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Sample records for pseudomonas achromobacter alcaligenes

  1. Development of a lipase fermentation process that uses a recombinant Pseudomonas alcaligenes strain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritse, G; Hommes, R.W J; Quax, Wim

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes M-l secretes an alkaline lipase, which has excellent characteristics for the removal of fatty stains under modern washing conditions. A fed-batch fermentation process based on the secretion of the alkaline lipase from P. alcaligenes was developed. Due to the inability of P.

  2. Electrophoretic analysis of cyanide depletion by Pseudomonas alcaligenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, S E; Davidson, R A; Walker, J C; Walker, E B

    1997-02-01

    Bacterial-facilitated depletion of cyanide is under development for remediation of heap leach operations in the gold mining industry. Capillary electrophoresis was found to be a powerful tool for quantifying cyanide depletion. Changes in cyanide concentration in aqueous suspensions of Pseudomonas alcaligenes bacteria and cyanide at elevated pH were easily monitored by capillary electrophoresis. The resulting data can be used to study rates of cyanide depletion by this strain of bacteria. Concentrations of these bacteria at 10(5) cells/mL were found to reduce cyanide from 100 ppm to less than 8 ppm in four days. In addition, other ions of interest in cyanide metabolism, such as formate, can be simultaneously analyzed. Direct UV detection of cyanide at 192 nm further simplifies the analytical method for these ions.

  3. Aderência in vitro do Staphylococcus epidermidis e da Pseudomonas alcaligenes em lentes intra-oculares In vitro adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas alcaligenes to intraocular lenses

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    Patrícia Ioschpe Gus

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Quantificar e comparar a aderência in vitro das bactérias Staphylococcus epidermidis e Pseudomonas alcaligenes em diferentes tipos de lentes intra-oculares (LIOs. MÉTODOS: Quatorze lentes intra-oculares foram usadas no experimento. Quatro de polimetilmetacrilato (PMMA, quatro de silicone, quatro de hidrogel e duas de acrílico. Oito lentes intra-oculares foram colocadas em oito tubos de ensaio contendo 4 ml de suspensão de Pseudomonas alcaligenes, e seis lentes intra-oculares foram colocadas em seis tubos de ensaio contendo 4 ml de suspensão de Staphylococcus epidermidis. A concentração do caldo utilizada para o teste de aderência foi de 10(8 unidades formadoras de colônias por mililitro (CFU/mL que corresponde a 0,5 na escala de McFarland. As lentes foram incubadas a 37° por duas horas. Após, foram removidas dos caldos e enxaguadas em água destilada estéril por duas vezes. As lentes foram cultivadas em placas de ágar-sangue a 35-37° e evaliadas a cada 24h por um período de 72h. Nas amostras que tiveram crescimento bacteriano, foram contadas as colônias utilizando os métodos convencionais de laboratório. Todos os ensaios foram executados em duplicata. RESULTADOS: A aderência do Staphylococcus epidermidis nas lentes de PMMA foi menor se comparada com as de silicone e de hidrogel. A aderência daPseudomonas alcaligenes nas lentes de hidrogel foi menor se comparada com as de silicone, PMMA e acrílico. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados sugerem que a aderência do Staphylococcus epidermidis e da Pseudomonas alcaligenes nas lentes intra-oculares é influenciada pelo tipo de material da lente e pela espécie do microorganismo. A aderência bacteriana pode ter papel importante na patogenicidade da endoftalmite pós-cirurgia de catarata.PURPOSE: To quantify and compare the in vitro adherence of Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas alcaligenes to different intraocular lenses (IOLs. METHODS: Fourteen intraocular lenses were

  4. Production optimization of cyanophycinase ChpEal from Pseudomonas alcaligenes DIP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Ahmed; Kalkandzhiev, Dimitar; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2011-11-07

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes DIP1 produces an extracellular cyanophycinase (CphEal). The corresponding gene (cphEal) was identified from subclones of a genomic DNA gene library by heterologously expressing the functionally active enzyme in Escherichia coli. The nucleotide sequence of the gene (1260 base pairs) was determined indicating a theoretical mass of 43.6 kDa (mature CphEal) plus a leader peptide of 2,6 kDa which corresponds well to the apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa as revealed by SDS-PAGE. The enzyme exhibited a high sequence identity of 91% with the extracellular cyanophycinase from P. anguilliseptica strain BI and carried an N-terminal Sec secretion signal peptide. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of cphE revealed a putative catalytic triad consisting of the serine motif GXSXG plus a histidine and a glutamate residue, suggesting a catalytic mechanism similar to serine-type proteases. The cyanophycinase (CphEal) was heterologously produced in two different E. coli strains (Top10 and BL21(DE3)) from two plasmid vectors (pBBR1MCS-4 and pET-23a(+)). The signal peptide of CphEal was cleaved in E. coli, suggesting active export of the protein at least to the periplasm. Substantial enzyme activity was also present in the culture supernatants. The extracellular cyanophycinase activities in E. coli were higher than activities in the wild type P. alcaligenes DIP1 in complex LB medium. Highest extracellular enzyme production was achieved with E. coli BL21(DE3) expressing CphEal from pBBR1MCS-4. Using M9 minimal medium was less effective, but the relatively low cost of mineral salt media makes these results important for the industrial-scale production of dipeptides from cyanophycin.

  5. Lipase A gene transcription in Pseudomonas alcaligenes is under control of RNA polymerase s54 and response regulator LipR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzeslak, Joanna; Papaioannou, Evelina; van Merkerk, Ronald; Paal, Krisztina A.; Bischoff, Rainer; Cool, Robbert H.; Quax, Wim J.

    Initial analysis has shown that the transcription of the Pseudomonas alcaligenes lipA gene, which encodes an extracellular lipase, is governed by the LipQR two-component system consisting of sensor kinase LipQ and DNA-binding regulator LipR. This study further analyzes lipA gene expression and

  6. Maintenance and induction of naphthalene degradation activity in Pseudomonas putida and an Alcaligenes sp. under different culture conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerin, W.F.; Boyd, S.A. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1995-11-01

    The expression of xenobiotic-degradative genes in indigenous bacteria or in bacteria introduced into an ecosystem is essential for the successful bioremediation of contaminated environments. The maintenance of naphthalene utilization activity is studied in Pseudomonas putida (ATCC 17484) and an Alcaligenes sp. (strain NP-Alk) under different batch culture conditions. Levels of activity decreased exponentially in stationary phase with half-lives of 43 and 13 h for strains ATCC 17484 nad NP-Alk, respectively. Activity half-lives were 2.7 and 5.3 times longer, respectively, in starved cultures than in stationary-phase cultures following growth on naphthalene. The treatment of starved cultures with chloramphenicol caused a loss of activity more rapid than that measured in untreated starved cultures, suggesting a continued enzyme synthesis in starved cultures in the absence of a substrate. Following growth in nutrient medium, activity decreased to undetectable levels in the Alcaligenes sp. but remained at measureable levels int he pseudomonad even after 9 months. The induction of naphthalene degradation activities in these cultures, when followed by radiorespirometry with {sup 14}C-labeled naphthalene as the substrate, was consistent with activity maintenance data. In the pseudomonad, naphthalene degradation activity was present constitutively at low levels under all growth conditions and was rapidly (in approximately 15 min) induced to high levels upon exposure to naphthalene. Adaptation in the uninduced Alcaligenes sp. occurred after many hours of exposure to naphthalene. In vivo labeling with {sup 35}S, to monitor the extent of de novo enzyme synthesis by naphthalene-challenged cells, provided an independent confirmation of the results. 43 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  8. A Tn5051-like mer-containing transposon identified in a heavy metal tolerant strain Achromobacter sp. AO22

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    Bhave Mrinal

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Achromobacter sp. AO22 (formerly Alcaligenes sp. AO22, a bacterial strain isolated from a lead-contaminated industrial site in Australia, was previously found to be resistant to moderate to high levels of mercury, copper and other heavy metals. However, the nature and location of the genetic basis for mercuric ion resistance in this strain, had not been previously identified. Findings Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a functional mer operon with all four essential genes (merRTPA and shows >99% DNA sequence identity to that of Tn501. The mer operon was present on a transposon, designated TnAO22, captured by introducing a broad-host-range IncP plasmid into Achromobacter sp. AO22 and subsequently transferring it to E. coli recipients. The transposition frequency of TnAO22 was 10-2 to 10-3 per target plasmid transferred. Analysis of TnAO22 sequence revealed it belonged to the Tn21 subgroup of the Tn3 superfamily of transposons, with the transposition module having >99% identity with Tn5051 of a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a water sample in New York. Conclusion TnAO22 is thus a new variant of Tn5051 of the Tn3 superfamily and the transposon and its associated mercury resistance system are among the few such systems reported in a soil bacterium. Achromobacter sp. AO22 can thus be exploited for applications such as in situ mercury bioremediation of contaminated sites, or the mobile unit and mer operon could be mobilized to other bacteria for similar purposes.

  9. A Tn5051-like mer-containing transposon identified in a heavy metal tolerant strain Achromobacter sp. AO22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shee Ping; Davis, Belinda; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2009-03-07

    Achromobacter sp. AO22 (formerly Alcaligenes sp. AO22), a bacterial strain isolated from a lead-contaminated industrial site in Australia, was previously found to be resistant to moderate to high levels of mercury, copper and other heavy metals. However, the nature and location of the genetic basis for mercuric ion resistance in this strain, had not been previously identified. Achromobacter sp. AO22 contains a functional mer operon with all four essential genes (merRTPA) and shows >99% DNA sequence identity to that of Tn501. The mer operon was present on a transposon, designated TnAO22, captured by introducing a broad-host-range IncP plasmid into Achromobacter sp. AO22 and subsequently transferring it to E. coli recipients. The transposition frequency of TnAO22 was 10-2 to 10-3 per target plasmid transferred. Analysis of TnAO22 sequence revealed it belonged to the Tn21 subgroup of the Tn3 superfamily of transposons, with the transposition module having >99% identity with Tn5051 of a Pseudomonas putida strain isolated from a water sample in New York. TnAO22 is thus a new variant of Tn5051 of the Tn3 superfamily and the transposon and its associated mercury resistance system are among the few such systems reported in a soil bacterium. Achromobacter sp. AO22 can thus be exploited for applications such as in situ mercury bioremediation of contaminated sites, or the mobile unit and mer operon could be mobilized to other bacteria for similar purposes.

  10. Class 1 integrons and tetracycline resistance genes in Alcaligenes, Arthrobacter, and Pseudomonas spp. isolated from pigsties and manured soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Sandvang, Dorthe

    2005-01-01

    The presence of tetracycline resistance (Tc-r) genes and class I integrons (in-1), and their ability to cotransfer were investigated in Tc-r gram-negative (185 strains) and gram-positive (72 strains) bacteria from Danish farmland and pigsties. The isolates belonged to the groups or species...... tet(33). No isolates contained more than one tet gene. The in-l-positive isolates were tested for resistance to selected antimicrobial agents and showed resistance to three to nine drugs. Filter-mating experiments showed cotransfer of Tc-r and class I integrons from soil isolates to Escherichia coli...... and/or Pseudomonas putida. We conclude that soil bacteria in close contact to manure or pigsty environment may thus have an important role in horizontal spread of resistance. Use of tetracyclines in food animal production may increase not only Tc-r but also multidrug resistance (caused by the presence...

  11. Achromobacter species in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C R; Pressler, T; Ridderberg, W

    2013-01-01

    Achromobacter species leads to chronic infection in an increasing number of CF patients. We report 2 cases of Achromobacter ruhlandii cross-infection between patients after well-described indirect contact....

  12. Treatment of Achromobacter Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Critically Ill Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, G Christopher; Jonap, Brittany L; Maish, George O; Magnotti, Louis J; Swanson, Joseph M; Boucher, Bradley A; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2018-02-01

    Achromobacter sp are nonfermenting Gram-negative bacilli (NFGNB) that rarely cause severe infections, including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Data on the treatment of Achromobacter pneumonia are very limited, and the organism has been associated with a high mortality rate. Thus, more data are needed on treating this organism. To evaluate the treatment of Achromobacter VAP in critically ill trauma patients. This retrospective, observational study evaluated critically ill trauma patients who developed Achromobacter VAP. A previously published pathway for the diagnosis and management of VAP was used according to routine patient care. This included the use of quantitative bronchoscopic bronchoalveolar lavage cultures to definitively diagnose VAP. A total of 37 episodes of Achromobacter VAP occurred in 34 trauma intensive care unit patients over a 15-year period. The most commonly used definitive antibiotics were imipenem/cilastatin, cefepime, or trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. The primary outcome of clinical success was achieved in 32 of 37 episodes (87%). This is similar to previous studies of other NFGNB VAP (eg, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter) from the study center. Microbiological success was seen in 21 of 28 episodes (75%), and VAP-related mortality was 9% (3 of 34 patients). Achromobacter is a rare but potentially serious cause of VAP in critically ill patients. In this study, there was an acceptable success rate compared with other causes of NFGNB VAP in this patient population.

  13. Taxonomic dissection of Achromobacter denitrificans Coenye et al. 2003 and proposal of Achromobacter agilis sp. nov., nom. rev., Achromobacter pestifer sp. nov., nom. rev., Achromobacter kerstersii sp. nov. and Achromobacter deleyi sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Peter A; Peeters, Charlotte; Inganäs, Elisabeth; Cnockaert, Margo; Houf, Kurt; Spilker, Theodore; Moore, Edward R B; LiPuma, John J

    2016-09-01

    The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of a historical collection of strains identified as Achromobacter denitrificanswere examined. Sequence analysis of a 765 bp nrdA gene fragment revealed that eight of these strains belonged to the recently described Achromobacter aegrifaciens, Achromobacter mucicolens, and Achromobacter insolitus, and that one strain belonged to Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The analysis also suggested the presence of four novel species of the genus Achromobacter among the remaining strains. The latter was confirmed by multilocus sequence analysis of concatenated nusA, eno, rpoB, gltB, lepA, nuoL andnrdA gene fragments and extensive genotypic and phenotypic characterization. We propose to name these novel species as Achromobacter agilis sp. nov., nom. rev. (type strain LMG 3411T=CCUG 62454T), Achromobacter pestifer sp. nov., nom. rev. (type strain LMG 3431T=CCUG 61959T) , Achromobacter kerstersii sp. nov. (type strain LMG 3441T=CCUG 62449T) and Achromobacter deleyi sp. nov. (type strain LMG 3458T=CCUG 62433T).

  14. Osteomyelitis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans

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    Takashi Shinha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an aerobic, nonfermenting gram-negative rod and described as a waterborne bacterium since it habits aquatic environments ubiquitously. It has frequently been isolated from aquatic surroundings in the hospital and from various human body sites. Although occasionally considered a non-pathogen, A. xylosoxidans has been associated with outbreaks of nosocomial infection due to contaminated fluids. Moreover, a wide variety of infectious etiologies due to A. xylosoxidans has been reported primarily in immunocompromised individuals. Heightened awareness of this bacterium and associated clinical importance is warranted for clinicians since its broad disease spectrum in humans and frequent multi-drug resistance may result in an increased mortality rate. In this report, we describe a case of osteomyelitis caused by A. xylosoxidans in a patient with a history of diabetes mellitus.

  15. Biofilm formation of Achromobacter xylosoxidans on contact lens.

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    Konstantinović, Neda; Ćirković, Ivana; Đukić, Slobodanka; Marić, Vesna; Božić, Dragana D

    2017-09-01

    Achromobacter spp. may contaminate lenses, lens cases, and contact lens solutions and cause ocular infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of isolated strain of Achromobacter xylosoxidans to form biofilm on the surface of soft contact lenses (CL), to quantify the production of the formed biofilm, and compare it with the reference strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Haemophilus influenzae). Bacterial strain isolated from one contact lens case was identified as A. xylosoxidans using Vitek2 Automated System. Biofilm forming capacity of isolated strain of A. xylosoxidans and reference strains of P. aeruginosa, S. aureus, and H. influenzae on soft CL were analyzed by commonly used microtitre plate method. Our results showed that isolated strain of A. xylosoxidans was capable to form biofilm on the surface of soft contact lens. A. xylosoxidans was strong biofilm producer while all examined reference strains were moderate biofilm producers. A. xylosoxidans appears to be superior biofilm producer on soft CL compared to reference strains.

  16. Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis after contact lens usage.

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    Park, Jung Hyun; Song, Nang Hee; Koh, Jae Woong

    2012-02-01

    To report on Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis in two healthy patients who had worn contact lenses foran extended period of time. A 36-year-old female and a 21-year-old female visited our hospital with ocular pain and blurred vision. Both patients had a history of wearing soft contact lenses for over fve years with occasional overnight wear. At the initial presentation, a slit lamp examination revealed corneal stromal infiltrations and epithelial defects with peripheral neovascularization in both patients. Microbiological examinations were performed from samples of corneal scrapings, contact lenses, contact lens cases, and solution. The culture resulting from the samples taken from the contact lenses, contact lens cases, and solution were all positive for Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Confrming that the direct cause of the keratitis was the contact lenses, the frst patient was prescribed ceftazidime and amikacin drops sensitive to Achromobacter xylosoxidans. The second patient was treated with 0.3% gatifoxacin and fortifed tobramycin drops. After treatment, the corneal epithelial defects were completely healed, and subepithelial corneal opacity was observed. Two cases of Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis were reported in healthy young females who wore soft contact lenses. Achromobacter xylosoxidans should be considered a rare but potentially harmful pathogen for lens-induced keratitis in healthy hosts.

  17. Complicated septic shock caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infections caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans cause significant morbidity and mortality in debilitated individuals. Eradication of these infections requires prolonged therapy with antimicrobial agents and removal of any infected central venous catheter. The outcome is usually poor in patients with high risk malignancy, ...

  18. Achromobacter species endocarditis: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Catherine Derber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Endocarditis due to Achromobacter species is a rare, yet serious, endovascular infection. Achromobacter species infective endocarditis is associated with underlying immunodeficiencies or prosthetic heart valves and devices. A case of prosthetic pulmonary valve endocarditis secondary to Achromobacter xylosoxidans subspecies denitrificans is described in the present report. This life-threatening infection was successfully treated with combined valve replacement and prolonged antibiotic therapy. A Medline/PubMed literature review of Achromobacter endocarditis was also performed. Achromobacter species are an uncommon, yet important, cause of nosocomial endocarditis. Given the significant associated morbidity and mortality, along with a high degree of intrinsic antibiotic resistance, Achromobacter species infective endocarditis remains a clinical treatment challenge.

  19. Achromobacter xylosoxidans Keratitis after Contact Lens Usage

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jung Hyun; Song, Nang Hee; Koh, Jae Woong

    2012-01-01

    To report on Achromobacter xylosoxidans keratitis in two healthy patients who had worn contact lenses foran extended period of time. A 36-year-old female and a 21-year-old female visited our hospital with ocular pain and blurred vision. Both patients had a history of wearing soft contact lenses for over fve years with occasional overnight wear. At the initial presentation, a slit lamp examination revealed corneal stromal infiltrations and epithelial defects with peripheral neovascularization ...

  20. Endophthalmitis caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans following Cataract Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, Victor M.; Emanuelli, Andres; Flynn, Harry W.; Berrocal, Audina M.; Miller, Darlene; Kao, Andrew A.; Dubovy, Sander R.; Alfonso, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report Achromobacter xylosoxidans as a cause of both acute-onset and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Methods A non-comparative, consecutive case series of patients with culture-proven A. xylosoxidans endophthalmitis between 1970 and 2012. Cataract surgery and intraocular lens placement were performed in all patients prior to endophthalmitis. Positive cultures were obtained from the vitreous, capsular bag, and/or the removed intraocular lens. Results The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in 4 patients with positive cultures. Two endophthalmitis patients had a preliminary culture report of Pseudomonas species. In addition to receiving intravitreal antibiotics, all patients underwent capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal at the time of pars plana vitrectomy. Visual acuity at last follow up was 20/40 or better in 2 of 4 (50%) but the remaining 2 patients were 20/200 or worse. Conclusion A. xylosoxidans may be a cause of acute, recurrent, and delayed-onset postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Complete capsulectomy and intraocular lens removal can be considered in recurrent and recalcitrant patients. PMID:24150240

  1. Achromobacter Species Isolated from Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveal Distinctly Different Biofilm Morphotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Signe M; Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    findings were visualized in sputum samples from cystic fibrosis patients using an Achromobacter specific peptide nucleic acid fluorescence in situ hybridization (PNA-FISH) probe, confirming the presence of Achromobacter biofilms in the CF lung. High antibiotic tolerance was associated with the biofilm......Achromobacter species have attracted attention as emerging pathogens in cystic fibrosis. The clinical significance of Achromobacter infection is not yet fully elucidated; however, their intrinsic resistance to antimicrobials and ability to form biofilms renders them capable of establishing long...

  2. High-level nickel resistance in Alcaligenes xylosoxydans 31A and Alcaligenes eutrophus KTO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, T.; Stoppel, R.D.; Schlegel, H.G. (Inst. fuer Mikrobiologie der Georg-August-Univ., Goettingen (West Germany))

    1991-11-01

    Two new nickel-resistant strains of Alcaligenes species were selected from a large number (about 400) of strains isolated from ecosystems polluted by heavy metals and were studied on the physiological and molecular level. Alcaligenes xylosoxydans 31A is a heterotrophic bacterium, and Alcaligenes eutrophus KTO2 is an autotrophic aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium. Both strains carry - among other plasmids - a megaplasmid determining resistance to 20 to 50 mM NiCl{sub 2} and 20 mM CoCl{sub 2} (when growing in defined Tris-buffered media). Megaplasmid pTOM8, pTOM9 from strain 31A, and pGOE2 from strain KTO2 confer nickel resistance to the same degree to transconjugants of all strains of A. eutrophus tested but were not transferred to Escherichia coli. However, DNA fragments carrying the nickel resistance genes, cloned into broad-host- range vector pVDZ{prime}2, confer resistance to A. eutrophus derivatives as well as E. coli. The DNA fragments of both bacteria, TBA8, TBA9, and GBA (14.5-kb BamHI fragments), appear to be identical. They share equal size, restriction maps, and strong DNA homology but are largely different from fragment HKI of nickel-cobalt resistance plasmid pMOL28 of A. eutrophus CH34.

  3. High-Level Nickel Resistance in Alcaligenes xylosoxydans 31A and Alcaligenes eutrophus KTO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, T; Stoppel, R D; Schlegel, H G

    1991-11-01

    Two new nickel-resistant strains of Alcaligenes species were selected from a large number (about 400) of strains isolated from ecosystems polluted by heavy metals and were studied on the physiological and molecular level. Alcaligenes xylosoxydans 31A is a heterotrophic bacterium, and Alcaligenes eutrophus KTO2 is an autotrophic aerobic hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium. Both strains carry-among other plasmids-a megaplasmid determining resistance to 20 to 50 mM NiCl(2) and 20 mM CoCl(2) (when growing in defined Tris-buffered media). Megaplasmids pTOM8, pTOM9 from strain 31A, and pGOE2 from strain KTO2 confer nickel resistance to the same degree to transconjugants of all strains of A. eutrophus tested but were not transferred to Escherichia coli. However, DNA fragments carrying the nickel resistance genes, cloned into broad-hostrange vector pVDZ'2, confer resistance to A. eutrophus derivatives as well as E. coli. The DNA fragments of both bacteria, TBA8, TBA9, and GBA (14.5-kb BamHI fragments), appear to be identical. They share equal size, restriction maps, and strong DNA homology but are largely different from fragment HKI of nickel-cobalt resistance plasmid pMOL28 of A. eutrophus CH34.

  4. Scleral buckle infection with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans

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    Chih-Kang Hsu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a rare case of extraocular inflammation secondary to scleral buckle infection with Alcaligenes xylosoxidans. A 60-year-old female with a history of retinal detachment repair with open-book technique of scleral buckling presented with purulent discharge and irritation in the right eye that had begun 4 weeks earlier and had been treated ineffectively at another hospital. Conjunctival erosion with exposure of the scleral buckle was noted. The scleral buckle was removed and cultured. The explanted material grew gram-negative rod later identified as A. xylosoxidans. On the basis of the susceptibility test results, the patient was treated by subconjunctival injection and fortified topical ceftazidime. After 4 weeks of treatment, the infection resolved.

  5. “Watch Out! Pneumonia Secondary to Achromobacter Denitrificans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pneumonia is the cause of significant morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries. The frequency and importance of emerging new pathogens have significant implications for therapy. We report a case of pneumonia caused by a very rare organism, Achromobacter denitrificans which was treated successfully ...

  6. Early treatment with inhaled antibiotics postpones next occurrence of Achromobacter in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Mikala; Ridderberg, W; Hansen, Christine Rønne

    2013-01-01

    In this nationwide retrospective study, we analysed species distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and time to next occurrence of Achromobacter in Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from 2000 to 2011.......In this nationwide retrospective study, we analysed species distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and time to next occurrence of Achromobacter in Danish cystic fibrosis (CF) patients from 2000 to 2011....

  7. OXA-258 from Achromobacter ruhlandii: a species-specific marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia, Mariana; Almuzara, Marisa; Cejas, Daniela; Traglia, German; Ramírez, Maria Soledad; Galanternik, Laura; Vay, Carlos; Gutkind, Gabriel; Radice, Marcela

    2013-05-01

    A new blaOXA-258 gene is described as a species-specific taxonomic marker for Achromobacter ruhlandii isolates (all recovered from cystic fibrosis patients). Even though OXA-258 differs from OXA-114 variants, isolates could be misidentified as A. xiloxosidans by the amplification of an inner fragment from the OXA-coding gene. A robust identification of A. ruhlandii can be achieved by sequencing this single OXA gene, as well as by a more laborious recently proposed multilocus sequence-typing (MLST) scheme.

  8. Keratitis Due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans in a Contact Lens User.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenara Michelena, Cristina; Del Buey, María Ángeles; Ascaso, Francisco Javier; Cristóbal, Jose Ángel

    2017-03-27

    Ocular infections due to Achromobacter xylosoxidans are extremely uncommon; their diagnosis is a challenge and the optimal treatment remains controversial. We present a case of A. xylosoxidans in a contact lens user and a review of the literature to facilitate diagnostic suspicion and empirical therapeutic management. Review of the literature in PubMed and MEDLINE. We also document a case diagnosed in our department in January 2016. Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Zaragoza, Spain. According to the literature, clinical manifestations and antibiotic sensitivity of A. xylosoxidans varied greatly. Our patient with no history of keratopathy presented three risk factors that made the diagnosis suspicious. The infection was resolved with topical moxifloxacin and fluorometholone. A. xylosoxidans is an uncommon cause of infection, but must be suspected in atypical keratitis, reported contact with warm or still waters, use of contact lenses, or previous corneal damage. In these cases, microbiological studies and antibiotic sensitivity testing are particularly important.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  9. Diyabetik Ayak Enfeksiyonunda Nadir Rastlanılan Bir Etken: Achromobacter Xylosoxidans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz Kayaş

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Foot infections are the most common infectious complications needs patient to be hospitalized in persons with diabetes. Achromobacter xylosoxidans especially causes invasive infections in immunocompromised patients such as malignancy, solid organ transplantation, hypogammaglobulinemia, AIDS and premature babies. With this case report we want to present two cases of Achromobacter xylosoxidans as extremely rare seen cause of diabetic foot infection. The cases are followed up more than 10 years in our out-patient clinic with a diabetes and diabetic foot complications. The tissue cultures of these cases with the soft tissue infection were identified as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and with surgical debridement and antimicrobial therapy we get effective clinical and microbiological results. Tissue culture is very important to find and identify the real microorganism causing an infection in a diabetic foot infections. To make a true microbiological culture leads us to identify the extremely rare seen microorganisms and to plan the therapy as in our cases.

  10. Identification of a partition and replication region in the Alcaligenes eutrophus megaplasmid pMOL28.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, S; Provoost, A; Mergeay, M; van der Lelie, D

    1996-02-05

    A 4.64 kb region of the 180 kb heavy metal resistance plasmid pMOL28 of Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34, previously shown to be able to replicate autonomously, was sequenced and analyzed. Three genes involved in plasmid maintenance were identified: parA28 and parB28 are involved in plasmid partitioning and stability, while repA28 encodes a protein required for replication. In addition to the par AB28 genes, a third locus, parS28, required in cis active partitioning was identified. The parABS28 locus of pMOL28 shows strong similarity in organization to the sop, par and rep regions, respectively, of the Escherichia coli F-factor, the E.coli P1 and P7 prophages and the Agrobacterium pTiB6S3 and pRiA4b plasmids. The ParAB28 proteins of pMOL28 also show similarity to the proteins encoded by two conserved open reading frames present in the replication regions of the Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis chromosomes. The functionality of the pMOL28 par region was examined by performing stability and incompatibility tests between pMOL28 and pMOL846 or pMOL850 which contain the 4.64 EcoRI replicon fragment of pMOL28, cloned in opposite orientations into pSUP202, which is itself unable to replicate in A. eutrophus. The RepA2 8 replication protein showed similarity to the RepL protein of P1, which is required for lytic replication of this E. coli phage. The replication origin of pMOL28, oriV28, seems to be located within the repA28 coding region, and pMOL28 replication may depend on transcriptional activation of oriV28.

  11. Growth of non-Campylobacter, oxidase-positive bacteria on selective Campylobacter agar.

    OpenAIRE

    Moskowitz, L B; Chester, B

    1982-01-01

    A total of 67 oxidase-positive, gram-negative bacteria were tested for growth on selective Campylobacter agar (Blaser formulation, BBL Microbiology Systems, Cockeysville, Md.) at 42 degrees C under microaerophilic conditions. Although the growth of most of these bacteria was prevented, all strains of Achromobacter xylosoxidans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putrefaciens, Pseudomonas alcaligenes, and Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes grew as well as Campylobacter fetus subsp. jejuni.

  12. Chronic infection with Achromobacter xylosoxidans in cystic fibrosis patients; a retrospective case control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønne Hansen, Christine; Pressler, Tacjana; Høiby, Niels

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans have become more frequent. The pathogenic role of this is yet unclear. METHODS: A retrospective case-control study of all patients chronically infected with A. xylosoxidans for at least 3 years. 15...

  13. Genetic Adaptation of Achromobacter sp. during Persistence in the Lungs of Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winnie Ridderberg

    Full Text Available Achromobacter species are increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients and often a chronic infection is established. How Achromobacter sp. adapts to the human host remains uncharacterised. By comparing longitudinally collected isolates of Achromobacter sp. isolated from five CF patients, we have investigated the within-host evolution of clonal lineages. The majority of identified mutations were isolate-specific suggesting co-evolution of several subpopulations from the original infecting isolate. The largest proportion of mutated genes were involved in the general metabolism of the bacterium, but genes involved in virulence and antimicrobial resistance were also affected. A number of virulence genes required for initiation of acute infection were selected against, e.g. genes of the type I and type III secretion systems and genes related to pilus and flagellum formation or function. Six antimicrobial resistance genes or their regulatory genes were mutated, including large deletions affecting the repressor genes of an RND-family efflux pump and a beta-lactamase. Convergent evolution was observed for five genes that were all implicated in bacterial virulence. Characterisation of genes involved in adaptation of Achromobacter to the human host is required for understanding the pathogen-host interaction and facilitate design of future therapeutic interventions.

  14. Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans prosthetic aortic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, S; Stark, D; Marriott, D; Harkness, J

    2008-04-01

    We report a case of prosthetic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans. The patient was an intravenous drug user and had injected amphetamines using 'duck pond water' as a diluent. After surgical intervention and 6 weeks of intravenous meropenem therapy, the patient made an uneventful recovery.

  15. Oil and Hydrocarbon Spill Bioremediation Product and Application Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    important found in marine and soil environments are Achromobacter, Acinetobacter, Alcaligenes, Arthrobacter, Bacillus, Flavobacterium, Nocardia , and...Kiebsiella Heiminthosporium Lactobacillus Mucor Leucothrix Oidiadendrumn Moraxella Paecylomyces Nocardia Phialophora Peptococcus Penicillium Pseudomonas...required since they are incorporated in the mixture. The product is non-toxic to humans, fish , or wildlife. No specific data on application rates

  16. Conversion of industrial food wastes by Alcaligenes latus into polyhydroxyalkanoates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P H; Chua, H; Huang, A L; Ho, K P

    1999-01-01

    Broader usage of biodegradable plastics in packaging and disposable products as a solution to environmental problems would heavily depend on further reduction of costs and the discovery of novel biodegradable plastics with improved properties. As the first step in our pursuit of eventual usage of industrial food wastewater as nutrients for microorganisms to synthesise environmental-friendly bioplastics, we investigated the usage of soya wastes from a soya milk dairy, and malt wastes from a beer brewery plant as the carbon sources for the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) by selected strain of microorganism. Bench experiments showed that Alcaligenes latus DSM 1124 used the nutrients from malt and soya wastes to biosynthesise PHAs. The final dried cell mass and specific polymer production of A. latus DSM 1124 were 32g/L and 70% polymer/cells (g/g), 18.42 g/L and 32.57% polymer/cell (g/g), and 28 g/L and 36% polymer/cells (g/g), from malt waste, soya waste, and from sucrose, respectively. These results suggest that many types of food wastes might be used as the carbon source for the production of PHA.

  17. Optimizing the production of welan gum by Alcaligenes facalis NX-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... These predicted values were also verified by validation experiments. Key words: Alcaligenes facalis NX-3, Medium optimization, Plackett–Burman design, statistical experiment design, welan gum. ... However, it has not yet been reported as a means to study and optimize process parameters for welan gum ...

  18. Stimulation of the ionic transport system in Brassica napus by a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (Achromobacter sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, H; Plassard, C; Pinochet, X; Touraine, B; Normand, P; Cleyet-Marel, J C

    2000-03-01

    A plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium belonging to the genus Achromobacter was isolated from the oil-seed-rape (Brassica napus) root. Growth promotion bioassays were performed with oilseed rape seedlings in a growth chamber in test tubes containing attapulgite and mineral nutrient solution, containing NO3- as N source. The presence of this Achromobacter strain increased shoot and root dry weight by 22-33% and 6-21%, respectively. Inoculation of young seedlings with the Achromobacter bacteria induced a 100% improvement in NO3- uptake by the whole root system. Observations on the seminal root of seedlings 20 h after inoculation showed that there was an enhancement of both the number and the length of root hairs, compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Electrophysiological measurements of NO3- net flux with ion-selective microelectrodes showed that inoculation resulted in a specific increase of net nitrate flux in a root zone morphologically similar in inoculated and non-inoculated plants. The root area increased due to root hair stimulation by the Achromobacter bacteria, which might have contributed to the improvement of NO3- uptake by the whole root system, together with the enhancement of specific NO3- uptake rate. Moreover, inoculated plants showed increased potassium net influx and proton net efflux. Overall, the data presented suggest that the inoculation of oilseed-rape with the bacteria Achromobacter affects the mineral uptake.

  19. Kinetics and metabolic versatility of highly tolerant phenol degrading Alcaligenes strain TW1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essam, Tamer; Amin, Magdy Aly; El Tayeb, Ossama; Mattiasson, Bo; Guieysse, Benoit

    2010-01-15

    A bacterium that could completely metabolize phenol in batch culture supplied with up to 1200 mg phenol l(-1) at room temperature (25 degrees C) was isolated from the activated sludge of the industrial wastewater treatment plant of a Coke company (Cairo, Egypt). Morphological and physiological characterization showed strain TW1 was a motile, strictly aerobic, gram negative and short-rod occurring singly or in clusters. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed strain TW1 belonged to the beta group of Proteobacteria, showing 100% identity to Alcaligenes SCTI. Strain TW1 aerobically grew on a number of monocyclic aromatic compounds (hydroquinone, catechol and o-cresol) as well as polycyclic aromatic compounds (pyrene, phenanthrene and naphthalene). The growth of Alcaligenes TW1 on phenol as sole carbon and energy source (25 degrees C) was well described by the Haldane kinetics model with a maximal specific growth rate of 0.58 h(-1), a half-saturation constant of 10 mg l(-1), and a substrate inhibition constant of 152-550 mg l(-1). The biomass yield coefficient ranged from 0.55 to 0.64 mg dry cell mass/mg phenol. Due to its high tolerance to phenol and high metabolic versatility, Alcaligenes sp. TW1 is considered an excellent candidate for the biotreatment of high strength phenol-laden industrial wastewaters.

  20. Prevalence and Outcomes of Achromobacter Species Infections in Adults with Cystic Fibrosis: a North American Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, B D; Greysson-Wong, J; Somayaji, R; Waddell, B; Whelan, F J; Storey, D G; Rabin, H R; Surette, M G; Parkins, M D

    2017-07-01

    Achromobacter species are increasingly being detected in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with an unclear epidemiology and impact. We studied a cohort of patients attending a Canadian adult CF clinic who had positive sputum cultures for Achromobacter species in the period from 1984 to 2013. Infection was categorized as transient or persistent (≥50% positive cultures for 1 year). Those with persistent infection were matched 2:1 with age-, sex-, and time-matched controls without a history of Achromobacter infection, and mixed-effects models were used to assess pulmonary exacerbation (PEx) frequency and lung function decline. Isolates from a biobank were retrospectively assessed, identified to the species level by nrdA sequencing, and genotyped using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Thirty-four patients (11% of those in our clinic), with a median age of 24 years (interquartile range [IQR], 20.3 to 29.8 years), developed Achromobacter infection. Ten patients (29%) developed persistent infection. Persistence did not denote permanence, as most patients ultimately cleared infection, often after years. Patients were more likely to experience PEx at incident isolation than at prior or subsequent visits (odds ratio [OR], 2.7 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.2 to 6.7]; P = 0.03). Following persistent infection, there was no difference in annual lung function decline (-1.08% [95% CI, -2.73 to 0.57%] versus -2.74% [95% CI, -4.02 to 1.46%]; P = 0.12) or the odds of PEx (OR, 1.21 [95% CI, 0.45 to 3.28]; P = 0.70). Differential virulence among Achromobacter species was not observed, and no cases of transmission occurred. We demonstrated that incident Achromobacter infection was associated with a greater risk of PEx; however, neither transient nor chronic infection was associated with a worsened long-term prognosis. Large, multicenter studies are needed to clarify the clinical impact, natural history, and transmissibility of Achromobacter . Copyright © 2017 American

  1. Clinical Features, Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles, and Outcomes of Infectious Keratitis Caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spierer, Oriel; Monsalve, Pedro F; OʼBrien, Terrence P; Alfonso, Eduardo C; Gologorsky, Daniel; Miller, Darlene

    2016-05-01

    Reports on Achromobacter xylosoxidans ocular infections are increasing, drawing attention to its emerging role in infectious keratitis. The purpose of this study is to report the clinical features, antibiotic sensitivities, and visual outcomes of infectious keratitis secondary to Achromobacter xylosoxidans. A microbiology database and clinical chart review was performed in all patients diagnosed with A. xylosoxidans keratitis at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between the years 1987 and 2014. Initial presentation, antimicrobial susceptibilities, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), treatment course, and outcomes were recorded. Twenty-eight patients were identified. The main risk factors were corneal graft (n = 8, 28.6%) and contact lens wear (n = 8, 28.6%). On presentation, visual acuity was 20/100 or worse in 20 (71.2%) patients. Hypopyon was present in 7 (25.0%) patients. In most cases, topical fluoroquinolones or tobramycin were the initial treatment, often accompanied by vancomycin. High susceptibility rates were found for piperacillin [100%, minimum inhibitory concentration for 90% of isolates (MIC90) = 8] and ticarcillin (100%, MIC90 = 16). Low susceptibility rates were documented for ciprofloxacin (46.7%, MIC90 = 8), tobramycin (26.7%, MIC90 = 16), and gentamicin (20%, MIC90 = 16). One (3.6%) patient suffered endophthalmitis. Six (21.4%) patients underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty, and 2 (7.1%) patients had conjunctival flap surgery. Visual acuity at final follow-up was 20/100 or worse in 16 (57.1%) patients. Infectious keratitis caused by A. xylosoxidans is associated with poor visual outcomes. Fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides are not appropriate treatments for these ocular infections. Further studies are needed to define the clinical application of compound piperacillin and ticarcillin eye drops.

  2. Uncovering Differences in Virulence Markers Associated with Achromobacter Species of CF and Non-CF Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipic, Brankica; Malesevic, Milka; Vasiljevic, Zorica; Lukic, Jovanka; Novovic, Katarina; Kojic, Milan; Jovcic, Branko

    2017-01-01

    Achromobacter spp. are recognized as emerging pathogens in hospitalized as well as in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. From 2012 to 2015, we collected 69 clinical isolates (41 patient) of Achromobacter spp. from 13 patients with CF (CF isolates, n = 32) and 28 patients receiving care for other health conditions (non-CF isolates, n = 37). Molecular epidemiology and virulence potential of isolates were examined. Antimicrobial susceptibility, motility, ability to form biofilms and binding affinity to mucin, collagen, and fibronectin were tested to assess their virulence traits. The nrdA gene sequencing showed that A. xylosoxidans was the most prevalent species in both CF and non-CF patients. CF patients were also colonized with A. dolens/A. ruhlandii, A. insuavis, and A. spiritinus strains while non-CF group was somewhat less heterogenous, although A. insuavis, A. insolitus, and A. piechaudii strains were detected beside A. xylosoxidans. Three strains displayed clonal distribution, one among patients from the CF group and two among non-CF patients. No significant differences in susceptibility to antimicrobials were observed between CF and non-CF patients. About one third of the isolates were classified as strong biofilm producers, and the proportion of CF and non-CF isolates with the ability to form biofilm was almost identical. CF isolates were less motile compared to the non-CF group and no correlation was found between swimming phenotype and biofilm formation. On the other hand, CF isolates exhibited higher affinity to bind mucin, collagen, and fibronectin. In generall, CF isolates from our study exhibited in vitro properties that could be of importance for the colonization of CF patients.

  3. Uncovering Differences in Virulence Markers Associated with Achromobacter Species of CF and Non-CF Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brankica Filipic

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Achromobacter spp. are recognized as emerging pathogens in hospitalized as well as in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. From 2012 to 2015, we collected 69 clinical isolates (41 patient of Achromobacter spp. from 13 patients with CF (CF isolates, n = 32 and 28 patients receiving care for other health conditions (non-CF isolates, n = 37. Molecular epidemiology and virulence potential of isolates were examined. Antimicrobial susceptibility, motility, ability to form biofilms and binding affinity to mucin, collagen, and fibronectin were tested to assess their virulence traits. The nrdA gene sequencing showed that A. xylosoxidans was the most prevalent species in both CF and non-CF patients. CF patients were also colonized with A. dolens/A. ruhlandii, A. insuavis, and A. spiritinus strains while non-CF group was somewhat less heterogenous, although A. insuavis, A. insolitus, and A. piechaudii strains were detected beside A. xylosoxidans. Three strains displayed clonal distribution, one among patients from the CF group and two among non-CF patients. No significant differences in susceptibility to antimicrobials were observed between CF and non-CF patients. About one third of the isolates were classified as strong biofilm producers, and the proportion of CF and non-CF isolates with the ability to form biofilm was almost identical. CF isolates were less motile compared to the non-CF group and no correlation was found between swimming phenotype and biofilm formation. On the other hand, CF isolates exhibited higher affinity to bind mucin, collagen, and fibronectin. In generall, CF isolates from our study exhibited in vitro properties that could be of importance for the colonization of CF patients.

  4. Cybernetic structured modeling of the production of polyhydroxyalkanoates by Alcaligenes Eutrophus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. FERRAZ

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a cybernetic structured mathematical model developed for the fermentation step of the process of production of the copolymer of polyhydroxyalkanoates by the bacteria Alcaligenes eutrophus. This process is performed in two different fermentation stages. The first emphasizes the growth of the microorganism in a batch operation without substrates limitations, while in the second, the focus is on copolymer production by a fed-batch operation in the absence of the nitrogen source. This paper presents the results of the treatment of experimental data and of preliminary parameter estimation. The fitting of the proposed model to the experimental data of a standard experiment showed a good agreement.

  5. Genomic Characterization of VIM Metallo-β-Lactamase-Producing Alcaligenes faecalis from Gaza, Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Laham, Nahed; Chavda, Kalyan D; Cienfuegos-Gallet, Astrid V; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Chen, Liang

    2017-11-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria (CP-GNB) have increasingly spread worldwide, and different families of carbapenemases have been identified in various bacterial species. Here, we report the identification of five VIM metallo-β-lactamase-producing Alcaligenes faecalis isolates associated with a small outbreak in a large hospital in Gaza, Palestine. Next-generation sequencing analysis showed blaVIM-2 is harbored by a chromosomal genomic island among three strains, while blaVIM-4 is carried by a novel plasmid in two strains. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. Purification and characterization of maleylacetate reductase from Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134(pJP4).

    OpenAIRE

    Seibert, V; Stadler-Fritzsche, K; Schlömann, M

    1993-01-01

    Maleylacetate reductase (EC 1.3.1.32) plays a major role in the degradation of chloroaromatic compounds by channeling maleylacetate and some of its substituted derivatives into the 3-oxoadipate pathway. The enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity from an extract of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D)-grown cells of Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134. Maleylacetate reductase appears to be a dimer of two identical subunits of 35 kDa. The pI was determined to be at pH 5.4. There was no indication o...

  7. Met144Ala mutation of the copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans reverses the intramolecular electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Eady, Robert R; Sawers, Gary

    2004-01-01

    Pulse radiolysis has been employed to investigate the intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 (T1) and type 2 (T2) copper sites in the Met144Ala Alcaligenes xylosoxidans nitrite reductase (AxCuNiR) mutant. This mutation increases the reduction potential of the T1 copper center...

  8. Effect of an Alcaligenes faecalis inoculant strain on bacterial communities in flooded soil microcosms planted with rice seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, M.; Smalla, K.; Heuer, H.; Elsas, van J.D.

    2000-01-01

    The fate and impact of Alcaligenes faecalis strain A1501R, a rifampicin-resistant derivative of a rice inoculant strain, were studied in flooded silt loam microcosms planted with rice seedlings. Selective plating revealed that strain A1501R survived at high, initially stable and later slowly

  9. Stenotrophomonas, Achromobacter, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species: antimicrobial resistance and therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Iain J; Peleg, Anton Y

    2015-02-01

    Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Achromobacter xylosoxidans, and nonmelioid Burkholderia species, namely, Burkholderia cepacia complex, collectively are a group of troublesome nonfermenters. Although not inherently virulent organisms, these environmental Gram negatives can complicate treatment in those who are immunocompromised, critically ill in the intensive care unit and those patients with suppurative lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis. Through a range of intrinsic antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, virulence factors, and the ability to survive in biofilms, these opportunistic pathogens are well suited to persist, both in the environment and the host. Treatment recommendations are hindered by the difficulties in laboratory identification, the lack of reproducibility of antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the lack of clinical breakpoints, and the absence of clinical outcome data. Despite trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole often being the mainstay of treatment, resistance is widely encountered, and alternative regimens, including combination therapy, are often used. This review will highlight the important aspects and unique challenges that these three nonfermenters pose, and, in the absence of clinical outcome data, our therapeutic recommendations will be based on reported antimicrobial susceptibility and pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiles. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Anaerobic taurine oxidation: a novel reaction by a nitrate-reducing Alcaligenes sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denger, K; Laue, H; Cook, A M

    1997-06-01

    Enrichment cultures were prepared under strictly anoxic conditions in medium representing fresh water and containing an organosulfonate as electron donor and carbon source, and nitrate as electron acceptor. The inoculum was from the anaerobic digestor of two communal sewage works. The natural organosulfonates 2-aminoethanesulfonate (taurine), DL-2-amino-3-sulfopropionate (cysteate) and 2-hydroxyethanesulfonate (isethionate) all gave positive enrichments, whereas unsubstituted alkanesulfonates, such as methanesulfonate and arenesulfonates, gave no enrichment. Two representative enrichments were used to obtain pure cultures, and strains NKNTAU (utilizing taurine) and NKNIS (utilizing isethionate) were isolated. Strain NKNTAU was examined in detail. Out of 18 tested organosulfonates, it utilized only one, taurine, and was identified as a novel Alcaligenes sp., a facultatively anaerobic bacterium. Carbon from taurine was converted to cell material and carbon dioxide. The amino group was released as ammonium ion and the sulfonate moiety was recovered as sulfate. Nitrate was reduced to nitrogen gas.

  11. Purification and properties of inducible penicillin beta-lactamase isolated from Alcaligenes faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Sato, K; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1985-04-01

    An inducible penicillin beta-lactamase was purified from a strain of Alcaligenes faecalis resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. The purified enzyme preparation gave a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was 29,000 based on sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its isoelectric point was 5.9. The enzyme more rapidly hydrolyzed penicillins, such as penicillin G, ampicillin, carbenicillin, piperacillin, and cloxacillin, than it hydrolyzed cephalosporins. For the hydrolysis of penicillin G, the optimal pH was 5.5, and the optimal temperature was 35 degrees C. The enzyme activity was inhibited by iodine, Cu2+, Hg2+, and EDTA but was not inhibited by clavulanic acid and sulbactam.

