of sections from the infected animals revealed disintegration of the respiratory epithelium lining the nasal turbinates...

  11. Conservation of the response regulator gene gacA in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Mazzola, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The response regulator gene gacA influences the production of several secondary metabolites in both pathogenic and beneficial Pseudomonas spp. In this study, we developed primers and a probe for the gacA gene of Pseudomonas species and sequenced a 425 bp fragment of gacA from ten Pseudomonas strains

  12. Redundant phenazine operons in Pseudomonas aeruginosa exhibit environment-dependent expression and differential roles in pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recinos, David A; Sekedat, Matthew D; Hernandez, Adriana; Cohen, Taylor Sitarik; Sakhtah, Hassan; Prince, Alice S; Price-Whelan, Alexa; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2012-11-20

    Evolutionary biologists have postulated that several fitness advantages may be conferred by the maintenance of duplicate genes, including environmental adaptation resulting from differential regulation. We examined the expression and physiological contributions of two redundant operons in the adaptable bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14. These operons, phzA1-G1 (phz1) and phzA2-G2 (phz2), encode nearly identical sets of proteins that catalyze the synthesis of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, the precursor for several phenazine derivatives. Phenazines perform diverse roles in P. aeruginosa physiology and act as virulence factors during opportunistic infections of plant and animal hosts. Although reports have indicated that phz1 is regulated by the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, factors controlling phz2 expression have not been identified, and the relative contributions of these redundant operons to phenazine biosynthesis have not been evaluated. We found that in liquid cultures, phz1 was expressed at higher levels than phz2, although phz2 showed a greater contribution to phenazine production. In colony biofilms, phz2 was expressed at high levels, whereas phz1 expression was not detectable, and phz2 was responsible for virtually all phenazine production. Analysis of mutants defective in quinolone signal synthesis revealed a critical role for 4-hydroxy-2-heptylquinoline in phz2 induction. Finally, deletion of phz2, but not of phz1, decreased lung colonization in a murine model of infection. These results suggest that differential regulation of the redundant phz operons allows P. aeruginosa to adapt to diverse environments.

  13. Dataset of proteomics analysis of aging C. elegans exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PA01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina D. King

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Here, we present the proteomics dataset of young and middle-aged Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa strain PA01, which is related to the article "Proteomic Identification of Virulence-Related Factors in Young and Aging C. elegans infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa" (C. D. King et. al, in-revisions. This dataset was generated to better understand the effects of aging on molecular mechanisms involved in host response to pathogen exposure. Protein from C. elegans of different age and exposure to P. aeruginosa PA01 or control E. coli OP50 were extracted and tryptically digested. Peptides were labeled with the reagents tandem mass tag (TMT6-plex, separated, and detected by using offline strong-cation exchange and online liquid chromatography – mass spectrometry (SCX – LC – MS/MS & MS3. A separate mixture of peptides were labeled on N-terminal amines and lysines with dimethylation. Dimethylated peptides were analyzed using LC – MS/MS and a portion of the results were used to verify fold-change direction for TMT6-plex experiments. Raw data can be found online at www.CHORUSproject.org, a cloud-based data repository (see specifications table for details.

  14. Genome-wide screen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies new virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat eZrieq

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that causes mortality in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. While many virulence factors of this pathogen have already been identified, several remain to be discovered. In this respect we set an unprecedented genome-wide screen of a P. aeruginosa expression library based on a yeast growth phenotype. 51 candidates were selected in a three-round screening process. The robustness of the screen was validated by the selection of three well known secreted proteins including one demonstrated virulence factor, the protease LepA. Further in silico sorting of the 51 candidates highlighted three potential new Pseudomonas effector candidates (Pec. By testing the cytotoxicity of wild type P. aeruginosa vs pec mutants towards macrophages and the virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrated that the three selected Pecs are novel virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Additional cellular localization experiments in the host revealed specific localization for Pec1 and Pec2 that could inform about their respective functions.

  15. Azoreductase kinetics and gene expression in the synthetic dyes-degrading Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameer Elfarash

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms have an effective capability to degrade synthetic dyestuff enzymatically. In this study, two 16S rRNA identified Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial isolates (ASU3 and ASU6 have been screened to enzymatically degrade both Disperse Blue 64 (DB64 and Acid Yellow 17 (AY17 which resembles 2 of the synthetic dyes that causes aquatic environmental pollution. The expression of the azoR1 gene has been detected in the strains, the degradation percentage of DB64 and AY17 by stain ASU6 was found to exceed the ASU3. This returned to the differences in the expression levels of azoR1 between the ASU6 and the ASU3 which was confirmed by RT-PCR. In addition, the specific activity (U/mg protein of azoreductase in ASU6 was higher than ASU3 when MethylRed (MR, DB64 and AY17 were used as a substrate, separately. The azoreductase kinetics was studied to find the optimum condition for maintaining the stability of the enzyme. The degraded products separated by HPLC/MS were tested for their toxicity on two crop plants and they were nontoxic to the plants. Keywords: Azoreductase, Kinetics, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Synthetic dyes

  16. Information Management of Genome Enabled Data Streams for Pseudomonas syringae on the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalen Lindeberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome enabled research has led to a large and ever-growing body of data on Pseudomonas syringae genome variation and characteristics, though systematic capture of this information to maximize access by the research community remains a significant challenge. Major P. syringae data streams include genome sequence data, newly identified type III effectors, biological characterization data for type III effectors, and regulatory feature characterization. To maximize data access, the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI website [1] is primarily focused on categorization of type III effectors and curation of effector functional data represented in the Hop database and Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction Resource, respectively. The PPI website further serves as a conduit for incorporation of new genome characterization data into the annotation records at NCBI and other data repositories, and clearinghouse for additional data sets and updates in response to the evolving needs of the research community.

  17. Impact du séchage sur la viabilité de Pseudomonas fluorescens (synthèse bibliographique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mputu Kanyinda, JN.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Impact of drying on Pseudomonas fluorescens viability. A review. Drying Pseudomonas fluorescens makes for more economical storage, transportation and marketing. The aim of the drying process is to stop and to stabilize all biological activity for optimal storage, compatible with the conservation of the maximum desired viability of the microorganisms. However, the viability rate of the bacteria after drying depends on the operating conditions of the drying process. One of the most important criteria to consider during the drying of biologically active products is the quality of the final dried product. Freeze-drying is the drying method most commonly used for Pseudomonas fluorescens. After their production, the bacteria are harvested by centrifugation and are freeze-dried, but the changes in temperature induced by freeze-drying are not without consequence for the cells. The freeze-drying process induces cell damage: peroxidation of fatty acids and proteins and DNA oxidation. However, use of protective compounds during freeze-drying and during storage increases significantly the rate of cell viability.

  18. Baicalin inhibits biofilm formation, attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence and enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa clearance in a mouse peritoneal implant infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jing; Dong, Biying; Wang, Ke; Cai, Shuangqi; Liu, Tangjuan; Cheng, Xiaojing; Lei, Danqing; Chen, Yanling; Li, Yanan; Kong, Jinliang; Chen, Yiqiang

    2017-01-01

    The quorum sensing (QS) circuit plays a role in the precise regulation of genes controlling virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. QS-controlled biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings has remained controversial due to emerging drug resistance; therefore, screening diverse compounds for anti-biofilm or anti-QS activities is important. This study demonstrates the ability of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of baicalin, an active natural compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal Scutellaria baicalensis, to inhibit the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance the bactericidal effects of various conventional antibiotics in vitro. In addition, baicalin exerted dose-dependent inhibitory effects on virulence phenotypes (LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, motilities and exotoxin A) regulated by QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, the expression levels of QS-regulatory genes, including lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR, pqsR and pqsA, were repressed after sub-MIC baicalin treatment, resulting in significant decreases in the QS signaling molecules 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL, confirming the ability of baicalin-mediated QS inhibition to alter gene and protein expression. In vivo experiments indicated that baicalin treatment reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Greater worm survival in the baicalin-treated group manifested as an increase in the LT50 from 24 to 96 h. In a mouse peritoneal implant infection model, baicalin treatment enhanced the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the implants of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with the control group. Moreover, the combination of baicalin and antibiotics significantly reduced the numbers of colony-forming units in the implants to a significantly greater degree than antibiotic treatment alone. Pathological and histological analyses revealed mitigation of the

  19. Baicalin inhibits biofilm formation, attenuates the quorum sensing-controlled virulence and enhances Pseudomonas aeruginosa clearance in a mouse peritoneal implant infection model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Luo

    Full Text Available The quorum sensing (QS circuit plays a role in the precise regulation of genes controlling virulence factors and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. QS-controlled biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in clinical settings has remained controversial due to emerging drug resistance; therefore, screening diverse compounds for anti-biofilm or anti-QS activities is important. This study demonstrates the ability of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs of baicalin, an active natural compound extracted from the traditional Chinese medicinal Scutellaria baicalensis, to inhibit the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms and enhance the bactericidal effects of various conventional antibiotics in vitro. In addition, baicalin exerted dose-dependent inhibitory effects on virulence phenotypes (LasA protease, LasB elastase, pyocyanin, rhamnolipid, motilities and exotoxin A regulated by QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Moreover, the expression levels of QS-regulatory genes, including lasI, lasR, rhlI, rhlR, pqsR and pqsA, were repressed after sub-MIC baicalin treatment, resulting in significant decreases in the QS signaling molecules 3-oxo-C12-HSL and C4-HSL, confirming the ability of baicalin-mediated QS inhibition to alter gene and protein expression. In vivo experiments indicated that baicalin treatment reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenicity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Greater worm survival in the baicalin-treated group manifested as an increase in the LT50 from 24 to 96 h. In a mouse peritoneal implant infection model, baicalin treatment enhanced the clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from the implants of mice infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared with the control group. Moreover, the combination of baicalin and antibiotics significantly reduced the numbers of colony-forming units in the implants to a significantly greater degree than antibiotic treatment alone. Pathological and histological analyses revealed

  20. Defining the Pseudomonas Genus: Where Do We Draw the Line with Azotobacter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, Asli Ismihan; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    genome family trees based on conserved gene families also show A. vinelandii to be more closely related to Pseudomonas than other related organisms. Third, exhaustive BLAST comparisons demonstrate that the fraction of shared genes between A. vinelandii and Pseudomonas genomes is similar...... using three genomic sequence-based methods. First, using 16S rRNA trees, it is shown that A. vinelandii groups within the Pseudomonas close to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genomes from other related organisms (Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter, and Cellvibrio) are outside the Pseudomonas cluster. Second, pan...

  1. Prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in surgical units of Ahmadu Bello University teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria: An ... The antibiotic susceptibility of isolates and a standard strain to ceftazidime, amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and perfloxacin was determined by the ...

  2. Utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas sp. and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This phenotype was not transformed to Pseudomonas by conjugation even with lysozyme treatment, however the petroleum oil and octadecane utilization were transformed to E. coli by lysozyme treatment. The transformed E. coli lost the ability to use octadecane after three subcultures on nutrient broth and 34 generations.

  3. Genomic and metabolic characterization of spoilage-associated Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanborough, Tamsyn; Fegan, Narelle; Powell, Shane M; Singh, Tanoj; Tamplin, Mark; Chandry, P Scott

    2018-03-02

    Pseudomonas are common spoilage agents of aerobically stored fresh foods. Their ability to cause spoilage is species- and may be strain-specific. To improve our understanding of the meat and milk spoilage agents Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas lundensis, we sequenced the genomes of 12 P. fragi and seven P. lundensis isolates. These genomes provided a dataset for genomic analyses. Key volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced or metabolised by the isolates were determined during their growth on a beef paste and where possible, metabolic activity was associated with gene repertoire. Genome analyses showed that the isolates included in this work may belong to more than two Pseudomonas species with possible spoilage potential. Pan-genome analyses demonstrated a high degree of diversity among the P. fragi and genetic flexibility and diversity may be traits of both species. Growth of the P. lundensis isolates was characterised by the production of large amounts of 1-undecene, 5-methyl-2-hexanone and methyl-2-butenoic acid. P. fragi isolates produced extensive amounts of methyl and ethyl acetate and the production of methyl esters predominated over ethyl esters. Some of the P. fragi produced extremely low levels of VOCs, highlighting the importance of strain-specific studies in food matrices. Furthermore, although usually not considered to be denitrifiers, all isolates generated molecular nitrogen, indicating that at least some steps of this pathway are intact. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype.

  5. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P. ...

  6. extracts of senna siamea (lam) on pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2009-05-30

    May 30, 2009 ... convulsion in children (Alli – Smith, 2009). In an attempt to rationally identify which pathogen to screen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was epidemiologically identified as the hardiest bacterium that constitutes problems to researchers and clinicians. As literature showed, the hardy nature of Ps aeruginosa is ...

  7. Biological production of monoethanolamine by engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foti, M.J.; Médici, R.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered for the production of monoethanolamine (MEA) from glucose via the decarboxylation of the central metabolite l-serine, which is catalyzed by the enzyme l-serine decarboxylase (SDC).The host was first evaluated for its tolerance towards MEA as well as its

  8. an tibiotic resistance trend of pseudomonas aeruginosa'in port

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AN TIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TREND OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA'IN PORT. HARCOURT oaursca. 0. K}. ONYEJEPU, N 1. 1. Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology. University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Port Harcourt. 2. Nigerian Institute of Medical Research. 6 Edmond Crescent, Yabl. Lagos.

  9. Secretion of elastinolytic enzymes and their propeptides by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, P; de Groot, A; Bitter, W; Tommassen, J

    Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The signal sequence is cleaved ol during transport across the inner membrane and, in the periplasm, proelastase is further processed. We demonstrate that the propeptide and the mature elastase are both secreted but that the

  10. Induction of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Jensen, E T; Høiby, N

    1991-01-01

    Imipenem induced high levels of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Piperacillin also induced beta-lactamase production in these biofilms but to a lesser degree. The combination of beta-lactamase production with other protective properties of the biofilm mode of growth...

  11. Heavy Metal uptake Potentials of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uptake of heavy metals, silver and cadmium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a Gram negative bacterium) and Micrococcus luteus (a Gram positive bacterium) was investigated in Cadmium and Silver stock solution using ion selective electrodes. Silver and cadmium uptake by the two organisms was described by Langmuir ...

  12. Dechlorination of 1,2– dichloroethane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of our attempt at isolating and stocking some indigenous microbial species, we isolated a bacterium from a waste dumpsite with appreciable dechlorination activity. 16S rDNA profiling revealed the isolate to be a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the sequence has been deposited in the NCBI nucleotide ...

  13. Antibiotic sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern of antibiotic sensitivity of 229 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated between June 1998 and May 2000 at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu was studied. The isolates were recovered from various clinical specimens by culturing on standard media viz: blood agar, ...

  14. Rhamnolipid stimulates uptake of hydrophobic compounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, WH; Janssen, DB

    The biodegradation of hexadecane by five biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG1, Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43066, R. erythropolis ATCC 19558, and strain BCG112) was determined in the presence and absence of exogenously added

  15. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    degrading microorganisms in oil-polluted site. (Atlas, 1981). Crude oil biodegradation can occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions (Zengler et al., 1999). This research was aimed at investigating the effects of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and. Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ...

