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Sample records for pseudocytisus subsp paui

  1. Dendrochronological study of the endangered shrub Vella pseudocytisus subsp. paui (Brassicaceae: implications for its recovery and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Génova, Mar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendrochronology is useful to determine plant longevity, to provide insights into the structure and dynamics of plant populations and to study the relationships between growth and environmental determinants. The dendrochronology of endangered shrubs is unexplored, although their use represents an opportunity to produce better conservation guidelines. We collected for this study 63 samples from already dead specimens of Vella pseudocytisus subsp. paui (Brassicaceae, an endangered Spanish endemism from three localities. We analyzed the relationship between ring data and plant size to determine the accuracy of using size as a proxy for plant age. We also explored the relationships between ring data and environmental variables to detect growth determinants. This shrub showed a high longevity as older individuals presented nearly 50 growth rings. The relationship between age and size is weak although it could be established based on the logarithmic function of plant biovolume. Significant relationships were found between rainfall and ring widths, showing that water limited annual growth. Finally, age structure characterized differences among populations, highlighting the effects of disturbance and land use. These results provided new opportunities for management within the ongoing recovery plan for the species.La dendrocronología es útil para determinar la longevidad de la planta, proporcionar información sobre la estructura y dinámica de las poblaciones vegetales y estudiar las relaciones entre el crecimiento y las variables ambientales. Hasta ahora no se había hecho uso de la dendrocronología en arbustos en peligro de extinción, aunque su empleo puede mejorar las directrices de conservación. En este estudio se han recolectado 63 especímenes ya muertos de tres localidades de Vella pseudocytisus subsp. paui (Brassicaceae, un endemismo español en peligro de extinción. Se han analizado las relaciones entre los grosores del anillo de

  2. Festuca paniculata (L. Schinz & Thell. subsp. paui, nuevo taxon para la Península Ibérica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cebolla, Consuelo

    1990-05-01

    Full Text Available A new subspecies, Festuca paniculata (L. Schinz & Thell. subsp. paui Cebolla & Rivas Ponce (Poaceae is described.

    Se describe una subespecie nueva, Festuca paniculata (L. Schinz & Thell. subsp. paui Cebolla & Rivas Ponce (Poaceae.

  3. Thymus vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. (Lamiaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Pablo Ferrer-Gallego; Albert J. Navarro Peris; Emilio Laguna Lumbreras; Gonzalo Mateo Sanz

    2013-01-01

    RESUMEN: Se describe una nueva subespecie de Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae); Th. vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov., caracterizada por presentar un hábito postrado, tallos estoloníferos, decumbentes y radicantes, hojas muy estrechas y una floración otoñal. ABSTRACT: Thymus vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. (Lamiaceae). A new subspecies of Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae); Th. vulgaris subsp. mansanetianus subsp. nov. is described. This new subspecies is characterized by its prost...

  4. in Streptococcus salivarius subsp. Thermophilus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGO

    2007-04-16

    Apr 16, 2007 ... Micrococcus luteus cells and thereby preventing their growth on assay plates. Thermostability of these ... Growth media were supplemented with 10 µg/mL ampicillin to select recombinant S. salivarius subsp. thermophilus and L. lactis and 50 µg/ml ampicillin .... Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Gene 66: ...

  5. Rapid detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paratuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a suspect causative agent of Crohns disease in man, is an emerging disease of international proportions affecting all ruminants. Early stage detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection would accelerate progress in control ...

  6. Identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis Isolated From Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium (MA) is divided into four subspecies based primarily on host-range and consists of MA subsp. avium (birds), MA subsp. silvaticum (wood pigeons), MA subsp. paratuberculosis (broad, poorly-defined host range), and the recently described MA subsp. hominissuis (hu...

  7. Delta endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

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    Armstrong, J L; Rohrmann, G F; Beaudreau, G. S.

    1985-01-01

    From Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, a proteinase-resistant protein was purified which exhibited toxicity to larval mosquitoes and cultured mosquito cells, lysed erythrocytes, and was lethal to mice. To extract the protein, a sporulating culture of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was treated with alkali, neutralized, and incubated with trypsin and proteinase K. It was then purified by gel filtration and DEAE column chromatography. Up to 240 micrograms of toxic protein was purif...

  8. Molecular Characterization of Copper Resistance Genes from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri and Xanthomonas alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behlau, Franklin; Canteros, Blanca I.; Minsavage, Gerald V.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Graham, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Copper sprays have been widely used for control of endemic citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in citrus-growing areas for more than 2 decades. Xanthomonas alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis populations were also exposed to frequent sprays of copper for several years as a protective measure against citrus bacterial spot (CBS) in Florida citrus nurseries. Long-term use of these bactericides has led to the development of copper-resistant (Cur) strains in both X. citri subsp. citri and X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis, resulting in a reduction of disease control. The objectives of this study were to characterize for the first time the genetics of copper resistance in X. citri subsp. citri and X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis and to compare these organisms to other Cur bacteria. Copper resistance determinants from X. citri subsp. citri strain A44(pXccCu2) from Argentina and X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis strain 1381(pXacCu2) from Florida were cloned and sequenced. Open reading frames (ORFs) related to the genes copL, copA, copB, copM, copG, copC, copD, and copF were identified in X. citri subsp. citri A44. The same ORFs, except copC and copD, were also present in X. alfalfae subsp. citrumelonis 1381. Transposon mutagenesis of the cloned copper resistance determinants in pXccCu2 revealed that copper resistance in X. citri subsp. citri strain A44 is mostly due to copL, copA, and copB, which are the genes in the cloned cluster with the highest nucleotide homology (≥92%) among different Cur bacteria. PMID:21515725

  9. Iridoid Glucosides from Lamium garganicum subsp. laevigatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tayfun, Ersöz; Kaya, Duygu; Yalcin, Funda Nuray

    2007-01-01

    Phytochemical investigations on the above ground parts of Lamium garganicum subsp. laevigatum resulted in the isolation of seven iridoid glucosides, shanzhiside methyl ester (1), barlerin (8-O-acetylshanzhiside methyl ester; 2), 6-O-syringyl-8-O-acetylshanzhiside methyl ester (3), 6β-hydroxyipola...

  10. Teucrium chamaedrys L. subsp. chamaedrys in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, van der R.W.J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of Teucrium chamaedrys subsp. chamaedrys in the Netherlands is discussed. Since 1905 this subspecies has been present in one locality in the dunes south-west of Haarlem. Probably it was imported there with pheasant fodder. The plants maintain themselves easily but seem to be unable to

  11. Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov., occurring in human clinical material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švec, Pavel; De Bel, Annelies; Sedláček, Ivo; Petráš, Petr; Gelbíčová, Tereza; Černohlávková, Jitka; Mašlanˇová, Ivana; Cnockaert, Margo; Varbanovová, Ivana; Echahidi, Fedoua; Vandamme, Peter; Pantuček, Roman

    2015-07-01

    Seven coagulase-negative, oxidase-negative and novobiocin-susceptible staphylococci assigned tentatively as Staphylococcus petrasii were investigated in this study in order to elucidate their taxonomic position. All strains were initially shown to form a genetically homogeneous group separated from remaining species of the genus Staphylococcus by using a repetitive sequence-based PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)5 primer. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene, hsp60, rpoB, dnaJ, gap and tuf sequences showed that the group is closely related to Staphylococcus petrasii but separated from the three hitherto known subspecies, S. petrasii subsp. petrasii, S. petrasii subsp. croceilyticus and S. petrasii subsp. jettensis. Further investigation using automated ribotyping, MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, fatty acid methyl ester analysis, DNA-DNA hybridization and extensive biotyping confirmed that the analysed group represents a novel subspecies within S. petrasii, for which the name Staphylococcus petrasii subsp. pragensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is NRL/St 12/356(T) ( = CCM 8529(T) = LMG 28327(T)).

  12. Campylobacter pinnipediorum sp. nov., isolated from pinnipeds, comprising Campylobacter pinnipediorum subsp. pinnipediorum subsp. nov. and Campylobacter pinnipediorum subsp. caledonicus subsp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Maarten J; Miller, William G; Leger, Judy St; Chapman, Mary H; Timmerman, Arjen J; Duim, Birgitta; Foster, Geoffrey; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2017-06-01

    During independent diagnostic screenings of otariid seals in California (USA) and phocid seals in Scotland (UK), Campylobacter-like isolates, which differed from the established taxa of the genus Campylobacter, were cultured from abscesses and internal organs of different seal species. A polyphasic study was undertaken to determine the taxonomic position of these six isolates. The isolates were characterized by 16S rRNA gene and AtpA sequence analysis and by conventional phenotypic testing. The whole-genome sequences were determined for all isolates, and the average nucleotide identity (ANI) was determined. The isolates formed a separate phylogenetic clade, divergent from all other taxa of the genus Campylobacter and most closely related to Campylobactermucosalis. Although all isolates showed 100 % 16S rRNA gene sequence homology, AtpA and ANI analyses indicated divergence between the otariid isolates from California and the phocid isolates from Scotland, which warrants subspecies status for each clade. The two subspecies could also be distinguished phenotypically on the basis of catalase activity. This study shows clearly that the isolates obtained from pinnipeds represent a novel species within the genus Campylobacter, for which the name Campylobacter pinnipediorum sp. nov. is proposed. Within this novel species, the Californian isolates represent a separate subspecies, for which the name C. pinnipediorum subsp. pinnipediorum subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain for both this novel species and subspecies is RM17260T (=LMG 29472T=CCUG 69570T). The Scottish isolates represent another subspecies, for which the name C. pinnipediorum subsp. caledonicus subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain of this subspecies is M302/10/6T (=LMG 29473T=CCUG 68650T).

  13. Teucrium chamaedrys L. subsp. chamaedrys in Nederland

    OpenAIRE

    Ham, van der, R.W.J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of Teucrium chamaedrys subsp. chamaedrys in the Netherlands is discussed. Since 1905 this subspecies has been present in one locality in the dunes south-west of Haarlem. Probably it was imported there with pheasant fodder. The plants maintain themselves easily but seem to be unable to make ripe seeds. As this subspecies has not yet spread, it is not included in the flora of the Netherlands.

  14. Description of Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. bovis subsp. nov., isolated from cattle (Bos taurus coreanae), emended description of Mycobacterium chelonae and creation of Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. chelonae subsp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung-Jun; Kim, Ga-Na; Kim, Bo-Ram; Jeon, Che Ok; Jeong, Joseph; Lee, Seon Ho; Lim, Ji-Hun; Lee, Seung-Heon; Kim, Chang Ki; Kook, Yoon-Hoh; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2017-10-01

    Three rapidly growing mycobacterial strains, QIA-37T, QIA-40 and QIA-41, were isolated from the lymph nodes of three separate Korean native cattle, Hanwoo (Bos taurus coreanae). These strains were previously shown to be phylogenetically distinct but closely related to Mycobacterium chelonae ATCC 35752T by taxonomic approaches targeting three genes (16S rRNA, hsp6 and rpoB) and were further characterized using a polyphasic approach in this study. The 16S rRNA gene sequences of all three strains showed 99.7 % sequence similarity with that of the M. chelonae type strain. A multilocus sequence typing analysis targeting 10 housekeeping genes, including hsp65 and rpoB, revealed a phylogenetic cluster of these strains with M. chelonae. DNA-DNA hybridization values of 78.2 % between QIA-37T and M. chelonae indicated that it belongs to M. chelonae but is a novel subspecies distinct from M. chelonae. Phylogenetic analysis based on whole-genome sequences revealed a 95.44±0.06 % average nucleotide identity (ANI) value with M. chelonae, slightly higher than the 95.0 % ANI criterion for determining a novel species. In addition, distinct phenotypic characteristics such as positive growth at 37 °C, at which temperature M. chelonae does not grow, further support the taxonomic status of these strains as representatives of a novel subspecies of M. chelonae. Therefore, we propose an emended description of Mycobacterium chelonae, and descriptions of M. chelonae subsp. chelonae subsp. nov. and M. chelonae subsp. bovis subsp. nov. are presented; strains ATCC 35752T(=CCUG 47445T=CIP 104535T=DSM 43804T=JCM 6388T=NCTC 946T) and QIA-37T (=KCTC 39630T=JCM 30986T) are the type strains of the two novel subspecies.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    OpenAIRE

    Caverly, Lindsay J.; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M.?abscessus complex genomics.

  16. Epipactis helleborine (L. Crantz subsp. moratoria A. Riechelmann

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    Lipovšek Matej

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The group of Epipactis helleborine s.l. includes several subspecies. A new subspecies Epipactis helleborine subsp. moratoria was determined in Slovenia in 2015. It thrives in mixed wood in a region of Gorica at Raztez. Morphologic and phenomenological comparison confirmed clear differences between E. helleborine subsp. moratoria and E. helleborine subsp. helleborine. The characteristic differences seen in E. helleborine subsp. moratoria are the stem which is more or less bent at the level of the leaf base, the plants are smaller and more slender than E. helleborine, there are also differences in the flowers and the leaves. The ovary in E. moratoria is often in a horizontal position, especially at the time of fruiting, wheras in E. helleborine ovary usually hangs down. All of the wild orchids in Slovenia are protected species and among them it is Epipactis helleborine subsp. moratoria which, up till now is only known at one site.

  17. Alkaloids from Narcissus angustifolius subsp. transcarpathicus (Amaryllidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labraña, Josep; Machocho, Alex King'ori; Kricsfalusy, Vladimir; Brun, Reto; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume

    2002-08-01

    Seven alkaloids have been isolated from fresh bulbs of Narcissus angustifolius subsp. transcarpathicus (Amaryllidaceae). Nangustine, reported here for the first time, is the first 5,11-methanomorphanthridine alkaloid with a C-3/C-4 substitution. The structure and stereochemistry of this new alkaloid, as well as those previously known, have been determined by physical and spectroscopic methods. Spectroscopic data of pancracine have been completed. The in vitro assay activity against the parasitic protozoa Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania donovani and Plasmodium falciparum was carried out with the compounds nangustine and pancracine.

  18. Genome sequencing identifies Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov., isolated from a ranch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bakker, Henk C; Manuel, Clyde S; Fortes, Esther D; Wiedmann, Martin; Nightingale, Kendra K

    2013-09-01

    Twenty Listeria-like isolates were obtained from environmental samples collected on a cattle ranch in northern Colorado; all of these isolates were found to share an identical partial sigB sequence, suggesting close relatedness. The isolates were similar to members of the genus Listeria in that they were Gram-stain-positive, short rods, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive; the isolates were similar to Listeria fleischmannii because they were non-motile at 25 °C. 16S rRNA gene sequencing for representative isolates and whole genome sequencing for one isolate was performed. The genome of the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii (strain LU2006-1(T)) was also sequenced. The draft genomes were very similar in size and the average MUMmer nucleotide identity across 91% of the genomes was 95.16%. Genome sequence data were used to design primers for a six-gene multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) scheme. Phylogenies based on (i) the near-complete 16S rRNA gene, (ii) 31 core genes and (iii) six housekeeping genes illustrated the close relationship of these Listeria-like isolates to Listeria fleischmannii LU2006-1(T). Sufficient genetic divergence of the Listeria-like isolates from the type strain of Listeria fleischmannii and differing phenotypic characteristics warrant these isolates to be classified as members of a distinct infraspecific taxon, for which the name Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is TTU M1-001(T) ( =BAA-2414(T) =DSM 25391(T)). The isolates of Listeria fleischmannii subsp. coloradonensis subsp. nov. differ from the nominate subspecies by the inability to utilize melezitose, turanose and sucrose, and the ability to utilize inositol. The results also demonstrate the utility of whole genome sequencing to facilitate identification of novel taxa within a well-described genus. The genomes of both subspecies of Listeria fleischmannii contained putative enhancin genes; the Listeria fleischmannii subsp

  19. Genetic Diversity of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis Isolated in Korea

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    Dong Hwan Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The plant pathogenic bacterial genus Pectobacteirum consists of heterogeneous strains. The P. carotovorum species is a complex strain showing divergent characteristics, and a new subspecies named P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis has been identified recently. In this paper, we re-identified the P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates from those classified under the subspecies carotovorum and newly isolated P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis strains. All isolates were able to produce plant cell-wall degrading enzymes such as pectate lyase, polygalacturonase, cellulase and protease. We used genetic and biochemical methods to examine the diversity of P. carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis isolates, and found genetic diversity within the brasiliensis subsp. isolates in Korea. The restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis based on the recA gene revealed a unique pattern for the brasiliensis subspecies. The Korean brasiliensis subsp. isolates were divided into four clades based on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. However, correlations between clades and isolated hosts or year could not be found, suggesting that diverse brasiliensis subsp. isolates existed.

  20. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis: two cases of tonsillitis

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    Vincenzo Savini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We described two case reports of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis tonsillitis occurred from January 2005 to January 2007, among patients who come to our observation during these two years. These patients are paradigmatic of some conditions: adult age, absence of underlying diseases, outbreak of similar pharyngo-tonsillar sympyomatology, unsuccessful oral penicillin therapy, isolation of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis from throat swab, complete recovery after oral beta-lattamic antibiotic therapy, but total clearance of the microorganism only after oral macrolides administrations. Thus, the intracellular localization of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equismilis, could be in charge of the failure of beta-lattamic antibiotics therapy.

  1. Demonstration of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp capripneumoniae and Mycoplasma mycoides subsp mycoides, small colony type in outbreaks of caprine pleuropneumonia in eastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusiluka, L.J.M.; Semuguruka, W.D.; Kazwala, R.R.

    2000-01-01

    by different degrees of vasculitis, and fibrinocellular exudation into the alveolar septae and lumina, and into interlobular septae and pleura. Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides, Small Colony type Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae and Mycoplasma arginini were isolated...

  2. Surveillance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, M.F.

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, the potential for improvements in surveillance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection and paratuberculosis in dairy herds was investigated, leading to a reduction in surveillance costs whilst continuing to meet specific quality targets. In particular,

  3. Description of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae sp. nov., isolated from human infections, with two subspecies, Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov., and demonstration that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of Klebsiella variicola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisse, Sylvain; Passet, Virginie; Grimont, Patrick A D

    2014-09-01

    Strains previously classified as members of Klebsiella pneumoniae phylogroups KpI, KpII-A, KpII-B and KpIII were characterized by 16S rRNA (rrs) gene sequencing, multilocus sequence analysis based on rpoB, fusA, gapA, gyrA and leuS genes, average nucleotide identity and biochemical characteristics. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that KpI and KpIII corresponded to K. pneumoniae and Klebsiella variicola, respectively, whereas KpII-A and KpII-B formed two well-demarcated sequence clusters distinct from other members of the genus Klebsiella. Average nucleotide identity between KpII-A and KpII-B was 96.4 %, whereas values lower than 94 % were obtained for both groups when compared with K. pneumoniae and K. variicola. Biochemical properties differentiated KpII-A, KpII-B, K. pneumoniae and K. variicola, with acid production from adonitol and l-sorbose and ability to use 3-phenylproprionate, 5-keto-d-gluconate and tricarballylic acid as sole carbon sources being particularly useful. Based on their genetic and phenotypic characteristics, we propose the names Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. and K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. for strains of KpII-A and KpII-B, respectively. The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae sp. nov. and of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 01A030(T) ( = SB11(T) = CIP 110771(T) = DSM 28211(T)). The type strain of K. quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae subsp. nov. is 07A044(T) ( = SB30(T) = CIP 110770(T) = DSM 28212(T)). Both strains were isolated from human blood cultures. This work also showed that Klebsiella singaporensis is a junior heterotypic synonym of K. variicola. © 2014 IUMS.

  4. Susceptibilidade antimicrobiana de Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis isolado de bovinos Antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis isolated from cattle

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    Agueda C. Vargas

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available A campilobacteriose venérea bovina, ocasionada principalmente pelo Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus e Campylobacter subsp. venerealis, é transmitida através do coito ou por inseminação com sêmen contaminado. O propósito deste estudo foi determinar a susceptibilidade in vitro de isolados de C. fetus subesp. venerealis a agentes antimicrobianos comumente utilizados para o tratamento clínico e de sêmen. Foram testadas duas cepas padrão, sendo uma de C. fetus subsp. fetus e outra de C. fetus subsp. venerealis, bem como 21 amostras de isolados clínicos de C. fetus subsp. venerealis. Os testes foram realizados conforme o método de Kirby-Bauer. A amostra padrão de C. fetus subsp. fetus demonstrou-se resistente à lincomicina, penicilina e ácido nalidíxico, enquanto a de C. fetus subsp. venerealis apresentou susceptibilidade a todos antimicrobianos testados, com exceção do ácido nalidíxico. Todas as amostras de C. fetus subsp. venerealis foram susceptíveis à amicacina, ampicilina, cefalotina, estreptomicina, gentamicina, penicilina e tetraciclina. Foi observada resistência de 42,86% à lincomicina e 4,76 % a enrofloxacina, e de 100% ao ácido nalidíxico. Ainda, 4,76% apresentaram susceptibilidade intermediária à enrofloxacina, neomicina e polimixina B e 9,52% à lincomicina. Os resultados evidenciaram a sensibilidade das amostras analisadas aos antimicrobianos comumente utilizados para o tratamento clínico e do sêmen.Venereal campylobacteriosis is associated with infection of Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis. The etiological agent is transmitted by natural bull breeding or artificial insemination using contaminated semen. The present study aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility of C. fetus subsp. venerealis isolates to antimicrobial drugs generally used in clinical and semen treatment. Reference strains of C. fetus subsp. fetus and C. fetus subsp. venerealis and 21 C. fetus

  5. Prevalence of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus in a sample of healthy dogs, cats and horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acke, E; Midwinter, A C; Lawrence, K; Gordon, S J G; Moore, S; Rasiah, I; Steward, K; French, N; Waller, A

    2015-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of β-haemolytic Lancefield group C streptococci in healthy dogs, cats and horses; to determine if frequent contact with horses was associated with isolation of these species from dogs and cats; and to characterise recovered S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates by multilocus sequence typing. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from 197 dogs and 72 cats, and nasopharyngeal swabs from 93 horses. Sampling was carried out at the Massey University Veterinary Teaching Hospital, on sheep and beef farms or on premises where horses were present. All animals were healthy and were categorised as Urban dogs and cats (minimal contact with horses or farm livestock), Farm dogs (minimal contact with horses) and Stable dogs and cats (frequent contact with horses). Swabs were cultured for β-haemolytic Streptococcus spp. and Lancefield group C streptococcal subspecies were confirmed by phenotypic and molecular techniques. Of the 197 dogs sampled, 21 (10.7 (95% CI= 4.0-25.4)%) tested positive for S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and 4 (2.0 (95% CI=0.7-5.5)%) tested positive for S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. All these isolates, except for one S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis isolate in an Urban dog, were from Stable dogs. S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis was isolated from one Stable cat. Of the 93 horses, 22 (23.7 (95% CI=12.3-40.6)%) and 6 (6.5 (95% CI=2.8-14.1)%) had confirmed S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolation respectively. Isolation of S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis from dogs was associated with frequent contact with horses (OR=9.8 (95% CI=2.6-72.8)). Three different multilocus sequence type profiles of S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus that have not been previously reported in dogs were recovered. Subclinical infection or colonisation by S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus and S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis occurs in dogs and further research on inter-species transmission and the pathogenic potential of these

  6. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis

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    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Wimmonds, Iona; Francis , Stewart; Kearney, Michael T.; Hansen, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC)and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon®, bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in theiglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums.