  12. Purification and properties of a beta-lactamase from Alcaligenes dentrificans subsp. xylosoxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Sato, K; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1985-09-01

    A penicillin beta-lactamase was purified from a strain of Alcaligenes dentrificans subsp. xylosoxydans resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. The purified enzyme preparation gave a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was 18,000 from sodium dodecylsulphate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration. Its isoelectric point was 9.8, the optimal pH was 8.5 and the optimal temperature was 35 degrees C. The enzyme hydrolyzed penicillin G and ampicillin more rapidly than cephalosporins. Relative rates, with penicillin G as 100, were: ampicillin, 102; carbenicillin, 15; cloxacillin, less than 1; piperacillin, 9; cephaloridine, 41; cefoperazone, 36; cefpiramide, 36 and cefmenoxime, 14. Clavulanic acid, sulbactam, imipenem, and cephamycins had low affinities for the enzyme. The enzyme activity was inhibited by iodine, Hg2+, clavulanic acid and sulbactam.

  13. Genome Sequencing Reveals the Potential of Achromobacter sp. HZ01 for Bioremediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Hui Hong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum pollution is a severe environmental issue. Comprehensively revealing the genetic backgrounds of hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms contributes to developing effective methods for bioremediation of crude oil-polluted environments. Marine bacterium Achromobacter sp. HZ01 is capable of degrading hydrocarbons and producing biosurfactants. In this study, the draft genome (5.5 Mbp of strain HZ01 has been obtained by Illumina sequencing, containing 5,162 predicted genes. Genome annotation shows that “amino acid metabolism” is the most abundant metabolic pathway. Strain HZ01 is not capable of using some common carbohydrates as the sole carbon sources, which is due to that it contains few genes associated with carbohydrate transport and lacks some important enzymes related to glycometabolism. It contains abundant proteins directly related to petroleum hydrocarbon degradation. AlkB hydroxylase and its homologs were not identified. It harbors a complete enzyme system of terminal oxidation pathway for n-alkane degradation, which may be initiated by cytochrome P450. The enzymes involved in the catechol pathway are relatively complete for the degradation of aromatic compounds. This bacterium lacks several essential enzymes for methane oxidation, and Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase involved in the subterminal oxidation pathway and cycloalkane degradation was not identified. These results suggest that strain HZ01 degrades n-alkanes via the terminal oxidation pathway, degrades aromatic compounds primarily via the catechol pathway and cannot perform methane oxidation or cycloalkane degradation. Additionally, strain HZ01 possesses abundant genes related to the metabolism of secondary metabolites, including some genes involved in biosurfactant (such as glycolipids and lipopeptides synthesis. The genome analysis also reveals its genetic basis for nitrogen metabolism, antibiotic resistance, regulatory responses to environmental changes, cell motility

  14. Efficient biodegradation of naphthalene by a newly characterized indigenous Achromobacter sp. FBHYA2 isolated from Tehran Oil Refinery Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farjadfard, Sima; Borghei, Seyyed Mehdi; Hassani, Amir Hessam; Yakhchali, Bagher; Ardjmand, Mehdi; Zeinali, Majid

    2012-01-01

    A bacterial strain, FBHYA2, capable of degrading naphthalene, was isolated from the American Petroleum Institute (API) separator of the Tehran Oil Refinery Complex (TORC). Strain FBHYA2 was identified as Achromobacter sp. based on physiological and biochemical characteristics and also phylogenetic similarity of 16S rRNA gene sequence. The optimal growth conditions for strain FBHYA2 were pH 6.0, 30 °C and 1.0% NaCl. Strain FBHYA2 can utilize naphthalene as the sole source of carbon and energy and was able to degrade naphthalene aerobically very fast, 48 h for 96% removal at 500 mg/L concentration. The physiological response of Achromobacter sp., FBHYA2 to several hydrophobic chemicals (aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons) was also investigated. No biosurfactant was detected during bacterial growth on any aliphatic/aromatic hydrocarbons. The results of hydrophobicity measurements showed no significant difference between naphthalene- and LB-grown cells. The capability of the strain FBHYA2 to degrade naphthalene completely and rapidly without the need to secrete biosurfactant may make it an ideal candidate to remediate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sites.

  15. Structure of the 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A. [RAL, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Erskine, P.; Guo, J.; Wood, S. P. [UCL Division of Medicine (Royal Free Campus), Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); Hopper, D. J. [Aberystwyth University, Penglais, Aberystwyth SY23 3DA Wales (United Kingdom); Rigby, S. E. J. [University of Manchester, 131 Princess Street, Manchester M1 7DN (United Kingdom); Cooper, J. B., E-mail: jon.cooper@ucl.ac.uk [UCL Division of Medicine (Royal Free Campus), Rowland Hill Street, London NW3 2PF (United Kingdom); RAL, Harwell Oxford, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    The first X-ray structure of a 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP at a resolution of 2.2 Å is reported. This structure establishes that the enzyme adopts the cupin-fold, forming compact dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. Each monomer possesses a catalytic ferrous iron that is coordinated by three histidines (76, 78 and 114) and an additional ligand which has been putatively assigned as a carbonate, although formate and acetate are possibilities. The enzyme 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2, 4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in

  16. Heterotrophic nitrification by Achromobacter xylosoxidans S18 isolated from a small-scale slaughterhouse wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Pradyut; Pramanik, Arnab; Mitra, Sayani; Choudhury, Jayanta Debabrata; Mukherjee, Joydeep; Mukherjee, Somnath

    2012-06-01

    Heterotrophic carbon utilizing microbes were acclimatized in the laboratory by inoculating sludge collected from the waste discharge pond of a small-scale rural abattoir in India in a nutrient solution intermittently fed with glucose and ammonium chloride. Cultures of 10 well-developed isolates were selected and grown in a basal medium containing glucose and ammonium chloride. Culture supernatants were periodically analyzed for ammonium nitrogen (NH(4)(+)-N) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Polyphasic taxonomic study of the most active nitrifier (S18) was done. Half saturation concentration (K(s)), maximum rate of substrate utilization (k), yield coefficient (Y) and decay coefficient (K(d)) were determined from the Lineweaver-Burk plot using the modified Monod equation. S18 was able to remove 97 ± 2% of (NH(4)(+)-N) and 88 ± 3% of COD. Molecular phylogenetic study supported by physiological and biochemical characteristics assigned S18 as Achromobacter xylosoxidans. Nitrification activity of A. xylosoxidans was demonstrated for the first time, while interestingly, the distinctive anaerobic denitrification property was preserved in S18. K (s) values were determined as 232.13 ± 1.5 mg/l for COD reduction and 2.131 ± 1.9 mg/l for NH(4)(+)-N utilization. Yield coefficients obtained were 0.4423 ± 0.1134 mg of MLVSS/mg of COD and 0.2461 ± 0.0793 mg of MLVSS/mg of NH(4)(+)-N while the decay coefficients were 0.0627 ± 0.0013 per day and 0.0514 ± 0.0008 per day, respectively. After a contact period of 24 h, 650 ± 5 mg/l solids were produced when the initial concentration of COD and NH(4)(+)-N were 1820 ± 10 mg/l and 120 ± 5.5 mg/l, respectively. This is the first report on the kinetic coefficients for carbon oxidation and nitrification by a single bacterium isolated from slaughterhouse wastewater.

  17. Model-Based Nutrient Feeding Strategies for the Increased Production of Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by Alcaligenes latus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahlawat, Geeta; Srivastava, Ashok K

    2017-10-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are biodegradable polymers which are considered as an effective alternative for conventional plastics due to their mechanical properties similar to the latter. However, the widespread use of these polymers is still hampered due to their higher cost of production as compared to plastics. The production cost could be overcome by obtaining high yields and productivity. The goal of the present research was to enhance the yield of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) with the help of two simple fed-batch cultivation strategies. In the present study, average batch kinetic and substrate limitation/inhibition study data of Alcaligenes latus was used for the development of PHB model which was then adopted for designing various off-line nutrient feeding strategies to enhance PHB accumulation. The predictive ability of the model was validated by experimental implementation of two fed-batch strategies. One such dynamic strategy of fed-batch cultivation under pseudo-steady state with respect to nitrogen and simultaneous carbon feeding strategy resulted in significantly high biomass and PHB concentration of 39.17 g/L and 29.64 g/L, respectively. This feeding strategy demonstrated a high PHB productivity and PHB content of 0.6 g/L h and 75%, respectively, which were remarkably high in comparison to batch cultivation. The mathematical model can also be employed for designing various other nutrient feeding strategies.

  18. Electroporation of Alcaligenes eutrophus with (mega) plasmids and genomic DNA fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavi, S; van der Lelie, D; Mergeay, M

    1994-10-01

    Electroporation was used as a tool to explore the genetics of the heavy-metal-resistant strain Alcaligenes eutrophus CH34. A 12.9-kb A. eutrophus-Escherichia coli shuttle vector, pMOL850, was constructed to optimize electroporation conditions. This vector is derived from the E. coli plasmid pSUP202 and contains the replication region of the A. eutrophus megaplasmid pMOL28. Electroporation was used to transform A. eutrophus CH34 derivatives with megaplasmids (sizes up to 240 kb), and transformants were selected for resistance to heavy metals. Electroporation was also performed with endonuclease-digested genomic DNA. Transformation of markers affecting lysine biosynthesis (lysA194) and biosynthesis of the siderophore alcaligin E were observed. Transfer of the nonselected markers pheB332 and aro-333, linked to lysA194, confirmed the intervention of homologous recombination. However, during transformation of ale::Tn5-Tc, illegitimate recombination and transposition were also observed as an alternative for the inheritance of the Tn5-Tc markers.

  19. Impact of Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans on Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms treated with antibiotic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azevedo, Andreia S; Almeida, Carina; Pereira, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that for urinary tract infections species with a lower or unproven pathogenic potential, such as Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans, might interact with conventional pathogenic agents such as Escherichia coli. Here, single- and dual-species biofilms...... of these microorganisms were characterized in terms of microbial composition over time, the average fitness of E. coli, the spatial organization and the biofilm antimicrobial profile. The results revealed a positive impact of these species on the fitness of E. coli and a greater tolerance to the antibiotic agents....... In dual-species biofilms exposed to antibiotics, E. coli was able to dominate the microbial consortia in spite of being the most sensitive strain. This is the first study demonstrating the protective effect of less common species over E. coli under adverse conditions imposed by the use of antibiotic...

  20. Impact of Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans on Escherichia coli dual-species biofilms treated with antibiotic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Andreia S; Almeida, Carina; Pereira, Bruno; Melo, Luís F; Azevedo, Nuno F

    2016-01-01

    Recently it was demonstrated that for urinary tract infections species with a lower or unproven pathogenic potential, such as Delftia tsuruhatensis and Achromobacter xylosoxidans, might interact with conventional pathogenic agents such as Escherichia coli. Here, single- and dual-species biofilms of these microorganisms were characterized in terms of microbial composition over time, the average fitness of E. coli, the spatial organization and the biofilm antimicrobial profile. The results revealed a positive impact of these species on the fitness of E. coli and a greater tolerance to the antibiotic agents. In dual-species biofilms exposed to antibiotics, E. coli was able to dominate the microbial consortia in spite of being the most sensitive strain. This is the first study demonstrating the protective effect of less common species over E. coli under adverse conditions imposed by the use of antibiotic agents.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sepsis Sharps Safety - CDC Transplant Safety Vaccine Safety Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Healthcare Settings Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... aeruginosa . Pseudomonas aeruginosa What types of infections does Pseudomonas aeruginosa cause? Serious Pseudomonas infections usually occur in people ...

  2. Biosorption characteristic of Alcaligenes sp. BAPb.1 for removal of lead(II) from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yu; Yu, Sumei; Teng, Chunying; Song, Tao; Dong, Liying; Liang, Jinsong; Bai, Xin; Xu, Xiuhong; Qu, Juanjuan

    2017-06-01

    In this study, strain BAPb.1 was isolated from lead mining area and used as an adsorbent to remove lead(II) ions from aqueous solution. The physicochemical characteristics, heavy metal resistance and antibiotic sensitivity of strain BAPb.1 were investigated. Biosorption capacity was evaluated by batch biosorption experiments, and isothermal characteristics were discussed. Atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR) were conducted to explore the mechanism for lead(II) adsorption. Based on morphological and physiological characteristics as well as the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rDNA sequences, strain BAPb.1 was identified as a member of the genus Alcaligenes. It exhibited high resistances to multiple heavy metals such as lead(II), copper(II), zinc(II), nickel(II) and chromium(VI), and to antibiotics such as kanamycin, ampicillin, streptomycin, chloramphenicol, and tetracycline. The optimum conditions for maximum biosorption rate of 85.2% and maximum capacity of 56.8 mg g-1 were found at pH of 5, adsorbent dosage of 1.5 g L-1 (dry weight), initial lead(II) concentration of 100 mg L-1, and contact time of 30 min at 30 °C. Biosorption isotherms were well fitted with Langmuir isotherm model. Mechanism analysis reveals that the lead(II) ions may exchange with sodium and potassium ions, and the hydroxyl, carbonyl and phosphate groups on the cell surface can chelate the lead(II) ions, therefore, surface adsorption play significant role in the biosorption process.

  3. Structure of the 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, R; Lebedev, A; Erskine, P; Guo, J; Wood, S P; Hopper, D J; Rigby, S E J; Cooper, J B

    2014-09-01

    The enzyme 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C-C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in the predominantly hydrophobic active-site pocket where it undergoes peroxide radical-mediated heterolysis.

  4. Structure of the 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, R.; Lebedev, A.; Erskine, P.; Guo, J.; Wood, S. P.; Hopper, D. J.; Rigby, S. E. J.; Cooper, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4′-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid with the incorporation of molecular oxygen. Whilst the vast majority of dioxygenases cleave within the aromatic ring of the substrate, DAD is very unusual in that it is involved in C—C bond cleavage in a substituent of the aromatic ring. There is evidence that the enzyme is a homotetramer of 20.3 kDa subunits, each containing nonhaem iron, and its sequence suggests that it belongs to the cupin family of dioxygenases. In this paper, the first X-ray structure of a DAD enzyme from the Gram-negative bacterium Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP is reported, at a resolution of 2.2 Å. The structure establishes that the enzyme adopts a cupin fold, forming dimers with a pronounced hydrophobic interface between the monomers. The catalytic iron is coordinated by three histidine residues (76, 78 and 114) within a buried active-site cavity. The iron also appears to be tightly coordinated by an additional ligand which was putatively assigned as a carbonate dianion since this fits the electron density optimally, although it might also be the product formate. The modelled carbonate is located in a position which is highly likely to be occupied by the α-hydroxyketone group of the bound substrate during catalysis. Modelling of a substrate molecule in this position indicates that it will interact with many conserved amino acids in the predominantly hydrophobic active-site pocket where it undergoes peroxide radical-mediated heterolysis. PMID:25195757

  5. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Ahmad, Asmat [School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Usup, Gires [School of Environmental and Natural Resources Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  6. Inhibition of Serratia marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation by Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutfi, Zainal; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2014-09-01

    Serratia marcescens biofilms are formed when they are bound to surfaces in aqueous environments. S. marcescens utilizes N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) as its quorum sensing signal molecule. The accumulation of AHL indicates the bacteria to produce matrices to form biofilms. Prodigiosin (2-methyl-3-pentyl-6-methoxyprodigiosin), which causes red pigmentation in the colonies, are also produced when the AHL reaches a certain threshold. The Alcaligenes faecalis STN17 crude extract is believed to inhibit quorum sensing in the S. marcescens Smj-11 and, thus, impedes its biofilm formation ability. A. faecalis STN17 was grown in marine broth, and ethyl acetate extraction was carried out. The crude compound of A. faecalis STN17 was diluted at high concentration (0.2-6.4 mg/mL) and was taken to confirm anti-biofilm activity through the crystal violet method in 96-wells plate. Then, the crude extract underwent purification using simple solvents partitioning test to discern the respective compounds that had the anti-biofilm activity under the crystal violet method. The crystal violet test showed that the crude did have anti-biofilm activity on S. marcescens Smj-11, but did not kill the cells. This finding signifies that the suppression of biofilm formation in S. marcescens by A. faecalis STN17 has a strong correlation. The partitioning test showed that A. faecalis STN17 crude extract has several compounds and only the compound(s) in chloroform showed activities. In conclusion, the crude extract of A. faecalis STN17 has the ability to inhibit S. marcescens Smj-11 biofilm formation.

  7. Rhizosphere colonization and arsenic translocation in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.) by arsenate reducing Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalca, Lucia; Corsini, Anna; Bachate, Sachin Prabhakar; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, six arsenic-resistant strains previously isolated were tested for their plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, in order to choose one model strain as an inoculum for sunflower plants in pot experiments. The aim was to investigate the effect of arsenic-resistant strain on sunflower growth and on arsenic uptake from arsenic contaminated soil. Based on plant growth promoting characteristics and heavy metal resistance, Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L was chosen as an inoculum. Beside the ability to reduce arsenate to arsenite via an Ars operon, the strain exhibited 1-amino-cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase activity and it was also able to produce siderophore and indole acetic acid. Pot experiments were conducted with an agricultural soil contaminated with arsenic (214 mg kg⁻¹). A real time PCR method was set up based on the quantification of ACR3(2) type of arsenite efflux pump carried by Alcaligenes sp. strain Dhal-L, in order to monitor presence and colonisation of the strain in the bulk and rhizospheric soil. As a result of strain inoculation, arsenic uptake by plants was increased by 53 %, whereas ACR3(2) gene copy number in rhizospheric soil was 100 times higher in inoculated than in control pots, indicating the colonisation of strain. The results indicated that the presence of arsenate reducing strains in the rhizosphere of sunflower influences arsenic mobilization and promotes arsenic uptake by plant.

  8. Mineralization of a Malaysian crude oil by Pseudomonas sp. and Achromabacter sp. isolated from coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, J.; Ahmad, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    Regarded as being a potentially effective tool to combat oil pollution, bioremediation involves mineralization, i.e., the conversion of complex hydrocarbons into harmless CO{sub 2} and water by action of microorganisms. Therefore, in achieving optimum effectiveness from the application of these products on crude oil in local environments, the capability of the bacteria to mineralize hydrocarbons was evaluated. The microbial laboratory testing of mineralization on local oil degraders involved, first, isolation of bacteria found at a port located on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Subsequently, these bacteria were identified by means of Biomereux`s API 20E and 20 NE systems and later screened by their growth on a Malaysian crude oil. Selected strains of Pseudomonas sp. and Achromabacter sp. were then exposed individually to a similar crude oil in a mineralization unit and monitored for 16 days for release of CO{sub 2}. Pseudomonas paucimobilis was found to produce more CO{sub 2} than Achromobacter sp. When tested under similar conditions, mixed populations of these two taxa produced more CO{sub 2} than that produced by any individual strain. Effective bioremediation of local crude in Malaysian waters can therefore be achieved from biochemically developed Pseudomonas sp. strains.

  9. Biochemical and histochemical analyses revealing endophytic Alcaligenes faecalis mediated suppression of oxidative stress in Abelmoschus esculentus challenged with Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shatrupa; Singh, Vivek; Singh, Surendra; Sarma, Birinchi Kumar; Singh, Harikesh Bahadur

    2016-12-01

    Sclerotium rolfsii is a highly aggressive pathogen that causes huge economic losses, especially in temperate climates. Alcaligenes faecalis, particularly in endophytic form, has rarely been used to control this fungus. In this study, endophytic Alcaligenes sp. strain BHU 12, BHU 16 (isolated from Abelmoschus esculentus leaf) and BHU M7 (isolated from Andrographis paniculata leaf) were reported to trigger a wide range of host defenses in Okra plant against the collar-rot pathogen S. rolfsii. Endophytic colonization of the strains in ten days old plants was assessed through re-isolation of the rif-tagged strains on rifampicin augmented nutrient agar media. The ability of the endophytic strains to induce systemic defense responses in above-ground organs was assessed by collecting leaf tissues of the Okra plants grown under non-gnotobiotic conditions at different time intervals post seedling bacterization with the endophytic biocontrol agents. The pathogen challenged unprimed plants exhibited flaccidity of the stem and leaves at 48 h post infection (hpi) in contrast to the bioprimed and challenged plants. Biochemical and histochemical analyses explained the above phenomenon as activation of phyto-peroxidases leading to an increased metabolism of the reactive oxygen species (ROS), accompanied by activation of the phenylpropanoid network and a subsequent enhancement in plant phenolics. Interestingly, though the maximum increase in the defense pathways was observed in treatments with native endophytes of Okra plant, yet the enhancement in antioxidant pathway due to A. paniculata borne endophytes was also quite significant. Thus, this work clearly demonstrates how Okra plants respond to the "non-hostile" colonization of bacterial endophytes and how induced defense response can contribute to the biocontrol activity of the endophytic strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Bioaugmentation with endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii enhances metal rhizoaccumulation in host Sedum plumbizincicola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying eMa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Application of hyperaccumulator–endophyte symbiotic systems is a potential approach to improve phytoremediation efficiency, since some beneficial endophytic bacteria are able to detoxify heavy metals, alter metal solubility in soil and facilitate plant growth. The objective of this study was to isolate multi-metal resistant and plant beneficial endophytic bacteria and to evaluate their role in enhancing plant growth and metal accumulation/translocation. The metal resistant endophytic bacterial strain E6S was isolated from stems of the Zn/Cd hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola growing in metalliferous mine soils using Dworkin and Foster salts minimal agar medium with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC as the sole nitrogen source, and identified as homologous to Achromobacter piechaudii based on morphological and biochemical characteristics, partial 16S rDNA sequence and phylogenetic analysis. Strain E6S showed high level of resistance to various metals (Cd, Zn and Pb. Besides utilizing ACC, strain E6S exhibited plant beneficial traits, such as solubilization of phosphate and production of indole-3-acetic acid. Inoculation with E6S significantly increased the bioavailability of Cd, Zn and Pb in soil. In addition, bacterial cells bound considerable amounts of metal ions in the following order: Zn ˃ Cd ˃ Pb. Inoculation of E6S significantly stimulated plant biomass, uptake and bioaccumulation of Cd, Zn and Pb. However, E6S greatly reduced the root to shoot translocation of Cd and Zn, indicating that bacterial inoculation assisted the host plant to uptake and store heavy metals in its root system. Inoculation with the endophytic bacterium E6S homologous to A. piechaudii can improve phytostabilization of metalliferous soils due to its effective ability to enhance in situ metal rhizoaccumulation in plants.

  11. Monocyte Profiles in Critically Ill Patients With Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Pseudomonas Infections; Pseudomonas Septicemia; Pseudomonas; Pneumonia; Pseudomonal Bacteraemia; Pseudomonas Urinary Tract Infection; Pseudomonas Gastrointestinal Tract Infection; Sepsis; Sepsis, Severe; Critically Ill

  12. Pseudomonas Lipopeptide Biosurfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnichsen, Lise

    Pseudomonas lipopetide biosurfactants are amphiphilic molecules with a broad range of natural functions. Due to their surface active properties, it has been suggested that Pseudomonas lipopetides potentially play a role in biodegradation of hydrophobic compounds and have essential functions...... in biofilm formation, however, detailed studies of these roles have not yet been carried out. The overall aim of this PhD project was therefore to elucidate in more depth the roles played by Pseudomonas lipopetides in pollutant biodegradation and biofilm formation. This study investigated the effect...... of the Pseudomonas lipopeptides belonging to different structural groups on important biodegradation parameters, mainly; solubilization and emulsification of hydrophobic pollutants (alkanes and PAHs) and increase of cell surface hydrophobicity of bacterial degraders. Ultimately, it was tested if these parameters led...

  13. Identification of a copper-responsive promoter and development of a copper biosensor in the soil bacterium Achromobacter sp. AO22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Shee Ping; Palombo, Enzo A; Bhave, Mrinal

    2012-05-01

    A number of human activities result in environmental contamination with copper compounds that can cause severe detrimental effects on the ecosystem as well as human health. The physico-chemical methods of metal detection have limitations such as inability to distinguish between total versus bio-available metals and differences in metal uptake in different organisms. The heavy metal resistance-encoding genetic systems of certain bacteria provide critical tools for development of biosensors for these purposes. This study reports a copper biosensor utilizing the cop operon of the heavy metal resistant bacterial isolate, Achromobacter sp. AO22, isolated from a contaminated site in Australia. A section located between the divergently transcribed putative response regulator gene copR and multicopper oxidase gene copA that included a palindromic cop box was identified as a copper-responsive promoter using a lacZ reporter construct, pCOPRP, in E. coli. The expression was found to be enhanced by inclusion of copR. Another engineered strain, AO22(pCOPRP), showed stronger induction, and the lacZ expression in both backgrounds was enhanced significantly (250-400 fold) by copper but minimally by other metals. The construct in Achromobacter sp. AO22 thus has a high potential as biosensor for detecting copper bioavailability (hence potential toxicity) in a soil bacterial background, while the construct in E. coli is ideal for laboratory-based testing.

  14. New molecular packing in a crystal of pseudoazurin from Alcaligenes faecalis: a double-helical arrangement of blue copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Yohta; Mizohata, Eiichi; Inoue, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Pseudoazurin from the denitrifying bacterium Alcaligenes faecalis (AfPAz) is a blue copper protein and functions as an electron donor to copper-containing nitrite reductase (CuNIR). Conventionally, AfPAz has been crystallized using highly concentrated ammonium sulfate as a precipitant. Here, a needle-like crystal of AfPAz grown in a solution containing a macromolecular precipitant, polyethylene glycol 8000 (PEG 8000), is reported. The crystal belonged to space group P61, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 68.7, c = 94.2 Å. The structure has been determined and refined at 2.6 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two AfPAz molecules contacting each other on negatively charged surfaces. The molecular packing of the crystal showed a right-handed double-helical arrangement of AfPAz molecules and hence of blue copper sites. This structure provides insight into the excluded-volume effect of PEG and the manner of assembly of AfPAz.

  15. Extension of resolution and oligomerization-state studies of 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase from Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J; Erskine, P; Coker, A R; Gor, J; Perkins, S J; Wood, S P; Cooper, J B

    2015-10-01

    The enzyme 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone dioxygenase (DAD) catalyses the conversion of 2,4'-dihydroxyacetophenone to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and formic acid. This enzyme is a very unusual dioxygenase in that it cleaves a C-C bond in a substituent of the aromatic ring rather than within the ring itself. Whilst it has been shown that DAD is a tetramer in solution, the recently solved crystal structure of the Alcaligenes sp. 4HAP enzyme was in fact dimeric rather than tetrameric. Since the use of limited chymotrypsinolysis, which apparently results in removal of the first 20 or so N-terminal residues of DAD, was necessary for crystallization of the protein, it was investigated whether this was responsible for the change in its oligomerization state. Gel-filtration and analytical ultracentrifugation studies were conducted, which confirmed that chymotrypsinolysed DAD has an apparent molecular weight of around 40 kDa, corresponding to a dimer. In contrast, the native enzyme has a molecular weight in the 70-80 kDa region, as expected for the tetramer. The structural basis for tetramerization has been investigated by the use of several docking servers, and the results are remarkably consistent with the tetrameric structure of a homologous cupin protein from Ralstonia eutropha (PDB entry 3ebr).

  16. Upstream process optimization of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) by Alcaligenes latus using two-stage batch and fed-batch fermentation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingqing; Sharma-Shivappa, Ratna R; Olson, Jonathan W; Khan, Saad A

    2012-11-01

    This research focused on optimizing the upstream process time for production of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from sucrose by two-stage batch and fed-batch fermentation with Alcaligenes latus ATCC 29714. The study included selection of strain, two-stage batch fermentations with different time points for switching to nitrogen limited media (14, 16 or 18 h) and fed-batch fermentations with varied time points (similar to two stage) for introducing nitrogen limited media. The optimal strain to produce PHB using sucrose as carbon source was A. latus ATCC 29714 with maximum-specific growth rate of 0.38 ± 0.01 h(-1) and doubling time of 1.80 ± 0.05 h. Inducing nitrogen limitation at 16 h and ending second stage at 26 h gave optimal performance for PHB production, resulting in a PHB content of 46.7 ± 12.2 % (g PHB per g dry cell weight) at the end of fermentation. This was significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) (approximately 7 %) than the corresponding fed batch run in which nitrogen limitation was initiated at 16 h.

  17. Production and characterization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) generated by Alcaligenes latus using lactose and whey after acid protein precipitation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwig, Karina Hammel; Baldasso, Camila; Dettmer, Aline

    2016-10-01

    Whey after acid protein precipitation was used as substrate for PHB production in orbital shaker using Alcaligenes latus. Statistical analysis determined the most appropriate hydroxide for pH neutralization of whey after protein precipitation among NH4OH, KOH and NaOH 10%w/v. The results were compared to those of commercial lactose. A scale-up test in a 4L bioreactor was done at 35°C, 750rpm, 7L/min air flow, and 6.5 pH. The PHB was characterized through Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. NH4OH provided the best results for productivity (p), 0.11g/L.h, and for polymer yield, (YP/S), 1.08g/g. The bioreactor experiment resulted in lower p and YP/S. PHB showed maximum degradation temperature (291°C), melting temperature (169°C), and chemical properties similar to those of standard PHB. The use of whey as a substrate for PHB production did not affect significantly the final product quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Actividad "in vitro" de diferentes antibacterianos sobre bacilos gram-negativos no fermentadores, excluidos Pseudomonas aeruginosa y Acinetobacter spp ‘In vitro' activity of different antimicrobial agents on gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli, excluding Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter spp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.A. Vay

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Los bacilos gram-negativos no fermentadores se encuentran ampliamente distribuidos en el medio ambiente. Además de causar dificultades en la identificación, a menudo presentan una marcada multirresistencia a los antimicrobianos incluyendo aquellos activos frente a Pseudomonas aeruginosa. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la actividad "in vitro" de diferentes antimicrobianos sobre 177 aislamientos de bacilos gram-negativos no fermentadores (excluidos Pseudomonas aeruginosa y Acinetobacter spp. provenientes de especimenes clínicos. Las concentraciones inhibitorias mínimas (CIM se determinaron por el método de dilución en agar Mueller Hinton frente a los siguientes antibacterianos: ampicilina, piperacilina, piperacilina-tazobactama, sulbactama, cefoperazona, cefoperazona-sulbactama, ceftazidima, cefepima, aztreonam, imipenem, meropenem, colistina, gentamicina, amicacina, trimetoprima-sulfametoxazol (TMS, cloranfenicol, eritromicina, rifampicina, norfloxacina, ciprofloxacina y minociclina. Sobre siete aislamientos: Sphingobacterium multivorum (2, Sphingobacterium spiritivorum (1, Empedobacter brevis (1, Weeksella virosa (1, Bergeyella zoohelcum (1 y Oligella urethralis (1 se ensayó la sensibilidad a amoxicilina-ácido clavulánico y ampicilina-sulbactama y no se determinó la actividad de cefoperazona ni de sulbactama. La multirresistencia fue comúnmente observada en los aislamientos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Burkholderia cepacia, Chryseobacterium spp., Myroides spp., Achromobacter xylosoxidans y Ochrobactrum anthropi. En cambio, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Shewanella putrefaciens-algae, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, Pseudomonas oryzihabitans, Bergeyella zoohelcum, Weeksella virosa y Oligella urethralis, fueron ampliamente sensibles a los antibacterianos ensayados. Debido a la gran variabilidad observada en la sensibilidad a los antimicrobianos en las distintas especies, se hace imprescindible realizar la prueba de sensibilidad a los

  19. L5-S1 Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy for the treatment of lumbosacral disc herniation: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Nicholas M; Aichmair, Alexander; Miller, Andy O; Girardi, Federico P

    2014-03-15

    Case report and literature review. To present a unique case of Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy for the treatment of L5-S1 disc herniation. Oxygen-ozone therapy is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of lumbar disc herniations, with unproven efficacy and few reported complications. Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen that inhabits aquatic environments and is a rare cause of osteomyelitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of A. xylosoxidans spondylodiscitis in the lumbar spine and the third report of spinal infection after intradiscal oxygen-ozone chemonucleolysis in the English literature. The medical records, operative reports, and radiographical imaging studies of a single patient were retrospectively reviewed. A 29-year-old female patient who previously underwent oxygen-ozone therapy for L5-S1 disc herniation presented to our institution with a 5-month history of intractable back and leg pain. The patient's laboratory studies were within normal limits and did not indicate signs of an active infection. Her physical examination revealed globally decreased muscle strength (4/5) and hyperesthesia in the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed severe disc degeneration and vertebral body endplate changes at L5-S1, in addition to paravertebral soft tissue swelling consistent with a previous infection. Given the severity of symptoms, the patient underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior segmental instrumentation at L5-S1. Histopathological evaluation of the disc material confirmed the diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis and septic discitis at L5-S1. Intraoperative cultures grew A. xylosoxidans and Propionibacterium acnes. The patient had prompt improvement in her level of pain and was discharged on a 6-week course of piperacillin-tazobactam without complication. This first report of A. xylosoxidans vertebral infection

  20. Degradação de 2-clorofenol, 3-clorofenol, 2,4-cliclorofenol e acido 2,4-cliclorofenociacetato por Alcaligenes faecalis

    OpenAIRE

    Koehntopp, Paulo Ivo

    1998-01-01

    Dissertação (mestrado) - Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Centro de Ciencias Biologicas Estudo da degradação de 2-clorofenol (2-CP), 3-clorofenol (3-CP), 2,4-diclorofenol (2,4DCP) e ácido 2,4-diclorofenoxiacetato (2,4-D) pela cepa Alcaligenes faecalís, degradadora de fenol e indução da capacidade de degradação na presença de fenol (co-metabolismo). Adaptações sucessivas de A. faecalis a 2-CP e 3-CP (16 mg/L) permitiram que estes compostos fossem totalmente consumidos, como única fon...

  1. Population Structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lutz Wiehlmann; Gerd Wagner; Nina Cramer; Benny Siebert; Peter Gudowius; Gracia Morales; Thilo Köhler; Christian van Delden; Christian Weinel; Peter Slickers; Burkhard Tümmler

    2007-01-01

    The metabolically versatile Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhabits terrestrial, aquatic, animal-, human-, and plant-host-associated environments and is an important causative agent...

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is implicated in many chronic infections and is readily isolated from chronic wounds, medical devices, and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. P. aeruginosa is believed to persist in the host organism due to its capacity to form...... biofilms, which protect the aggregated, biopolymer-embedded bacteria from the detrimental actions of antibiotic treatments and host immunity. A key component in the protection against innate immunity is rhamnolipid, which is a quorum sensing (QS)-regulated virulence factor. QS is a cell-to-cell signaling...

  3. Bioflocculant production and biosorption of zinc and lead by a novel bacterial species, Achromobacter sp. TERI-IASST N, isolated from oil refinery waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subudhi, Sanjukta; Batta, Neha; Pathak, Mihirjyoti; Bisht, Varsha; Devi, Arundhuti; Lal, Banwari; Al khulifah, Bader

    2014-10-01

    A bioflocculant-producing bacterial isolate designated as 'TERI-IASST N' was isolated from activated sludge samples collected from an oil refinery. This isolate demonstrated maximum bioflocculation activity (74%) from glucose among 15 different bioflocculant-producing bacterial strains isolated from the sludge samples and identified as Achromobacter sp. based on 16S rRNA gene sequence. Optimization of pH and supplementation of urea as nitrogen source in the production medium enhanced the flocculation activity of strain TERI-IASST N to 84% (at pH 6). This strain revealed maximum flocculation activity (90%) from sucrose compared to the flocculation activity observed from other carbon sources as investigated (glucose, lactose, fructose, maltose and starch). Ca(2+) served as the suitable divalent cation for maximum bioflocculation activity of TERI-IASST strain N. Maximum flocculation activity was observed at optimum C/N ratio of 1. Flocculation activity of this strain decreased to 75% in the presence of heavy metals; Zn, Pb, Ni, Cu and Cd. In addition strain N revealed considerable biosorption of Zn (430mgL(-1)) and Pb (30mgL(-1)). Bioflocculant yield of strain N was 10.5gL(-1). Fourier transform infrared spectrum indicated the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl, and amino groups, typical of glycoprotein. Spectroscopic analysis of bioflocculant by nuclear magnetic resonance revealed that it is a glycoprotein, consisting of 57% total sugar and 13% protein. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Meningoencephalitis caused by Pseudomonas cepacia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Monrás, Miriam Fina; Batlle Almodóvar, María del Carmen; González, Cernero; Tamargo Martínez, Isis; Meneses, Félix Dickinson

    2006-01-01

    A case of meningoencephalitis of bacterial etiology caused by Pseudomonas cepacia was described. The strain was received at the Reference Laboratory of Bacterial Acute Respiratory Infections of "Pedro Kouri" Institute of Tropical Medicine, where its microbiological identification was confirmed. This isolation was a finding in an adult immunocompetent patient. The evolution was favourable with no sequelae for his future life. Pseudomona cepacia has been associated with respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. Patients with Pseudomonas cepacia may be asymptomatic or present fatal acute and fulminant infection.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria in natural, industrial and clinical settings predominantly live in biofilms, i.e., sessile structured microbial communities encased in self-produced extracellular matrix material. One of the most important characteristics of microbial biofilms is that the resident bacteria display...... a remarkable increased tolerance toward antimicrobial attack. Biofilms formed by opportunistic pathogenic bacteria are involved in devastating persistent medical device-associated infections, and chronic infections in individuals who are immune-compromised or otherwise impaired in the host defense. Because...... the use of conventional antimicrobial compounds in many cases cannot eradicate biofilms, there is an urgent need to develop alternative measures to combat biofilm infections. The present review is focussed on the important opportunistic pathogen and biofilm model organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Initially...

  6. Pseudomonas folliculitis in Arabian baths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Leyva, Alejandro; Ruiz-Ruigomez, Maria

    2013-07-14

    A 35-year-old man presented with a painful cutaneous skin eruption that was localized on the upper trunk. He stated that the previous weekend he had attended an Arabian bath. The physical examination revealed multiple hair follicle-centered papulopustules surrounded by an erythematous halo. A clinical diagnosis of pseudomonas folliculitis was made and treatment was prescribed. Afterwards Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from a pustule culture. Pseudomonas folliculitis is a bacterial infection of the hair follicles. The most common reservoirs include facilities with hot water and complex piping systems that are difficult to clean, such as hot tubs and bathtubs. Despite adequate or high chlorine levels, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can grow within a biofilm.

  7. Final screening assessment for Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 31483, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 31800, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 700369

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2017-01-01

    "Pursuant to paragraph 74(b) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA), the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health have conducted a screening assessment on four strains of Pseudomonas putida...

  8. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujeet Kumar Meher

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms.

  9. The structures of Alcaligenes faecalis D-3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase before and after NAD+ and acetate binding suggest a dynamical reaction mechanism as a member of the SDR family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Md Mominul; Shimizu, Satoru; Hossain, Md Tofazzal; Yamamoto, Tamotsu; Imamura, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Kaoru; Tsunoda, Masaru; Amano, Hitoshi; Sekiguchi, Takeshi; Takénaka, Akio

    2008-05-01

    D-3-Hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase, which catalyzes the reversible reaction between D-3-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, has been classified into the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family and is a useful marker in the assay of diabetes mellitus and/or ketoacidosis. The enzyme from Alcaligenes faecalis was crystallized in the apo form and in the holo form with acetate as a substrate analogue. The crystal structures of both forms were determined at 2.2 angstroms resolution. The enzyme is a tetramer composed of four subunits assembled with noncrystallographic 222 point symmetry. Each subunit has two domains. The principal domain adopts the Rossmann fold essential for nucleotide binding, which is a common feature of the SDR family. NAD+ is bound in a large cleft in the domain. The pyrophosphate group of NAD+ is covered by the small additional domain, which is supported by two extended arms allowing domain movement. In the catalytic site, a water molecule is trapped by the catalytic Tyr155 and Ser142 residues in the vicinity of the bound NAD+ and acetate. The substrate analogue acetate is bound above the nicotinamide plane. A substrate (D-3-hydroxybutylate) bound model can reasonably be constructed by adding two C atoms into the void space between the water O atom and the methyl group of the acetate, suggesting a substrate-bound state before enzymatic reaction occurs. Based on these structural features, a reaction mechanism has been proposed.

  10. Production of poly(D-3-hydroxybutyrate) from CO(2), H(2), and O(2) by high cell density autotrophic cultivation of Alcaligenes eutrophus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K; Ishizaki, A; Kanamaru, T; Kawano, T

    1995-02-05

    Hydrogen-oxidizing bacterium, Alcaligenes eutrophus autotrophically produces biodegradable plastic material, poly(D-3-hydroxybutyrate), P(3HB), from carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and oxygen. In autotrophic cultivation of the microorganism, it is essential to eliminate possible occurrence of gas explosions from the fermentation process. We developed a bench-plant scale, recycled-gas, closed-circuit culture system equipped with several safety features to perform autotrophic cultivation of A. eutrophus by maintaining the oxygen concentration in the substrate gas phase below the lower limit for a gas explosion (6.9%). The culture vessel utilized a baskettype agitator, resulting in a K(L) a value of 2970 h(-1). Oxygen gas was also directly fed to the fermentor separately from the other gases. As a result, 91.3 g . dm(-3) of the cells and 61.9 g . dm(-3) of P(3HB) were obtained after 40 h of cultivation under this oxygen-limited condition. The results compared favorably with those reported for mass production of P(3HB) by heterotrophic fermentation. (c) 1995 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. The cobalt, zinc, and cadmium efflux system CzcABC from Alcaligenes eutrophus functions as a cation-proton antiporter in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nies, D H

    1995-05-01

    The function of the CzcABC protein complex, which mediates resistance to Co2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ in Alcaligenes eutrophus by cation efflux, was investigated by using everted membrane vesicles of Escherichia coli and an acridine orange fluorescence quenching assay. Since metal cation uptake could not be measured with inside-out membrane vesicles prepared from A. eutrophus and since available E. coli strains did not express the Czc-mediated resistance to cobalt, zinc, and cadmium salts, mutants of E. coli which exhibited a Czc-dependent increase in heavy metal resistance were isolated. E. coli mutant strain EC351 constitutively accumulated Co2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+. In the presence of Czc, net uptake of these heavy metal cations was reduced to the wild-type level. Inside-out vesicles prepared from E. coli EC351 cells displayed a Czc-dependent uptake of Co2+, Zn2+, and Cd2+ and a cation-triggered acridine orange fluorescence increase. The czc-encoded protein complex CzcABC was shown to be a zinc-proton antiporter.

  12. Silver against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Kirketerp-Møller, K.; Kristiansen, S.

    2007-01-01

    bacteria in both the planktonic and biofilm modes of growth. The action of silver on mature in vitro biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a primary pathogen of chronic infected wounds, was investigated. The results show that silver is very effective against mature biofilms of P. aeruginosa...

  13. Gene escape model: transfer of heavy metal resistance genes from Escherichia coli to Alcaligenes eutrophus on agar plates and in soil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, E; Mergeay, M; Springael, D; Verstraete, W

    1990-08-01

    Conjugal transfer from Escherichia coli to Alcaligenes eutrophus of the A. eutrophus genes coding for plasmid-borne resistance to cadmium, cobalt, and zinc (czc genes) was investigated on agar plates and in soil samples. This czc fragment is not expressed in the donor strain, E. coli, but it is expressed in the recipient strain, A. eutrophus. Hence, expression of heavy metal resistance by cells plated on a medium containing heavy metals represents escape of the czc genes. The two plasmids into which this DNA fragment has been cloned previously and which were used in these experiments are the nonconjugative, mobilizable plasmid pDN705 and the nonconjugative, nonmobilizable plasmid pMOL149. In plate matings at 28 to 30 degrees C, the direct mobilization of pDN705 occurred at a frequency of 2.4 x 10(-2) per recipient, and the mobilization of the same plasmid by means of the IncP1 conjugative plasmids RP4 or pULB113 (present either in a third cell [triparental cross] or in the recipient strain itself [retromobilization]) occurred at average frequencies of 8 x 10(-4) and 2 x 10(-5) per recipient, respectively. The czc genes cloned into the Tra- Mob- plasmid pMOL149 were transferred at a frequency of 10(-7) to 10(-8) and only by means of plasmid pULB113. The direct mobilization of pDN705 was further investigated in sandy, sandy-loam, and clay soils. In sterile soils, transfer frequencies at 20 degrees C were highest in the sandy-loam soil (10(-5) per recipient) and were enhanced in all soils by the addition of easily metabolizable nutrients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Phylogenomics and systematics in Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita eGomila

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Pseudomonas currently contains 144 species, making it the genus of Gram-negative bacteria that contains the largest number of species. Currently, multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA is the preferred method for establishing the phylogeny between species and genera. Four partial gene sequences of housekeeping genes (16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD were obtained from 112 complete or draft genomes of strains related to the genus Pseudomonas that were available in databases. These genes were analyzed together with the corresponding sequences of 133 Pseudomonas type strains of validly published species to assess their correct phylogenetic assignations. We confirmed that 30% of the sequenced genomes of non-type strains were not correctly assigned at the species level in the accepted taxonomy of the genus and that 20% of the strains were not identified at the species level. Most of these strains had been isolated and classified several years ago, and their taxonomic status has not been updated by modern techniques. MLSA was also compared with indices based on the analysis of whole-genome sequences that have been proposed for species delineation, such as tetranucleotide usage patterns (TETRA, average nucleotide identity (ANIm, based on MUMmer and ANIb, based on BLAST and genome-to-genome distance (GGDC. TETRA was useful for discriminating Pseudomonas from other genera, whereas ANIb and GGDC clearly separated strains of different species. ANIb showed the strongest correlation with MLSA. The correct species classification is a prerequisite for most diversity and evolutionary studies. This work highlights the necessity for complete genomic sequences of type strains to build a phylogenomic taxonomy and that all new genome sequences submitted to databases should be correctly assigned to species to avoid taxonomic inconsistencies.

  15. Pseudomonas-follikulitis efter badning i spabad

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldall Pallesen, Kristine Appel; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Mørtz, Charlotte Gotthard

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of folliculitis. Pseudomonas folliculitis can develop after contact with contaminated water from swimming pools, hot tubs and spa baths. Systemic therapy may be indicated in patients with widespread lesions, systemic symptoms or in immunosuppressed patients....... We describe a 23-year-old healthy woman who developed a pustular rash and general malaise after using a spa bath contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Bacterial culture from a pustule confirmed Pseudomonas folliculitis and the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with rapid good effect....

  16. Petroleum-hydrocarbons biodegradation by Pseudomonas strains ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many indigenous microorganisms in water and soil are capable of degrading hydrocarbon contaminants. In this study, two bacterial strains were isolated from a contaminated soil of a refinery of Arzew (Oran). The isolated strains were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P3) and Pseudomonas fluoresens (P4).

  17. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as. Pseudomonas ... Key words: Alkaline protease, casein agar, meat waste contaminated soil, Pseudomonas fluorescens. INTRODUCTION ... advent of new frontiers in biotechnology, the spectrum of protease ...

  18. [Pseudomonas genus bacteria on weeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdiak, R I; Iakovleva, L M; Pasichnik, L A; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown in the work that the weeds (couch-grass and ryegrass) may be affected by bacterial diseases in natural conditions, Pseudomonas genus bacteria being their agents. The isolated bacteria are highly-aggressive in respect of the host-plant and a wide range of cultivated plants: wheat, rye, oats, barley, apple-tree and pear-tree. In contrast to highly aggressive bacteria isolated from the affected weeds, bacteria-epi phytes isolated from formally healthy plants (common amaranth, orache, flat-leaved spurge, field sow thistle, matricary, common coltsfoot, narrow-leaved vetch) and identified as P. syringae pv. coronafaciens, were characterized by weak aggression. A wide range of ecological niches of bacteria evidently promote their revival and distribution everywhere in nature.

  19. Multilocus sequence typing of carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important nosocomial pathogen that exhibits multiple drug resistance with increasing frequency, especially to carbapenems making patient treatment difficult. Carbapenem-resistance may be caused by porin gene mutations, active drug efflux, and carbapenemase production.

  20. Dynamics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Genome Evolution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalai Mathee; Giri Narasimhan; Camilo Valdes; Xiaoyun Qiu; Jody M. Matewish; Michael Koehrsen; Antonis Rokas; Chandri N. Yandava; Reinhard Engels; Erliang Zeng; Raquel Olavarietta; Melissa Doud; Roger S. Smith; Philip Montgomery; Jared R. White; Paul A. Godfrey; Chinnappa Kodira; Bruce Birren; James E. Galagan; Stephen Lory

    2008-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to thrive in diverse environments that includes humans with a variety of debilitating diseases or immune deficiencies...

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: resistance to the max

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Poole, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is intrinsically resistant to a variety of antimicrobials and can develop resistance during anti-pseudomonal chemotherapy both of which compromise treatment of infections caused by this organism...

  2. Antibiotic Conditioned Growth Medium of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benathen, Isaiah A.; Cazeau, Barbara; Joseph, Njeri

    2004-01-01

    A simple method to study the consequences of bacterial antibiosis after interspecific competition between microorganisms is presented. Common microorganisms are used as the test organisms and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are used as the source of the inhibitor agents.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Family Pseudomonadaceae) is an obligate aerobic, motile, gram negative bacillus.which is able to grow and survive in almost any environment and resistant to temperature extremes. It is involved in the etiology of several diseases i.

  4. Active Immunization with Lipopolysaccharide Pseudomonas Antigen for Chronic Pseudomonas Bronchopneumonia in Guinea Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Pennington, James E.; Hickey, William F.; Blackwood, Linda L.; Arnaut, M. Amin

    1981-01-01

    Chronic respiratory infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading clinical problem among patients with cystic fibrosis. Because antimicrobial agents are usually ineffective in eradicating these infections, additional therapeutic or prophylactic measures should be considered. In this study, an experimental guinea pig model of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa bronchopneumonia was utilized to determine whether active immunization with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) P. aeruginosa antigen may favorab...