  16. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Contreras, R; Lira-Silva, E; Jasso-Chávez, R; Hernández-González, I.L.; Maeda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Boogerd, F.C.; Sheng, L; Wood, TK; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed

  17. Decrease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by food waste materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maděrová, Z.; Horská, K.; Kim, S.-R.; Lee, Ch.-H.; Pospíšková, K.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 9 (2016), s. 2143-2149 ISSN 0273-1223 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biofilm * food waste materials * magnetic spent grain * Pseudomonas aeruginosa Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.197, year: 2016

  18. Characterization of Pseudomonas species causing brown blotch of Agaricus bisporis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Kastelein, P.; Krijger, M.C.; Hendriks, M.J.A.; Baars, J.J.P.; Amsing, J.G.M.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Warris, S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial blotch is occasionally causing damage in the production of common mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). The disease is found worldwide and can be caused by different fluorescent Pseudomonas species present in casing material. For identification of the causative agents of blotch in the Netherlands

  19. dichloroethane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa OK1 isolated from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    chlorinated organics such as monochloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, dichloromethane, trichloromethane and tetrachloromethane at pH 7.5 and 9.0. Optimum temperature for dehalogenase activity against 1, 2 – DCE was 35oC. Key words: Dechlorination, 16S rDNA, bioremediation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa OK1.

  20. Unraveling root developmental programs initiated by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamioudis, C.; Mastranesti, P.; Dhonukshe, P.; Blilou, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant roots are colonized by an immense number of microbes, referred to as the root microbiome. Selected strains of beneficial soil-borne bacteria can protect against abiotic stress and prime the plant immune system against a broad range of pathogens. Pseudomonas spp. rhizobacteria represent one of

  1. Unraveling Root Developmental Programs Initiated by Beneficial Pseudomonas spp. Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamioudis, C.; Mastranesti, P.; Dhonukshe, P.; Blilou, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant roots are colonized by an immense number of microbes, referred to as the root microbiome. Selected strains of beneficial soil-borne bacteria can protect against abiotic stress and prime the plant immune system against a broad range of pathogens. Pseudomonas spp. rhizobacteria represent one of

  2. Screening of thermophilic neutral lipase-producing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From oil-contaminated soil, three lipase-producing microorganisms were selected as good lipase producers using rhodamine B-olive oil plate agar and they were identified as from Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Klebsiella genera by morphology, biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the ...

  3. Enhanced alpha-galactosidase expression in pseudomonas chlororaphis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis is a non-pathogenic bacterium useful for fermentative production of biopolymer (i.e., poly(hydroxyalkanoates); PHA) and biosurfactant (i.e., rhamnolipid; RhL). In order to enable P. chlororaphis to better fermentatively utilize the residual soy sugars in soy molasses – a lo...

  4. Effect of biosurfactant from two strains of Pseudomonas on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two Pseudomonas strains isolated from oil-contaminated soil which produce biosurfactant were studied. The biosurfactant containing broth formed stable emulsions with liquid light paraffin, cooking medium vegetable oil and toluene. The strains under study produce extra cellular biosurfactant in the culture media.

  5. Effect of alternating and direct currents on Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... studies must be done so as to reach optimum voltage and currents. The test media were Muller-Hinton agar and eosin methylene blue (EMB) agar. In this research Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was isolated from patients׳ wounds was examined with levels of alternating and direct current (AC and DC).

  6. Effect of alternating and direct currents on Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was isolated from patients wounds was examined with levels of alternating and direct current (AC and DC) electrical stimulation (1.5V, 3.5V, 5.5V and 10V) to see if these currents could inhibit P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. The experiment was performed in two forms: The first ...

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  8. Utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas sp. and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pseudomonas isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil was instable. In this work, t is shown that when the isolates are immobilized on Perlite, they are more stable for oil egradation. Although the isolate did not have any chemotaxis to ...

  9. High Temperature Induced Antibiotic Sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    aeruginosa ATCC 9027 was maintained on Pseudomonas P agar slants (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, MI.). The organism was cultivated at 37°C or 46°C in a proteose...Studies on the permeability change produced in coliform bacteria by ethylene diamine tetracetate. J. Biol. Chem. 243: 2372 - 2380. 7. 9. Lowry, O.H., N.J

  10. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas resistant to heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas resistant to heavy metals and poly aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) from Persian Gulf sediments. ... Among 10 bacterial species isolated from marine sediment, one strain represented high potential to grow in medium supplemented with copper and phenanthrene. Isolated ...

  11. The Transcriptional Landscape of the Production Organism Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta

    Bacterial cell factories represent a valid alternative to fossil fuel-based production. A promising bacterium that can be optimized as cell factory is Pseudomonas putida. However, its development in bioproduction applications poses some challenges including a clear understanding of the bacterial ...

  12. Detection of Pseudomonas fluorescens from broth, water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loop mediated isothermal amplification is rapid, highly sensitive and specifically developed method for detection of bacterial infections. AprX gene for alkaline metalloprotease of Pseudomonas fluorescens was used to design four primers and loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) conditions were standardized for ...

  13. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed

  14. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were

  15. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas , Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  16. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  17. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    Abstract. The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic ...

  18. Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) indices of Pseudomonas and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objectives: Pseudomonas and Klebsiella infections are important nosocomial infections because of the attendant significant morbidity, mortality and socio-economic impact. These infections are difficult to treat due to the innate and acquired resistance mediated by the organisms' genome and other transferable ...

  19. Production of a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant by Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The work herewith investigated the effect of the culture medium composition on rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LBM10, previously isolated from an estuarine environment in Southern Brazil. Experimental design and surface response methodology were used in order to improve biosurfactant ...

  20. Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... Isolate Ps5 showed the highest lipase activity which was later identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of ..... Identification and characterization of a locally isolated lipolytic microfungus Geotrichum candidum. Malaysian J. Microbiol. 2: 22-29. Martinelle M, Hult K (1995).Kinetics of acyl transfer ...

  1. [Activity of doripenem against Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. rods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Deptuła, Aleksander; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Doripenem, the newest carbapenem was approved in 2008 by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections and complicated urinary tract infections. Its spectrum of activity is similar to that of meropenem and imipenem/cilastatin. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro activity of doripenem against nonfermentative Gram-negative rods. A total of 235 strains of Pseudomonas spp. (74.9%) and Acinetobacter spp. (25.1%) were included into the study. Strains were isolated in The Department of Clinical Microbiology of the University Hospital No 1 in Bydgoszcz and identified using ID GN tests (bioMérieux). To determine susceptibility to doripenem and other carbapenems disc-diffusion method was applied. Percentage of doripenem resistant strains reached 28.4% and 39.0% for Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp, respectively. All doripenem sensitive or intermediate Acinetobacter spp. strains were simultaneously sensitive to imipenem and meropenem. Activity of imipenem and meropenem among doripenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. were represented by 60.9% and 56.5% strains, respectively. Activity of imipenem and meropenem among doripenem resistant Pseudomonas spp. strains were represented by 12.0% and 18.0%, respectively. Occurence of one doripenem sensitive Pseudomonas spp. strain simultaneously resistant to imipenem and meropenem was observed.

  2. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas putida WLY for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The azoreductase produced by P. putida WLY was extracellular and induced according to electrophoresis experiments and decolorization tests. After purification by ion exchange and gel chromatography, its molecular weight was estimated to be 28,000 Da by SDS-PAGE. Key words: Pseudomonas putida; reactive brilliant ...

  3. Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six isolates (Ps1, Ps2, Ps3, Ps4, Ps5 and Ps6) producing lipase were screened from wastewater on a selective medium agar containing Tween 80 or olive oil as the only source of carbon. Isolate Ps5 showed the highest lipase activity which was later identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of media composition ...

  4. Interaction between fish spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas sp and Shewanella putrefaciens in fish extracts and on fish tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1996-01-01

    , supernatant fluids from siderophore- negative Pseudomonas isolates did not inhibit growth of S. putrefaciens. The inhibitory effect was, except for one strain of Pseudomonas, not seen in supernatant fluids from iron- enriched cultures of Pseudomonas sp. Finally, siderophore- producing Pseudomonas sp. lowered...

  5. Pseudomonas guariconensis sp. nov., isolated from rhizospheric soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Marcia; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, Maria José; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2013-12-01

    We isolated a bacterial strain designated PCAVU11(T) in the course of a study of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria occurring in rhizospheric soil of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. in Guárico state, Venezuela. The 16S rRNA gene sequence had 99.2 % sequence similarity with respect to the most closely related species, Pseudomonas taiwanensis, and 99.1 % with respect to Pseudomonas entomophila, Pseudomonas plecoglossicida and Pseudomonas monteilii, on the basis of which PCAVU11(T) was classified as representing a member of the genus Pseudomonas. Analysis of the housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed the phylogenetic affiliation and showed sequence similarities lower than 95 % in all cases with respect to the above-mentioned closest relatives. Strain PCAVU11(T) showed two polar flagella. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0 (25.7 %), 18 : 1ω7c (20.4 %), 17 : 0 cyclo (11.5 %) and 16 : 1ω7c/15 : 0 iso 2-OH in summed feature 3 (10.8 %). The strain was oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive, the arginine dihydrolase system was present but nitrate reduction, β-galactosidase production and aesculin hydrolysis were negative. Strain PCAVU11(T) grew at 44 °C and at pH 10. The DNA G+C content was 61.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values lower than 56 % relatedness with respect to the type strains of the four most closely related species. Therefore, the results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses support the classification of strain PCAVU11(T) as representing a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, which we propose to name Pseudomonas guariconensis sp. nov. The type strain is PCAVU11(T) ( = LMG 27394(T) = CECT 8262(T)).

  6. Inhibition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence: characterization of the AprA-AprI interface and species selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoel, Bart W; van Kessel, Kok P M; van Strijp, Jos A G; Milder, Fin J

    2012-01-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes the virulence factor alkaline protease (AprA) to enhance its survival. AprA cleaves one of the key microbial recognition molecules, monomeric flagellin, and thereby diminishes Toll-like receptor 5 activation. In addition, AprA degrades host proteins such as complement proteins and cytokines. P. aeruginosa encodes a highly potent inhibitor of alkaline protease (AprI) that is solely located in the periplasm where it is presumed to protect periplasmic proteins against secreted AprA. We set out to study the enzyme-inhibitor interactions in more detail in order to provide a basis for future drug development. Structural and mutational studies reveal that the conserved N-terminal residues of AprI occupy the protease active site and are essential for inhibitory activity. We constructed peptides mimicking the N-terminus of AprI; however, these were incapable of inhibiting AprA-mediated flagellin cleavage. Furthermore, we expressed and purified AprI of P. aeruginosa and the homologous (37% sequence identity) AprI of Pseudomonas syringae, which remarkably show species specificity for their cognate protease. Exchange of the first five N-terminal residues between AprI of P. syringae and P. aeruginosa did not affect the observed specificity, whereas exchange of only six residues located at the AprI surface that contacts the protease did abolish specificity. These findings are elementary steps toward the design of molecules derived from the natural inhibitor of the virulence factor AprA and their use in therapeutic applications in Pseudomonas and other Gram-negative infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... paration (American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on. Nutrition, 1989), leather processing (George et al., 1995) and in weaving processing (Helmann, 1995). Proteases are complex multienzyme system which catalyses the hydrolysis of amide bond in a protein molecule hence it has been used in the ...

  8. Specific Genomic Fingerprints of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas Strains Generated by Box Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2014-01-01

    Primers corresponding to conserved bacterial repetitive of BOX elements were used to show that BOX-DNA sequences are widely distributed in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains. Phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas was isolated from oil palm fields (tropical soil) in Malaysia. BOX elements were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Pseudomonas isolates to identify strains that were not distinguishable by other classification methods. BOX-PCR, that derived genomic fingerprints, was generated from whole purified genomic DNA by liquid culture of phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas. BOX-PCR generated the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas specific fingerprints to identify the relationship between these strains. This suggests that distribution of BOX elements' sequences in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains is the mirror image of their genomic structure. Therefore, this method appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains and it may be useful tool for fast identification of potential biofertilizer strains. PMID:25580434

  9. IMPACT OF MICROBIOTA ON RESISTANCE TO OCULAR PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA–INDUCED KERATITIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Sankaranarayanan, Saiprasad

    2016-01-01

    –induced keratitis. We find that in health, the presence of microbiota strengthened the ocular innate immune barrier by significantly increasing the concentrations of immune effectors in the tear film, including secretory IgA and complement proteins. Consistent with this view, Swiss Webster (SW) mice......The existence of the ocular microbiota has been reported but functional analyses to evaluate its significance in regulating ocular immunity are currently lacking. We compared the relative contribution of eye and gut commensals in regulating the ocular susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... that are typically resistant to P. aeruginosa–induced keratitis become susceptible due to the lack of microbiota. This was exemplified by increased corneal bacterial burden and elevated pathology of the germ free (GF) mice when compared to the conventionally maintained SW mice. The protective immunity was found...

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Psl Exopolysaccharide Interacts with the Antimicrobial Peptide LG21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Seow Fong Chin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm formation by opportunistic pathogens serves as one of the major causes of chronic and persistent infections. Bacterial cells in the biofilms are embedded in their self-generated protective extracellular polymeric substances (EPS, which include exopolysaccharides, large adhesin proteins and extracellular DNA. In this study, we identified an antimicrobial peptide (AMP LG21 that is able to interact specifically with the Psl exopolysaccharide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, thus it can be used as a diagnostic tool for P. aeruginosa biofilms. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis showed that residues numbered from 15 to 21 (WKRKRFG in LG21 are involved in interacting with Psl. Our study indicates that host immune systems might detect and interact with microbial biofilms through AMPs. Engineering biofilm EPS-targeting AMPs might provide novel strategies for biofilm detection and treatment.

  11. Dynamics and spatial distribution of beta-lactamase expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, N.; Hentzer, Morten; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2004-01-01

    The development of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics is a problem in the treatment of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. The main resistance mechanism is high-level expression of the chromosomally encoded AmpC beta-lactamase of P. aeruginosa...... of the ampC promoter to gfp(ASV) encoding an unstable version of the green fluorescent protein. In vitro biofilms of P. aeruginosa were exposed to the beta-lactam antibiotics imipenem and ceftazidime. Sub-MICs of imipenem significantly induced the monitor system of the biofilm bacteria in the peripheries...... distributions of beta-lactamase induction in P. aeruginosa cells growing in biofilms. Thus, our experiments show that P. aeruginosa cells growing in biofilms constitute a heterogeneous population unit which may create different antibiotic-selective environments for the bacteria in the biofilm....

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa anaerobic respiration in biofilms: relationships to cystic fibrosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sang Sun; Hennigan, Robert F; Hilliard, George M; Ochsner, Urs A; Parvatiyar, Kislay; Kamani, Moneesha C; Allen, Holly L; DeKievit, Teresa R; Gardner, Paul R; Schwab, Ute; Rowe, John J; Iglewski, Barbara H; McDermott, Timothy R; Mason, Ronald P; Wozniak, Daniel J; Hancock, Robert E W; Parsek, Matthew R; Noah, Terry L; Boucher, Richard C; Hassett, Daniel J

    2002-10-01

    Recent data indicate that cystic fibrosis (CF) airway mucus is anaerobic. This suggests that Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in CF reflects biofilm formation and persistence in an anaerobic environment. P. aeruginosa formed robust anaerobic biofilms, the viability of which requires rhl quorum sensing and nitric oxide (NO) reductase to modulate or prevent accumulation of toxic NO, a byproduct of anaerobic respiration. Proteomic analyses identified an outer membrane protein, OprF, that was upregulated approximately 40-fold under anaerobic versus aerobic conditions. Further, OprF exists in CF mucus, and CF patients raise antisera to OprF. An oprF mutant formed poor anaerobic biofilms, due, in part, to defects in anaerobic respiration. Thus, future investigations of CF pathogenesis and therapy should include a better understanding of anaerobic metabolism and biofilm development by P. aeruginosa.