  7. Biofilm formation of Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Esteban; Halliday-Simmonds, Iona; Francis, Stewart; Kearney, Michael T; Hansen, John D

    2015-12-31

    Francisella noatunensis subsp. orientalis (Fno) is an emergent fish pathogen in both marine and fresh water environments. The bacterium is suspected to persist in the environment even without the presence of a suitable fish host. In the present study, the influence of different abiotic factors such as salinity and temperature were used to study the biofilm formation of different isolates of Fno including intracellular growth loci C (iglC) and pathogenicity determinant protein A (pdpA) knockout strains. Finally, we compared the susceptibility of planktonic and biofilm to three disinfectants used in the aquaculture and ornamental fish industry, namely Virkon(®), bleach and hydrogen peroxide. The data indicates that Fno is capable of producing biofilms within 24 h where both salinity as well as temperature plays a role in the growth and biofilm formation of Fno. Mutations in the iglC or pdpA, both known virulence factors, do not appear to affect the capacity of Fno to produce biofilms, and the minimum inhibitory concentration, and minimum biocidal concentration for the three disinfectants were lower than the minimum biofilm eradication concentration values. This information needs to be taken into account if trying to eradicate the pathogen from aquaculture facilities or aquariums. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. New phenylethanoids from Buddleja cordata subsp. cordata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, L; Martínez, E; Castañeda, P; Franzblau, S; Timmermann, B N; Linares, E; Bye, R; Mata, R

    2000-04-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of a crude extract of the stem bark of Buddleja cordata subsp. cordata with significant antimycobacterial activity led to the isolation of a mixture composed by ten new long-chain esters of 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethanol (1-10), along with the lichen metabolites methyl beta-orcinolcarboxylate (11) and beta-orcinolcarboxylate (12). Extensive HPLC allowed the separation of the major components of the mixture, which were characterized by spectral means as 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl stearate (3), 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl behenate (6), and 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl lignocerate (8). The minor esters were identified as 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl palmitate (1), 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl heptadecanoate (2), 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl nonadecanoate (4), 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl arachidate (5), 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl tricosanoate (7), 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl pentacosanoate (9), and 2[4'-hydroxyphenyl]-ethyl hexacosanoate (10) by GC-MS analysis of the methyl esters derivatives of the fatty acids obtained by alkaline hydrolysis of the mixture. Compound 8 exhibited moderate antibacterial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MIC = 64 micrograms/ml).

  9. Molecular characterization of virulence genes of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in equines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Javed

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to determine the occurrence of streptococci in equines in Jammu (R. S. Pura, Katra, characterization of Streptococci equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus with respect to their virulence traits and to determine antibiotic sensitivity pattern of virulent Streptococcus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 96 samples were collected from both clinically affected animals (exhibiting signs of respiratory tract disease and apparently healthy animals and were sent to laboratory. The organisms were isolated on Columbia nalidixic acid agar containing 5% sheep blood as well as on sheep blood agar and confirmed by cultural characteristics and biochemical tests. Molecular detection of Streptococcus was done directly from cultures using sodA and seM gene-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Antibiogram was performed against five antibiotics such as amoxicillin, penicillin G, streptomycin, rifampicin, and methicillin. Results: During this study, a total 40 streptococcal isolates were obtained out of which 2 isolates were of S. equi subsp. equi, 12 isolates were from S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. In the PCR-based detection, we revealed amplicons of 235 bp and 679 bp for confirmation of sodA and seM gene, respectively. In antibiogram, two isolates of S. equi subsp. equi were found resistant to penicillin G, and all other isolates were found sensitive to amoxicillin and streptomycin. Conclusion: The majority of streptococcal infections was due to S. equi subsp. Zooepidemicus, and thus was recognized as a potential pathogen of diseases of equines besides S. equi subsp. equi.

  10. Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis subsp. asaccharedens subsp. nov., a thermophilic bacterium isolated from a hot spring in Batman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul-Guven, Reyhan; Guven, Kemal; Poli, Annarita; Nicolaus, Barbara

    2008-12-01

    A new thermophilic spore-forming strain KG8(T) was isolated from the mud of Taslidere hot spring in Batman. Strain KG8(T) was aerobe, Gram-positive, rod-shaped, motile, occurring in pairs or filamentous. Growth was observed from 35-65 degrees C (optimum 55 degrees C) and at pH 5.5-9.5 (optimum pH 7.5). It was capable of utilizing starch, growth was observed until 3% NaCl (w/v) and it was positive for nitrate reduction. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, strain KG8(T) was shown to be related most closely to Anoxybacillus species. Chemotaxonomic data (major isoprenoid quinone-menaquinone-7; major fatty acid-iso-C15:0 and iso-C17:0) supported the affiliation of strain KG8(T) to the genus Anoxybacillus. The results of DNA-DNA hybridization, physiological and biochemical tests allowed genotypic and phenotypic differentiation of strain KG8(T). Based on these results we propose assigning a novel subspecies of Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis, to be named Anoxybacillus kamchatkensis subsp. asaccharedens subsp. nov. with the type strain KG8(T) (DSM 18475(T)=CIP 109280(T)).

  11. Potential Transmission Pathways of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessika Dumke

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, a member of group D streptococci, is an inhabitant of the animal and human gastrointestinal tract. Furthermore, it is a facultative pathogen which causes e.g. endocarditis, septicemia and mastitis. S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus may be transmitted either directly or indirectly between animals and humans. However, the transmission routes are an unsolved issue. In this study, we present systematic analyses of an S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolate of an infective endocarditis patient in relation to isolates of his laying hen flock. Isolates from pooled droppings of laying hens, pooled dust samples and human blood culture were characterized by using multilocus sequence typing (MLST and DNA fingerprinting. MLST revealed the same allelic profile of isolates from the human blood culture and from the droppings of laying hens. In addition, these isolates showed clonal identity regarding a similar DNA fingerprinting pattern. For the first time, we received a hint that transmission of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus between poultry and humans may occur. This raises the question about the zoonotic potential of isolates from poultry and should be considered in future studies.

  12. Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp hyointestinalis, a common Campylobacter species in reindeer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanninen, M.L.; Sarelli, L.; Sukura, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To study the prevalence of Campylobacter spp. in the faecal material of reindeer, and to identify the isolates by means of a polyphasic approach. In addition, to study the genetic diversity of Camp. hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis reindeer isolates by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis...... slaughterhouses. Samples were cultured by methods suitable for isolation of fastidious Campylobacter species. Of all samples, 6% (24/399) were Campylobacter-positive. Phenotypic characteristics, SDS-PAGE protein patterns, dot blot DNA-DNA hybridization, 23S rDNA restriction fragment polymorphism analysis and PFGE...... identified the isolates as Camp. hyointestinalis subsp. kyointestinalis. Conclusions: Campylobacter hyointestinalis subsp. hyointestinalis was the only Campylobacter species isolated from reindeer in this study. The isolates showed high genomic diversity in PFGE with the restriction enzymes SmaI and Kpn...

  13. Streptococcus equi subsp zooepidemicus Invades and Survives in Epithelial Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skive, Bolette; Rohde, Manfred; Molinari, Gabriella

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is an opportunistic pathogen of several species including humans. S. zooepidemicus is found on mucus membranes of healthy horses, but can cause acute and chronic endometritis. Recently S. zooepidemicus was found able to reside in the endo......Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (S. zooepidemicus) is an opportunistic pathogen of several species including humans. S. zooepidemicus is found on mucus membranes of healthy horses, but can cause acute and chronic endometritis. Recently S. zooepidemicus was found able to reside...

  14. A single or multistage mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis subunit vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention provides one or more immunogenic polypeptides for use in a preventive or therapeutic vaccine against latent or active infection in a human or animal caused by a Mycobacterium species, e.g. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Furthermore a single or multi-phase vaccine...... comprising the one or more immunogenic polypeptides is provided for administration for the prevention or treatment of infection with a Mycobacterium species, e.g. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Additionally, nucleic acid vaccines, capable of in vivo expression of the multi-phase vaccine...

  15. Complete genome sequence of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. insidiosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. insidiosus (Cmi) causes bacterial wilt disease of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) and can also infect the model legume plant M. truncatula. The virulence mechanisms of Cmi are yet to be identified, hampered by the lack of efficient mutagenesis tools as well as by the la...

  16. Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa: an alternative model for bacterial cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazlewood, G P; Laurie, J I; Ferreira, L M; Gilbert, H J

    1992-03-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, a Gram-negative soil bacterium, can utilize crystalline cellulose or xylan as main sources of carbon and energy. Synthesis of endoglucanases and xylanases is induced by Avicel, filter paper, carboxymethylcellulose or xylan and is repressed by cellobiose, glucose or xylose. These enzymes are secreted into the culture supernatant fluid and do not form aggregates or associate with the cell surface. Cells of Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa do not adhere to cellulose. In cultures containing Avicel or filter paper, a significant proportion of the secreted cellulase and xylanase activities becomes tightly bound to the insoluble cellulose. Western blotting has revealed that endoglucanase B, xylanase A and a cellodextrinase encoded by genes previously isolated from Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa and expressed in Escherichia coli, are synthesized by the pseudomonad under a variety of conditions. These enzymes appear to be post-translationally modified, probably through glycosylation. Overall, it appears that the cellulase/hemicellulase system of Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa differs from the model established for celluloytic anaerobes such as Clostridium thermocellum.

  17. Factors affecting survival of Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, van der J.M.; Beckhoven, van J.R.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The survival of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), the causal organism of bacterial ring rot in potato, was studied in water, to assess the risks for dissemination of Cms via surface water and infection of potato crops by irrigation. Cms was able to survive for a maximum period of 7

  18. (Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae) associated with red stripe disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-24

    Jun 24, 2011 ... 8°C after 150 days storage, only shyness appeared and after 90 and 120 days storage it showed positive re- isolation result. Phenotypic characterization. Isolate of A. avenae subsp. avenae was tested for some confirmatory physiological and biochemical tests (Table. 3). The isolate was tested for gram ...

  19. Sensitive and rapid detection of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A set of four specific primers was designed by targeting the H2 gene sequences of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae (MCCP). Using Bst DNA polymerase, the products were amplified for 60 min at 65°C in a simple water bath. Compared with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test that targets the H2 gene ...

  20. Function and safety assessment of Lactococus lactis subsp. lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... The effect of yogurt fermented by Lactococus lactis subsp. lactis LB12 isolated from traditional Chinese pickled cabbage on serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were investigated in mice. In the same, the characterizations of the strain, such as acid-tolerance, bile-tolerance, antimicrobial activity,.

  1. Comparative genomics of extrachromosomal elements in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotin, Alexandre; Gillis, Annika; Sanchis, Vincent; Nielsen-LeRoux, Christina; Mahillon, Jacques; Lereclus, Didier; Sorokin, Alexei

    2017-05-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is one of the most important microorganisms used against mosquitoes. It was intensively studied following its discovery and became a model bacterium of the B. thuringiensis species. Those studies focused on toxin genes, aggregation-associated conjugation, linear genome phages, etc. Recent announcements of genomic sequences of different strains have not been explicitly related to the biological properties studied. We report data on plasmid content analysis of four strains using ultra-high-throughput sequencing. The strains were commercial product isolates, with their putative ancestor and type B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain sequenced earlier. The assembled contigs corresponding to published and novel data were assigned to plasmids described earlier in B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and other B. thuringiensis strains. A new 360 kb plasmid was identified, encoding multiple transporters, also found in most of the earlier sequenced strains. Our genomic data show the presence of two toxin-coding plasmids of 128 and 100 kb instead of the reported 225 kb plasmid, a co-integrate of the former two. In two of the sequenced strains, only a 100 kb plasmid was present. Some heterogeneity exists in the small plasmid content and structure between strains. These data support the perception of active plasmid exchange among B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains in nature. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge on Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra with emphasis on its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge on Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra with emphasis on its importance as a non-timber forest product in South and southern Africa: a summary: part 2: commercial use, tenure and policy, domestication, intellectual property rights and benefit-sharing: review paper.

  3. Laminaria japonica Extract, an Inhibitor of Clavibater michiganense Subsp. Sepedonicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Cai

    Full Text Available Bacterial ring rot of potato is one of the most serious potato plant and tuber diseases. Laminaria japonica extract was investigated for its antimicrobial activity against Clavibater michiganense subsp. sepedonicum (Spieckermann & Kotthoff Davis et al., the causative agent of bacterial ring rot of potato. The results showed that the optimum extraction conditions of antimicrobial substances from L. japonica were an extraction temperature of 80°C, an extraction time of 12 h, and a solid to liquid ratio of 1∶25. Active compounds of L. japonica were isolated by solvent partition, thin layer chromatography (TLC and column chromatography. All nineteen fractionations had antimicrobial activities against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum, while Fractionation three (Fr.3 had the highest (P<0.05 antimicrobial activity. Chemical composition analysis identified a total of 26 components in Fr.3. The main constituents of Fr.3 were alkanes (80.97%, esters (5.24%, acids (4.87% and alcohols (2.21%. Antimicrobial activity of Fr.3 against C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum could be attributed to its ability to damage the cell wall and cell membrane, induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, increase cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, inhibit the glycolytic pathway (EMP and tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, inhibit protein and nucleic acid synthesis, and disrupt the normal cycle of DNA replication. These findings indicate that L. japonica extracts have potential for inhibiting C. michiganense subsp. sepedonicum.

  4. (PCR) for the identification of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-10-07

    Oct 7, 2011 ... sodium pyruvate) in a high security laboratory. The DNA of. Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica was maintained in the State Key Laboratory of Veterinary Etiological Biology. Clinical samples. 28 samples from 14 artificially infected animals with M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae were ...

  5. Molecular Characterization of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii Genotype III▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenas, Maria B.; Bradley, Julie; Maggi, Ricardo G.; Takara, Matt; Hegarty, Barbara C.; Breitschwerdt, Edward B.

    2008-01-01

    The molecular characterization of a Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype III strain (NCSU strain 06-CO1) isolated from the blood of a military working dog diagnosed with endocarditis is reported in this study. Several genes were amplified and sequenced for comparative sequence similarity with other strains. PMID:18367567

  6. Knowledge on Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra with emphasis on its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Knowledge on Sclerocarya birrea subsp. caffra with emphasis on its importance as a non-timber forest product in South and southern Africa: a summary: Part 1: ... potentially high fruit production and use of S. birrea it has frequently been identified as a key species to support the development of rural enterprises based on the ...

  7. The effects of aqueous root extract of Senna italica subsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-02-15

    Feb 15, 2010 ... The effects of aqueous root extracts of Senna italica subsp. arachoides on the feeding performance of adults of Hyalomma marginatum rufipes in three consecutive infestations of rabbits were studied under laboratory conditions. Rabbits were divided into treatment group (n = 3), fed aqueous root extracts ...

  8. Function and safety assessment of Lactococus lactis subsp. lactis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of yogurt fermented by Lactococus lactis subsp. lactis LB12 isolated from traditional Chinese pickled cabbage on serum cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were investigated in mice. In the same, the characterizations of the strain, such as acid-tolerance, bile-tolerance, antimicrobial activity, antibiotic sensitivity ...

  9. Fitness and its variation among populations of Acacia tortilis subsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2008-07-23

    Jul 23, 2008 ... Acacia tortilis subsp. raddiana (Fabaceae) plays an important role in the life of desert animals and is a major source of livestock feed and firewood for the native Bedouin people in Southern Sinai, Egypt. High mortality and low juvenile recruitment has been reported in recent years leading to decline in.

  10. Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare) originated from Crescent Fertile region as detected by seed storage proteins. RIM MZID FARHAT CHIBANI RAYDA BEN AYED MOHSEN HANANA JOELLE BREIDI RABIH KABALAN SAMIH EL-HAJJ HASSAN MACHLAB AHMED REBAI LAMIS ...

  11. Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic diversity in barley landraces (Hordeum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare) originated from Crescent Fertile region as detected by seed storage proteins. RIM MZID1∗, FARHAT CHIBANI2, RAYDA BEN AYED3, MOHSEN HANANA1, JOELLE BREIDI4,. RABIH KABALAN4, SAMIH EL-HAJJ5, HASSAN MACHLAB6, AHMED ...

  12. Fitness and its variation among populations of Acacia tortilis subsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acacia tortilis subsp. raddiana (Fabaceae) plays an important role in the life of desert animals and is a major source of livestock feed and firewood for the native Bedouin people in Southern Sinai, Egypt. High mortality and low juvenile recruitment has been reported in recent years leading to decline in population size and ...

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Beijerinckia indica subsp. indica▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tamas, Ivica; Dedysh, Svetlana N.; Liesack, Werner; Stott, Matthew B.; Alam, Maqsudul; Murrell, J. Colin; Dunfield, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    Beijerinckia indica subsp. indica is an aerobic, acidophilic, exopolysaccharide-producing, N-2-fixing soil bacterium. It is a generalist chemoorganotroph that is phylogenetically closely related to facultative and obligate methanotrophs of the genera Methylocella and Methylocapsa. Here we report the full genome sequence of this bacterium.

  14. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  15. Genetic Basis of Tetracycline Resistance in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gueimonde, M.; Florez, A.B.; Hoek, van A.H.A.M.; Stuer-Lauridsen, B.; Stroman, P.; Reyes-Gavilan, de los C.G.; Margolles, A.

    2010-01-01

    All strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis described to date show medium level resistance to tetracycline. Screening of 26 strains from a variety of sources revealed the presence of tet(W) in all isolates. A transposase gene upstream of tet(W) was found in all strains, and both genes were

  16. Emended description of Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus and Mycobacteriumabscessus subsp. bolletii and designation of Mycobacteriumabscessus subsp. massiliense comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortoli, Enrico; Kohl, Thomas A; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Trovato, Alberto; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Garcia, Maria Jesus; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Turenne, Christine Y; Griffith, David E; Philley, Julie V; Baldan, Rossella; Campana, Silvia; Cariani, Lisa; Colombo, Carla; Taccetti, Giovanni; Teri, Antonio; Niemann, Stefan; Wallace, Richard J; Cirillo, Daniela M

    2016-11-01

    The taxonomic position of members of the Mycobacterium abscessus complex has been the subject of intensive investigation and, in some aspects confusion, in recent years as a result of varying approaches to genetic data interpretation. Currently, the former species Mycobacterium massiliense and Mycobacterium bolletii are grouped together as Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii. They differ greatly, however, as the former M. bolletii has a functional erm(41) gene that confers inducible resistance to macrolides, the primary therapeutic antimicrobials for M. abscessus, while in the former M. massiliense the erm(41) gene is non-functional. Furthermore, previous whole genome studies of the M. abscessus group support the separation of M. bolletii and M. massiliense. To shed further light on the population structure of Mycobacterium abscessus, 43 strains and three genomes retrieved from GenBank were subjected to pairwise comparisons using three computational approaches: verage ucleotide dentity, enome to enome istance and single nucleotide polymorphism analysis. The three methods produced overlapping results, each demonstrating three clusters of strains corresponding to the same number of taxonomic entities. The distances were insufficient to warrant distinction at the species level, but met the criteria for differentiation at the subspecies level. Based on prior erm(41)-related phenotypic data and current genomic data, we conclude that the species M. abscessus encompasses, in adjunct to the presently recognized subspecies M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, a third subspecies for which we suggest the name M. abscessus subsp. massiliense comb. nov. (type strain CCUG 48898T=CIP 108297T=DSM 45103T=KCTC 19086T).

  17. Novel Temperate Phages of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and subsp. diarizonae and Their Activity against Pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica Isolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Mikalová

    Full Text Available Forty strains of Salmonella enterica (S. enterica subspecies salamae (II, arizonae (IIIa, diarizonae (IIIb, and houtenae (IV were isolated from human or environmental samples and tested for bacteriophage production. Production of bacteriophages was observed in 15 S. enterica strains (37.5% belonging to either the subspecies salamae (8 strains or diarizonae (7 strains. Activity of phages was tested against 52 pathogenic S. enterica subsp. enterica isolates and showed that phages produced by subsp. salamae had broader activity against pathogenic salmonellae compared to phages from the subsp. diarizonae. All 15 phages were analyzed using PCR amplification of phage-specific regions and 9 different amplification profiles were identified. Five phages (SEN1, SEN4, SEN5, SEN22, and SEN34 were completely sequenced and classified as temperate phages. Phages SEN4 and SEN5 were genetically identical, thus representing a single phage type (i.e. SEN4/5. SEN1 and SEN4/5 fit into the group of P2-like phages, while the SEN22 phage showed sequence relatedness to P22-like phages. Interestingly, while phage SEN34 was genetically distantly related to Lambda-like phages (Siphoviridae, it had the morphology of the Myoviridae family. Based on sequence analysis and electron microscopy, phages SEN1 and SEN4/5 were members of the Myoviridae family and phage SEN22 belonged to the Podoviridae family.