  5. Bordetella bronchialis sp. nov., Bordetella flabilis sp. nov. and Bordetella sputigena sp. nov., isolated from human respiratory specimens, and reclassification of Achromobacter sediminum Zhang et al. 2014 as Verticia sediminum gen. nov., comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Peter A; Peeters, Charlotte; Cnockaert, Margo; Inganäs, Elisabeth; Falsen, Enevold; Moore, Edward R B; Nunes, Olga C; Manaia, Célia M; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J

    2015-10-01

    The phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of four Bordetella hinzii-like strains from human respiratory specimens and representing nrdA gene sequence based genogroups 3, 14 and 15 were examined. In a 16S rRNA gene sequence based phylogenetic tree, the four strains consistently formed a single coherent lineage but their assignment to the genus Bordetella was equivocal. The respiratory quinone, polar lipid and fatty acid profiles generally conformed to those of species of the genus Bordetella and were characterized by the presence of ubiquinone 8, of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol and several aminolipids, and of high percentages of C16 : 0, cyclo-C17 : 0 and summed feature 2, as major chemotaxonomic marker molecules, respectively. The DNA G+C content was about 66 mol%, which corresponded with that of the high-percentage DNA G+C content genera of the family Alcaligenaceae including the genus Bordetella. DNA–DNA hybridization experiments revealed the presence of three distinct genomospecies and thus confirmed phenotypic differences as revealed by means of extensive biochemical characterization. We therefore propose to formally classify Bordetella genogroups 3, 14 and 15 as Bordetella bronchialis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 28640T = AU3182T = CCUG 56828T), Bordetella sputigena sp. nov. (type strain LMG 28641T = CCUG 56478T) and Bordetella flabilis sp. nov. (type strain LMG 28642T = AU10664T = CCUG 56827T). In addition, we propose to reclassify Achromobacter sediminum into the novel genus Verticia, as Verticia sediminum, gen. nov., comb. nov., on the basis of its unique phylogenetic position, its marine origin and its distinctive phenotypic, fatty acid and polar lipid profile.

  6. 12038_2016_9620_Supplementary 1..3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae. +. +. +. CHIN_87. Leclercia adecarboxylata. +. CHIN_8. Plesiomonas shigelloides. +. +. +. CHIN_82. Plesiomonas shigelloides. +. TAL_128_a. Plesiomonas shigelloides. +. TAL_44. Pseudomonas sp. +. +. TAL_105. Pseudomonas alcaligenes. +. +. +. CHIN_89. Pseudomonas plecoglossicida. +. +.

  7. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  8. Airway epithelial cell tolerance to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verghese Margrith W

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The respiratory tract epithelium is a critical environmental interface that regulates inflammation. In chronic infectious airway diseases, pathogens may permanently colonize normally sterile luminal environments. Host-pathogen interactions determine the intensity of inflammation and thus, rates of tissue injury. Although many cells become refractory to stimulation by pathogen products, it is unknown whether the airway epithelium becomes either tolerant or hypersensitive in the setting of chronic infection. Our goals were to characterize the response of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cells to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to understand whether repeated exposure induced tolerance and, if so, to explore the mechanism(s. Methods The apical surface of well-differentiated primary human tracheobronchial epithelial cell cultures was repetitively challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates or the bacterial media control. Toxicity, cytokine production, signal transduction events and specific effects of dominant negative forms of signaling molecules were examined. Additional experiments included using IL-1β and TNFα as challenge agents, and performing comparative studies with a novel airway epithelial cell line. Results An initial challenge of the apical surface of polarized human airway epithelial cells with Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture filtrates induced phosphorylation of IRAK1, JNK, p38, and ERK, caused degradation of IκBα, generation of NF-κB and AP-1 transcription factor activity, and resulted in IL-8 secretion, consistent with activation of the Toll-like receptor signal transduction pathway. These responses were strongly attenuated following a second Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or IL-1β, but not TNFα, challenge. Tolerance was associated with decreased IRAK1 protein content and kinase activity and dominant negative IRAK1 inhibited Pseudomonas aeruginosa -stimulated NF-κB transcriptional

  9. Diversity of small RNAs expressed in Pseudomonas species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez-Lozano, Mara; Marvig, Rasmus Lykke; Molina-Santiago, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has revealed several hundreds of previously undetected small RNAs (sRNAs) in all bacterial species investigated, including strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas syringae. Nonetheless, only little is known about the extent of conservation of...

  10. 21 CFR 866.3415 - Pseudomonas spp. serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... genus Pseudomonas. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections, and has been..., abscesses, and meningitis (inflammation of brain membranes). Pseudomonas pseudomallei causes melioidosis, a chronic pneumonia. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The device is exempt from the...

  11. Growth of Pseudomonas spp. in cottage cheese

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Nina Bjerre; Dalgaard, Paw

    of spoilage microorganisms in cottage cheese can cause undesirable alterations in flavour, odour, appearance and texture. Contamination and growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads including Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas putida has been reported for cottage cheese but the influence of these bacteria...... on product spoilage and shelf-life remains poorly described. The present study used a quantitative microbial ecology approach to model and predict the effect of product characteristics and storage conditions on growth of psychrotolerant pseudomonads in cottage cheese. The effect of temperature (5-15˚C) and p...

  12. Antibacterial activity of garlic and lime on isolates of extracted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) on seven bacterial species (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Norcadia asteroides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Actinomyces viscosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Veillonella alcaligens) isolated from 240 extracted, carious ...

  13. Antibacterial activity of garlic and lime on isolates of extracted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-24

    ) on seven bacterial species (Streptococcus mutans, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Norcadia asteroides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Actinomyces viscosus, Staphylococcus aureus and Veillonella alcaligens) isolated from 240.

  14. Plant growth promotion by Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, X.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a Gram-negative rod shaped bacterium that has a versatile metabolism and is widely spread in soil and water. P. fluorescens strain SBW25 (Pf.SBW25) is a well-known model strain to study bacterial evolution, plant colonization and biocontrol of plant diseases. It produces

  15. Antibiograms of Staphylococcus Aureus and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While there was no bacterial growth after 48hrs incubation recorded for group one, only 5(13.9%) samples yielded growth of Staphylococcus aureus for group two with 31(86.1%) yielding no bacterial growth. All group three samples yielded profuse growth of which 11(36.7%) yielded Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

  16. Transesterification of Jatropha oil using immobilized Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mild transesterification has become of much current interest for alternative fuel production. In the present study the ability of a commercial immobilized Pseudomonas fluorescens MTCC 103 to catalyze the transesterification of Jatropha oil and methanol was investigated. The cell of P. fluorescens was easily immobilized ...

  17. Behavioral response of resistant and sensitive Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-07-18

    Jul 18, 2008 ... Key words: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, cadmium stress, heavy metal resistance. INTRODUCTION. The release of .... plasmids located in the bacterial strains isolated from agricultural and industrial soils ..... esteraromaticum S51 with other strains of non-flocculating sludge bacteria. IWA's Water Environ.

  18. Evaluation of gamma irradiation effect and Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antagonistic effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens and influence of gamma irradiation on the development of Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of postharvest disease on apple fruit was studied. P. fluorescens was originally isolated from rhizosphere of the apple trees. Suspension of P. fluorescens and P. expansum ...

  19. Bacteriocinogenicity and production of pyocins from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The susceptible organisms include Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Klebsiella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Proteus spp. and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. The results of this study have provided evidence for broadspectrum antibacterial activity of pyocins elicited by Pseudomonas species from Nigeria ...

  20. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-08

    Mar 8, 2010 ... indicates its potential application in biological treatment of wastewaters contaminated with arsenic. Key words: Arsenic, wastewater, Pseudomonas lubricans, bioremediation. INTRODUCTION. Arsenic is the most prevalent environmental toxic metal and is first on the superfund list of hazardous substances.

  1. Antibiotics Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This work investigated the prevalence and antibiotics sensitivity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from wounds of patients attending Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital (ABUTH), Zaria-Nigeria. One hundred Isolates were characterized and identified from the specimens using standard ...

  2. Characterization of drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the fact that they remain asymptomatic in many cases, they nevertheless play significant roles in the epidemiology of these pathogens through their dissemination to the public, sometimes through the food chain. Four multidrug resistant Gram negative pathogens including: 2 Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 2 Proteus ...

  3. Growth of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Cassava Starch ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This involved hydrolysis of starch extracted from freshly harvested cassava tubers using enzyme-enzyme method of hydrolysis, followed by aerobic fermentation of Pseudomonas fluorescens on a mixture of the hydrolysate and nutrient media in a fermentor in batch cultures. The reducing sugar hydrolysate served as the ...

  4. Characterization of rhodanese produced by Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enzymatic remediation of polluted environment presents advantages over traditional technologies and also over microbial remediation. Extracellular rhodanese of strains of Pseudomonas aerugionosa and Bacillus brevis isolated from soil of cassava processing site were studied. Biochemical characteristics of the purified ...

  5. Production and characterization of biosurfactant from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this present study, biosurfactant-producing microorganisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa PBSC1, was isolated from mangrove ecosystem in Pichavaram (Boat house), Tamil Nadu, India. The biosurfactant production was done using a minimal salt medium (MSM) with crude oil as the hydrocarbon. The microbial growths ...

  6. Optimization of alkaline protease production from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A protease producing bacteria was isolated from meat waste contaminated soil and identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens. Optimization of the fermentation medium for maximum protease production was carried out. The culture conditions like inoculum concentration, incubation time, pH, temperature, carbon sources, ...

  7. "Hot Tub Rash" and "Swimmer's Ear" (Pseudomonas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hot Tub Rash > Remove swimsuits and shower with soap after getting out of the water. > Clean swimsuits after getting out of the water. ... in locations that have been closed because of pollution. Pseudomonas can multiply quickly when water disinfectant levels drop, so testing your pool or ...

  8. Occurrence of Fusarium Oxysporum and Ralstonia (Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microflora associated with the root-surface of five tomato cultivars commonly cultivated in Edo State Nigeria, was investigated by inoculating serially washed 5 mm tomato root segments on potato dextrose agar (PDA) incubated at room temperature (28-30oC). Fusarium oxysporum and Ralstonia (pseudomonas) ...

  9. High pressure inactivation of Pseudomonas in black truffle - comparison with Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballestra, Patricia; Verret, Catherine; Cruz, Christian; Largeteau, Alain; Demazeau, Gerard; El Moueffak, Abdelhamid

    2010-03-01

    Pseudomonas is one of the most common genera in black Perigord truffle. Its inactivation by high pressure (100-500 MPa/10 min) applied on truffles at sub-zero or low temperatures was studied and compared with those of Pseudomonas fluorescens in tryptone soya broth. Pressurization of truffles at 300 MPa/4 °C reduced the bacterial count of Pseudomonas by 5.3 log cycles. Higher pressures of 400 or 500 MPa, at 4 °C or 20 °C, allowed us to slightly increase the level of destruction to the value of ca. 6.5 log cycles but did not permit us to completely inactivate Pseudomonas. The results showed a residual charge of about 10 CFU/g. Pressure-shift freezing of truffles, which consists in applying a pressure of 200 MPa/-18 °C for 10 min and then quickly releasing this pressure to induce freezing, reduced the population of Pseudomonas by 3.3 log cycles. The level of inactivation was higher than those obtained with conventional freezing. Endogenous Pseudomonas in truffle was shown to be more resistant to high pressure treatments than P. fluorescens used for inoculation of broths.

  10. Biodegradation Of 4-Chlorobiphenyl By Pseudomonas synxantha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanjal Noorpreet Inder Kaur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The stabilization and disposal of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs from soil environment and wetland areas is of great concern for health and safety. Wetland remediation with microorganisms is an approach for treating PCBs. A bacterial strain was isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil of Ropar, Punjab, able to degrade PCBs under aerobic conditions. The percentage of degradation with 100 mM/ml of 4-chlorobiphenyl was up to 90%. Degradation was monitored by mass spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography and spectrophotometrically, showing that 4-chlorobiphenyl was degraded almost completely. The bacterial strain was identified as Pseudomonas synxantha by 16sRNA sequencing method. This is the first report of 4-chlorobiphenyl degradation by Pseudomonas synxantha.

  11. Pseudomonas spp. convert metmyoglobin into deoxymyoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoyama, Michiyo; Kobayashi, Miho; Sasaki, Keisuke; Nomura, Masaru; Mitsumoto, Mitsuru

    2010-01-01

    Meat 'reddening' by bacteria was observed in chilled beef. To identify the reddening bacteria, isolates were inoculated onto beef and the changes in CIE L*a*b* values monitored. As a result, two Pseudomonas spp., including Pseudomonas fragi which is commonly observed in raw meat, were selected and identified as reddening bacteria. The reddening was coincidentally occurred with the appearance of slime, and the increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) was simultaneously suppressed. In myoglobin-containing nutrient broth, it is shown spectroscopically that P. fragi converted metmyoglobin into deoxymyoglobin. It was concluded that the meat reddening was due to the formation of deoxymyoglobin, induced by the very-low-oxygen tension brought about by Pseudomonad's oxygen consumption: This oxygen depletion simultaneously suppressed TBARS increase.

  12. The immune system vs. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Peter Østrup; Givskov, Michael; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Ilya Metchnikoff and Paul Ehrlich were awarded the Nobel price in 1908. Since then, numerous studies have unraveled a multitude of mechanistically different immune responses to intruding microorganisms. However, in the vast majority of these studies, the underlying infectious agents have appeared...... the present review on the immune system vs. biofilm bacteria is focused on Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mainly because this is the most thoroughly studied), many of the same mechanisms are also seen with biofilm infections generated by other microorganisms....

  13. Extracytoplasmic function sigma factors in Pseudomonas syringae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiil, Kristoffer; Oguiza, J.A.; Ussery, D.W.

    2005-01-01

    Genome analyses of the plant pathogens Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000, pv. syringae B728a and pv. phaseolicola 1448A reveal fewer extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors than in related Pseudomonads with different lifestyles. We highlight the presence of a P. syringae-specific ECF s...... sigma factor that is an interesting target for future studies because of its potential role in the adaptation of P. syringae to its specialized phytopathogenic lifestyle....

  14. Isolation and characterization of arsenite oxidizing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A bacterium, Pseudomonas lubricans, isolated from heavy metal laden industrial wastewater, has been shown to tolerate multiple heavy metals suggesting its importance in bioremediation of industrial effluents. P. lubricans tolerated As(III) up to 3 mg ml-1, Cu2+ up to 0.7 mg ml-1, Hg2+ up to 0.4 mg ml-1, Ni2+ up to 0.4 mg ...

  15. Nosocomial outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, I; Valencia, R; Torres, M J; Cantos, A; Conde, M; Aznar, J

    2006-11-01

    We describe an outbreak of nosocomial endophthalmitis due to a common source, which was determined to be trypan blue solution prepared in the hospital's pharmacy service. We assume that viable bacteria probably gained access to the trypan blue stock solution during cooling after autoclaving. The temporal cluster of Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis was readily perceived on the basis of clinical and microbiological findings, and an exogenous source of contamination was unequivocally identified by means of DNA fingerprinting.

  16. High quality draft genome sequences of Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T) type strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Arantxa; Busquets, Antonio; Gomila, Margarita; Mulet, Magdalena; Gomila, Rosa M; Reddy, T B K; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Markowitz, Victor; García-Valdés, Elena; Göker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos; Lalucat, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas has the highest number of species out of any genus of Gram-negative bacteria and is phylogenetically divided into several groups. The Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch includes at least 13 species of environmental and industrial interest, plant-associated bacteria, insect pathogens, and even some members that have been found in clinical specimens. In the context of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project, we present the permanent, high-quality draft genomes of the type strains of 3 taxonomically and ecologically closely related species in the Pseudomonas putida phylogenetic branch: Pseudomonas fulva DSM 17717(T), Pseudomonas parafulva DSM 17004(T) and Pseudomonas cremoricolorata DSM 17059(T). All three genomes are comparable in size (4.6-4.9 Mb), with 4,119-4,459 protein-coding genes. Average nucleotide identity based on BLAST comparisons and digital genome-to-genome distance calculations are in good agreement with experimental DNA-DNA hybridization results. The genome sequences presented here will be very helpful in elucidating the taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution of the Pseudomonas putida species complex.

  17. The effect of pseudomonas exotoxin A on cytokine production in whole blood exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M. J.; Speelman, P.; Zaat, S. A.; Hack, C. E.; van Deventer, S. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (P-ExA) on cytokine production, we studied cytokine release induced by heat-killed P. aeruginosa (HKPA) in human whole blood in the presence or absence of P-ExA. P-ExA (0.01-1 microgram ml(-1)) caused a dose-dependent decrease in

  18. Stratified growth in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, E.; Roe, F.; Bugnicourt, A.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, stratified patterns of protein synthesis and growth were demonstrated in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Spatial patterns of protein synthetic activity inside biofilms were characterized by the use of two green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene constructs. One construct...... of oxygen limitation in the biofilm. Oxygen microelectrode measurements showed that oxygen only penetrated approximately 50 mum into the biofilm. P. aeruginosa was incapable of anaerobic growth in the medium used for this investigation. These results show that while mature P. aeruginosa biofilms contain...

  19. Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov., a halophilic member of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from a wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali; Shahinpei, Azadeh; Sepahy, Abbas Akhavan; Makhdoumi-Kakhki, Ali; Seyedmahdi, Shima Sadat; Schumann, Peter; Ventosa, Antonio

    2014-10-01

    A novel Gram-stain-negative, aerobic, non-endospore-forming, non-pigmented, rod-shaped, slightly halophilic bacterium, designated GBPy5(T), was isolated from aquatic plants of the Gomishan wetland, Iran. Cells of strain GBPy5(T) were motile. Growth occurred with between 1 and 10% (w/v) NaCl and the isolate grew optimally with 3% (w/v) NaCl. The optimum pH and temperature for growth of the strain were pH 8.0 and 30 °C, respectively, while it was able to grow over a pH range of 6.5-9.0 and a temperature range of 4-35 °C. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rRNA gene sequences, revealed that strain GBPy5(T) is a member of the genus Pseudomonas forming a monophyletic branch. The novel strain exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity of 95.4% with type strains of Pseudomonas guariconensis PCAVU11(T) and Pseudomonas sabulinigri J64(T), respectively. The major cellular fatty acids of the isolate were C18:1ω7c (37.8%), C16:0 (14.9%), C16:1ω7c (12.9%), C12:0 3-OH (7.1%) and C12:0 (7.0%). The polar lipid pattern of strain GBPy5(T) comprised phosphatidylglycerol, diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine and one phospholipid. Ubiquinone 9 (Q-9) was the predominant lipoquinone. The G+C content of the genomic DNA of strain GBPy5(T) was 59.2 mol%. On the basis of the phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain GBPY5(T) represents a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas salegens sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is GBPy5(T) ( = IBRC-M 10762(T) = CECT 8338(T)). IUMS.

  20. Antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas and its impact on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study focused on the antagonistic potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas in vitro, and its inoculation effect on growth performance of Lycopersicon esculentum in Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani infested soil. Biochemical characteristics of fluorescent Pseudomonas showed that all ten isolates were positive ...

  1. Genetic detection of Pseudomonas spp. in commercial Amazonian fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardura, Alba; Linde, Ana R; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2013-08-29

    Brazilian freshwater fish caught from large drainages like the River Amazon represent a million ton market in expansion, which is of enormous importance for export to other continents as exotic seafood. A guarantee of bacteriological safety is required for international exports that comprise a set of different bacteria but not any Pseudomonas. However, diarrhoea, infections and even septicaemia caused by some Pseudomonas species have been reported, especially in immune-depressed patients. In this work we have employed PCR-based methodology for identifying Pseudomonas species in commercial fish caught from two different areas within the Amazon basin. Most fish caught from the downstream tributary River Tapajòs were contaminated by five different Pseudomonas species. All fish samples obtained from the River Negro tributary (Manaus markets) contained Pseudomonas, but a less diverse community with only two species. The most dangerous Pseudomonas species for human health, P. aeruginosa, was not found and consumption of these fish (from their Pseudomonas content) can be considered safe for healthy consumers. As a precautionary approach we suggest considering Pseudomonas in routine bacteriological surveys of imported seafood.

  2. Novel Targets for Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alhede, Morten; Alhede, Maria; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes infection in all parts of the human body. The bacterium is naturally resistant to a wide range of antibiotics. In addition to resistance mechanisms such as efflux pumps, the ability to form aggregates, known as biofilm, further reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa’s...

  3. Interleukin-18 impairs the pulmonary host response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marc J.; Knapp, Sylvia; Florquin, Sandrine; Pater, Jennie; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Akira, Shizuo; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    Interleukin-18 (IL-18) is a potent cytokine with many different proinflammatory activities. To study the role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of Pseudomonas pneumonia, IL-18-deficient (IL-18(-/-)) and wild-type mice were intranasally inoculated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. IL-18 deficiency was

  4. Interactions between biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas and Phytophthora species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran, H.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas bacteria produce a wide variety of antimicrobial metabolites, including soap-like compounds referred to as biosurfactants. The results of this thesis showed that biosurfactant-producing Pseudomonas bacteria are effective in controlling Phytophthora foot rot disease of black

  5. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and

  6. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...... between cystic fibrosis patients has occurred....

  7. Energetics of binary mixed culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioenergetic analysis of the growth of the binary mixed culture (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescence) on phenol chemostat culture was carried out. The data were checked for consistency using carbon and available electron balances. When more than the minimum number of variables are measured, ...

  8. Energetics of binary mixed culture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... Bioenergetic analysis of the growth of the binary mixed culture (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and. Pseudomonas fluorescence) on ... biological system is widely gaining recognition (Yang et al., 1984; Solomon et al., .... Thus, by application of the covariate adjustment technique. (Solomon et al., 1985, 1994) in ...

  9. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  10. 33 original article infections a pseudomonas aeruginosa dans un ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    institution of effective resistance surveillance and infection control measures. . Keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, National Hospital Abuja, Susceptibility. INFECTIONS A PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA DANS UN HOPITAL TERTIAIRE. AU NIGERIA. *Iregbu KC, Eze SO,. Département de Microbiologie Médicale and ...

  11. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  12. Biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashemi Elham

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dihydrolinalool and terpineol are sources of fragrances that provide a unique volatile terpenoid alcohol of low toxicity and thus are widely used in the perfumery industry, in folk medicine, and in aromatherapy. They are important chemical constituents of the essential oil of many plants. Previous studies have concerned the biotransformation of limonene by Pseudomonas putida. The objective of this research was to study biotransformation of myrcene by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The culture preparation was done using such variables as different microbial methods and incubation periods to obtain maximum cells of P. aeruginosa for myrcene biotransformation. Results It was found that myrcene was converted to dihydrolinalool and 2,6-dimethyloctane in high percentages. The biotransformation products were identified by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, ultraviolet (UV analysis, gas chromatography (GC, and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS. Comparison of the different incubation times showed that 3 days was more effective, the major products being 2,6-dimethyloctane (90.0% and α-terpineol (7.7% and comprising 97.7%. In contrast, the main compounds derived for an incubation time of 1.5 days were dihydrolinalool (79.5% and 2,6-dimethyloctane (9.3%, with a total yield of 88.8%.

  13. Microbial Evaluation of Lafun in Selected Eateries in Abeokuta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the microbial safety of lafun paste (LP) sold in three selected eateries from five locations in Abeokuta, Nigeria. ... include Alcaligenes faecalis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus subtilis, Lactobacillus plantarum, Weissella confusa.

  14. Pseudomonas spp.: contamination sources in bulk tanks of dairy farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M.C. Vidal

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study focused on isolating Pseudomonas spp. during milking process in ten dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking systems during dry and rainy seasons, and evaluating DNA homology and patterns of distribution between isolates, in order to identify main sources of milk contamination by Pseudomonas spp. A total of 167 isolates of Pseudomonas spp. were obtained from water, milkers’ hands, cows’ teats, teat cups, cooling tanks and raw milk. Bacteria of Pseudomonas spp. genus were isolated from 85 and 82 sampling points in dairy farms with manual and mechanical milking system, respectively. A significant difference (p=0.02 on Pseudomonas spp. isolation was observed among samples of surface of cows’ teats before and after pre-dipping, but no significant difference (p>0.05 was observed among milking systems or seasons. The possibility of the same Pseudomonas spp. patterns are distributed in different farms and seasons using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP technique was demonstrated. Milkers’ hands, surface of cows’ teats, teat cups and cooling tanks were associated with raw milk contamination with Pseudomonas spp. on farms with manual and mechanical milking system, showing that regardless of the type of milking system and season, proper hygiene procedures of equipment, utensils and workers’ hands are essential to avoid contamination of the milk and, therefore, improve milk quality.

  15. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is a......BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  16. Management and treatment of contact lens-related Pseudomonas keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willcox MD

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mark DP WillcoxSchool of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaAbstract: Pubmed and Medline were searched for articles referring to Pseudomonas keratitis between the years 2007 and 2012 to obtain an overview of the current state of this disease. Keyword searches used the terms "Pseudomonas" + "Keratitis" limit to "2007–2012", and ["Ulcerative" or "Microbial"] + "Keratitis" + "Contact lenses" limit to "2007–2012". These articles were then reviewed for information on the percentage of microbial keratitis cases associated with contact lens wear, the frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of microbial keratitis around the world, the most common therapies to treat Pseudomonas keratitis, and the sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas to commonly prescribed antibiotics. The percentage of microbial keratitis associated with contact lens wear ranged from 0% in a study from Nepal to 54.5% from Japan. These differences may be due in part to different frequencies of contact lens wear. The frequency of Pseudomonas sp. as a causative agent of keratitis ranged from 1% in Japan to over 50% in studies from India, Malaysia, and Thailand. The most commonly reported agents used to treat Pseudomonas keratitis were either aminoglycoside (usually gentamicin fortified with a cephalosporin, or monotherapy with a fluoroquinolone (usually ciprofloxacin. In most geographical areas, most strains of Pseudomonas sp. (≥95% were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, but reports from India, Nigeria, and Thailand reported sensitivity to this antibiotic and similar fluoroquinolones of between 76% and 90%.Keywords: Pseudomonas, keratitis, contact lens

  17. The pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS balances life and death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Häussler

    Full Text Available When environmental conditions deteriorate and become inhospitable, generic survival strategies for populations of bacteria may be to enter a dormant state that slows down metabolism, to develop a general tolerance to hostile parameters that characterize the habitat, and to impose a regime to eliminate damaged members. Here, we provide evidence that the pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS mediates induction of all of these phenotypes. For individual cells, PQS, an interbacterial signaling molecule of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, has both deleterious and beneficial activities: on the one hand, it acts as a pro-oxidant and sensitizes the bacteria towards oxidative and other stresses and, on the other, it efficiently induces a protective anti-oxidative stress response. We propose that this dual function fragments populations into less and more stress tolerant members which respond differentially to developing stresses in deteriorating habitats. This suggests that a little poison may be generically beneficial to populations, in promoting survival of the fittest, and in contributing to bacterial multi-cellular behavior. It further identifies PQS as an essential mediator of the shaping of the population structure of Pseudomonas and of its response to and survival in hostile environmental conditions.

  18. Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers associated with contaminated eye mascaras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, L A; Ahearn, D G

    1977-07-01

    Seven Pseudomonas-induced corneal ulcers were associated with the use of four brands of mascara contaminated with P. aeruginosa. In laboratory studies, preservative systems of three of the four brands were inadequate in comparison with a control mascara of known antimicrobial activity. If the corneal epithelium is scratched during the application of mascara, particularly if the applicator is old, the cornea should be treated immediately and the mascara cultured to detect Pseudomonas. The high incidence of recurrent corneal ulceration in cases of Pseudomonas-induced keratitis indicates that initial chemotherapy should be intensive and maintained until the lesion stabilizes.

  19. Targeting quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics combined with an increasing acknowledgement of the role of biofilms in chronic infections has led to a growing interest in new antimicrobial strategies that target the biofilm mode of growth. In the aggregated biofilm mode, cell-to-cell communication...... systems involved in the process known as quorum sensing regulate coordinated expression of virulence with immune shielding mechanisms and antibiotic resistance. For two decades, the potential of interference with quorum sensing by small chemical compounds has been investigated with the aim of developing...... alternative antibacterial strategies. Here, we review state of the art research of quorum sensing inhibitors against the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is found in a number of biofilm-associated infections and identified as the predominant organism infecting the lungs of cystic...

  20. Complement activation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, E T; Kharazmi, A; Garred, P

    1993-01-01

    In chronic infections, such as the bronchopulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, bacteria persist despite an intact host immune defense and frequent antibiotic treatment. An important reason for the persistence of the bacteria is their capacity for the biofilm...... mode of growth. In this study we investigated the role of biofilms in activation of complement, a major contributor to the inflammatory process. Complement activation by P. aeruginosa was examined in a complement consumption assay, production of C3 and factor B conversion products assessed by crossed...... immuno-electrophoresis, C5a generation tested by a PMN chemotactic assay, and terminal complement complex formation measured by ELISA. Two of the four assays showed that P. aeruginosa grown in biofilm activated complement less than planktonic bacteria, and all assays showed that activation by intact...

  1. Rhamnolipid Biosurfactants Produced by Pseudomonas Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Kaskatepe

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Surfactants are chemical products widely used in our daily life in toothpaste and other personal hygiene and cosmetic products, and in several industries. Biosurfactants are surfactants of biological origin that can be produced by microorganisms and have many advantages, such as low toxicity and high biodegradability, compared to synthetic counterparts. Unfortunately, high production costs limit the use of biosurfactants. Low-cost production is the most important factor for biosurfactants to be able to compete in the global market place. This review presents general information on rhamnolipid biosurfactant produced by Pseudomonas species, as well as on their production and applications. In addition, industrial products and their wastes used for rhamnolipid production are reviewed in detail based on recent studies.

  2. Cell death in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Webb, J.S.; Thompson, L.S.; James, S.

    2003-01-01

    Bacteria growing in biofilms often develop multicellular, three-dimensional structures known as microcolonies. Complex differentiation within biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, leading to the creation of voids inside microcolonies and to the dispersal of cells from within these voids....... However, key developmental processes regulating these events are poorly understood. A normal component of multicellular development is cell death. Here we report that a repeatable pattern of cell death and lysis occurs in biofilms of P. aeruginosa during the normal course of development. Cell death...... occurred with temporal and spatial organization within biofilms, inside microcolonies, when the biofilms were allowed to develop in continuous-culture flow cells. A subpopulation of viable cells was always observed in these regions. During the onset of biofilm killing and during biofilm development...

  3. Cooperative production of siderophores by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Freya; Buckling, Angus

    2009-01-01

    The production of iron-scavenging siderophores by the opportunistic animal pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a textbook example of public goods cooperation. This trait provides an excellent model system with which to study cooperation. Further, the links between siderophore production and P. aeruginosa virulence allow us to investigate how pathogen ecology, social behaviour and pathology might be connected. We present here the results of basic research on the evolution and ecology of siderophore cooperation in this species. In particular, we explore the effects of population and community structure, iron regime and genomic mutation rate on the relative success of siderophore cooperators and cheats. We also present preliminary data on the links between siderophore production and another clinically-relevant social trait, biofilm formation. It is our hope that more realistic laboratory studies of siderophore cooperation in P. aeruginosa will eventually cast light on the roles played by social traits in long-term microbial infections.

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa endophthalmitis masquerading as chronic uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Badami Nagaraj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year-old male presented with decreased vision in the left eye of 15-day duration after having undergone an uneventful cataract surgery 10 months back. He had been previously treated with systemic steroids for recurrent uveitis postoperatively on three occasions in the same eye. B-scan ultrasonography showed multiple clumplike echoes suggestive of vitreous inflammation. Aqueous tap revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa sensitive to ciprofloxacin. The patient was treated with intravitreal ciprofloxacin and vancomycin along with systemic ciprofloxacin with good clinical response. Even a virulent organism such as P.aeruginosa can present as a chronic uveitis, which, if missed, can lead to a delay in accurate diagnosis and appropriate management.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    of mutations, slow growth and adaptation of the bacteria to the conditions in the lungs, and to antibiotic therapy. Low bacterial metabolic activity and increase of doubling times of the bacterial cells in CF lungs are responsible for some of the tolerance to antibiotics. Conventional resistance mechanisms......, such as chromosomal ß-lactamase, upregulated efflux pumps, and mutations of antibiotic target molecules in the bacteria, also contribute to the survival of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Biofilms can be prevented by early aggressive antibiotic prophylaxis or therapy, and they can be treated by chronic suppressive therapy.......The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...

  6. Biosynthesis of pyocyanin pigment by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. El-Fouly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Sixty-three isolates belonging to the genus Pseudomonas were isolated from different environmental sources including; soil, water and clinical specimens. Twenty out of them were identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and individually screened for pyocyanin production. P. aeruginosa R1; isolated from rice-cultivated soil and P. aeruginosa U3 selected from clinical specimen (Urinary tract infection were the highest pyocyanin producers; pyocyanin production reached 9.3 and 5.9 μg/ml, respectively on synthetic glucose supplemented nutrient medium (GSNB. The identification of both selected strains (P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 was confirmed by 16S rRNA, the similarity with other strains available in database was 97% (with P. aeruginosa FPVC 14 and 94% (with P. aeruginosa 13.A, respectively. P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 are accessed at gene bank with accession numbers KM924432 and KM603511, in the same order. Pyocyanin was extracted by standard methods, purified by column chromatography and characterized by UV-Vis absorption, mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance. The antimicrobial activity of purified pyocyanin against multi-drug resistant microbes was investigated; the efficiency of pyocyanin was more obvious in Gram +ve bacteria than Gram−ve bacteria and yeast. To reduce the cost of pyocyanin production, a new conventional medium based on cotton seed meal supplemented with peptone was designed. The pyocyanin production of both selected strains P. aeruginosa R1 and P. aeruginosa U3 using the new medium is increased by 30.1% and 17.2%, respectively in comparison with synthetic GSNB medium, while the cost of production process is reduced by 56.7%.

  7. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB112 (JN996498 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PB112 (JN996498) isolated from infected Labeo bata (Hamilton) by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) analysis. Somerita Panda, PK Bandyopadhyay, SN Chatterjee ...

  8. The Enzymes of the Ammonia Assimilation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Camp, Huub J.M. op den; Leenen, Pieter J.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1980-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa is regulated by repression/derepression of enzyme synthesis and by adenylylation/deadenylylation control. High levels of deadenylylated biosynthetically active glutamine synthetase were observed in cultures growing with limiting amounts of nitrogen

  9. Resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    negative bacilli in patients with impaired host defences emphasizes the need for information on the antibiotic susceptibility of the organisms that infects such patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa are becoming increasingly resistant to ...

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans reveals novel Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    The susceptibility of Caenorhabditis elegans to different virulent phenotypes of Pseudomonas aeruginosa makes the worms an excellent model for studying host-pathogen interactions. Including the recently described liquid killing, five different killing assays are now available offering superb

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dose-Response and Bathing Water Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most commonly identified opportunistic pathogen associated with pool acquired bather disease. To better understand why this microorganism poses this protracted problem we recently appraised P. aeruginosa pool risk management. Much is known about the ...

  12. Pseudomonas Folliculitis Associated with Use of Hot Tubs and Spas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Michael L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the history, etiology, diagnosis, histopathology, treatment, and prevention of Pseudomonas Folliculitis, an increasingly common skin infection contracted in hot tubs and, to some extent, in swimming pools. (Author/SM)

  13. Sequencing and characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage JG004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garbe, Julia; Bunk, Boyke; Rohde, Manfred; Schobert, Max

    2011-01-01

    .... Pseudomonas aeruginosa. For an effective use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents, it is important to understand phage biology but also genes of the bacterial host essential for phage infection...

  14. Alginate overproduction affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, G.M.; Balzer, G.J.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant com...

  15. Functional bacterial amyloid increases Pseudomonas biofilm hydrophobicity and stiffness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Vad, Brian S; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-01-01

    hydrophobicity and mechanical properties. Using atomic force microscopy imaging and force spectroscopy, we show that the amyloid renders individual cells more resistant to drying and alters their interactions with hydrophobic probes. Importantly, amyloid makes Pseudomonas more hydrophobic and increases biofilm...

  16. New strategies for genetic engineering Pseudomonas syringae using recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Here we report that DNA oligonucleotides (oligos) introduced directly into bacteria by electroporation can recombine with the bacterial chromosome. This phenomenon was identified in Pseudomonas syringae and we subsequently found that Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri are...

  17. Infectious conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from a bathroom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eguchi, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Tatsuro; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Mitamura, Sayaka; Mitamura, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    .... The purpose of this report is to describe a case of suture-related conjunctivitis caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa for which we identified the transmission route using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE...

  18. Characterization of Glutamine-Requiring Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Joosten, Han M.L.J.; Herst, Patricia M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    Revertants were isolated from a glutamine-requiring mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO. One strain showed thermosensitive glutamine requirement and formed thermolabile glutamine synthetase, suggesting the presence of a mutation in the structural gene for glutamine synthetase. The mutation

  19. Isolation of chlorhexidine-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa from clinical lesions.

    OpenAIRE

    Nakahara, H; Kozukue, H

    1982-01-01

    The chlorhexidine resistance of 317 strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from hospital patients was determined. The distribution pattern of their susceptibility to chlorhexidine clearly revealed two peaks, and the frequency of resistance to chlorhexidine was 84.2%.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility of biof...

  1. A study on nitrogen removal efficiency of Pseudomonas stutzeri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... 1College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou Higher. Education Mega Centre, Panyu District, ... Key words: Anaerobic/anoxic/oxic treatment process, reaction condition, denitrification, nitrification, nitrogen removal, Pseudomonas stutzeri.

  2. Plant perceptions of plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas.

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, Gail M

    2004-01-01

    Plant-associated Pseudomonas live as saprophytes and parasites on plant surfaces and inside plant tissues. Many plant-associated Pseudomonas promote plant growth by suppressing pathogenic micro-organisms, synthesizing growth-stimulating plant hormones and promoting increased plant disease resistance. Others inhibit plant growth and cause disease symptoms ranging from rot and necrosis through to developmental dystrophies such as galls. It is not easy to draw a clear distinction between pathoge...

  3. Biodegradasi Petroleum dan Hidrokarbon Eikosana oleh Isolat Bakteri Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Faiqah Umar

    2015-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum and hydrocarbon eicosane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate. Hydrocarbon are important environmental contaminants in soil and water. These compounds have a potential risk to human health, as many of them are carsinogenic and toxic to marine organisms such as diatome, gasthrophode, mussel, and fish. The purpose of this research was to know the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to degradate the hydrocarbon (petroleum Hundill and eicosane) substrate. Growing test used ...

  4. Effect of osmotic stress on plant growth promoting Pseudomonas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhya, V; Ali, Sk Z; Venkateswarlu, B; Reddy, Gopal; Grover, Minakshi

    2010-10-01

    In this study we isolated and screened drought tolerant Pseudomonas isolates from arid and semi arid crop production systems of India. Five isolates could tolerate osmotic stress up to -0.73 MPa and possessed multiple PGP properties such as P-solubilization, production of phytohormones (IAA, GA and cytokinin), siderophores, ammonia and HCN however under osmotic stress expression of PGP traits was low compared to non-stressed conditions. The strains were identified as Pseudomonas entomophila, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Pseudomonas putida, Pseudomonas syringae and Pseudomonas monteilli respectively on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Osmotic stress affected growth pattern of all the isolates as indicated by increased mean generation time. An increase level of intracellular free amino acids, proline, total soluble sugars and exopolysaccharides was observed under osmotic stress suggesting bacterial response to applied stress. Further, strains GAP-P45 and GRFHYTP52 showing higher levels of EPS and osmolytes (amino acids and proline) accumulation under stress as compared to non-stress conditions, also exhibited higher expression of PGP traits under stress indicating a relationship between stress response and expression of PGP traits. We conclude that isolation and screening of indigenous, stress adaptable strains possessing PGP traits can be a method for selection of efficient stress tolerant PGPR strains.

  5. EFFICACY OF ENDOPHYTIC BACTERIA IN REDUCING PLANT PARASITIC NEMATODE Pratylenchus brachyurus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Harni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Pratylenchus brachyurus is a major parasitic nematode on patchouli that reduces plant production up to 85%. The use of endophytic bacteria is promising for controlling nematode and promoting plant growth through production of phytohormones and enhancing the availability of soil nutrients. The objective of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of endophytic bacteria to control P. brachyurus on patchouli plant and its influence on plant productions (plant fresh weight and patchouli oil. The study was conducted at Cimanggu Experimental Garden and Laboratory of the Indonesian Spice and Medicinal Crops Research Institute (ISMECRI, Bogor, West Java. The experi-ment was designed in a randomized block with seven treatments and eight replications; each replication consisted of 10 plants. The treatments evaluated were five isolates of endophytic bacteria (Achromobacter xylosoxidans TT2, Alcaligenes faecalis NJ16, Pseudomonas putida EH11, Bacillus cereus MSK and Bacillus subtilis NJ57, synthetic nematicide as a reference, and non-treated plant as a control.  Four-week old patchouli plants of cv. Sidikalang were treated by soaking the roots in suspension of endophytic bacteria (109 cfu  ml-1 for one hour before trans-planting to the field. At one month after planting, the plants were drenched with the bacterial suspension as much as 100 ml per plant. The results showed that applications of the endophytic bacteria could suppress the nematode populations (52.8-80% and increased plant weight (23.62-57.48% compared to the control. The isolate of endophytic bacterium Achromobacter xylosoxidans TT2 was the best and comparable with carbofuran.

  6. [Mechanism of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by an association of Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas stutzeri strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, N V; Kondrat'eva, T F; Krasil'nikova, E N; Karavaĭko, G I

    2006-01-01

    The intermediate and terminal products of cyanide and thiocyanate decomposition by individual strains of the genus Pseudomonas, P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18, and by their association were analyzed. The activity of the enzymes of nitrogen and sulfur metabolism in these strains was compared with that of the collection strains P. putida VKM B-2187T and P. stutzeri VKM B-975T. Upon the introduction of CN- and SCN- into cell suspensions of strains 18 and 21 in phosphate buffer (pH 8.8), the production of NH4+ was observed. Due to the high rate of their utilization, NH3, NH4+, and CNO- were absent from the culture liquids of P. putida strain 21 and P. stutzeri strain 18 grown with CN- or SCN-. Both Pseudomonas strains decomposed SCN- via cyanate production. The cyanase activity was 0.75 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. putida strain 21 and 1.26 micromol/(min mg protein) for P. stutzeri strain 18. The cyanase activity was present in the cells grown with SCN- but absent in cells grown with NH4+. Strain 21 of P. putida was a more active CN- decomposer than strain 18 of P. stutzeri. Ammonium and CO2 were the terminal nitrogen and carbon products of CN- and SCN- decomposition. The terminal sulfur products of SCN- decomposition by P. stutzeri strain 18 and P. putida strain 21 were thiosulfate and tetrathionate, respectively. The strains utilized the toxic compounds in the anabolism only, as sources of nitrogen (CN- and SCN-) and sulfur (SCN-). The pathway of thiocyanate decomposition by the association of bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas is proposed based on the results obtained.

  7. Biosorpsi Logam Zn Pada Limbah Sintetik Menggunakan Biomassa Campuran Pseudomonas aeruginosa dan Pseudomonas sp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidayati Hidayati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Zinc is one of the heavy metals that could be harmful for environment. This metal usually arises from industrial activities. Biosorption of zinc in synthetic waste was conducted using biomass mixture of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas sp. This research aims to determine the zinc adsorption capacity of the biomass in synthetic waste water. Zinc biosorption was performed at pH 4, room temperature and stirring 800 rpm. Variation of contact time used was 30, 60 and 120 min; and the amount of biomass used was 0.01 g, 0.02 g, 0.03 g, 0.04 g and 0.05 g. The highest zinc biosorption capacity was obtained 25.43% at the time of 120 minutes and the amount of biomass used 0.01 g. The optimum condition for biomass biosorption and removal capacity based on the correlation between experimental data and mathematical models was obtained with the addition of 0.04 g of biomass with correlation coefficient (R 1 and 0,965 respectively.ABSTRAK Salah satu logam berat yang berbahaya dari hasil kegiatan industri adalah logam Zn (seng. Biosorpsi logam Zn pada limbah sintetik dilakukan dengan menggunakan biomassa campuran Pseudomonas aeruginosa dan Pseudomonas sp. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui kapasitas biomassa dalam mengadsorpsi logam Zn pada limbah sintetik. Biosorpsi logam Zn dilakukan pada kondisi pH 4, temperatur ruang dan pengadukan 800 rpm. Variasi waktu kontak dilakukan pada 30, 60 dan 120 menit  dan menggunakan jumlah biomassa 0,01 g, 0,02 g, 0,03 g, 0,04 g  dan 0,05 g. Kapasitas biosorpsi logam Zn tertinggi diperoleh sebesar 25,43% pada waktu 120 menit dengan jumlah biomassa 0,01 g. Kondisi optimum biosorpsi logam Zn berdasarkan korelasi antara data eksperimen dan model matematika diperoleh pada penambahan jumlah biomassa sebesar 0,04 g baik untuk kapasitas biosorpsi logam Zn maupun efisiensi removal logam Zn dengan nilai koefisien korelasi (R2 masing-masing adalah 1 dan 0,965.

  8. Antivirulence activity of azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eImperi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics represent our bulwark to combat bacterial infections, but the spread of antibiotic resistance compromises their clinical efficacy. Alternatives to conventional antibiotics are urgently needed in order to complement the existing antibacterial arsenal. The macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example of an unconventional antibacterial drug. Besides its growth-inhibiting activity, AZM displays potent anti-inflammatory properties, as well as antivirulence activity on some intrinsically resistant bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this bacterium, the antivirulence activity of AZM mainly relies on its ability to interact with the ribosome, resulting in direct and/or indirect repression of specific subsets of genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and intrinsic antibiotic resistance. Both clinical experience and clinical trials have shown the efficacy of AZM in the treatment of chronic pulmonary infections caused by P. aeruginosa. The aim of this review is to combine results from laboratory studies with evidence from clinical trials in order to unify the information on the in vivo mode of action of AZM in P. aeruginosa infection.

  9. Bioadsorption characteristics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kőnig-Péter Anikó

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cd(II and Pb(II ions from aqueous solution using lyophilized Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAOI cells were observed under various experimental conditions. The effect of pH, initial metal concentration, equilibration time and temperature on bioadsorption was investigated. The optimum pH value for Pb(II adsorption was found to be 5.0, and for Cd(II 5.0 − 6.0. The Pb(II and Cd(II bioadsorption equilibrium were analyzed by using Freundlich and Langmuir model using nonlinear least-squares estimation. The experimental maximum uptake capacity of Pb(II and Cd(II was estimated to be 164 mg g-1 and 113 mg g-1, respectively. For biosorption kinetic study the pseudo second-order kinetic model was applied at various temperatures. The temperature had no significant effect on Pb(II bioadsorption. In case of Cd(II bioadsorption the adsorbed amount decreased with increasing temperature.

  10. Benzoate transport in Pseudomonas putida CSV86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Alpa; Purohit, Hemant; Phale, Prashant S

    2017-07-03

    Pseudomonas putida strain CSV86 metabolizes variety of aromatic compounds as the sole carbon source. Genome analysis revealed the presence of genes encoding putative transporters for benzoate, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenylacetate, p-hydroxyphenylacetate and vanillate. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that benzoate transport and metabolism genes are clustered at the ben locus as benK-catA-benE-benF. Protein topology prediction suggests that BenK (aromatic acid-H+ symporter of major facilitator superfamily) has 12 transmembrane α-helices with the conserved motif LADRXGRKX in loop 2, while BenE (benzoate-H+ symporter protein) has 11 predicted transmembrane α-helices. benF and catA encode benzoate specific porin, OprD and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively. Biochemical studies suggest that benzoate was transported by an inducible and active process. Inhibition (90%-100%) in the presence of dinitrophenol suggests that the energy for the transport process is derived from the proton motive force. The maximum rate of benzoate transport was 484 pmole min-1 mg-1 cells with an affinity constant, Kmof 4.5 μM. Transcriptional analysis of the benzoate and glucose-grown cells showed inducible expression of benF, benK and benE, suggesting that besides outer membrane porin, both inner membrane transporters probably contribute for the benzoate transport in P. putida strain CSV86. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The metabolism of thymol by a Pseudomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Enid M.; Dagley, S.