  13. Post-translational modifications in Pseudomonas aeruginosa revolutionized by proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouidir, Tassadit; Jouenne, Thierry; Hardouin, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe infections in vulnerable individuals. It is known that post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in bacterial physiology. Their characterization is still challenging and the recent advances in proteomics allow large-scale and high-throughput analyses of PTMs. Here, we provide an overview of proteomic data about the modified proteins in P. aeruginosa. We emphasize the significant contribution of proteomics in knowledge enhancement of PTMs (phosphorylation, N-acetylation and glycosylation) and we discuss their importance in P. aeruginosa physiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  14. Type IV secretion systems and genomic islands-mediated horizontal gene transfer in Pseudomonas and Haemophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial secretion systems, such as type IV secretion systems (T4SSs) are multi-subunit machines transferring macromolecules across membranes. Besides proteins, T4SSs also transfer nucleoprotein complexes, thus having a significant impact on the evolution of bacterial species. By T4SS-mediated horizontal gene transfer bacteria can acquire a broad spectrum of fitness genes allowing them to thrive in the wide variety of environments. Furthermore, acquisition of antibiotic-resistance and virulence genes can lead to the emergence of novel 'superbugs'. This review provides an update on the investigation of T4SSs. It highlights the role T4SSs play in the horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the evolution of catabolic pathways, antibiotic-resistance and virulence in Haemophilus and Pseudomonas. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Herpetic keratouveitis mixed with bilateral Pseudomonas corneal ulcers in vitamin A deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yuan Hsu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 56-year-old woman complained of blurred vision and pain in her right eye for several days. Slit lamp examination revealed a large epithelial defect and disciform stromal edema with ring infiltration in her right cornea. Unfortunately, hypopyon and purulent discharge subsequently developed in both eyes. Herpetic keratouveitis and a superimposed pseudomonas infection were diagnosed. A systemic review on the patient showed malnutrition due to her dietary preference and vegetarianism. After the infection was controlled, bilateral epithelial defects persisted for a long time. We performed amniotic membrane transplantation on both eyes and the clinical status improved with administration of vitamin and protein supplements. Although rare in Taiwan, vitamin A deficiency should be kept in mind when conjunctival and corneal xerosis occurred. Vitamin A supplements are suggested because of the increased susceptibility to infection in patients with this clinical status.

  16. IMPACT OF MICROBIOTA ON RESISTANCE TO OCULAR PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA–INDUCED KERATITIS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Christiansen, Stig Hill; Sankaranarayanan, Saiprasad

    2016-01-01

    The existence of the ocular microbiota has been reported but functional analyses to evaluate its significance in regulating ocular immunity are currently lacking. We compared the relative contribution of eye and gut commensals in regulating the ocular susceptibility to Pseudomonas aeruginosa......–induced keratitis. We find that in health, the presence of microbiota strengthened the ocular innate immune barrier by significantly increasing the concentrations of immune effectors in the tear film, including secretory IgA and complement proteins. Consistent with this view, Swiss Webster (SW) mice...... that are typically resistant to P. aeruginosa–induced keratitis become susceptible due to the lack of microbiota. This was exemplified by increased corneal bacterial burden and elevated pathology of the germ free (GF) mice when compared to the conventionally maintained SW mice. The protective immunity was found...

  17. The role of fluoroquinolones in the promotion of alginate synthesis and antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, S E; Mattingly, S J

    1997-08-01

    Treatment of nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa with gyrase inhibitors such as ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin, which target the A subunit of topoisomerase II, resulted in 100% conversion to the mucoid phenotype. However, antibiotics that partially inhibited growth and macromolecular synthesis (DNA, RNA, protein, or peptidoglycan) of nonmucoid isolates in a gluconate-limited chemostat culture system did not promote conversion to mucoid subpopulations. An increase in resistance was observed in populations that expressed the mucoid phenotype. Both mucoid conversion and antibiotic resistance were completely reversible when ciprofloxacin pressure was withdrawn, but only partially reversible by the removal of norfloxacin and ofloxacin. Thus, these experiments indicate that in the presence of some fluoroquinolones, a conditional response resulting in mucoid conversion and antibiotic resistance may occur.

  18. Activation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in Pseudomonas putida by triggering dissociation of the propeptide-enzyme complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, P; Bitter, W; Tommassen, J

    2000-01-01

    The propeptide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase functions both as an intramolecular chaperone required for the folding of the enzyme and as an inhibitor that prevents activity of the enzyme before its secretion into the extracellular medium. Since expression of the lasB gene, which encodes

  19. Toluene-4-monooxygenase, a three-component enzyme system that catalyzes the oxidation of toluene to p-cresol in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1.

    OpenAIRE

    Whited, G M; Gibson, D T

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 grows on toluene as a sole carbon and energy source. A multicomponent oxygenase was partially purified from toluene-grown cells and separated into three protein components. The reconstituted enzyme system, in the presence of NADH and Fe2+, oxidized toluene to p-cresol as the first detectable product. Experiments with p-deutero-toluene led to the isolation of p-cresol which retained 68% of the deuterium initially present in the parent molecule. When the reconstituted ...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR: an acute–chronic switch regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most intractable human pathogens that pose serious clinical challenge due to extensive prevalence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates. Armed with abundant virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, it is a major etiologic agent in a number of acute and chronic infections. A complex and intricate network of regulators dictates the expression of pathogenicity factors in P. aeruginosa. Some proteins within the network play key roles and control multiple pathways. This review discusses the role of one such protein, AmpR, which was initially recognized for its role in antibiotic resistance by regulating AmpC β-lactamase. Recent genomic, proteomic and phenotypic analyses demonstrate that AmpR regulates expression of hundreds of genes that are involved in diverse pathways such as β-lactam and non-β-lactam resistance, quorum sensing and associated virulence phenotypes, protein phosphorylation, and physiological processes. Finally, ampR mutations in clinical isolates are reviewed to shed light on important residues required for its function in antibiotic resistance. The prevalence and evolutionary implications of AmpR in pathogenic and nonpathogenic proteobacteria are also discussed. A comprehensive understanding of proteins at nodal positions in the P. aeruginosa regulatory network is crucial in understanding, and ultimately targeting, the pathogenic stratagems of this organism. PMID:25066236

  1. Enhanced nematicidal potential of the chitinase pachi from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in association with Cry21Aa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Jiang, Huang; Cheng, Qipeng; Chen, Junpeng; Wu, Gaobing; Kumar, Ashok; Sun, Ming; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-01-01

    Nematodes are known to be harmful to various crops, vegetables, plants and insects. The present study reports that, chitin upregulates the activity of chitinase (20%) and nematicidal potential (15%) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The chitinase gene (pachi) from P. aeruginosa was cloned, and its nematicidal activity of pachi protein against Caenorhabditis elegans was studied. The mortality rate induced by pachi increased by 6.3-fold when in association with Cry21Aa from Bacillus thuringiensis. Pachi efficiently killed C. elegans in its native state (LC50 = 387.3 ± 31.7 μg/ml), as well as in association with Cry21Aa (LC50 = 30.9 ± 4.1 μg/ml), by degrading the cuticle, egg shell and intestine in a relatively short time period of 24 h. To explore the nematidal potential of chitinase, six fusion proteins were constructed using gene engineering techniques. The CHACry showed higher activity against C. elegans than others owing to its high solubility. Notably, the CHACry showed a synergistic factor of 4.1 versus 3.5 a mixture [1:1] of pachi and Cry21Aa. The present study has identified eco-friendly biological routes (e.g., mixed proteins, fusion proteins) with potent nematicidal activity, which not only can help to prevent major crop losses but also strengthen the agro-economy and increase gross crop yield. PMID:26400097

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Alters Staphylococcus aureus Sensitivity to Vancomycin in a Biofilm Model of Cystic Fibrosis Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Orazi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF patients have thick mucus, which fosters chronic, polymicrobial infections. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are two of the most prevalent respiratory pathogens in CF patients. In this study, we tested whether P. aeruginosa influences the susceptibility of S. aureus to frontline antibiotics used to treat CF lung infections. Using our in vitro coculture model, we observed that addition of P. aeruginosa supernatants to S. aureus biofilms grown either on epithelial cells or on plastic significantly decreased the susceptibility of S. aureus to vancomycin. Mutant analyses showed that 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline N-oxide (HQNO, a component of the P. aeruginosa Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS system, protects S. aureus from the antimicrobial activity of vancomycin. Similarly, the siderophores pyoverdine and pyochelin also contribute to the ability of P. aeruginosa to protect S. aureus from vancomycin, as did growth under anoxia. Under our experimental conditions, HQNO, P. aeruginosa supernatant, and growth under anoxia decreased S. aureus growth, likely explaining why this cell wall-targeting antibiotic is less effective. P. aeruginosa supernatant did not confer additional protection to slow-growing S. aureus small colony variants. Importantly, P. aeruginosa supernatant protects S. aureus from other inhibitors of cell wall synthesis as well as protein synthesis-targeting antibiotics in an HQNO- and siderophore-dependent manner. We propose a model whereby P. aeruginosa causes S. aureus to shift to fermentative growth when these organisms are grown in coculture, leading to reduction in S. aureus growth and decreased susceptibility to antibiotics targeting cell wall and protein synthesis.

  3. Determinación de aislados nativos de pseudomonas desulfurizadoras mediante el estudio del perfil de ácidos grasos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilberto Silva Gómez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilizando CGAR se determinó el contenido de ácidos grasos celulares de doce aislados colombianos, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 y 103, Pseudomonas sp 23, 24, 25, 26 y 27 con capacidad desulfurizadora, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 y 10145, Pseudomonas sp ATCC 39327 y Pseudomonas flúores cens. Se encontraron 53 ácidos grasos diferentes, entre saturados e insaturados de cadena lineal, y principalmente hidroxiácidos y ramificados.

  4. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil A Trantas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor and P. mediterranea (Pmed, are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for commercially significant chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of a type III secretion system and of known type III effectors from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes.

  5. Constitutive Activity of the Arabidopsis MAP Kinase 3 Confers Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae and Drives Robust Immune Responses

    KAUST Repository

    Lang, Julien

    2017-08-02

    Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) are known to be important mediators of plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a recent report, we enlarged the understanding of the Arabidopsis thaliana MPK3 functions showing that the expression of a constitutively active (CA) form of the protein led to auto-immune phenotypes. CA-MPK3 plants are dwarf and display defense responses that are characterized by the accumulation of salicylic acid and phytoalexins as well as by the upregulation of several defense genes. Consistently with these data, we present here results demonstrating that, compared to wild type controls, CA-MPK3 plants are more resistant to the hemibiotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae DC3000. Based on our previous work, we also discuss the mechanisms of robust plant immunity controlled by sustained MPK3 activity, focusing especially on the roles of disease resistance proteins.

  6. Calcium causes multimerization of the large adhesin LapF and modulates biofilm formation by Pseudomonas putida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Gil, Marta; Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2012-12-01

    LapF is a large secreted protein involved in microcolony formation and biofilm maturation in Pseudomonas putida. Its C-terminal domain shows the characteristics of proteins secreted through a type I secretion system and includes a predicted calcium binding motif. We provide experimental evidence of specific binding of Ca(2+) to the purified C-terminal domain of LapF (CLapF). Calcium promotes the formation of large aggregates, which disappear in the presence of the calcium chelator EGTA. Immunolocalization of LapF also shows the tendency of this protein to accumulate in vivo in certain extracellular regions. These findings, along with results showing that calcium influences biofilm formation, lead us to propose a model in which P. putida cells interact with each other via LapF in a calcium-dependent manner during the development of biofilms.

  7. Genetic Diversity of Nitrogen-Fixing and Plant Growth Promoting Pseudomonas Species Isolated from Sugarcane Rhizosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Bi Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to isolate and characterize Pseudomonas spp. from sugarcane rhizosphere, and to evaluate their plant- growth- promoting (PGP traits and nitrogenase activity. A biological nitrogen-fixing microbe has great potential to replace chemical fertilizers and be used as a targeted biofertilizer in a plant. A total of 100 isolates from sugarcane rhizosphere, belonging to different species, were isolated; from these, 30 isolates were selected on the basis of preliminary screening, for in vitro antagonistic activities against sugarcane pathogens and for various PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. The production of IAA varied from 312.07 to 13.12 μg mL−1 in tryptophan supplemented medium, with higher production in AN15 and lower in CN20 strain. The estimation of ACC deaminase activity, strains CY4 and BA2 produced maximum and minimum activity of 77.0 and 15.13 μmoL mg−1 h−1. For nitrogenase activity among the studied strains, CoA6 fixed higher and AY1 fixed lower in amounts (108.30 and 6.16 μmoL C2H2 h−1 mL−1. All the strains were identified on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequencing, and the phylogenetic diversity of the strains was analyzed. The results identified all strains as being similar to Pseudomonas spp. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of nifH and antibiotic genes was suggestive that the amplified strains had the capability to fix nitrogen and possessed biocontrol activities. Genotypic comparisons of the strains were determined by BOX, ERIC, and REP PCR profile analysis. Out of all the screened isolates, CY4 (Pseudomonas koreensis and CN11 (Pseudomonas entomophila showed the most prominent PGP traits, as well as nitrogenase activity. Therefore, only these two strains were selected for further studies; Biolog profiling; colonization through green fluorescent protein (GFP-tagged bacteria; and nifH gene expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis. The

  8. Skin-Derived C-Terminal Filaggrin-2 Fragments Are Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Directed Antimicrobials Targeting Bacterial Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Hansmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil- and waterborne bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa are constantly challenging body surfaces. Since infections of healthy skin are unexpectedly rare, we hypothesized that the outermost epidermis, the stratum corneum, and sweat glands directly control the growth of P. aeruginosa by surface-provided antimicrobials. Due to its high abundance in the upper epidermis and eccrine sweat glands, filaggrin-2 (FLG2, a water-insoluble 248 kDa S100 fused-type protein, might possess these innate effector functions. Indeed, recombinant FLG2 C-terminal protein fragments display potent antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa and other Pseudomonads. Moreover, upon cultivation on stratum corneum, P. aeruginosa release FLG2 C-terminus-containing FLG2 fragments from insoluble material, indicating liberation of antimicrobially active FLG2 fragments by the bacteria themselves. Analyses of the underlying antimicrobial mechanism reveal that FLG2 C-terminal fragments do not induce pore formation, as known for many other antimicrobial peptides, but membrane blebbing, suggesting an alternative mode of action. The association of the FLG2 fragment with the inner membrane of treated bacteria and its DNA-binding implicated an interference with the bacterial replication that was confirmed by in vitro and in vivo replication assays. Probably through in situ-activation by soil- and waterborne bacteria such as Pseudomonads, FLG2 interferes with the bacterial replication, terminates their growth on skin surface and thus may contributes to the skin's antimicrobial defense shield. The apparent absence of FLG2 at certain body surfaces, as in the lung or of burned skin, would explain their higher susceptibility towards Pseudomonas infections and make FLG2 C-terminal fragments and their derivatives candidates for new Pseudomonas-targeting antimicrobials.

  9. Pyocyanin from Pseudomonas induces IL-8 production through the PKC and NF-κB pathways in U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Wenshu; Zhang, Jia; Zhu, Zhitu; Liu, Wei; Pan, Dianzhu; Li, Ying; Chen, Baiyi

    2013-11-01

    Pyocyanin, an extracellular product of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), is important in invasive pulmonary infection. Pseudomonas infections are characterized by a marked influx of polymorphonuclear cells (neutrophils). An increased release of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a potent neutrophil chemoattractant, in response to pyocyanin may contribute to the marked infiltration of neutrophils and subsequent neutrophil-mediated tissue damage observed in Pseudomonas-associated lung diseases. In order to explore the pathogenesis of pyocyanin on macrophages, we treated phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-differentiated U937 cells with pyocyanin in vitro and explored the expression of IL-8 using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the present study, we also investigated the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and nuclear factor (NF)-κB in PMA-differentiated U937 cells by western blotting and immunohistochemical methods. It was found that pyocyanin increased IL-8 release and mRNA expression in differentiated U937 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Calphostin C (Cal C), a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) , an NF-κB inhibitor, blocked IL-8 expression in a concentration-dependent manner in pyocyanin-induced U937 cells. We concluded that pyocyanin promotes IL-8 secretion and mRNA expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and furthermore, that the PKC and NF-κΒ signaling pathways may be involved in the expression of IL-8 in pyocyanin-infected PMA-differentiated U937 cells.