  18. Identification of Bartonella Species Isolated from Rodents from Yucatan, Mexico, and Isolation of Bartonella vinsonii subsp. yucatanensis subsp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte Fischedick, Frederique B; Stuckey, Matthew J; Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro; Moreno-Sandoval, Hayde; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo; Salas-Rojas, Mónica; Arechiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Overgaauw, Paul A M; Kasten, Rickie W; Chomel, Bruno B

    2016-10-01

    Bartonella species are highly endemic among wild rodents in many parts of the world. Blood and/or blood clot cultures from 38 rodents, including 27 Yucatan deer mouse (Peromyscus yucatanicus), 7 Gaumer's spiny pocket mouse (Heteromys gaumeri), 2 black rats (Rattus rattus) and 2 big-eared climbing rats (Ototylomys phyllotis) captured near Merida, Yucatan, Mexico, led to the isolation in 3-4 days of small gram-negative bacilli, which were identified as Bartonella spp. based on colony morphology. DNA extraction and PCR testing were also performed from heart samples of 35 of these 38 rodents. Overall, Bartonella spp. were isolated from the blood/blood clots of 22 (58%) rodents. All Bartonella-positive rodents were Yucatán deer mice from San José Pituch. Sequencing of a fragment of the gltA gene showed that all but one rodent isolates were closest to B. vinsonii subsp. vinsonii and one isolate was intermediate between B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. vinsonii subsp. arupensis. Further analysis of concatenated housekeeping genes (gltA, ftsZ, rpoB, and 16S rRNA) suggests that this outlier isolate is a new subspecies within the B. vinsonii genogroup, for which we proposed the name B. vinsonii subsp. yucatanensis.

  19. Antioxidant activity profiling by spectrophotometric methods of aqueous methanolic extracts of Helichrysum stoechas subsp. rupestre and Phagnalon saxatile subsp. saxatile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddouchi, Farah; Chaouche, Tarik Mohammed; Ksouri, Riadh; Medini, Faten; Sekkal, Fatima Zohra; Benmansour, Abdelhafid

    2014-06-01

    The aqueous methanolic extracts of two plants from Algeria, Helichrysum stoechas subsp. rupestre and Phagnalon saxatile subsp. saxatile, were investigated for their antioxidant activity. Total phenolics, flavonoids, and tannins were determined by spectrophotometric techniques. In vitro antioxidant and radical scavenging profiling was determined by spectrophotometric methods, through: Total antioxidant capacity, and radical scavenging effects by the DPPH and ABTS methods, reducing and chelating power, and blanching inhibition of the β-carotene. All of the extracts showed interesting antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. The highest contents in phenolics, tannins, and the highest total antioxidant capacity as gallic acid equivalents of 97.5 ± 0.33 mg GAE/g DW was obtained for the flowers of H. stoechas subsp. rupestre extract in the phosphomolybdenum assay. An extract of the leafy stems of P. saxatile subsp. saxatile revealed the highest content of flavonoids, and the highest antioxidant activity by the radical scavenging and β-carotene assays when compared with standards. The best activity was by the scavenging radical DPPH with an IC50 value of 5.65 ± 0.10 μg·mL(-1). The studied medicinal plants could provide scientific evidence for some traditional uses in the treatment of diseases related to the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni from zoo animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luechtefeld, N W; Cambre, R C; Wang, W L

    1981-12-01

    Over a 1-year period, 619 fecal specimens from animals at the Denver Zoo were cultured for Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni. The organism was isolated from 35 animals, including 12 primates, 2 felids, a red panda, 13 hooved animals, 6 birds, and 1 reptile. Of 44 cultured fecal specimens from diarrheal animals, 31.8% were positive for Campylobacter, whereas only 5.6% of 575 specimens from animals without diarrhea were positive (P less than 0.001). Among 25 isolates tested, 12 serotypes were represented; several of these serotypes are commonly associated with Campylobacter enteritis in human beings. Campylobacter fetus subsp jejuni was isolated from 8% of 75 wild pigeons trapped on the zoo premises during winter months and from 26% of 75 trapped during March and April (P less than 0.01).

  1. Actinobacillus equuli subsp. equuli associated with equine valvular endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalbæk, Bent; Østergaard, Stine; Buhl, Rikke

    2007-01-01

    Microbiological and pathological data from a case of equine valvular endocarditis are reported. Limited information is available on the pathogenic potential of equine Actinobacillus species as several strains originate from apparently healthy horses. After the establishment of two subspecies within...... this species, this seems to be the first report of an etiological association between A. equuli subsp. equuli and equine endocarditis. Furthermore, new information on some phenotypical characteristics of this subspecies are reported, compared to previous findings...

  2. Russian isolates enlarge the known geographic diversity of Francisella tularensis subsp. mediasiatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalii Timofeev

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis, a small Gram-negative bacterium, is capable of infecting a wide range of animals, including humans, and causes a plague-like disease called tularemia-a highly contagious disease with a high mortality rate. Because of these characteristics, F. tularensis is considered a potential agent of biological terrorism. Currently, F. tularensis is divided into four subspecies, which differ in their virulence and geographic distribution. Two of them, subsp. tularensis (primarily found in North America and subsp. holarctica (widespread across the Northern Hemisphere, are responsible for tularemia in humans. Subsp. novicida is almost avirulent in humans. The fourth subspecies, subsp. mediasiatica, is the least studied because of its limited distribution and impact in human health. It is found only in sparsely populated regions of Central Asia. In this report, we describe the first focus of naturally circulating F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica in Russia. We isolated and characterized 18 strains of this subspecies in the Altai region. All strains were highly virulent in mice. The virulence of subsp. mediasiatica in a vaccinated mouse model is intermediate between that of subsp. tularensis and subsp. holarctica. Based on a multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA, we show that the Altaic population of F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica is genetically distinct from the classical Central Asian population, and probably is endemic to Southern Siberia. We propose to subdivide the mediasiatica subspecies into three phylogeographic groups, M.I, M.II and M.III.

  3. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105°C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. IMPORTANCE M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula

  4. Thermal Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Artificially Contaminated Milk by Direct Steam Injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterz, Mats; Butot, Sophie; Jagadeesan, Balamurugan; Bakker, Douwe; Donaghy, John

    2016-05-01

    The efficiency of direct steam injection (DSI) at 105 °C for 3 s to inactivate Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk at a pilot-plant scale was investigated. Milk samples were artificially contaminated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and also with cow fecal material naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also tested milk artificially contaminated with Mycobacterium smegmatis as a candidate surrogate to compare thermal inactivation between M. smegmatis and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Following the DSI process, no viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or M. smegmatis was recovered using culture methods for both strains. For pure M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cultures, a minimum reduction of 5.6 log10 was achieved with DSI, and a minimum reduction of 5.7 log10 was found with M. smegmatis. The minimum log10 reduction for wild-type M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis naturally present in feces was 3.3. In addition, 44 dairy and nondairy powdered infant formula (PIF) ingredients used during the manufacturing process of PIF were tested for an alternate source for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and were found to be negative by quantitative PCR (qPCR). In conclusion, the results obtained from this study indicate that a >7-fold-log10 reduction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk can be achieved with the applied DSI process. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is widespread in dairy herds in many countries. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle, and infected animals can directly or indirectly (i.e., fecal contamination) contaminate milk. Despite much research and debate, there is no conclusive evidence that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is a zoonotic bacterium, i.e., one that causes disease in humans. The presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis or its DNA has been reported in dairy products, including pasteurized milk, cheese, and infant formula. In light of this

  5. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens SUBSP. plantarum PROBIOTIC STRAINS AS PROTEASE PRODUCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Маtseliukh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteases from probiotic strains of the genus Bacillus, just like the antibiotics, bacteriocins and other hydrolytic enzymes, are one of the main factors that determine their biological activity. The aim of this work was to study the synthesis and biochemical properties of proteases from two strains Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5139 and UCM B-5140 that included in the probiotic Endosporin. The cultivation of strains was carried out in flasks under rotating for two days. The influence of physico-chemical parameters of the reaction medium on proteolytic activity was studied on partially purified protease preparations. Lytic activity was determined by turbidimetric method. On the second day of cultivation B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM В-5139 and UCM В-5140 synthesized the metal-dependent peptidase and serine protease, respectively. The optimum conditions of their action were the following: temperature 37–40 °C and pH 6.5–7.0. Isolated proteases are able to lyse the living cells of Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. Thus we demonstrated that B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum UCM B-5140 and UCM B-5139, included in the probiotic veterinary preparation Endosporin, produced proteolytic enzymes that hydrolyze the native insoluble proteins (elastin, fibrin and collagen. These enzymes belong to the group of neutral metal-dependent and serine proteases. They are active under physiological conditions against gram-positive bacteria and yeasts. The application of these proteases in biotechnology is considered.

  6. Relationship between Presence of Cows with Milk Positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibody by Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay and Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Dust in Cattle Barns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenberg, S.W.F.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314000380; Chuchaisangrat, R.; Nielen, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123535298; Koets, A.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/194306992

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne’s disease, in cattle is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, which has recently been suspected to be transmitted through dust. This longitudinal study on eight commercial M. avium subsp. paratuberculosispositive dairy farms studied the relationship

  7. Discrimination of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Rinosh J; Thachil, Anil J; Ramachandran, Akhilesh

    2017-09-01

    Accurate and timely identification of infectious etiologies is of great significance in veterinary microbiology, especially for critical diseases such as strangles, a highly contagious disease of horses caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. equi. We evaluated a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) platform for use in species- and subspecies-level identification of S. equi isolates from horses and compared it with an automated biochemical system. We used 25 clinical isolates each of S. equi subsp. equi and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Using the MALDI-TOF MS platform, it was possible to correctly identify all 50 isolates to the species level. Unique mass peaks were identified in the bacterial peptide mass spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS, which can be used for accurate subspecies-level identification of S. equi. Mass peaks (mass/charge, m/ z) 6,751.9 ± 1.4 (mean ± standard deviation) and 5,958.1 ± 1.3 were found to be unique to S. equi subsp. equi and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus, respectively. The automated biochemical system correctly identified 47 of 50 of the isolates to the species level as S. equi, whereas at the subspecies level, 24 of 25 S. equi subsp. equi isolates and 22 of 25 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates were correctly identified. Our results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS can be used for accurate species- and subspecies-level identification of S. equi.

  8. The origin of the serpentine endemic Minuartia laricifolia subsp. ophiolitica by vicariance and competitive exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Abigail J; Merges, Dominik; Kadereit, Joachim W

    2013-04-01

    Serpentine soils harbour a unique flora that is rich in endemics. We examined the evolution of serpentine endemism in Minuartia laricifolia, which has two ecologically distinct subspecies with disjunct distributions: subsp. laricifolia on siliceous rocks in the western Alps and eastern Pyrenees and subsp. ophiolitica on serpentine in the northern Apennines. We analysed AFLPs and chloroplast sequences from 30 populations to examine their relationships and how their current distributions and ecologies were influenced by Quaternary climatic changes. Minuartia laricifolia was divided into four groups with a BAPS cluster analysis of the AFLP data, one group consisted only of subsp. ophiolitica, while three groups were found within subsp. laricifolia: Maritime Alps, north-western Alps and central Alps. The same groups were recovered in a neighbour-joining tree, although subsp. ophiolitica was nested within the Maritime Alps group of subsp. laricifolia. Subspecies ophiolitica contained three different chloroplast haplotypes, which were also found in the Maritime Alps group of subsp. laricifolia. Given its high genetic diversity, subsp. ophiolitica appears to have arisen from subsp. laricifolia by vicariance instead of by long-distance dispersal. Genetic and geographic evidence point to the Maritime Alps populations of subsp. laricifolia as the closest relatives of subsp. ophiolitica. We hypothesize that M. laricifolia was also able to grow on nonserpentine rocks in the northern Apennines during glacial periods when the vegetation was more open, but that only the serpentine-adapted populations were able to persist until the present due to their competitive exclusion from more favourable habitats. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Molecular Epidemiology of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a Longitudinal Study of Three Dairy Herds▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Abani K.; Mitchell, Rebecca M.; Kramer, Aagje J.; Zurakowski, Michael J.; Fyock, Terry L.; Whitlock, Robert H.; Smith, Julia M.; Hovingh, Ernest; Van Kessel, Jo Ann S.; Karns, Jeffrey S.; Schukken, Ynte H.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether cows that were low shedders of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were passively shedding or truly infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. We also investigated whether it is possible that these M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected animals could have been infected as adults by contemporary high-shedding animals (supershedders). The M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates were obtained from a longitudinal study of three dairy herds in the northeastern United States. Isolates were selected from fecal samples and tissues at slaughter from all animals that were culture positive at the same time that supershedders were present in the herds. Shedding levels (CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis/g of feces) for the animals at each culture-positive occasion were determined. Using a multilocus short-sequence-repeat technique, we found 15 different strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from a total of 142 isolates analyzed. Results indicated herd-specific infection patterns; there was a clonal infection in herd C, with 89% of isolates from animals sharing the same strain, whereas herds A and B showed several different strains infecting the animals at the same time. Tissues from 80% of cows with at least one positive fecal culture (other than supershedders) were culture positive, indicating a true M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. The results of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain typing and observed shedding levels showed that at least 50% of low shedders have the same strain as that of a contemporary supershedder. Results of this study suggest that in a dairy herd, more of the low-shedding cows are truly infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis than are passively shedding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The sharing of strains between low shedders and the contemporary supershedders suggests that low shedders may have been infected by environmental exposure of M. avium

  10. Complete Genomic Sequence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 Strain RM1285 Isolated from Packaged Chicken

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Craig; Huynh, S; Heikema, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPoultry products serve as the main source of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni infections in humans. C. jejuni subsp. jejuni infections are a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis and are a prevalent antecedent to Guillain-Barré syndrome. This study describes the genome of C. jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 strain RM1285, isolated from packaged chicken in California.

  11. Complete genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, isolated from human breast milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease. We report the draft genome sequences of six M. avium subsp paratuberculosis isolates obtained from diverse hosts including bison, cattle and sheep. These sequences will deepen our understanding of host association ...

  12. First isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis from commercial pasteurized milk in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Paolicchi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis was isolated from two out of seventy samples (2.86 % of pasteurized and ultra-pasteurized milk. The isolates were positives to IS900 PCR and showed a C17 RFLP pattern, the most prevalent in Argentina. The present study is the first report of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis culture from pasteurized milk in Argentina.

  13. MAO-A inhibition profiles of some benzophenone glucosides from Gentiana verna subsp. pontica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaya, Duygu; Jäger, Anna; Yalçin, Funda N

    2014-01-01

    Gentiana verna L. subsp. pontica (Soltok.) Hayek, G. pyrenaica L., and G. verna L. subsp. balcanica Pritchard from Turkey were tested for their MAO-A inhibitory effects. A photometric peroxidase linked MAO-A bioassay performed on the H20 extracts prepared from the methanolic extracts of the title...

  14. Neonatal streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, Shigeo; Ogihara, Tohru; Yasui, Masako; Hasegawa, Masashi; Hira, Seigo; Oue, Shinya; Ubukata, Kimiko; Watanabe, Haruo; Takahashi, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We report a neonatal infection with Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis occurring through maternal transmission and presenting as streptococcal toxic shock syndrome 12 hours after birth. Pediatricians and obstetricians should be aware of the possibility of this infectious disease when examining newborns with fever. These observations suggest that antenatal maternal screening for S. dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis should be considered.

  15. Preliminary investigation of a mice model of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renois, Fanny; Jacques, Jérôme; Guillard, Thomas; Moret, Hélène; Pluot, Michel; Andreoletti, Laurent; de Champs, Christophe

    2011-11-01

    In the present study, we comparatively assessed the pathophysiological mechanisms developed during lung infection of BALB/C female mice infected by an original wild type Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. ozaenae strain (CH137) or by a referent subspecies K. pneumoniae. subsp. pneumoniae strain (ATCC10031). The mice infected with 2.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. pneumoniae (n = 10) showed transient signs of infection and all of them recovered. All of those infected with 1.10⁶ CFU K. p. subsp. ozaenae (n = 10) developed pneumonia within 24 h and died between 48 and 72 h. Few macrophages, numerous polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were observed in their lungs in opposite to K. p. subsp. pneumoniae. In bronchoalveolar lavage, a significant increase in MIP-2, IL-6, KC and MCP-1 levels was only observed in K. p. subsp. ozaenae infected mice whereas high levels of TNF-α were evidenced with the two subspecies. Our findings indicated a lethal effect of a wild type K. p. subsp. ozaenae strain by acute pneumonia reflecting an insufficient alveolar macrophage response. This model might be of a major interest to comparatively explore the pathogenicity of K. p. subsp ozaenae strains and to further explore the physiopathological mechanisms of gram-negative bacteria induced human pneumonia. Copyright © 2011 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Draft genome sequence of the first human isolate of the ruminant pathogen Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seersholm, Frederik Valeur; Fischer, Anne; Heller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is a well-known pathogen of small ruminants. A recent human case of septicemia involving this agent raised the question of its potential pathogenicity to humans. We present the first draft genome sequence of a human Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum...

  17. Hospedeiros alternativos de Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli Alternative hosts of Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rosa P. Nascimento

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Uma das principais doenças que afeta o meloeiro é a mancha-aquosa, causada pela bactéria Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac. Visando conhecer hospedeiros alternativos de Aac, plantas no estágio de primeiras folhas definitivas, de várias espécies/cultivares, incluindo cucurbitáceas, solanáceas, gramíneas, leguminosas e caricáceas, foram inoculadas pela atomização da parte aérea com suspensão dos isolados Aac 1.49 e Aac 12.13, oriundos de melão e melancia, respectivamente. A suscetibilidade das plantas aos isolados foi avaliada pelo período de incubação (PI e incidência da doença (INC. Caupi, feijão, fumo e milho não apresentaram sintomas. Os menores PIs foram observados em cucurbitáceas (3,0 d, com exceção da bucha (6,83 d. Incidências da doença acima de 90% foram observadas em cucurbitáceas, excetuando a bucha e em solanáceas, para ambos os isolados de Aac. Em outro experimento, frutos de abóbora, abobrinha, berinjela, mamão, maxixe, melancia, melão, pepino, pimentão e tomate foram analisados quanto à suscetibilidade aos isolados Aac 1.49 e Aac 12.13. Os frutos foram inoculados pelo método de injeção subepidérmica, determinando-se PI, INC e severidade, avaliada pelo diâmetro da lesão externa (DLE e profundidade da lesão (PL. Menores PIs (2,0 d foram detectados em frutos de mamão, melancia, melão e pimentão. Incidência de 100% foi observada em todos os frutos inoculados, com exceção da abobrinha (93,75% e da abóbora (34,37%. Maiores DLEs foram observados em pepino (1,47 cm para o isolado Aac 1.49 e em melancia (1,60 cm e melão (1,07 cm para Aac 12.13. As maiores PL foram constatadas em melancia (1,72 e 0,75 cm respectivamente para Aac 1.49 e Aac 12.13. Frutos de berinjela não apresentaram sintomas externos embora as lesões internas tenham sido profundas.One of the most important melon diseases is the bacterial blotch caused by Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac. Alternative hosts of this

  18. Genetic diversity and phylogeography in two diploid ferns, Asplenium fontanum subsp. fontanum and A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens, in the western Mediterranean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, H V; Ansell, S W; Russell, S J; Schneider, H; Vogel, J C

    2009-12-01

    Asplenium fontanum subsp. fontanum and A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens are diploid rock ferns of limestone outcrops of the western Mediterranean region. Asplenium fontanum subsp. fontanum occurs from Valencia through northeastern Spain to the Alpes-Maritimes and Swiss Jura. Asplenium petrarchae subsp. bivalens occurs only on Majorca, in Valencia and possibly in southern Spain. We analysed allozyme and chloroplast genetic marker diversity in 75 populations of A. fontanum subsp. fontanum and 12 populations of A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens sampled from across their respective ranges. The two species show similar levels of species and population genetic diversity to one another and to other diploid European Asplenium taxa. Both are predominantly outbreeding, as indicated by F(IS) = 0.108 and 0.167 respectively. Substantial between-population differentiation results largely from differentiation between regions. Isolation by distance operates over limited geographic ranges, up to 50 km. In A. fontanum subsp. fontanum, the major geographical differentiation between Valencia and the rest of the taxon range probably represents an ancient range fragmentation. A less pronounced differentiation divides populations in the SW from those in the NE of the range, with evidence for a biogeographic link between the eastern Pyrenees and southeastern France. High diversity in the Pyrenees may either represent ancient population differentiation, or a suture zone. In A. petrarchae subsp. bivalens, populations on Majorca exhibit a subset of the genetic diversity present in Valencia, although the two regions are strongly differentiated by differing allele frequencies. Dispersal from the mainland may have founded Majorcan populations, although a role for in situ island survival cannot be excluded.

  19. Assessing the Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during Composting of Livestock Carcasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachuk, Victoria L.; Krause, Denis O.; McAllister, Tim A.; Buckley, Katherine E.; Reuter, Tim; Hendrick, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants, with substantial economic impacts on the cattle industry. Johne's disease is known for its long latency period, and difficulties in diagnosis are due to insensitivities of current detection methods. Eradication is challenging as M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can survive for extended periods within the environment, resulting in new infections in naïve animals (W. Xu et al., J. Environ. Qual. 38:437-450, 2009). This study explored the use of a biosecure, static composting structure to inactivate M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Mycobacterium smegmatis was also assessed as a surrogate for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Two structures were constructed to hold three cattle carcasses each. Naturally infected tissues and ground beef inoculated with laboratory-cultured M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. smegmatis were placed in nylon and plastic bags to determine effects of temperature and compost environment on viability over 250 days. After removal, samples were cultured and growth of both organisms was assessed after 12 weeks. After 250 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was still detectable by PCR, while M. smegmatis was not detected after 67 days of composting. Furthermore, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable in both implanted nylon and plastic bags over the composting period. As the compost never reached a homogenous thermophilic (55 to 65°C) state throughout each structure, an in vitro experiment was conducted to examine viability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis after exposure to 80°C for 90 days. Naturally infected lymph tissues were mixed with and without compost. After 90 days, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis remained viable despite exposure to temperatures typically higher than that achieved in compost. In conclusion, it is unlikely composting can be used as a means of inactivating M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis associated with cattle

  20. Review of Mycobacteriumavium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen candidates with diagnostic potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is a slow growing bacterium that can infect ruminants and remain latent for years without development of any clinical signs or disease. Diagnosis is often based on detection of MAP antibodies in milk or serum samples or culture of bacteria from...... faeces; however, these diagnostic tools are often not applicable until years after infection. Detection of MAP specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses can serve as an alternative and be implemented in a diagnostic tool. CMI responses can be measured at an early stage of infection, prior...