    1968-01-01

    1. Pseudomonas putida when grown with thymol contained a meta-fission dioxygenase, which required ferrous ions and readily cleaved the benzene nucleus of catechols between adjacent carbon atoms bearing hydroxyl and isopropyl groups. 2. 3-Hydroxythymo-1,4-quinone was excreted towards the end of exponential growth and later was slowly metabolized. This compound was oxidized by partially purified extracts only when NADH was supplied; the substrate for the dioxygenase appeared to be 3-hydroxythymo-1,4-quinol, which was readily and non-enzymically oxidized to the quinone. 3. 2-Oxobutyrate (0·9 mole) was formed from 1 mole of 3-hydroxythymo-1,4-quinone with the consumption of 1 mole of oxygen; acetate, isobutyrate and 2-hydroxybutyrate (which arose from the enzymic reduction of 2-oxobutyrate) were also formed. 4. These products, which were produced only when the catechol substrate contained a third hydroxyl group, appeared to result from the enzymic hydrolysis of the ring-fission product. PMID:4303067

  12. Degradation of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons by two strains of Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obinna C. Nwinyi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The goal of this investigation was to isolate competent polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons degraders that can utilize polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons of former industrial sites at McDoel Switchyard in Bloomington, Indiana. Using conventional enrichment method based on soil slurry, we isolated, screened and purified two bacterial species strains PB1 and PB2. Applying the ribotyping technique using the 16S rRNA gene analysis, the strains were assigned to the genus Pseudomonas (Pseudomonas plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2. Both isolates showed promising metabolic capacity on pyrene sprayed MS agar plates during the preliminary investigations. Using time course studies in the liquid cultures at calculated concentrations 123, 64, 97 and 94 ppm for naphthalene, chrysene, fluroanthene and pyrene, P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 showed partial utilization of the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Naphthalene was degraded between 26% and 40%, chrysene 14% and 16%, fluroanthene 5% and 7%; pyrene 8% and 13% by P. plecoglossicida strain PB1 and Pseudomonas sp. PB2 respectively. Based on their growth profile, we developed a model R2 = 1 to predict the degradation rate of slow polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon-degraders where all the necessary parameters are constant. From this investigation, we confirm that the former industrial site soil microbial communities may be explored for the biorestoration of the industrial site.

  13. Pseudomonas fluorescens' view of the periodic table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workentine, Matthew L; Harrison, Joe J; Stenroos, Pernilla U; Ceri, Howard; Turner, Raymond J

    2008-01-01

    Growth in a biofilm modulates microbial metal susceptibility, sometimes increasing the ability of microorganisms to withstand toxic metal species by several orders of magnitude. In this study, a high-throughput metal toxicity screen was initiated with the aim of correlating biological toxicity data in planktonic and biofilm cells to the physiochemical properties of metal ions. To this end, Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 was grown in the Calgary Biofilm Device (CBD) and biofilms and planktonic cells of this microorganism were exposed to gradient arrays of different metal ions. These arrays included 44 different metals with representative compounds that spanned every group of the periodic table (except for the halogens and noble gases). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) values were obtained after exposing the biofilms to metal ions for 4 h. Using these values, metal ion toxicity was correlated to the following ion-specific physicochemical parameters: standard reduction-oxidation potential, electronegativity, the solubility product of the corresponding metal-sulfide complex, the Pearson softness index, electron density and the covalent index. When the ions were grouped according to outer shell electron structure, we found that heavy metal ions gave the strongest correlations to these parameters and were more toxic on average than the other classes of the ions. Correlations were different for biofilms than for planktonic cells, indicating that chemical mechanisms of metal ion toxicity differ between the two modes of growth. We suggest that biofilms can specifically counter the toxic effects of certain physicochemical parameters, which may contribute to the increased ability of biofilms to withstand metal toxicity.

  14. Aflatoxin B₁ degradation by a Pseudomonas strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, Lancine; Zhao, Yueju; Folly, Yawa Minnie Elodie; Chang, Jinghua; Li, Jinhan; Selvaraj, Jonathan Nimal; Xing, Fuguo; Zhou, Lu; Wang, Yan; Liu, Yang

    2014-10-23

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), one of the most potent naturally occurring mutagens and carcinogens, causes significant threats to the food industry and animal production. In this study, 25 bacteria isolates were collected from grain kernels and soils displaying AFB1 reduction activity. Based on its degradation effectiveness, isolate N17-1 was selected for further characterization and identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. P. aeruginosa N17-1 could degrade AFB₁, AFB₂ and AFM₁ by 82.8%, 46.8% and 31.9% after incubation in Nutrient Broth (NB) medium at 37 °C for 72 h, respectively. The culture supernatant of isolate N17-1 degraded AFB₁ effectively, whereas the viable cells and intra cell extracts were far less effective. Factors influencing AFB1 degradation by the culture supernatant were investigated. Maximum degradation was observed at 55 °C. Ions Mn²⁺ and Cu²⁺ were activators for AFB1 degradation, however, ions Mg²⁺, Li⁺, Zn²⁺, Se²⁺, Fe³⁺ were strong inhibitors. Treatments with proteinase K and proteinase K plus SDS significantly reduced the degradation activity of the culture supernatant. No degradation products were observed based on preliminary LC-QTOF/MS analysis, indicating AFB₁ was metabolized to degradation products with chemical properties different from that of AFB₁. The results indicated that the degradation of AFB₁ by P. aeruginosa N17-1 was enzymatic and could have a great potential in industrial applications. This is the first report indicating that the isolate of P. aeruginosa possesses the ability to degrade aflatoxin.

  15. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  16. Therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections with tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, D C; Fekety, F R; Bruce, B; Silva, J; Archer, G

    1975-07-01

    The efficacy of tobramycin in doses of 2.7 to 5.6 mg/kg per day in 29 courses of therapy in 25 hospitalized patients with serious Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections was studied. Eighty-three percent of the P. aeruginosa strains showed zones of inhibition of 16 mm or more around a 10-mug tobramycin disk in the Bauer-Kirby disk method. Tobramycin minimal inhibitory concentration ranged from <0.05 to 1.5 mug/ml (microtiter twofold dilution method); for gentamicin they ranged from 0.05 to 6.2 mug/ml; corresponding geometric means were 0.19 and 0.49 mug/ml. Therapy was given for a median of 10 days (mean 19, range 1 to 83). The clinically satisfactory response rate for the 29 courses of therapy was 52%: critically ill, 44%; seriously ill, 50%; moderately ill, 80%. The response rates for various sites of infection were bone and cartilage, 100%; urinary tract infection, 56%; wound, 50%; respiratory tract, 67%; septicemia, 40%; abscess, 0%; burns, 44%. No adverse reactions were seen. Serum concentration (mug/ml +/- standard deviation) of tobramycin determined by an agar-well plate method, were 4.81 +/- 2.17 (1 h); 3.24 +/- 1.43 (2 h); 2.35 +/- 1.30 (4 h); and 1.40 +/- 1.09 (8 h). Tobramycin appears to be as effacacious as gentamicin in the treatment of serious P. aeruginosa infections and has a theoretical advantage of lower minimal inhibitory concentration for P. aeruginosa. The data suggest that, for life-threatening infections, dosages of tobramycin may need to be increased over those used in this study.

  17. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  18. Chromosomal organization and segregation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Vallet-Gely

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of chromosomal organization and segregation in a handful of bacteria has revealed surprising variety in the mechanisms mediating such fundamental processes. In this study, we further emphasized this diversity by revealing an original organization of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa chromosome. We analyzed the localization of 20 chromosomal markers and several components of the replication machinery in this important opportunistic γ-proteobacteria pathogen. This technique allowed us to show that the 6.3 Mb unique circular chromosome of P. aeruginosa is globally oriented from the old pole of the cell to the division plane/new pole along the oriC-dif axis. The replication machinery is positioned at mid-cell, and the chromosomal loci from oriC to dif are moved sequentially to mid-cell prior to replication. The two chromosomal copies are subsequently segregated at their final subcellular destination in the two halves of the cell. We identified two regions in which markers localize at similar positions, suggesting a bias in the distribution of chromosomal regions in the cell. The first region encompasses 1.4 Mb surrounding oriC, where loci are positioned around the 0.2/0.8 relative cell length upon segregation. The second region contains at least 800 kb surrounding dif, where loci show an extensive colocalization step following replication. We also showed that disrupting the ParABS system is very detrimental in P. aeruginosa. Possible mechanisms responsible for the coordinated chromosomal segregation process and for the presence of large distinctive regions are discussed.

  19. Risk assessment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Kristina D; Gerba, Charles P

    2009-01-01

    drinking water industry, very little has been reported regarding the role of P. aeruginosa in biofilms. Tap water appears to be a significant route of transmission in hospitals, from colonization of plumbing fixtures. It is still not clear if the colonization results from the water in the distribution system, or personnel use within the hospital. Infections and colonization can be significantly reduced by placement of filters on the water taps. The oral dose of P. aeruginosa required to establish colonization in a healthy subject is high (George et al. 1989a). During dose-response studies, even when subjects (mice or humans) were colonized via ingestion, there was no evidence of disease. P. aeruginosa administered by the aerosol route at levels of 10(7) cells did cause disease symptoms in mice, and was lethal in aerosolized doses of 10(9) cells. Aerosol dose-response studies have not been undertaken with human subjects. Human health risks associated with exposure to P. aeruginosa via drinking water ingestion were estimated using a four-step risk assessment approach. The risk of colonization from ingesting P. aeruginosa in drinking water is low. The risk is slightly higher if the subject is taking an antibiotic resisted by P. aeruginosa. The fact that individuals on ampicillin are more susceptible to Pseudomonas gastrointestinal infection probably results from suppression of normal intestinal flora, which would allow Pseudomonas to colonize. The process of estimating risk was significantly constrained because of the absence of specific (quantitative) occurrence data for Pseudomonas. Sensitivity analysis shows that the greatest source of variability/uncertainty in the risk assessment is from the density distribution in the exposure rather than the dose-response or water consumption distributions. In summary, two routes appear to carry the greatest health risks from contacting water contaminated with P. aeruginosa (1) skin exposure in hot tubs and (2) lung exposure from

  20. The missing link: Bordetella petrii is endowed with both the metabolic versatility of environmental bacteria and virulence traits of pathogenic Bordetellae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneiker-Bekel Susanne

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bordetella petrii is the only environmental species hitherto found among the otherwise host-restricted and pathogenic members of the genus Bordetella. Phylogenetically, it connects the pathogenic Bordetellae and environmental bacteria of the genera Achromobacter and Alcaligenes, which are opportunistic pathogens. B. petrii strains have been isolated from very different environmental niches, including river sediment, polluted soil, marine sponges and a grass root. Recently, clinical isolates associated with bone degenerative disease or cystic fibrosis have also been described. Results In this manuscript we present the results of the analysis of the completely annotated genome sequence of the B. petrii strain DSMZ12804. B. petrii has a mosaic genome of 5,287,950 bp harboring numerous mobile genetic elements, including seven large genomic islands. Four of them are highly related to the clc element of Pseudomonas knackmussii B13, which encodes genes involved in the degradation of aromatics. Though being an environmental isolate, the sequenced B. petrii strain also encodes proteins related to virulence factors of the pathogenic Bordetellae, including the filamentous hemagglutinin, which is a major colonization factor of B. pertussis, and the master virulence regulator BvgAS. However, it lacks all known toxins of the pathogenic Bordetellae. Conclusion The genomic analysis suggests that B. petrii represents an evolutionary link between free-living environmental bacteria and the host-restricted obligate pathogenic Bordetellae. Its remarkable metabolic versatility may enable B. petrii to thrive in very different ecological niches.

  1. Diuron degradation by bacteria from soil of sugarcane crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Tassia C; da Silva, Roberto; Boscolo, Maurício; Rigonato, Janaina; Monteiro, Diego A; Grünig, Danilo; da Silva, Humberto; van der Wielen, Frans; Helmus, Rick; Parsons, John R; Gomes, Eleni

    2017-12-01

    The isolation of microorganisms from soil impacted by xenobiotic chemicals and exposing them in the laboratory to the contaminant can provide important information about their response to the contaminants. The purpose of this study was to isolate bacteria from soil with historical application of herbicides and to evaluate their potential to degrade diuron. The isolation media contained either glucose or diuron as carbon source. A total of 400 bacteria were isolated, with 68% being Gram-positive and 32% Gram-negative. Most isolates showed potential to degrade between 10 and 30% diuron after five days of cultivation; however Stenotrophomonas acidophila TD4.7 and Bacillus cereus TD4.31 were able to degrade 87% and 68%, respectively. The degradation of diuron resulted in the formation of the metabolites DCPMU, DCPU, DCA, 3,4-CAC, 4-CA, 4-CAC and aniline. Based on these results it was proposed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa TD2.3, Stenotrophomonas acidaminiphila TD4.7, B. cereus TD4.31 and Alcaligenes faecalis TG 4.48, act on 3,4-DCA and 4-CA by alkylation and dealkylation while Micrococcus luteus and Achromobacter sp follow dehalogenation directly to aniline. Growth on aniline as sole carbon source demonstrates the capacity of strains to open the aromatic ring. In conclusion, the results show that the role of microorganisms in the degradation of xenobiotics in the environment depends on their own metabolism and also on their synergistic interactions.

  2. Long-term Hg pollution-induced structural shifts of bacterial community in the terrestrial isopod (Porcellio scaber) gut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapanje, Ales, E-mail: ales@ifb.s [Institute of Physical Biology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Zrimec, Alexis [Institute of Physical Biology, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Drobne, Damjana [Department of Biology, Biotechnical Faculty, University of Ljubljana, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Rupnik, Maja [Institute of Public Health Maribor, Maribor (Slovenia)

    2010-10-15

    In previous studies we detected lower species richness and lower Hg sensitivity of the bacteria present in egested guts of Porcellio scaber (Crustacea, Isopoda) from chronically Hg polluted than from unpolluted environment. Basis for such results were further investigated by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes of mercury-resistant (Hg{sup r}) isolates and clone libraries. We observed up to 385 times higher numbers of Hg{sup r} bacteria in guts of animals from polluted than from unpolluted environment. The majority of Hg{sup r} strains contained merA genes. Sequencing of 16S rRNA clones from egested guts of animals from Hg-polluted environments showed elevated number of bacteria from Pseudomonas, Listeria and Bacteroidetes relatives groups. In animals from pristine environment number of bacteria from Achromobacter relatives, Alcaligenes, Paracoccus, Ochrobactrum relatives, Rhizobium/Agrobacterium, Bacillus and Microbacterium groups were elevated. Such bacterial community shifts in guts of animals from Hg-polluted environment could significantly contribute to P. scaber Hg tolerance. - Chronic environmental mercury pollution induces bacterial community shifts and presence of elevated number as well as increased diversity of Hg-resistant bacteria in guts of isopods.

  3. Uji produksi biosurfaktan oleh Pseudomonas sp. pada substrat yang berbeda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Fatimah

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactant, microbial metabolite whose properties like surfactant, was suggested to replace chemically synthesized surfactant for take in hand environtmental pollution by petroleum hydrocarbon. This work was done to examine potency of Pseudomonas sp. isolated from Tanjung Perak Harbor to produce biosurfactant. Also, to know the effect of different substrates (glucose + yeast extract, lubricating oil and hexadecane toward biosurfactant production. Pseudomonas sp. grown in mineral synthetic water and biosurfactant production was measured on stationary phase. Biosurfactant production based on emulsification activity and surface tension reduction of supernatant (using Du Nouy tensiometer. Solar, lubricating oil, and hexadecane were used to examine emulsification activity. Results indicated that Pseudomonas sp. have a potency to produce biosurfactant. Surface tension of supernatant decreased up to 20 dyne/cm, when grown on hexadecane substrate. Hexadecane is the best growing substrate for biosurfactant production than others.

  4. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... is controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity...

  5. Effects of ambroxol on alginate of mature Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Hua; Wan, Zhenyan; Bai, Dan

    2008-07-01

    Biofilm-forming bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in mechanically ventilated newborns, which can cause life-threatening infections. Alginate of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms is considered an important virulence factor which contributes to the resistance to antibiotics. Traditionally, ambroxol is widely used in newborns with lung problems as a mucolytic agent and antioxidant agent as well. And there are few studies that demonstrated the anti-biofilm activity of ambroxol. In this study, we found that ambroxol can affect the structure of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Further, we found that ambroxol reduces the production of alginate, the expression of the important genes and the activity of key enzyme guanosine diphospho-D-mannose dehydrogenase (GDP-mannose dehydrogenase; GMD) which were involved in alginate biosynthesis.

  6. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino sinusitis in mink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, S.; Hammer, A. S.; Høiby, N.

    2017-01-01

    The nasal and sinus cavities in children may serve as reservoirs for microorganisms that cause recurrent and chronic lung infections. This study evaluates whether the mink can be used as an animal model for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis since there is no suitable...... in the infected mink shows features of carbohydrate expression comparable to what has been described in the respiratory system after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in humans. It is suggested that the mink is suitable for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis....... traditional animal model for this disease. Nasal tissue samples from infected and control mink were fixed in formalin, demineralized, and embedded in paraffin. A histological examination of sections from the infected animals revealed disintegration of the respiratory epithelium lining the nasal turbinates...

  7. Conservation of the response regulator gene gacA in Pseudomonas species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, J.T.; Mazzola, M.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The response regulator gene gacA influences the production of several secondary metabolites in both pathogenic and beneficial Pseudomonas spp. In this study, we developed primers and a probe for the gacA gene of Pseudomonas species and sequenced a 425 bp fragment of gacA from ten Pseudomonas strains

  8. Information Management of Genome Enabled Data Streams for Pseudomonas syringae on the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalen Lindeberg

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome enabled research has led to a large and ever-growing body of data on Pseudomonas syringae genome variation and characteristics, though systematic capture of this information to maximize access by the research community remains a significant challenge. Major P. syringae data streams include genome sequence data, newly identified type III effectors, biological characterization data for type III effectors, and regulatory feature characterization. To maximize data access, the Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction (PPI website [1] is primarily focused on categorization of type III effectors and curation of effector functional data represented in the Hop database and Pseudomonas-Plant Interaction Resource, respectively. The PPI website further serves as a conduit for incorporation of new genome characterization data into the annotation records at NCBI and other data repositories, and clearinghouse for additional data sets and updates in response to the evolving needs of the research community.

  9. Type VI Secretion System in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachani, Abderrahman; Lossi, Nadine S.; Hamilton, Alexander; Jones, Cerith; Bleves, Sophie; Albesa-Jové, David; Filloux, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium causing chronic infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Such infections are associated with an active type VI secretion system (T6SS), which consists of about 15 conserved components, including the AAA+ ATPase, ClpV. The T6SS secretes two categories of proteins, VgrG and Hcp. Hcp is structurally similar to a phage tail tube component, whereas VgrG proteins show similarity to the puncturing device at the tip of the phage tube. In P. aeruginosa, three T6SSs are known. The expression of H1-T6SS genes is controlled by the RetS sensor. Here, 10 vgrG genes were identified in the PAO1 genome, among which three are co-regulated with H1-T6SS, namely vgrG1a/b/c. Whereas VgrG1a and VgrG1c were secreted in a ClpV1-dependent manner, secretion of VgrG1b was ClpV1-independent. We show that VgrG1a and VgrG1c form multimers, which confirmed the VgrG model predicting trimers similar to the tail spike. We demonstrate that Hcp1 secretion requires either VgrG1a or VgrG1c, which may act independently to puncture the bacterial envelope and give Hcp1 access to the surface. VgrG1b is not required for Hcp1 secretion. Thus, VgrG1b does not require H1-T6SS for secretion nor does H1-T6SS require VgrG1b for its function. Finally, we show that VgrG proteins are required for secretion of a genuine H1-T6SS substrate, Tse3. Our results demonstrate that VgrG proteins are not only secreted components but are essential for secretion of other T6SS substrates. Overall, we emphasize variability in behavior of three P. aeruginosa VgrGs, suggesting that, although very similar, distinct VgrGs achieve specific functions. PMID:21325275

  10. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  11. Defining the Pseudomonas Genus: Where Do We Draw the Line with Azotobacter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özen, Asli Ismihan; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    genome family trees based on conserved gene families also show A. vinelandii to be more closely related to Pseudomonas than other related organisms. Third, exhaustive BLAST comparisons demonstrate that the fraction of shared genes between A. vinelandii and Pseudomonas genomes is similar...... using three genomic sequence-based methods. First, using 16S rRNA trees, it is shown that A. vinelandii groups within the Pseudomonas close to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genomes from other related organisms (Acinetobacter, Psychrobacter, and Cellvibrio) are outside the Pseudomonas cluster. Second, pan...

  12. Prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of multi-drug resistance (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in surgical units of Ahmadu Bello University teaching Hospital, Zaria, Nigeria: An ... The antibiotic susceptibility of isolates and a standard strain to ceftazidime, amikacin, gentamicin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and perfloxacin was determined by the ...

  13. Utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas sp. and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This phenotype was not transformed to Pseudomonas by conjugation even with lysozyme treatment, however the petroleum oil and octadecane utilization were transformed to E. coli by lysozyme treatment. The transformed E. coli lost the ability to use octadecane after three subcultures on nutrient broth and 34 generations.

  14. Genomic and metabolic characterization of spoilage-associated Pseudomonas species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanborough, Tamsyn; Fegan, Narelle; Powell, Shane M; Singh, Tanoj; Tamplin, Mark; Chandry, P Scott

    2018-03-02

    Pseudomonas are common spoilage agents of aerobically stored fresh foods. Their ability to cause spoilage is species- and may be strain-specific. To improve our understanding of the meat and milk spoilage agents Pseudomonas fragi and Pseudomonas lundensis, we sequenced the genomes of 12 P. fragi and seven P. lundensis isolates. These genomes provided a dataset for genomic analyses. Key volatile organic compounds (VOCs) produced or metabolised by the isolates were determined during their growth on a beef paste and where possible, metabolic activity was associated with gene repertoire. Genome analyses showed that the isolates included in this work may belong to more than two Pseudomonas species with possible spoilage potential. Pan-genome analyses demonstrated a high degree of diversity among the P. fragi and genetic flexibility and diversity may be traits of both species. Growth of the P. lundensis isolates was characterised by the production of large amounts of 1-undecene, 5-methyl-2-hexanone and methyl-2-butenoic acid. P. fragi isolates produced extensive amounts of methyl and ethyl acetate and the production of methyl esters predominated over ethyl esters. Some of the P. fragi produced extremely low levels of VOCs, highlighting the importance of strain-specific studies in food matrices. Furthermore, although usually not considered to be denitrifiers, all isolates generated molecular nitrogen, indicating that at least some steps of this pathway are intact. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Elastase Deficiency Phenotype of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Canine Otitis Externa Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Petermann, Shana R.; Doetkott, Curt; Rust, Lynn

    2001-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa veterinary isolates were assayed for elastase and total matrix protease activity. The elastase activity of canine ear isolates was much less than that of strain PAO1 and that of all other veterinary isolates (P < 0.0001). The results indicate that canine ear isolates have a distinct elastase phenotype.

  16. An update on Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation, tolerance, and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Morten; Yang, Liang; Pamp, Sünje Johanna

    2010-01-01

    We review the recent advances in the understanding of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lifestyle from studies using in vitro laboratory setups such as flow chambers and microtiter trays. Recent work sheds light on the role of nutrients, motility, and quorum sensing in structure formation in P. ...

  17. extracts of senna siamea (lam) on pseudomonas aeruginosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    2009-05-30

    May 30, 2009 ... convulsion in children (Alli – Smith, 2009). In an attempt to rationally identify which pathogen to screen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was epidemiologically identified as the hardiest bacterium that constitutes problems to researchers and clinicians. As literature showed, the hardy nature of Ps aeruginosa is ...

  18. Biological production of monoethanolamine by engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foti, M.J.; Médici, R.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered for the production of monoethanolamine (MEA) from glucose via the decarboxylation of the central metabolite l-serine, which is catalyzed by the enzyme l-serine decarboxylase (SDC).The host was first evaluated for its tolerance towards MEA as well as its

  19. an tibiotic resistance trend of pseudomonas aeruginosa'in port

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AN TIBIOTIC RESISTANCE TREND OF PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA'IN PORT. HARCOURT oaursca. 0. K}. ONYEJEPU, N 1. 1. Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology. University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital. Port Harcourt. 2. Nigerian Institute of Medical Research. 6 Edmond Crescent, Yabl. Lagos.

  20. Secretion of elastinolytic enzymes and their propeptides by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, P; de Groot, A; Bitter, W; Tommassen, J

    Elastase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is synthesized as a preproenzyme. The signal sequence is cleaved ol during transport across the inner membrane and, in the periplasm, proelastase is further processed. We demonstrate that the propeptide and the mature elastase are both secreted but that the

  1. Induction of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giwercman, B; Jensen, E T; Høiby, N

    1991-01-01

    Imipenem induced high levels of beta-lactamase production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Piperacillin also induced beta-lactamase production in these biofilms but to a lesser degree. The combination of beta-lactamase production with other protective properties of the biofilm mode of growth...

  2. The cytotoxin of Pseudomonas aeruginosa : Cytotoxicity requires proteolytic activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orlik-Eisel, Gabriele; Lutz, Frieder; Henschen, Agnes; Eisel, Ulrich; Struckmeier, Martin; Kräuter, Josef; Niemann, Heiner

    The primary structure of a cytotoxin from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was determined by sequencing of the structural gene. The cytotoxin (31,700 Mr) lacks an N-terminal signal sequence for bacterial secretion but contains a pentapeptide consensus sequence commonly found in prokaryotic proteins which

  3. Heavy Metal uptake Potentials of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uptake of heavy metals, silver and cadmium by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a Gram negative bacterium) and Micrococcus luteus (a Gram positive bacterium) was investigated in Cadmium and Silver stock solution using ion selective electrodes. Silver and cadmium uptake by the two organisms was described by Langmuir ...

  4. Dechlorination of 1,2– dichloroethane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of our attempt at isolating and stocking some indigenous microbial species, we isolated a bacterium from a waste dumpsite with appreciable dechlorination activity. 16S rDNA profiling revealed the isolate to be a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the sequence has been deposited in the NCBI nucleotide ...

  5. Antibiotic sensitivity of isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pattern of antibiotic sensitivity of 229 clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated between June 1998 and May 2000 at the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH) Enugu was studied. The isolates were recovered from various clinical specimens by culturing on standard media viz: blood agar, ...

  6. Rhamnolipid stimulates uptake of hydrophobic compounds by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, WH; Janssen, DB

    The biodegradation of hexadecane by five biosurfactant-producing bacterial strains (Pseudomonas aeruginosa UG2, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus RAG1, Rhodococcus erythropolis DSM 43066, R. erythropolis ATCC 19558, and strain BCG112) was determined in the presence and absence of exogenously added

  7. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    degrading microorganisms in oil-polluted site. (Atlas, 1981). Crude oil biodegradation can occur under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions (Zengler et al., 1999). This research was aimed at investigating the effects of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and. Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ...

  8. Isolation and characterization of gallium resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Contreras, R; Lira-Silva, E; Jasso-Chávez, R; Hernández-González, I.L.; Maeda, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Boogerd, F.C.; Sheng, L; Wood, TK; Moreno-Sánchez, R

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 cells resistant to the novel antimicrobial gallium nitrate (Ga) were developed using transposon mutagenesis and by selecting spontaneous mutants. The mutants showing the highest growth in the presence of Ga were selected for further characterization. These mutants showed

  9. Decrease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by food waste materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maděrová, Z.; Horská, K.; Kim, S.-R.; Lee, Ch.-H.; Pospíšková, K.; Šafaříková, Miroslava; Šafařík, Ivo

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 9 (2016), s. 2143-2149 ISSN 0273-1223 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : biofilm * food waste materials * magnetic spent grain * Pseudomonas aeruginosa Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.197, year: 2016

  10. Characterization of Pseudomonas species causing brown blotch of Agaricus bisporis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Kastelein, P.; Krijger, M.C.; Hendriks, M.J.A.; Baars, J.J.P.; Amsing, J.G.M.; Lee, van der T.A.J.; Warris, S.

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial blotch is occasionally causing damage in the production of common mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). The disease is found worldwide and can be caused by different fluorescent Pseudomonas species present in casing material. For identification of the causative agents of blotch in the Netherlands

  11. dichloroethane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa OK1 isolated from a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    chlorinated organics such as monochloroacetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, dichloromethane, trichloromethane and tetrachloromethane at pH 7.5 and 9.0. Optimum temperature for dehalogenase activity against 1, 2 – DCE was 35oC. Key words: Dechlorination, 16S rDNA, bioremediation, Pseudomonas aeruginosa OK1.

  12. Unraveling root developmental programs initiated by beneficial Pseudomonas spp. bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamioudis, C.; Mastranesti, P.; Dhonukshe, P.; Blilou, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant roots are colonized by an immense number of microbes, referred to as the root microbiome. Selected strains of beneficial soil-borne bacteria can protect against abiotic stress and prime the plant immune system against a broad range of pathogens. Pseudomonas spp. rhizobacteria represent one of

  13. Unraveling Root Developmental Programs Initiated by Beneficial Pseudomonas spp. Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamioudis, C.; Mastranesti, P.; Dhonukshe, P.; Blilou, I.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Plant roots are colonized by an immense number of microbes, referred to as the root microbiome. Selected strains of beneficial soil-borne bacteria can protect against abiotic stress and prime the plant immune system against a broad range of pathogens. Pseudomonas spp. rhizobacteria represent one of

  14. Screening of thermophilic neutral lipase-producing Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From oil-contaminated soil, three lipase-producing microorganisms were selected as good lipase producers using rhodamine B-olive oil plate agar and they were identified as from Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Klebsiella genera by morphology, biochemical characterization and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Among the ...

  15. Enhanced alpha-galactosidase expression in pseudomonas chlororaphis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis is a non-pathogenic bacterium useful for fermentative production of biopolymer (i.e., poly(hydroxyalkanoates); PHA) and biosurfactant (i.e., rhamnolipid; RhL). In order to enable P. chlororaphis to better fermentatively utilize the residual soy sugars in soy molasses – a lo...

  16. Effect of biosurfactant from two strains of Pseudomonas on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two Pseudomonas strains isolated from oil-contaminated soil which produce biosurfactant were studied. The biosurfactant containing broth formed stable emulsions with liquid light paraffin, cooking medium vegetable oil and toluene. The strains under study produce extra cellular biosurfactant in the culture media.

  17. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chitinase, a Gradually Secreted Protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folders, J. (Jindra); Algra, J. (Jon); Roelofs, M.S. (Marc); Loon, L.C. van; Tommassen, J.P.M.; Bitter, Wilbert

    2001-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes many proteins into its extracellular environment via the type I, II, and III secretion systems. In this study, a gene, chiC, coding for an extracellular chitinolytic enzyme, was identified. The chiC gene encodes a polypeptide of 483 amino

  18. Effect of alternating and direct currents on Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-20

    Sep 20, 2010 ... studies must be done so as to reach optimum voltage and currents. The test media were Muller-Hinton agar and eosin methylene blue (EMB) agar. In this research Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was isolated from patients׳ wounds was examined with levels of alternating and direct current (AC and DC).

  19. Effect of alternating and direct currents on Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this research Pseudomonas aeruginosa which was isolated from patients wounds was examined with levels of alternating and direct current (AC and DC) electrical stimulation (1.5V, 3.5V, 5.5V and 10V) to see if these currents could inhibit P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. The experiment was performed in two forms: The first ...

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  1. Utilization of petroleum hydrocarbons by Pseudomonas sp. and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pseudomonas isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil was instable. In this work, t is shown that when the isolates are immobilized on Perlite, they are more stable for oil egradation. Although the isolate did not have any chemotaxis to ...

  2. High Temperature Induced Antibiotic Sensitivity in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    aeruginosa ATCC 9027 was maintained on Pseudomonas P agar slants (Difco Laboratories, Detroit, MI.). The organism was cultivated at 37°C or 46°C in a proteose...Studies on the permeability change produced in coliform bacteria by ethylene diamine tetracetate. J. Biol. Chem. 243: 2372 - 2380. 7. 9. Lowry, O.H., N.J

  3. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas resistant to heavy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas resistant to heavy metals and poly aromatics hydrocarbons (PAHs) from Persian Gulf sediments. ... Among 10 bacterial species isolated from marine sediment, one strain represented high potential to grow in medium supplemented with copper and phenanthrene. Isolated ...

  4. The Transcriptional Landscape of the Production Organism Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Arrigo, Isotta

    Bacterial cell factories represent a valid alternative to fossil fuel-based production. A promising bacterium that can be optimized as cell factory is Pseudomonas putida. However, its development in bioproduction applications poses some challenges including a clear understanding of the bacterial ...

  5. Detection of Pseudomonas fluorescens from broth, water and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Loop mediated isothermal amplification is rapid, highly sensitive and specifically developed method for detection of bacterial infections. AprX gene for alkaline metalloprotease of Pseudomonas fluorescens was used to design four primers and loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) conditions were standardized for ...

  6. Metabolism of amino acid amides in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, H.F.M.; Croes, L.M.; Peeters, W.P.H.; Peters, P.J.H.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1993-01-01

    The metabolism of the natural amino acid L-valine, the unnatural amino acids D-valine, and D-, L-phenylglycine (D-, L-PG), and the unnatural amino acid amides D-, L-phenylglycine amide (D, L-PG-NH2) and L-valine amide (L-Val-NH2) was studied in Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The organism possessed

  7. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were

  8. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas , Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  9. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and ...

  10. Effects of the Consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Johnny

    Abstract. The effect of the consortium of Pseudomonas, Bacillus and Micrococcus spp on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in crude oil was carried out using standard microbiological methods. Spectrophotometer, gas chromatography and viable count which determined the optical density, the polycyclic aromatic ...

  11. Multiple Antibiotic Resistance (MAR) indices of Pseudomonas and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Objectives: Pseudomonas and Klebsiella infections are important nosocomial infections because of the attendant significant morbidity, mortality and socio-economic impact. These infections are difficult to treat due to the innate and acquired resistance mediated by the organisms' genome and other transferable ...

  12. Production of a rhamnolipid-type biosurfactant by Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The work herewith investigated the effect of the culture medium composition on rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa LBM10, previously isolated from an estuarine environment in Southern Brazil. Experimental design and surface response methodology were used in order to improve biosurfactant ...

  13. Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... Isolate Ps5 showed the highest lipase activity which was later identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of ..... Identification and characterization of a locally isolated lipolytic microfungus Geotrichum candidum. Malaysian J. Microbiol. 2: 22-29. Martinelle M, Hult K (1995).Kinetics of acyl transfer ...

  14. [Activity of doripenem against Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. rods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogiel, Tomasz; Deptuła, Aleksander; Gospodarek, Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Doripenem, the newest carbapenem was approved in 2008 by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of complicated intra-abdominal infections and complicated urinary tract infections. Its spectrum of activity is similar to that of meropenem and imipenem/cilastatin. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro activity of doripenem against nonfermentative Gram-negative rods. A total of 235 strains of Pseudomonas spp. (74.9%) and Acinetobacter spp. (25.1%) were included into the study. Strains were isolated in The Department of Clinical Microbiology of the University Hospital No 1 in Bydgoszcz and identified using ID GN tests (bioMérieux). To determine susceptibility to doripenem and other carbapenems disc-diffusion method was applied. Percentage of doripenem resistant strains reached 28.4% and 39.0% for Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp, respectively. All doripenem sensitive or intermediate Acinetobacter spp. strains were simultaneously sensitive to imipenem and meropenem. Activity of imipenem and meropenem among doripenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. were represented by 60.9% and 56.5% strains, respectively. Activity of imipenem and meropenem among doripenem resistant Pseudomonas spp. strains were represented by 12.0% and 18.0%, respectively. Occurence of one doripenem sensitive Pseudomonas spp. strain simultaneously resistant to imipenem and meropenem was observed.

  15. Isolation and characterization of Pseudomonas putida WLY for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The azoreductase produced by P. putida WLY was extracellular and induced according to electrophoresis experiments and decolorization tests. After purification by ion exchange and gel chromatography, its molecular weight was estimated to be 28,000 Da by SDS-PAGE. Key words: Pseudomonas putida; reactive brilliant ...

  16. Isolation, purification and properties of lipase from Pseudomonas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six isolates (Ps1, Ps2, Ps3, Ps4, Ps5 and Ps6) producing lipase were screened from wastewater on a selective medium agar containing Tween 80 or olive oil as the only source of carbon. Isolate Ps5 showed the highest lipase activity which was later identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The effect of media composition ...

  17. Interaction between fish spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas sp and Shewanella putrefaciens in fish extracts and on fish tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1996-01-01

    , supernatant fluids from siderophore- negative Pseudomonas isolates did not inhibit growth of S. putrefaciens. The inhibitory effect was, except for one strain of Pseudomonas, not seen in supernatant fluids from iron- enriched cultures of Pseudomonas sp. Finally, siderophore- producing Pseudomonas sp. lowered...

  18. Pseudomonas guariconensis sp. nov., isolated from rhizospheric soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Marcia; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, Maria José; Velázquez, Encarna; Peix, Alvaro

    2013-12-01

    We isolated a bacterial strain designated PCAVU11(T) in the course of a study of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria occurring in rhizospheric soil of Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. in Guárico state, Venezuela. The 16S rRNA gene sequence had 99.2 % sequence similarity with respect to the most closely related species, Pseudomonas taiwanensis, and 99.1 % with respect to Pseudomonas entomophila, Pseudomonas plecoglossicida and Pseudomonas monteilii, on the basis of which PCAVU11(T) was classified as representing a member of the genus Pseudomonas. Analysis of the housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed the phylogenetic affiliation and showed sequence similarities lower than 95 % in all cases with respect to the above-mentioned closest relatives. Strain PCAVU11(T) showed two polar flagella. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were 16 : 0 (25.7 %), 18 : 1ω7c (20.4 %), 17 : 0 cyclo (11.5 %) and 16 : 1ω7c/15 : 0 iso 2-OH in summed feature 3 (10.8 %). The strain was oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive, the arginine dihydrolase system was present but nitrate reduction, β-galactosidase production and aesculin hydrolysis were negative. Strain PCAVU11(T) grew at 44 °C and at pH 10. The DNA G+C content was 61.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values lower than 56 % relatedness with respect to the type strains of the four most closely related species. Therefore, the results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses support the classification of strain PCAVU11(T) as representing a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, which we propose to name Pseudomonas guariconensis sp. nov. The type strain is PCAVU11(T) ( = LMG 27394(T) = CECT 8262(T)).

  19. Specific Genomic Fingerprints of Phosphate Solubilizing Pseudomonas Strains Generated by Box Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadi Nobandegani, Mohammad Bagher; Saud, Halimi Mohd; Yun, Wong Mui

    2014-01-01

    Primers corresponding to conserved bacterial repetitive of BOX elements were used to show that BOX-DNA sequences are widely distributed in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains. Phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas was isolated from oil palm fields (tropical soil) in Malaysia. BOX elements were used to generate genomic fingerprints of a variety of Pseudomonas isolates to identify strains that were not distinguishable by other classification methods. BOX-PCR, that derived genomic fingerprints, was generated from whole purified genomic DNA by liquid culture of phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas. BOX-PCR generated the phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas specific fingerprints to identify the relationship between these strains. This suggests that distribution of BOX elements' sequences in phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains is the mirror image of their genomic structure. Therefore, this method appears to be a rapid, simple, and reproducible method to identify and classify phosphate solubilizing Pseudomonas strains and it may be useful tool for fast identification of potential biofertilizer strains. PMID:25580434

  20. Activation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase in Pseudomonas putida by triggering dissociation of the propeptide-enzyme complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, P; Bitter, W; Tommassen, J

    2000-01-01

    The propeptide of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase functions both as an intramolecular chaperone required for the folding of the enzyme and as an inhibitor that prevents activity of the enzyme before its secretion into the extracellular medium. Since expression of the lasB gene, which encodes

  1. Determinación de aislados nativos de pseudomonas desulfurizadoras mediante el estudio del perfil de ácidos grasos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilberto Silva Gómez

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilizando CGAR se determinó el contenido de ácidos grasos celulares de doce aislados colombianos, Pseudomonas aeruginosa 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22 y 103, Pseudomonas sp 23, 24, 25, 26 y 27 con capacidad desulfurizadora, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 y 10145, Pseudomonas sp ATCC 39327 y Pseudomonas flúores cens. Se encontraron 53 ácidos grasos diferentes, entre saturados e insaturados de cadena lineal, y principalmente hidroxiácidos y ramificados.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanouil A Trantas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor and P. mediterranea (Pmed, are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for commercially significant chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of a type III secretion system and of known type III effectors from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes.

  3. Expression of recombinant Pseudomonas stutzeri di-heme cytochrome c(4) by high-cell-density fed-batch cultivation of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Marianne Hallberg; Nørgaard, Allan; Hansen, Anne Merete

    2003-01-01

    The gene of the di-heme protein cytochrome c(4) from Pseudomonas stutzeri was expressed in Pseudomonas putida. High-yield expression of the protein was achieved by high-cell-density fed-batch cultivation using an exponential glucose feeding strategy. The recombinant cytochrome c(4) protein...

  4. Study of Pseudomonas Aeroginosa resistance to Penicillines, Cephalosporins and Aminoglycosides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maleknezhad P

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug therapy and prophylaxy in infectious diseases, from hygienic and economical point of view, are very important. Infections caused by pseudomonas aeroginosa were particularly severe, with high mortality rates. In the recent years pseudomonas aeroginosa continued to cause the most severe, life-thereating infections in burned patients, in spite of the introduction of a wide variety of antibiotics advised specifically for their anti pseudomonal activity. The aim of this study, in which many cases of ps.aeroginosa infections are assessed is to identify the drug resistance of this bacteria to penicillines, cephalosporins and aminoglycosides by antibiotic sensitivity test (disk ager diffusion. Results as percent of resistance to each antibiotic were 89% to carbenicillin, 55% to piperacillin, 89% to mezlocillin, 89.5% to ticarcillin+clavulonic acid, 85% to ceftriaxone, 95% to tobramycin, 5% of all isolates were not sensitive to any antibiotics.

  5. PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA IN CHRONIC SUPPURATIVE OTITIS MEDIA- A DRUGSENSITIVITY STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Chronic suppurative otitis media is one among the commonest ENT disease seen in day-to-day practice. It is seen mainly among low socioeconomic class. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study was conducted in the Department of ENT, Shadan Institute of Medical Sciences. Fifty patients with CSOM of all age groups and both sexes attending the Outpatient Department of ENT were selected randomly for the study. RESULTS From our study, we found mainly children of age group 10-11 years commonly affected. They belong to poor socioeconomic background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common organism isolated in the present study. Ciprofloxacin was found to be the most sensitive antibiotic to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. CONCLUSION We noticed that drug resistance is on the rise due to misuse of antibiotics, over-the-counter treatment, inadequate period of therapy and less awareness among public regarding drug resistance. Constant monitoring of antibiotic sensitivity is needed to prevent drug resistance in CSOM.

  6. Neonatal Orbital Abscess Secondary to Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Conjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Bulent; Orucov, Nesimi; Ibrahimzade, Gunay

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa conjunctivitis, although rare in healthy infants, may cause serious ocular and systemic complications. A 30-day-old, otherwise healthy male infant was referred with the diagnosis of right orbital abscess. The patient had been diagnosed as having Pseudomonas conjunctivitis 9 days previously at the referring center. Despite antibiotic treatment, his ocular findings had worsened and marked proptosis had developed. Other examination findings were ptosis, restriction of eye movements, periorbital erythema, and chemosis. Radiologic studies showed a large, homogenous mass with a thick capsule in the lateral retrobulbar orbit. The abscess was drained through a lateral orbitotomy. A culture of the abscess yielded P. aeruginosa. After surgery, the ocular findings improved rapidly without any complication. No other focus of infection or immune system abnormality was found. The patient did not experience any other significant disease during a follow up of 23 months.

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of multiple strains of two unusual plant pathogens: Pseudomonas corrugata and Pseudomonas mediterranea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantas, Emmanouil A; Licciardello, Grazia; Almeida, Nalvo F; Witek, Kamil; Strano, Cinzia P; Duxbury, Zane; Ververidis, Filippos; Goumas, Dimitrios E; Jones, Jonathan D G; Guttman, David S; Catara, Vittoria; Sarris, Panagiotis F

    2015-01-01

    The non-fluorescent pseudomonads, Pseudomonas corrugata (Pcor) and P. mediterranea (Pmed), are closely related species that cause pith necrosis, a disease of tomato that causes severe crop losses. However, they also show strong antagonistic effects against economically important pathogens, demonstrating their potential for utilization as biological control agents. In addition, their metabolic versatility makes them attractive for the production of commercial biomolecules and bioremediation. An extensive comparative genomics study is required to dissect the mechanisms that Pcor and Pmed employ to cause disease, prevent disease caused by other pathogens, and to mine their genomes for genes that encode proteins involved in commercially important chemical pathways. Here, we present the draft genomes of nine Pcor and Pmed strains from different geographical locations. This analysis covered significant genetic heterogeneity and allowed in-depth genomic comparison. All examined strains were able to trigger symptoms in tomato plants but not all induced a hypersensitive-like response in Nicotiana benthamiana. Genome-mining revealed the absence of type III secretion system and known type III effector-encoding genes from all examined Pcor and Pmed strains. The lack of a type III secretion system appears to be unique among the plant pathogenic pseudomonads. Several gene clusters coding for type VI secretion system were detected in all genomes. Genome-mining also revealed the presence of gene clusters for biosynthesis of siderophores, polyketides, non-ribosomal peptides, and hydrogen cyanide. A highly conserved quorum sensing system was detected in all strains, although species specific differences were observed. Our study provides the basis for in-depth investigations regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying virulence strategies in the battle between plants and microbes.

  8. Effects of atmospheric conditions on ice nucleation activity of Pseudomonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Glaux

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Although ice nuclei from bacterial origin are known to be efficient at the highest temperatures known for ice catalysts, quantitative data are still needed to assess their role in cloud processes. Here we studied the effects of three typical cloud conditions (i acidic pH (ii NO2 and O3 exposure and (iii UV-A exposure on the ice nucleation activity (INA of four Pseudomonas strains. Three of the Pseudomonas syringae strains were isolated from cloud water and the phyllosphere and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain CGina-01 was isolated from Antarctic glacier ice melt. Among the three conditions tested, acidic pH caused the most significant effects on INA likely due to denaturation of the ice nucleation protein complex. Exposure to NO2 and O3 gases had no significant or only weak effects on the INA of two P. syringae strains whereas the INA of P. fluorescens CGina-01 was significantly affected. The INA of the third P. syringae strain showed variable responses to NO2 and O3 exposure. These differences in the INA of different Pseudomonas suggest that the response to atmospheric conditions could be strain-specific. After UV-A exposure, a substantial loss of viability of all four strains was observed whereas their INA decreased only slightly. This corroborates the notion that under certain conditions dead bacterial cells can maintain their INA. Overall, the negative effects of the three environmental factors on INA were more significant at the warmer temperatures. Our results suggest that in clouds where temperatures are near 0 °C, the importance of bacterial ice nucleation in precipitation processes could be reduced by some environmental factors.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bloodstream Infection: Importance of Appropriate Initial Antimicrobial Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Micek, Scott T; Lloyd, Ann E.; David J. Ritchie; Reichley, Richard M.; Fraser, Victoria J.; Kollef, Marin H

    2005-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bloodstream infection is a serious infection with significant patient mortality and health-care costs. Nevertheless, the relationship between initial appropriate antimicrobial treatment and clinical outcomes is not well established. This study was a retrospective cohort analysis employing automated patient medical records and the pharmacy database at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. Three hundred five patients with P. aeruginosa bloodstream infection were identified over a 6-yea...

  10. [Genome plasticity and catabolic potential of pseudomonas cepacia]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    This progress report describes efforts directed at understanding the genomic structure of Pseudomonas cepacia. Variously reported are descriptions of the replicons in the genome, organization of macrorestriction fragments comprising the genome, use of a Tn-5- 751S to insertionally inactivate and map selected genes, construction of IS407 derivatives containing a trimethoprim resistance marker and SwaI site, and analysis of nucleotide sequences of IS401 and IS408.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phage AAT-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-Domínguez, Andrés; Kolter, Roberto

    2016-08-25

    Aspects of the interaction between phages and animals are of interest and importance for medical applications. Here, we report the genome sequence of the lytic Pseudomonas phage AAT-1, isolated from mammalian serum. AAT-1 is a double-stranded DNA phage, with a genome of 57,599 bp, containing 76 predicted open reading frames. Copyright © 2016 Andrade-Domínguez and Kolter.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Analyzed in a Dictyostelium discoideum Host System

    OpenAIRE

    Cosson, Pierre; Zulianello, Laurence; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Faurisson, François; Gebbie, Leigh; Benghezal, Mohammed; Van Delden, Christian; Kocjancic Curty, Lasta; Köhler, Thilo

    2002-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that produces a variety of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors. P. aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat effectively because of the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this study, we analyzed whether the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as a simple model system to analyze the virulence of P. aeruginosa strains. The virulent wild-type strain PAO1 was shown to inhibit growth of D. discoide...

  13. [Phlegmonous gastritis. Report of a case induced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Jiménez, F A; Arocena Cedrón, M G; Goikoetxea Artola, J M; Lázaro Aramburu, S; Múgica Barreiros, P

    1992-06-01

    The authors present a case of phlegmonous gastritis in a 65 year old patient. The diagnosis was made in the operating room and the treatment was conservative; no gastric resection was done. This clinical entity is interesting because it is a least frequent pathology, the pathogenic bacteria which was the cause (Pseudomona aeruginosa) has at this time not been reported in the literature, including the favorable outcome of the patient without gastric resection.

  14. Pyochelin Potentiates the Inhibitory Activity of Gallium on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frangipani, Emanuela; Bonchi, Carlo; Minandri, Fabrizia; Imperi, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Gallium (Ga) is an iron mimetic that has successfully been repurposed for antibacterial chemotherapy. To improve the antibacterial potency of Ga on Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the effect of complexation with a variety of siderophores and synthetic chelators was tested. Ga complexed with the pyochelin siderophore (at a 1:2 ratio) was more efficient than Ga(NO3)3 in inhibiting P. aeruginosa growth, and its activity was dependent on increased Ga entrance into the cell through the pyochelin translocon. PMID:24957826

  15. Recent advances in understanding Pseudomonas aeruginosa as a pathogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockgether, Jens; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2017-01-01

    The versatile and ubiquitous Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing acute and chronic infections in predisposed human subjects. Here we review recent progress in understanding P. aeruginosa population biology and virulence, its cyclic di-GMP-mediated switches of lifestyle, and its interaction with the mammalian host as well as the role of the type III and type VI secretion systems in P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:28794863

  16. Cloning and expression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa flagellin in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly-Wintenberg, K; Montie, T. C.