  10. Study of Pseudomonas Aeroginosa resistance to Penicillines, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleknezhad P

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug therapy and prophylaxy in infectious diseases, from hygienic and economical point of view, are very important. Infections caused by pseudomonas aeroginosa were particularly severe, with high mortality rates. In the recent years pseudomonas aeroginosa continued to cause the most severe, life-thereating infections in burned patients, in spite of the introduction of a wide variety of antibiotics advised specifically for their anti pseudomonal activity. The aim of this study, in which many cases of ps.aeroginosa infections are assessed is to identify the drug resistance of this bacteria to penicillines, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides by antibiotic sensitivity test (disk ager diffusion. Results as percent of resistance to each antibiotic were 89% to carbenicillin, 55% to piperacillin, 89% to mezlocillin, 89.5% to ticarcillin+clavulonic acid, 85% to ceftriaxone, 95% to tobramycin, 5% of all isolates were not sensitive to any antibiotics.

  11. PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA- A DRUGSENSITIVITY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic suppurative otitis media is one among the commonest ENT disease seen in day-to-day practice. It is seen mainly among low socioeconomic class. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted in the Department of ENT, Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences. Fifty patients with CSOM of all age groups and both sexes attending the Outpatient Department of ENT were selected randomly for the study. RESULTS From our study, we found mainly children of age group 10-11 years commonly affected. They belong to poor socioeconomic background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common organism isolated in the present study. Ciprofloxacin was found to be the most sensitive antibiotic to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CONCLUSION We noticed that drug resistance is on the rise due to misuse of antibiotics, over-the-counter treatment, inadequate period of therapy and less awareness among public regarding drug resistance. Constant monitoring of antibiotic sensitivity is needed to prevent drug resistance in CSOM.

  12. Neonatal Orbital Abscess Secondary to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Bulent; Orucov, Nesimi; Ibrahimzade, Gunay

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa conjunctivitis, although rare in healthy infants, may cause serious ocular and systemic complications. A 30-day-old, otherwise healthy male infant was referred with the diagnosis of right orbital abscess. The patient had been diagnosed as having Pseudomonas conjunctivitis 9 days previously at the referring center. Despite antibiotic treatment, his ocular findings had worsened and marked proptosis had developed. Other examination findings were ptosis, restriction of eye movements, periorbital erythema, and chemosis. Radiologic studies showed a large, homogenous mass with a thick capsule in the lateral retrobulbar orbit. The abscess was drained through a lateral orbitotomy. A culture of the abscess yielded P. aeruginosa. After surgery, the ocular findings improved rapidly without any complication. No other focus of infection or immune system abnormality was found. The patient did not experience any other significant disease during a follow up of 23 months.

  13. Flexible survival strategies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in biofilms result in increased fitness compared with Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purschke, Frauke Gina; Hiller, Ekkehard; Trick, Iris; Rupp, Steffen

    2012-12-01

    The majority of microorganisms persist in nature as surface-attached communities often surrounded by an extracellular matrix, called biofilms. Most natural biofilms are not formed by a single species but by multiple species. Microorganisms not only cooperate as in some multispecies biofilms but also compete for available nutrients. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans are two opportunistic pathogens that are often found coexisting in a human host. Several models of mixed biofilms have been reported for these organisms showing antagonistic behavior. To investigate the interaction of P. aeruginosa and C. albicans in more detail, we analyzed the secretome of single and mixed biofilms of both organisms using MALDI-TOF MS/MS at several time points. Overall 247 individual proteins were identified, 170 originated from P. aeruginosa and 77 from C. albicans. Only 39 of the 131 in mixed biofilms identified proteins were assigned to the fungus whereby the remaining 92 proteins belonged to P. aeruginosa. In single-species biofilms, both organisms showed a higher diversity of proteins with 73 being assigned to C. albicans and 154 to P. aeruginosa. Most interestingly, P. aeruginosa in the presence of C. albicans secreted 16 proteins in significantly higher amounts or exclusively among other virulence factors such as exotoxin A and iron acquisition systems. In addition, the high affinity iron-binding siderophore pyoverdine was identified in mixed biofilms but not in bacterial biofilms, indicating that P. aeruginosa increases its capability to sequester iron in competition with C. albicans. In contrast, C. albicans metabolism was significantly reduced, including a reduction in detectable iron acquisition proteins. The results obtained in this study show that microorganisms not only compete with the host for essential nutrients but also strongly with the present microflora in order to gain a competitive advantage.

  14. Flexible Survival Strategies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Biofilms Result in Increased Fitness Compared with Candida albicans *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purschke, Frauke Gina; Hiller, Ekkehard; Trick, Iris; Rupp, Steffen

    2012-01-01

    The majority of microorganisms persist in nature as surface-attached communities often surrounded by an extracellular matrix, called biofilms. Most natural biofilms are not formed by a single species but by multiple species. Microorganisms not only cooperate as in some multispecies biofilms but also compete for available nutrients. The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans are two opportunistic pathogens that are often found coexisting in a human host. Several models of mixed biofilms have been reported for these organisms showing antagonistic behavior. To investigate the interaction of P. aeruginosa and C. albicans in more detail, we analyzed the secretome of single and mixed biofilms of both organisms using MALDI-TOF MS/MS at several time points. Overall 247 individual proteins were identified, 170 originated from P. aeruginosa and 77 from C. albicans. Only 39 of the 131 in mixed biofilms identified proteins were assigned to the fungus whereby the remaining 92 proteins belonged to P. aeruginosa. In single-species biofilms, both organisms showed a higher diversity of proteins with 73 being assigned to C. albicans and 154 to P. aeruginosa. Most interestingly, P. aeruginosa in the presence of C. albicans secreted 16 proteins in significantly higher amounts or exclusively among other virulence factors such as exotoxin A and iron acquisition systems. In addition, the high affinity iron-binding siderophore pyoverdine was identified in mixed biofilms but not in bacterial biofilms, indicating that P. aeruginosa increases its capability to sequester iron in competition with C. albicans. In contrast, C. albicans metabolism was significantly reduced, including a reduction in detectable iron acquisition proteins. The results obtained in this study show that microorganisms not only compete with the host for essential nutrients but also strongly with the present microflora in order to gain a competitive advantage. PMID

  15. Nonnatural amino acid incorporation into the methionine 214 position of the metzincin Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honek John F

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The alkaline protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (AprA is a member of the metzincin superfamily of metalloendoproteases. A key feature of these proteases is a conserved methionine-containing 1,4-tight β turn at the base of the active site zinc binding region. Results To explore the invariant methionine position in this class of protease, incorporation of a nonnatural fluorinated methionine, L-difluoromethionine (DFM, into this site was accomplished. Although overproduction of the N-terminal catalytic fragment of AprA resulted in protein aggregates which could not be resolved, successful heterologous production of the entire AprA was accomplished in the presence and absence of the nonnatural amino acid. DFM incorporation was found to only slightly alter the enzyme kinetics of AprA. In addition, differential scanning calorimetry indicated no significant alteration in the thermal stability of the modified enzyme. Conclusion Although invariant in all metzincin proteases, the methionine 214 position in AprA can be successfully replaced by the nonnatural amino acid DFM resulting in little effect on protein structure and function. This study indicates that the increased size of the methyl group by the introduction of two fluorines is still sufficiently non-sterically demanding, and bodes well for the application of DFM to biophysical studies of protein structure and function in this class of protease.

  16. Host translational inhibition by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin A Triggers an immune response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Deborah L; Kirienko, Natalia V; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2012-04-19

    Intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to both innocuous and pathogenic microbes, which need to be distinguished to mount an effective immune response. To understand the mechanisms underlying pathogen recognition, we investigated how Pseudomonas aeruginosa triggers intestinal innate immunity in Caenorhabditis elegans, a process independent of Toll-like pattern recognition receptors. We show that the P. aeruginosa translational inhibitor Exotoxin A (ToxA), which ribosylates elongation factor 2 (EF2), upregulates a significant subset of genes normally induced by P. aeruginosa. Moreover, immune pathways involving the ATF-7 and ZIP-2 transcription factors, which protect C. elegans from P. aeruginosa, are required for preventing ToxA-mediated lethality. ToxA-responsive genes are not induced by enzymatically inactive ToxA protein but can be upregulated independently of ToxA by disruption of host protein translation. Thus, C. elegans has a surveillance mechanism to recognize ToxA through its effect on protein translation rather than by direct recognition of either ToxA or ribosylated EF2. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Dexamethasone and N-acetyl-cysteine attenuate Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced mucus expression in human airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Lisa; Goldmann, Torsten; Vollmer, Ekkehard; Steffen, Armin; Wollenberg, Barbara; Zabel, Peter; Hauber, Hans-Peter

    2011-04-01

    Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) induces mucus hypersecretion in airways. Therapeutic options to attenuate excessive mucus expression are sparse. To investigate the effect of steroids and N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) on PA-induced mucus expression. Calu-3 cells and explanted human mucosa from the upper airways were stimulated with either PA, lipopolysaccharide from alginate producing PA (smooth, sPA-LPS) or non-alginate producing PA (rough, rPA-LPS). Dexamethasone (DEX) and NAC were added in different concentrations. Expression of mucin (MUC5AC) gene and mucin protein expression was quantified using PAS (periodic acids Schiff) staining and real time PCR. PA, sPA-LPS or rPA-LPS significantly induced mucin protein and MUC5AC gene expression in Calu-3 cells and explanted mucosal tissue (P NAC significantly decreased PA-, sPA-LPS- and rPA-LPS-induced mucin protein expression both in vitro and ex vivo (P 0.05). Our data show that both an anti-inflammatory drug (DEX) and an anti-oxidative agent (NAC) can attenuate PA-induced mucus expression in human airways. These results support the use of steroids and NAC in clinical practice to treat PA-induced mucus hypersecretion. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prediction of vaccine candidates against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: An integrated genomics and proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad Ibrahim; Naz, Anam; Ali, Amjad; Andleeb, Saadia

    2017-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is among top critical nosocomial infectious agents due to its persistent infections and tendency for acquiring drug resistance mechanisms. To date, there is no vaccine available for this pathogen. We attempted to exploit the genomic and proteomic information of P. aeruginosa though reverse-vaccinology approaches to unveil the prospective vaccine candidates. P. aeruginosa strain PAO1 genome was subjected to sequential prioritization approach following genomic, proteomics and structural analyses. Among, the predicted vaccine candidates: surface components of antibiotic efflux pumps (Q9HY88, PA2837), chaperone-usher pathway components (CupC2, CupB3), penicillin binding protein of bacterial cell wall (PBP1a/mrcA), extracellular component of Type 3 secretory system (PscC) and three uncharacterized secretory proteins (PA0629, PA2822, PA0978) were identified as potential candidates qualifying all the set criteria. These proteins were then analyzed for potential immunogenic surface exposed epitopes. These predicted epitopes may provide a basis for development of a reliable subunit vaccine against P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection: Importance of Appropriate Initial Antimicrobial Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Micek, Scott T; Lloyd, Ann E.; David J. Ritchie; Reichley, Richard M.; Fraser, Victoria J.; Kollef, Marin H

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection is a serious infection with significant patient mortality and health-care costs. Nevertheless, the relationship between initial appropriate antimicrobial treatment and clinical outcomes is not well established. This study was a retrospective cohort analysis employing automated patient medical records and the pharmacy database at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Three hundred five patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection were identified over a 6-yea...

  20. [Genome plasticity and catabolic potential of pseudomonas cepacia]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes efforts directed at understanding the genomic structure of Pseudomonas cepacia. Variously reported are descriptions of the replicons in the genome, organization of macrorestriction fragments comprising the genome, use of a Tn-5- 751S to insertionally inactivate and map selected genes, construction of IS407 derivatives containing a trimethoprim resistance marker and SwaI site, and analysis of nucleotide sequences of IS401 and IS408.

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-08-25

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. Copyright © 2016 Andrade-Domínguez and Kolter.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Analyzed in a Dictyostelium discoideum Host System

    OpenAIRE

    Cosson, Pierre; Zulianello, Laurence; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Faurisson, François; Gebbie, Leigh; Benghezal, Mohammed; Van Delden, Christian; Kocjancic Curty, Lasta; Köhler, Thilo

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that produces a variety of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors. P. aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat effectively because of the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this study, we analyzed whether the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as a simple model system to analyze the virulence of P. aeruginosa strains. The virulent wild-type strain PAO1 was shown to inhibit growth of D. discoide...

  3. [Phlegmonous gastritis. Report of a case induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Jiménez, F A; Arocena Cedrón, M G; Goikoetxea Artola, J M; Lázaro Aramburu, S; Múgica Barreiros, P

    1992-06-01

    The authors present a case of phlegmonous gastritis in a 65 year old patient. The diagnosis was made in the operating room and the treatment was conservative; no gastric resection was done. This clinical entity is interesting because it is a least frequent pathology, the pathogenic bacteria which was the cause (Pseudomona aeruginosa) has at this time not been reported in the literature, including the favorable outcome of the patient without gastric resection.

  4. Pyochelin Potentiates the Inhibitory Activity of Gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon. PMID:24957826

  5. Recent advances in understanding Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockgether, Jens; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    The versatile and ubiquitous Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing acute and chronic infections in predisposed human subjects. Here we review recent progress in understanding P. aeruginosa population biology and virulence, its cyclic di-GMP-mediated switches of lifestyle, and its interaction with the mammalian host as well as the role of the type III and type VI secretion systems in P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:28794863

  6. The evolution of a pleiotropic fitness tradeoff in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    OpenAIRE

    MacLean, R. Craig; Bell, Graham; Rainey, Paul B.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of ecological specialization is expected to carry a cost, due to either antagonistic pleiotropy or mutation accumulation. In general, it has been difficult to distinguish between these two possibilities. Here, we demonstrate that the experimental evolution of niche-specialist genotypes of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens that colonize the air–broth interface of spatially structured microcosms is accompanied by pleiotropic fitness costs in terms of reduced carbon catabolism....

  7. Identification and isolation of insecticidal oxazoles from Pseudomonas spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Grundmann, Florian; Dill, Veronika; Dowling, Andrea; Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Bode, Edna; Chantratita, Narisara; Ffrench-Constant, Richard; Bode, Helge B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Two new and five known oxazoles were identified from two different Pseudomonas strains in addition to the known pyrones pseudopyronine A and B. Labeling experiments confirmed their structures and gave initial evidence for a novel biosynthesis pathway of these natural oxazoles. In order to confirm their structure, they were synthesized, which also allowed tests of their bioactivity. Additionally, the bioactivities of the synthesis intermediates were also investigated revealing interest...

  8. Antimicrobial effect of probiotic Lactobacillus spp. on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Maysaa Kadhim Al-Malkey; Munira Ch. Ismeeal; Fahema Jabbar Abo Al-Hur; Sinaa W. Mohammed; Hanan J. Nayyef

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Study the antimicrobial effect of probiotics produced from Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn and wound infection and their ability of protease production. Methods Swab samples were collected from 70 patients admitted at Burns Center/Al-Yarmouk Teaching Hospital. Primary bacterial identification cultured on differential selective media and biochemical tests were done. The Vitek2 compact system (Biomerieux, France...