  1. Triterpenes from the flowers of Gochnatia polymorpha subsp. floccosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana B. Silva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical study of the flowers of Gochnatia polymorpha subsp. floccosa, Asteraceae, yielded eleven known triterpenes identified as lupeol, lupeyl acetate, lupeyl palmitate, taraxasterol, taraxasteryl acetate, pseudotaraxasterol, pseudotaraxasterol acetate, α-amyrin, α-amyryl palmitate, β-amyrin and β-amyryl palmitate, along with sitosterol, stigmasterol, palmitic and stearic acids. These compounds are been reported for the first time in the species. The compounds were identified by analysis of NMR spectra (¹H, 13C and DEPT, GC-MS and comparison with literature data. Previous work have reported the isolation of triterpenes, diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, coumarins and phenolic compounds from aerial parts and roots from G. polymorpha.

  2. Triterpenes from the flowers of Gochnatia polymorpha subsp. floccosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana B. Silva

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemical study of the flowers of Gochnatia polymorpha subsp. floccosa, Asteraceae, yielded eleven known triterpenes identified as lupeol, lupeyl acetate, lupeyl palmitate, taraxasterol, taraxasteryl acetate, pseudotaraxasterol, pseudotaraxasterol acetate, α-amyrin, α-amyryl palmitate, β-amyrin and β-amyryl palmitate, along with sitosterol, stigmasterol, palmitic and stearic acids. These compounds are been reported for the first time in the species. The compounds were identified by analysis of NMR spectra (¹H, 13C and DEPT, GC-MS and comparison with literature data. Previous work have reported the isolation of triterpenes, diterpenes, sesquiterpenes, flavonoids, coumarins and phenolic compounds from aerial parts and roots from G. polymorpha.

  3. Micromorphology of the halophyte Juncus gerardii Loisel. subsp. gerardii (Juncaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Futorna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been established that anatomical structure of vegetative organs of the halophyte Juncus gerardiisubsp. gerardiicombines xeromorphic and halomophic features. Such features as parenchyma lining, good development of bulliform cells, and weak development of mechanical tissue are typically halomophic. However, plants also have features considered as xeromorphic: e.g. smaller cells of the tissues, the high length of the cells in palisade mesophyll (in the leaves, and length of the cells in chlorenchyma (in the stem. The seeds of J. gerardii subsp. gerardiihave not special morphological or anatomical adaptations to germination at the high level of salinity.

  4. Subspeciation of Bifidobacterium longum by multilocus approaches and amplified fragment length polymorphism: Description of B. longum subsp. suillum subsp. nov., isolated from the faeces of piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanokura, Emiko; Oki, Kaihei; Makino, Hiroshi; Modesto, Monica; Pot, Bruno; Mattarelli, Paola; Biavati, Bruno; Watanabe, Koichi

    2015-07-01

    The species Bifidobacterium longum is currently divided into three subspecies, B. longum subsp. longum, B. longum subsp. infantis and B. longum subsp. suis. This classification was based on an assessment of accumulated information on the species' phenotypic and genotypic features. The three subspecies of B. longum were investigated using genotypic identification [amplified-fragment length polymorphism (AFLP), multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST)]. By using the AFLP and the MLSA methods, we allocated 25 strains of B. longum into three major clusters corresponding to the three subspecies; the cluster comprising the strains of B. longum subsp. suis was further divided into two subclusters differentiable by the ability to produce urease. By using the MLST method, the 25 strains of B. longum were divided into eight groups: four major groups corresponding to the results obtained by AFLP and MLSA, plus four minor disparate groups. The results of AFLP, MLSA and MLST analyses were consistent and revealed a novel subspeciation of B. longum, which comprised three known subspecies and a novel subspecies of urease-negative B. longum, for which the name B. longum subsp. suillum subsp. nov. is proposed, with type strain Su 851(T)=DSM 28597(T)=JCM 19995(T). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Capsular exopolysaccharide biosynthesis gene of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Falentin, Hélène; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Lapointe, Gisèle; Roy, Denis

    2008-07-31

    In the dairy industry, exopolysaccharides (EPS) contribute to improving the texture and viscosity of cheese and yoghurt and also receive increasing attention because of their beneficial properties for health. For lactic acid bacteria, the production of EPS is well studied. However, for dairy propionibacteria the biosynthesis of EPS is poorly documented. A polysaccharide synthase-encoding gene was identified in the genome of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii TL 34 (CIP 103027). This gene best aligns with Tts, the polysaccharide synthase gene of Streptococcus pneumoniae type 37 that is responsible for the production of a beta-glucan capsular polysaccharide. PCR amplification showed the presence of an internal fragment of this gene in twelve strains of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii with a ropy phenotype in YEL+ medium. The gene sequence is highly conserved, as less than 1% of nucleotides differed among the 10 strains containing the complete gtf gene. The same primers failed to detect the gene in Propionibacterium acidipropionici strain TL 47, which is known to excrete exopolysaccharides in milk. The presence of (1-->3, 1-->2)-beta-d-glucan capsule was demonstrated for 7 out of 12 strains by agglutination with a S. pneumoniae-type 37-specific antiserum. The presence of mRNA corresponding to the gene was detected by RT-PCR in three strains at both exponential and stationary growth phases. This work represents the first identification of a polysaccharide synthase gene of P. freudenreichii, and further studies will be undertaken to elucidate the role of capsular EPS.

  6. Análisis comparativo del cariotipo en poblaciones de Alstroemeria ligtu subsp. ligtu y A. ligtu subsp. simsii (Alstroemeriaceae de Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M. Baeza

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alstroemeria (Alstroemeriaceae es un género endémico de América del Sur. En Chile, este género se distribuye desde el extremo norte hasta la Patagonia, y la mayor diversidad de especies se encuentra en la zona central. Precisamente en esta zona crece Alstroemeria ligtu con sus 3 subespecies: A. ligtu subsp. ligtu, A. ligtu subsp. incarnata, A. ligtu subsp. simsii. Se realizó un estudio comparativo del cariotipo de individuos provenientes de 5 poblaciones de A. ligtu subsp. ligtu de la VIII Región, y de una población de A. ligtu subsp. simsii de la V Región, mediante tinción de los cromosomas con DAPI u orceína acética. Las seis poblaciones estudiadas presentaron un cariotipo asimétrico, con 2n=2x=16 cromosomas. Las poblaciones de A. ligtu subsp. ligtu presentaron una fórmula haploide conformada por cuatro cromosomas metacéntricos (los pares 1 y 2 con microsatélites, uno submetacéntrico con microsatélite y tres telocéntricos con microsatélites. La población de A. ligtu subsp. simsii se caracterizó por poseer cinco cromosomas metacéntricos (el par 2 con un microsatélite y el par 6 con una constricción secundaria y tres cromosomas telocéntricos con satélite. Estos resultados indican que el cariotipo en A. ligtu es variable, y es probable que cambios a nivel cromosómico hayan contribuido en la diversificación de esta especie.

  7. Proposal to reclassify Brenneria quercina (Hildebrand and Schroth 1967) Hauben et al. 1999 into a new genus, Lonsdalea gen. nov., as Lonsdalea quercina comb. nov., descriptions of Lonsdalea quercina subsp. quercina comb. nov., Lonsdalea quercina subsp. iberica subsp. nov. and Lonsdalea quercina subsp. britannica subsp. nov., emendation of the description of the genus Brenneria, reclassification of Dickeya dieffenbachiae as Dickeya dadantii subsp. dieffenbachiae comb. nov., and emendation of the description of Dickeya dadantii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Carrie L; Cleenwerck, Ilse; Denman, Sandra; Venter, Stephanus N; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; Coutinho, Teresa A; De Vos, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Bacterial isolates from oak trees in Spain and Britain, showing symptoms of bark canker and Acute Oak Decline (AOD), respectively, were examined by a polyphasic approach. Both 16S rRNA gene sequencing and multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA), based on partial sequences of gyrB, rpoB, infB and atpD genes, revealed that the isolates were separated into two genetic groups according to their origin. Their closest phylogenetic relative was Brenneria quercina, the causal agent of drippy nut disease of oak, which clustered distant to the other species of the genus Brenneria. MLSA data for species of the genera Brenneria, Pectobacterium, Dickeya, Erwinia, Pantoea and Samsonia confirmed the polyphyletic nature of the genus Brenneria and indicated synonymy of Dickeya dadantii and Dickeya dieffenbachiae. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed this synonymy and also revealed DNA-DNA relatedness values of 58-73% between the new oak isolates and B. quercina. Phenotypic and/or chemotaxonomic methods allowed B. quercina and the two genetic groups of new oak isolates to be discriminated from other recognized species of the genus Brenneria and from members of the closely related genera Dickeya, Pectobacterium and Samsonia. Based on the data obtained, the following taxonomic proposals are made: (1) reclassification of B. quercina as the type species of a novel genus, Lonsdalea gen. nov., as Lonsdalea quercina comb. nov. (type strain LMG 2724(T)=ATCC 29281(T)=CCUG 48867(T)=CFBP 3617(T)=CIP 105201(T)=DSM 4561(T)=ICMP 1845(T)), (2) classification of the oak isolates as Lonsdalea quercina subsp. iberica subsp. nov. (type strain LMG26264(T)=NCPPB 4490(T)) and Lonsdalea quercina subsp. britannica subsp. nov. (type strain LMG 26267(T)=NCPPB 4481(T)) and leading to the automatic creation of Lonsdalea quercina subsp. quercina subsp. nov. (type strain LMG 2724(T)=ATCC 29281(T)), (3) emendation of the description of the genus Brenneria, and (4) reclassification of Dickeya dieffenbachiae as

  8. The Karyotype of Alstroemeria diluta Ehr. Bayer subsp. chrysantha (Alstroemeriaceae Karyotype of Alstroemeria diluta Ehr. Bayer subsp. chrysantha (Alstroemeriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos M Baeza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The karyotype of Alstroemeria diluta subsp. chrysantha Ehr. Bayer from Chile was examined. The species has 2n = 2x = 16 chromosomes, with 4m + 4sm + 2st-sat + 4t + 2t-sat. The reported karyotype is very asymmetrical (AsK % = 71.4 and Syi = 40.0%. This karyotype is similar to that published previously for Alstroemeria graminea Phil.Alstroemeria diluta subsp. chrysantha Ehr. Bayer (Alstroemeriaceae fue examinada citológicamente. Esta especie presenta un número cromosómico somático de 2n = 2x = 16 cromosomas, con una fórmula haploide constituida por 4m + 4sm + 2st-sat + 4t + 2t-sat cromosomas. El cariotipo es muy asimétrico, con valores de AsK % = 71,4 y Syi = 40,0%. Estos resultados se compararon con los de Alstroemeria graminea Phil., especie que presenta un cariotipo muy similar.

  9. Purulent pericarditis and pneumonia caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, Jürgen; Schmitz, Roland; van der Linden, Mark; Nührenberg, Thomas; Häcker, Georg; Neumann, Franz-Josef

    2014-02-01

    Purulent pericarditis is a life-threatening disease that usually manifests following bacteraemia or through spreading from an intrathoracic focus. Only a few cases of this disease have been reported with Lancefield group C streptococci as aetiological agents, and the primary focus in these infections remains unknown. We report a case of purulent pericarditis with septic and cardiogenic shock, caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus (group C) in a 51-year-old patient. The pathogen was possibly contracted through contact with horses. Most probably, it caused initially pneumonia before spreading to the pericardium, either directly or via the bloodstream. A combined therapeutic approach, consisting of antibiotic therapy and repeated pericardial drainage, was necessary to ensure a clinical cure. After discharge, long-term follow-up for development of constrictive pericarditis is considered mandatory.

  10. The cellodextrinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa consists of multiple functional domains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferreira, L M; Hazlewood, G P; Barker, P J; Gilbert, H J

    1991-01-01

    A genomic library of Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa DNA was constructed in pUC18 and Escherichia coli recombinants expressing 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-cellobioside-hydrolysing activity (MUCase) were isolated...

  11. Comparative Genomics of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Reveals a Strict Monophyletic Bifidobacterial Taxon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Christian; Duranti, Sabrina; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Bottacini, Francesca; Strati, Francesco; Arioli, Stefania; Foroni, Elena; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    Strains of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis are extensively exploited by the food industry as health-promoting bacteria, although the genetic variability of members belonging to this taxon has so far not received much scientific attention. In this article, we describe the complete genetic makeup of the B. animalis subsp. lactis Bl12 genome and discuss the genetic relatedness of this strain with other sequenced strains belonging to this taxon. Moreover, a detailed comparative genomic analysis of B. animalis subsp. lactis genomes was performed, which revealed a closely related and isogenic nature of all currently available B. animalis subsp. lactis strains, thus strongly suggesting a closed pan-genome structure of this bacterial group. PMID:23645200

  12. Composition and potency characterization of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis purified protein derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) purified protein derivatives (PPDs) are immunologic reagents prepared from cultured filtrates of the type strain ATCC 19698. Traditional production consists of floating culture incubation at 37oC, organism inactivation by autoclaving, coarse filtrat...

  13. Draft Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae?subsp.?pneumoniae ATCC 9621

    OpenAIRE

    Poehlein, Anja; Najdenski, Hristo; Simeonova, Diliana D

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the 5.561-Mbp assembled draft genome sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae?subsp.?pneumoniae ATCC 9621, a phosphite- and organophosphonate-assimilating Gammaproteobacterium. The genome harbors 5,179 predicted protein-coding genes.

  14. Klebsiella alba is a later heterotypic synonym of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chun Yan; Zhou, Yuan Liang; Ji, Jing; Gu, Chun Tao

    2016-06-01

    The taxonomic position of Klebsiella alba was re-examined. The reconstructed phylogenetic tree based on multilocus sequence analysis showed that Klebsiella alba LMG 24441T (=KCTC 12878T) was closely related to Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae 07A044T, showing 99.5-100 % similarities for fusA, gapA, gyrA, leuS, pyrG, rpoB, rpoB2, atpD, gyrB and infB gene sequences and concatenated partial fusA, gapA, gyrA, leuS, pyrG, rpoB2, atpD, gyrB and infB gene sequences. High sequence similarities between Klebsiella alba LMG 24441T and Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae 07A044T indicated that they have the same taxonomic position. Klebsiellaalba was reclassified as Klebsiellaquasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae and Klebsiella alba is a later heterotypic synonym of Klebsiella quasipneumoniae subsp. similipneumoniae.

  15. Colorectal neoplasm in cases of Clostridium septicum and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus bacteraemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corredoira, J.; Grau, I.; Garcia-Rodriguez, J.F.; Garcia-Pais, M.J.; Rabunal, R.; Ardanuy, C.; Garcia-Garrote, F.; Coira, A.; Alonso, M.P.; Boleij, A.; Pallares, R.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteremia with Clostridium septicum (CS) and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (SGG) have both been associated with colorectal neoplasms (CRN) and colonoscopic examination is advised, however the differences and similarities in colorectal findings are not well known.

  16. Phenolic content and antioxidant property of the bark extracts of Ziziphus mucronata Willd. subsp. mucronata Willd

    OpenAIRE

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Several plants traditionally used in treatment of a variety of infections in South Africa are reported in ethnobotanical surveys. Many of these plants including Ziziphus mucronata subsp. mucronata lack scientific reports to support their medicinal importance. Methods The antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the stems of Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. The total phenol, tot...

  17. Decreased Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis to Mosquito Larvae after Contact with Leaf Litter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalinski, Renaud; Kersusan, Dylann; Veyrenc, Sylvie; David, Jean-Philippe; Reynaud, Stéphane; Després, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis is a bacterium producing crystals containing Cry and Cyt proteins, which are toxic for mosquito larvae. Nothing is known about the interaction between crystal toxins and decaying leaf litter, which is a major component of several mosquito breeding sites and represents an important food source. In the present work, we investigated the behavior of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxic crystals sprayed on leaf litter. In the presence of leaf litter, a 60% decrease in the amount of Cyt toxin detectable by immunology (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays [ELISAs]) was observed, while the respective proportions of Cry toxins were not affected. The toxicity of Cry toxins toward Aedes aegypti larvae was not affected by leaf litter, while the synergistic effect of Cyt toxins on all B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Cry toxins was decreased by about 20% when mixed with leaf litter. The toxicity of two commercial B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strains (VectoBac WG and VectoBac 12AS) and a laboratory-produced B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis strain decreased by about 70% when mixed with leaf litter. Taken together, these results suggest that Cyt toxins interact with leaf litter, resulting in a decreased toxicity of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in litter-rich environments and thereby dramatically reducing the efficiency of mosquitocidal treatments. PMID:22610426

  18. Adaptation and Response of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to Bile: a Proteomic and Physiological Approach▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Borja; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Johansen, Eric; Zagorec, Monique; Margolles, Abelardo

    2007-01-01

    Bile salts are natural detergents that facilitate the digestion and absorption of the hydrophobic components of the diet. However, their amphiphilic nature makes them very inhibitory for bacteria and strongly influences bacterial survival in the gastrointestinal tract. Adaptation to and tolerance of bile stress is therefore crucial for the persistence of bacteria in the human colonic niche. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, a probiotic bacterium with documented health benefits, is applied largely in fermented dairy products. In this study, the effect of bile salts on proteomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA 4549 and its bile-resistant derivative B. animalis subsp. lactis 4549dOx was analyzed, leading to the identification of proteins which may represent the targets of bile salt response and adaptation in B. animalis subsp. lactis. The comparison of the wild-type and the bile-resistant strain responses allowed us to hypothesize about the resistance mechanisms acquired by the derivative resistant strain and about the bile salt response in B. animalis subsp. lactis. In addition, significant differences in the levels of metabolic end products of the bifid shunt and in the redox status of the cells were also detected, which correlate with some differences observed between the proteomes. These results indicate that adaptation and response to bile in B. animalis subsp. lactis involve several physiological mechanisms that are jointly dedicated to reduce the deleterious impact of bile on the cell's physiology. PMID:17827318

  19. Adaptation and response of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to bile: a proteomic and physiological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Borja; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Johansen, Eric; Zagorec, Monique; Margolles, Abelardo

    2007-11-01

    Bile salts are natural detergents that facilitate the digestion and absorption of the hydrophobic components of the diet. However, their amphiphilic nature makes them very inhibitory for bacteria and strongly influences bacterial survival in the gastrointestinal tract. Adaptation to and tolerance of bile stress is therefore crucial for the persistence of bacteria in the human colonic niche. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, a probiotic bacterium with documented health benefits, is applied largely in fermented dairy products. In this study, the effect of bile salts on proteomes of B. animalis subsp. lactis IPLA 4549 and its bile-resistant derivative B. animalis subsp. lactis 4549dOx was analyzed, leading to the identification of proteins which may represent the targets of bile salt response and adaptation in B. animalis subsp. lactis. The comparison of the wild-type and the bile-resistant strain responses allowed us to hypothesize about the resistance mechanisms acquired by the derivative resistant strain and about the bile salt response in B. animalis subsp. lactis. In addition, significant differences in the levels of metabolic end products of the bifid shunt and in the redox status of the cells were also detected, which correlate with some differences observed between the proteomes. These results indicate that adaptation and response to bile in B. animalis subsp. lactis involve several physiological mechanisms that are jointly dedicated to reduce the deleterious impact of bile on the cell's physiology.

  20. Complete Genome and Methylome Sequences of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Kuan; Muruvanda, Tim; Roberts, Richard J; Payne, Justin; Allard, Marc W; Hoffmann, Maria

    2016-03-17

    Salmonella enterica spp. are pathogenic bacteria commonly associated with food-borne outbreaks in human and animals. Salmonella enterica spp. are characterized into more than 2,500 different serotypes, which makes epidemiological surveillance and outbreak control more difficult. In this report, we announce the first complete genome and methylome sequences from two Salmonella type strains associated with food-borne outbreaks, Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Panama (ATCC 7378) and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Sloterdijk (ATCC 15791). Copyright © 2016 Yao et al.

  1. Altered Toll-Like Receptor 9 Signaling in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Infected Bovine Monocytes Reveals Potential Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Ryan J.; Li, Yue; Maattanen, Pekka; Scruten, Erin; Doig, Kimberley; Potter, Andrew; Griebel, Philip; Kusalik, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle. The complex, multifaceted interaction of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis with its host includes dampening the ability of infected cells to respond to stimuli that promote M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis clearance. By disrupting host defenses, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis creates an intracellular environment that favors the establishment and maintenance of infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important sensors that initiate innate immune responses to microbial challenge and are also immunotherapeutic targets. For example, TLR9 contributes to host defense against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and its agonists (CpG oligodeoxynucleotides [ODNs]) are under investigation for treatment of Johne's disease and other infections. Here we demonstrate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection changes the responsiveness of bovine monocytes to TLR9 stimulation. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis inhibits classical TLR9-mediated responses despite a 10-fold increase in TLR9 expression and maintained uptake of CpG ODNs. Other TLR9-mediated responses, such as oxidative burst, which occur through noncanonical signaling, remain functional. Kinome analysis verifies that classic TLR9 signaling is blocked by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and that signaling instead proceeds through a Pyk2-mediated mechanism. Pyk2-mediated signaling does not hinder infection, as CpG ODNs fail to promote M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis clearance. Indeed, Pyk2 signaling appears to be an important aspect of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, as Pyk2 inhibitors significantly reduce the number of intracellular M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria. The actions of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis on TLR9 signaling may represent a strategy to generate a host environment which is better suited for infection, revealing potential new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID

  2. Structural similarity between the lepidoptera- and diptera-specific insecticidal endotoxin genes of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. "kurstaki" and "israelensis".