    1989-01-01

    The flagellin gene was isolated from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 genomic bank by conjugation into a PA103 Fla- strain. Flagellin DNA was transferred from motile recipient PA103 Fla+ cells by transformation into Escherichia coli. We show that transformed E. coli expresses flagellin protein. Export of flagellin to the E. coli cell surface was suggested by positive colony blots of unlysed cells and by isolation of flagellin protein from E. coli supernatants.

  17. The evolution of a pleiotropic fitness tradeoff in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    OpenAIRE

    MacLean, R. Craig; Bell, Graham; Rainey, Paul B.

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of ecological specialization is expected to carry a cost, due to either antagonistic pleiotropy or mutation accumulation. In general, it has been difficult to distinguish between these two possibilities. Here, we demonstrate that the experimental evolution of niche-specialist genotypes of the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens that colonize the air–broth interface of spatially structured microcosms is accompanied by pleiotropic fitness costs in terms of reduced carbon catabolism....

  18. Identification and isolation of insecticidal oxazoles from Pseudomonas spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Grundmann, Florian; Dill, Veronika; Dowling, Andrea; Thanwisai, Aunchalee; Bode, Edna; Chantratita, Narisara; Ffrench-Constant, Richard; Bode, Helge B.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Two new and five known oxazoles were identified from two different Pseudomonas strains in addition to the known pyrones pseudopyronine A and B. Labeling experiments confirmed their structures and gave initial evidence for a novel biosynthesis pathway of these natural oxazoles. In order to confirm their structure, they were synthesized, which also allowed tests of their bioactivity. Additionally, the bioactivities of the synthesis intermediates were also investigated revealing interest...

  19. Antimicrobial effect of probiotic Lactobacillus spp. on Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Maysaa Kadhim Al-Malkey; Munira Ch. Ismeeal; Fahema Jabbar Abo Al-Hur; Sinaa W. Mohammed; Hanan J. Nayyef

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Study the antimicrobial effect of probiotics produced from Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Lactobacillus acidophilus on Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from burn and wound infection and their ability of protease production. Methods Swab samples were collected from 70 patients admitted at Burns Center/Al-Yarmouk Teaching Hospital. Primary bacterial identification cultured on differential selective media and biochemical tests were done. The Vitek2 compact system (Biomerieux, France...

  20. A study on nitrogen removal efficiency of Pseudomonas stutzeri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By using the nitrogen balance method, the total nitrogen loss was calculated to be 40.1% (w/w) when the carbon source was citric acid with a C/N ratio of 5. Meanwhile, the isolated strain was identified by 16S rDNA to be a Pseudomonas stutzeri with a similarity of 99%. Varying the initial TN, the C/N, the pH value and the ...

  1. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2014-07-18

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  2. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Laverty

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl, pellicle Formation (Pel and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation.

  3. Biomolecular Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, Garry; Gorman, Sean P.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli are the most prevalent Gram-negative biofilm forming medical device associated pathogens, particularly with respect to catheter associated urinary tract infections. In a similar manner to Gram-positive bacteria, Gram-negative biofilm formation is fundamentally determined by a series of steps outlined more fully in this review, namely adhesion, cellular aggregation, and the production of an extracellular polymeric matrix. More specifically this review will explore the biosynthesis and role of pili and flagella in Gram-negative adhesion and accumulation on surfaces in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The process of biofilm maturation is compared and contrasted in both species, namely the production of the exopolysaccharides via the polysaccharide synthesis locus (Psl), pellicle Formation (Pel) and alginic acid synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and UDP-4-amino-4-deoxy-l-arabinose and colonic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. An emphasis is placed on the importance of the LuxR homologue sdiA; the luxS/autoinducer-II; an autoinducer-III/epinephrine/norepinephrine and indole mediated Quorum sensing systems in enabling Gram-negative bacteria to adapt to their environments. The majority of Gram-negative biofilms consist of polysaccharides of a simple sugar structure (either homo- or heteropolysaccharides) that provide an optimum environment for the survival and maturation of bacteria, allowing them to display increased resistance to antibiotics and predation. PMID:25438014

  4. Spontaneous Nosocomial Pseudomonas aeruginosa Meningitis Presenting as Trismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Parr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 78-year-old female receiving adjuvant postsurgical chemotherapy for colon adenocarcinoma who spontaneously developed nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis causing severe trismus. The patient was initially admitted for ileus, developing neck stiffness and trismus on the thirteenth day of admission. Cerebrospinal fluid grew pansensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was consistent with bilateral subacute infarcts secondary to meningitis. The patient responded well to 21 days of broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy modified to ceftazidime alone following speciation and sensitivity. Outpatient follow-up at 46 days revealed normal maximal mouth opening with the ability to chew and tolerate a full diet. Trismus is a motor disturbance of the trigeminal nerve with difficulty in opening the mouth. Infectious etiologies commonly described include tetanus, odontogenic infections, or deep neck space infections. This is the first reported case of simultaneous nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis and trismus in a patient with no history of neurosurgery or lumbar spinal manipulation.

  5. Experimental Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino sinusitis in mink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkeby, S; Hammer, A S; Høiby, N; Salomonsen, C M

    2017-05-01

    The nasal and sinus cavities in children may serve as reservoirs for microorganisms that cause recurrent and chronic lung infections. This study evaluates whether the mink can be used as an animal model for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis since there is no suitable traditional animal model for this disease. Nasal tissue samples from infected and control mink were fixed in formalin, demineralized, and embedded in paraffin. A histological examination of sections from the infected animals revealed disintegration of the respiratory epithelium lining the nasal turbinates and swelling and edema of the submucosa. The expression of mucins and sialylated glycans was examined using immunohistochemistry. MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC were upregulated in the inoculated animals as a much stronger staining was present in the respiratory epithelium in the infected animals compared to the controls. The goblet cells in the nasal epithelium from the infected mink showed high affinity to the Maackia amurensis lectin and anti-asialo GM1 indicating a high concentration of α2-3 sialic acid respectively βGalNAc1-4Galβ containing glycans in these mucin producing cells. The nasal cavity in the infected mink shows features of carbohydrate expression comparable to what has been described in the respiratory system after Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in humans. It is suggested that the mink is suitable for studying Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated rhino-sinusitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Chitosan Coated Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Munmun; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the potent opportunistic pathogens associated with respiratory and urinary tract infection. The bacterium owes its pathogenicity due to the intrinsic resistance to antibiotics and disinfectants. The present study is focused on the synthesis of antibacterial chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles for rapid inactivation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We have discussed the relevant patents on synthesis and antibacterial potential of metallic nanoparticles and chitosan. Chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method at room temperature using non-toxic chitosan and iron salts in alkali media. The particles were characterized and evaluated for antibacterial property against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The average size of the particles was measured as 52 nm. The surface area of the coated particles was as high as 90 ±5 m2/g. FTIR spectra confirmed the coating of chitosan on nanoparticles. The coated particles showed excellent antibacterial activity against the bacteria. The minimum inhibitory concentration of the coated particles was 105)µg mol-1. The morphological alteration and cytoplasmic leakage of bacteria were confirmed by SEM image and release of intracellular constituents, respectively. Higher 260 nm absorbance value confirmed stronger antibacterial activity of the coated nanoparticles as compared to pure chitosan and bare iron oxide nanoparticles. The study indicated that chitosan coated iron oxide nanoparticles have superior antibacterial property as compared to pure chitosan and iron oxide nanoparticles.

  7. 13C-NMR studies of acetate and methanol metabolism by methylotrophic Pseudomonas strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbad, A; Hewlins, M J; Callely, A G

    1989-06-01

    The metabolism of [2-13C]acetate by Pseudomonas M27(Icl-) and Pseudomonas MA(Icl+) was studied in vivo using 13C-NMR spectroscopy. The flux of 13C-label into bicarbonate, glutamate and citrate was observed in both organisms. In addition 13C-labelled alpha, alpha-trehalose was synthesized as a major metabolite by Pseudomonas M27 but not by Pseudomonas MA. The presence of this disaccharide in cell extracts of Pseudomonas AM1(Icl-) grown with [13C]methanol was also observed. The data from analysis of the trehalose multiplet signal observed in the spectra of Pseudomonas M27 cell extracts were consistent with the absence of the glyoxylate cycle in this methylotroph.

  8. Relationship of sediment-biochemistry, bacterial morphology, and activity to geotechnical properties in the central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Khadge, N.H.; Valsangkar, A.B.; Das, A.; Fernandes, C.E.G.; LokaBharathi, P.A.

    under EVDC I (2003) showed prevalence of Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Moraxella, Enterobacter, Flavobacter, Clostridium and Alcaligenes among the rods, and Staphyloccocus, Streptococcus, Micrococcus and Diplococcus among the cocci (Naik, M...

  9. Transformation of the insecticide teflubenzuron by microorganisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finkelstein, Z.I.; Baskunov, B.P.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Boersma, M.G.; Vervoort, J.; Golovleva, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    Transformation of teflubenzuron, the active component in the insecticide commercialized as Nomolt, by soil microorganisms was studied. It was shown that microorganisms, belonging to Bacillus, Alcaligenes, Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter genera are capable to perform the hydrolytic cleavage of the

  10. Effect of green manure on the incidence of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains in hop garden soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paszkowski, Wojciech L; Dwornikiewicz, Jerzy

    2003-05-01

    Incidence of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains in hop garden soils in relation to the kind of fertilization was studied. Incidence differed with respect to the fertilization treatment and the age of the plantation. Amendment of soil with rye and with white mustard as green manures limited the number of cyanogenic Pseudomonas strains relative to farmyard manures and NPK fertilization. Among all fertilization treatments, cyanogenic Pseudomonas spp. strains had lowest populations in soils amended with white mustard.

  11. Investigating the diversity of pseudomonas spp. in soil using culture dependent and independent techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lili; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed; Bergmark, Lasse; Riber, Leise; Hansen, Lars H; Magid, Jakob; Sørensen, Søren J

    2013-10-01

    Less than 1 % of bacterial populations present in environmental samples are culturable, meaning that cultivation will lead to an underestimation of total cell counts and total diversity. However, it is less clear whether this is also true for specific well-defined groups of bacteria for which selective culture media is available. In this study, we use culture dependent and independent techniques to describe whether isolation of Pseudomonas spp. on selective nutrient-poor NAA 1:100 agar-medium can reflect the full diversity, found by pyrosequencing, of the total soil Pseudomonas community in an urban waste field trial experiment. Approximately 3,600 bacterial colonies were isolated using nutrient-poor NAA 1:100 medium from soils treated with different fertilizers; (i) high N-level sewage sludge (SA), (ii) high N-level cattle manure (CMA), and (iii) unfertilized control soil (U). Based on Pseudomonas specific quantitative-PCR and Pseudomonas CFU counts, less than 4 % of Pseudomonas spp. were culturable using NAA 1:100 medium. The Pseudomonas selectivity and specificity of the culture medium were evaluated by 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons generated using Bacteria- and Pseudomonas-specific primers. Pyrosequencing results showed that most isolates were Pseudomonas and that the culturable fraction of Pseudomonas spp. reflects most clusters of the total Pseudomonas diversity in soil. This indicates that NAA 1:100 medium is highly selective for Pseudomonas species, and reveals the ability of NAA 1:100 medium to culture mostly the dominant Pseudomonas species in soil.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A-induced hepatotoxicity in dynamics: an animal model in white mice

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morrison A.V; Popovich V.I; Morrison V.V

    2015-01-01

    .... Material and Methods. The experiments were carried out on white mice in dynamics development of pseudomonas aeruginosa caused by intraperitoneal injection of various dosage of exotoxin A. Results...

  13. Compromised Host Defense on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms: Characterization of Neutrophil and Biofilm Interactions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jesaitis, Algirdas J; Franklin, Michael J; Berglund, Deborah; Sasaki, Maiko; Lord, Connie I; Bleazard, Justin B; Duffy, James E; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2003-01-01

    Departments of * Microbiology, Civil Engineering, Chemical Engineering, and Center for Biofilm Engineering, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that forms...

  14. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-01-01

    .... Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential...

  15. Combined inoculation of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Trichoderma harzianum for enhancing plant growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandheep, A R; Asok, A K; Jisha, M S

    2013-06-15

    This study was conducted to evaluate the plant growth promoting efficiency of combined inoculation of rhizobacteria on Vanilla plants. Based on the in vitro performance of indigenous Trichoderma spp. and Pseudomonas spp., four effective antagonists were selected and screened under greenhouse experiment for their growth enhancement potential. The maximum percentage of growth enhancement were observed in the combination of Trichoderma harzianum with Pseudomonas fluorescens treatment followed by Pseudomonas fluorescens, Trichoderma harzianum, Pseudomonas putida and Trichoderma virens, respectively in decreasing order. Combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens registered the maximum length of vine (82.88 cm), highest number of leaves (26.67/plant), recorded the highest fresh weight of shoots (61.54 g plant(-1)), fresh weight of roots (4.46 g plant(-1)) and dry weight of shoot (4.56 g plant(-1)) where as the highest dry weight of roots (2.0806 g plant(-1)) were achieved with treatments of Pseudomonas fluorescens. Among the inoculated strains, combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens recorded the maximum nitrogen uptake (61.28 mg plant(-1)) followed by the combined inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum (std) and Pseudomonas fluorescens (std) (55.03 mg plant(-1)) and the highest phosphorus uptake (38.80 mg plant(-1)) was recorded in dual inoculation of Trichoderma harzianum and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

  16. De aanwezigheid van Pseudomonas aeruginosa in circulatiebaden in relatie tot de controle volgens de Wet Hygiene en Veiligheid Zwemgelegenheden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven JF; Havelaar AH

    1989-01-01

    Door 8 externe laboratoria werden 133 buitenbaden en 340 binnenbaden onderzocht op aanwezigheid van Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Het betrof circulatiebaden, die periodiek volgens de eisen van het Besluit Hygiene en Veiligheid Zwemgelegenheden (BHVZ) werden gecontroleerd. Pseudomonas aeruginosa bleek

  17. Polytrauma Increases Susceptibility to Pseudomonas Pneumonia in Mature Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Isaiah R; Ghosh, Sarbani; Fuchs, Anja; Hilliard, Julia; Davis, Christopher G; Bochicchio, Grant V; Southard, Robert E

    2016-05-01

    Pneumonia is the most common complication observed in patients with severe injuries. Although the average age of injured patients is 47 years, existing studies of the effect of injury on the susceptibility to infectious complications have focused on young animals, equivalent to a late adolescent human. We hypothesized that mature adult animals are more susceptible to infection after injury than younger counterparts. To test this hypothesis, we challenged 6 to 8-month-old mature mice to a polytrauma injury followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia and compared them to young (8-10-week-old) animals. We demonstrate that polytrauma injury increases mortality from pneumonia in mature animals (sham-pneumonia 21% vs. polytrauma-pneumonia 62%) but not younger counterparts. After polytrauma, pneumonia in mature mice is associated with higher bacterial burden in lung, increased incidence of bacteremia, and elevated levels of bacteria in the blood, demonstrating that injury decreases the ability to control the infectious challenge. We further find that polytrauma did not induce elevations in circulating cytokine levels (TNF-alpha, IL-6, KC, and IL-10) 24  h after injury. However, mature mice subjected to polytrauma demonstrated an exaggerated circulating inflammatory cytokine response to subsequent Pseudomonas pneumonia. Additionally, whereas prior injury increases LPS-stimulated IL-6 production by peripheral blood leukocytes from young (8-10-week-old) mice, injury does not prime IL-6 production by cell from mature adult mice. We conclude that in mature mice polytrauma results in increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas pneumonia while priming an exaggerated but ineffective inflammatory response.

  18. Pseudomonas turukhanskensis sp. nov., isolated from oil-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunova, Tatiana Y; Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Chetverikov, Sergey P; Igual, Jose M; Peix, Álvaro; Loginov, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    A bacterial strain named IB1.1T was isolated in a screening of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria from oil-contaminated soils on the territory of the Turukhansk District of Krasnoyarsk Krai, East Siberia, Russia. The 16S rRNA gene sequence had 98.7 % identity with respect to the closest phylogenetic relative, Pseudomonas granadensis F-278,770T, and the next most closely related species with 98.6 % similarity was Pseudomonaspunonensis, suggesting that IB1.1T should be classified within the genus Pseudomonas. The analysis of housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB showed similarities lower than 90 % in all cases with respect to the closest relatives, confirming its phylogenetic affiliation. The strain showed a polar flagellum. The respiratory quinone was Q9. The major fatty acids were 16 : 1ω7c/16 : 1ω6c (summed feature 3), 18 : 1ω7c and 16 : 0. The strain was oxidase- and catalase-positive, but the arginine dihydrolase system was not present. Nitrate reduction, urease and β-galactosidase production, and aesculin hydrolysis were negative. The temperature range for growth was 4-34 °C, and the strain could grow at pH 11. The DNA G+C content was 58.5 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed values of less than 30 % relatedness with respect to the type strains of the eight most closely related species. Therefore, the dataset of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic data support the classification of strain IB1.1T into a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonasturukhanskensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is IB1.1T (=VKM B-2935T=CECT 9091T).

  19. Plasmid profile as fingerprinting of typing Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    El-Naggar, Wael; El-Emam, M; Hassan, R; George, S

    2014-01-01

    Pyocine production typing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of plasmid DNA with BamH1 (BamH1 RFLP) were compared for intraspecies discrimination of 100 Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Typeability of pyocine production method was 76% while that of BamH1 RFLP was 100%. BamHl RFLP was highly discriminative so as to distinguish unrelated isolates of close lineage. However, it was not a good method to identify isolates of unrelated lineage because BamH1 RFLP appeared to be a sub...

  20. Electrical enhancement of biocide efficacy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenkinsopp, S A; Khoury, A E; Costerton, J W

    1992-01-01

    When applied within a low-strength electric field (+/- 12 V/cm) with a low current density (+/- 2.1 mA/cm2), several industrial biocides exhibited enhanced killing action against Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grown on stainless steel studs. Biocide concentrations lower than those necessary to kill planktonic cells of P. aeruginosa (1, 5, and 10 ppm of the active ingredients of kathon, glutaraldehyde, and quaternary ammonium compound, respectively) were bactericidal within 24 h when applied within our electrified device. PMID:1482196

  1. Regulation of phytotoxin production in Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, L.M.; Ghosh, S.; Knight, T.J.; Unkefer, P.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-05-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, a pathogen of tobacco, is capable of colonizing the rhizosphere of many plants. This pathogen excretes tabtoxinine-{beta}-lactam (T{beta}L), an active site directed, irreversible inhibitor of glutamine synthetase. T{beta}L is produced in planta, in the rhizosphere, and under certain culture conditions. However, the factors which regulated T{beta}L production in these environments are unknown. As a first step in characterizing T{beta}L synthesis by P. syringae pv. tabaci, the authors have determined the effects of root exudates and various nutrients on production of T{beta}L by P. syringae pv. tabaci PT113.

  2. HOPM1 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-11-15

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein HopM1.sub.1-300 mediated protection is enhanced, such as increased protection to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1 and/or there is an increase in activity of an ATMIN associated plant protection protein, such as ATMIN7. Reagents of the present invention further provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  3. Vaccines for Pseudomonas aeruginosa: A long and winding road

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Gregory P.; Goldberg, Joanna B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Despite the recognition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, no vaccine against this bacteria have come to market. This review describes the current state-of-the-art in vaccinology for this bacterium. This includes a discussion of those at risk for infection, the types of vaccines and the approaches for empirical and targeted antigen selection under development, as well as a perspective on where the field should go. In addition, the challenges in developing a vaccine for those individuals at risk are discussed. PMID:24575895

  4. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from keratitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomholt, JA; Kilian, Mogens

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To examine the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of 106 Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye isolates from the United Kingdom, Denmark, India, the United States, and Australia, and to determine the molecular mechanisms of resistance. METHODS: Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by an agar dilution method...... isolates of P aeruginosa from European countries are fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin and the concentration of ciprofloxacin eye drops used for local treatment (3000 mg/l) exceeds MIC values for strains recorded as resistant. Mutations in more than one target gene were associated with higher MIC values....

  5. Methods of detecting and controlling mucoid Pseudomonas biofilm production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongwei D. (Inventor); Qiu, Dongru (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Compositions and methods for detecting and controlling the conversion to mucoidy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are disclosed. The present invention provides for detecting the switch from nonmucoid to mucoid state of P. aeruginosa by measuring mucE expression or MucE protein levels. The interaction between MucE and AlgW controls the switch to mucoidy in wild type P. aeruginosa. Also disclosed is an alginate biosynthesis heterologous expression system for use in screening candidate substances that inhibit conversion to mucoidy.

  6. Alkaline cyanide biodegradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Blasco, R; Huertas, M J; Martínez-Luque, M; Moreno-Vivián, C; Castillo, F; Roldán, M D

    2005-02-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 uses cyanide, cyanate, beta-cyanoalanine, and other cyanoderivatives as nitrogen sources under alkaline conditions, which prevents volatile HCN (pK(a) 9.2) formation. The cyanide consumed by this strain is stoichiometrically converted into ammonium. In addition, this bacterium grows with the heavy metal, cyanide-containing waste water generated by the jewellery industry, and is also a cyanide-resistant strain which induces an alternative oxidase and a siderophore-based mechanism for iron acquisition in the presence of cyanide. The detection of cyanase and beta-cyanoalanine nitrilase activities in cyanide-induced cells suggests their implication in the cyanide degradation pathway.

  7. The sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) of Pseudomonas putida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cases, I.; Ussery, David; de Lorenzo, V.

    2003-01-01

    , the sigma(54) regulon has been studied both in Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhimurium and several species of the Rhizobiaceae. Here we present the analysis of the sigma(54) regulon (sigmulon) in the complete genome of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We have developed an improved method for the prediction......% of the sigma(54)-dependent promoters of P. putida with high confidence. Our analysis has revealed new functions for sigma(54) and, by means of comparative analysis with the previous studies, we have drawn a potential mechanism for the evolution of this regulatory system....

  8. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita M Bhatawadekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra.

  9. An unusual presentation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa blebitis following combined surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabana Bharathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of blebitis that occurred 3 years later following a combined glaucoma and cataract surgery. It was an atypical presentation, as patient had no classical fiery looking signs of blebitis despite the isolated organism being Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Improvized surgical techniques like use of Mitomycin C, releasable flap sutures though considered as part of the recommended procedure for better surgical outcomes, their role as potential risk factors for visually blinding complications like endophthalmitis are often overlooked. This case report throws light on such risk factors for bleb associated infections and recommends removal or trimming of all releasable sutures and the need for a regular postoperative follow-up.

  10. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  11. Adaptive synonymous mutations in an experimentally evolved Pseudomonas fluorescens population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Susan; Hinz, Aaron; Kassen, Rees

    2014-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that synonymous mutations, nucleotide changes that do not alter the encoded amino acid, have no detectable effect on phenotype or fitness. However, a growing body of evidence from both comparative and experimental studies suggests otherwise. Synonymous mutations have been...... in an experimentally evolved population of Pseudomonas fluorescens. We show experimentally that these mutations increase fitness by an amount comparable to non-synonymous mutations and that the fitness increases stem from increased gene expression. These results provide unequivocal evidence that synonymous mutations...... can drive adaptive evolution and suggest that this class of mutation may be underappreciated as a cause of adaptation and evolutionary dynamics....

  12. Development of potent inhibitors of pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura C; O'Loughlin, Colleen T; Zhang, Zinan; Siryaporn, Albert; Silpe, Justin E; Bassler, Bonnie L; Semmelhack, Martin F

    2015-02-12

    The development of new approaches for the treatment of antimicrobial-resistant infections is an urgent public health priority. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogen, in particular, is a leading source of infection in hospital settings, with few available treatment options. In the context of an effort to develop antivirulence strategies to combat bacterial infection, we identified a series of highly effective small molecules that inhibit the production of pyocyanin, a redox-active virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. Interestingly, these new antagonists appear to suppress P. aeruginosa virulence factor production through a pathway that is independent of LasR and RhlR.

  13. Pseudomonas sax genes overcome aliphatic isothiocyanate-mediated non-host resistance in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun Fan; Casey Crooks; Gary Creissen; Lionel Hill; Shirley Fairhurst; Peter Doerner; Chris Lamb

    2011-01-01

    Most plant-microbe interactions do not result in disease; natural products restrict non-host pathogens. We found that sulforaphane (4-methylsulfinylbutyl isothiocyanate), a natural product derived from aliphatic glucosinolates, inhibits growth in Arabidopsis of non-host Pseudomonas bacteria in planta. Multiple sax genes (saxCAB/F/D/G) were identified in Pseudomonas...

  14. Erythromycin inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced tumour necrosis factor-alpha production in human whole blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M. J.; Speelman, P.; van der Poll, T.

    2001-01-01

    Erythromycin has been shown to be beneficial for panbronchiolitis, a disorder linked to infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Erythromycin, but not the anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics imipenem, ceftazidime, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin, caused a dose-dependent decrease in the production of tumour

  15. De novo production of the monoterpenoid geranic acid by metabolically engineered Pseudomonas putida

    OpenAIRE

    Mi, Jia; Becher, Daniela; Lubuta, Patrice; Dany, Sarah; Tusch, Kerstin; Schewe, Hendrik; Buchhaupt, Markus; Schrader, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Background Production of monoterpenoids as valuable chemicals using recombinant microbes is a growing field of interest. Unfortunately, antimicrobial activity of most monoterpenoids hampers a wide application of microorganisms for their production. Strains of Pseudomonas putida, a fast growing and metabolically versatile bacterium, often show an outstanding high tolerance towards organic solvents and other toxic compounds. Therefore, Pseudomonas putida constitutes an attractive alternative ho...

  16. Genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, isolated from alpine glacial cryoconite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Chul; Kim, Su Jin; Hong, Soon Gyu; Ahn, Do Hwan; Lee, Yung Mi; Lee, Hyoungseok; Lee, Jungeun; Park, Hyun

    2012-04-01

    Pseudomonas spp. have shown characteristics of efficiently metabolizing environmental pollutants and also producing exopolysaccharides known as biofilms. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas sp. strain PAMC 25886, which was isolated from glacier cryoconite in the Alps mountain permafrost region and which may provide further insight into biodegradative and/or biofilm-producing mechanisms in a cold environment.

  17. 40 CFR 180.1261 - Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. 180.1261 Section 180.1261 Protection of.... vesicatoria and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato specific Bacteriophages. An exemption from the requirement of... syringae pv. tomato specific bacteriophages in or on pepper and tomato. ...

  18. Regulation of the biosynthesis of cyclic lipopeptides from Pseudomonas putida PCL1445

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubern, Jean-Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida strain PCL1445 produces two cyclic lipopeptides, named putisolvins I and II, which represent a Novel class of biosurfactants. Putisolvins reduce the surface tension between liquid and air, and disrupt already existing biofilms of several Pseudomonas sp., including those of the

  19. Regulation of pqs quorum sensing via catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Gao, Qingguo; Chen, Wanying

    2013-01-01

    that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolite repression control protein regulates the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing, which further controls synthesis of virulence factor pyocyanin, biofilm formation and survival during infection models. Our study suggests that deregulation of the catabolite repression by P...

  20. Dual Infection by Burkholderia Cepaciaand Pseudomonas Putida in an Infective Endocarditis Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Maria; Lalani, Farida Khurram; Ikram, Aamer; Zaman, Gohar; Ahmed, Parvez

    2017-06-01

    Infective endocarditis is rarely caused by Burkholderia cepacia. Pseudomonas putidahas not been reported to cause infective endocarditis so far. This is the first case of infective endocarditis being reported, that is caused by Pseudomonas putidaand Burkholderia cepaciain an immunocompetent host with no predisposing factors. Aortic valve replacement surgery was carried out and antibiotics were given, to which the patient responded well and recovered.

  1. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  2. Bloodstream infections caused by Pseudomonas spp.; how to detect carbapenemase producers directly from positive blood cultures ?

    OpenAIRE

    Dortet, Laurent; Boulanger, Anne; Poirel, Laurent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    The Carba NP test has been evaluated to detect carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas spp. directly from blood cultures. This rapid and cost-effective test permits an early identification of carbapenemase-producing Pseudomonas spp. directly from blood cultures with excellent sensitivity and specificity. Results may be useful in particular for guiding the first-line therapy and epidemiological purposes.

  3. The nitrogen-fixation island insertion site is conserved in diazotrophic Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas sp. isolated from distal and close geographical regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia Venieraki

    Full Text Available The presence of nitrogen fixers within the genus Pseudomonas has been established and so far most isolated strains are phylogenetically affiliated to Pseudomonas stutzeri. A gene ortholog neighborhood analysis of the nitrogen fixation island (NFI in four diazotrophic P. stutzeri strains and Pseudomonas azotifigens revealed that all are flanked by genes coding for cobalamin synthase (cobS and glutathione peroxidise (gshP. The putative NFIs lack all the features characterizing a mobilizable genomic island. Nevertheless, bioinformatic analysis P. stutzeri DSM 4166 NFI demonstrated the presence of short inverted and/or direct repeats within both flanking regions. The other P. stutzeri strains carry only one set of repeats. The genetic diversity of eleven diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates was also investigated. Multilocus sequence typing grouped nine isolates along with P. stutzeri and two isolates are grouped in a separate clade. A Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis grouped the eleven isolates into four distinct genotypes. We also provided evidence that the putative NFI in our diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates is flanked by cobS and gshP genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the putative NFI of Pseudomonas sp. Gr65 is flanked by inverted repeats identical to those found in P. stutzeri DSM 4166 and while the other P. stutzeri isolates harbor the repeats located in the intergenic region between cobS and glutaredoxin genes as in the case of P. stutzeri A1501. Taken together these data suggest that all putative NFIs of diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates are anchored in an intergenic region between cobS and gshP genes and their flanking regions are designated by distinct repeats patterns. Moreover, the presence of almost identical NFIs in diazotrophic Pseudomonas strains isolated from distal geographical locations around the world suggested that this horizontal gene transfer event may have taken place early in the evolution.

  4. Systematic investigations on the biodegradation and viscosity reduction of long chain hydrocarbons using Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakthipriya, N; Doble, Mukesh; Sangwai, Jitendra S

    2016-03-01

    The use of microorganisms has been researched extensively for possible applications related to hydrocarbon degradation in the petroleum industry. However, attempts to improve the effect of microorganisms on the viscosity of hydrocarbons, which find potential use in the development of robust models for biodegradation, have been rarely documented. This study investigates the degradation of long chain hydrocarbons, such as hexadecane and eicosane using Pseudomonas fluorescens PMMD3 (P. fluorescens) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa CPCL (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa used here is isolated from petroleum contaminated sediments and the P. fluorescens is from the coastal area, and both have hydrocarbon degrading genes. The degradation of hydrocarbons is studied using carbon profiling and reduction in viscosity pre- and post-degradation of hydrocarbons. The carbon profiling has been obtained using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR) results. GC-MS results have indicated an improved biodegradation of hydrocarbons by 77-93% in one day. The yield coefficients of biomass (YX/S) for P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens using hexadecane as a carbon source are 1.35 and 0.81 g g(-1), and the corresponding values with eicosane are 0.84 and 0.88 g g(-1). The viscosity of hexadecane is reduced by the order of 53 and 47%, while that of eicosane was reduced by 53 and 65%, using P. aeruginosa and P. fluorescens, respectively. This study also presents information on the activity of enzymes responsible for the hydrocarbon degradation. Pseudomonas species have shown their use in potential applications for bioremediation, oil-spill treatment, and flow assurance. We believe that this study will also provide stringent tests for possible model development for the bioremediation of long chain paraffins suitable for oilfield applications.

  5. Impact of Silver Nanoparticle Transformation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa GFP Biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboye, Temitope Azeezat

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag NP) undergo transformations when released into the environment and often the transformed nanoparticles exhibit different behavior from the pristine analog. It is important to understand the influence of Ag NP transformation (particularly sulfidation) on its potential impacts in order to determine the effects of environmental transformation on biofilms. The goal of our study was to investigate interactions of polyvinylpyrrolidone-capped (PVP) pristine and transformed Ag NP (30 - 50 nm particle size) with bacterial biofilm to assess their impacts on biofilm communities. In this study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa GFP (ATCCRTM 10145GFP(TM)) biofilms were subjected to similar concentrations of pristine- Ag NP and transformed- Ag2S NP under environmentally relevant conditions. Residual concentrations of dissolved silver and NP after exposure to biofilms were evaluated by ICP-AES (Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy) analysis. The morphological properties of Pseudomonas aeruginosa GFP (P. aeruginosa) biofilms after exposure to both forms of silver nanoparticles were characterized by cell viability studies (using microplate reader and live/dead assay) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We also analyzed the distribution and size of investigated silver nanoparticles within P.aeruginosa biofilms using SEM coupled with EDS. Here, we report that transformed silver nanoparticle (Ag2S NP) exhibit reduced biofilm inactivation effects against P. aeruginosa biofilms compared to its pristine form (Ag NP). This result could be explained by a lower uptake of Ag2S nanoparticle by P. aeruginosa biofilms demonstrated by ICP-AES and SEM/EDS analysis.

  6. Copper uptake by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Muayad M; Saeed, Humodi A; Tarawneh, Khaled A; Khleifat, Khaled M; Al Tarawneh, Amjad

    2009-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from infected burn patients and characterized by standard biochemical tests. The in vitro copper uptake was compared between this isolated pathogenic strain and two non-pathogenic control strains of gram positive bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis strain Israelis as well as gram negative bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes. Maximum copper uptake of 470 ppm/g biomass was obtained by P. aeruginosa strain, while the control strains B. thuringiensis and Enterobacter aerogenes had copper uptake of 350 and 383 ppm/g biomass, respectively. However, the lowest copper uptake (60 ppm/g biomass) was observed with another control the saprophytic strain Pseudomonas (Shewanella) putrefaciens. A further investigation regarding the effect of copper toxicity on bacterial growth, gave an MIC score of 600 ppm for P. aeruginosa strain compared to 460 and 300 ppm for the two gram positive and gram negative control strains, respectively. In tandem with these in vitro findings, blood analysis on burn patients infected with P. aeruginosa has indicated a selective decrease of copper (hypocupremia) and ceruloplasmin plasma levels. The iron metabolism was also affected by this copper deprivation leading to a similar decrease in plasma levels of PCV, iron, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin. All these hematological changes were significantly different (P < 0.05) from the matched group of non-infected burn patients. The observed hypocupremia in infected burn patients was attributed to demanding scavenger ability by P. aeruginosa strain for the copper of plasma.

  7. Biodegradasi Petroleum dan Hidrokarbon Eikosana oleh Isolat Bakteri Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiqah Umar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of petroleum and hydrocarbon eicosane by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate. Hydrocarbon are important environmental contaminants in soil and water. These compounds have a potential risk to human health, as many of them are carsinogenic and toxic to marine organisms such as diatome, gasthrophode, mussel, and fish. The purpose of this research was to know the ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to degradate the hydrocarbon (petroleum Hundill and eicosane substrate. Growing test used in two steps, the preculture and culture step. The biodegradation capacity was measured by quantitative and qualitative tests. The essay showed an increasing biodegradation capacitypercentage of bacteria cell mass on hydrocarbon substrate. The percentage on petroleum Hundill substrat as follows; log phase was 51,6%, descelerate phase was 73%, and linear phase was 81,4%. On eicosane substrate as follows; log phase was 62,7%, descelerate phase was 85,2%, and linear phase was 85,2%. The qualitative biodegradation capacity by chromatography result showed separate enchained of carbon n-alkana in each growth phase on petroleum Hundill substrate. Carbon chain termination as follows; C11, C12, C14, C15, C16, C18, C22 on log phase, C12, C17, C19, C20, C24 on descelerate phase, and C12 until C25 even better on linear phase.

  8. PARTIAL PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ALKALOPHILIC PROTEASE FROM PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Satheeskumar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Partial purification and characterization of alkalophilic protease production from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from the gut of marine and coastal waters shrimp Penaeus monodon. The protease production was assayed in submerged fermentation to produce maximum protease activity (423 ± 0.09 U/ml. The enzyme was precipitated with ammonium sulphate and partially purified by ion exchange chromatography through DEAE Sephadex A-50 column. In 10th fraction showed maximum protease activity (734 ± 0.18 U/ml with increase in purification fold. The molecular weight of protease from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was recorded as 60 kDa. The stability of protease was tested at various pH and temperature; it showed maximum protease activity at pH-9 and temperature 50ºC. Among the various surfactants tested for enzyme stability, maximum activity was retained in poly ethylene glycol. The compatibility of protease enzyme with various commercial detergents; the enzyme retained maximum protease activity in tide. The results are indicated that all these properties make the bacterial proteases are most suitable for wide industrial applications.

  9. Pseudomonas aeruginosa: an uncommon cause of diabetic foot infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Heather; Knepper, Bryan; Hernandez, Whitney; Shor, Asaf; Bruntz, Merribeth; Berg, Chrystal; Price, Connie S

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has traditionally been considered a common pathogen in diabetic foot infection (DFI), yet the 2012 Infectious Diseases Society of America guideline for DFI states that "empiric therapy directed at P aeruginosa is usually unnecessary." The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of P aeruginosa isolated from bone or tissue cultures from patients with DFI. This study is a cross-sectional survey of diabetic patients presenting with a foot infection to an urban county hospital between July 1, 2012, and December 31, 2013. All of the patients had at least one debridement procedure during which tissue or bone cultures from operative or bedside debridements were obtained. The χ(2) test and the t test of means were used to determine relationships between variables and the frequency of P aeruginosa in culture. The median number of bacteria isolated from DFI was two. Streptococcus spp and Staphylococcus aureus were the most commonly isolated organisms; P aeruginosa was isolated in only five of 112 patients (4.5%). The presence of P aeruginosa was not associated with the patient's age, glycosylated hemoglobin level, tobacco abuse, the presence of osteomyelitis, a prescription for antibiotic drugs in the preceding 3 months, or the type of operative procedure. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was an infrequent isolate from DFI in this urban, underserved diabetic population. The presence of P aeruginosa was not associated with any measured risk factors. By introducing a clinical practice guideline, we hope to discourage frontline providers from using routine antipseudomonal antibiotic drugs for DFI.

  10. Isolation of Pseudomonas cepacia in cystic fibrosis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de Andrade Marques

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infection on cystic fibrosis (CF patients are associated with a limited qualitative number of microorganisms. During the colonization process, Staphylococcus aureus usually preceedes Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This latter is at first non-mucoid, being replaced or associated to a mucoid morphotype which is rare in other diseases. In 1980, Pseudomonas cepacia appeared as an important agent in CF pulmonary infections with a mean frequency of about 6.1% isolations in different parts of the world. The primus colonization mainly occurs in the presence of pre-existent tissue lesions and the clinical progress of the disease is variable. In some patients it can be fulminant; in others it can cause a gradual and slow decrease in their pulmonary functions. The concern with this germ isolation is justified by its antibiotic multiple resistence and the possibility of direct transmission from a colonized patient to a non-colonized one. We reported the first case of P. cepacia infection in a CF patient in our area. The microbiological attendance to this patient had been made from 1986 to 1991 and the first positive culture appeared in 1988. The sensitivity profile showed that the primus colonization strain was sensitive to 9 of 17 tested antibiotics, however in the last culture the strain was resistent to all antibiotics. These data corroborate the need for monitoring the bacterial flora on CF patients respiratory system.

  11. Expression, purification, and characterization of formaldehyde dehydrogenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangluo; Chen, Shuai; Liao, Yuanping; Wang, Dingli; Ding, Jianfeng; Wang, Yingming; Ran, Xiaoyuan; Lu, Daru; Zhu, Huaxing

    2013-12-01

    As a member of zinc-containing medium-chain alcohol dehydrogenase family, formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FDH) can oxidize toxic formaldehyde to less active formate with NAD(+) as a cofactor and exists in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Most FDHs are well known to be glutathione-dependent in the catalysis of formaldehyde oxidation, but the enzyme from Pseudomonas putida is an exception, which is independent of glutathione. To identify novel glutathione-independent FDHs from other bacterial strains and facilitate the corresponding structural and enzymatic studies, high-level soluble expression and efficient purification of these enzymes need to be achieved. Here, we present molecular cloning, expression, and purification of the FDH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium causing opportunistic human infection. The FDH of P. aeruginosa shows high sequence identity (87.97%) with that of P. putida. Our results indicated that coexpression with molecular chaperones GroES, GroEL, and Tig has significantly attenuated inclusion body formation and improved the solubility of the recombinant FDH in Escherichiacoli cells. A purification protocol including three chromatographic steps was also established to isolate the recombinant FDH to homogeneity with a yield of ∼3.2 mg from 1L of cell culture. The recombinant P. aeruginosa FDH was properly folded and biologically functional, as demonstrated by the mass spectrometric, crystallographic, and enzymatic characterizations of the purified proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyot, Nicolas; Bergsson, Gudmundur; Butler, Marcus W.; Greene, Catherine M.; Weldon, Sinead; Kessler, Efrat; Levine, Rodney L.; O’Neill, Shane J.; Taggart, Clifford C.; McElvaney, Noel G.

    2012-01-01

    Elafin is a 6 kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases (neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3) with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), were able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaved elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidences that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin. PMID:20370321

  13. Interspecies Interaction between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Other Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yosuke; Yawata, Yutaka; Toyofuku, Masanori; Uchiyama, Hiroo; Nomura, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Microbes interact with each other in multicellular communities and this interaction enables certain microorganisms to survive in various environments. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a highly adaptable bacterium that ubiquitously inhabits diverse environments including soil, marine habitats, plants and animals. Behind this adaptivity, P. aeruginosa has abilities not only to outcompete others but also to communicate with each other to develop a multispecies community. In this review, we focus on how P. aeruginosa interacts with other microorganisms. P. aeruginosa secretes antimicrobial chemicals to compete and signal molecules to cooperate with other organisms. In other cases, it directly conveys antimicrobial enzymes to other bacteria using the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) or membrane vesicles (MVs). Quorum sensing is a central regulatory system used to exert their ability including antimicrobial effects and cooperation with other microbes. At least three quorum sensing systems are found in P. aeruginosa, Las, Rhl and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) systems. These quorum-sensing systems control the synthesis of extracellular antimicrobial chemicals as well as interaction with other organisms via T6SS or MVs. In addition, we explain the potential of microbial interaction analysis using several micro devices, which would bring fresh sensitivity to the study of interspecies interaction between P. aeruginosa and other organisms. PMID:23363620

  14. Biochemical and genetic studies on degradation of chlorobenzoates by Pseudomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, H; Kahlon, R S

    1989-01-01

    The chlorobenzoates constitute an important class of recalcitrant compounds polluting this biosphere. Two bacterial strains B16 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and DT4 (Pseudomonas sp.) isolated by enrichment technique were found to utilize 2-chlorobenzoic acid (2-Cba) and 4-chlorobenzoic acid (4-Cba) respectively as sole source of carbon and energy. 2-Cba and 4-Cba were supplemented in synthetic medium at 1500 micrograms/ml and 1000 micrograms/ml (w/v) respectively. Addition of 100 micrograms/ml (w/v) yeast extract stimulated growth of cultures. Degradation studies revealed that substrates were degraded without release of chloride ion with possible accumulation of respective chlorophenols. Respiration studies revealed inducible nature of enzymes for break down of 2-Cba, 4-Cba benzoic acid, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and catechol. Extraction of plasmid DNA from parent strains showed presence of plasmid of same size in both strains. Cured strains showed absence of corresponding plasmid DNA bands thus indicating plasmid-borne genes for degradation of chlorobenzoates.

  15. Study on Antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas aeruginosa NO4 Strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ji Young; Kim, Jin Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    As important human and veterinary medicines, antibiotics are being produced and consumed in large quantities around the world. For example, more than 50 million pounds (22,000 tons) of antibiotics are produced in the U.S. each year and annual production in Germany is about 2,000 tons. Antibiotics are low molecular weight microbial metabolites that at low concentrations inhibit the growth of other microorganisms. Resistant bacteria may also spread and become broader infection-control problems, not only within health care institutions, but in communities as well. Clinically important bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a common cause of infection among hospitalized patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major cause of opportunistic infections among immunocompromised individuals. The spread of this organism in health care settings is often difficult to control due to the presence of multiple intrinsic and acquired mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance. In this study, we isolated novel bacterium which had strong antagonistic activity and separated antibiotic compounds from Pseudomonas sp., and analyzed characteristics and molecular weight of the antibiotic compound

  16. Enterobacteria secrete an inhibitor of Pseudomonas virulence during clinical bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlemacher, Shannon I; Giblin, Daryl E; d'Avignon, D André; Stapleton, Ann E; Trautner, Barbara W; Henderson, Jeffrey P

    2017-11-01

    Escherichia coli and other Enterobacteriaceae are among the most common pathogens of the human urinary tract. Among the genetic gains of function associated with urinary E. coli isolates is the Yersinia high pathogenicity island (HPI), which directs the biosynthesis of yersiniabactin (Ybt), a virulence-associated metallophore. Using a metabolomics approach, we found that E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae expressing the Yersinia HPI also secrete escherichelin, a second metallophore whose chemical structure matches a known synthetic inhibitor of the virulence-associated pyochelin siderophore system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We detected escherichelin during clinical E. coli urinary tract infection (UTI) and experimental human colonization with a commensal, potentially probiotic E. coli bacteriuria strain. Escherichelin production by colonizing enterobacteria may help human hosts resist opportunistic infections by Pseudomonas and other pyochelin-expressing bacteria. This siderophore-based mechanism of microbial antagonism may be one of many elements contributing to the protective effects of the human microbiome. Future UTI-preventive probiotic strains may benefit by retaining the escherichelin biosynthetic capacity of the Yersinia HPI while eliminating the Ybt biosynthetic capacity.

  17. Reduction of PCN biosynthesis by NO in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Gao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pyocyanin (PCN, a virulence factor synthesized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, plays an important role during clinical infections. There is no study of the effect of nitric oxide (NO on PCN biosynthesis. Here, the effect of NO on PCN levels in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1, a common reference strain, was tested. The results showed that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP can significantly reduce PCN levels (82.5% reduction at 60 μM SNP. Furthermore, the effect of endogenous NO on PCN was tested by constructing PAO1 nor (NO reductase gene knockout mutants. Compared to the wild-type strain, the Δnor strain had a lower PCN (86% reduction in Δnor. To examine whether the results were universal with other P. aeruginosa strains, we collected 4 clinical strains from a hospital, tested their PCN levels after SNP treatment, and obtained similar results, i.e., PCN biosynthesis was inhibited by NO. These results suggest that NO treatment may be a new strategy to inhibit PCN biosynthesis and could provide novel insights into eliminating P. aeruginosa virulence as a clinical goal.

  18. Functional study of elafin cleaved by Pseudomonas aeruginosa metalloproteinases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Guyot, Nicolas

    2010-06-01

    Elafin is a 6-kDa innate immune protein present at several epithelial surfaces including the pulmonary epithelium. It is a canonical protease inhibitor of two neutrophil serine proteases [neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3] with the capacity to covalently bind extracellular matrix proteins by transglutamination. In addition to these properties, elafin also possesses antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa proteases on elafin function. We found that P. aeruginosa PAO1-conditioned medium and two purified Pseudomonas metalloproteases, pseudolysin (elastase) and aeruginolysin (alkaline protease), are able to cleave recombinant elafin. Pseudolysin was shown to inactivate the anti-NE activity of elafin by cleaving its protease-binding loop. Interestingly, antibacterial properties of elafin against PAO1 were found to be unaffected after pseudolysin treatment. In contrast to pseudolysin, aeruginolysin failed to inactivate the inhibitory properties of elafin against NE. Aeruginolysin cleaves elafin at the amino-terminal Lys6-Gly7 peptide bond, resulting in a decreased ability to covalently bind purified fibronectin following transglutaminase activity. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that elafin is susceptible to proteolytic cleavage at alternative sites by P. aeruginosa metalloproteinases, which can affect different biological functions of elafin.

  19. Influence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on exacerbation in patients with bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Chawla

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A majority of the studies done on the western population have shown that Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes many severe infections in patients with bronchiectasis as compared to other pathogens. There is scarcity of similar data from the Asian population. Materials and Methods: A prospective study was undertaken to identify the various pathogens isolated from the respiratory samples of 117 patients with bronchiectasis from south India and to compare the clinicomicrobiological profile of infections caused by P. aeruginosa and other respiratory pathogens. Results: The respiratory pathogens were isolated from 63 (53.8% patients. P. aeruginosa was the most common isolate (46.0% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (14.3% and other pathogenic bacteria. Patients included in the P. aeruginosa group had a higher number of exacerbations (p: 0.008, greater number of hospital admissions (p: 0.007, a prolonged hospital stay (p: 0.03, and poor lung function, compared to the patients infected with the non-Pseudomonas group. Conclusion: It is necessary to investigate the etiology of respiratory tract infections among bronchiectasis patients followed by the prompt management of cases diagnosed with P. aeruginosa infections, so as to lower the morbidity and have a better prognosis.