  9. A study on nitrogen removal efficiency of Pseudomonas stutzeri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By using the nitrogen balance method, the total nitrogen loss was calculated to be 40.1% (w/w) when the carbon source was citric acid with a C/N ratio of 5. Meanwhile, the isolated strain was identified by 16S rDNA to be a Pseudomonas stutzeri with a similarity of 99%. Varying the initial TN, the C/N, the pH value and the ...

  10. Glyphosate-Induced Specific and Widespread Perturbations in the Metabolome of Soil Pseudomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmilla Aristilde

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have reported adverse effects of glyphosate on crop-beneficial soil bacterial species, including several soil Pseudomonas species. Of particular interest is the elucidation of the metabolic consequences of glyphosate toxicity in these species. Here we investigated the growth and metabolic responses of soil Pseudomonas species grown on succinate, a common root exudate, and glyphosate at different concentrations. We conducted our experiments with one agricultural soil isolate, P. fluorescens RA12, and three model species, P. putida KT2440, P. putida S12, and P. protegens Pf-5. Our results demonstrated both species- and strain-dependent growth responses to glyphosate. Following exposure to a range of glyphosate concentrations (up to 5 mM, the growth rate of both P. protegens Pf-5 and P. fluorescens RA12 remained unchanged whereas the two P. putida strains exhibited from 0 to 100% growth inhibition. We employed a 13C-assisted metabolomics approach using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to monitor disruptions in metabolic homeostasis and fluxes. Profiling of the whole-cell metabolome captured deviations in metabolite levels involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle, ribonucleotide biosynthesis, and protein biosynthesis. Altered metabolite levels specifically in the biosynthetic pathway of aromatic amino acids (AAs, the target of toxicity for glyphosate in plants, implied the same toxicity target in the soil bacterium. Kinetic flux experiments with 13C-labeled succinate revealed that biosynthetic fluxes of the aromatic AAs were not inhibited in P. fluorescens Pf-5 in the presence of low and high glyphosate doses but these fluxes were inhibited by up to 60% in P. putida KT2440, even at sub-lethal glyphosate exposure. Notably, the greatest inhibition was found for the aromatic AA tryptophan, an important precursor to secondary metabolites. When the growth medium was supplemented with aromatic AAs, P. putida S12 exposed to a lethal

  11. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-07-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  12. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  13. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  14. Spontaneous Nosocomial Pseudomonas aeruginosa Meningitis Presenting as Trismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Parr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 78-year-old female receiving adjuvant postsurgical chemotherapy for colon adenocarcinoma who spontaneously developed nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis causing severe trismus. The patient was initially admitted for ileus, developing neck stiffness and trismus on the thirteenth day of admission. Cerebrospinal fluid grew pansensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was consistent with bilateral subacute infarcts secondary to meningitis. The patient responded well to 21 days of broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy modified to ceftazidime alone following speciation and sensitivity. Outpatient follow-up at 46 days revealed normal maximal mouth opening with the ability to chew and tolerate a full diet. Trismus is a motor disturbance of the trigeminal nerve with difficulty in opening the mouth. Infectious etiologies commonly described include tetanus, odontogenic infections, or deep neck space infections. This is the first reported case of simultaneous nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis and trismus in a patient with no history of neurosurgery or lumbar spinal manipulation.

  15. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino sinusitis in mink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeby, S; Hammer, A S; Høiby, N; Salomonsen, C M

    2017-05-01

    The nasal and sinus cavities in children may serve as reservoirs for microorganisms that cause recurrent and chronic lung infections. This study evaluates whether the mink can be used as an animal model for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis since there is no suitable traditional animal model for this disease. Nasal tissue samples from infected and control mink were fixed in formalin, demineralized, and embedded in paraffin. A histological examination of sections from the infected animals revealed disintegration of the respiratory epithelium lining the nasal turbinates and swelling and edema of the submucosa. The expression of mucins and sialylated glycans was examined using immunohistochemistry. MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC were upregulated in the inoculated animals as a much stronger staining was present in the respiratory epithelium in the infected animals compared to the controls. The goblet cells in the nasal epithelium from the infected mink showed high affinity to the Maackia amurensis lectin and anti-asialo GM1 indicating a high concentration of α2-3 sialic acid respectively βGalNAc1-4Galβ containing glycans in these mucin producing cells. The nasal cavity in the infected mink shows features of carbohydrate expression comparable to what has been described in the respiratory system after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in humans. It is suggested that the mink is suitable for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Chitosan Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Munmun; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the potent opportunistic pathogens associated with respiratory and urinary tract infection. The bacterium owes its pathogenicity due to the intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and disinfectants. The present study is focused on the synthesis of antibacterial chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles for rapid inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have discussed the relevant patents on synthesis and antibacterial potential of metallic nanoparticles and chitosan. Chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method at room temperature using non-toxic chitosan and iron salts in alkali media. The particles were characterized and evaluated for antibacterial property against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The average size of the particles was measured as 52 nm. The surface area of the coated particles was as high as 90 ±5 m2/g. FTIR spectra confirmed the coating of chitosan on nanoparticles. The coated particles showed excellent antibacterial activity against the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the coated particles was 105)µg mol-1. The morphological alteration and cytoplasmic leakage of bacteria were confirmed by SEM image and release of intracellular constituents, respectively. Higher 260 nm absorbance value confirmed stronger antibacterial activity of the coated nanoparticles as compared to pure chitosan and bare iron oxide nanoparticles. The study indicated that chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles have superior antibacterial property as compared to pure chitosan and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  17. 13C-NMR studies of acetate and methanol metabolism by methylotrophic Pseudomonas strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbad, A; Hewlins, M J; Callely, A G

    1989-06-01

    The metabolism of [2-13C]acetate by Pseudomonas M27(Icl-) and Pseudomonas MA(Icl+) was studied in vivo using 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The flux of 13C-label into bicarbonate, glutamate and citrate was observed in both organisms. In addition 13C-labelled alpha, alpha-trehalose was synthesized as a major metabolite by Pseudomonas M27 but not by Pseudomonas MA. The presence of this disaccharide in cell extracts of Pseudomonas AM1(Icl-) grown with [13C]methanol was also observed. The data from analysis of the trehalose multiplet signal observed in the spectra of Pseudomonas M27 cell extracts were consistent with the absence of the glyoxylate cycle in this methylotroph.

  18. Effect of green manure on the incidence of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains in hop garden soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkowski, Wojciech L; Dwornikiewicz, Jerzy

    2003-05-01

    Incidence of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains in hop garden soils in relation to the kind of fertilization was studied. Incidence differed with respect to the fertilization treatment and the age of the plantation. Amendment of soil with rye and with white mustard as green manures limited the number of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains relative to farmyard manures and NPK fertilization. Among all fertilization treatments, cyanogenic Pseudomonas spp. strains had lowest populations in soils amended with white mustard.

  19. Investigating the diversity of pseudomonas spp. in soil using culture dependent and independent techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Bergmark, Lasse; Riber, Leise; Hansen, Lars H; Magid, Jakob; Sørensen, Søren J

    2013-10-01

    Less than 1 % of bacterial populations present in environmental samples are culturable, meaning that cultivation will lead to an underestimation of total cell counts and total diversity. However, it is less clear whether this is also true for specific well-defined groups of bacteria for which selective culture media is available. In this study, we use culture dependent and independent techniques to describe whether isolation of Pseudomonas spp. on selective nutrient-poor NAA 1:100 agar-medium can reflect the full diversity, found by pyrosequencing, of the total soil Pseudomonas community in an urban waste field trial experiment. Approximately 3,600 bacterial colonies were isolated using nutrient-poor NAA 1:100 medium from soils treated with different fertilizers; (i) high N-level sewage sludge (SA), (ii) high N-level cattle manure (CMA), and (iii) unfertilized control soil (U). Based on Pseudomonas specific quantitative-PCR and Pseudomonas CFU counts, less than 4 % of Pseudomonas spp. were culturable using NAA 1:100 medium. The Pseudomonas selectivity and specificity of the culture medium were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons generated using Bacteria- and Pseudomonas-specific primers. Pyrosequencing results showed that most isolates were Pseudomonas and that the culturable fraction of Pseudomonas spp. reflects most clusters of the total Pseudomonas diversity in soil. This indicates that NAA 1:100 medium is highly selective for Pseudomonas species, and reveals the ability of NAA 1:100 medium to culture mostly the dominant Pseudomonas species in soil.

  20. Plasmid Replicons from Pseudomonas Are Natural Chimeras of Functional, Exchangeable Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaji, Leire; Añorga, Maite; Ruiz-Masó, José A.; del Solar, Gloria; Murillo, Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Plasmids are a main factor for the evolution of bacteria through horizontal gene exchange, including the dissemination of pathogenicity genes, resistance to antibiotics and degradation of pollutants. Their capacity to duplicate is dependent on their replication determinants (replicon), which also define their bacterial host range and the inability to coexist with related replicons. We characterize a second replicon from the virulence plasmid pPsv48C, from Pseudomonas syringae pv. savastanoi, which appears to be a natural chimera between the gene encoding a newly described replication protein and a putative replication control region present in the widespread family of PFP virulence plasmids. We present extensive evidence of this type of chimerism in structurally similar replicons from species of Pseudomonas, including environmental bacteria as well as plant, animal and human pathogens. We establish that these replicons consist of two functional modules corresponding to putative control (REx-C module) and replication (REx-R module) regions. These modules are functionally separable, do not show specificity for each other, and are dynamically exchanged among replicons of four distinct plasmid families. Only the REx-C module displays strong incompatibility, which is overcome by a few nucleotide changes clustered in a stem-and-loop structure of a putative antisense RNA. Additionally, a REx-C module from pPsv48C conferred replication ability to a non-replicative chromosomal DNA region containing features associated to replicons. Thus, the organization of plasmid replicons as independent and exchangeable functional modules is likely facilitating rapid replicon evolution, fostering their diversification and survival, besides allowing the potential co-option of appropriate genes into novel replicons and the artificial construction of new replicon specificities. PMID:28243228

  1. Comparative Genomics Reveals Specific Genetic Architectures in Nicotine Metabolism of Pseudomonas sp. JY-Q

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Microbial degradation of nicotine is an important process to control nicotine residues in the aqueous environment. In this study, a high active nicotine degradation strain named Pseudomonas sp. JY-Q was isolated from tobacco waste extract (TWE. This strain could completely degrade 5.0 g l−1 nicotine in 24 h under optimal culture conditions, and it showed some tolerance even at higher concentrations (10.0 g l−1 of nicotine. The complete genome of JY-Q was sequenced to understand the mechanism by which JY-Q could degrade nicotine and tolerate such high nicotine concentrations. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that JY-Q degrades nicotine through putative novel mechanisms. Two candidate gene cluster duplications located separately at distant loci were predicted to be responsible for nicotine degradation. These two nicotine (Nic degradation-related loci (AA098_21325—AA098_21340, AA098_03885—AA098_03900 exhibit nearly completely consistent gene organization and component synteny. The nicotinic acid (NA degradation gene cluster (AA098_17770–AA098_17790 and Nic-like clusters were both predicted to be flanked by mobile genetic elements (MGE. Furthermore, we analyzed the regions of genomic plasticity (RGP in the JY-Q strain and found a dynamic genome carrying a type VI secretion system (T6SS that promotes nicotine metabolism and tolerance based on transcriptomics and used in silico methods to identify the T6SS effector protein. Thus, a novel nicotine degradation mechanism was elucidated for Pseudomonas sp. JY-Q, suggesting its potential application in the bioremediation of nicotine-contaminated environments, such as TWEs.

  2. Role of the novel OprD family of porins in nutrient uptake in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamber, Sandeep; Ochs, Martina M; Hancock, Robert E W

    2006-01-01

    To circumvent the permeability barrier of its outer membrane, Pseudomonas aeruginosa has evolved a series of specific porins. These channels have binding sites for related classes of molecules that facilitate uptake under nutrient-limited conditions. Here, we report on the identification of a 19-member family of porins similar to the basic-amino-acid-specific porin OprD. The members of this family fell into one of two phylogenetically distinct clusters, one bearing high similarity to OprD and the other bearing most similarity to the putative phenylacetic acid uptake porin PhaK of Pseudomonas putida. Analysis of the genome context, operon arrangement, and regulation of the PhaK-like porin OpdK indicated that it might be involved in vanillate uptake. This result was confirmed by demonstrating that an opdK mutant had a deficiency in the ability to grow on vanillate as a carbon source. To extrapolate these data to other paralogues within this family, the substrate specificities of 6 of the 17 remaining OprD homologues were inferred using an approach similar to that used with opdK. The specificities determined were as follows: OpdP, glycine-glutamate; OpdC, histidine; OpdB, proline; OpdT, tyrosine; OpdH, cis-aconitate; and OpdO, pyroglutamate. Thus, members of the OprD subfamily took up amino acids and related molecules, and those characterized members most similar to PhaK were responsible for the uptake of a diverse array of organic acids. These results imply that there is a functional basis for the phylogenetic clustering of these proteins and provide a framework for studying OprD homologues in other organisms.

  3. Xylanase B and an arabinofuranosidase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa contain identical cellulose-binding domains and are encoded by adjacent genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kellett, L E; Poole, D M; Ferreira, L M; Durrant, A J; Hazlewood, G P; Gilbert, H J

    1990-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa xynB gene, encoding an endo-beta-1,4-xylanase (xylanase B; XYLB) has been determined. The structural gene consists of an open reading frame (ORF) of 1775 bp coding for a protein of Mr 61,000. A second ORF (xynC) of 1712 bp, which starts 148 bp downstream of xynB, encodes a protein, designated xylanase C (XYLC), of Mr 59,000. XYLB hydrolyses oat spelt xylan to xylobiose and xylose, whereas XYLC releases only arabi...

  4. Tn6350, a Novel Transposon Carrying Pyocin S8 Genes Encoding a Bacteriocin with Activity against Carbapenemase-Producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turano, Helena; Gomes, Fernando; Barros-Carvalho, Gesiele A; Lopes, Ralf; Cerdeira, Louise; Netto, Luis E S; Gales, Ana C; Lincopan, Nilton

    2017-05-01

    A novel transposon belonging to the Tn3-like family was identified on the chromosome of a commensal strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa sequence type 2343 (ET02). Tn6350 is 7,367 bp long and harbors eight open reading frames (ORFs), an ATPase (IS481 family), a transposase (DDE catalytic type), a Tn3 resolvase, three hypothetical proteins, and genes encoding the new pyocin S8 with its immunity protein. We show that pyocin S8 displays activity against carbapenemase-producing P. aeruginosa, including IMP-1, SPM-1, VIM-1, GES-5, and KPC-2 producers. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A-induced hepatotoxicity in dynamics: an animal model in white mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrison A.V; Popovich V.I; Morrison V.V

    2015-01-01

    .... Material and Methods. The experiments were carried out on white mice in dynamics development of pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by intraperitoneal injection of various dosage of exotoxin A. Results...

  6. Compromised Host Defense on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms: Characterization of Neutrophil and Biofilm Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jesaitis, Algirdas J; Franklin, Michael J; Berglund, Deborah; Sasaki, Maiko; Lord, Connie I; Bleazard, Justin B; Duffy, James E; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    Departments of * Microbiology, Civil Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that forms...

  7. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-01-01

    .... Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential...