    OpenAIRE

    Thorne, L; Garduno, F; Thompson, T; Decker, D.; Zounes, M; Wild, M.; Walfield, A M; Pollock, T J

    1986-01-01

    A gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. "israelensis" was cloned from the large plasmids of this subspecies and was shown to code for a mosquitocidal polypeptide. The gene could be expressed in either Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, or B. thuringiensis subsp. "israelensis" to produce the larvicidal activity. Similarly, a Lepidoptera-specific toxin gene from B. thuringiensis subsp. "kurstaki" was also cloned and expressed in E. coli and B. subtilis. Both cloned genes were sequenced and ...

  3. Desulfovibrio oceani subsp. oceani sp. nov., subsp. nov. and Desulfovibrio oceani subsp. galateae subsp. nov., novel sulfate-reducing bacteria isolated from the oxygen minimum zone off the coast of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finster, Kai W; Kjeldsen, Kasper U

    2010-03-01

    Two deltaproteobacterial sulfate reducers, designated strain I.8.1(T) and I.9.1(T), were isolated from the oxygen minimum zone water column off the coast of Peru at 400 and 500 m water depth. The strains were Gram-negative, vibrio-shaped and motile. Both strains were psychrotolerant, grew optimally at 20 degrees C at pH 7.0-8.0 and at 2.5-3.5% NaCl (w/v). The strains grew by utilizing hydrogen/acetate, C(3-4) fatty acids, amino acids and glycerol as electron acceptors for sulfate reduction. Fumarate, lactate and pyruvate supported fermentative growth. Sulfate, sulfite, thiosulfate and taurin supported growth as electron acceptors. Both strains were catalase-positive and highly oxygen-tolerant, surviving 24 days of exposure to atmospheric concentrations. MK6 was the only respiratory quinone. The most prominent cellular fatty acid was iso-17:1-omega9c (18%) for strain I.8.1(T) and iso-17:0-omega9c (14%) for strain I.9.1(T). The G+C contents of their genomic DNA were 45-46 mol%. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and dsrAB gene sequences showed that both strains belong to the genus Desulfovibrio. Desulfovibrio acrylicus DSM 10141(T) and Desulfovibrio marinisediminis JCM 14577(T) represented their closest validly described relatives with pairwise 16S rRNA gene sequence identities of 98-99%. The level of DNA-DNA hybridization between strains I.8.1(T) and I.9.1(T) was 30-38%. The two strains shared 10-26% DNA-DNA relatedness with D. acrylicus. Based on a polyphasic investigation it is proposed that strains I.8.1(T) and I.9.1(T) represent a novel species for which the name Desulfovibrio oceani sp. nov. is proposed with the two subspecies D. oceani subsp. oceani (type strain, I.8.1(T) = DSM 21390(T) = JCM 15970(T)) and D. oceani subsp. galateae (type strain, I.9.1(T) = DSM 21391(T) = JCM 15971(T)).

  4. Effects of Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica on Growth and Aflatoxin Production by Aspergillus parasiticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodavaisy, Sadegh; Rezaie, Sassan; Noorbakhsh, Fatemeh; Baghdadi, Elham; Sharifynia, Somayeh; Aala, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Background Aflatoxins are highly toxic secondary metabolites mainly produced by Aspergillus parasiticus. This species can contaminate a wide range of agricultural commodities, including cereals, peanuts, and crops in the field. In recent years, research on medicinal herbs, such as Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica, have led to reduced microbial growth, and these herbs also have a particular effect on the production of aflatoxins as carcinogenic compounds. Objectives In this study, we to examine P. atlantica subsp. kurdica as a natural compound used to inhibit the growth of A. parasiticus and to act as an anti-mycotoxin. Materials and Methods In vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica for A. parasiticus was performed according to CLSI document M38-A2. The rate of aflatoxin production was determined using the HPLC technique after exposure to different concentrations (62.5 - 125 mg/mL) of the gum. The changes in expression levels of the aflR gene were analyzed with a quantitative real-time PCR assay. Results The results showed that P. atlantica subsp. kurdica can inhibit A. parasiticus growth at a concentration of 125 mg/mL. HPLC results revealed a significant decrease in aflatoxin production with 125 mg/mL of P. atlantica subsp. kurdica, and AFL-B1 production was entirely inhibited. Based on quantitative real-time PCR results, the rate of aflR gene expression was significantly decreased after treatment with P. atlantica subsp. kurdica. Conclusions Pistacia atlantica subsp. kurdica has anti-toxic properties in addition to an inhibitory effect on A. parasiticus growth, and is able to decrease aflatoxin production effectively in a dose-dependent manner. Therefore, this herbal extract maybe considered a potential anti-mycotoxin agent in medicine or industrial agriculture. PMID:27800127

  5. In vitro anti-biofilm activity of Quercus brantii subsp. persica on human pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bahar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Quercus brantii subsp. persica is used in folk medicine to treat infections in Iran. There is not available report on the anti-biofilm activity of Quercus brantii subsp.  persica. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of Quercus brantii subsp. persica against bacterial biofilms. Methods: Eighty biofilm producing strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were collected. Quercus brantii subsp. persica fruits aqueous extraction (QBAE was prepared though maceration method. Chemical analysis to distinguish the main components of the QBAE was carried out using thin-layer chromatography. The antibacterial effects of QBAE on bacterial isolates were determined by the Kirby-Bauer and broth microdilution methods. The antibiofilm effects of QBAE on bacterial isolates were determined using a microtiter assay. Results: The Quercus brantii subsp. persica exhibited bacterial growth inhibition and bactericidal activity on the majority of the strains at concentrations between 0.2 and 1.2 mg/mL. The average of biofilm formation inhibition by Quercus brantii subsp. persica at a minimum inhibitory concentration MIC50 in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus strains were 35%, 45%, 57% and 61%, respectively. coumarins, phenols, terpenes and steroids were found in the QBAE by TLC. Conclusion: The results showed that Quercus brantii subsp. persica aqueous extraction was effective against the tested microorganisms and showed anti-biofilm activity which can be a basis for future studies to investigate for new anti-biofilm drugs.

  6. Microbiota of Minas cheese as influenced by the nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, Luana Martins; Dal Bello, Barbara; Belviso, Simona; Zeppa, Giuseppe; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Cocolin, Luca; Nero, Luís Augusto

    2015-12-02

    Minas cheese is a popular dairy product in Brazil that is traditionally produced using raw or pasteurized cow milk. This study proposed an alternative production of Minas cheese using raw goat milk added of a nisin producer Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. An in situ investigation was carried on to evaluate the interactions between the L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 and the autochthonous microbiota of a Minas cheese during the ripening; production of biogenic amines (BAs) was assessed as a safety aspect. Minas cheese was produced in two treatments (A, by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05, and B, without adding this strain), in three independent repetitions (R1, R2, and R3). Culture dependent (direct plating) and independent (rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE) methods were employed to characterize the microbiota and to assess the possible interferences caused by L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05. BA amounts were measured using HPLC. A significant decrease in coagulase-positive cocci was observed in the cheeses produced by adding L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 (cheese A). The rep-PCR and PCR-DGGE highlighted the differences in the microbiota of both cheeses, separating them into two different clusters. Lactococcus sp. was found as the main microorganism in both cheeses, and the microbiota of cheese A presented a higher number of species. High concentrations of tyramine were found in both cheeses and, at specific ripening times, the BA amounts in cheese B were significantly higher than in cheese A (pnisin producer L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 was demonstrated in situ, by demonstration of its influence in the complex microbiota naturally present in a raw goat milk cheese and by controlling the growth of coagulase-positive cocci. L. lactis subsp. lactis GLc05 influenced also the production of BA determining that their amounts in the cheeses were maintained at acceptable levels for human consumption. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of a novel host-specific IgG protease in Streptococcus phocae subsp. phocae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungelrath, Viktoria; Wohlsein, Jan Christian; Siebert, Ursula; Stott, Jeffrey; Prenger-Berninghoff, Ellen; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Baums, Christoph G; Seele, Jana

    2017-03-01

    Streptococcus (S.) phocae subsp. phocae causes bronchopneumonia and septicemia in a variety of marine mammals. Especially in harbor seals infected with phocine distemper virus it plays an important role as an opportunistic pathogen. This study was initiated by the detection of IgG cleavage products in Western blot analysis after incubation of bacterial supernatant with harbor seal serum. Hence, the objectives of this study were the identification and characterization of a secreted IgG cleaving protease in S. phocae subsp. phocae isolated from marine mammals. To further identify the responsible factor of IgG cleavage a protease inhibitor profile was generated. Inhibition of the IgG cleaving activity by iodoacetamide and Z-LVG-CHN2 indicated that a cysteine protease is involved. Moreover, an anti-IdeS antibody directed against the IgG endopeptidase IdeS of S. pyogenes showed cross reactivity with the putative IgG protease of S. phocae subsp. phocae. The IgG cleaving factor of S. phocae subsp. phocae was identified through an inverse PCR approach and designated IdeP (Immunoglobulin G degrading enzyme of S. phocae subsp. phocae) in analogy to the cysteine protease IdeS. Notably, recombinant (r) IdeP is a host and substrate specific protease as it cleaves IgG from grey and harbor seals but not IgG from harbor porpoises or non-marine mammals. The identification of IdeP represents the first description of a protein in S. phocae subsp. phocae involved in immune evasion. Furthermore, the fact that IdeP cleaves solely IgG of certain marine mammals reflects functional adaption of S. phocae subsp. phocae to grey and harbor seals as its main hosts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Dose-response study of probiotic bacteria Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis BB-12 and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei CRL-341 in healthy young adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, C.N.; Nielsen, S.; Kaestel, P.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to investigate the dose-response effects of supplementation with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (CRL-431) on blood lipids, recovery from feces and bowel habits. Changes of the fecal microflora was analy......Objective: This study was performed to investigate the dose-response effects of supplementation with Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis (BB-12) and Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei (CRL-431) on blood lipids, recovery from feces and bowel habits. Changes of the fecal microflora...... weeks intervention and 2 weeks wash-out. Diary reporting bowel habits and well being (abdominal bloating, flatulence and headache) was kept for all 7 weeks and blood lipids, fecal recovery of BB-12 and CRL-431, as well as fecal microflora was tested before, immediately and 2 weeks after intervention....... Results: The fecal recovery of BB-12 increased significantly (P BB-12 was recovered from 13 out of 15 volunteers. CRL-431 was not recovered in any of the fecal samples. Supplementation with probiotics did not change the fecal bacterial...

  9. Compositions of essential oils and trichomes of Teucrium chamaedrys L. subsp. trapezunticum Rech. fil. and subsp. syspirense (C. Koch) Rech. fil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ayla; Demirci, Betül; Başer, K Hüsnü C

    2009-01-01

    Teucrium chamaedrys L. is a member of the Lamiaceae family and is represented in the Flora of Turkey by six subspecies. The aerial organs of T. chamaedrys L. subsp. trapezunticum Rech. fil. and subsp. syspirense (C. Koch) Rech. fil. bears numerous eglandular and glandular trichomes. Eglandular trichomes are simple, long-multicellular with cuticular micropapillae, and glandular hairs are of peltate and capitate types. The peltate hairs consist of a basal cell, a short unicellular stalk, and multicellular secretory head, and the capitate ones possess 1-2 stalk cells and one glandular head cell. The aerial parts were subjected to microdistillation for the isolation of volatiles. The analysis was simultaneously performed by using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The major components were characterized as beta-caryophyllene (18%), nonacosane (12%), germacrene D (11%), caryophyllene oxide (7%), and alpha-pinene (7%) for subsp. trapezunticum, and caryophyllene oxide (23%), alpha-pinene (11%), and caryophyllenol II (5%) for subsp. syspirense.

  10. Flow Cytometric Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibodies in Experimentally Infected and Naturally Exposed Calves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridger, P. S.; Bulun, H.; Fischer, M.; Akineden, Ö.; Seeger, T.; Barth, S.; Henrich, M.; Doll, K.; Bülte, M.; Menge, C.; Bauerfeind, R.

    2013-01-01

    A desirable test to diagnose infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis facilitates identification of infected cattle prior to the state of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. This study aimed at adjusting a flow cytometry (FC)-based assay, using intact M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria as the antigen, for diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in calves. Serum samples were collected from experimentally infected (n = 12) and naturally exposed (n = 32) calves. Samples from five calves from positive dams were analyzed to determine the dynamics of maternal antibodies. Samples from adult cattle with defined infection status served as the standard (18 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedders, 22 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free). After preadsorption with Mycobacterium phlei, sera were incubated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. avium bacterial suspensions, respectively, followed by the separate detection of bovine IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IgM attached to the bacterial surface. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific sample/positive (S/P) ratios were compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) S/P ratios. In adult cattle, the FC assay for IgG1 had a sensitivity of 78% at a specificity of 100%. Maternally acquired antibodies could be detected in calves up to 121 days of life. While all but two sera taken at day 100 ± 10 postnatum from naturally exposed calves tested negative, elevated S/P ratios (IgG and IgG1) became detectable from 44 and 46 weeks postinoculation onwards in two calves infected experimentally. Even with the optimized FC assay, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibodies can only occasionally be detected in infected calves less than 12 months of age. The failure to detect such antibodies apparently reflects the distinct immunobiology of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections rather than methodological constraints. PMID:23885032

  11. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Its Dipteran-Specific Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eitan Ben-Dov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six δ-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come.

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Its Dipteran-Specific Toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dov, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti) is the first Bacillus thuringiensis to be found and used as an effective biological control agent against larvae of many mosquito and black fly species around the world. Its larvicidal activity resides in four major (of 134, 128, 72 and 27 kDa) and at least two minor (of 78 and 29 kDa) polypeptides encoded respectively by cry4Aa, cry4Ba, cry11Aa, cyt1Aa, cry10Aa and cyt2Ba, all mapped on the 128 kb plasmid known as pBtoxis. These six δ-endotoxins form a complex parasporal crystalline body with remarkably high, specific and different toxicities to Aedes, Culex and Anopheles larvae. Cry toxins are composed of three domains (perforating domain I and receptor binding II and III) and create cation-selective channels, whereas Cyts are composed of one domain that acts as well as a detergent-like membrane perforator. Despite the low toxicities of Cyt1Aa and Cyt2Ba alone against exposed larvae, they are highly synergistic with the Cry toxins and hence their combinations prevent emergence of resistance in the targets. The lack of significant levels of resistance in field mosquito populations treated for decades with Bti-bioinsecticide suggests that this bacterium will be an effective biocontrol agent for years to come. PMID:24686769

  13. Utilization of galactooligosaccharides by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Daniel; Ruiz-Moyano, Santiago; Jimenez-Espinoza, Rogelio; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Block, David E.; Mills, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Prebiotics are non-digestible substrates that stimulate the growth of beneficial microbial populations in the intestine, especially Bifidobacterium species. Among them, fructo- and galacto-oligosaccharides are commonly used in the food industry, especially as a supplement for infant formulas. Mechanistic details on the enrichment of bifidobacteria by these prebiotics are important to understand the effects of these dietary interventions. In this study the consumption of galactooligosaccharides was studied for 22 isolates of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis, one of the most representative species in the infant gut microbiota. In general all isolates showed a vigorous growth on these oligosaccharides, but consumption of larger galactooligosaccharides was variable. Bifidobacterium infantis ATCC 15697 has five genes encoding β-galactosidases, and three of them were induced during bacterial growth on commercial galactooligosaccharides. Recombinant β-galactosidases from B. infantis ATCC 15697 displayed different preferences for β-galactosides such as 4′ and 6′-galactobiose, and four β-galactosidases in this strain released monosaccharides from galactooligosaccharides. Finally, we determined the amounts of short chain fatty acids produced by strain ATCC 15697 after growth on different prebiotics. We observed that biomass and product yields of substrate were higher for lactose and galactooligosaccharides, but the amount of acids produced per cell was larger after growth on human milk oligosaccharides. These results provide a molecular basis for galactooligosaccharide consumption in B. infantis, and also represent evidence for physiological differences in the metabolism of prebiotics that might have a differential impact on the host. PMID:23200660

  14. Metabolic engineering of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii for xylose fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peilian; Lin, Meng; Wang, Zhongqiang; Fu, Hongxin; Yang, Hopen; Jiang, Wenyan; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2016-11-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii cannot use xylose, the second most abundant sugar in lignocellulosic biomass. Although Propionibacterium acidipropionici can use xylose as a carbon source, it is difficult to genetically modify, impeding further improvement through metabolic engineering. This study identified three xylose catabolic pathway genes encoding for xylose isomerase (xylA), xylose transporter (xylT), and xylulokinase (xylB) in P. acidipropionici and overexpressed them in P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii via an expression plasmid pKHEM01, enabling the mutant to utilize xylose efficiently even in the presence of glucose without glucose-induced carbon catabolite repression. The mutant showed similar fermentation kinetics with glucose, xylose, and the mixture of glucose and xylose, respectively, as carbon source, and with or without the addition of antibiotic for selection pressure. The engineered P. shermanii thus can provide a novel cell factory for industrial production of propionic acid and other value-added products from lignocellulosic biomass. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular Characterization of Invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Takeaki; Morozumi, Miyuki; Hanada, Shigeo; Sunaoshi, Katsuhiko; Chiba, Naoko; Iwata, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We collected β-hemolytic streptococci (1,611 isolates) from patients with invasive streptococcal infections in Japan during April 2010–March 2013. Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) was most common (n = 693); 99% of patients with SDSE infections were elderly (mean age 75 years, SD ±15 years). We aimed to clarify molecular and epidemiologic characteristics of SDSE isolates and features of patient infections. Bacteremia with no identified focus of origin and cellulitis were the most prevalent manifestations; otherwise, clinical manifestations resembled those of S. pyogenes infections. Clinical manifestations also differed by patient’s age. SDSE isolates were classified into 34 emm types; stG6792 was most prevalent (27.1%), followed by stG485 and stG245. Mortality rates did not differ according to emm types. Multilocus sequence typing identified 46 sequence types and 12 novel types. Types possessing macrolide- and quinolone-resistance genes were 18.4% and 2.6%, respectively; none showed β-lactam resistance. Among aging populations, invasive SDSE infections are an increasing risk. PMID:26760778

  16. Immunological response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and culture are 2 common diagnostic tests for detecting Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) in Johne’s disease, but they are not as sensitive as polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, inhibitors can coextract with the target DNA and cause interference in PCR. Development of an immune capture assay followed by PCR amplification can alleviate this problem. In this study, we were able to induce an immune response in chickens using heat or formalin inactivated Map. The purified immunoglobulin (Ig)Y has a molecular weight of 160 kDa. The titers were at 1:6400 and 1:12 800 at weeks 5 to 6 and 8 to 9, respectively, as determined by the IDEXX modified ELISA kit for Johne’s disease. The IgY produced from inactivated bacterial cells had no effect on its ability to recognize live Map cells as illustrated by immunofluorescence assay and immune capture PCR results. PMID:15581226

  17. Epidemiology of Danish Aeromonas salmonicida subsp salmonicida in Fish Farms Using Whole Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, Simona; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Aarestrup, Frank Møller

    2017-01-01

    Furunculosis, a serious infection caused by the bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is common in sea-reared rainbow trout production in Denmark. Developing an effective control strategy requires knowledge of the epidemiology, as well as the genomic and virulent variability of the D......Furunculosis, a serious infection caused by the bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is common in sea-reared rainbow trout production in Denmark. Developing an effective control strategy requires knowledge of the epidemiology, as well as the genomic and virulent variability...... of the Danish A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida isolates. To obtain this, the genomes of 101 A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, including 99 Danish isolates, one Scottish strain and the type strain NCIMB 1102, were sequenced using the Illumina HiSeq platform. Isolates were de novo assembled, examined...... for presence of plasmids, virulence and iron acquisition proteins, genomic islands, and antibiotic resistance genes. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms were aligned and subjected to Bayesian temporal phylogenetic and maximum likelihood tree reconstruction using the published genome of A. salmonicida subsp...

  18. Persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in Urban Environments following Spraying▿†‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cuyk, Sheila; Deshpande, Alina; Hollander, Attelia; Duval, Nathan; Ticknor, Lawrence; Layshock, Julie; Gallegos-Graves, LaVerne; Omberg, Kristin M.

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki is applied extensively in North America to control the gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar. Since B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki shares many physical and biological properties with Bacillus anthracis, it is a reasonable surrogate for biodefense studies. A key question in biodefense is how long a biothreat agent will persist in the environment. There is some information in the literature on the persistence of Bacillus anthracis in laboratories and historical testing areas and for Bacillus thuringiensis in agricultural settings, but there is no information on the persistence of Bacillus spp. in the type of environment that would be encountered in a city or on a military installation. Since it is not feasible to release B. anthracis in a developed area, the controlled release of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki for pest control was used to gain insight into the potential persistence of Bacillus spp. in outdoor urban environments. Persistence was evaluated in two locations: Fairfax County, VA, and Seattle, WA. Environmental samples were collected from multiple matrices and evaluated for the presence of viable B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki at times ranging from less than 1 day to 4 years after spraying. Real-time PCR and culture were used for analysis. B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki was found to persist in urban environments for at least 4 years. It was most frequently detected in soils and less frequently detected in wipes, grass, foliage, and water. The collective results indicate that certain species of Bacillus may persist for years following their dispersal in urban environments. PMID:21926205

  19. Spatial analysis of Yersinia pestis and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii seroprevalence in California coyotes (Canis latrans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoar, B R; Chomel, B B; Rolfe, D L; Chang, C C; Fritz, C L; Sacks, B N; Carpenter, T E

    2003-01-15

    Zoonotic transmission of sylvatic plague caused by Yersinia pestis occurs in California, USA. Human infections with various Bartonella species have been reported recently. Coyotes (Canis latrans) are ubiquitous throughout California and can become infected with both bacterial agents, making the species useful for surveillance purposes. This study examined the geographic distribution of 863 coyotes tested for Y. pestis and Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii serologic status to gain insight into the natural history of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and to characterize the spatial distribution of the two agents. We found 11.7% of specimens positive to Y. pestis and 35.5% positive to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii. The two pathogens had distinct spatial clusters: Y. pestis was more prevalent in eastern portions of the state and B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii in coastal regions. Prevalence of Y. pestis increased with increasing elevation, whereas prevalence of B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii decreased with increasing elevation. There were differences in the proportions of positive animals on a yearly basis to both pathogens.