  20. Crestamento bacteriano em filodendro causado por Pseudomonas cichorií.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdemar A. Malavolta Júnior

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available É descrita a ocorrência de Pseudomonas cichorii causando lesões foliares ligeiramente circulares e de tamanho variável, em plantas de diversos cultivares de filodendro (Philodendron spp., provenientes de viveiro comercial localizado no município de Holambra (SP, e cultivados sob cobertura plástica. Essas manchas, pardo-escuras, podiam atingir até 7 a 8 cm de diâmetro, verificando-se, em alguns casos, coalescência de lesões, acarretando intenso crestamento foliar. Essa é a primeira constatação de Pseudomonas cichorii em filodendro no Brasil. Isolados encontram-se depositados na Coleção de Culturas do Instituto Biológico, Seção de Bacteriologia Fitopatológica (IBSBF sob n.ºs 1262 e 1263. Diferentes graus de resistência foram observados entre os cultivares de filodendro. O ‘Amarelo’ foi o mais resistente, enquanto P. scandens e os cultivares Boulevard e Red Emerald, além de quatro outros não identificados, mostraram alta suscetibilidade.

  1. Induction of Callose Deposition in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum by Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pipit Marianingsih

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is a major component of outer-membrane gram-negative bacteria, and it can act as a Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP for perception of pathogens by plants. LPS can be recognized by plants, triggering certain plant defense-related responses, including callose deposition. This study investigated induction of callose deposition by bacterial LPS in tobacco. Tobacco leaves were infiltrated with 400 μg/mL and 800 μg/mL LPS extracted from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta and Pseudomonas syringae pv. glycinea (Pgl and incubated for 24 h or 48 h. To detect callose deposition, tobacco leaves were cleared in lactophenol solution, stained with aniline blue, and visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Results showed that LPS from Pgl induced more callose deposition in tobacco leaves than did that from Pta. In addition, a Pearson correlation test revealed that incubation period was the most significant factor in callose deposition, followed by the type of LPS bacteria. However, LPS concentration was not significantly corelated to callose deposition in tobacco leaves.

  2. “Watch Out! Pneumonia Secondary to Achromobacter Denitrificans”

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ubiquitous bacterium not fermenting glucose, oxidase and. Figure 1: Chest X‑ray posteroanterior view: Right upper lobe pulmonary fibrosis and tracheal shift to the right side with secondary infection. Figure 2: Computed tomography‑chest: Bilateral consolidation (right more than left), secondary infection, pleural thickening.

  3. Ferric Uptake Regulator Fur Is Conditionally Essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqua, Martina; Visaggio, Daniela; Lo Sciuto, Alessandra; Genah, Shirley; Banin, Ehud; Visca, Paolo; Imperi, Francesco

    2017-11-15

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein controls both metabolism and virulence in response to iron availability. Differently from other bacteria, attempts to obtain fur deletion mutants of P. aeruginosa failed, leading to the assumption that Fur is an essential protein in this bacterium. By investigating a P. aeruginosa conditional fur mutant, we demonstrate that Fur is not essential for P. aeruginosa growth in liquid media, biofilm formation, and pathogenicity in an insect model of infection. Conversely, Fur is essential for growth on solid media since Fur-depleted cells are severely impaired in colony formation. Transposon-mediated random mutagenesis experiments identified pyochelin siderophore biosynthesis as a major cause of the colony growth defect of the conditional fur mutant, and deletion mutagenesis confirmed this evidence. Impaired colony growth of pyochelin-proficient Fur-depleted cells does not depend on oxidative stress, since Fur-depleted cells do not accumulate higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and are not rescued by antioxidant agents or overexpression of ROS-detoxifying enzymes. Ectopic expression of pch genes revealed that pyochelin production has no inhibitory effects on a fur deletion mutant of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci, suggesting that the toxicity of the pch locus in Fur-depleted cells involves a P. aeruginosa-specific pathway(s).IMPORTANCE Members of the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein family are bacterial transcriptional repressors that control iron uptake and storage in response to iron availability, thereby playing a crucial role in the maintenance of iron homeostasis. While fur null mutants of many bacteria have been obtained, Fur appears to be essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa for still unknown reasons. We obtained Fur-depleted P. aeruginosa cells by conditional mutagenesis and showed that Fur is dispensable for planktonic growth, while it is required for colony formation. This is

  4. Adherence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa onto surfactant-laden contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosuela, Reynalyn; Mustafa, Shelan; Gould, Simon; Hassanin, Hany; Alany, Raid G; ElShaer, Amr

    2018-03-01

    There is an immense research interest to utilise contact lens (CLs) as a popular platform for ocular drug delivery. However, CLs are the major predisposing factors of bacterial keratitis which is commonly caused by adhesion of microbes such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The aim of the current study is to explore the effect of surfactants; Poloxamer 188, Polysorbate 80 and Tetronic ® 90R4 (at 0.25% - 3% v/v) on the characteristics of CLs and on the adhesion abilities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to the lenses' surfaces. CLs were formulated using a hydrophilic monomer; 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) together with silicone-based polymer such as Poly dimethyl siloxane (PDMS) or 3,3,3-trifluoropropylsilane (FSA) then lenses were polymerized under UV light. The formulated CLs with surfactants were found to have an increased equilibrium water content (EWC) due to hydrophilic moiety present in surfactants. A relationship was deduced between EWC and surface contact angle of lenses containing surfactants; where an increased EWC was associated with a decrease in contact angle reflecting a more hydrophilic surfaces of CLs. Apart from the 3% Polysorbate 80 (p Lenses with surfactants were found to have lower bacterial ATP concentration than lenses without surfactants. Poloxamer 188 in FSA lenses reduced bacterial adhesion from 4.22 × 10 -4  ± 1.30 × 10 -4 pM to 1.03 × 10 -4  ± 4.86 × 10 -5 pM, a reduction by 75.59% when compared to the control lenses (p = .002). Moreover, 1% Tetronic ® 90R4 in PDMS showed a reduction by 57.17% in ATP concentration. Polysorbate 80 in FSA exhibited the least bacterial adhesion with an average bacterial ATP concentration of 3.85 × 10 -5  ± 2.61 × 10 -5 pM; i.e 90.88% less bacterial ATP than control lenses (p = .001). Bioluminescence studies demonstrated a decrease in Pseudomonas aeruginosa adhesion to CLs containing surfactants without impairing the optical and

  5. Inhibition of Cell Differentiation in Bacillus subtilis by Pseudomonas protegens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Matthew J.; Sanabria-Valentín, Edgardo; Bowers, Albert A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Interspecies interactions have been described for numerous bacterial systems, leading to the identification of chemical compounds that impact bacterial physiology and differentiation for processes such as biofilm formation. Here, we identified soil microbes that inhibit biofilm formation and sporulation in the common soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis. We did so by creating a reporter strain that fluoresces when the transcription of a biofilm-specific gene is repressed. Using this reporter in a coculture screen, we identified Pseudomonas putida and Pseudomonas protegens as bacteria that secrete compounds that inhibit biofilm gene expression in B. subtilis. The active compound produced by P. protegens was identified as the antibiotic and antifungal molecule 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG). Colonies of B. subtilis grown adjacent to a DAPG-producing P. protegens strain had altered colony morphologies relative to B. subtilis colonies grown next to a DAPG-null P. protegens strain (phlD strain). Using a subinhibitory concentration of purified DAPG in a pellicle assay, we saw that biofilm-specific gene transcription was delayed relative to transcription in untreated samples. These transcriptional changes also corresponded to phenotypic alterations: both biofilm biomass and spore formation were reduced in B. subtilis liquid cultures treated with subinhibitory concentrations of DAPG. Our results add DAPG to the growing list of antibiotics that impact bacterial development and physiology at subinhibitory concentrations. These findings also demonstrate the utility of using coculture as a means to uncover chemically mediated interspecies interactions between bacteria. IMPORTANCE Biofilms are communities of bacteria adhered to surfaces by an extracellular matrix; such biofilms can have important effects in both clinical and agricultural settings. To identify chemical compounds that inhibited biofilm formation, we used a fluorescent reporter to screen for bacteria that

  6. Diversity of Pseudomonas Genomes, Including Populus-Associated Isolates, as Revealed by Comparative Genome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Se-Ran; Wassenaar, Trudy M.; Nookaew, Intawat; Hauser, Loren; Wanchai, Visanu; Land, Miriam; Timm, Collin M.; Lu, Tse-Yuan S.; Schadt, Christopher W.; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Pelletier, Dale A.

    2015-01-01

    The Pseudomonas genus contains a metabolically versatile group of organisms that are known to occupy numerous ecological niches, including the rhizosphere and endosphere of many plants. Their diversity influences the phylogenetic diversity and heterogeneity of these communities. On the basis of average amino acid identity, comparative genome analysis of >1,000 Pseudomonas genomes, including 21 Pseudomonas strains isolated from the roots of native Populus deltoides (eastern cottonwood) trees resulted in consistent and robust genomic clusters with phylogenetic homogeneity. All Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomes clustered together, and these were clearly distinct from other Pseudomonas species groups on the basis of pangenome and core genome analyses. In contrast, the genomes of Pseudomonas fluorescens were organized into 20 distinct genomic clusters, representing enormous diversity and heterogeneity. Most of our 21 Populus-associated isolates formed three distinct subgroups within the major P. fluorescens group, supported by pathway profile analysis, while two isolates were more closely related to Pseudomonas chlororaphis and Pseudomonas putida. Genes specific to Populus-associated subgroups were identified. Genes specific to subgroup 1 include several sensory systems that act in two-component signal transduction, a TonB-dependent receptor, and a phosphorelay sensor. Genes specific to subgroup 2 contain hypothetical genes, and genes specific to subgroup 3 were annotated with hydrolase activity. This study justifies the need to sequence multiple isolates, especially from P. fluorescens, which displays the most genetic variation, in order to study functional capabilities from a pangenomic perspective. This information will prove useful when choosing Pseudomonas strains for use to promote growth and increase disease resistance in plants. PMID:26519390

  7. Hydrolytic potential of a psychrotrophic Pseudomonas isolated from refrigerated raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula F. Corrêa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of extracellular hydrolases by a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from refrigerated raw milk, and identified as a Pseudomonas sp. belonging to the Pseudomonas jenssenii group, was studied. This bacterium produced proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes in all media investigated (skim milk, cheese whey, casein broth, and tryptone soy broth. High levels of α-glucosidase were produced in skim milk broth. Hydrolytic enzymes detected in skim milk broth are of particular concern, indicating that these enzymes could be produced by Pseudomonas sp. during the cold storage of raw milk, contributing to the spoilage problem in milk and dairy products.

  8. Characteristics of Bacterial Strains from Pseudomonas Genera Isolated from Diseased Plum Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Gavrilović

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of Pseudomonas syringae strains isolated from diseased plum trees are presented is this paper. Based on pathogenic, biochemical and physiological characteristics, isolated starins were divided into two groups: First group of strains, isolated from diseased plum branches with symptoms of suden decay, was simillar to Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae; second group of strains, isolated from necrotic flower buds on plum trees, exhibited characteristics simillar to Pseudomonas syringae pv. morsprunorum. In addition, phytopathogenic fungi belonging to genera Phomopsis, Botryosphaeria and Leucostoma, were also isolated from diseased plum trees. Further study of these pathogens and their role in the epidemiology of suden plum trees decay is in progress.

  9. [Pseudomonas infection: biological risk by occupational exposure and results of an environmental monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoni, Francesco; Giorgi, Doriana Antonella; Palmieri, Sabina; Arcangeli, Luca; Ricci, Serafino

    2014-01-01

    The biological risk of Pseudomonas aeruginosa for activities involving exposure to contaminated water, such as, for example, routine maintenance of swimming pools, is related to the availability of effective prophylactic and therapeutic measures. The authors present the data of the microbiological analyzes made on 2349 samples taken from pools in Rome and province. The contamination by Pseudomonas was found in 191 samples with 13 samples that had a level > 100 cfu/100 ml and 5 samples with level > 200 cfu/100 ml. Useful considerations derived from the analysis of the literature about the profile and prophylactic treatment of infection by Pseudomonas, necessarily to be taken into consideration for an adequate risk assessment.

  10. Dynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate utilization andantibiotic susceptibility of strain Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovčić B.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151 harbors a gene encoding a putative alkylsulfatase (sdsA. Here we report a growth ability of this strain in minimal media containing 0.5, 0.75, and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate as the sole carbon source. The most prominent growth was detected for the minimal medium with 0.5% SDS, so this concentration of SDS was used to monitor Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151 SDS biodegradation dynamics. Bacterial growth coincided with the disappearance of SDS. Antibiotic susceptibility was tested as well. Pseudomonas sp. ATCC19151 was resistant to six out of nine tested antibiotics, including ampicillin, tetracycline, chloramphenicol, tobramycin, nalidixic acid, and gentamycin.

  11. Bioreporter pseudomonas fluorescens HK44 immobilized in a silica matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trogl J.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioluminescent bioreporter Pseudomonas fluorescens HK44, the whole cell bacterial biosensor that responds to naphthalene and its metabolites via the production of visible light, was immobilized into a silica matrix by the sol-gel technique. The bioluminescence intensities were measured in the maximum of the bioluminescence band at X = 500 nm. The immobilized cells (>105 cells per g silica matrix produced light after induction by salicylate (cone. > 10 g/l, naphthalene and aminobenzoic acid. The bioluminescence intensities induced by 2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene 3-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid were comparable to a negative control. The cells in the silica layers on glass slides produced light in response to the presence of an inductor at least 8 months after immobilization, and >50 induction cycles. The results showed that these test slides could be used as assays for the multiple determination of water pollution.

  12. Extracellular DNA Shields against Aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chiang, Wen-Chi; Nilsson, Martin; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years, it has been established that extracellular DNA is a key constituent of the matrix of microbial biofilms. In addition, it has recently been demonstrated that DNA binds positively charged antimicrobials such as aminoglycosides and antimicrobial peptides. In the present study, w...... that the aminoglycoside tolerance mediated by the presence of extracellular DNA is not caused by activation of the pmr genes in our P. aeruginosa biofilms but rather by a protective shield effect of the extracellular DNA....... provide evidence that extracellular DNA shields against aminoglycosides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We show that exogenously supplemented DNA integrates into P. aeruginosa biofilms and increases their tolerance toward aminoglycosides. We provide evidence that biofilms formed by a DNA release...

  13. Nitrite Formation from Hydroxylamine and Oximes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarger, Noelle; Alexander, M.

    1968-01-01

    Nitrite was formed from hydroxylamine and several oximes by intact cells and extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The activity was induced by the presence of oximes in the culture medium. Nitroalkanes were not intermediates in the conversion of acetaldoxime, acetone oxime, or butanone oxime to nitrite, since nitromethane inhibited the formation of nitrite from the nitro compounds but not from the corresponding oximes. The oxime apparently functions as a constant source of hydroxylamine during growth of the bacterium. Hydroxylamine at low concentration was converted stoichiometrically to nitrite by extracts of the bacterium; high concentrations were inhibitory. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxygen, and other unidentified cofactors were necessary for the reaction. Actively nitrifying extracts possessed no hydroxylamine-cytochrome c reductase activity. Hyponitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide were not metabolized. PMID:4384968

  14. Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Treated with Azithromycin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, Vanessa V.; Fang, Jinshu; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2015-06-01

    In microbiology, changes in specialized metabolite production (cell-to-cell signaling metabolites, virulence factors, and natural products) are measured using phenotypic assays. However, advances in mass spectrometry-based techniques including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) now allow researchers to directly visualize the production of specialized metabolites from microbial colony biofilms. In this study, a combination of IMS and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to visualize the effect of the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM) on colony biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Although previous research suggested that AZM may inhibit cell-to-cell signaling of P. aeruginosa and thereby reduce pathogenicity, we observed no clear decrease in specialized metabolite production.

  15. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten T; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity......-up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host....... The immune response leading to this chronic inflammation is described. Finally, novel treatment strategies against P. aeruginosa are described including, quorum-sensing inhibition and induced biofilm-dispersion. The tolerance towards currently available antimicrobials calls for development of alternative...

  16. Chemistry and biology of pyoverdines, Pseudomonas primary siderophores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cézard, C; Farvacques, N; Sonnet, P

    2015-01-01

    Pyoverdine is the generic name given to a vast family of fluorescent green-yellowish pigments produced by Pseudomonas species. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, particularly infecting humans with compromised natural defenses. These infections result in significantly higher morbidity, longer hospitalization, increased mortality rates and excess health care costs. P. aeruginosa is very difficult to eradicate because of an intrinsic coupled with an adaptive resistance to a wide variety of classical antibiotics. When subjected to iron starvation conditions, Pseudomonas bacteria synthesize pyoverdines, their primary siderophores, to acquire iron from the extracellular medium. These molecules are not only powerful iron(III) scavengers but efficient iron(III) transporters as well. Three distinct structural parts constitute pyoverdines, i.e. (i) the fluorescent chromophore, deriving from a dihydroxyquinoline, attached via its carbonyl group to (ii) a type-specific peptide composed of 6 to 14 amino acids and (iii) a small side chain corresponding to a carboxylic acid derivative. Their chemical structure show three bidentate chelating sites including a catechol and two hydroxamates, leading to an octahedral geometry when complexed to iron(III). While the chromophore group is common to all pyoverdines, their peptide moiety differs among strains and species by the number, length, composition and configuration of amino acids. Following chelation with iron(III), the newly formed pyoverdine-Fe complex is recognized by a specific outer membrane transporter, namely FpvA, and reenters the cell where the iron is released from the pyoverdine into the periplasm for further incorporation into bacterial proteins. The remaining apo-pyoverdine is then recycled and secreted back to the extracellular medium by efflux pumps. Besides, the role of pyoverdines in P. aeruginosa is not only limited to scavenge iron from the bacterial environment. Indeed, these siderophores act

  17. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments...... protected animal models from developing chronic lung infection by P. aeruginosa. In the present study, the effects of ginseng on the formation of P. aeruginosa biofilms were further investigated in vitro and in vivo. Ginseng aqueous extract at concentrations of 0.5-2.0% did not inhibit the growth of P....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming...

  18. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in normal and athymic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Espersen, F; Pedersen, S S

    1993-01-01

    We have compared a chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa embedded in alginate beads in normal and athymic rats with an acute infection with free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. The following parameters were observed and described: mortality, macroscopic and microscopic pathologic changes......, and antibody responses. The rats challenged with P. aeruginosa alginate beads experienced a generally more severe lung pathology and the antibody responses were more homogeneous with less dispersion as compared to the rats having free live P. aeruginosa bacteria. In general, manifestations were more severe...... in the athymic rats compared to the normal rats. It is, however, notable that the athymic rats developed similar microscopic lung manifestations as the normal rats when given a large number of P. aeruginosa in the beads, with dense accumulation of neutrophil granulocytes and microcolonies comparable...

  19. Hyperbaric oxygen sensitizes anoxic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm to ciprofloxacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Lerche, Christian J; Kragh, Kasper Nørskov

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by the presence of endobronchial antibiotic-tolerant biofilm subject to strong oxygen (O2) depletion due to the activity of surrounding polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The exact mechanisms affecting the antibiotic susceptibility...... metabolism activity and the endogenous formation of reactive O2 radicals (ROS). In this study we aimed to apply hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT) in order to sensitize anoxic P. aeruginosa agarose-biofilms established to mimic situations with intense O2 consumption by the host response in the cystic...... that oxygenation by HBOT improves the bactericidal activity of ciprofloxacin on P. aeruginosa biofilm and suggest that bacterial biofilms is sensitized to antibiotics by supplying hyperbaric O2....

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 pathogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirienko, Natalia V; Cezairliyan, Brent O; Ausubel, Frederick M; Powell, Jennifer R

    2014-01-01

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a simple model host for studying the interaction between bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the metazoan innate immune system. Powerful genetic and molecular tools in both C. elegans and P. aeruginosa facilitate the identification and analysis of bacterial virulence factors as well as host defense factors. Here we describe three different assays that use the C. elegans-P. aeruginosa strain PA14 host-pathogen system. Fast Killing is a toxin-mediated death that depends on a diffusible toxin produced by PA14 but not on live bacteria. Slow Killing is due to an active infection in which bacteria colonize the C. elegans intestinal lumen. Liquid Killing is designed for high-throughput screening of chemical libraries for anti-infective compounds. Each assay has unique features and, interestingly, the PA14 virulence factors involved in killing are different in each assay.

  1. Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by quorum sensing inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hentzer, Morten; Wu, Hong; Andersen, Jens Bo

    2003-01-01

    Traditional treatment of infectious diseases is based on compounds that kill or inhibit growth of bacteria. A major concern with this approach is the frequent development of resistance to antibiotics. The discovery of communication systems (quorum sensing systems) regulating bacterial virulence has...... afforded a novel opportunity to control infectious bacteria without interfering with growth. Compounds that can override communication signals have been found in the marine environment. Using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as an example of an opportunistic human pathogen, we show that a synthetic derivate...... and inhibited virulence factor expression. Application of the drug to P.aeruginosa biofilms increased bacterial susceptibility to tobramycin and SDS. In a mouse pulmonary infection model, the drug inhibited quorum sensing of the infecting bacteria and promoted their clearance by the mouse immune response....

  2. [Effect on keratocyte-mediated collagen degradation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J; Lu, Y; Jia, H; Liu, J; Xu, J; Zhang, R

    2000-01-01

    To study the pathogenesis of cornea melting (ulceration) by pseudomona (P) aeruginosa for instruction of clinical treatment. Type I collagen gels with or without suspended keratocytes were incubated for 24 hours under medium containing sterile P. aeruginosa culture broth. Native collagen fibrils were removed from the media by ultrafiltration. The ultrafiltrates were then hydrolyzed, and the amount of hydroxyproline was measured spectrophotometrically. The effect of a synthetic matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor, Galardin, on collagen degradation was also examined. P. aeruginosa broth induced type I collagen gel degradation directly. In the presence of keratocytes, degradation by P. aeruginosa broth was enhanced. Galardin significantly reduced the amount of collagen degraded by P. aeruginosa culture broth, no matter keratocytes were present or not. P. aeruginosa culture broth directly degrades type I collagen and also increases keratocyte-mediated collagen degradation. The result is helpful to the clinical treatment of cornea melting caused by P. aeruginosa, and the mechanism should be further studied.

  3. Expanded bed adsorption of an alkaline lipase from Pseudomona cepacia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Padilha, Giovana; Curvelo-Santana, José Carlos; Alegre, Ranulfo Monte; Tambourgi, Elias Basile

    2009-02-15

    An extracellular lipase was isolated from Pseudomona cepacia by expanded bed adsorption on an Amberlite 410 ion-exchange resin. Enzyme characterization and hydrodynamic study of a chromatography column were done. Enzyme purification was done at three condition of expanded bed height (H): at one and half (6cm), at two (8cm) and at three (12cm) times the fixed bed height (H(0)=4cm). The results showed that the experimental data was fitted to the Richardson and Zaki equation, and the comparison between the experimental and calculated terminal velocities showed low relative error. In enzyme purification for better condition, a purification factor of about 80 times was found at 6cm of expanded bed height, or 1.5 times of expansion degree. Purified lipase had an optimal pH and a temperature of 8 and 37 degrees C, respectively.

  4. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Biggs

    Full Text Available Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  5. Novel multiscale modeling tool applied to Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Matthew B; Papin, Jason A

    2013-01-01

    Multiscale modeling is used to represent biological systems with increasing frequency and success. Multiscale models are often hybrids of different modeling frameworks and programming languages. We present the MATLAB-NetLogo extension (MatNet) as a novel tool for multiscale modeling. We demonstrate the utility of the tool with a multiscale model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation that incorporates both an agent-based model (ABM) and constraint-based metabolic modeling. The hybrid model correctly recapitulates oxygen-limited biofilm metabolic activity and predicts increased growth rate via anaerobic respiration with the addition of nitrate to the growth media. In addition, a genome-wide survey of metabolic mutants and biofilm formation exemplifies the powerful analyses that are enabled by this computational modeling tool.

  6. Flagellation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in newly divided cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kun; Lee, Calvin; Anda, Jaime; Wong, Gerard

    2015-03-01

    For monotrichous bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, after cell division, one daughter cell inherits the old flagellum from its mother cell, and the other grows a new flagellum during or after cell division. It had been shown that the new flagellum grows at the distal pole of the dividing cell when the two daughter cells haven't completely separated. However, for those daughter cells who grow new flagella after division, it still remains unknown at which pole the new flagellum will grow. Here, by combining our newly developed bacteria family tree tracking techniques with genetic manipulation method, we showed that for the daughter cell who did not inherit the old flagellum, a new flagellum has about 90% chances to grow at the newly formed pole. We proposed a model for flagellation of P. aeruginosa.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm, a Programmed Bacterial Life for Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Keehoon; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2017-06-28

    A biofilm is a community of microbes that typically inhabit on surfaces and are encased in an extracellular matrix. Biofilms display very dissimilar characteristics to their planktonic counterparts. Biofilms are ubiquitous in the environment and influence our lives tremendously in both positive and negative ways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a bacterium known to produce robust biofilms. P. aeruginosa biofilms cause severe problems in immunocompromised patients, including those with cystic fibrosis or wound infection. Moreover, the unique biofilm properties further complicate the eradication of the biofilm infection, leading to the development of chronic infections. In this review, we discuss the history of biofilm research and general characteristics of bacterial biofilms. Then, distinct features pertaining to each stage of P. aeruginosa biofilm development are highlighted. Furthermore, infections caused by biofilms on their own or in association with other bacterial species (i.e., multispecies biofilms) are discussed in detail.

  8. Antibacterial Coating for Elimination of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Abidin Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymer antibacterial surface has been successfully developed. The coating system used silane as binder and Ag particles as antibacterial agent. The silver was synthesized using precipitation method. X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET tests, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were carried out to evaluate the silver particles. Antibacterial properties of the coating system were tested against gram-negative bacteria, namely, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. Different amounts of Ag were used in the coating to optimize its usage. The Japanese International Standard, JISZ2801, was used for bacteria test and the surface developed complies with the standard being antibacterial.

  9. Pyocyanin degradation by a tautomerizing demethylase inhibits Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kyle C; Glasser, Nathaniel R; Conway, Stuart J; Newman, Dianne K

    2017-01-13

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces colorful redox-active metabolites called phenazines, which underpin biofilm development, virulence, and clinical outcomes. Although phenazines exist in many forms, the best studied is pyocyanin. Here, we describe pyocyanin demethylase (PodA), a hitherto uncharacterized protein that oxidizes the pyocyanin methyl group to formaldehyde and reduces the pyrazine ring via an unusual tautomerizing demethylation reaction. Treatment with PodA disrupts P. aeruginosa biofilm formation similarly to DNase, suggesting interference with the pyocyanin-dependent release of extracellular DNA into the matrix. PodA-dependent pyocyanin demethylation also restricts established biofilm aggregate populations experiencing anoxic conditions. Together, these results show that modulating extracellular redox-active metabolites can influence the fitness of a biofilm-forming microorganism. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. The implication of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jensen, Peter Ø; Høiby, Niels

    2011-01-01

    . The immune response leading to this chronic inflammation is described. Finally, novel treatment strategies against P. aeruginosa are described including, quorum-sensing inhibition and induced biofilm-dispersion. The tolerance towards currently available antimicrobials calls for development of alternative......Biofilm formation by bacteria is recognized as a major problem in chronic infections due to their recalcitrance against the immune defense and available antibiotic treatment schemes. The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has drawn special attention in this regard due to its severity......-up of the extracellular matrix encasing the biofilm-associated bacteria as well as the elaborate signaling mechanisms employed by the bacterium enables it to withstand the continuous stresses imposed by the immune defense and administered antibiotics resulting in a state of chronic inflammation that damages the host...

  11. Production of biopolymers by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from marine source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Jamil

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Two bacterial strains, Pseudomonas aeruginosa CMG607w and CMG1421 produce commercially important biopolymers. CMG607w isolated from the sediments of Lyari outfall to Arabian Sea synthesize the mcl-polyhydroxyalkanoates from various carbon sources. The production of PHAs was directly proportional to the incubation periods. Other strain CMG1421, a dry soil isolate, produced high viscous water absorbing extracellular acidic polysaccharide when it was grown aerobically in the minimal medium containing glucose or fructose or sucrose as sole source of carbon. The biopolymer had the ability to absorb water 400 times more than its dry weight. This property was superior to that of currently used non-degradable synthetic water absorbents. It acted as salt filter and had rheological and stabilizing activity as well.

  12. Hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salomonsen, Charlotte Mark

    experiencing outbreaks of hemorrhagic pneumonia among their mink was that the disease always started in the mink kits, never in the adults. Furthermore, 39% reported that most deaths occurred in the male mink. The results presented in this thesis suggest that factors of the mink make them more prone to develop......Hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink is an acute and fatal disease caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mink are typically found dead without prior clinical symptoms. The disease can be highly contagious and varying mortalities on the farm level has been reported. Hemorrhagic pneumonia in mink...... is seasonal with outbreaks almost exclusively occurring from September to November in Denmark. In human medicine, P. aeruginosa is regarded as a pathogen for immune compromised individuals but no underlying disease or immune defect has been identified in mink dying of hemorrhagic pneumonia. In fact, little...

  13. Evolution and Pathoadaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marvig, Rasmus Lykke

    understanding of how bacteria evolve and genetically adapt in a natural environment. In particular we sought to identify the genes that are targeted by mutation to optimize fitness in a given environment, and to understand the evolutionary mechanisms that govern the genetic change. Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... is the dominating pathogen of chronic airway infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and the bacterial long-term persistence in CF hosts involves mutation and selection of genetic variants with increased fitness in the CF airways. We performed a retrospective study of the P. aeruginosa DK2 clone type......, which is a transmissible clone isolated from chronically infected Danish CF patients over a period of 38 years. Whole-genome analysis of DK2 isolates enabled a finegrained reconstruction of the recent evolutionary history of the DK2 lineage and an identification of bacterial genes targeted by mutations...

  14. Acquisition and Role of Molybdate in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederick, Victoria G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Ween, Miranda P.; Begg, Stephanie L.; Paton, James C.

    2014-01-01

    In microaerophilic or anaerobic environments, Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes nitrate reduction for energy production, a process dependent on the availability of the oxyanionic form of molybdenum, molybdate (MoO42−). Here, we show that molybdate acquisition in P. aeruginosa occurs via a high-affinity ATP-binding cassette permease (ModABC). ModA is a cluster D-III solute binding protein capable of interacting with molybdate or tungstate oxyanions. Deletion of the modA gene reduces cellular molybdate concentrations and results in inhibition of anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction. Further, we show that conditions that permit nitrate reduction also cause inhibition of biofilm formation and an alteration in fatty acid composition of P. aeruginosa. Collectively, these data highlight the importance of molybdate for anaerobic growth of P. aeruginosa and reveal novel consequences of nitrate reduction on biofilm formation and cell membrane composition. PMID:25172858

  15. Hydrocarbon-degradation by Isolate Pseudomonas lundensis UTAR FPE2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline, S. Y. Ting

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the potential of isolate Pseudomonas lundensis UTAR FPE2 as a hydrocarbon degrader was established. Their biodegradation activity was first detected with the formation of clearing zones on Bushnell-Hass agar plates, with the largest diameter observed on plates supplemented with paraffin, followed by mineral oil and petrol. Utilization of hydrocarbon sources were again detected in broth cultures supplemented with similar hydrocarbon substrates, where the mean viable cell count recovered from hydrocarbon-supplemented broth cultures were higher than the initial inoculum except for napthalene. In both tests, the isolate showed higher degradability towards aliphatic hydrocarbon sources, and the least activity towards the aromatic hydrocarbon naphthalene. The isolate P. lundensis UTAR FPE2 (8 log10 cfu/mL also degraded crude diesel sample, with 69% degradation during the first three days. To conclude, this study suggests the potential use of this isolate for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated environments.

  16. Nanohybrids of silver particles on clay platelets delaminate Pseudomonas biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Li-Ping; Juan, Chih-Yin; Lin, Shiun-Long; Doran, Michael R; Lin, Jiang-Jen; Hsu, Shan-Hui; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Shen, Ching-I; Su, Hong-Lin

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of novel nanohybrids, composed of silver nanoparticles and nanoscale silicate platelets, to clear Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. The nanohybrids were manufactured from an in situ reduction of silver salts in the silicate platelet dispersion, and then applied to biofilms in vitro and in vivo. In reference to the biocidal effects of gentamycin, the nanohybrids mitigated the spreading of the biofilms, and initiated robust cell death and exfoliation from the superficial layers of the biofilms in vitro. In vivo, the nanohybrids exhibited significant therapeutic effects by eliminating established biofilms from infected corneas and promoting the recovery of corneal integrity. All of the evaluations indicate the high potency of the newly developed silver nanoparticle/nanoscale silicate platelet nanohybrids for eliminating biofilms.

  17. Transcriptome Dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 under Water Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gülez, Gamze; Dechesne, Arnaud; Workman, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    into water forming thin liquid films in the soil pores. Little is known of how bacteria respond to such conditions, where, in addition to facing water deprivation that might impair their metabolism, they have to adapt their dispersal strategy as swimming motility may be compromised. Using the pressurized...... porous surface model (PPSM), which allows creation of thin liquid films by controlling Ψm, we examined the transcriptome dynamics of Pseudomonas putida KT2440. We identified the differentially expressed genes in cells exposed to a mild matric stress (–0.4 MPa) for 4, 24, or 72 h. The major response...... 8000), a nonpermeating solute often used to simulate Ψm, on the gene expression profile and detected a different profile than that observed by directly imposing Ψm. This study is the first transcriptome profiling of KT2440 under directly controlled Ψm and also the first to show the difference in gene...

  18. Nitrite formation from hydroxylamine and oximes by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarger, N; Alexander, M

    1968-05-01

    Nitrite was formed from hydroxylamine and several oximes by intact cells and extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The activity was induced by the presence of oximes in the culture medium. Nitroalkanes were not intermediates in the conversion of acetaldoxime, acetone oxime, or butanone oxime to nitrite, since nitromethane inhibited the formation of nitrite from the nitro compounds but not from the corresponding oximes. The oxime apparently functions as a constant source of hydroxylamine during growth of the bacterium. Hydroxylamine at low concentration was converted stoichiometrically to nitrite by extracts of the bacterium; high concentrations were inhibitory. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, oxygen, and other unidentified cofactors were necessary for the reaction. Actively nitrifying extracts possessed no hydroxylamine-cytochrome c reductase activity. Hyponitrite, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide were not metabolized.

  19. Outbreak of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteraemia in a haematology department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Benjamin Schnack; Christensen, Nikolas; Sørensen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. In Denmark, an increase in P. aeruginosa isolates from blood cultures from a haematology department prompted a hygienic audit in 2007. METHODS: Blood cultures...... the outbreak and 12 months later. The audits were conducted by the method of direct observation. RESULTS: Several PFGE types were involved with no clear association to isolates from environmental samples. The audit revealed poor hygiene related to the handling of central venous catheters. After optimising...... catheter hygiene, the number of P. aeruginosa bacteraemia cases fell significantly. CONCLUSION: Since no clear association between patient and environmental genotype was established, it was suspected that central venous catheters were the main portal of entry. This was further supported by a simultaneous...

  20. Association of Pectolytic Fluorescent PSeudomonas with Postharvest Rots of Onion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.H. El-Hendawy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Five isolates of pectolytic fluorescent pseudomonads were obtained from a rotted onion bulb and identified as Pseudomonas marginalis. At both 4 and 25oC, all isolates caused soft rot to detached plant parts of onion and to carrot, celery, cucumber, pepper, spinach, tomato and turnip (but not garlic. They did not however cause any symptoms in living plants of these same species. These results suggest that the onion isolates are a postharvest pathogen which is not destructive in the field but becomes a threat to fresh vegetables stored at low-temperature. Analysis of cellulosolytic and pectic enzymes revealed that pectic lyases, but not polygalacturonases, pectin methyl esterases and cellulases were produced in culture by each isolate.

  1. Structure, function and regulation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa porins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Sylvie; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Bodilis, Josselin; Maillot, Olivier; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G J; Orange, Nicole; Dufour, Alain; Cornelis, Pierre

    2017-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative bacterium belonging to the γ-proteobacteria. Like other members of the Pseudomonas genus, it is known for its metabolic versatility and its ability to colonize a wide range of ecological niches, such as rhizosphere, water environments and animal hosts, including humans where it can cause severe infections. Another particularity of P. aeruginosa is its high intrinsic resistance to antiseptics and antibiotics, which is partly due to its low outer membrane permeability. In contrast to Enterobacteria, pseudomonads do not possess general diffusion porins in their outer membrane, but rather express specific channel proteins for the uptake of different nutrients. The major outer membrane 'porin', OprF, has been extensively investigated, and displays structural, adhesion and signaling functions while its role in the diffusion of nutrients is still under discussion. Other porins include OprB and OprB2 for the diffusion of glucose, the two small outer membrane proteins OprG and OprH, and the two porins involved in phosphate/pyrophosphate uptake, OprP and OprO. The remaining nineteen porins belong to the so-called OprD (Occ) family, which is further split into two subfamilies termed OccD (8 members) and OccK (11 members). In the past years, a large amount of information concerning the structure, function and regulation of these porins has been published, justifying why an updated review is timely. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garrido-Sanz

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as

  3. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa opportunistic pathogen and human infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bentzmann, Sophie; Plésiat, Patrick

    2011-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative environmental species and an opportunistic microorganism, establishes itself in vulnerable patients, such as those with cystic fibrosis or hospitalized in intensive care units. It has become a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide (about 10% of all such infections in most European Union hospitals) and a serious threat to Public Health. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics have also led to the selection of resistant strains against which very few therapeutic options exist. How an environmental species can cause human infections remains a key question that still needs elucidation despite the incredibly high progress that has been made in the P. aeruginosa biology over the past decades. The workshop belonging to Current trends in Biomedicine series, which was held under the sponsorship of the Universidad International de Andalucia between the 8th and the 10th November 2010 brought in the most recent advances in the environmental life of P. aeruginosa, the human P. aeruginosa infections, the new animal models to study Pseudomonas infections, the new genetic aspects including metabolomics, genomics and bioinformatics and the community lifestyle named biofilm that accounts for P. aeruginosa persistence in humans. This workshop organized by Soeren Molin (Danemark), Juan-Luis Ramos (Spain) and Sophie de Bentzmann (France) gathered 46 researchers coming from 11 European and American countries in a small format and was hosted in the 'Sede Antonio Machado' in Baeza. It was organized in seven sessions covering animal models for P. aeruginosa pathogenesis, resistance to drugs, regulatory potency including small RNA, two component systems, extracytoplasmic function sigma factors and trancriptional regulators, new therapies emerging from dissection of molecular mechanisms, and evolutionary mechanisms of P. aeruginosa strains in patients. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. WHOP, a Genomic Region Associated With Woody Hosts in the Pseudomonas syringae Complex Contributes to the Virulence and Fitness of Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi in Olive Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballo-Ponce, Eloy; van Dillewijn, Pieter; Wittich, Regina Michaela; Ramos, Cayo

    2017-02-01

    Bacteria from the Pseudomonas syringae complex belonging to phylogroups 1 and 3 (PG1 and PG3, respectively) isolated from woody hosts share a genomic region herein referred to as WHOP (from woody host and Pseudomonas spp.), which is absent in strains infecting herbaceous organs. In this work, we show that this region is also encoded in P. syringae pv. actinidifoliorum (PG1) and six additional members of PG3, namely, Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. retacarpa, three P. syringae pathovars, Pseudomonas meliae, and Pseudomonas amygdali. Partial conservation of the WHOP occurs in only a few PG2 strains. In P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi NCPPB 3335, the WHOP region is organized into four operons and three independently transcribed genes. While the antABC and catBCA operons mediate the catabolism of anthranilate and catechol, respectively, the ipoABC operon confers oxygenase activity to aromatic compounds. The deletion of antABC, catBCA, or ipoABC in NCPPB 3335 caused reduced virulence in woody olive plants without affecting knot formation in nonwoody plants; catBCA, dhoAB, and PSA3335_3206 (encoding a putative aerotaxis receptor) were also required for the full fitness of this strain exclusively in woody olive plants. Overall, this study sheds light on the evolution and adaptation of bacteria from the P. syringae complex to woody hosts and highlights the enzymatic activities encoded within the WHOP region that are essential for this process.

  5. MECANISMOS DE RESISTENCIA EN PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA: ENTENDIENDO A UN PELIGROSO ENEMIGO Resistance mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa: understanding a dangerous enemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Andrés Gómez Álvarez

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa es un bacilo Gram negativo no fermentador, ampliamente relacionado con la infección nosocomial. Este tipo de infecciones se presentan en pacientes severamente comprometidos, hospitalizados especialmente en unidades de cuidado intensivo, donde existe una alta presión de selección de resistencia por parte de los antibióticos. Estas infecciones nosocomiales tienen implicaciones en el pronóstico del paciente, los costos del tratamiento, la estancia hospitalaria, la morbilidad y la mortalidad. Es importante que en cada institución hospitalaria se mantenga una estrecha vigilancia de los perfiles de resistencia de esta bacteria, con el fin de reconocer sus mecanismos de resistencia, su evolución y la forma de transferencia. En este sentido, un concepto como "la lectura interpretativa del antibiograma" se impone y ayuda al clínico a inferir los posibles mecanismos de resistencia que exhibe la bacteria para de esta manera orientar el uso de la terapia antibiótica y avanzar en el gran desafío que implica enfrentar las consecuencias de la infección por P. aeruginosa.Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative fermentative bacilli related with nosocomial infections. This kind of infections is more frequent in critical ill patients, specially in intensive care units, where a high pressure selection is ejerxed. Nosocomial infections are associated with poor prognosis, increased treatment cost, cubed length, morbidity and mortality. Each health care institution might establish antimicrobial resistance surveillance in order to recognize antimicrobial resistance mechanisms, and transference of resistance of this pathogen. In the other hand, concepts as "interpretative reading" help the clinician to infer the possible mechanisms involved and in this way guide the antimicrobial therapy in order to boarding the challenge of this kind of infections.

  6. Molecular detection of an atypical, highly resistant, clonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in cystic fibrosis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Deirdre

    2013-03-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can be challenging due to the multitude of phenotypic changes isolates undergo during adaptation to the microenvironment of the CF lung.

  7. Colistin-Tobramycin Combinations Are Superior to Monotherapy Concerning the Killing of Biofilm Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, G.; Yang, Liang; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Antibiotic combination therapy might be more efficient than single antibiotics to combat Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis. We tested the ability of colistin sulphatetobramycin combinations and single antibiotics to kill P. aeruginosa biof...

  8. The cellodextrinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa consists of multiple functional domains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferreira, L M; Hazlewood, G P; Barker, P J; Gilbert, H J

    1991-01-01

    A genomic library of Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa DNA was constructed in pUC18 and Escherichia coli recombinants expressing 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-cellobioside-hydrolysing activity (MUCase) were isolated...

  9. The Effect of Strict Segregation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mansfeld, Rosa; de Vrankrijker, Angelica; Brimicombe, Roland; Heijerman, Harry; Teding van Berkhout, Ferdinand; Spitoni, Cristian|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304625957; Grave, Sanne; van der Ent, Cornelis; Wolfs, Tom; Willems, Rob; Bonten, Marc

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Segregation of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) was implemented to prevent chronic infection with epidemic Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with presumed detrimental clinical effects, but its effectiveness has not been carefully evaluated. METHODS: The effect of strict segregation on

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis: insights into pathogenic processes and treatment strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassett, Daniel J; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Irvin, Randall T

    2010-01-01

    CF airway mucus can be infected by opportunistic microorganisms, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Once organisms are established as biofilms, even the most potent antibiotics have little effect on their viability, especially during late-stage chronic infections. Better understanding...

  11. Antibiotic therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis : a European consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Döring, G; Conway, S P; Heijerman, H G; Hodson, M E; Høiby, N; Smyth, A; Touw, D J

    2000-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal hereditary disorder with autosomal recessive heredity in caucasians. The majority of CF patients suffer from chronic respiratory infection with the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No consensus among clinicians has been reached

  12. Flavonoids from Rhizophora conjugata fruit extract blocks virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, D.; Tilvi, S.; DeSouza, L.

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a major nosocomial pathogen which causes hospital acquired infections and recently has gained importance as a model to study antibiotic resistance. In the present study, we investigated the effect of methanol and methanol...

  13. Quorum sensing is necessary for the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during urinary tract infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Ravi; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2009-01-01

    .... To understand the role of quorum sensing in pathogenesis of urinary tract infections, wild type Pseudomonas aeruginosa, having both functional las and rhl quorum sensing systems, and its isogenic...

  14. Quorum Sensing and Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during Lung Infection of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, T.; Jensen, P.O.; Jakobsen, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant microorganism in chronic lung infection of cystic fibrosis patients. The chronic lung infection is preceded by intermittent colonization. When the chronic infection becomes established, it is well accepted that the isolated strains differ phenotypically...

  15. Dynamics of mutations during development of resistance by Pseudomonas aeruginosa against five antibiotics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feng, Y.; Jonker, M.J.; Moustakas, I.; Brul, S.; ter Kuile, B.H.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes considerable morbidity and mortality, specifically in the intensive care. Antibiotic resistant variants of this organism are more difficult to treat and cause substantial extra costs compared to susceptible strains. In the laboratory,

  16. Quinolone Signaling in the Cell-to-Cell Communication System of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Everett C. Pesci; Jared B. J. Milbank; James P. Pearson; Susan McKnight; Andrew S. Kende; E. Peter Greenberg; Barbara H. Iglewski

    1999-01-01

    ...) that consists of a homoserine lactone with a fatty acid side chain. Such is the case in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which contains two quorum sensing systems (las and rhl...

  17. Evolution of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa mutational resistome in an international Cystic Fibrosis clone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Causapé, Carla; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Cabot, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Emergence of epidemic clones and antibiotic resistance development compromises the management of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cystic fibrosis (CF) chronic respiratory infections. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) was used to decipher the phylogeny, interpatient dissemination, WGS mutator genotypes (mutome)...

  18. Electricity generation and wastewater treatment of oil refinery in microbial fuel cells using Pseudomonas putida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Majumder, Dip; Maity, Jyoti Prakash; Tseng, Min-Jen; Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chang, Young-Fo; Yang, Tsui-Chu; Chen, Chen-Yen

    2014-01-01

    .... Using Pseudomonas putida (BCRC 1059), a wild-type bacterium, we demonstrated that the refinery wastewater could be treated and also generate electric current in an air-cathode chamber over four-batch cycles for 63 cumulative days...

  19. Epidemiology and Ecology of Opportunistic Premise Plumbing Pathogens: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Legionella pneumophila, Mycobacterium avium, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are opportunistic premise plumbing pathogens (OPPPs) that persist and grow in household plumbing, habitats they share with humans. Infections caused by these OPPPs involve individuals with preexis...

  20. TSCA Experimental Release Application Approved for Pseudomonas putida Strains (fact sheet)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1998, EPA approved the TERAs R98-0004/5 submitted by the National Explosives Waste Technology & Evaluation Center (NEWTEC) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for field trials of two modified strains of Pseudomonas putida (P.putida).

  1. Indexing the Pseudomonas specialized metabolome enabled the discovery of poaeamide B and the bananamides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, D.; Melnik, Alexey V; Koyama, N.; Lu, X.; Schorn, M.; Fang, J.; Aguinaldo, K.; Lincecum Jr., T.; Ghequire, M.; Carrion, V.J.; Cheng, T.; Malone, J.; Mauchline, T.; Sanchez, L.; Marm Kilpatrick, A.; Raaijmakers, J.M.; De Mot, Rene; Moore, B.; Medema, Marnix H; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonads are cosmopolitan microorganisms able to produce a wide array of specialized metabolites. These molecules allow Pseudomonas to scavenge nutrients, sense population density and enhance or inhibit growth of competing microorganisms. However, these valuable metabolites are typically

  2. Indexing the Pseudomonas specialized metabolome enabled the discovery of poaeamide B and the bananamides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Don D.; Melnik, Alexey V.; Koyama, Nobuhiro; Lu, Xiaowen; Schorn, Michelle; Fang, Jinshu; Aguinaldo, Kristen; Lincecum, Tommie L.; Ghequire, Maarten G.K.; Carrion, Victor J.; Cheng, Tina L.; Duggan, Brendan M.; Malone, Jacob G.; Mauchline, Tim H.; Sanchez, Laura M.; Marm Kilpatrick, A.; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Mot, De René; Moore, Bradley S.; Medema, Marnix H.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonads are cosmopolitan microorganisms able to produce a wide array of specialized metabolites. These molecules allow Pseudomonas to scavenge nutrients, sense population density and enhance or inhibit growth of competing microorganisms. However, these valuable metabolites are typically

  3. Promotion of plant growth by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain SS101 via novel volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Dutta, Swarnalee; Ann, Mina; Raaijmakers, Jos M.; Park, Kyungseok

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) play key roles in modulating plant growth and induced systemic resistance (ISR) to pathogens. Despite their significance, the physiological functions of the specific VOCs produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens

  4. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Typing of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated from Surgical Wounds in Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kehinde Akinsinde

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with surgical wounds in hospitals and also to investigate their epidemiological relatedness using molecular typing techniques. Twenty Pseudomonas sp. isolated from surgical wounds were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by disk diffusion, plasmid profile, SDS-PAGE and PCR using the parC, gyr A gene and RAPD using the 1254 primer. The isolates showed resistance to 12 different antibiotics with six being 100% resistant. Plasmids were detected in 16 (80% of the isolates. The RAPD-PCR using the primer 1254, SDS-PAGE classified the 20 Pseudomonas spp. into 5 and 6 types respectively. Pseudomona aeruginosa strains isolated from surgical wounds were generally resistant to a broad range of antibiotics and this is rather worrisome. The typing techniques classified the 20 isolates into 5 and 6 groups.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular typing of pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from surgical wounds in Lagos, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stella; Ganiyu, Olaniyi; John, Rachael; Fowora, Muinah; Akinsinde, Kehinde; Odeigah, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the resistance patterns of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates recovered from patients with surgical wounds in hospitals and also to investigate their epidemiological relatedness using molecular typing techniques. Twenty Pseudomonas sp. isolated from surgical wounds were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by disk diffusion, plasmid profile, SDS-PAGE and PCR using the parC, gyr A gene and RAPD using the 1254 primer. The isolates showed resistance to 12 different antibiotics with six being 100% resistant. Plasmids were detected in 16 (80%) of the isolates. The RAPD-PCR using the primer 1254, SDS-PAGE classified the 20 Pseudomonas spp. into 5 and 6 types respectively. Pseudomona aeruginosa strains isolated from surgical wounds were generally resistant to a broad range of antibiotics and this is rather worrisome. The typing techniques classified the 20 isolates into 5 and 6 groups.