  8. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the plant growth promoting efficiency of combined inoculation of rhizobacteria on Vanilla plants. Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential. The maximum percentage of growth enhancement were observed in the combination of Trichoderma harzianum with Pseudomonas fluorescens treatment followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas putida and Trichoderma virens, respectively in decreasing order. Combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens registered the maximum length of vine (82.88 cm), highest number of leaves (26.67/plant), recorded the highest fresh weight of shoots (61.54 g plant(-1)), fresh weight of roots (4.46 g plant(-1)) and dry weight of shoot (4.56 g plant(-1)) where as the highest dry weight of roots (2.0806 g plant(-1)) were achieved with treatments of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the inoculated strains, combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens recorded the maximum nitrogen uptake (61.28 mg plant(-1)) followed by the combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (std) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (std) (55.03 mg plant(-1)) and the highest phosphorus uptake (38.80 mg plant(-1)) was recorded in dual inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  9. Early events in the pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae on Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hann, Dagmar R; Rathjen, John P

    2007-02-01

    Conserved microbial molecules known as PAMPs (pathogen-associated molecular patterns) elicit defence responses in plants through extracellular receptor proteins. One important PAMP is the flagellin protein derived from motile bacteria. We show here that the solanaceous species Nicotiana benthamiana perceives the flagellin proteins of both pathogenic and non-host species of Pseudomonas syringae. The response to flagellin required a gene closely related to that encoding the Arabidopsis thaliana flagellin receptor that we designated NbFls2. In addition, silencing of NbFls2 led to increased growth of compatible, non-host and non-pathogenic strains of P. syringae. Thus, flagellin perception restricts growth of P. syringae strains on N. benthamiana. Pathogenic bacteria secrete effector proteins into the plant cell to enhance virulence. We tested the ability of several unrelated effectors to suppress PAMP-mediated defences. The effector proteins AvrPto and AvrPtoB, but not AvrRps4, suppressed all responses tested including the hypersensitive response induced by non-host flagellins and the oomycete elicitor INF1. Strikingly, transient expression of avrPto or avrPtoB stimulated the growth of non-pathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciensin planta, suggesting that multiplication of this species is also restricted by PAMP perception. Unexpectedly, AvrPtoB but not AvrPto required the defence-associated genes Rar1, Sgt1 and Eds1 for suppression. This observation separates the respective mechanisms of the two effectors, and suggests that AvrPtoB may target the defence machinery directly for its suppressive effect.

  10. Degradation of Benzene by Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2 and 1YB2 Is Catalyzed by Enzymes Encoded in Distinct Catabolism Gene Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima-Morales, Daiana; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Jáuregui, Ruy; Vilchez-Vargas, Ramiro; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2015-10-16

    Pseudomonas veronii 1YdBTEX2, a benzene and toluene degrader, and Pseudomonas veronii 1YB2, a benzene degrader, have previously been shown to be key players in a benzene-contaminated site. These strains harbor unique catabolic pathways for the degradation of benzene comprising a gene cluster encoding an isopropylbenzene dioxygenase where genes encoding downstream enzymes were interrupted by stop codons. Extradiol dioxygenases were recruited from gene clusters comprising genes encoding a 2-hydroxymuconic semialdehyde dehydrogenase necessary for benzene degradation but typically absent from isopropylbenzene dioxygenase-encoding gene clusters. The benzene dihydrodiol dehydrogenase-encoding gene was not clustered with any other aromatic degradation genes, and the encoded protein was only distantly related to dehydrogenases of aromatic degradation pathways. The involvement of the different gene clusters in the degradation pathways was suggested by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. High quality draft genome sequence of the type strain of Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T), a phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Yunyoung; Park, Gun-Seok; Shin, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas lutea OK2(T) (=LMG 21974(T), CECT 5822(T)) is the type strain of the species and was isolated from the rhizosphere of grass growing in Spain in 2003 based on its phosphate-solubilizing capacity. In order to identify the functional significance of phosphate solubilization in Pseudomonas Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, we describe here the phenotypic characteristics of strain OK2(T) along with its high-quality draft genome sequence, its annotation, and analysis. The genome is comprised of 5,647,497 bp with 60.15 % G + C content. The sequence includes 4,846 protein-coding genes and 95 RNA genes.

  12. Chromosomal insertion of the entire Escherichia coli lactose operon, into two strains of Pseudomonas, using a modified mini-Tn5 delivery system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, L. H.; Sørensen, S. J.; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    1997-01-01

    A 12-kb PstI fragment including the entire E. coli lactose operon (lacIPOZYA) was inserted in one copy into the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas fluorescens and an E. coli strain with lac(-) phenotype. This was made possible by improvements of an already existing mini-Tn5 transposon...... flanked by NotI sites needed in the mini-Tn5 delivery system; (b) the generation of E. coli nonlysogenic strains expressing the pi protein thus being capable of maintaining and delivering R6K-based mini-Tn5 vectors to other E. coli strains; (c) the successful insertion of the E. coli lactose operon...... into the P. fluorescens chromosome giving P. fluorescens the ability to grow on lactose; (d) evidence from Southern blotting that contradicts the assumption that the mini-Tn5 delivery system always creates one-copy inserts. These improvements allow insertion of large DNA fragments encoding highly expressed...

  13. Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 denaturation by five systematic urea derivatives that differ in the alkyl chain length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shinya; Fujii, Sotaro; Koga, Aya; Wakai, Satoshi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2017-07-01

    Reversible denaturation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c551 (PAc551) could be followed using five systematic urea derivatives that differ in the alkyl chain length, i.e. urea, N-methylurea (MU), N-ethylurea (EU), N-propylurea (PU), and N-butylurea (BU). The BU concentration was the lowest required for the PAc551 denaturation, those of PU, EU, MU, and urea being gradually higher. Furthermore, the accessible surface area difference upon PAc551 denaturation caused by BU was found to be the highest, those by PU, EU, MU, and urea being gradually lower. These findings indicate that urea derivatives with longer alkyl chains are stronger denaturants. In this study, as many as five systematic urea derivatives could be applied for the reversible denaturation of a single protein, PAc551, for the first time, and the effects of the alkyl chain length on protein denaturation were systematically verified by means of thermodynamic parameters.

  14. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Cif, a virulence factor secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahl, Christopher D; MacEachran, Daniel P; O'Toole, George A; Madden, Dean R

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes a protein that triggers the accelerated degradation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) in airway epithelial cells. This protein, which is known as the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), acts as a virulence factor and may facilitate airway colonization by P. aeruginosa. Based on sequence similarity Cif appears to be an epoxide hydrolase (EH), but it lacks several of the conserved features found in the active sites of canonical members of the EH family. Here, the crystallization of purified recombinant Cif by vapor diffusion is reported. The crystals formed in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 167.4, b = 83.6, c = 88.3 A, beta = 100.6 degrees . The crystals diffracted to 2.39 A resolution on a rotating-anode source. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (2.2 A(3) Da(-1)), it appears that the asymmetric unit contains four molecules.

  15. Manganese (Mn oxidation increases intracellular Mn in Pseudomonas putida GB-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Banh

    Full Text Available Bacterial manganese (Mn oxidation plays an important role in the global biogeochemical cycling of Mn and other compounds, and the diversity and prevalence of Mn oxidizers have been well established. Despite many hypotheses of why these bacteria may oxidize Mn, the physiological reasons remain elusive. Intracellular Mn levels were determined for Pseudomonas putida GB-1 grown in the presence or absence of Mn by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Mn oxidizing wild type P. putida GB-1 had higher intracellular Mn than non Mn oxidizing mutants grown under the same conditions. P. putida GB-1 had a 5 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to the non Mn oxidizing mutant P. putida GB-1-007 and a 59 fold increase in intracellular Mn compared to P. putida GB-1 ∆2665 ∆2447. The intracellular Mn is primarily associated with the less than 3 kDa fraction, suggesting it is not bound to protein. Protein oxidation levels in Mn oxidizing and non oxidizing cultures were relatively similar, yet Mn oxidation did increase survival of P. putida GB-1 when oxidatively stressed. This study is the first to link Mn oxidation to Mn homeostasis and oxidative stress protection.

  16. An orphan chemotaxis sensor regulates virulence and antibiotic tolerance in the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Pearl McLaughlin

    Full Text Available The synthesis of virulence factors by pathogenic bacteria is highly regulated and occurs in response to diverse environmental cues. An array of two component systems (TCSs serves to link perception of different cues to specific changes in gene expression and/or bacterial behaviour. Those TCSs that regulate functions associated with virulence represent attractive targets for interference in anti-infective strategies for disease control. We have previously identified PA2572 as a putative response regulator required for full virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the opportunistic human pathogen, to Galleria mellonella (Wax moth larvae. Here we have investigated the involvement of candidate sensors for signal transduction involving PA2572. Mutation of PA2573, encoding a probable methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein, gave rise to alterations in motility, virulence, and antibiotic resistance, functions which are also controlled by PA2572. Comparative transcriptome profiling of mutants revealed that PA2572 and PA2573 regulate expression of a common set of 49 genes that are involved in a range of biological functions including virulence and antibiotic resistance. Bacterial two-hybrid analysis indicated a REC-dependent interaction between PA2572 and PA2573 proteins. Finally expression of PA2572 in the PA2573 mutant background restored virulence to G. mellonella towards wild-type levels. The findings indicate a role for the orphan chemotaxis sensor PA2573 in the regulation of virulence and antibiotic tolerance in P. aeruginosa and indicate that these effects are exerted in part through signal transduction involving PA2572.

  17. An Rhs-like genetic element is involved in bacteriocin production by Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisto, Angelo; Cipriani, Maria Grazia; Morea, Maria; Lonigro, Stella Lisa; Valerio, Francesca; Lavermicocca, Paola

    2010-11-01

    The main aim of this work was the identification of genetic determinants involved in bacteriocin production by strain ITM317 of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi, besides bacteriocin characterization. The bacteriocin was observed to be a heat-sensitive, high molecular weight proteinaceous compound. We identified a transposon (Tn5)-induced mutant which had lost its ability to produce the bacteriocin. The Tn5 insertion's responsibility for the above mutated phenotype was demonstrated by marker-exchange mutagenesis. An EcoRI DNA fragment, corresponding to the EcoRI Tn5-containing fragment of the mutant, was also cloned from the wild-type strain, and its introduction into the mutant complemented the mutation. Moreover, that fragment enabled bacteriocin production by P. s. pv. savastanoi ITM302, a strain not previously capable of doing so. DNA sequence analysis revealed that Tn5 insertion occurred in the mutant within a large ORF encoding a protein which showed similarity with proteins from the Rhs family. The DNA region including that ORF showed features which have been considered typical of the Rhs genetic elements previously identified in other bacteria but whose function is as yet unclear. The results of this study for the first time identify an Rhs-like element in P. s. pv. savastanoi, and for the first time indicate that an Rhs element is involved in bacteriocin production, also suggesting this possible function for Rhs genetic elements previously characterized in other bacteria.

  18. Identification of novel members of the bacterial azoreductase family in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescente, Vincenzo; Holland, Sinead M; Kashyap, Sapna; Polycarpou, Elena; Sim, Edith; Ryan, Ali

    2016-03-01

    Azoreductases are a family of diverse enzymes found in many pathogenic bacteria as well as distant homologues being present in eukarya. In addition to having azoreductase activity, these enzymes are also suggested to have NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO) activity which leads to a proposed role in plant pathogenesis. Azoreductases have also been suggested to play a role in the mammalian pathogenesis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In view of the importance of P. aeruginosa as a pathogen, we therefore characterized recombinant enzymes following expression of a group of putative azoreductase genes from P. aeruginosa expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzymes include members of the arsenic-resistance protein H (ArsH), tryptophan repressor-binding protein A (WrbA), modulator of drug activity B (MdaB) and YieF families. The ArsH, MdaB and YieF family members all show azoreductase and NQO activities. In contrast, WrbA is the first enzyme to show NQO activity but does not reduce any of the 11 azo compounds tested under a wide range of conditions. These studies will allow further investigation of the possible role of these enzymes in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. © 2016 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  19. HopW1 from Pseudomonas syringae disrupts the actin cytoskeleton to promote virulence in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsung Kang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A central mechanism of virulence of extracellular bacterial pathogens is the injection into host cells of effector proteins that modify host cellular functions. HopW1 is an effector injected by the type III secretion system that increases the growth of the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae on the Columbia accession of Arabidopsis. When delivered by P. syringae into plant cells, HopW1 causes a reduction in the filamentous actin (F-actin network and the inhibition of endocytosis, a known actin-dependent process. When directly produced in plants, HopW1 forms complexes with actin, disrupts the actin cytoskeleton and inhibits endocytosis as well as the trafficking of certain proteins to vacuoles. The C-terminal region of HopW1 can reduce the length of actin filaments and therefore solubilize F-actin in vitro. Thus, HopW1 acts by disrupting the actin cytoskeleton and the cell biological processes that depend on actin, which in turn are needed for restricting P. syringae growth in Arabidopsis.

  20. Expression, purification and functional characterization of a novel 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianmin; Gao, Xiufeng; Hong, Lin; Ma, Liting; Li, Yongsheng

    2015-11-01

    3α-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD) catalyzes the oxidation of the 3-hydroxyl group of steroids. The enzymatic conversion is a critical step in the enzymatic assay of urinary sulfated bile acids (SBAs), which is a valuable diagnosis index of hepatobiliary diseases. However, the source of 3α-HSD for clinical applications is limited. In this study, an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a novel 3α-HSD was successfully cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant protein was purified by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography. Enzyme characterization studies revealed that the protein has 3α-HSD activity and the Km value for sodium cholate is 1.06 mmol L(-1). More than 60% relative enzyme activity was observed in a wide range of pH and temperature, with an optimum pH at 8.0 and an optimum temperature at 30°C. The enzyme's good thermostability under 40°C would be favorable in clinical applications. Ion interference experiments indicated that Zn(2+) was an activating cofactor which increased the enzyme activity 1.75-fold. With the favorable characteristics mentioned above, the new 3α-HSD is a promising enzyme for clinical applications. More importantly, the present work is the first report on a 3α-HSD from P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of a novel two-partner secretion system implicated in the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, Laura M; Garvis, Steve; de Bentzmann, Sophie; Bigot, Sarah

    2014-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen implicated in nosocomial infection and infecting people with compromised immune systems such as cystic fibrosis patients. Although multiple genes involved in P. aeruginosa pathogenesis have been characterized, the overall mechanism of virulence is not fully understood. In this study, we identified a functional two-partner secretion (TPS) system, composed of the PdtA exoprotein and its cognate pore-forming β-barrel PdtB transporter, which is implicated in the virulence of P. aeruginosa. We found that the predicted PdtA exoprotein is related to the HMW-like adhesins subfamily TPS systems. We demonstrate here that limitation of inorganic phosphate (Pi) allows the production of PdtA protein. We show that PdtA is processed during its outer-membrane translocation, with an N-terminal domain released into the extracellular environment and a C-terminal domain associated with the outer membrane of the cell. We also obtained evidence that the transport of PdtA is strictly dependent on the production of PdtB, a result confirming that these proteins constitute a functional TPS system. Furthermore, using the Caenorhabditis elegans model of infection, we show that a pdtA mutant is less virulent than the wild-type strain. © 2014 The Authors.