  20. Optimization of a plasmid electroporation protocol for Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallaire-Dufresne, Stéphanie; Emond-Rheault, Jean-Guillaume; Attéré, Sabrina A; Tanaka, Katherine H; Trudel, Mélanie V; Frenette, Michel; Charette, Steve J

    2014-03-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a major fish pathogen. Molecular tools are required to study the virulence and genomic stability of this bacterium. An efficient electroporation-mediated transformation protocol for A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida would make genetic studies faster and easier. In the present study, we designed the 4.1-kb pSDD1 plasmid as a tool for optimizing an electroporation protocol for A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. We systematically tested the electroporation conditions to develop a protocol that generates the maximum number of transformants. Under these optimal conditions (25 kV/cm, 200 Ω, 25 μF), we achieved an electroporation efficiency of up to 1×10(5) CFU/μg DNA. The electroporation protocol was also tested using another plasmid of 10.6-kb and three different strains of A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. The strains displayed significant differences in their electro-transformation competencies. Strain 01-B526 was the easiest to electroporate, especially with the pSDD1 plasmid. This plasmid was stably maintained in the 01-B526 transformants, as were the native plasmids, but could be easily cured by removing the selection conditions. This is the first efficient electroporation protocol reported for A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, and offers new possibilities for studying this bacterium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Synergy between toxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and Bacillus sphaericus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Margaret C; Jiannino, Joshua A; Federici, Brian A; Walton, William E

    2004-09-01

    Synergistic interactions among the multiple endotoxins of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis de Barjac play an important role in its high toxicity to mosquito larvae and the absence of insecticide resistance in populations treated with this bacterium. A lack of toxin complexity and synergism are the apparent causes of resistance to Bacillus sphaericus Neide in particular Culex field populations. To identify endotoxin combinations of the two Bacillus species that might improve insecticidal activity and manage mosquito resistance to B. sphaericus, we tested their toxins alone and in combination. Most combinations of B. sphaericus and B. t. subsp. israelensis toxins were synergistic and enhanced toxicity relative to B. sphaericus, particularly against Culex quinquefasciatus Say larvae resistant to B. sphaericus and Aedes aegypti (L.), a species poorly susceptible to B. sphaericus. Toxicity also improved against susceptible Cx. quinquefasciatus. For example, when the CytlAa toxin from B. t. subsp. israelensis was added to Bin and Cry toxins, or when native B. t. subsp. israelensis was combined with B. sphaericus, synergism values as high as 883-fold were observed and combinations were 4-59,000-fold more active than B. sphaericus. These data, and previous studies using cytolytic toxins, validate proposed strategies for improving bacterial larvicides by combining B. sphaericus with B. t. subsp. israelensis or by engineering recombinant bacteria that express endotoxins from both strains. These combinations increase both endotoxin complexity and synergistic interactions and thereby enhance activity and help avoid insecticide resistance.

  2. Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri type IV Pilus is required for twitching motility, biofilm development, and adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunger, German; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Andrade, Maxuel O; Jones, Jeffrey B; Farah, Chuck S

    2014-10-01

    Bacterial type IV pili (T4P) are long, flexible surface filaments that consist of helical polymers of mostly pilin subunits. Cycles of polymerization, attachment, and depolymerization mediate several pilus-dependent bacterial behaviors, including twitching motility, surface adhesion, pathogenicity, natural transformation, escape from immune system defense mechanisms, and biofilm formation. The Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri strain 306 genome codes for a large set of genes involved in T4P biogenesis and regulation and includes several pilin homologs. We show that X. citri subsp. citri can exhibit twitching motility in a manner similar to that observed in other bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Xylella fastidiosa and that this motility is abolished in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri knockout strains in the genes coding for the major pilin subunit PilAXAC3241, the ATPases PilBXAC3239 and PilTXAC2924, and the T4P biogenesis regulators PilZXAC1133 and FimXXAC2398. Microscopy analyses were performed to compare patterns of bacterial migration in the wild-type and knockout strains and we observed that the formation of mushroom-like structures in X. citri subsp. citri biofilm requires a functional T4P. Finally, infection of X. citri subsp. citri cells by the bacteriophage (ΦXacm4-11 is T4P dependent. The results of this study improve our understanding of how T4P influence Xanthomonas motility, biofilm formation, and susceptibility to phage infection.

  3. Xylella fastidiosa Isolates from Both subsp. multiplex and fastidiosa Cause Disease on Southern Highbush Blueberry (Vaccinium sp.) Under Greenhouse Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J E; Cobine, P A; De La Fuente, L

    2015-07-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited gram-negative plant pathogen that affects numerous crop species, including grape, citrus, peach, pecan, and almond. Recently, X. fastidiosa has also been found to be the cause of bacterial leaf scorch on blueberry in the southeastern United States. Thus far, all X. fastidiosa isolates obtained from infected blueberry have been classified as X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex; however, X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates are also present in the southeastern United States and commonly cause Pierce's disease of grapevines. In this study, seven southeastern U.S. isolates of X. fastidiosa, including three X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolates from grape, one X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa isolate from elderberry, and three X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry, were used to infect the southern highbush blueberry 'Rebel'. Following inoculation, all isolates colonized blueberry, and isolates from both X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex and X. fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa caused symptoms, including characteristic stem yellowing and leaf scorch symptoms as well as dieback of the stem tips. Two X. fastidiosa subsp. multiplex isolates from blueberry caused more severe symptoms than the other isolates examined, and infection with these two isolates also had a significant impact on host mineral nutrient content in sap and leaves. These findings have potential implications for understanding X. fastidiosa host adaptation and expansion and the development of emerging diseases caused by this bacterium.

  4. Complete genomic sequence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni HS: 19 strain RM1285 isolated from packaged chicken

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Parker (Craig); Huynh, S. (Steven); A.P. Heikema (Astrid)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPoultry products serve as the main source of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni infections in humans. C. jejuni subsp. jejuni infections are a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis and are a prevalent antecedent to Guillain-Barré syndrome. This study describes the genome of C.

  5. Rapid and Sensitive Method To Identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cow's Milk by DNA Methylase Genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José

    2013-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time. PMID:23275511

  6. Rapid and sensitive method to identify Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in cow's milk by DNA methylase genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundo, Silvia Leonor; Gilardoni, Liliana Rosa; Hoffman, Federico José; Lopez, Osvaldo Jorge

    2013-03-01

    Paratuberculosis is an infectious, chronic, and incurable disease that affects ruminants, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This bacterium is shed primarily through feces of infected cows but can be also excreted in colostrum and milk and might survive pasteurization. Since an association of genomic sequences of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in patients with Crohn's disease has been described; it is of interest to rapidly detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk for human consumption. IS900 insertion is used as a target for PCR amplification to identify the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in biological samples. Two target sequences were selected: IS1 (155 bp) and IS2 (94 bp). These fragments have a 100% identity among all M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains sequenced. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was specifically concentrated from milk samples by immunomagnetic separation prior to performing PCR. The amplicons were characterized using DNA methylase Genotyping, i.e., the amplicons were methylated with 6-methyl-adenine and digested with restriction enzymes to confirm their identity. The methylated amplicons from 100 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis can be visualized in a Western blot format using an anti-6-methyl-adenine monoclonal antibody. The use of DNA methyltransferase genotyping coupled to a scintillation proximity assay allows for the detection of up to 10 CFU of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis per ml of milk. This test is rapid and sensitive and allows for automation and thus multiple samples can be tested at the same time.

  7. Local genetic diversity of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in citrus orchards in northwest Paraná state, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, causal agent of Asiatic citrus canker, is an important pathogen of citrus in Brazil and elsewhere. The genetic diversity of X. citri subsp. citri pathtype ‘A’ has not been studied in Brazil at a local scale (up to 300 km). A total of 40 isolates were collected from le...

  8. Microsatellite development for an endangered riparian inhabitant, Lilaeopsis schaffneriana subsp. recurva (Apiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tew, Jessica M; Lance, Stacey L; Jones, Kenneth L; Fehlberg, Shannon D

    2012-04-01

    Microsatellite markers were developed and characterized to evaluate genetic diversity and population structure in Lilaeopsis schaffneriana subsp. recurva, an endangered species endemic to wetlands dispersed throughout southeastern Arizona, USA, and northern Sonora, Mexico. Eight loci (one of which was monomorphic) were developed and characterized in 48 individuals from two populations. The total number of alleles was 35, ranging from one to 10 per locus. Many of the primers amplified in L. carolinensis, L. chinensis, L. masonii, L. occidentalis, L. schaffneriana subsp. schaffneriana, Oxypolis fendleri, and Eryngium lemmonii. Development of these novel microsatellite loci will facilitate a deeper understanding of genetic diversity, mode of reproduction, and population structure not only in L. schaffneriana subsp. recurva, but also in apiaceous relatives.

  9. Culture Phenotypes of Genomically and Geographically Diverse Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Isolates from Different Hosts▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittington, Richard J.; Marsh, Ian B.; Saunders, Vanessa; Grant, Irene R.; Juste, Ramon; Sevilla, Iker A.; Manning, Elizabeth J. B.; Whitlock, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in ruminants in most countries. Historical data suggest substantial differences in culturability of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates from small ruminants and cattle; however, a systematic comparison of culture media and isolates from different countries and hosts has not been undertaken. Here, 35 field isolates from the United States, Spain, Northern Ireland, and Australia were propagated in Bactec 12B medium and Middlebrook 7H10 agar, genomically characterized, and subcultured to Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ), Herrold's egg yolk (HEY), modified Middlebrook 7H10, Middlebrook 7H11, and Watson-Reid (WR) agars, all with and without mycobactin J and some with sodium pyruvate. Fourteen genotypes of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis were represented as determined by BstEII IS900 and IS1311 restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. There was no correlation between genotype and overall culturability, although most S strains tended to grow poorly on HEY agar. Pyruvate was inhibitory to some isolates. All strains grew on modified Middlebrook 7H10 agar but more slowly and less prolifically on LJ agar. Mycobactin J was required for growth on all media except 7H11 agar, but growth was improved by the addition of mycobactin J to 7H11 agar. WR agar supported the growth of few isolates. The differences in growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis that have historically been reported in diverse settings have been strongly influenced by the type of culture medium used. When an optimal culture medium, such as modified Middlebrook 7H10 agar, is used, very little difference between the growth phenotypes of diverse strains of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was observed. This optimal medium is recommended to remove bias in the isolation and cultivation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:21430104

  10. Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. dhakensis isolated from feces, water and fish in Mediterranean Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, Consuelo; Alcaide, Elena; Blasco, María Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Eight Aeromonas hydrophila-like arabinose-negative isolates from diverse sources (i.e., river freshwater, cooling-system water pond, diseased wild European eels, and human stools) sampled in Valencia (Spain) during 2004-2005, were characterized by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and extensive biochemical testing along with reference strains of most Aeromonas species. These isolates and all reference strains of A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis and A. aquariorum showed a 16S rRNA sequence similarity of 99.8-100%, and they all shared an identical phenotype. This matched exactly with that of A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis since all strains displayed positive responses to the Voges-Prokauer test and to the use of dl-lactate. This is the first report of A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis recovered from environmental samples, and further, from its original isolation in India during 1993-1994. This was accurately identified and segregated from other clinical aeromonads (A. hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, A. caviae, A. veronii biovars veronii and sobria, A. trota, A. schubertii and A. jandaei) by using biochemical key tests. The API 20 E profile for all strains included in A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis was 7047125. The prevalence of this species in Spanish sources was higher for water (9.4%) than for feces (6%) or eels (1.3%). Isolates recovered as pure cultures from diseased eels were moderately virulent (LD(50) of 3.3×10(6) CFU fish(-1)) to challenged eels in experimental trials. They were all resistant to ticarcillin, amoxicillin-clavuranic acid, cefoxitin, and imipenem, regardless of its source. Our data point to A. hydrophila subsp. dhakensis as an emerging pathogen for humans and fish in temperate countries.

  11. Interaction between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and environmental protozoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe Michael T

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interactions between Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map and free-living protozoa in water are likely to occur in nature. The potential impact of ingestion of Map by two naturally occurring Acanthamoeba spp. on this pathogen's survival and chlorine resistance was investigated. Results Between 4.6 and 9.1% of spiked populations of three Map strains (NCTC 8578, B2 and ATCC 19698, which had been added at a multiplicity of infection of 10:1, were ingested by Acanthamoeba castellanii CCAP 1501/1B and A. polyphaga CCAP 1501/3B during co-culture for 3 h at 25°C. Map cells were observed to be present within the vacuoles of the amoebae by acid-fast staining. During extended co-culture of Map NCTC 8578 at 25°C for 24 d with both A. castellanii and A. polyphaga Map numbers did not change significantly during the first 7 days of incubation, however a 1–1.5 log10 increase in Map numbers was observed between days 7 and 24 within both Acanthamoeba spp. Ingested Map cells were shown to be more resistant to chlorine inactivation than free Map. Exposure to 2 μg/ml chlorine for 30 min resulted in a log10 reduction of 0.94 in ingested Map but a log10 reduction of 1.73 in free Map (p Conclusion This study demonstrated that ingestion of Map by and survival and multiplication of Map within Acanthamoeba spp. is possible, and that Map cells ingested by amoebae are more resistant to inactivation by chlorine than free Map cells. These findings have implications with respect to the efficacy of chlorination applied to Map infected surface waters.

  12. Characterization of free exopolysaccharides secreted by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clothilde Bertin

    Full Text Available Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is a severe respiratory disease of cattle that is caused by a bacterium of the Mycoplasma genus, namely Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm. In the absence of classical virulence determinants, the pathogenicity of Mmm is thought to rely on intrinsic metabolic functions and specific components of the outer cell surface. One of these latter, the capsular polysaccharide galactan has been notably demonstrated to play a role in Mmm persistence and dissemination. The free exopolysaccharides (EPS, also produced by Mmm and shown to circulate in the blood stream of infected cattle, have received little attention so far. Indeed, their characterization has been hindered by the presence of polysaccharide contaminants in the complex mycoplasma culture medium. In this study, we developed a method to produce large quantities of EPS by transfer of mycoplasma cells from their complex broth to a chemically defined medium and subsequent purification. NMR analyses revealed that the purified, free EPS had an identical β(1->6-galactofuranosyl structure to that of capsular galactan. We then analyzed intraclonal Mmm variants that produce opaque/translucent colonies on agar. First, we demonstrated that colony opacity was related to the production of a capsule, as observed by electron microscopy. We then compared the EPS extracts and showed that the non-capsulated, translucent colony variants produced higher amounts of free EPS than the capsulated, opaque colony variants. This phenotypic variation was associated with an antigenic variation of a specific glucose phosphotransferase permease. Finally, we conducted in silico analyses of candidate polysaccharide biosynthetic pathways in order to decipher the potential link between glucose phosphotransferase permease activity and attachment/release of galactan. The co-existence of variants producing alternative forms of galactan (capsular versus free extracellular galactan and associated

  13. Characterization of Free Exopolysaccharides Secreted by Mycoplasma mycoides Subsp. mycoides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, Clothilde; Pau-Roblot, Corinne; Courtois, Josiane; Manso-Silván, Lucía; Thiaucourt, François; Tardy, Florence; Le Grand, Dominique; Poumarat, François; Gaurivaud, Patrice

    2013-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia is a severe respiratory disease of cattle that is caused by a bacterium of the Mycoplasma genus, namely Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (Mmm). In the absence of classical virulence determinants, the pathogenicity of Mmm is thought to rely on intrinsic metabolic functions and specific components of the outer cell surface. One of these latter, the capsular polysaccharide galactan has been notably demonstrated to play a role in Mmm persistence and dissemination. The free exopolysaccharides (EPS), also produced by Mmm and shown to circulate in the blood stream of infected cattle, have received little attention so far. Indeed, their characterization has been hindered by the presence of polysaccharide contaminants in the complex mycoplasma culture medium. In this study, we developed a method to produce large quantities of EPS by transfer of mycoplasma cells from their complex broth to a chemically defined medium and subsequent purification. NMR analyses revealed that the purified, free EPS had an identical β(1−>6)-galactofuranosyl structure to that of capsular galactan. We then analyzed intraclonal Mmm variants that produce opaque/translucent colonies on agar. First, we demonstrated that colony opacity was related to the production of a capsule, as observed by electron microscopy. We then compared the EPS extracts and showed that the non-capsulated, translucent colony variants produced higher amounts of free EPS than the capsulated, opaque colony variants. This phenotypic variation was associated with an antigenic variation of a specific glucose phosphotransferase permease. Finally, we conducted in silico analyses of candidate polysaccharide biosynthetic pathways in order to decipher the potential link between glucose phosphotransferase permease activity and attachment/release of galactan. The co-existence of variants producing alternative forms of galactan (capsular versus free extracellular galactan) and associated with an

  14. Molecular subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum in Lisbon, Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, R; Prieto, E; Aguas, M J; Manata, M J; Botas, J; Pereira, F Martins

    2009-08-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reproducibility of a molecular method for the subtyping of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum and to discriminate strains of this microorganism from strains from patients with syphilis. We studied 212 specimens from a total of 82 patients with different stages of syphilis (14 primary, 7 secondary and 61 latent syphilis). The specimens were distributed as follows: genital ulcers (n = 9), skin and mucosal lesions (n = 7), blood (n = 82), plasma (n = 82), and ear lobe scrapings (n = 32). The samples were assayed by a PCR technique to amplify a segment of the polymerase gene I (polA). Positive samples were typed on the basis of the analysis of two variable genes, tpr and arp. Sixty-two of the 90 samples positive for polA yielded typeable Treponema pallidum DNA. All skin lesions in which T. pallidum was identified (six of six [100%]) were found to contain enough DNA for typing of the organism. It was also possible to type DNA from 7/9 (77.7%) genital ulcer samples, 13/22 (59.1%) blood samples, 20/32 (62.5%) plasma samples, and 16/21 (76.2%) ear lobe scrapings. The same subtype was identified in all samples from the same patient. Five molecular subtypes (subtypes 10a, 14a, 14c, 14f, and 14g) were identified, with the most frequently found subtype being subtype 14a and the least frequently found subtype being subtype 10a. In conclusion, the subtyping technique used in this study seems to have good reproducibility. To our knowledge, subtype 10a was identified for the first time. Further studies are needed to explain the presence of this subtype in Portugal, namely, its relationship to the Treponema pallidum strains circulating in the African countries where Portuguese is spoken.

  15. Virulence differences among Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis clades in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia R Molins

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis (type A and holarctica (type B are of clinical importance in causing tularemia. Molecular typing methods have further separated type A strains into three genetically distinct clades, A1a, A1b and A2. Epidemiological analyses of human infections in the United States suggest that A1b infections are associated with a significantly higher mortality rate as compared to infections caused by A1a, A2 and type B. To determine if genetic differences as defined by molecular typing directly correlate with differences in virulence, A1a, A1b, A2 and type B strains were compared in C57BL/6 mice. Here we demonstrate significant differences between survival curves for infections caused by A1b versus A1a, A2 and type B, with A1b infected mice dying earlier than mice infected with A1a, A2 or type B; these results were conserved among multiple strains. Differences were also detected among type A clades as well as between type A clades and type B with respect to bacterial burdens, and gross anatomy in infected mice. Our results indicate that clades defined within F. tularensis subsp. tularensis by molecular typing methods correlate with virulence differences, with A1b strains more virulent than A1a, A2 and type B strains. These findings indicate type A strains are not equivalent with respect to virulence and have important implications for public health as well as basic research programs.

  16. Clonal Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus post breeding endometritis in thoroughbred broodmares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Söderlind, Maja; Rydemann Rudefalk, Sofia

    Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is one of the most commonly isolated pathogens from the uterus of mares with infectious endometritis. Its ability to cause chronic latent infection by residing deep within the endometrial tissue has previously been described. The aim of the study was to inv......Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus is one of the most commonly isolated pathogens from the uterus of mares with infectious endometritis. Its ability to cause chronic latent infection by residing deep within the endometrial tissue has previously been described. The aim of the study...

  17. Genome Sequence of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118, a GABA-Producing Strain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira, Letícia C; Saraiva, Tessália D L; Soares, Siomar C

    2014-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity.......Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis NCDO 2118 is a nondairy lactic acid bacterium, a xylose fermenter, and a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) producer isolated from frozen peas. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of L. lactis NCDO 2118, a strain with probiotic potential activity....

  18. Characteristics of the Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides strains from fresh vegetables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimić Gordana R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Strains synthesizing extracellular polysaccharide dextran on a medium with 10% sucrose were isolated from different kind of vegetables (cabbage, cucumber, cauliflower, kohlrabi, carrot, green beans, red beet, pepper, eggplant, radish. Carbohydrate fermentation was examined using a bioMerieux API 50 CHL test system. Among micropopulations with characteristic spherical cell morphology, 94.9% belonged to Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides and 5.1% were identified as Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum. According to fermentation of pentoses L. mesenteroides strains were divided into three groups with a certain number of biotypes; 10 strains were tested on acid production. .

  19. Relevance of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Plasminogen Binding Activity in the Human Gastrointestinal Microenvironment ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Centanni, Manuela; Fiori, Jessica; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2011-01-01

    Human plasmin(ogen) is regarded as a component of the molecular cross talk between the probiotic species Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and the human host. However, up to now, only in vitro studies have been reported. Here, we demonstrate that the probiotic strain B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 is capable of recruiting plasmin(ogen) present at physiological concentrations in crude extracts from human feces. Our results provide evidence that supports the significance of the B. lactis-plasmin(ogen) interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract. PMID:21821753

  20. Relevance of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis plasminogen binding activity in the human gastrointestinal microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candela, Marco; Turroni, Silvia; Centanni, Manuela; Fiori, Jessica; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Brigidi, Patrizia

    2011-10-01

    Human plasmin(ogen) is regarded as a component of the molecular cross talk between the probiotic species Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and the human host. However, up to now, only in vitro studies have been reported. Here, we demonstrate that the probiotic strain B. animalis subsp. lactis BI07 is capable of recruiting plasmin(ogen) present at physiological concentrations in crude extracts from human feces. Our results provide evidence that supports the significance of the B. lactis-plasmin(ogen) interaction in the human gastrointestinal tract.