  6. Contribution of cell elongation to the biofilm formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa during anaerobic respiration

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yoon, Mi Young; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Yongjin; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2011-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacterium of clinical importance, forms more robust biofilm during anaerobic respiration, a mode of growth presumed to occur in abnormally thickened mucus layer...

  7. Allantoinase from Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. Purification, Properties and Immunochemical Characterization of Its In Vivo Inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Dick B.; Smits, Rob A.M.M.; Drift, Chris van der

    1982-01-01

    The catabolic enzyme allantoinase is rapidly inactivated in cells of Pseudomonas aeruginosa when the stationary phase of growth is reached. This process is irreversible since the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol completely blocked the reappearance of allantoinase activity that is observed

  8. Inhibition of human monocyte chemotaxis and chemiluminescence by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase on human monocyte function was examined. Mononuclear cells isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy individuals were incubated with various concentrations of elastase, and the chemotactic activity and chemiluminescence response of these ...

  9. Identification of pesticide-degrading Pseudomonas strains as poly-β ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . 14 strains of pesticide-degrading Pseudomonas isolated from subtropical lowland soil in southern Brazil were analyzed using optical microscopy. Lipid inclusions were identified in four strains, and three of them, which degraded the pesticide ...

  10. Characterization of fluorescent pseudomonas spp. associated with roots and soil of two sorghum genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum, useful for bioenergy feedstock, animal feed, and food, requires economical methods for disease prevention and control. Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. were isolated from sorghum roots and adherent soil to identify isolates that inhibited sorghum fungal pathogens. Pseudomonads were collected fr...

  11. Activation of pulmonary and lymph node dendritic cells during chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damlund, Dina S. M.; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2016-01-01

    The majority of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients acquire chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection, resulting in increased mortality and morbidity. The chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection is characterized by bacteria growing in biofilm surrounded by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). However...

  12. Initial Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in patients with cystic fibrosis: characteristics of eradicated and persistent isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tramper-Stranders, G. A.; van der Ent, C. K.; Molin, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Clin Microbiol Infect 2012; 18: 567574 Abstract Despite intensive eradication therapy, some CF patients with early Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection rapidly develop a chronic infection. To elucidate factors associated with this persistence, bacterial characteristics of early P. aeruginosa isolates...

  13. Functional, genetic and chemical characterization of biosurfactants produced by plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida 267

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijt, M.; Tran, H.; Raaijmakers, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: Plant growth-promoting Pseudomonas putida strain 267, originally isolated from the rhizosphere of black pepper, produces biosurfactants that cause lysis of zoospores of the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici. The biosurfactants were characterized, the biosynthesis gene(s) partially

  14. Potencial de pseudomonas spp. fluorescentes para biocontrole de alternaria ricini em mamoneira Potential of fluorescent pseudomonas spp. For biological control of alternaria ricini on castorbean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco de A.G. da Silva

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The potential of fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. to control Alternaria leaf spot on castorbean, caused by Alternaria ricini, was studied under greenhouse conditions. Two periods for antagonist applications were tested: 48h before and simultaneously to the pathogen inoculation. Among the antagonists tested JA4 and BJ22 were the most effectives showing disease severity reduction of 20.9% and 17.8% respectively, when applied simultaneously. The effect of Pseudomonas spp. on the micelial growth and sporulation was also studied throughout three different methods (funel, streak and celophane. Inhibition of micelial growth and sporulation was observed. There was no correlation between in vitro and in vivo data. Antibiosis was showed as a mode of action for Pseudomonas spp. in relation to Alternaria ricini. Ultrastructural studies confirmed the inhibition of spore germination by the bacteria.

  15. Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-15

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Biofilm Formation Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Predicted via Genome-Scale Kinetic Models of Bacterial Metabolism Francisco G...jaques.reifman.civ@mail.mil Abstract A hallmark of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is its ability to establish biofilm -based infections that are difficult to...eradicate. Biofilms are less susceptible to host inflammatory and immune responses and have higher antibiotic tolerance than free-living planktonic

  16. Antibiotic resistance patterns of Pseudomonas spp. isolated from the River Danube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens eKittinger

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spread and persistence of antibiotic resistance pose a severe threat to human health, yet there is still lack of knowledge about reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment. We took the opportunity of the Joint Danube Survey 3 (JDS3, the world's biggest river research expedition of its kind in 2013, to analyse samples originating from different sampling points along the whole length of the river. Due to its high clinical relevance, we concentrated on the characterization of Pseudomonas spp. and evaluated the resistance profiles of Pseudomonas spp. which were isolated from eight sampling points. In total, 520 Pseudomonas isolates were found, 344 (66.0% isolates were identified as Pseudomonas putida, and 141 (27.1% as Pseudomonas fluorescens, all other Pseudomonas species were represented by less than five isolates, among those two P. aeruginosa isolates. Thirty seven percent (37% of all isolated Pseudomonas species showed resistance to at least one out of eleven tested antibiotics. The most common resistance was against meropenem (30.4% / 158 isolates piperacillin/tazobactam (10.6% / 55 isolates and ceftazidime (4.2% / 22 isolates. 16 isolates (3.1% / 16 isolates were multi-resistant. For each tested antibiotic at least one resistant isolate could be detected. Sampling points from the upper stretch of the River Danube showed more resistant isolates than downriver. Our results suggest that antibiotic resistance can be acquired by and persists even in Pseudomonas species that are normally not in direct contact with humans. A possible scenario is that these bacteria provide a reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes that can spread to related human pathogens by horizontal gene transfer.

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene PA5507 controls PQS concentration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Tipton, Kyle A.; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can sense and respond to a myriad of environmental signals and utilizes a system of small molecules to communicate through intercellular signaling. The small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal [PQS]) is one of these signals and its synthesis is important for virulence. Previously, we identified an RpiR-type transcriptional regulator, QapR, that positively affects PQS production by repressing the qapR operon. An in-frame deletion of thi...

  18. ANOMALOUS BLUE COLOURING OF MOZZARELLA CHEESE INTENTIONALLY CONTAMINATED WITH PIGMENT PRODUCING STRAINS OF PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Sechi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2010 a large outbreak of anomalous blue coloration of mozzarella cheese was recorded in Italy and some northern European countries. Official laboratory analysis and health authorities linked the outbreak to the contamination of processing water with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens, although several expert raised the question of how to unequivocally link the blue coloring to the presence of the micro-organism. In an attempt to set-up a method to determine whether a given Pseudomonas spp. strain is responsible of the defect, an in vitro system for the evaluation of blue colouring of mozzarella cheese intentionally contaminated with strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens. was developed The system is aimed to ascertain whether P. fluorescens strains, isolated from mozzarella cheese with anomalous blue coloration, are able to reproduce the blue coloration under controlled experimental condition. 96 trials of experimental inoculation of mozzarella cheese in different preservation liquids, were conducted using various suspension of Pseudomonas spp. (P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, P. fluorescens CFBP 3150, one P. fluorescens field strain isolated from blue-colored mozzarella cheese and P. aeruginosa ATCC 10145 as positive control at different concentrations and incubated at different temperatures. Growth curve of all Pseudomonas spp. strains tested demonstrated that after three days of incubation the concentration was generally higher than 106 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in Tryptic Soy Broth (TSB, and higher than 105 CFU/g of mozzarella cheese incubated in preservation liquid. All mozzarella cheeses inoculated with the field strain of Pseudomonas fluorescens showed the characteristic anomalous blue coloration, which is often associated with Pseudomonas fluorescens contamination of water used during mozzarella cheesemaking. With the proposed system, which enabled a considerable amount of samples to be analysed under controlled experimental

  19. Identification of small molecule inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S using a yeast phenotypic screen.

    OpenAIRE

    Anthony Arnoldo; Jasna Curak; Saranya Kittanakom; Igor Chevelev; Vincent T Lee; Mehdi Sahebol-Amri; Becky Koscik; Lana Ljuma; Peter J Roy; Antonio Bedalov; Guri Giaever; Corey Nislow; A Rod Merrill; Stephen Lory; Igor Stagljar

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that is a key factor in the mortality of cystic fibrosis patients, and infection represents an increased threat for human health worldwide. Because resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to antibiotics is increasing, new inhibitors of pharmacologically validated targets of this bacterium are needed. Here we demonstrate that a cell-based yeast phenotypic assay, combined with a large-scale inhibitor screen, identified small molecule inhibi...

  20. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients Referring to Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Zeynab Golshani; Ali Mohammad Ahadi; Ali Sharifzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this article as: Golshani Z, Ahadi AM, Sharifzadeh A. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Pattern of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients Referring to Hospitals. Arch Hyg Sci 2012;1(2):48-53. Abstract: Background & Aims of the Study: The aim of this study was to detect and survey the antibiotic resistance pattern of Pseudomonas (P.) aeruginosa isolated from patients in Isfahan (located in central Iran) hospitals. Materials & Methods : A Total of 50 clinical isola...

  1. An rpoD gene sequence based evaluation of cultured Pseudomonas diversity on different growth media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghyselinck, Jonas; Coorevits, An; Van Landschoot, Anita; Samyn, Emly; Heylen, Kim; De Vos, Paul

    2013-10-01

    The last decade has shown an increased interest in the utilization of bacteria for applications ranging from bioremediation to wastewater purification and promotion of plant growth. In order to extend the current number of micro-organism mediated applications, a continued quest for new agents is required. This study focused on the genus Pseudomonas, which is known to harbour strains with a very diverse set of interesting properties. The aim was to identify growth media that allow retrieval of a high Pseudomonas diversity, as such increasing the chance of isolating isolates with beneficial properties. Three cultivation media: trypticase soy agar (TSA), potato dextrose agar (PDA) and Pseudomonas isolation agar (PIA) were evaluated for their abilities to grow Pseudomonas strains. TSA and PDA were found to generate the largest Pseudomonas diversity. However, communities obtained with both media overlapped. Communities obtained with PIA, on the other hand, were unique. This indicated that the largest diversity is obtained by sampling from either PDA or TSA and from PIA in parallel. To evaluate biodiversity of the isolated Pseudomonas members on the media, an appropriate biomarker had to be identified. Hence, an introductory investigation of the taxonomic resolution of the 16S rRNA, rpoD, gyrB and rpoB genes was performed. The rpoD gene sequences not only had a high phylogenetic content and the highest taxonomic resolution amongst the genes investigated, it also had a gene phylogeny that related well with that of the 16S rRNA gene.

  2. Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy to inhibit pseudomonas aeruginosa of corneal isolates (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durkee, Heather A.; Relhan, Nidhi; Arboleda, Alejandro; Halili, Francisco; De Freitas, Carolina; Alawa, Karam; Aguilar, Mariela C.; Amescua, Guillermo; Miller, Darlene; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-03-01

    Keratitis associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is difficult to manage. Treatment includes antibiotic eye drops, however, some strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa are resistant. Current research efforts are focused on finding alternative and adjunct therapies to treat multi-drug resistant bacteria. One promising alternate technique is photodynamic therapy (PDT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of riboflavin- and rose bengal-mediated PDT on Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis isolates in vitro. Two isolates (S+U- and S-U+) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were derived from keratitis patients and exposed to five experimental groups: (1) Control (dark, UV-A irradiation, 525nm irradiation); (2) 0.1% riboflavin (dark, UV-A irradiation); and (3) 0.1% rose bengal, (4) 0.05% rose bengal and (5) 0.01% rose bengal (dark, 525nm irradiation). Three days after treatment, in dark conditions of all concentration of riboflavin and rose bengal showed no inhibition in both S+U- and S-U+ strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In 0.1% and 0.05% rose bengal irradiated groups, for both S+U- and S-U+ strains, there was complete inhibition of bacterial growth in the central 50mm zone corresponding to the diameter of the green light source. These in vitro results suggest that rose bengal photodynamic therapy may be an effective adjunct treatment for Pseudomonas aeruginosa keratitis.

  3. Pseudomonas kribbensis sp. nov., isolated from garden soils in Daejeon, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong-Ho; Rhee, Moon-Soo; Kim, Ji-Sun; Lee, Yookyung; Park, Mi Young; Kim, Haseong; Lee, Seung-Goo; Kim, Byoung-Chan

    2016-11-01

    Two bacterial strains, 46-1 and 46-2(T), were isolated from garden soil. These strains were observed to be aerobic, Gram-stain negative, rod-shaped, non-spore-forming, motile and catalase and oxidase positive. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the two strains shared 100 % sequence similarity with each other and belong to the genus Pseudomonas in the class Gammaproteobacteria. The concatenated 16S rRNA, gyrB, rpoB and rpoD gene sequences further confirmed that the isolates belong to the Pseudomonas koreensis subgroup (SG), with P. koreensis Ps 9-14(T), Pseudomonas moraviensis 1B4(T) and Pseudomonas granadensis F-278,770(T) as their close relatives (>96 % pairwise similarity). DNA-DNA hybridization with the closely related type strain P. koreensis SG revealed a low level of relatedness (15 %) in the isolates but it was a minor component (Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas kribbensis sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is 46-2(T) (=KCTC 32541(T) = DSM 100278(T)).

  4. METABOLIC PECULIARITIES AT EXPERIMENTAL GENERALIZED PROCESS CAUSED BY PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov М. М.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available System of free radical oxidation is a non-specific link of most of pathologic processes formation in organism. Enzimological studies allowing the definition of both organospecific violations and the state of biological membranes are of great interest in complex approach to the estimation of structural and metabolic peculiarities of organism in conditions of inflammatory pathology. Thus the purpose of the given study is the definition of metabolic state peculiarities at experimental generalized process caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. According to the results of the carried out studies the activity of the processes of lipids peroxidation in myocardium of infected animals rises: the content of MDA and DC is increased in comparison with intact animals while SH-groups content and catalase activity are decreased, i.e. the oxidative stress takes place in myocardium of infected animals which leads to energy-hungry state process which is also proved by AF – enzyme activity increase which implements hydrolysis of monophosphoric esteris and LDH – enzyme of anaerobic glуcolysis. Activity of AsAT, AlAT and γ-GTP is reliably higher which proves about the activation of protein biosynthesis into tissues which is connected with accelerated enzyme synthesis under the influence of inflammation mediators, i.e. compensatory reaction activation takes place. The similar picture is found in kidneys and liver: LPO under insufficiency of AOS, power-hungry state. The level of МСВ – integrated indicator of intoxication as well as LPO products grows in blood of infected experimental animals which proves about high level of inflammatory process and organism intoxication. Increasing of protein concentration of acute phase – haptoglobulin – also proves about high level of inflammatory process. High activity of LDG (cytoplasmatic enzyme proves about cytoplasmic membranes injury. The decrease of catalase activity and level of SH-groups of blood are found in

  5. A Direct Quantitative Agar-Plate Based Assay for Analysis of Pseudomonas protegens PF-5 Degradation of Polyurethane Films (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-02

    activity in Pseudomonas fluorescens CHA0. Mol. Plant - Microbe . Interact . 25, 1440e1449. Yang, X., Wang, S., Zhou, L., 2012. Effect of carbon source, C... Interactions between the Pf-5 colonies and thin polyurethane (PU) coatings on ZnSe coupons were evaluated for degradation using infrared spectroscopy...Small (1 mm diameter) colonies of Pseudomonas protegens Pf-5 (formerly Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf-5) were used for this work. Interactions between

  6. Dermal Wound Transcriptomic Responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Rabbit Ear Wound Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Dermal wound transcriptomic responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model Kai P Leung Pt...with Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp.) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.o.) would indicate host responses associated with the worse healing of P.o. than Kp...responses to injection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  7. N-acetylcysteine inhibit biofilms produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Youning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common pathogen in chronic respiratory tract infections. It typically makes a biofilm, which makes treatment of these infections difficult. In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC on biofilms produced by P. aeruginosa. Results We found that minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs of NAC for most isolates of P. aeruginosa were 10 to 40 mg/ml, the combination of NAC and ciprofloxacin (CIP demonstrated either synergy (50% or no interaction (50% against the P. aeruginosa strains. NAC at 0.5 mg/ml could detach mature P. aeruginosa biofilms. Disruption was proportional to NAC concentrations, and biofilms were completely disrupted at 10 mg/ml NAC. Analysis using COMSTAT software also showed that PAO1 biofilm biomass decreased and its heterogeneity increased as NAC concentration increased. NAC and ciprofloxacin showed significant killing of P. aeruginosa in biofilms at 2.5 mg/ml and > 2 MIC, respectively (p p P. aeruginosa also decreased by 27.64% and 44.59% at NAC concentrations of 0.5 mg/ml and 1 mg/ml. Conclusions NAC has anti-bacterial properties against P. aeruginosa and may detach P. aeruginosa biofilms. Use of NAC may be a new strategy for the treatment of biofilm-associated chronic respiratory infections due to P. aeruginosa, although it would be appropriate to conduct clinical studies to confirm this.

  8. Surface Sensing for Biofilm Formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Yi Chang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aggregating and forming biofilms on biotic or abiotic surfaces are ubiquitous bacterial behaviors under various conditions. In clinical settings, persistent presence of biofilms increases the risks of healthcare-associated infections and imposes huge healthcare and economic burdens. Bacteria within biofilms are protected from external damage and attacks from the host immune system and can exchange genomic information including antibiotic-resistance genes. Dispersed bacterial cells from attached biofilms on medical devices or host tissues may also serve as the origin of further infections. Understanding how bacteria develop biofilms is pertinent to tackle biofilm-associated infections and transmission. Biofilms have been suggested as a continuum of growth modes for adapting to different environments, initiating from bacterial cells sensing their attachment to a surface and then switching cellular physiological status for mature biofilm development. It is crucial to understand bacterial gene regulatory networks and decision-making processes for biofilm formation upon initial surface attachment. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the model microorganisms for studying bacterial population behaviors. Several hypotheses and studies have suggested that extracellular macromolecules and appendages play important roles in bacterial responses to the surface attachment. Here, I review recent studies on potential molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways for P. aeruginosa surface sensing.

  9. Pyoverdine, the Major Siderophore in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Evades NGAL Recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Peek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen that persists in the cystic fibrosis lungs. Bacteria such as P. aeruginosa secrete siderophores (iron-chelating molecules and the host limits bacterial growth by producing neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL that specifically scavenges bacterial siderophores, therefore preventing bacteria from establishing infection. P. aeruginosa produces a major siderophore known as pyoverdine, found to be important for bacterial virulence and biofilm development. We report that pyoverdine did not bind to NGAL, as measured by tryptophan fluorescence quenching, while enterobactin bound to NGAL effectively causing a strong response. The experimental data indicate that pyoverdine evades NGAL recognition. We then employed a molecular modeling approach to simulate the binding of pyoverdine to human NGAL using NGAL’s published crystal structures. The docking of pyoverdine to NGAL predicted nine different docking positions; however, neither apo- nor ferric forms of pyoverdine docked into the ligand-binding site in the calyx of NGAL where siderophores are known to bind. The molecular modeling results offer structural support that pyoverdine does not bind to NGAL, confirming the results obtained in the tryptophan quenching assay. The data suggest that pyoverdine is a stealth siderophore that evades NGAL recognition allowing P. aeruginosa to establish chronic infections in CF lungs.

  10. Effect of methylglyoxal on multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko eHayashi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Honey has a complex chemistry, and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity varies with floral source, climate, and harvesting conditions. Methylglyoxal was identified as the dominant antibacterial component of manuka honey. Although it has been known that methylglyoxal has antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus, there is not much information describing its activity against gram-negative bacteria. In this study, we report the effect of methylglyoxal against multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MDRP using 53 clinically isolated strains. We also assessed the effect of deleting the five multidrug efflux systems in P. aeruginosa, as well as the efflux systems in Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, on MICs of methylglyoxal. Our results indicate that methylglyoxal inhibits the growth of MDRP at concentrations of 128–512 µg/ml (1.7–7.1 mM and is not recognized by drug efflux systems.

  11. [Cervical lymphoadenopathy due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa following mesotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaladi, Ali Muftah; Crestani, Francesco; Bocchi, Anna; Saltari, Maria Rita; Piva, Bruno; Tartari, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Mesotherapy is a treatment method devised for controlling several diseases by means of subcutaneous microinjections given at or around the affected areas at short time intervals. It is used to treat a variety of medical conditions, amongst which all orthopaedic diseases and rheumatic pain. Mesotherapy is especially indicated for neck pain. The mechanism of action is twofold: a pharmacological effect due to the drug administered, and a reflexogenic effect, the skin containing many nerve endings that are sensitive to the mechanical action of the needle. Although this therapy is safe, like any other medical intervention it cannot be considered free of complications that may occur, such as allergies, haematomas, bruising, wheals, granulomas and telangiectasias. Infective complications are also possible, due to pathogenic bacteria that are inoculated through contamination of products, of the materials used for the procedure or even from germs on the skin. We present the case of a patient who had cervical lymphadenopathy due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa after mesotherapy treatment for neck pain.

  12. Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa: an alternative model for bacterial cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, G P; Laurie, J I; Ferreira, L M; Gilbert, H J

    1992-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, a Gram-negative soil bacterium, can utilize crystalline cellulose or xylan as main sources of carbon and energy. Synthesis of endoglucanases and xylanases is induced by Avicel, filter paper, carboxymethylcellulose or xylan and is repressed by cellobiose, glucose or xylose. These enzymes are secreted into the culture supernatant fluid and do not form aggregates or associate with the cell surface. Cells of Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa do not adhere to cellulose. In cultures containing Avicel or filter paper, a significant proportion of the secreted cellulase and xylanase activities becomes tightly bound to the insoluble cellulose. Western blotting has revealed that endoglucanase B, xylanase A and a cellodextrinase encoded by genes previously isolated from Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and expressed in Escherichia coli, are synthesized by the pseudomonad under a variety of conditions. These enzymes appear to be post-translationally modified, probably through glycosylation. Overall, it appears that the cellulase/hemicellulase system of Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa differs from the model established for celluloytic anaerobes such as Clostridium thermocellum.

  13. Ginger Extract Inhibits Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Shin; Park, Hee-Deung

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation can cause serious problems in clinical and industrial settings, which drives the development or screening of biofilm inhibitors. Some biofilm inhibitors have been screened from natural products or modified from natural compounds. Ginger has been used as a medicinal herb to treat infectious diseases for thousands of years, which leads to the hypothesis that it may contain chemicals inhibiting biofilm formation. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated ginger’s ability to inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm formation. A static biofilm assay demonstrated that biofilm development was reduced by 39–56% when ginger extract was added to the culture. In addition, various phenotypes were altered after ginger addition of PA14. Ginger extract decreased production of extracellular polymeric substances. This finding was confirmed by chemical analysis and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, ginger extract formed noticeably less rugose colonies on agar plates containing Congo red and facilitated swarming motility on soft agar plates. The inhibition of biofilm formation and the altered phenotypes appear to be linked to a reduced level of a second messenger, bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate. Importantly, ginger extract inhibited biofilm formation in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Also, surface biofilm cells formed with ginger extract detached more easily with surfactant than did those without ginger extract. Taken together, these findings provide a foundation for the possible discovery of a broad spectrum biofilm inhibitor. PMID:24086697

  14. Bacteriocins and the assembly of natural Pseudomonas fluorescens populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, J B; West, S A; Griffin, A S

    2017-02-01

    When competing for space and resources, bacteria produce toxins known as bacteriocins to gain an advantage over competitors. Recent studies in the laboratory have confirmed theoretical predictions that bacteriocin production can determine coexistence, by eradicating sensitive competitors or driving the emergence of resistant genotypes. However, there is currently limited evidence that bacteriocin-mediated competition influences the coexistence and distribution of genotypes in natural environments, and what factors drive interactions towards inhibition remain unclear. Using natural soil populations of Pseudomonas fluorescens, we assessed the ability of the isolates to inhibit one another with respect to spatial proximity in the field, genetic similarity and niche overlap. The majority of isolates were found to produce bacteriocins; however, widespread resistance between coexisting isolates meant relatively few interactions resulted in inhibition. When inhibition did occur, it occurred more frequently between ecologically similar isolates. However, in contrast with results from other natural populations, we found no relationship between the frequency of inhibition and the genetic similarity of competitors. Our results suggest that bacteriocin production plays an important role in mediating competition over resources in natural settings and, by selecting for isolates resistant to local bacteriocin production, can influence the assembly of natural populations of P. fluorescens. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  15. PA3297 Counteracts Antimicrobial Effects of Azithromycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Hao eTan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes acute and chronic infections in human. Its increasing resistance to antibiotics requires alternative treatments that are more effective than available strategies. Among the alternatives is the unconventional usage of conventional antibiotics, of which the macrolide antibiotic azithromycin (AZM provides a paradigmatic example. AZM therapy is associated with a small but consistent improvement in respiratory function of cystic fibrosis (CF patients suffering from chronic P. aeruginosa infection. Besides immunomodulating activities, AZM represses bacterial genes involved in virulence, quorum sensing, biofilm formation, and motility, all of which are due to stalling of ribosome and depletion of cellular tRNA pool. However, how P. aeruginosa responds to and counteracts the effects of AZM remain elusive. Here we found that deficiency of PA3297, a gene encoding a DEAH-box helicase, intensified AZM-mediated bacterial killing, suppression of pyocyanin production and swarming motility, and hypersusceptibility to hydrogen peroxide. We demonstrated that expression of PA3297 is induced by the interaction between AZM and ribosome. Importantly, mutation of PA3297 resulted in elevated levels of unprocessed 23S-5S rRNA in the presence of AZM, which might lead to increased susceptibility to AZM-mediated effects. Our results revealed one of the bacterial responses in counteracting the detrimental effects of AZM.

  16. Production of Poly-β-Hydroxyalkanoic Acid by Pseudomonas cepacia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, Bruce A.; Ramsay, Juliana A.; Cooper, David G.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of using the nutritionally versatile bacterium Pseudomonas cepacia to produce poly-β-hydroxyalkanoic acid was evaluated. Chemostat culture showed that growth of P. cepacia became nitrogen limited when the molar carbon-to-nitrogen ratio of the medium fed into the fermentor was above 15. When grown under nitrogen limitation in batch culture with fructose as the sole source of carbon, P. cepacia accumulated poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) in excess of 50% of the dry weight of its biomass. In batch culture, almost no PHB was produced until the onset of nitrogen limitation. After this point, PHB was produced at a linear rate of 0.12 g liter−1 h−1 (from a constant value of 1.6 g of cellular protein liter−1). PHB produced by P. cepacia had a weight-average molecular weight of 5.37 × 105 g mol−1 and a polydispersivity index of 3.9. Poly(β-hydroxybutyric acid-β-hydroxyvaleric acid) copolymer was produced with a poly-β-hydroxybutyric acid-poly-β-hydroxyvaleric acid ratio of up to 30% by weight when propionic acid was added to the medium. PMID:16347867

  17. Biofilm Formation Characteristics of Pseudomonas lundensis Isolated from Meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Ji; Xie, Jing; Zhao, Li-Jun; Qian, Yun-Fang; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Xiao

    2015-12-01

    Biofilms formations of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria on food or food contact surfaces have attracted increasing attention. These events may lead to a higher risk of food spoilage and foodborne disease transmission. While Pseudomonas lundensis is one of the most important bacteria that cause spoilage in chilled meat, its capability for biofilm formation has been seldom reported. Here, we investigated biofilm formation characteristics of P. lundensis mainly by using crystal violet staining, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The swarming and swimming motility, biofilm formation in different temperatures (30, 10, and 4 °C) and the protease activity of the target strain were also assessed. The results showed that P. lundensis showed a typical surface-associated motility and was quite capable of forming biofilms in different temperatures (30, 10, and 4 °C). The strain began to adhere to the contact surfaces and form biofilms early in the 4 to 6 h. The biofilms began to be formed in massive amounts after 12 h at 30 °C, and the extracellular polysaccharides increased as the biofilm structure developed. Compared with at 30 °C, more biofilms were formed at 4 and 10 °C even by a low bacterial density. The protease activity in the biofilm was significantly correlated with the biofilm formation. Moreover, the protease activity in biofilm was significantly higher than that of the corresponding planktonic cultures after cultured 12 h at 30 °C. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A dynamic and intricate regulatory network determines Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Schneper, Lisa; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically versatile bacterium that is found in a wide range of biotic and abiotic habitats. It is a major human opportunistic pathogen causing numerous acute and chronic infections. The critical traits contributing to the pathogenic potential of P. aeruginosa are the production of a myriad of virulence factors, formation of biofilms and antibiotic resistance. Expression of these traits is under stringent regulation, and it responds to largely unidentified environmental signals. This review is focused on providing a global picture of virulence gene regulation in P. aeruginosa. In addition to key regulatory pathways that control the transition from acute to chronic infection phenotypes, some regulators have been identified that modulate multiple virulence mechanisms. Despite of a propensity for chaotic behaviour, no chaotic motifs were readily observed in the P. aeruginosa virulence regulatory network. Having a ‘birds-eye’ view of the regulatory cascades provides the forum opportunities to pose questions, formulate hypotheses and evaluate theories in elucidating P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms involved in making P. aeruginosa a successful pathogen is essential in helping devise control strategies. PMID:23143271

  20. Mechanisms of phagocytosis and host clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovewell, Rustin R.; Patankar, Yash R.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for a high incidence of acute and chronic pulmonary infection. These infections are particularly prevalent in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis: much of the morbidity and pathophysiology associated with these diseases is due to a hypersusceptibility to bacterial infection. Innate immunity, primarily through inflammatory cytokine production, cellular recruitment, and phagocytic clearance by neutrophils and macrophages, is the key to endogenous control of P. aeruginosa infection. In this review, we highlight recent advances toward understanding the innate immune response to P. aeruginosa, with a focus on the role of phagocytes in control of P. aeruginosa infection. Specifically, we summarize the cellular and molecular mechanisms of phagocytic recognition and uptake of P. aeruginosa, and how current animal models of P. aeruginosa infection reflect clinical observations in the context of phagocytic clearance of the bacteria. Several notable phenotypic changes to the bacteria are consistently observed during chronic pulmonary infections, including changes to mucoidy and flagellar motility, that likely enable or reflect their ability to persist. These traits are likewise examined in the context of how the bacteria avoid phagocytic clearance, inflammation, and sterilizing immunity. PMID:24464809

  1. Macrolides protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection via inhibition of inflammasomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Li-Chao; Lin, Jie-Lu; Yang, Jia-Wei; Mao, Bei; Lu, Hai-Wen; Ge, Bao-Xue; Choi, Augustine M K; Xu, Jin-Fu

    2017-10-01

    Macrolides antibiotics have been effectively used in many chronic diseases, especially with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) infection. The mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effects of macrolides in these diseases remain poorly understood. We established a mouse model of chronic lung infection using P. aeruginosa agar-beads, with azithromycin treatment or placebo. Lung injury, bacterial clearance, and inflammasome-related proteins were measured. In vitro, the inflammasomes activation induced by flagellin or ATP were assessed in LPS-primed macrophages with or without macrolides treatment. Plasma IL-18 levels were determined from patients who were diagnosed with bronchiectasis isolated with or without P. aeruginosa and treated with azithromycin for 3-5 days. Azithromycin treatment enhanced bacterial clearance and attenuated lung injury in mice chronically infected with P. aeruginosa, which resulted from the inhibition of caspase-1-dependent IL-1β and IL-18 secretion. In vitro, azithromycin and erythromycin inhibited NLRC4 and NLRP3 inflammasomes activation. Plasma IL-18 levels were higher in bronchiectasis patients with P. aeruginosa isolation compared with healthy controls. Azithromycin administration markedly decreased IL-18 secretion in bronchiectasis patients. The results of this study reveal that azithromycin and erythromycin exert a novel anti-inflammatory effect by attenuating inflammasomes activation, which suggests potential treatment options for inflammasome-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in premise plumbing of large buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédard, Emilie; Prévost, Michèle; Déziel, Eric

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that is widely occurring in the environment and is recognized for its capacity to form or join biofilms. The present review consolidates current knowledge on P. aeruginosa ecology and its implication in healthcare facilities premise plumbing. The adaptability of P. aeruginosa and its capacity to integrate the biofilm from the faucet and the drain highlight the role premise plumbing devices can play in promoting growth and persistence. A meta-analysis of P. aeruginosa prevalence in faucets (manual and electronic) and drains reveals the large variation in device positivity reported and suggest the high variability in the sampling approach and context as the main reason for this variation. The effects of the operating conditions that prevail within water distribution systems (disinfection, temperature, and hydraulic regime) on the persistence of P. aeruginosa are summarized. As a result from the review, recommendations for proactive control measures of water contamination by P. aeruginosa are presented. A better understanding of the ecology of P. aeruginosa and key influencing factors in premise plumbing are essential to identify culprit areas and implement effective control measures. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Genetic and Functional Diversity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Joseph S.; Taylor, Véronique L.; Islam, Salim T.; Hao, Youai; Kocíncová, Dana

    2011-01-01

    Lipopolysccharide (LPS) is an integral component of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa cell envelope, occupying the outer leaflet of the outer membrane in this Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen. It is important for bacterium–host interactions and has been shown to be a major virulence factor for this organism. Structurally, P. aeruginosa LPS is composed of three domains, namely, lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and the distal O antigen (O-Ag). Most P. aeruginosa strains produce two distinct forms of O-Ag, one a homopolymer of D-rhamnose that is a common polysaccharide antigen (CPA, formerly termed A band), and the other a heteropolymer of three to five distinct (and often unique dideoxy) sugars in its repeat units, known as O-specific antigen (OSA, formerly termed B band). Compositional differences in the O units among the OSA from different strains form the basis of the International Antigenic Typing Scheme for classification via serotyping of different strains of P. aeruginosa. The focus of this review is to provide state-of-the-art knowledge on the genetic and resultant functional diversity of LPS produced by P. aeruginosa. The underlying factors contributing to this diversity will be thoroughly discussed and presented in the context of its contributions to host–pathogen interactions and the control/prevention of infection. PMID:21687428

  4. Characterization of environmental Pseudomonas aeruginosa using multilocus sequence typing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radó, Júlia; Kaszab, Edit; Petrovics, Tünde; Pászti, Judit; Kriszt, Balázs; Szoboszlay, Sándor

    2017-10-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine environmental (hydrocarbon degrading) Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with Multilocus Sequence Typing (MLST) and to determine their relevant features, such as serotype, virulence genes, biofilm forming ability and hydrocarbon degrading capacity. The diversity of environmental isolates was assessed with an MLST scheme. Investigation of virulence determinants included serotyping, hemolytic activity test and the detection of virulence genes exoS, exoY, exoT, exoU, exoA. Biofilm forming ability was examined in a modified microtiter assay, hydrocarbon degrading capacity was determined with gravimetric methods. The majority of environmental isolates shared the same MLST profiles with isolates of cystic fibrosis (CF). Virulence patterns and serotypes were slightly connected to the phylogenetic localization, but further clinically important features such as antibiotic resistance were not. At least one of the examined environmental isolates was multidrug-resistant, virulent and had biofilm forming ability such as nosocomial P. aeruginosa and retained its hydrocarbon degradation ability. The current theses that distinguish isolates originating from different sources are questionable; environmental P. aeruginosa can be a potential risk to public health and cannot be excluded as an external (non-nosocomial) source of infections, especially in patients with CF. Further studies such as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and the determination of other clinically important virulence factors are needed to confirm these findings.

  5. Rapid diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa urinary tract infections by radioimmunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, R B; Wheat, L J; White, A

    1979-01-01

    A solid-phase radioimmunoassay designed to detect serotype 6 Pseudomonas aeruginosa antigens was evaluated for its ability to rapidly diagnose urinary tract infections. Twelve P. aeruginosa serotypes were easily differentiated in the assay from eight other gram-negative bacterial species. During log-phase growth, the assay detected antigens in culture when approximately 10(6) or more serotype 6 P. aeruginosa organisms were present. Both cell-associated and solubilized antigens were detected. The assay detected antigens in 13 of 17 urine specimens which grew greater than 10(5) P. aeruginosa, 3 of 38 which grew other gram-negative rods, and none of 83 with no growth. Two of the three positive specimens from the other gram-negative rod group probably also contained P. aeruginosa. No preincubation of the urine specimens was required, and results were available within 2.5 h. The assay represents an improvement over other procedures for rapidly diagnosing urinary tract infections in that it allows diagnosis by species and should be adaptable to semiautomation. PMID:107191

  6. Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Charcot arthropathy of the foot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illgner, Ulrich; Uekoetter, Andreas; Runge, Sabrina; Wetz, Hans Henning

    2013-02-01

    Patients with Charcot arthropathy present a high risk for ulcers with secondary bone infection. Infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa represent a severe threat to the patients. We hypothesized that infections with P aeruginosa result in a longer stay in hospital and more operations than infections with other bacteria. All patients who underwent surgery for Charcot arthropathy of the feet between 1996 and 2006 (n = 205) in our clinic were included. The duration of hospitalization and number of surgeries for infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) versus P aeruginosa were compared to infections with other bacteria. All patients were scanned for MRSA and were isolated when tested positive and treated according to a defined algorithm. Seventy-nine intraoperative samples exhibited bacterial growth: 12 cases of MRSA, 14 cases of P aeruginosa, and 53 case of other bacteria. Patients with deep infections due to P aeruginosa stayed significantly longer in the hospital (52 vs 35 days, P < .041) and needed significantly more surgery (1.71 vs 1.28 surgeries, P < .027). There was no significant difference between patients with MRSA infections and those without MRSA or P aeruginosa. Infections with P aeruginosa resulted in more surgeries and a longer stay in the hospital. Early debridement is the basic treatment. A specific algorithm for isolation and operative and antibiotic treatment for P aeruginosa infections is proposed similar to an algorithm for MRSA that has been shown to be successful. Level IV, retrospective case Series.

  7. Plant-expressed pyocins for control of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Šarūnas Paškevičius

    Full Text Available The emergence, persistence and spread of antibiotic-resistant human pathogenic bacteria heralds a growing global health crisis. Drug-resistant strains of gram-negative bacteria, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are especially dangerous and the medical and economic burden they impose underscore the critical need for finding new antimicrobials. Recent studies have demonstrated that plant-expressed bacteriocins of the colicins family can be efficient antibacterials against all major enteropathogenic strains of E. coli. We extended our studies of colicin-like bacteriocins to pyocins, which are produced by strains of P. aeruginosa for ecological advantage against other strains of the same species. Using a plant-based transient expression system, we expressed six different pyocins, namely S5, PaeM, L1, L2, L3 and one new pyocin, PaeM4, and purified them to homogeneity. Among these pyocins, PaeM4 demonstrated the broadest spectrum of activity by controlling 53 of 100 tested clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. The activity of plant-made pyocins was confirmed in the agar drop, liquid culture susceptibility and biofilm assays, and in the Galleria mellonella animal infection model.

  8. Selection of DNA aptamers specific for live Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Soundy

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients, particular cystic fibrosis sufferers, burns victims, diabetics and neonates. It thrives in moist places where it forms biofilms that are exceedingly difficult to eradicate on hospital surfaces, in water supplies and implanted biomaterials. Using a live cell SELEX approach we selected DNA aptamers to P. aeruginosa grown as biofilms in microfluidic cells. From a pool of aptamer candidates showing tight binding a stem-loop structure was identified as being important for binding. Enhanced binding and increased specificity was achieved by truncating structures and generating chimeric aptamers from the pool of top candidates. The top candidates have low nanomolar binding constants and high discrimination for P. aeruginosa over other Gram-negative bacteria. The aptamers bind both planktonic grown and biofilm grown cells. They do not have intrinsic bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity, but are ideal candidates for modification for use as aptamer-drug conjugates and in biosensors.

  9. Biosurfactant Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Renewable Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavasi, R; Subramanyam Nambaru, V R M; Jayalakshmi, S; Balasubramanian, T; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2011-01-01

    This study deals with production and characterization of biosurfactant from renewable resources by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Biosurfactant production was carried out in 3L fermentor using waste motor lubricant oil and peanut oil cake. Maximum biomass (11.6 mg/ml) and biosurfactant production (8.6 mg/ml) occurred with peanut oil cake at 120 and 132 h respectively. Characterization of the biosurfactant revealed that, it is a lipopeptide with chemical composition of protein (50.2%) and lipid (49.8%). The biosurfactant (1 mg/ml) was able to emulsify waste motor lubricant oil, crude oil, peanut oil, kerosene, diesel, xylene, naphthalene and anthracene, comparatively the emulsification activity was higher than the activity found with Triton X-100 (1 mg/ml). Results obtained in the present study showed the possibility of biosurfactant production using renewable, relatively inexpensive and easily available resources. Emulsification activity found with the biosurfactant against different hydrocarbons showed its possible application in bioremediation of environments polluted with various hydrocarbons.

  10. Effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Buried Steel Pipeline Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spark, Amy J; Law, David W; Ward, Liam P; Cole, Ivan S; Best, Adam S

    2017-08-01

    Buried steel infrastructure can be a source of iron ions for bacterial species, leading to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Localized corrosion of pipelines due to MIC is one of the key failure mechanisms of buried steel pipelines. In order to better understand the mechanisms of localized corrosion in soil, semisolid agar has been developed as an analogue for soil. Here, Pseudomonas fluorescens has been introduced to the system to understand how bacteria interact with steel. Through electrochemical testing including open circuit potentials, potentiodynamic scans, anodic potential holds, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy it has been shown that P. fluorescens increases the rate of corrosion. Time for oxide and biofilms to develop was shown to not impact on the rate of corrosion but did alter the consistency of biofilm present and the viability of P. fluorescens following electrochemical testing. The proposed mechanism for increased corrosion rates of carbon steel involves the interactions of pyoverdine with the steel, preventing the formation of a cohesive passive layer, after initial cell attachment, followed by the formation of a metal concentration gradient on the steel surface.

  11. Biodegradation of acetochlor by a newly isolated Pseudomonas strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Gu, Qiuya; Chen, Wenting; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Duan, Zhibing; Yu, Xiaobin

    2015-05-01

    A novel microbial strain JD115 capable of degrading acetochlor was isolated from the sludge of acetochlor manufacture and was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa species. This strain was able to grow on acetochlor as the sole source of both carbon and nitrogen. The biodegradation of acetochlor by strain JD115 could be described either by the pseudo-first-order or by the second-order kinetics models, while the latter gave a better performance. The strain optimally degraded acetochlor at a pH value of 7.0 and a temperature of 37 °C. Additional nutriments could greatly enhance the degradation rate of acetochlor up to 95.4% in the presence of 50 mg acetochlor l(-1). The metabolite analyses by GC-MS presumed that catechol was an intermediate product of acetochlor, which was finally degraded for 5 days of incubation. This study highlights the potential use of this strain for the bioremediation of an acetochlor-polluted environment.

  12. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines that kill Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Yuen, Grace J; Saghatelian, Alan; Ausubel, Frederick M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches.

  13. Pseudomonas syringae Catalases Are Collectively Required for Plant Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ming; Block, Anna; Bryan, Crystal D.; Becker, Donald F.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 must detoxify plant-produced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in order to survive in its host plant. Candidate enzymes for this detoxification include the monofunctional catalases KatB and KatE and the bifunctional catalase-peroxidase KatG of DC3000. This study shows that KatG is the major housekeeping catalase of DC3000 and provides protection against menadione-generated endogenous H2O2. In contrast, KatB rapidly and substantially accumulates in response to exogenous H2O2. Furthermore, KatB and KatG have nonredundant roles in detoxifying exogenous H2O2 and are required for full virulence of DC3000 in Arabidopsis thaliana. Therefore, the nonredundant ability of KatB and KatG to detoxify plant-produced H2O2 is essential for the bacteria to survive in plants. Indeed, a DC3000 catalase triple mutant is severely compromised in its ability to grow in planta, and its growth can be partially rescued by the expression of katB, katE, or katG. Interestingly, our data demonstrate that although KatB and KatG are the major catalases involved in the virulence of DC3000, KatE can also provide some protection in planta. Thus, our results indicate that these catalases are virulence factors for DC3000 and are collectively required for pathogenesis. PMID:22797762

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence analyzed in a Dictyostelium discoideum host system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosson, Pierre; Zulianello, Laurence; Join-Lambert, Olivier; Faurisson, François; Gebbie, Leigh; Benghezal, Mohammed; Van Delden, Christian; Curty, Lasta Kocjancic; Köhler, Thilo

    2002-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important opportunistic pathogen that produces a variety of cell-associated and secreted virulence factors. P. aeruginosa infections are difficult to treat effectively because of the rapid emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains. In this study, we analyzed whether the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum can be used as a simple model system to analyze the virulence of P. aeruginosa strains. The virulent wild-type strain PAO1 was shown to inhibit growth of D. discoideum. Isogenic mutants deficient in the las quorum-sensing system were almost as inhibitory as the wild type, while rhl quorum-sensing mutants permitted growth of Dictyostelium cells. Therefore, in this model system, factors controlled by the rhl quorum-sensing system were found to play a central role. Among these, rhamnolipids secreted by the wild-type strain PAO1 could induce fast lysis of D. discoideum cells. By using this simple model system, we predicted that certain antibiotic-resistant mutants of P. aeruginosa should show reduced virulence. This result was confirmed in a rat model of acute pneumonia. Thus, D. discoideum could be used as a simple nonmammalian host system to assess pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa.

  15. Boolean models of biosurfactants production in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Richard

    Full Text Available Cyclolipopeptides (CLPs are biosurfactants produced by numerous Pseudomonas fluorescens strains. CLP production is known to be regulated at least by the GacA/GacS two-component pathway, but the full regulatory network is yet largely unknown. In the clinical strain MFN1032, CLP production is abolished by a mutation in the phospholipase C gene (plcC and not restored by plcC complementation. Their production is also subject to phenotypic variation. We used a modelling approach with Boolean networks, which takes into account all these observations concerning CLP production without any assumption on the topology of the considered network. Intensive computation yielded numerous models that satisfy these properties. All models minimizing the number of components point to a bistability in CLP production, which requires the presence of a yet unknown key self-inducible regulator. Furthermore, all suggest that a set of yet unexplained phenotypic variants might also be due to this epigenetic switch. The simplest of these Boolean networks was used to propose a biological regulatory network for CLP production. This modelling approach has allowed a possible regulation to be unravelled and an unusual behaviour of CLP production in P. fluorescens to be explained.

  16. [Iron uptake and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan; Ma, Luyan

    2017-09-25

    Biofilms are surface-associated communities of microorganisms embedded within self-secreted extracellular polymeric substances, and a major cause of chronic and persistent infections. Respiratory Pseudomona aeruginosa infection is the leading reason for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. The formation of biofilms by P. aeruginosa in the airway is thought to increase persistence and antibiotic resistance during infection. Biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa is regulated by complicated signaling systems including quorum sensing and two-component systems that control the synthesis of extracellular polymeric substances. Furthermore, iron is an essential and scarce nutrient for bacteria and an important signal factor. P. aeruginosa has developed multiple iron uptake systems to sequester enough iron for its survival, with important regulatory roles in both release of virulence factors and formation of biofilms. In this review, we summarize recent advances in biofilm formation and its regulation along with the iron-uptake strategies in P. aeruginosa, to provide new insights and understanding to fight bacterial biofilms.

  17. Electrochemical reduction of oxygen catalyzed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cournet, Amandine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France)] [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Berge, Mathieu; Roques, Christine [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, LU49, Adhesion bacterienne et formation de biofilms, 35 chemin des Maraichers, 31062 Toulouse Cedex 09 (France); Bergel, Alain [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France); Delia, Marie-Line, E-mail: marieline.delia@ensiacet.f [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique CNRS UMR5503, 4 allee Emile Monso, BP 84234, 31432 Toulouse Cedex 04 (France)

    2010-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has already been shown to catalyze oxidation processes in the anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell. The present study focuses on the reverse capacity of the bacterium, i.e. reduction catalysis. Here we show that P. aeruginosa is able to catalyze the electrochemical reduction of oxygen. The use of cyclic voltammetry showed that, for a given range of potential values, the current generated in the presence of bacteria could reach up to four times the current obtained without bacteria. The adhesion of bacteria to the working electrode was necessary for the catalysis to be observed but was not sufficient. The electron transfer between the working electrode and the bacteria did not involve mediator metabolites like phenazines. The transfer was by direct contact. The catalysis required a certain contact duration between electrodes and live bacteria but after this delay, the metabolic activity of cells was no longer necessary. Membrane-bound proteins, like catalase, may be involved. Various strains of P. aeruginosa, including clinical isolates, were tested and all of them, even catalase-defective mutants, presented the same catalytic property. P. aeruginosa offers a new model for the analysis of reduction catalysis and the protocol designed here may provide a basis for developing an interesting tool in the field of bacterial adhesion.