  2. The high-affinity peptidoglycan binding domain of Pseudomonas phage endolysin KZ144

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briers, Yves [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J. [Institute of Food Science and Nutrition, ETH Zuerich, Schmelzbergstrasse 7, CH-8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Hendrix, Jelle; Engelborghs, Yves [Laboratory of Biomolecular Dynamics, Department of Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200G, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Volckaert, Guido [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Lavigne, Rob, E-mail: rob.lavigne@biw.kuleuven.be [Division of Gene Technology, Department of Biosystems, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 21, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2009-05-29

    The binding affinity of the N-terminal peptidoglycan binding domain of endolysin KZ144 (PBD{sub KZ}), originating from Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage {phi}KZ, has been examined using a fusion protein of PBD{sub KZ} and green fluorescent protein (PBD{sub KZ}-GFP). A fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis of bound PBD{sub KZ}-GFP molecules showed less than 10% fluorescence recovery in the bleached area within 15 min. Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed this apparent high binding affinity revealing an equilibrium affinity constant of 2.95 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} for the PBD{sub KZ}-peptidoglycan interaction. This unique domain, which binds to the peptidoglycan of all tested Gram-negative species, was harnessed to improve the specific activity of the peptidoglycan hydrolase domain KMV36C. The chimeric peptidoglycan hydrolase (PBD{sub KZ}-KMV36C) exhibits a threefold higher specific activity than the native catalytic domain (KMV36C). These results demonstrate that the modular assembly of functional domains is a rational approach to improve the specific activity of endolysins from phages infecting Gram-negatives.

  3. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa type VI secretion phospholipase D effector targets both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Waterfield, Nicholas R; Yang, Jian; Yang, Guowei; Jin, Qi

    2014-05-14

    Widely found in animal and plant-associated proteobacteria, type VI secretion systems (T6SSs) are potentially capable of facilitating diverse interactions with eukaryotes and/or other bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes three distinct T6SS haemolysin coregulated protein (Hcp) secretion islands (H1, H2, and H3-T6SS), each involved in different aspects of the bacterium's interaction with other organisms. Here we describe the characterization of a P. aeruginosa H3-T6SS-dependent phospholipase D effector, PldB, and its three tightly linked cognate immunity proteins. PldB targets the periplasm of prokaryotic cells and exerts an antibacterial activity. Surprisingly, PldB also facilitates intracellular invasion of host eukaryotic cells by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway, revealing it to be a trans-kingdom effector. Our findings imply a potentially widespread T6SS-mediated mechanism, which deploys a single phospholipase effector to influence both prokaryotic cells and eukaryotic hosts. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A new transcriptional repressor of the pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing receptor gene lasR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Longo

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenic potential is controlled via multiple regulatory pathways, including three quorum sensing (QS systems. LasR is a key QS signal receptor since it acts as a global transcriptional regulator required for optimal expression of main virulence factors. P. aeruginosa modulates the QS response by integrating this cell density-dependent circuit to environmental and metabolic cues. Hence, QS also controls the adaptation to challenging environmental niches, such as infection sites. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms connecting QS and other signalling pathways. In this work, DNA-affinity chromatography was used to identify new lasR transcriptional regulators. This approach led to the identification and functional characterization of the TetR-like transcriptional repressor PA3699. This protein was purified and shown to directly bind to the lasR promoter region in vitro. The induction of PA3699 expression in P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures repressed lasR promoter activity and the production of LasR-dependent virulence factors, such as elastase, pyocyanin, and proteases. These findings suggest a role for PA3699 in P. aeruginosa pathogenicity. P. aeruginosa genome encodes at least 38 TetR-family proteins, and PA3699 is the eighth member of this group functionally characterized so far and the first one shown to bind the lasR promoter in vitro.

  5. Immunomodulation by the Pseudomonas syringae HopZ type III effector family in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Lewis

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae employs a type III secretion system to inject 20-30 different type III effector (T3SE proteins into plant host cells. A major role of T3SEs is to suppress plant immune responses and promote bacterial infection. The YopJ/HopZ acetyltransferases are a superfamily of T3SEs found in both plant and animal pathogenic bacteria. In P. syringae, this superfamily includes the evolutionarily diverse HopZ1, HopZ2 and HopZ3 alleles. To investigate the roles of the HopZ family in immunomodulation, we generated dexamethasone-inducible T3SE transgenic lines of Arabidopsis for HopZ family members and characterized them for immune suppression phenotypes. We show that all of the HopZ family members can actively suppress various facets of Arabidopsis immunity in a catalytic residue-dependent manner. HopZ family members can differentially suppress the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase cascades or the production of reactive oxygen species, whereas all members can promote the growth of non-virulent P. syringae. Localization studies show that four of the HopZ family members containing predicted myristoylation sites are localized to the vicinity of the plasma membrane while HopZ3 which lacks the myristoylation site is at least partially nuclear localized, suggesting diversification of immunosuppressive mechanisms. Overall, we demonstrate that despite significant evolutionary diversification, all HopZ family members can suppress immunity in Arabidopsis.

  6. Forage Quantity and Quality of Berseem Clover (Trifolium ‎alexandrinum L. as Affected by Uses of Pseudomonas putida ‎Strains and Phophorus Fertilizer in the Second Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Ansari

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects of phosphate fertilizer and pseudomonas putida strains on the quantity and quality of forage of berseem clover as a second crop was studied in a factorial field experiment using randomized complete block design with three replications at Fooman, Guilan province, Iran. Treatments consisted of phosphate fertilizer with three levels (0, 75 and 150 kg/ha as triple super phosphate and Pseudomonas putida strains with four levels (M21, M5, M168 and control. The results showed that use of phosphate fertilizers increased the soil pH during growing season while bacterial inoculation adjusted soil pH. The bacterial inoculation increased amount of crude protein, digestible protein, acidic and alkaline phosphatase activity compared to non-inoculated treatment, but it decreased crude fiber of the forage. Clover forage yield, protein yield and phosphorus content of foliage also were influenced by the interaction of bacterial strains and phosphate fertilizer. The highest forage and protein yield were obtained by using strain M5+150 kg P ha-1. Significant increases in forage and protein yield were found to be 16.49% and 8.01%, respectively, as compared with non-inoculated treatment. Based on the result of this experiment, application of 150 kg P ha-1 and Pseudomonas putida strain M5 inoculation can be used to obtain highest forage yield and quality of berseem clover as second crop in the experimental site.

  7. De aanwezigheid van Pseudomonas aeruginosa in circulatiebaden in relatie tot de controle volgens de Wet Hygiene en Veiligheid Zwemgelegenheden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven JF; Havelaar AH

    1989-01-01

    Door 8 externe laboratoria werden 133 buitenbaden en 340 binnenbaden onderzocht op aanwezigheid van Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Het betrof circulatiebaden, die periodiek volgens de eisen van het Besluit Hygiene en Veiligheid Zwemgelegenheden (BHVZ) werden gecontroleerd. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bleek

  8. Structural insights into the effector-immunity system Tse1/Tsi1 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Benz

    Full Text Available During an interbacterial battle, the type-6-secretion-system (T6SS of the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa injects the peptidoglycan(PG-hydrolase Tse1 into the periplasm of gram-negative enemy cells and induces their lysis. However, for its own benefit, P. aeruginosa produces and transports the immunity-protein Tsi1 into its own periplasm where in prevents accidental exo- and endogenous intoxication. Here we present the high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the lytic enzyme Tse1 and describe the mechanism by which Tse1 cleaves the γ-D-glutamyl-l-meso-diaminopimelic acid amide bond of crosslinked PG. Tse1 belongs to the superfamily of N1pC/P60 peptidases but is unique among described members of this family of which the structure was described, since it is a single domain protein without any putative localization domain. Most importantly, we present the crystal structure of Tse1 bound to its immunity-protein Tsi1 as well and describe the mechanism of enzyme inhibition. Tsi1 occludes the active site of Tse1 and abolishes its enzyme activity by forming a hydrogen bond to a catalytically important histidine residue in Tse1. Based on our structural findings in combination with a bioinfomatic approach we also identified a related system in Burkholderia phytofirmans. Not only do our findings point to a common catalytic mechanism of the Tse1 PG-hydrolases, but we can also show that it is distinct from other members of this superfamily. Furthermore, we provide strong evidence that the mechanism of enzyme inhibition between Tsi1 orthologues is conserved. This work is the first structural description of an entire effector/immunity pair injected by the T6SS system. Moreover, it is also the first example of a member of the N1pC/P60 superfamily which becomes inhibited upon binding to its cognate immunity protein.

  9. Polytrauma Increases Susceptibility to Pseudomonas Pneumonia in Mature Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Isaiah R; Ghosh, Sarbani; Fuchs, Anja; Hilliard, Julia; Davis, Christopher G; Bochicchio, Grant V; Southard, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Pneumonia is the most common complication observed in patients with severe injuries. Although the average age of injured patients is 47 years, existing studies of the effect of injury on the susceptibility to infectious complications have focused on young animals, equivalent to a late adolescent human. We hypothesized that mature adult animals are more susceptible to infection after injury than younger counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we challenged 6 to 8-month-old mature mice to a polytrauma injury followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and compared them to young (8-10-week-old) animals. We demonstrate that polytrauma injury increases mortality from pneumonia in mature animals (sham-pneumonia 21% vs. polytrauma-pneumonia 62%) but not younger counterparts. After polytrauma, pneumonia in mature mice is associated with higher bacterial burden in lung, increased incidence of bacteremia, and elevated levels of bacteria in the blood, demonstrating that injury decreases the ability to control the infectious challenge. We further find that polytrauma did not induce elevations in circulating cytokine levels (TNF-alpha, IL-6, KC, and IL-10) 24  h after injury. However, mature mice subjected to polytrauma demonstrated an exaggerated circulating inflammatory cytokine response to subsequent Pseudomonas pneumonia. Additionally, whereas prior injury increases LPS-stimulated IL-6 production by peripheral blood leukocytes from young (8-10-week-old) mice, injury does not prime IL-6 production by cell from mature adult mice. We conclude that in mature mice polytrauma results in increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas pneumonia while priming an exaggerated but ineffective inflammatory response.

  10. Pseudomonas turukhanskensis sp. nov., isolated from oil-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunova, Tatiana Y; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Chetverikov, Sergey P; Igual, Jose M; Peix, Álvaro; Loginov, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    A bacterial strain named IB1.1T was isolated in a screening of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from oil-contaminated soils on the territory of the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai, East Siberia, Russia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence had 98.7 % identity with respect to the closest phylogenetic relative, Pseudomonas granadensis F-278,770T, and the next most closely related species with 98.6 % similarity was Pseudomonaspunonensis, suggesting that IB1.1T should be classified within the genus Pseudomonas. The analysis of housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB showed similarities lower than 90 % in all cases with respect to the closest relatives, confirming its phylogenetic affiliation. The strain showed a polar flagellum. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were 16 : 1ω7c/16 : 1ω6c (summed feature 3), 18 : 1ω7c and 16 : 0. The strain was oxidase- and catalase-positive, but the arginine dihydrolase system was not present. Nitrate reduction, urease and β-galactosidase production, and aesculin hydrolysis were negative. The temperature range for growth was 4-34 °C, and the strain could grow at pH 11. The DNA G+C content was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values of less than 30 % relatedness with respect to the type strains of the eight most closely related species. Therefore, the dataset of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data support the classification of strain IB1.1T into a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonasturukhanskensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IB1.1T (=VKM B-2935T=CECT 9091T).

  11. Plasmid profile as fingerprinting of typing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    El-Naggar, Wael; El-Emam, M; Hassan, R; George, S

    2014-01-01

    Pyocine production typing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of plasmid DNA with BamH1 (BamH1 RFLP) were compared for intraspecies discrimination of 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Typeability of pyocine production method was 76% while that of BamH1 RFLP was 100%. BamHl RFLP was highly discriminative so as to distinguish unrelated isolates of close lineage. However, it was not a good method to identify isolates of unrelated lineage because BamH1 RFLP appeared to be a sub...

  12. Electrical enhancement of biocide efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkinsopp, S A; Khoury, A E; Costerton, J W

    1992-01-01

    When applied within a low-strength electric field (+/- 12 V/cm) with a low current density (+/- 2.1 mA/cm2), several industrial biocides exhibited enhanced killing action against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on stainless steel studs. Biocide concentrations lower than those necessary to kill planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa (1, 5, and 10 ppm of the active ingredients of kathon, glutaraldehyde, and quaternary ammonium compound, respectively) were bactericidal within 24 h when applied within our electrified device. PMID:1482196

  13. Regulation of phytotoxin production in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, L.M.; Ghosh, S.; Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, a pathogen of tobacco, is capable of colonizing the rhizosphere of many plants. This pathogen excretes tabtoxinine-{beta}-lactam (T{beta}L), an active site directed, irreversible inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. T{beta}L is produced in planta, in the rhizosphere, and under certain culture conditions. However, the factors which regulated T{beta}L production in these environments are unknown. As a first step in characterizing T{beta}L synthesis by P. syringae pv. tabaci, the authors have determined the effects of root exudates and various nutrients on production of T{beta}L by P. syringae pv. tabaci PT113.

  14. Vaccines for Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A long and winding road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Gregory P.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, no vaccine against this bacteria have come to market. This review describes the current state-of-the-art in vaccinology for this bacterium. This includes a discussion of those at risk for infection, the types of vaccines and the approaches for empirical and targeted antigen selection under development, as well as a perspective on where the field should go. In addition, the challenges in developing a vaccine for those individuals at risk are discussed. PMID:24575895

  15. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from keratitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To examine the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of 106 Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye isolates from the United Kingdom, Denmark, India, the United States, and Australia, and to determine the molecular mechanisms of resistance. METHODS: Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by an agar dilution method...... isolates of P aeruginosa from European countries are fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin and the concentration of ciprofloxacin eye drops used for local treatment (3000 mg/l) exceeds MIC values for strains recorded as resistant. Mutations in more than one target gene were associated with higher MIC values....

  16. Alkaline cyanide biodegradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Blasco, R; Huertas, M J; Martínez-Luque, M; Moreno-Vivián, C; Castillo, F; Roldán, M D

    2005-02-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 uses cyanide, cyanate, beta-cyanoalanine, and other cyanoderivatives as nitrogen sources under alkaline conditions, which prevents volatile HCN (pK(a) 9.2) formation. The cyanide consumed by this strain is stoichiometrically converted into ammonium. In addition, this bacterium grows with the heavy metal, cyanide-containing waste water generated by the jewellery industry, and is also a cyanide-resistant strain which induces an alternative oxidase and a siderophore-based mechanism for iron acquisition in the presence of cyanide. The detection of cyanase and beta-cyanoalanine nitrilase activities in cyanide-induced cells suggests their implication in the cyanide degradation pathway.

  17. The sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cases, I.; Ussery, David; de Lorenzo, V.

    2003-01-01

    , the sigma(54) regulon has been studied both in Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and several species of the Rhizobiaceae. Here we present the analysis of the sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) in the complete genome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We have developed an improved method for the prediction......% of the sigma(54)-dependent promoters of P. putida with high confidence. Our analysis has revealed new functions for sigma(54) and, by means of comparative analysis with the previous studies, we have drawn a potential mechanism for the evolution of this regulatory system....

  18. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita M Bhatawadekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra.

  19. An unusual presentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blebitis following combined surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of blebitis that occurred 3 years later following a combined glaucoma and cataract surgery. It was an atypical presentation, as patient had no classical fiery looking signs of blebitis despite the isolated organism being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Improvized surgical techniques like use of Mitomycin C, releasable flap sutures though considered as part of the recommended procedure for better surgical outcomes, their role as potential risk factors for visually blinding complications like endophthalmitis are often overlooked. This case report throws light on such risk factors for bleb associated infections and recommends removal or trimming of all releasable sutures and the need for a regular postoperative follow-up.

  20. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  1. Adaptive synonymous mutations in an experimentally evolved Pseudomonas fluorescens population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Susan; Hinz, Aaron; Kassen, Rees

    2014-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that synonymous mutations, nucleotide changes that do not alter the encoded amino acid, have no detectable effect on phenotype or fitness. However, a growing body of evidence from both comparative and experimental studies suggests otherwise. Synonymous mutations have been...... in an experimentally evolved population of Pseudomonas fluorescens. We show experimentally that these mutations increase fitness by an amount comparable to non-synonymous mutations and that the fitness increases stem from increased gene expression. These results provide unequivocal evidence that synonymous mutations...... can drive adaptive evolution and suggest that this class of mutation may be underappreciated as a cause of adaptation and evolutionary dynamics....