  1. Determination of antioxidant properties of Rumex crispus and Scrophularia canina subsp. bicolor

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Serhat; Bozkurt, Buket; Önür, Mustafa Ali; Kaya, İrem Gülen; Ünver Somer, Nehir

    2017-01-01

    Methanoland ethyl acetate extracts of Rumex crispus L. and Scrophularia canina L. subsp. bicolor (SM.) Greuter were tested fortheir antioxidant activity using the DPPH method. Extracts were prepared fromthe above-ground parts of these plants. Significant antioxidant activity wasdetermined for methanol (IC50: 4.16 µg/mL) and ethyl acetate (IC50:8.71 µg/mL) extracts of Rumex crispus.Moreover, methanol (IC50: 60.78 µg/mL) and ethyl acetate (IC50:149.33 µg/mL) extracts of Scrophulariacanina subsp...

  2. Essential oil composition of the fruits of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Labill.) Markgraf (Apocynaceae - Periplocoideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Pietro; Sajeva, Maurizio; Bruno, Maurizio; Maggio, Antonella; Rosselli, Sergio; Senatore, Felice; Formisano, Carmen

    2011-08-01

    The essential oil of the fruits of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Labill.) Markgraf (Apocynaceae) from Lampedusa Island was obtained by hydrodistillation and its composition was analysed. The analyses allowed the identification and quantification of 64 volatile compounds belonging to different classes. The most abundant compounds were nonacosane, heptacosane, hentriacontane and δ-cadinene. Among the volatile compounds identified in the fruits of P. laevigata subsp. angustifolia, 31 are present in other taxa of Apocynaceae, 19 have antimicrobial activity and four are pheromones for the butterfly Danaus chrysippus. The possible ecological role of the volatile compounds found is briefly discussed.

  3. Arabis soyeri Reuter ex Huet subsp. soyeri (Brassicaceae en el Pirineo aragonés [Arabis soyeri Reuter & Huet subsp. soyeri (Brassicaceae, in the Aragonese Pyrenees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Vicente FERRÁNDEZ PALACIO

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: En esta nota confirmamos la presencia de Arabis soyeri subsp. soyeri en el Pirineo aragonés (provincia de Huesca. Esta cita oscense se sitúa en el límite SW de su área de distribución endémica. Además, comentamos algunos aspectos sobre su autoecología y conservación.SUMMARY: Arabis soyeri Reuter & Huet subsp. soyeri is confirmed for the flora of the Aragonese Pyrenees (Huesca province, Spain. Moreower, this new station is located on the south-western border of its endemic range. Some aspects on its autecology and conservation are discussed as well.

  4. Isolation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica (O:4,5:i and Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium from free-living domestic pigeons (Columba livia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Rocha-e-Silva

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the isolation of Salmonella enterica in organs of free-living domestic pigeons. In the clinic examination, the presence of feces in the peri-cloacal and abdominal regions were observed, as well as symptoms such as cachexy, incoordination and opisthotonos. Before any therapeutic protocol was applied the bird died and a necropsy was then performed for the removal of spleen, liver, kidney and intestine for bacteriological examination and antibiotic sensitivity test. Salmonella enterica subsp.enterica (O:4,5:i- and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium were isolated from the liver and intestine and the sensitivity test demonstrated that these strains are sensitive to several antibiotics.

  5. Bioprocessing of some agro-industrial residues for endoglucanase production by the new subsp.; Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Naggar, Noura El-Ahmady; Abdelwahed, Nayera A M; Saber, Wesam I A; Mohamed, Asem A

    2014-01-01

    The use of low cost agro-industrial residues for the production of industrial enzymes is one of the ways to reduce significantly production costs. Cellulase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil and decayed agricultural wastes. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-J, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological and chemotaxonomic properties, together with 16S rDNA sequence. It is proposed that strain NEAE-J should be included in the species Streptomyces albogriseolus as a representative of a novel sub-species, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J and sequencing product was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number JN229412. This organism was tested for its ability to produce endoglucanase and release reducing sugars from agro-industrial residues as substrates. Sugarcane bagasse was the most suitable substrate for endoglucanase production. Effects of process variables, namely incubation time, temperature, initial pH and nitrogen source on production of endoglucanase by submerged fermentation using Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus have been studied. Accordingly optimum conditions have been determined. Incubation temperature of 30 °C after 6 days, pH of 6.5, 1% sugarcane bagasse as carbon source and peptone as nitrogen source were found to be the optimum for endoglucanase production. Optimization of the process parameters resulted in about 2.6 fold increase in the endoglucanase activity. Therefore, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus coud be potential microorganism for the intended application.

  6. Bioprocessing of some agro-industrial residues for endoglucanase production by the new subsp.; Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura El-Ahmady El-Naggar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of low cost agro-industrial residues for the production of industrial enzymes is one of the ways to reduce significantly production costs. Cellulase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil and decayed agricultural wastes. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-J, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological and chemotaxonomic properties, together with 16S rDNA sequence. It is proposed that strain NEAE-J should be included in the species Streptomyces albogriseolus as a representative of a novel sub-species, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus strain NEAE-J and sequencing product was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number JN229412. This organism was tested for its ability to produce endoglucanase and release reducing sugars from agro-industrial residues as substrates. Sugarcane bagasse was the most suitable substrate for endoglucanase production. Effects of process variables, namely incubation time, temperature, initial pH and nitrogen source on production of endoglucanase by submerged fermentation using Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus have been studied. Accordingly optimum conditions have been determined. Incubation temperature of 30 ºC after 6 days, pH of 6.5, 1% sugarcane bagasse as carbon source and peptone as nitrogen source were found to be the optimum for endoglucanase production. Optimization of the process parameters resulted in about 2.6 fold increase in the endoglucanase activity. Therefore, Streptomyces albogriseolus subsp. cellulolyticus coud be potential microorganism for the intended application.

  7. Fortunella margarita transcriptional reprogramming triggered by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Abeer A; Gmitter, Frederick G; Conesa, Ana; Dopazo, Joaquin; Moore, Gloria A

    2011-11-11

    Citrus canker disease caused by the bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc) has become endemic in areas where high temperature, rain, humidity, and windy conditions provide a favourable environment for the dissemination of the bacterium. Xcc is pathogenic on many commercial citrus varieties but appears to elicit an incompatible reaction on the citrus relative Fortunella margarita Swing (kumquat), in the form of a very distinct delayed necrotic response. We have developed subtractive libraries enriched in sequences expressed in kumquat leaves during both early and late stages of the disease. The isolated differentially expressed transcripts were subsequently sequenced. Our results demonstrate how the use of microarray expression profiling can help assign roles to previously uncharacterized genes and elucidate plant pathogenesis-response related mechanisms. This can be considered to be a case study in a citrus relative where high throughput technologies were utilized to understand defence mechanisms in Fortunella and citrus at the molecular level. cDNAs from sequenced kumquat libraries (ESTs) made from subtracted RNA populations, healthy vs. infected, were used to make this microarray. Of 2054 selected genes on a customized array, 317 were differentially expressed (P < 0.05) in Xcc challenged kumquat plants compared to mock-inoculated ones. This study identified components of the incompatible interaction such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and programmed cell death (PCD). Common defence mechanisms and a number of resistance genes were also identified. In addition, there were a considerable number of differentially regulated genes that had no homologues in the databases. This could be an indication of either a specialized set of genes employed by kumquat in response to canker disease or new defence mechanisms in citrus. Functional categorization of kumquat Xcc-responsive genes revealed an enhanced defence-related metabolism as well as a number of

  8. Optimization of Hexadecylpyridinium Chloride Decontamination for Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Milk

    OpenAIRE

    Bradner, L.; Robbe-Austerman, S.; Beitz, D. C.; Stabel, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    A protocol was optimized for the isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) from milk and colostrum, with parameters including chemical decontamination, antibiotics, and different culture media. This study demonstrates that the efficiency of MAP recovery from milk is highly dependent upon the culturing protocol, and such protocols should be optimized to ensure that low concentrations of MAP in milk can be detected.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa Strain Stag?s Leap

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, J.; Wu, F.; Zheng, Z.; Deng, X.; Burbank, L. P.; Stenger, D. C.

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce?s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag?s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce?s disease resistance and a phenotypic assessment of knockout mutants to determine gene function.

  10. Draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa strain Stag’s Leap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xylella fastidiosa subsp. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease of grapevine. Presented here is the draft genome sequence of the Stag’s Leap strain, previously used in pathogenicity/virulence assays to evaluate grapevine germplasm bearing Pierce’s disease....

  11. Cytotoxic and antibacterial activities of sesquiterpene lactones isolated from Tanacetum praeteritum subsp praeteritum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goren, N; Woerdenbag, HJ; BozokJohansson, C

    1996-01-01

    Ten sesquiterpene lactones and one sesquiterpene isolated from Tanacetum praeteritum subsp. praeteritum: 1 alpha,6 alpha-dihydroxyisocostic acid methyl ester (2), 1 alpha-hydroxy-1-deoxoarglanine (3), douglanin (5), santamarin (6), reynosin (7), 1-epi-tatridin B (8), ludovicin A (10), armexin (12),

  12. Molecular cloning and immune response analysis of putative variable lipoproteins from Mycoplasma mycoides subsp capri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C G; Hao, Y Q; Zhang, L; Hao, R X; Liu, X L; Huang, Z Y

    2014-03-12

    Mycoplasma mycoides subsp capri is the cause of goat "MAKePS" (Mastitis, Arthritis, Keratoconjunctivitis, Pneumonia, Septicemia) syndrome. We identified three genes (GL_ 000459; 000461; 000462) as variable lipoprotein genes in the M. mycoides subsp capri str. PG3 genome by genomic information and comparative genomic analyses. To study the role of variable lipoproteins in M. mycoides subsp capri pathogenesis and evaluate the immunogenic and protective potentials of those proteins, we constructed the expression systems and expressed the mature peptide portion of the three proteins in E. coli. We also determined the titers and opsonophagocytosis activity of total IgG antibodies and the levels of Th1 and Th2 cytokines in sera, and we ran a lymphocyte proliferation assay in mice immunized with recombinant proteins His-tag-GL000459, His-tag-GL000461, and His-tag-GL000462. These three lipoproteins induced humoral and cellular immune responses in the immunized mice. Additionally, the whole blood opsonophagocitic in vitro assay demonstrated that the antibodies produced by the immunized groups can neutralize strain PG3; consequently, these three variable lipoproteins could be the major surface antigens in M. mycoides subsp capri str. PG3.

  13. Epidemiology of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus in potato under European conditions: population development and yield reduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hukkanen, A.; Karjalainen, R.; Nielsen, S.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The population development of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp, sepedonicus (Cms) using fluidal strain (NCPPB 4053) and non-mucoid strain (NCPPB 3898) were monitored by IF cell staining method in potato cultivars 'Hansa' and 'Desiree' under field conditions in Denmark and Finland. The influence of

  14. Genomic sequence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 Penner serotype reference strain RM3420

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.T. Parker (Craig); Huynh, S. (Steven); A.P. Heikema (Astrid)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractCampylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni infections are a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis and the most prevalent antecedent to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Penner serotype HS:19 is among several capsular types shown to be markers for GBS. This study describes the genome of C.

  15. Complete genomic sequence of campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 penner reference strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Cjj) infections are a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis and the most prevalent antecedent to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Capsular type Penner HS:19 is among several capsule types shown to be markers for GBS. This study describes the genome of Cjj HS:19...

  16. Studies upon morhological and biological traits of Festuca rubra, subsp.fallax (Poaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusław Sawicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Observation and measurements of some traits of Festuca rubra L., subsp. fallax (Thuill. Hack. ecotypes were made in 1995-1997 using samples selected from natural habitats and collected in Grassland Experimental Station in Sosnowica. High differentiation of traits under study and their correlations were found. Valorized ecotypes are good material for new varieties breeding.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium fortuitum subsp. fortuitum Type Strain DSM46621

    KAUST Repository

    Ho, Y. S

    2012-10-26

    Mycobacterium fortuitum is a member of the rapidly growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM). It is ubiquitous in water and soil habitats, including hospital environments. M. fortuitum is increasingly recognized as an opportunistic nosocomial pathogen causing disseminated infection. Here we report the genome sequence of M. fortuitum subsp. fortuitum type strain DSM46621.

  18. Listeria innocua and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus employ different strategies to cope with acid stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabala, Lana; McMeekin, Tom; Budde, Birgitte Bjørn

    2006-01-01

    Responses of Listeria innocua and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus to a rapid change in extracellular pH (pHex) from pHex 6 to a range of concentrations down to pHex 3.0 were examined, using HCl and lactic acid (LA) as acidulants. A new fluorescent probe 5-(and-6)-carboxy-2', 7'-dichlo...

  19. Cerastium holosteoides Fries (s.s.) en C. fontanum Baumg. subsp. triviale (Link) Jalas in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salman, A.H.P.M.; Ommering, van G.; Voogd, de W.B.

    1976-01-01

    Als conclusie van ons onderzoek kunnen wij stellen, dat a. het juister is om Cerastium holosteoides subsp. triviale op te vatten als ondersoort van C. fontanum, zoals JALAS (1963, 1964) voorstelt; b. de „kale” ondersoorten van C. holosteoides beter tot één taxon kunnen worden verenigd; c. in

  20. Draft Genome Sequences of 64 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Enteritidis Isolates from Mice in US

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ciprofloxacin resistant (CipR) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Kentucky ST198 has rapidly and extensively disseminated globally to become a major food-safety and public health concern. Here, we report a complete genome sequence of a CipR S. Kentucky ST198 strain PU131 isolated from a ...

  1. Geography of genetic differentiation in the barley wild relative Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Informed collecting, conservation, monitoring and utilization of genetic diversity require knowledge of the distribution and structure of genetic variation occurring in a species. Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) Thell., a primary wild relative of barley, is an important source of genetic...

  2. Inferring biomarkers for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and disease progression using experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Available diagnostic assays for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) have poor sensitivities and cannot detect early stages of the infection, therefore, there is need to find new diagnostic markers for early infection detection and disease stages. We analyzed longitudinal IFN- gamma, ELI...

  3. From mouth to macrophage: mechanisms of innate immune subversion by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic enteric infection of cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The high economic cost and potential zoonotic threat of JD have driven efforts to develop tools and approaches to effectively manage this disease within livestock herds. Efforts...

  4. Epidemiological and economic consequences of purchasing livestock infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Carsten Thure; Græsbøll, Kaare; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2017-01-01

    Paratuberculosis (PTB) is a chronic disease which may lead to reduced milk yield, lower animal welfare and death in cattle. The causative agent is Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The economic consequences are particularly important incentives in the control and eradication...

  5. Envelope protein complexes of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and their antigenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s disease, a chronic enteric disease of ruminant animals. In the present study, blue native PAGE electrophoresis and 2D SDS-PAGE were used to separate MAP envelope protein complexes, followed by mass spectrometry (MS) ...

  6. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Drinking Water and Biofilms Using Quantitative PCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease in domestic animals and has been implicated in Crohn’s disease in humans. Cows infected with Johne’s disease shed large quantities of MAP into soil. Further, MAP has been isolated from surface water, is resi...

  7. Mycobacterium avium Subsp. avium Infection in Four Veal Calves: Differentiation from Intestinal Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Goepfert

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (Maa is an intracellular pathogen belonging to the Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC. Reservoirs of MAC are the natural environment, wildlife and domestic animals. In adult bovine, MAC infections are typically caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map. Maa infections in bovine are rarely reported but may cause clinical disease and pathological lesions similar to those observed in paratuberculosis or those induced by members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC. Therefore, differentiation of MAC from MTBC infection should be attempted, especially if unusual mycobacterial lesions are encountered. Four veal calves from a fattening farm dying with clinical signs of otitis media, fever, and weight loss were submitted for necropsy. Samples from affected organs were taken for histologic investigation, bacteriologic culture, and bacterial specification using PCR. Macroscopic thickening of the intestinal mucosa was induced by granulomatous enteritis and colitis. Intracytoplasmic acid-fast bacteria were detected by Ziehl-Neelsen stains and PCR revealed positive results for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Clinical and pathological changes of Maa infection in veal calves had features of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and the MTBC. Therefore, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection should be considered in cases of granulomatous enteritis in calves.

  8. PURIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ENDOPEPTIDASE FROM LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS SUBSP CREMORIS WG2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TAN, PST; POS, KM; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    An endopeptidase has been purified to homogeneity from a crude cell extract of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris Wg2 by a procedure that includes diethyl-aminoethane-Sephacel chromatography, phenyl-Sepharose chromatography, hydroxylapatite chromatography, and fast protein liquid chromatography over

  9. Optimization of hexadecylpyridinium chloride decontamination for culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from milk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cows in advanced stages of Johne’s disease shed Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) into both their milk and feces, allowing for transmission of the bacteria between animals. The objective of this study was to formulate an optimized protocol for the isolation of MAP from milk and colos...

  10. Characterization of cry1Cb3 and cry1Fb7 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huang, T.; Xiao, Y.; Pan, J.; Zhang, L.; Gelbič, Ivan; Guan, X.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2015), s. 521-528 ISSN 2391-5412 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. galleriae * PCR-RFLP * cloning Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/biol.2015.10.issue-1/biol-2015-0054/biol-2015-0054. xml

  11. Note on the occurrence of Melientha suavis subsp. suavis (Opiliaceae) in the Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langenberger, G.

    2002-01-01

    The small tree Melientha suavis Pierre subsp. suavis (Opiliaceae) is in the Philippines so far known from two localities in Mindanao, only (Misamis Or., Claveria; Cotabato, Port Lebak: Hiepko, 1979, 1984). During vegetation studies on Mt Pangasugan, Leyte, Eastern Visayas (Langenberger, 2000), it

  12. Identification of expressed genes during infection of chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) by Plasmodiophora brassicae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundelin, Thomas; Jensen, Dan Funck; Lübeck, Mette

    2011-01-01

    and that the introns are small. These results show that it is possible to discover new P. brassicae genes from a mixed pool of both plant and pathogen cDNA. The results also revealed that some of the P. brassicae genes expressed in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa subsp. pekinensis) were identical to the genes expressed...

  13. Risk factors for clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on Dutch dairy farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Wilpshaar, H.; Frankena, K.; Bartels, C.; Barkema, H.W.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for outbreaks in 1999 of clinical Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium infection on dairy farms were studied in a matched case–control study with 47 case farms and 47 control farms. All 47 case farms experienced a clinical outbreak of salmonellosis which was confirmed

  14. Herd-level diagnosis for Salmonella enterica subsp enterica serovar Dublin infection in bovine dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veling, J.; Barkema, H.W.; Schans, van de J.; Zijderveld, van F.G.; Verhoeff, J.

    2002-01-01

    Herd-level sensitivities of bacteriological and serological methods were compared in 79 bovine dairy herds, recently infected with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Dublin. All farms experienced clinical signs of salmonellosis for the first time and had no history of vaccination against

  15. Bioaccessible Antioxidants in Milk Fermented by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Mérilie; Savard, Patricia; Rivière, Audrey; LaPointe, Gisèle

    2015-01-01

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum is among the dominant species of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and could thus have potential as probiotics. New targets such as antioxidant properties have interest for beneficial effects on health. The objective of this study was to evaluate the bioaccessibility of antioxidants in milk fermented by selected B. longum subsp. longum strains during in vitro dynamic digestion. The antioxidant capacity of cell extracts from 38 strains, of which 32 belong to B. longum subsp. longum, was evaluated with the ORAC (oxygen radical absorbance capacity) method. On the basis of screening and gene sequence typing by multilocus locus sequence analysis (MLSA), five strains were chosen for fermenting reconstituted skim milk. Antioxidant capacity varied among the strains tested (P = 0.0009). Two strains of B. longum subsp. longum (CUETM 172 and 171) showed significantly higher ORAC values than the other bifidobacteria strains. However, there does not appear to be a relationship between gene sequence types and antioxidant capacity. The milk fermented by each of the five strains selected (CUETM 268, 172, 245, 247, or PRO 16-10) did not have higher initial ORAC values compared to the nonfermented milk samples. However, higher bioaccessibility of antioxidants in fermented milk (175–358%) was observed during digestion. PMID:25802836

  16. Evidence for a chromosomally determined mesenterocin, a bacteriocin produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides OZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanagaoglu, Ozlem; Kiran, Fadime

    2011-06-01

    Mesenterocin, a small anti-listerial peptide of 3.5 kDa produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides OZ at the end of exponential growth was inactivated by proteolytic enymes, stable to cold storage (4 °C for 3 d), heat, organic solvents and surfactants, and exhibited maximum bactericidal mode of activity in the pH range 3 to 10. Although Leu. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides OZ harboured plasmids ranging in size from 3.6 to 9.7 kbp, no evidence was obtained indicating that mesenterocin was under the control of extrachromosomal plasmids because loss of bacteriocin production following plasmid curing experiments could not be correlated with plasmid loss and the lack of detectable plasmids suggested a chromosomal location for the genetic determinants of mesenterocin. To determine its chromosomal location, genetic determinants of the bacteriocin of Leu. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides OZ were tested with previously described bacteriocins of the Leuconostocs through PCR and results of PCR indicated that the gene for mesenterocin activity is located on the chromosome. No papers have been published, to the best of our knowledge, on chromosomal location of bacteriocin of Leuconostoc species. Association of meat spoilage with bacteriocin producing heterofermentative Leu. mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides OZ is also suggested. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Transport in Cytoplasmic Membranes of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum CNRZ 1273

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WINTERS, DA; POOLMAN, B; HEMME, D; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    Membrane vesicles of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. dextranicum fused with proteoliposomes prepared from Escherichia coli phospholipids containing beef heart cytochrome c oxidase were used to study the transport of branched-chain amino acids in a strain isolated from a raw milk cheese. At a medium

  18. Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis invades, survives and replicates in Atlantic cod cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkemo, Kathrine R; Mikkelsen, Helene; Johansen, Audny; Robertsen, Børre; Seppola, Marit

    2016-09-26

    Systemic infection caused by the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella noatunensis subsp. noatunensis remains a disease threat to Atlantic cod Gadus morhua L. Future prophylactics could benefit from better knowledge on how the bacterium invades, survives and establishes infection in its host cells. Here, facilitated by the use of a gentamicin protection assay, this was studied in primary monocyte/macrophage cultures and an epithelial-like cell line derived from Atlantic cod larvae (ACL cells). The results showed that F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis is able to invade primary monocyte/macrophages, and that the actin-polymerisation inhibitor cytochalasin D blocked internalisation, demonstrating that the invasion is mediated through phagocytosis. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) treatment of cod macrophages prior to infection enhanced bacterial invasion, potentially by stimulating macrophage activation in an early step in host defence against F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis infections. We measured a rapid drop of the initial high levels of internalised bacteria in macrophages, indicating the presence and action of a cellular immune defence mechanism before intracellular bacterial replication took place. Low levels of bacterial internalisation and replication were detected in the epithelial-like ACL cells. The capacity of F. noatunensis subsp. noatunensis to enter, survive and even replicate within an epithelial cell line may play an important role in its ability to infect live fish and transverse epithelial barriers to reach the bacterium's main target cells-the macrophage.