  18. EXAFS Study of Uranyl Complexation at Pseudomonas fluorescens Cell Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, R.; Bargar, J. R.; Tebo, B. M.

    2002-12-01

    Little is known about the roles of microbial biomass as a sink and source for uranium in contaminated aquifers, nor of the impact of bacterial biochemistry on uranium speciation in the subsurface. A significant role is implied by the high affinities of both Gram positive and Gram negative cells for binding uranyl (UO2{ 2+}). In the present study, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy was used to identify membrane functional groups involved in uranyl binding to the Gram negative bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens from pH 3 to pH 8. Throughout this pH-range, EXAFS spectra can be described primarily in terms of coordination of carboxylic groups to uranyl. U-C distances characteristic of 4-, 5- and 8- membered rings were observed, as well as the possibility of phosphato groups. Both shell-by-shell fits and principle component analyses indicate that the functional groups involved in binding of uranyl to the cell surface do not vary systematically across the pH range investigated. This result contrasts with EXAFS results of uranyl sorbed to Gram positive bacteria, and suggests an important role for long-chain carboxylate-terminated membrane functional groups in binding uranyl.

  19. Gallium induces the production of virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; Lira-Silva, Elizabeth; Jasso-Chávez, Ricardo; Coria-Jiménez, Rafael; Rangel-Vega, Adrián; Maeda, Toshinari; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-02-01

    The novel antimicrobial gallium is a nonredox iron III analogue with bacteriostatic and bactericidal properties, effective for the treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo in mouse and rabbit infection models. It interferes with iron metabolism, transport, and presumably its homeostasis. As gallium exerts its antimicrobial effects by competing with iron, we hypothesized that it ultimately will lead cells to an iron deficiency status. As iron deficiency promotes the expression of virulence factors in vitro and promotes the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa in animal models, it is anticipated that treatment with gallium will also promote the production of virulence factors. To test this hypothesis, the reference strain PA14 and two clinical isolates from patients with cystic fibrosis were exposed to gallium, and their production of pyocyanin, rhamnolipids, elastase, alkaline protease, alginate, pyoverdine, and biofilm was determined. Gallium treatment induced the production of all the virulence factors tested in the three strains except for pyoverdine. In addition, as the Ga-induced virulence factors are quorum sensing controlled, co-administration of Ga and the quorum quencher brominated furanone C-30 was assayed, and it was found that C-30 alleviated growth inhibition from gallium. Hence, adding both C-30 and gallium may be more effective in the treatment of P. aeruginosa infections. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with discrepant carbapenem susceptibility profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pragasam, Agila K; Raghanivedha, M; Anandan, Shalini; Veeraraghavan, Balaji

    2016-02-24

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common nosocomial pathogen, notorious for its multidrug resistance and causes life threatening infections. Carbapenems were considered as the last resort of drugs for the treatment of multi drug resistant P. aeruginosa infections. The emergence of resistance to carbapenems limits its use for treatment. Unlike other organisms, in P. aeruginosa intrinsic/chromosomal mediated resistance mechanisms plays a major role for carbapenem resistance rather than the carbapenemases. Carbapenemase producing organisms becomes resistant to both imipenem and meropenem. However, in our clinical settings, we have observed rare carbapenem resistant phenotypes such as imipenem resistant but meropenem susceptible (IRMS) and meropenem resistant but imipenem susceptible (MRIS) phenotypes. Thus we have chosen these rare phenotypes to look for the respective resistance mechanisms by phenotypic and molecular methods. From this study we found that, IRMS is primarily due to the mutations across various regions in the loops of oprD gene and MRIS is due to the over expression of mexAB efflux pumps. This study results confirms that, this rare phenotypes are due to the intrinsic/chromosomal mediated mechanisms, which occurred due to the antibiotic selection pressure. This study also provided data concerning alterations in outer membrane permeability which is often associated with the increased levels of antibiotic efflux. Consequently, this study provided the prevalence of the various resistance mechanisms that have deployed by the organism to resist antibiotics through different phenotypes.

  1. Pa0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Goble; Z Zhang; J Sauder; S Burley; S Swaminathan; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  2. Production and characterization of rhamnolipids from Pseudomonas aeruginosa san ai

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikalovic Milena G.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Production and characterization of rhamnolipid biosurfactant obtained by strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa san ai was investigated. With regard to carbon and nitrogen source several media were tested to enhance production of rhamnolipids. Phosphate-limited proteose peptone-ammonium salt (PPAS medium supplemented with sun flower oil as a source of carbon and mineral ammonium chloride and peptone as a nitrogen source greatly improved rhamnolipid production, from 0.15 on basic PPAS (C/N ratio 4.0, to 3 g L-1, on optimized PPAS medium (C/N ratio 7.7. Response surface methodology analysis was used for testing effect of three factors: temperature, concentration of carbon and nitrogen source (w/w, in optimized PPAS medium on rhamnolipid production. Isolated rhamnolipids were characterized by IR and ESI-MS. IR spectra confirmed that isolated compound corresponds to rhamnolipid structure, whereas MS indicated that isolated preparation is a mixture of mono-rhamno-mono-lipidic, mono-rhamno-di-lipidic- and dirhamno- di-lipidic congeners.

  3. PA0148 from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Catalyzes the Deamination of Adenine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goble, A.M.; Swaminathan, S.; Zhang, Z.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2011-08-02

    Four proteins from NCBI cog1816, previously annotated as adenosine deaminases, have been subjected to structural and functional characterization. Pa0148 (Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1), AAur1117 (Arthrobacter aurescens TC1), Sgx9403e, and Sgx9403g have been purified and their substrate profiles determined. Adenosine is not a substrate for any of these enzymes. All of these proteins will deaminate adenine to produce hypoxanthine with k{sub cat}/K{sub m} values that exceed 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These enzymes will also accept 6-chloropurine, 6-methoxypurine, N-6-methyladenine, and 2,6-diaminopurine as alternate substrates. X-ray structures of Pa0148 and AAur1117 have been determined and reveal nearly identical distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrels with a single zinc ion that is characteristic of members of the amidohydrolase superfamily. Structures of Pa0148 with adenine, 6-chloropurine, and hypoxanthine were also determined, thereby permitting identification of the residues responsible for coordinating the substrate and product.

  4. Pseudomonas deceptionensis DC5-mediated synthesis of extracellular silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jae H; Singh, Priyanka; Kim, Yeon J; Wang, Chao; Mathiyalagan, Ramya; Jin, Chi-Gyu; Yang, Deok C

    2016-09-01

    The biological synthesis of metal nanoparticles is of great interest in the field of nanotechnology. The present work highlights the extracellular biological synthesis of silver nanoparticles using Pseudomonas deceptionensis DC5. The particles were synthesized in the culture supernatant within 48 h of incubation. Extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles in the culture supernatant was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, which showed the absorption peak at 428 nm, and also under field emission transmission electron microscopy which displayed the spherical shape. In addition, the particles were characterized by X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, which corresponds to the crystalline nature of nanoparticles, and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis which exhibited the intense peak at 3 keV, resembling the silver nanoparticles. Further, the synthesized nanoparticles were examined by elemental mapping which displayed the dominance of the silver element in the synthesized product, and dynamic light scattering which showed the distribution of silver nanoparticles with respect to intensity, volume, and number of particles. Moreover, the silver nanoparticles have been found to be quite active in antimicrobial activity and biofilm inhibition activity against pathogenic microorganisms. Thus, the present work emphasized the prospect of using the P. deceptionensis DC5 to achieve the extracellular synthesis of silver nanoparticles in a facile and environmental manner.

  5. Novel polymeric nanoparticles targeting the lipopolysaccharides of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Y; Li, Z; Bi, Q; Deng, C; Chen, Z; Bhattachayya, S; Li, C

    2016-04-11

    Considering outburst of various infectious diseases globally, nanoparticle assisted targeted drug delivery has emerged as a promising strategy that can enhance the therapeutic efficacy and minimize the undesirable side effects of an antimicrobial agents. Molecular imprinting is a newly developed strategy that can synthesize a drug carrier with highly stable ligand-like 'cavity', may serve as a new platform of ligand-free targeted drug delivery systems. In this study, we use the amphiphilic lipopolysaccharides, derived from Pseudomonas aeruginosa as imprinting template and obtained an evenly distributed sub-40 nm polymeric nanoparticles by using inverse emulsion method. These molecularly imprinted nanoparticles (MIPNPs) showed specific binding to the lipopolysaccharide as determined by fluorescence polarization and microscale thermophoresis. MIPNPs showed selective recognition of target bacteria as detected by flow cytometry. Additionally, MIPNPs exhibited the in vivo targeting capabilities in both the keratitis model and meningitis model. Moreover, the photosensitizer methylene blue-loaded MIPNPs presented significantly strong inhibition of bacterial Growth, compared to non-imprinted controls for in vitro model of the photodynamic therapy. Our study shows an attempt to design a magic bullet by molecular imprinting that may provide a novel approach to generate synthetic carrier for targeting pathogen and treatment for a variety of infectious human diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Interactions between Neutrophils and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, Balázs

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects 70,000 patients worldwide. Morbidity and mortality in CF is largely caused by lung complications due to the triad of impaired mucociliary clearance, microbial infections and chronic inflammation. Cystic fibrosis airway inflammation is mediated by robust infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs, neutrophils). Neutrophils are not capable of clearing lung infections and contribute to tissue damage by releasing their dangerous cargo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen causing infections in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa is a main respiratory pathogen in CF infecting most patients. Although PMNs are key to attack and clear P. aeruginosa in immunocompetent individuals, PMNs fail to do so in CF. Understanding why neutrophils cannot clear P. aeruginosa in CF is essential to design novel therapies. This review provides an overview of the antimicrobial mechanisms by which PMNs attack and eliminate P. aeruginosa. It also summarizes current advances in our understanding of why PMNs are incapable of clearing P. aeruginosa and how this bacterium adapts to and resists PMN-mediated killing in the airways of CF patients chronically infected with P. aeruginosa. PMID:28282951

  7. [Characteristics of tetrahydrofuran degradation by Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu-Yang; Chen, Dong-Zhi; Jin, Xiao-Jun; Chen, Jian-Meng; He, Jie

    2011-01-01

    A tetrahydrofuran (THF)-degrading strain Pseudomonas oleovorans DT4 was isolated from the activated sludge of a pharmaceutical plant. P. oleovorans DT4 was able to utilize THF as the sole carbon and energy source under aerobic condition. 5 mmol/L of THF could be completely degraded by 3.2 mg/L inoculums of P. oleovorans DT4 in 14 h at pH 7.2 and 30 degrees C, with the cells concentration increasing to 188.6 mg/L. After the complete consumption of THF, no TOC could be detected but IC reached the stable value of about 46 mg/L, with pH decreasing to 6.54, which indicated that the substance was totally mineralized by P. oleovorans DT4. The optimum conditions for THF biodegradation in shaking flasks were pH 7.5 and temperature 37 degrees C, respectively. Results from the oxygen control experiments revealed that the oxygen supply by shaking was the satisfactory growth condition. Additionally, as the important elements for DT4, Mg2+ and Ca2+ at concentrations of 0.80 mmol/L and 0.20 mmol/L, respectively, were suitable for THF degradation. All the results contribute to the efficient bioremediation for the THF contaminated.

  8. MICROBIAL BIOFILMS PRODUCED BY PSEUDOMONAS FLUORESCENS ON SOLID SURFACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Kozelová

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 A biofilm is a complex aggregation of microorganisms growing on a solid substrate. Biofilms are characterized by structural heterogeneity, genetic diversity, complex community interactions, and an extracellular matrix of polymeric substances. The experimental part was focused on the adhesion of bacterial cells under static conditions and testing the effectiveness of disinfectants on created biofilm. In laboratory conditions we prepared and formed the bacterial biofilms Pseudomonas fluorescens in the four test surfaces of stainless steel, glass and plastic materials - PE (polyethylene and EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer. Over the next 72 hours and 72 hours were observed numbers of adhesion bacterial cells of P. fluorescens on solid surfaces of tested materials. The highest values adhesion cells reached P. fluorescens cells after 72 hours of cultivation on plastic surfaces, where  was increased in adhesion bacterial cells for EPDM in the values of 105 CFU/cm2 and for PE up to 106 CFU/cm2. The subsequent repeated 72-hour cultivation P. fluorescens was an increase (growth in the number of adhesion bacterial cells to all tested surfaces.doi:10.5219/18  

  9. In vitro antimicrobial activity of LED irradiation on Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Morena; Trentini, Paolo; Tripodi, Domenico; Spoto, Giuseppe; D'Ercole, Simonetta

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen responsible of many deaths due to nosocomial pneumonia each year. It is particularly resistant to many different classes of antibiotics and disinfectants. For all these reasons, there is the necessity to find novel approaches of treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 880nm light emitting diodes (LED) irradiation on P. aeruginosa, in vitro. Different LED irradiation parameters (time, energy output and the addition of methylene blue and chlorhexidine) have been tested in order to evaluate the effects on this bacterium. After treatment, the colony forming units per milliliter (CFU mL-1) were recorded and the data were submitted to ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests at a level of significance of 5%. A statistical significant reduction of bacterial count has been registered after 5min of LED irradiation. The antibacterial effect was directly proportional to irradiation time and the output energy. The pre-treatment with methylene blue, seems to be not effective against P. aeruginosa, independently from irradiation parameters. On the contrary, the contemporary action of LED and chlorhexidine has shown a great reduction of bacterial count that was statistical significant respect chlorhexidine and LED alone. The effect of LED irradiation was visible also after 24h, when a lower bacterial count characterized all irradiated samples respect controls. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pseudomonas putida CSV86: A Candidate Genome for Genetic Bioaugmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Vasundhara; Raju, Sajan C.; Modak, Arnab; Phale, Prashant S.; Purohit, Hemant J.

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida CSV86, a plasmid-free strain possessing capability to transfer the naphthalene degradation property, has been explored for its metabolic diversity through genome sequencing. The analysis of draft genome sequence of CSV86 (6.4 Mb) revealed the presence of genes involved in the degradation of naphthalene, salicylate, benzoate, benzylalcohol, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate on the chromosome thus ensuring the stability of the catabolic potential. Moreover, genes involved in the metabolism of phenylpropanoid and homogentisate, as well as heavy metal resistance, were additionally identified. Ability to grow on vanillin, veratraldehyde and ferulic acid, detection of inducible homogentisate dioxygenase and growth on aromatic compounds in the presence of heavy metals like copper, cadmium, cobalt and arsenic confirm in silico observations reflecting the metabolic versatility. In silico analysis revealed the arrangement of genes in the order: tRNAGly, integrase followed by nah operon, supporting earlier hypothesis of existence of a genomic island (GI) for naphthalene degradation. Deciphering the genomic architecture of CSV86 for aromatic degradation pathways and identification of elements responsible for horizontal gene transfer (HGT) suggests that genetic bioaugmentation strategies could be planned using CSV86 for effective bioremediation. PMID:24475028

  11. Biosurfactant production by Pseudomonas aeruginosain kefir and fish meal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Kaskatepe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to increase rhamnolipid production by formulating media using kefir and fish meal for Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from different environmental resources. The strains, named as H1, SY1, and ST1, capable of rhamnolipid production were isolated from soil contaminated with wastes originating from olive and fish oil factories. Additionally, P. aeruginosa ATCC 9027 strain, which is known as rhamnolipid producer, was included in the study. Initially, rhamnolipid production by the strains was determined in Mineral Salt Medium (MSM and then in media prepared by using kefir and fish meal. The obtained rhamnolipids were purified and quantified according to Dubois et al. (1956. The quantity of rhamnolipids of ATCC, H1 and SY1 strains in kefir media were determined as 11.7 g/L, 10.8 g/L and 3.2 g/L, respectively, and in fish meal media as 12.3 g/L, 9.3 g/L and 10.3 g/L, respectively. In addition, effect of UV light exposure on rhamnolipid production was also investigated but contrary a decrease was observed. The results indicate that P. aeruginosa strains isolated from various environmental resources used in this study can be important due to their rhamnolipid yield, and fish meal, which is obtained from waste of fish, can be an alternative source in low cost rhamnolipid production.

  12. Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi: some like it knot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Cayo; Matas, Isabel M; Bardaji, Leire; Aragón, Isabel M; Murillo, Jesús

    2012-12-01

    Pseudomonas savastanoi pv. savastanoi is the causal agent of olive (Olea europaea) knot disease and an unorthodox member of the P. syringae complex, causing aerial tumours instead of the foliar necroses and cankers characteristic of most members of this complex. Olive knot is present wherever olive is grown; although losses are difficult to assess, it is assumed that olive knot is one of the most important diseases of the olive crop. The last century witnessed a large number of scientific articles describing the biology, epidemiology and control of this pathogen. However, most P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi strains are highly recalcitrant to genetic manipulation, which has effectively prevented the pathogen from benefitting from the scientific progress in molecular biology that has elevated the foliar pathogens of the P. syringae complex to supermodels. A number of studies in recent years have made significant advances in the biology, ecology and genetics of P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi, paving the way for the molecular dissection of its interaction with other nonpathogenic bacteria and their woody hosts. The selection of a genetically pliable model strain was soon followed by the development of rapid methods for virulence assessment with micropropagated olive plants and the analysis of cellular interactions with the plant host. The generation of a draft genome of strain NCPPB 3335 and the closed sequence of its three native plasmids has allowed for functional and comparative genomic analyses for the identification of its pathogenicity gene complement. This includes 34 putative type III effector genes and genomic regions, shared with other pathogens of woody hosts, which encode metabolic pathways associated with the degradation of lignin-derived compounds. Now, the time is right to explore the molecular basis of the P. savastanoi pv. savastanoi-olive interaction and to obtain insights into why some pathovars like it necrotic and why some like it knot

  13. Atomic Structure of Type VI Contractile Sheath from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Osman; He, Shaoda; Planamente, Sara; Stach, Lasse; MacDonald, James T; Manoli, Eleni; Scheres, Sjors H W; Filloux, Alain; Freemont, Paul S

    2017-12-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa has three type VI secretion systems (T6SSs), H1-, H2-, and H3-T6SS, each belonging to a distinct group. The two T6SS components, TssB/VipA and TssC/VipB, assemble to form tubules that conserve structural/functional homology with tail sheaths of contractile bacteriophages and pyocins. Here, we used cryoelectron microscopy to solve the structure of the H1-T6SS P. aeruginosa TssB1C1 sheath at 3.3 Å resolution. Our structure allowed us to resolve some features of the T6SS sheath that were not resolved in the Vibrio cholerae VipAB and Francisella tularensis IglAB structures. Comparison with sheath structures from other contractile machines, including T4 phage and R-type pyocins, provides a better understanding of how these systems have conserved similar functions/mechanisms despite evolution. We used the P. aeruginosa R2 pyocin as a structural template to build an atomic model of the TssB1C1 sheath in its extended conformation, allowing us to propose a coiled-spring-like mechanism for T6SS sheath contraction. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Probenecid reduces infection and inflammation in acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wonnenberg, Bodo; Tschernig, Thomas; Voss, Meike; Bischoff, Markus; Meier, Carola; Schirmer, Stephan H; Langer, Frank; Bals, Robert; Beisswenger, Christoph

    2014-07-01

    The activation of inflammasome signaling mediates pathology of acute Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. This suggests that the inflammasome might represent a target to limit the pathological consequences of acute P. aeruginosa lung infection. Pannexin-1 (Px1) channels mediate the activation of caspase-1 and release of IL-1β induced by P2X7 receptor activation. The approved drug probenecid is an inhibitor of Px1 and ATP release. In this study, we demonstrate that probenecid reduces infection and inflammation in acute P. aeruginosa pneumonia. Treatment of mice prior to infection with P. aeruginosa resulted in an enhanced clearance of P. aeruginosa and reduced levels of inflammatory mediators, such as IL-1β. In addition, probenecid inhibited the release of inflammatory mediators in murine alveolar macrophages and human U937 cell-derived macrophages upon bacterial infection but not in human bronchial epithelial cells. Thus, Px1 blockade via probenecid treatment may be a therapeutic option in P. aeruginosa pneumonia by improving bacterial clearance and reducing negative consequences of inflammation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Arat

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2, nitric oxide (NO and nitrous oxide (N2O. This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2, nitrate (NO3, and phosphate (PO4 suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.

  16. Pyocyanin promotes extracellular DNA release in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Theerthankar; Manefield, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are both dependent on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) mainly composed of polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and extracellular DNA (eDNA). eDNA promotes biofilm establishment in a wide range of bacterial species. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is major component of biofilms and is essential for biofilm formation and stability. In this study we report that production of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PA14 batch cultures is responsible for promotion of eDNA release. A phzSH mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 that overproduces pyocyanin displayed enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) generation, cell lysis, and eDNA release in comparison to its wildtype strain. A ΔphzA-G mutant of P. aeruginosa PA14 deficient in pyocyanin production generated negligible amounts of H(2)O(2) and released less eDNA in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. Exogenous addition of pyocyanin or incubation with H(2)O(2) was also shown to promote eDNA release in low pyocyanin producing (PAO1) and pyocynain deficient (PA14) strains. Based on these data and recent findings in the biofilm literature, we propose that the impact of pyocyanin on biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa occurs via eDNA release through H(2)O(2) mediated cell lysis.

  17. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines that kill Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brent Cezairliyan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches.

  18. Identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenazines that Kill Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezairliyan, Brent; Vinayavekhin, Nawaporn; Grenfell-Lee, Daniel; Yuen, Grace J.; Saghatelian, Alan; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes employ a variety of methods to overcome host defenses, including the production and dispersal of molecules that are toxic to their hosts. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a Gram-negative bacterium, is a pathogen of a diverse variety of hosts including mammals and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In this study, we identify three small molecules in the phenazine class that are produced by P. aeruginosa strain PA14 that are toxic to C. elegans. We demonstrate that 1-hydroxyphenazine, phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, and pyocyanin are capable of killing nematodes in a matter of hours. 1-hydroxyphenazine is toxic over a wide pH range, whereas the toxicities of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and pyocyanin are pH-dependent at non-overlapping pH ranges. We found that acidification of the growth medium by PA14 activates the toxicity of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, which is the primary toxic agent towards C. elegans in our assay. Pyocyanin is not toxic under acidic conditions and 1-hydroxyphenazine is produced at concentrations too low to kill C. elegans. These results suggest a role for phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in mammalian pathogenesis because PA14 mutants deficient in phenazine production have been shown to be defective in pathogenesis in mice. More generally, these data demonstrate how diversity within a class of metabolites could affect bacterial toxicity in different environmental niches. PMID:23300454

  19. Reactions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin with reduced glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheluvappa, Rajkumar; Shimmon, Ronald; Dawson, Michael; Hilmer, Sarah N; Le Couteur, David G

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common cause of chronic and recurrent lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) whose sputa contain copious quantities of P. aeruginosa toxin, pyocyanin. Pyocyanin triggers tissue damage mainly by its redox cycling and induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The reactions between reduced glutathione (GSH) and pyocyanin were observed using absorption spectra from spectrophotometry and the reaction products analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Pyocyanin reacted with GSH non-enzymatically at 37 degrees C resulting in the production of red-brown products, spectophotometrically visible as a 480 nm maximum absorption peak after 24 h of incubation. The reaction was concentration-dependent on reduced glutathione but not on pyocyanin. Minimizing the accessibility of oxygen to the reaction decreased its rate. The anti-oxidant enzyme catalase circumvented the reaction. Proton-NMR analysis demonstrated the persistence of the original aromatic ring and the methyl-group of pyocyanin in the red-brown products. Anti-oxidant agents having thiol groups produced similar spectophotometrically visible peaks. The presence of a previously unidentified non-enzymatic GSH-dependent metabolic pathway for pyocyanin has thus been identified. The reaction between pyocyanin and GSH is concentration-, time-, and O(2)-dependent. The formation of H(2)O(2) as an intermediate and the thiol group in GSH seem to be important in this reaction.

  20. Dynorphin activates quorum sensing quinolone signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Olga Zaborina

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488 and endogenous (dynorphin kappa-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to kappa-opioids. The in vivo significance of kappa-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin pyocyanin causes cystic fibrosis airway pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Charles C; Chen, Yi; Goetzmann, Holly S; Hao, Yonghua; Borchers, Michael T; Hassett, Daniel J; Young, Lisa R; Mavrodi, Dmitri; Thomashow, Linda; Lau, Gee W

    2009-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) airway bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes multiple virulence factors. Among these, the redox active exotoxin pyocyanin (PCN) is produced in concentrations up to 100 mumol/L during infection of CF and other bronchiectatic airways. However, the contributions of PCN during infection of bronchiectatic airways are not appreciated. In this study, we demonstrate that PCN is critical for chronic infection in mouse airways and orchestrates adaptive immune responses that mediate lung damage. Wild-type FVBN mice chronically exposed to PCN developed goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia, airway fibrosis, and alveolar airspace destruction. Furthermore, after 12 weeks of exposure to PCN, mouse lungs down-regulated the expression of T helper (Th) type 1 cytokines and polarized toward a Th2 response. Cellular analyses indicated that chronic exposure to PCN profoundly increased the lung population of recruited macrophages, CD4(+) T cells, and neutrophils responsible for the secretion of these cytokines. PCN-mediated goblet cell hyperplasia and metaplasia required Th2 cytokine signaling through the Stat6 pathway. In summary, this study establishes that PCN is an important P. aeruginosa virulence factor capable of directly inducing pulmonary pathophysiology in mice, consistent with changes observed in CF and other bronchiectasis lungs.

  2. Pyocyanin promotes extracellular DNA release in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

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    Theerthankar Das

    Full Text Available Bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation are both dependent on the production of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS mainly composed of polysaccharides, proteins, lipids, and extracellular DNA (eDNA. eDNA promotes biofilm establishment in a wide range of bacterial species. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa eDNA is major component of biofilms and is essential for biofilm formation and stability. In this study we report that production of pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 and PA14 batch cultures is responsible for promotion of eDNA release. A phzSH mutant of P. aeruginosa PAO1 that overproduces pyocyanin displayed enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 generation, cell lysis, and eDNA release in comparison to its wildtype strain. A ΔphzA-G mutant of P. aeruginosa PA14 deficient in pyocyanin production generated negligible amounts of H(2O(2 and released less eDNA in comparison to its wildtype counterpart. Exogenous addition of pyocyanin or incubation with H(2O(2 was also shown to promote eDNA release in low pyocyanin producing (PAO1 and pyocynain deficient (PA14 strains. Based on these data and recent findings in the biofilm literature, we propose that the impact of pyocyanin on biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa occurs via eDNA release through H(2O(2 mediated cell lysis.

  3. Alkaline protease contributes to pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiyama, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Eigo; Lee, Jae Man; Mon, Hiroaki; Morishita, Mai; Kusakabe, Takahiro; Yasunaga-Aoki, Chisa

    2017-04-01

    The role of the alkaline protease (AprA) in pyocyanin production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa was investigated. AprA was overproduced when a plasmid carrying the aprA gene was introduced to an aprA-deletion mutant strain, EG03; thus, aprA-complemented EG03 was used as an overproducing strain. The complemented strain produced higher pyocyanin than the mutant strain in all commercially available media evaluated. Particularly, pyocyanin production was higher in the complemented than in the parental strain in brain-heart infusion and tryptic soy broths. These results suggested that protein degradation products by AprA were utilized for pyocyanin production. Protein-rich media were used in subsequent validation studies. Similar results were obtained when the basal medium was supplemented with casein or skim milk as the sole organic nitrogen source. However, gelatin failed to induce abundant pyocyanin production in the complemented strain, despite the presence of protein degradation products by AprA as assessed by SDS-PAGE. Thus, gelatin degradation products may not be suitable for pyocyanin synthesis. In conclusion, AprA could contribute to pyocyanin production in the presence of several proteins or peptides. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Mechanical destruction of pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms by ultrasound exposure

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    Xu, Jin; Bigelow, Timothy A.; Halverson, Larry J.; Middendorf, Jill; Rusk, Ben

    2012-10-01

    Medical implants are prone to colonization by bacterial biofilms, which are highly resistant to antibiotics. Normally, surgery is required to replace the infected implant. One promising non-invasive treatment option is to destroy the biofilm with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) exposure. In our study, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacterial biofilms were grown on graphite disks in a flow chamber for three days prior to exposing them to ultrasound pulses of varying duration or burst period. The pulses were 20 cycles in duration at a frequency of 1.1 MHz from a spherically focused transducer (f/1, 63 mm focal length), creating peak compressional and rarefactional pressures at the disk surface of 30 and 13 MPa, respectively. P. aeruginosa were tagged with GFP and cells killed by HIFU were visualized using propidium iodide, which permeates membranes of dead cells, to aid determining the extent of biofilm destruction and whether cells are alive or dead. Our results indicate that a 30-s exposure and 6-ms pulse period or those combinations with the same number of pulses, were sufficient to destroy the biofilm and to kill the remaining cells. Reducing the number of pulses decreased biofilm destruction, leaving more dead and live bacteria on the surface.

  5. Nosocomial Pseudomonas putida Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review.

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    Khan, Fahmi Yousef; AbuKamar, Mohammed; Anand, Deshmukh

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of Pseudomonas putida meningitis in a 26-year-old Nepalese man who was admitted to Hamad General Hospital with epidermoid cyst for drainage. Ommaya reservoir was placed into the cyst for drainage and externalventricular drainage (EVD) was performed. After four days, the patient was transferred to the ward in stable condition. His weakness resolved partially and headache severity decreased. After three days, the patient developed fever and headache severity increased with deterioration of consciousness level. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) through EVD showed 2 200 leucocytes/µL, protein level of 295 mg/dL, and glucose level of < 1.8 mg/dL. Meropenem was started on the patient. Aspirate from Ommaya reservoir and CSF showed gram-negative rods and cultures yielded P. putida sensitive to cefepime, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin, but resistant to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. EVD was replaced and the patient received cefepime and ciprofloxacin for 21 days after which he improved and was discharged with right sided residual weakness.

  6. Pseudomonas putida CSV86: a candidate genome for genetic bioaugmentation.

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    Vasundhara Paliwal

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas putida CSV86, a plasmid-free strain possessing capability to transfer the naphthalene degradation property, has been explored for its metabolic diversity through genome sequencing. The analysis of draft genome sequence of CSV86 (6.4 Mb revealed the presence of genes involved in the degradation of naphthalene, salicylate, benzoate, benzylalcohol, p-hydroxybenzoate, phenylacetate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate on the chromosome thus ensuring the stability of the catabolic potential. Moreover, genes involved in the metabolism of phenylpropanoid and homogentisate, as well as heavy metal resistance, were additionally identified. Ability to grow on vanillin, veratraldehyde and ferulic acid, detection of inducible homogentisate dioxygenase and growth on aromatic compounds in the presence of heavy metals like copper, cadmium, cobalt and arsenic confirm in silico observations reflecting the metabolic versatility. In silico analysis revealed the arrangement of genes in the order: tRNA(Gly, integrase followed by nah operon, supporting earlier hypothesis of existence of a genomic island (GI for naphthalene degradation. Deciphering the genomic architecture of CSV86 for aromatic degradation pathways and identification of elements responsible for horizontal gene transfer (HGT suggests that genetic bioaugmentation strategies could be planned using CSV86 for effective bioremediation.

  7. Efficient recombinant production of prodigiosin in Pseudomonas putida

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    Andreas eDomröse

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Serratia marcescens and several other bacteria produce the red-colored pigment prodigiosin which possesses bioactivities as an antimicrobial, anticancer and immunosuppressive agent. Therefore, there is a great interest to produce this natural compound. Efforts aiming at its biotechnological production have so far largely focused on the original producer and opportunistic human pathogen S. marcescens. Here, we demonstrate efficient prodigiosin production in the heterologous host Pseudomonas putida. Random chromosomal integration of the 21 kb prodigiosin biosynthesis gene cluster of S. marcescens in P. putida KT2440 was employed to construct constitutive prodigiosin production strains. Standard cultivation parameters were optimized such that titers of 94 mg/L culture were obtained upon growth of P. putida at 20 °C using rich medium under high aeration conditions. Subsequently, a novel, fast and effective protocol for prodigiosin extraction and purification was established enabling the straightforward isolation of prodigiosin from P. putida growth medium. In summary, we describe here a highly efficient method for the heterologous biosynthetic production of prodigiosin which may serve as a basis to produce large amounts of this bioactive natural compound and may provide a platform for further in-depth studies of prodiginine biosynthesis.

  8. Differentiation of Pseudomonas syringae Pathovars Originating from Stone Fruits

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    Katarina Gašić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to an overlapping host range, similar symptomatology and many common characteristics,Pseudomonas syringae pathovars originating from stone fruits can easily be misidentified.In order to select tests for rapid and efficient differentiation of P. s. pvs. syringae,morsprunorum and persicae, we studied the suitability and differentiating potential ofsome standard bacteriological and molecular methods. Differentiation of the strains wasperformed using LOPAT, GATTa and ice nucleation tests, nutrient sucrose broth growthand utilization of various carbon sources. PCR method enabled the detection of toxin-producinggenes: syrB and syrD in P. s. pv. syringae, and cfl gene in P. s. pv. morsprunorum race1. Syringomycin production by pv. syringae was confirmed in bioassay using Geotrichumcandidum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Rhodotorula pilimanae as indicator organisms.Pathogenicity test on lemon and immature nectarine fruits, as well as on string bean pods,showed different intensity of reaction of the inoculated material which could separate pv.syringae from the other two pathovars. PCR-based repetitive sequences, Rep-PCR withREP, ERIC and BOX primers revealed different genetic profiles within P. syringae pathovars.

  9. Nosocomial Pseudomonas putida Meningitis: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Fahmi Yousef Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of Pseudomonas putida meningitis in a 26-year-old Nepalese man who was admitted to Hamad General Hospital with epidermoid cyst for drainage. Ommaya reservoir was placed into the cyst for drainage and externalventricular drainage (EVD was performed. After four days, the patient was transferred to the ward in stable condition. His weakness resolved partially and headache severity decreased. After three days, the patient developed fever and headache severity increased with deterioration of consciousness level. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF through EVD showed 2 200 leucocytes/µL, protein level of 295 mg/dL, and glucose level of < 1.8 mg/dL. Meropenem was started on the patient. Aspirate from Ommaya reservoir and CSF showed gram-negative rods and cultures yielded P. putida sensitive to cefepime, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin, and amikacin, but resistant to meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam. EVD was replaced and the patient received cefepime and ciprofloxacin for 21 days after which he improved and was discharged with right sided residual weakness.

  10. The role of glutamine in Pseudomonas mediterranea in biotechnological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Maria Giovanna; Chines, Valeria; Franco, Domenico; Nicolò, Marco S; Guglielmino, Salvatore P P

    2017-07-25

    In this work, in order to study the effect of glutamine as co-feeder on growth kinetics, biomass and PHA production in Pseudomonas mediterranea, different co-metabolic strategies were employed. Unrelated (glycerol and glucose) and related (sodium octanoate) carbon sources both in presence and absence of glutamine have been tested. For each cultural condition, we (i) evaluated growth kinetics and measured the cell metabolic activity by MTT assay, (ii) monitored PHA production and (iii) estimated the expression of phaC1 and phaC2 genes through RT-PCR. Our results show that the use of glutamine as co-feeder in P. mediterranea led to an improvement of the specific growth rate and cell metabolic activity and enhanced the uptake of all the carbon sources assayed. Moreover, the use of glutamine reduced significantly the time required for PHA production and increased biopolymer yield, as consequence of an early activation of phaC1 and phaC2. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar ribicola NCPPB 963.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnock, C

    1998-01-01

    In 1939, a bacterial spot caused severe defoliation of Ribes aureum (Golden Currant) The causal agent is now recognized as Pseudomonas syringae pathovar ribicola. This communication extends the phenotype of the only identified strain of P. syringae pv. ribicola, which is reminiscent of those of other pathovars, and provides a molecular biological characterization. A minimum size of 5.55 Mb for the bacterial genome was obtained using pulsed-field electrophoresis. The SDS-PAGE outer-membrane profile contained seven major bands, and has obvious similarities to that of P. aeruginosa. SDS-PAGE of concentrated mid-log phase culture supernatants revealed large amounts of a single, cryptic 24.0 kD protein. The amino acid composition and 57 residues in the N-terminus of this protein. were determined. The protein sequence was nearly identical to the translation of a region of unknown function in the P. aeruginosa genome. Extensive similarity in N-terminal sequence, composition and subunit size to a secreted hydrophilic Vibrio cholerae protein of unknown function was also found. Neither protein has been directly associated with disease development.

  12. Subversion of mucosal barrier polarity by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Joanne eEngel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The lumenal surfaces of human body are lined by a monolayer of epithelia that together with mucus secreting cells and specialized immune cells form the mucosal barrier. This barrier is one of the most fundamental components of the innate immune system, protecting organisms from the vast environmental microbiota. The mucosal epithelium is comprised of polarized epithelial cells with distinct apical and basolateral surfaces that are defined by unique set of protein and lipid composition and are separated by tight junctions. The apical surface serves as a barrier to the outside world and is specialized for the exchange of materials with the lumen. The basolateral surface is adapted for interaction with other cells and for exchange with the bloodstream. A wide network of proteins and lipids regulates the formation and maintenance of the epithelium polarity. Many human pathogens have evolved virulence mechanisms that target this network and interfere with epithelial polarity to enhance binding to the apical surface, enter into cells, and/or cross the mucosal barrier. This review highlights recent advances in our understanding of how Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic human pathogen that preferentially infects damaged epithelial tissues, exploits the epithelial cell polarization machinery to enhance infection.

  13. Diluent sensitivity in thermally stressed cells of pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R J; Ordal, Z J; Witter, L D

    1977-01-01

    Thermally injured cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens were unable to produce colonies on Trypticase soy agar (TSA) after dilution with 0.1% peptone. Nutritional exigency could not be used as the criterion for this injury, since varying the composition of the plating medium had little effect on the number of colonies that developed. The injured cells had no requirement for compounds known to leak out during the heat treatment in order to recover. The cells did not exhibit injury if dilution preceded heat treatment on the plating medium, demonstrating that the heat treatment sensitized the cells to the trauma of dilution. Substitution of 0.1% peptone with growth medium as the diluent largely offset the previously observed drop in TSA count. Little difference in survival was observed when monosodium glutamate or the balance of the defined medium was used as the diluent. The diluent effect was ionic rather than osmotic. The presence of cations was important in maintaining the integrity of the injured cell, and divalent cations enhanced this protective effect. The role of these cations at the level of the cell envelope is discussed. PMID:406839

  14. The cost of multiple drug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, H; Perron, G G; Maclean, R C

    2009-05-01

    The spread of bacterial antibiotic resistance mutations is thought to be constrained by their pleiotropic fitness costs. Here we investigate the fitness costs of resistance in the context of the evolution of multiple drug resistance (MDR), by measuring the cost of acquiring streptomycin resistance mutations (StrepR) in independent strains of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa carrying different rifampicin resistance (RifR) mutations. In the absence of antibiotics, StrepR mutations are associated with similar fitness costs in different RifR genetic backgrounds. The cost of StrepR mutations is greater in a rifampicin-sensitive (RifS) background, directly demonstrating antagonistic epistasis between resistance mutations. In the presence of rifampicin, StrepR mutations have contrasting effects in different RifR backgrounds: StrepR mutations have no detectable costs in some RifR backgrounds and massive fitness costs in others. Our results clearly demonstrate the importance of epistasis and genotype-by-environment interactions for the evolution of MDR.

  15. Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci in papaya seedlings Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci em plântulas de mamoeiro

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    Luís Otávio S. Beriam

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The natural occurrence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci causing leaf spot symptoms in papaya seedlings is reported. The pathogen was identified through biochemical, physiological, serological, and molecular assays and artificial inoculations in papaya plants. It was also shown that the strains were pathogenic to bean and tobacco plants. The restriction patterns obtained with Afa I, Alu I, Dde I, Hae III, Hpa II, Hinf I, Sau 3A I and Taq I of the PCR-RFLP of 16S-23S DNAr were identical to the P. s. pv. tabaci patterns. Primers corresponding to hrpL gene of P. syringae were also tested and the results grouped the papaya strains with P s. pv. tabaci. Bacterial strains were deposited at Coleção de Culturas IBSBF, Instituto Biológico, Campinas, Brazil, under access numbers 1687 and 1822.É relatada a ocorrência natural de Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci causando sintomas de lesões foliares em plântulas de mamoeiro. O patógeno foi identificado por meio de testes bioquímicos, fisiológicos, serológicos e moleculares, além de ensaios de patogenicidade em plantas de mamoeiro, feijoeiro e fumo. Os padrões de restrição obtidos com as enzimas Afa I, Alu I, Dde I, Hae III, Hpa II, Hinf I, Sal 3A I e Taq I, utilizando-se a técnica de PCR-RLFP da região espaçadora 16S-23S do DNA ribossômico, foram idênticos àqueles apresentados para P. s. pv. tabaci. Primers correspondentes ao gene hrpL de P. syringae foram também testados e os resultados obtidos permitiram agrupar as linhagens isoladas de mamão com P. s. pv. tabaci. Linhagens bacterianas estão depositadas na coleção de culturas IBSBF, Instituto Biológico, Campinas, sob n. 1687 e 1822.

  16. Determination Pattern of Antimicrobial Resistance of Pseudomonas Isolated from Patients in a University Tertiary Hospital

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    Alka Hasani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Pseudomonas are ubiquitous bacteria widely present in nature. However, they have emerged as an opportunistic pathogen for humans. This bacterium is accountable for many localized and disseminated diseases, especially wounds in burn patients, respiratory infections, septicemia and bacteremia. Among all Pseudomonas species, P. aeruginosa is one of the important and most virulent species in hospital settings, while other pathogenic species include stutzeri, putida and fluorescence. The aim of this study was to assess pattern of antibiotic resistance in these bacteria isolated from a University teaching and treatment center. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 99 Pseudomonas strains (68 strains P. aeruginosa and 31 other Pseudomonas species isolated from various clinical specimens. Antimicrobial drug susceptibility test was performed using the disc agar diffusion method according to CLSI recommendations. In this study, among various clinical specimens sent to microbiology laboratory, wound (59.59% was found as a major source of Pseudomonas spp. Among various wards, Pseudomonas spp. was isolated more from patients admitted to burns ward (48.48%. Antibiotic susceptibility assay results revealed non susceptibility pattern towards most of the antibiotics; however, among all antibiotics tested, most common resistance was observed towards ceftazidime (76.76%. The results of this study shows the presence of Pseudomonas infection in the hospital setting and their developed resistance towards many conventional antibiotics, which is a concern at this treatment center. Thus, there exist a need for evaluation of careful and accurate measurement of resistance and assessment of exact drug administration policies. Therefore, to control the infection and prevent from increased prevalence of resistant strains appropriate resolution should be followed.

  17. Pseudomonas endophytica sp. nov., isolated from stem tissue of Solanum tuberosum L. in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Bahena, Martha-Helena; Cuesta, Maria José; Tejedor, Carmen; Igual, José Mariano; Fernández-Pascual, Mercedes; Peix, Álvaro

    2015-07-01

    A bacterial strain named BSTT44(T) was isolated in the course of a study of endophytic bacteria occurring in stems and roots of potato growing in a soil from Salamanca, Spain. The 16S rRNA gene sequence had 99.7% identity with respect to that of its closest relative, Pseudomonas psychrophila E-3T, and the next most closely related type strains were those of Pseudomonas fragi, with 99.6% similarity, Pseudomonas deceptionensis, with 99.2% similarity, and Pseudomonas lundensis, with 99.0% similarity; these results indicate that BSTT44(T) should be classified within the genus Pseudomonas. Analysis of the housekeeping genes rpoB, rpoD and gyrB confirmed its phylogenetic affiliation and showed identities lower than 92% in all cases with respect to the above-mentioned closest relatives. Cells of the strain bore one polar-subpolar flagellum. The respiratory quinone was Q-9.The major fatty acids were C16:0, C18:1ω7c and summed feature 3 (C16:1ω7c and/or C16:1ω6c). The strain was oxidase-, catalase- and urease-positive and the arginine dihydrolase system was present, but tests for nitrate reduction, β-galactosidase production and aesculin hydrolysis were negative. It could grow at 35 °C and at pH 5-9.The DNA G+C content was 60.2 mol%. DNA-DNA hybridization results showed less than 48% relatedness with respect to the type strains of the four most closely related species. Therefore, the combined results of genotypic, phenotypic and chemotaxonomic analyses support the classification of strain BSTT44 into a novel species of the genus Pseudomonas, for which the name Pseudomonas endophytica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is BSTT44(T) ( = LMG 28456(T) = CECT 8691(T)).

  18. PURIFIKASI DAN KARAKTERISASI PROTEASE DARI BAKTERI PATOGEN Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Purification and Characterization of Protease from Pathogenic Bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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    Ace Baehaki1

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, concern on protease as medical target for overcoming bacterial diseases and viral diseases has been rapidly increased because of the obvious involvement of this enzyme in the molecular of the diseases. The purpose of this research was to purify and characterize protease from pathogenic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The bacteria were grown in media containing triptone 1%, NaCl 1% and Yeast extract 0,5%. Protease of P.aeruginosa was purified using column chromatography with Sephadex G-100 gel. There were three peaks of enzyme protein, which were detected on fractions 14, 17 and 30. The optimum pH of the extracelluler protease from P. aeruginosa was 8. The optimum temperature of P.aeruginosa protease was 300C. Fe3+ (1dan 5 mM was strong activator and Co2+ was strong inhibitor. Study on the effect of metals ion and spesific inhibitors indicated that protease from P. aeruginosa was serin metaloprotease. The apparent moleculer weights, as determined by SDS-PAGE and zymogram technique, 36 kD and 42 kD.

  19. Cytokinin production by Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 determines biocontrol activity against Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; Tafner, Richard; Moreno, María V; Stenglein, Sebastian A; García de Salamone, Inés E; Nelson, Louise M; Novák, Ondřej; Strnad, Miroslav; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2016-03-17

    Plant beneficial microbes mediate biocontrol of diseases by interfering with pathogens or via strengthening the host. Although phytohormones, including cytokinins, are known to regulate plant development and physiology as well as plant immunity, their production by microorganisms has not been considered as a biocontrol mechanism. Here we identify the ability of Pseudomonas fluorescens G20-18 to efficiently control P. syringae infection in Arabidopsis, allowing maintenance of tissue integrity and ultimately biomass yield. Microbial cytokinin production was identified as a key determinant for this biocontrol effect on the hemibiotrophic bacterial pathogen. While cytokinin-deficient loss-of-function mutants of G20-18 exhibit impaired biocontrol, functional complementation with cytokinin biosynthetic genes restores cytokinin-mediated biocontrol, which is correlated with differential cytokinin levels in planta. Arabidopsis mutant analyses revealed the necessity of functional plant cytokinin perception and salicylic acid-dependent defence signalling for this biocontrol mechanism. These results demonstrate microbial cytokinin production as a novel microbe-based, hormone-mediated concept of biocontrol. This mechanism provides a basis to potentially develop novel, integrated plant protection strategies combining promotion of growth, a favourable physiological status and activation of fine-tuned direct defence and abiotic stress resilience.

  20. Quantitative approach to track lipase producing Pseudomonas sp. S1 in nonsterilized solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, R K; Subudhi, E; Kumar, M

    2014-06-01

    Proliferation of the inoculated Pseudomonas sp. S1 is quantitatively evaluated using ERIC-PCR during the production of lipase in nonsterile solid state fermentation an approach to reduce the cost of enzyme production. Under nonsterile solid state fermentation with olive oil cake, Pseudomonas sp. S1 produced 57·9 IU g(-1) of lipase. DNA fingerprints of unknown bacterial isolates obtained on Bushnell Haas agar (BHA) + tributyrin exactly matched with that of Pseudomonas sp. S1. Using PCR-based enumeration, population of Pseudomonas sp. S1 was proliferated from 7·6 × 10(4) CFU g(-1) after 24 h to 4·6 × 10(8) CFU g(-1) after 96 h, which tallied with the maximum lipase activity as compared to control. Under submerged fermentation (SmF), Pseudomonas sp. S1 produced maximum lipase (49 IU ml(-1) ) using olive oil as substrate, while lipase production was 9·754 IU ml(-1) when Pseudomonas sp. S1 was grown on tributyrin. Optimum pH and temperature of the crude lipase was 7·0 and 50°C. Crude enzyme activity was 71·2% stable at 50°C for 360 min. Pseudomonas sp. S1 lipase was also stable in methanol showing 91·6% activity in the presence of 15% methanol, whereas 75·5 and 51·1% of activity were retained in the presence of 20 and 30% methanol, respectively. Thus, lipase produced by Pseudomonas sp. S1 is suitable for the production of biodiesel as well as treatment of oily waste water. This study presents the first report on the production of thermophilic organic solvent tolerant lipase using agro-industry waste in nonsterile solid state fermentation. Positive correlation between survival of Pseudomonas sp. S1 and lipase production under nonsterile solid state fermentation was established, which may emphasize the need to combine molecular tools and solid state fermentation in future studies. Our study brings new insights into the lipase production in cost-effective manner, which is an industrially relevant approach. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.