  2. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura C; O'Loughlin, Colleen T; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E; Bassler, Bonnie L; Semmelhack, Martin F

    2015-02-12

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, these new antagonists appear to suppress P. aeruginosa virulence factor production through a pathway that is independent of LasR and RhlR.

  3. NudC Nudix hydrolase from Pseudomonas syringae, but not its counterpart from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is a novel regulator of intracellular redox balance required for growth, motility and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzelan, Marta; Kujawa, Martyna; Głąbski, Krzysztof; Jagura-Burdzy, Grażyna; Kraszewska, Elzbieta

    2014-09-01

    Nudix pyrophosphatases, ubiquitous in all organisms, have not been well studied. Recent implications that some of them may be involved in response to stress and in pathogenesis indicate that they play important biological functions. We have investigated NudC Nudix proteins from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato str. DC3000 and from the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1161. We found that these homologous enzymes are homodimeric and in vitro preferentially hydrolyse NADH. The P. syringae mutant strain deficient in NudC accumulated NADH and displayed significant defects in growth, motility and biofilm formation. The wild type copy of the nudC gene with its cognate promoter delivered in trans into the nudC mutant restored its fitness. However, introduction of the P. syringae nudC gene under the control of the strong tacp promoter into either P. syringae or P. aeruginosa cells had a toxic effect on both strains. Opposite to P. syringae NudC, the P. aeruginosa NudC deficiency as well as its overproduction had no visible impact on cells. Moreover, P. aeruginosa NudC does not compensate the lack of its counterpart in the P. syringae mutant. These results indicate that NudC from P. syringae, but not from P. aeruginosa is vital for bacteria. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pseudomonas sax genes overcome aliphatic isothiocyanate-mediated non-host resistance in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Fan; Casey Crooks; Gary Creissen; Lionel Hill; Shirley Fairhurst; Peter Doerner; Chris Lamb

    2011-01-01

    Most plant-microbe interactions do not result in disease; natural products restrict non-host pathogens. We found that sulforaphane (4-methylsulfinylbutyl isothiocyanate), a natural product derived from aliphatic glucosinolates, inhibits growth in Arabidopsis of non-host Pseudomonas bacteria in planta. Multiple sax genes (saxCAB/F/D/G) were identified in Pseudomonas...

  5. Erythromycin inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha production in human whole blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M. J.; Speelman, P.; van der Poll, T.

    2001-01-01

    Erythromycin has been shown to be beneficial for panbronchiolitis, a disorder linked to infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Erythromycin, but not the anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics imipenem, ceftazidime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin, caused a dose-dependent decrease in the production of tumour

  6. De novo production of the monoterpenoid geranic acid by metabolically engineered Pseudomonas putida

    OpenAIRE

    Mi, Jia; Becher, Daniela; Lubuta, Patrice; Dany, Sarah; Tusch, Kerstin; Schewe, Hendrik; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Production of monoterpenoids as valuable chemicals using recombinant microbes is a growing field of interest. Unfortunately, antimicrobial activity of most monoterpenoids hampers a wide application of microorganisms for their production. Strains of Pseudomonas putida, a fast growing and metabolically versatile bacterium, often show an outstanding high tolerance towards organic solvents and other toxic compounds. Therefore, Pseudomonas putida constitutes an attractive alternative ho...

  7. Genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, isolated from alpine glacial cryoconite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Chul; Kim, Su Jin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Ahn, Do Hwan; Lee, Yung Mi; Lee, Hyoungseok; Lee, Jungeun; Park, Hyun

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas spp. have shown characteristics of efficiently metabolizing environmental pollutants and also producing exopolysaccharides known as biofilms. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, which was isolated from glacier cryoconite in the Alps mountain permafrost region and which may provide further insight into biodegradative and/or biofilm-producing mechanisms in a cold environment.

  8. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato. ...

  9. Regulation of the biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptides from Pseudomonas putida PCL1445

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubern, Jean-Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain PCL1445 produces two cyclic lipopeptides, named putisolvins I and II, which represent a Novel class of biosurfactants. Putisolvins reduce the surface tension between liquid and air, and disrupt already existing biofilms of several Pseudomonas sp., including those of the

  10. Dual Infection by Burkholderia Cepaciaand Pseudomonas Putida in an Infective Endocarditis Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria; Lalani, Farida Khurram; Ikram, Aamer; Zaman, Gohar; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-06-01

    Infective endocarditis is rarely caused by Burkholderia cepacia. Pseudomonas putidahas not been reported to cause infective endocarditis so far. This is the first case of infective endocarditis being reported, that is caused by Pseudomonas putidaand Burkholderia cepaciain an immunocompetent host with no predisposing factors. Aortic valve replacement surgery was carried out and antibiotics were given, to which the patient responded well and recovered.

  11. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  12. Bloodstream infections caused by Pseudomonas spp.; how to detect carbapenemase producers directly from positive blood cultures ?

    OpenAIRE

    Dortet, Laurent; Boulanger, Anne; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The Carba NP test has been evaluated to detect carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas spp. directly from blood cultures. This rapid and cost-effective test permits an early identification of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas spp. directly from blood cultures with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Results may be useful in particular for guiding the first-line therapy and epidemiological purposes.

  13. The nitrogen-fixation island insertion site is conserved in diazotrophic Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas sp. isolated from distal and close geographical regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Venieraki

    Full Text Available The presence of nitrogen fixers within the genus Pseudomonas has been established and so far most isolated strains are phylogenetically affiliated to Pseudomonas stutzeri. A gene ortholog neighborhood analysis of the nitrogen fixation island (NFI in four diazotrophic P. stutzeri strains and Pseudomonas azotifigens revealed that all are flanked by genes coding for cobalamin synthase (cobS and glutathione peroxidise (gshP. The putative NFIs lack all the features characterizing a mobilizable genomic island. Nevertheless, bioinformatic analysis P. stutzeri DSM 4166 NFI demonstrated the presence of short inverted and/or direct repeats within both flanking regions. The other P. stutzeri strains carry only one set of repeats. The genetic diversity of eleven diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates was also investigated. Multilocus sequence typing grouped nine isolates along with P. stutzeri and two isolates are grouped in a separate clade. A Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis grouped the eleven isolates into four distinct genotypes. We also provided evidence that the putative NFI in our diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates is flanked by cobS and gshP genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the putative NFI of Pseudomonas sp. Gr65 is flanked by inverted repeats identical to those found in P. stutzeri DSM 4166 and while the other P. stutzeri isolates harbor the repeats located in the intergenic region between cobS and glutaredoxin genes as in the case of P. stutzeri A1501. Taken together these data suggest that all putative NFIs of diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates are anchored in an intergenic region between cobS and gshP genes and their flanking regions are designated by distinct repeats patterns. Moreover, the presence of almost identical NFIs in diazotrophic Pseudomonas strains isolated from distal geographical locations around the world suggested that this horizontal gene transfer event may have taken place early in the evolution.

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists attenuate biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, Brahmchetna; Maurice, Nicholas M; Ciavatta, Vincent T; Lynn, K Sabrina; Yuan, Zhihong; Molina, Samuel A; Joo, Myungsoo; Tyor, William R; Goldberg, Joanna B; Koval, Michael; Hart, C Michael; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2017-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a significant contributor to recalcitrant multidrug-resistant infections, especially in immunocompromised and hospitalized patients. The pathogenic profile of P. aeruginosa is related to its ability to secrete a variety of virulence factors and to promote biofilm formation. Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism wherein P. aeruginosa secretes small diffusible molecules, specifically acyl homo serine lactones, such as N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3O-C12-HSL), that promote biofilm formation and virulence via interbacterial communication. Strategies that strengthen the host's ability to inhibit bacterial virulence would enhance host defenses and improve the treatment of resistant infections. We have recently shown that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonists are potent immunostimulators that play a pivotal role in host response to virulent P. aeruginosa Here, we show that QS genes in P. aeruginosa (strain PAO1) and 3O-C12-HSL attenuate PPARγ expression in bronchial epithelial cells. PAO1 and 3O-C12-HSL induce barrier derangements in bronchial epithelial cells by lowering the expression of junctional proteins, such as zonula occludens-1, occludin, and claudin-4. Expression of these proteins was restored in cells that were treated with pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, before infection with PAO1 and 3O-C12-HSL. Barrier function and bacterial permeation studies that have been performed in primary human epithelial cells showed that PPARγ agonists are able to restore barrier integrity and function that are disrupted by PAO1 and 3O-C12-HSL. Mechanistically, we show that these effects are dependent on the induction of paraoxonase-2, a QS hydrolyzing enzyme, that mitigates the effects of QS molecules. Importantly, our data show that pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, significantly inhibits biofilm formation on epithelial cells by a mechanism that is mediated via paraoxonase-2. These findings elucidate a novel role for

  15. Chronic lung infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm is cured by L-Methionine in combination with antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadhas, Divya Prakash; Elango, Monalisha; Datey, Akshay; Chakravortty, Dipshikha

    2015-11-02

    Bacterial biofilms are associated with 80-90% of infections. Within the biofilm, bacteria are refractile to antibiotics, requiring concentrations >1,000 times the minimum inhibitory concentration. Proteins, carbohydrates and DNA are the major components of biofilm matrix. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilms, which are majorly associated with chronic lung infection, contain extracellular DNA (eDNA) as a major component. Herein, we report for the first time that L-Methionine (L-Met) at 0.5 μM inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) biofilm formation and disassembles established PA biofilm by inducing DNase expression. Four DNase genes (sbcB, endA, eddB and recJ) were highly up-regulated upon L-Met treatment along with increased DNase activity in the culture supernatant. Since eDNA plays a major role in establishing and maintaining the PA biofilm, DNase activity is effective in disrupting the biofilm. Upon treatment with L-Met, the otherwise recalcitrant PA biofilm now shows susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. This was reflected in vivo, in the murine chronic PA lung infection model. Mice treated with L-Met responded better to antibiotic treatment, leading to enhanced survival as compared to mice treated with ciprofloxacin alone. These results clearly demonstrate that L-Met can be used along with antibiotic as an effective therapeutic against chronic PA biofilm infection.

  16. [Cloning and functional analysis of cysI gene involved in siderophores biosynthesis in Pseudomonas mosselii E1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Hong; Ding, Yan-Qin; Yao, Liang-Tong; Du, Zhi-Bing; Du, Bing-Hai

    2007-10-01

    A siderophores-producing strain E1 was isolated from the rhizosphere of cotton. Its 16S rDNA is identical to that of Pseudomonas mosselii sp. nov. at 100% level. The suicide plasmid pRL1063a carrying Tn5-1063 was introduced into E1 by triparental mating and 1000 transposon insertion mutants were subsequently screened using CAS assay. One mutant deficiency in siderophores production was obtained, namely, E1-185. DNA sequences flanking Tn5-1063 of E1-185 was amplified by TAIL-PCR. According to the DNA sequencing results, it is found that Tn5-1063 was inserted into cysI gene. The cysI of E1 is identical to that of Pseudomonas entomophila. L48 at 96% level, and similarity of amino acid sequences of their CysI is 97% . The cysI gene is required for the synthesis of cysteine. However, The ability in siderophores production of E1-185 on the plate of CAS with cysteine was recovered. It is indicated that cysI play an important role during the synthesis of siderophores. It was supposed that cysI is involved in the synthesis of acyl-S-PCPs, which is the key protein in the synthesis pathway of siderophores.

  17. Responses of unsaturated Pseudomonas putida CZ1 biofilms to environmental stresses in relation to the EPS composition and surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huirong; Chen, Guangcun; Long, Dongyan; Chen, Xincai

    2014-12-01

    The extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) and surface properties of unsaturated biofilms of a heavy metal-resistant rhizobacterium Pseudomonas putida CZ1, in response to aging, pH, temperature and osmotic stress, were studied by quantitative analysis of EPS and atomic force microscope. It was found that EPS production increased approximately linearly with culture time, cells in the air-biofilm interface enhanced EPS production and decreased cell volume to cope with nutrient depletion during aging. Low pH, high temperature and certain osmotic stress (120 mM NaCl) distinctly stimulated EPS production, and the main component enhanced was extracellular protein. In addition to the enhancement of EPS production in response to high osmotic (328 mM NaCl) stress, cells in the biofilm adhere tightly together to maintain a particular microenvironment. These results indicated the variation of EPS composition and the cooperation of cells in the biofilms is important for the survival of Pseudomonas putida CZ1 from environmental stresses in the unsaturated environments such as rhizosphere.

  18. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications.

  19. Impact of Silver Nanoparticle Transformation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa GFP Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboye, Temitope Azeezat

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NP) undergo transformations when released into the environment and often the transformed nanoparticles exhibit different behavior from the pristine analog. It is important to understand the influence of Ag NP transformation (particularly sulfidation) on its potential impacts in order to determine the effects of environmental transformation on biofilms. The goal of our study was to investigate interactions of polyvinylpyrrolidone-capped (PVP) pristine and transformed Ag NP (30 - 50 nm particle size) with bacterial biofilm to assess their impacts on biofilm communities. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa GFP (ATCCRTM 10145GFP(TM)) biofilms were subjected to similar concentrations of pristine- Ag NP and transformed- Ag2S NP under environmentally relevant conditions. Residual concentrations of dissolved silver and NP after exposure to biofilms were evaluated by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy) analysis. The morphological properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa GFP (P. aeruginosa) biofilms after exposure to both forms of silver nanoparticles were characterized by cell viability studies (using microplate reader and live/dead assay) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We also analyzed the distribution and size of investigated silver nanoparticles within P.aeruginosa biofilms using SEM coupled with EDS. Here, we report that transformed silver nanoparticle (Ag2S NP) exhibit reduced biofilm inactivation effects against P. aeruginosa biofilms compared to its pristine form (Ag NP). This result could be explained by a lower uptake of Ag2S nanoparticle by P. aeruginosa biofilms demonstrated by ICP-AES and SEM/EDS analysis.

  20. Copper uptake by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Muayad M; Saeed, Humodi A; Tarawneh, Khaled A; Khleifat, Khaled M; Al Tarawneh, Amjad

    2009-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from infected burn patients and characterized by standard biochemical tests. The in vitro copper uptake was compared between this isolated pathogenic strain and two non-pathogenic control strains of gram positive bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis strain Israelis as well as gram negative bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes. Maximum copper uptake of 470 ppm/g biomass was obtained by P. aeruginosa strain, while the control strains B. thuringiensis and Enterobacter aerogenes had copper uptake of 350 and 383 ppm/g biomass, respectively. However, the lowest copper uptake (60 ppm/g biomass) was observed with another control the saprophytic strain Pseudomonas (Shewanella) putrefaciens. A further investigation regarding the effect of copper toxicity on bacterial growth, gave an MIC score of 600 ppm for P. aeruginosa strain compared to 460 and 300 ppm for the two gram positive and gram negative control strains, respectively. In tandem with these in vitro findings, blood analysis on burn patients infected with P. aeruginosa has indicated a selective decrease of copper (hypocupremia) and ceruloplasmin plasma levels. The iron metabolism was also affected by this copper deprivation leading to a similar decrease in plasma levels of PCV, iron, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin. All these hematological changes were significantly different (P < 0.05) from the matched group of non-infected burn patients. The observed hypocupremia in infected burn patients was attributed to demanding scavenger ability by P. aeruginosa strain for the copper of plasma.