  19. Insertion of Transposon Tn917 Derivatives into the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsen, Hans; Hansen, Egon Bech

    1993-01-01

    Two transposition vectors, pTV32 and pLTV1, containing transposon Tn917 derivatives TV32 and LTV1, respectively, were introduced into Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis MG1614. It was found that pTV32 and pLTV1 replicate and that TV32 and LTV1 transpose in this strain. A protocol for production of a collection of Tn917 insertions in L. lactis subsp. lactis was developed. The physical locations of TV32 on the chromosomal SmaI fragments of 62 independent transpositions were established by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. These transpositions could be divided into at least 38 different groups that exhibited no Tn917-dominating hot spots on the L. lactis subsp. lactis chromosome. A total of 10 of the 62 transpositions resulted in strains that express β-galactosidase. This indicates that there was fusion of the promoterless lacZ of the Tn917 derivatives to a chromosomal promoter. Thus, the Tn917-derived transposons should be powerful genetic tools for studying L. lactis subsp. lactis. Images PMID:16348845

  20. The anti-tick properties of the root extracts of Senna italica subsp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the anti-tick properties of the root extracts of Senna italica subsp. arachoides against adults of Hyalomma marginatum rufipes. Of the hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts tested, only ethyl acetate extracts proved to be potent against adults of H. marginatum rufipes.

  1. Sensitive detection of Myobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in bovine semen by real-time PCR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herthnek, D.; Englund, S.; Willemsen, P.T.J.; Bolske, G.

    2006-01-01

    Aims: To develop a fast and sensitive protocol for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in bovine semen and to make a critical evaluation of the analytical sensitivity. Methods and Results: Processed semen was spiked with known amounts of MAP. Semen from different bulls as

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus carnosus subsp. utilis LTH 7013, Isolated from South Tyrolean Ham

    OpenAIRE

    M?ller, Anne; Huptas, Christopher; Wenning, Mareike; Schmidt, Herbert; Weiss, Agnes

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus carnosus is used as a starter culture in meat fermentation, where it contributes to color formation and produces aromatic compounds. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of an S.?carnosus subsp. utilis strain, LTH 7013, isolated from South Tyrolean ham, with potential application as a starter culture.

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Staphylococcus carnosus subsp. utilis LTH 7013, Isolated from South Tyrolean Ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Anne; Huptas, Christopher; Wenning, Mareike; Schmidt, Herbert; Weiss, Agnes

    2015-05-14

    Staphylococcus carnosus is used as a starter culture in meat fermentation, where it contributes to color formation and produces aromatic compounds. Here, we report the first draft genome sequence of an S. carnosus subsp. utilis strain, LTH 7013, isolated from South Tyrolean ham, with potential application as a starter culture. Copyright © 2015 Müller et al.

  4. Resistance of sweet orange Pera (Citrus sinensis) genotypes to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri under field conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus canker control is based on protection measures and eradication of plants infected with Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri. Although these measures show satisfactory results, the use of resistant genotypes is an important alternative for citrus canker control. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  5. Effect of Watering Trough Chlorination on Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosi

    Science.gov (United States)

    The continued global increase in the number of cases of Johne’s disease suggests that more information is needed to understand the mechanisms by which the causative agent Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is spread among livestock on the farm site. Livestock watering troughs are freq...

  6. Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum can cause potato blackleg in temperate climates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de E.G.; Dekker-Nooren, T.C.E.M.; Bovenkamp, van den G.W.; Speksnijder, A.G.C.L.; Zouwen, van der P.S.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that the pectinolytic bacteria Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pca) and Dickeya spp. are causal organisms of blackleg in potato. In temperate climates, the role of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc) in potato blackleg, however, is unclear. In different western

  7. Distribution of Dickeya spp. and Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp carotovorum in naturally infected seed potatoes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Czajkowski, R.L.; Grabe, G.J.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed studies were conducted on the distribution of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and Dickeya spp. in two potato seed lots of different cultivars harvested from blackleg-diseased crops. Composite samples of six different tuber sections (peel, stolon end, and peeled potato tissue

  8. Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei L. casei W8 suppresses energy intake acutely

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Anne Toksvig; Kristensen, Mette Bredal; Ritz, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Probiotic bacteria have been shown to have various effects on the microbiota; this may also affect appetite and may help promote weight loss and maintenance. Objective: This study was conducted to investigate the effect of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp paracasei L. casei W8 (L. casei W8...

  9. Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans prosthetic aortic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hal, S; Stark, D; Marriott, D; Harkness, J

    2008-04-01

    We report a case of prosthetic valve infective endocarditis and aortic root abscesses caused by Achromobacter xylosoxidans subsp. xylosoxidans. The patient was an intravenous drug user and had injected amphetamines using 'duck pond water' as a diluent. After surgical intervention and 6 weeks of intravenous meropenem therapy, the patient made an uneventful recovery.

  10. Bovine Immunoinhibitory Receptors Contribute to Suppression of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific T-Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okagawa, Tomohiro; Konnai, Satoru; Nishimori, Asami; Ikebuchi, Ryoyo; Mizorogi, Seiko; Nagata, Reiko; Kawaji, Satoko; Tanaka, Shogo; Kagawa, Yumiko; Murata, Shiro; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ohashi, Kazuhiko

    2015-10-19

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) is a chronic enteritis in cattle that is caused by intracellular infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This infection is characterized by the functional exhaustion of T-cell responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens during late subclinical and clinical stages, presumably facilitating the persistence of this bacterium and the formation of clinical lesions. However, the mechanisms underlying T-cell exhaustion in Johne's disease are poorly understood. Thus, we performed expression and functional analyses of the immunoinhibitory molecules programmed death-1 (PD-1)/PD-ligand 1 (PD-L1) and lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3)/major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected cattle during the late subclinical stage. Flow cytometric analyses revealed the upregulation of PD-1 and LAG-3 in T cells in infected animals, which suffered progressive suppression of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) responses to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. In addition, PD-L1 and MHC-II were expressed on macrophages from infected animals, consistent with PD-1 and LAG-3 pathways contributing to the suppression of IFN-γ responses during the subclinical stages of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. Furthermore, dual blockade of PD-L1 and LAG-3 enhanced M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific IFN-γ responses in blood from infected animals, and in vitro LAG-3 blockade enhanced IFN-γ production from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, the present data indicate that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell exhaustion is in part mediated by PD-1/PD-L1 and LAG-3/MHC-II interactions and that LAG-3 is a molecular target for the control of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific T-cell responses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. Divergent Immune Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection Correlate with Kinome Responses at the Site of Intestinal Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  12. Selective enumeration and viability of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis in a new fermented milk product Enumeração seletiva e viabilidade de Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis em um novo produto lácteo fermentado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriane Elisabete Costa Antunes

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the key focuses of today's dairy industry worldwide is the continued development of new products, especially probiotic-based products. Buttermilk is originally a by-product of butter making fermented by Mesophilic Aromatic Cultures (MAC. It can also be made by fermentation of pasteurized whole milk or skimmed milk. This product is not marketed in Brazil. The objectives of this work were: (1 to develop a selective medium for Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis enumeration and (2 to determine the viability of this microorganism during the shelf life of the buttermilk. Skim milk added with 10% sucrose or 0.03% sucralose was pasteurized and inoculated with a composite starter culture consisting of 1% MAC (containing Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis biovar. diacetylactis and Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris and 2% Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To attain selective counts of Bif. animalis subsp. lactis the MRS agar supplemented with 0.5% L-cysteine hydrochloride at 10%, 1% lithium chloride at 10%, 0.01% aniline blue and 0.5% dicloxacillin at 0.1% was modified by increasing the antibiotic concentration, addition of NaCl, adjusting pH to 4.8 or increasing the incubation temperature (from 37 to 45ºC. Raising the incubation temperature to 45ºC was found to be efficient in inhibiting the MAC cultures, even in media not added with dicloxacillin. Bif. animalis subsp. lactis exhibited high viability in the product. The buttermilk product prepared with sucrose and sweetener contained in excess of 10(8 cfu.ml-1 bifidobacteria throughout the shelf life of the product (28 days.Atualmente, um dos principais focos da indústria de laticínios em todo o mundo é o desenvolvimento de novos produtos, especialmente probióticos. Buttermilk é originalmente um sub-produto do processamento da manteiga fermentado por Culturas Aromáticas Mesofílicas (MAC. Pode também ser

  13. A Rapid Method for Quantifying Viable Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Cellular Infection Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Hannah B.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Begg, Douglas J.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determining the viability of bacteria is a key outcome of in vitro cellular infection assays. Currently, this is done by culture, which is problematic for fastidious slow-growing bacteria such as Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, where it can take up to 4 months to confirm growth. This study aimed to identify an assay that can rapidly quantify the number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in a cellular sample. Three commercially available bacterial viability assays along with a modified liquid culture method coupled with high-throughput quantitative PCR growth detection were assessed. Criteria for assessment included the ability of each assay to differentiate live and dead M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis organisms and their accuracy at low bacterial concentrations. Using the culture-based method, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth was reliably detected and quantified within 2 weeks. There was a strong linear association between the 2-week growth rate and the initial inoculum concentration. The number of viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells in an unknown sample was quantified based on the growth rate, by using growth standards. In contrast, none of the commercially available viability assays were suitable for use with samples from in vitro cellular infection assays. IMPORTANCE Rapid quantification of the viability of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in samples from in vitro cellular infection assays is important, as it allows these assays to be carried out on a large scale. In vitro cellular infection assays can function as a preliminary screening tool, for vaccine development or antimicrobial screening, and also to extend findings derived from experimental animal trials. Currently, by using culture, it takes up to 4 months to obtain quantifiable results regarding M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis viability after an in vitro infection assay; however, with the quantitative PCR and liquid culture method

  14. Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and Bartonella henselae bacteremia in a father and daughter with neurological disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods Christopher W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii is an important, emerging, intravascular bacterial pathogen that has been recently isolated from immunocompetent patients with endocarditis, arthritis, neurological disease and vasoproliferative neoplasia. Vector transmission is suspected among dogs and wild canines, which are the primary reservoir hosts. This investigation was initiated to determine if pets and family members were infected with one or more Bartonella species. Methods PCR and enrichment blood culture in Bartonella alpha Proteobacteria growth medium (BAPGM was used to determine infection status. Antibody titers to B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotypes I-III and B. henselae were determined using a previously described indirect fluorescent antibody test. Two patients were tested sequentially for over a year to assess the response to antibiotic treatment. Results Intravascular infection with B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II and Bartonella henselae (Houston 1 strain were confirmed in a veterinarian and his daughter by enrichment blood culture, followed by PCR and DNA sequencing. Symptoms included progressive weight loss, muscle weakness, lack of coordination (the father and headaches, muscle pain and insomnia (the daughter. B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii genotype II was also sequenced from a cerebrospinal fluid BAPGM enrichment culture and from a periodontal swab sample. After repeated courses of antibiotics, post-treatment blood cultures were negative, there was a decremental decrease in antibody titers to non-detectable levels and symptoms resolved in both patients. Conclusions B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii and B. henselae are zoonotic pathogens that can be isolated from the blood of immunocompetent family members with arthralgias, fatigue and neurological symptoms. Therapeutic elimination of Bartonella spp. infections can be challenging, and follow-up testing is recommended. An increasing number of arthropod

  15. Complete genome and comparative analysis of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus, an emerging pathogen of infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreier Jens

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus is an important causative agent of infectious endocarditis, while the pathogenicity of this species is widely unclear. To gain insight into the pathomechanisms and the underlying genetic elements for lateral gene transfer, we sequenced the entire genome of this pathogen. Results We sequenced the whole genome of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus strain ATCC BAA-2069, consisting of a 2,356,444 bp circular DNA molecule with a G+C-content of 37.65% and a novel 20,765 bp plasmid designated as pSGG1. Bioinformatic analysis predicted 2,309 ORFs and the presence of 80 tRNAs and 21 rRNAs in the chromosome. Furthermore, 21 ORFs were detected on the plasmid pSGG1, including tetracycline resistance genes telL and tet(O/W/32/O. Screening of 41 S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates revealed one plasmid (pSGG2 homologous to pSGG1. We further predicted 21 surface proteins containing the cell wall-sorting motif LPxTG, which were shown to play a functional role in the adhesion of bacteria to host cells. In addition, we performed a whole genome comparison to the recently sequenced S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus strain UCN34, revealing significant differences. Conclusions The analysis of the whole genome sequence of S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus promotes understanding of genetic factors concerning the pathogenesis and adhesion to ECM of this pathogen. For the first time we detected the presence of the mobilizable pSGG1 plasmid, which may play a functional role in lateral gene transfer and promote a selective advantage due to a tetracycline resistance.

  16. Perlakuan Panas Kering dan Bakterisida untuk Menekan Infeksi Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii pada Benih Jagung Manis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suswi Nalis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stewart’s Wilt is an important bacterial disease of sweet corn caused by Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (synonim Erwinia stewartii. This bacteria is a seed transmitted pathogen therefore seed treatment is one method to control stewart’s wilt. The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of dry heat, bactericide treatment, and their combinations to eliminate P. stewartii subsp. stewartii infection on sweet corn seed without damaging seed quality. The research was conducted in 3 experiments. Experiment I was conducted to determine the treatment window of dry heat and bactericide treatment. The treatment was carried out on sweet corn seed using the P. stewartii subsp. stewartii in vitro. Experiment II was conducted to study dry heat and bactericide treatment on sweet corn seed infested by P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. Experiment III was conducted to study combination of dry heat and bactericide treatment on sweet corn seed infested by P. stewartii subsp. stewartii. The results showed that dry heat treatment at 50 °C for 24 hours was able to eliminate pathogen populations in vitro but was unable to eliminate the 128 pathogen on infected seed (in vivo. Germination tests indicated that seed treatments with dry heat up to 55 °C did not decrease the germination level. The use of bactericide treatment in 100 ppm could reduce the population of bacteria on sweet corn seeds. Bactericide concentration of 150 and 200 ppm could decrease the population of bacteria on sweet corn seeds, however it could cause phytotoxic effect. The combination of bactericide (100 ppm, w/v with dry heat treatment (55 °C for 24 hours was able to eliminate bacteria on infected seed with seed germination above 85%.

  17. Human Treponema pallidum 11q/j isolate belongs to subsp. endemicum but contains two loci with a sequence in TP0548 and TP0488 similar to subsp. pertenue and subsp. pallidum, respectively.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Mikalová

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum (TEN is the causative agent of endemic syphilis (bejel. An unusual human TEN 11q/j isolate was obtained from a syphilis-like primary genital lesion from a patient that returned to France from Pakistan.The TEN 11q/j isolate was characterized using nested PCR followed by Sanger sequencing and/or direct Illumina sequencing. Altogether, 44 chromosomal regions were analyzed. Overall, the 11q/j isolate clustered with TEN strains Bosnia A and Iraq B as expected from previous TEN classification of the 11q/j isolate. However, the 11q/j sequence in a 505 bp-long region at the TP0488 locus was similar to Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA strains, but not to TEN Bosnia A and Iraq B sequences, suggesting a recombination event at this locus. Similarly, the 11q/j sequence in a 613 bp-long region at the TP0548 locus was similar to Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue (TPE strains, but not to TEN sequences.A detailed analysis of two recombinant loci found in the 11q/j clinical isolate revealed that the recombination event occurred just once, in the TP0488, with the donor sequence originating from a TPA strain. Since TEN Bosnia A and Iraq B were found to contain TPA-like sequences at the TP0548 locus, the recombination at TP0548 took place in a treponeme that was an ancestor to both TEN Bosnia A and Iraq B. The sequence of 11q/j isolate in TP0548 represents an ancestral TEN sequence that is similar to yaws-causing treponemes. In addition to the importance of the 11q/j isolate for reconstruction of the TEN phylogeny, this case emphasizes the possible role of TEN strains in development of syphilis-like lesions.

  18. Human Treponema pallidum 11q/j isolate belongs to subsp. endemicum but contains two loci with a sequence in TP0548 and TP0488 similar to subsp. pertenue and subsp. pallidum, respectively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikalová, Lenka; Strouhal, Michal; Oppelt, Jan; Grange, Philippe Alain; Janier, Michel; Benhaddou, Nadjet; Dupin, Nicolas; Šmajs, David

    2017-03-01

    Treponema pallidum subsp. endemicum (TEN) is the causative agent of endemic syphilis (bejel). An unusual human TEN 11q/j isolate was obtained from a syphilis-like primary genital lesion from a patient that returned to France from Pakistan. The TEN 11q/j isolate was characterized using nested PCR followed by Sanger sequencing and/or direct Illumina sequencing. Altogether, 44 chromosomal regions were analyzed. Overall, the 11q/j isolate clustered with TEN strains Bosnia A and Iraq B as expected from previous TEN classification of the 11q/j isolate. However, the 11q/j sequence in a 505 bp-long region at the TP0488 locus was similar to Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (TPA) strains, but not to TEN Bosnia A and Iraq B sequences, suggesting a recombination event at this locus. Similarly, the 11q/j sequence in a 613 bp-long region at the TP0548 locus was similar to Treponema pallidum subsp. pertenue (TPE) strains, but not to TEN sequences. A detailed analysis of two recombinant loci found in the 11q/j clinical isolate revealed that the recombination event occurred just once, in the TP0488, with the donor sequence originating from a TPA strain. Since TEN Bosnia A and Iraq B were found to contain TPA-like sequences at the TP0548 locus, the recombination at TP0548 took place in a treponeme that was an ancestor to both TEN Bosnia A and Iraq B. The sequence of 11q/j isolate in TP0548 represents an ancestral TEN sequence that is similar to yaws-causing treponemes. In addition to the importance of the 11q/j isolate for reconstruction of the TEN phylogeny, this case emphasizes the possible role of TEN strains in development of syphilis-like lesions.

  19. A case of acute diarrhea due to the emerging pathogen Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei in Southern Chile Um caso de diarréia aguda devido ao patógeno emergente Campylobacter jejuni subsp. doylei no sul do Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Fernández

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The first documented case of acute diarrhea due to C. jejuni subsp. doylei in Chile is reported. The clinical findings, the absence of other enteropathogens, virus or parasites and the fact that C. jejuni subsp. doylei was the only bacteria isolated support the assumption that it was the etiological agent of this diarrheal case.O primeiro caso documentado de diarréia aguda por C. jejuni subsp. doylei no sul do Chile é apresentado. As características clínicas, a ausência de outros enteropatógenos, vírus ou parasitas, e o fato de C. jejuni subsp. doylei ter sido a única bactéria isolada, permitem assumir que este microrganismo é o agente etiológico neste caso de diarréia.

  20. Discovery of Stable and Variable Differences in the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Type I, II, and III Genomes by Pan-Genome Microarray Analysis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elena; Aranaz, Alicia; Gould, Katherine A.; Linedale, Richard; Stevenson, Karen; Alvarez, Julio; Dominguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucia; Hinds, Jason; Bull, Tim J.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is an important animal pathogen widely disseminated in the environment that has also been associated with Crohn's disease in humans. Three M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomotypes are recognized, but genomic differences have not been fully described. To further investigate these potential differences, a 60-mer oligonucleotide microarray (designated the MAPAC array), based on the combined genomes of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (strain K-10) and Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis (strain 104), was designed and validated. By use of a test panel of defined M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, the MAPAC array was able to identify a set of large sequence polymorphisms (LSPs) diagnostic for each of the three major M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis types. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis type II strains contained a smaller genomic complement than M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis type I and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis type III genomotypes, which included a set of genomic regions also found in M. avium subsp. hominissuis 104. Specific PCRs for genes within LSPs that differentiated M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis types were devised and shown to accurately screen a panel (n = 78) of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains. Analysis of insertion/deletion region INDEL12 showed deletion events causing a reduction in the complement of mycobacterial cell entry genes in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis type II strains and significantly altering the coding of a major immunologic protein (MPT64) associated with persistence and granuloma formation. Analysis of MAPAC data also identified signal variations in several genomic regions, termed variable genomic islands (vGIs), suggestive of transient duplication/deletion events. vGIs contained significantly low GC% and were immediately flanked by insertion sequences, integrases, or short inverted repeat sequences. Quantitative PCR demonstrated that variation in vGI signals

  1. The Probiotic Combination of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BPL6 Reduces Pathogen Loads and Improves Gut Health of Weaned Piglets Orally Challenged with Salmonella Typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Emili Barba-Vidal; Lorena Castillejos; Victor F. B. Roll; Gloria Cifuentes-Orjuela; José A. Moreno Muñoz; Martín-Orúe, Susana M.

    2017-01-01

    Probiotics have been demonstrated to be useful to enhance gut health and prevent gastrointestinal infections in humans. Additionally, some multi-strain probiotic combinations have been suggested to have greater efficacy than single strains. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the potential of a combination of the probiotic strains: Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CECT 7210 (brand name B. infantis IM1®) and B. animalis subsp. lactis BPL6 to enhance gut health and to ameliorate...

  2. Control of Brochothrix thermosphacta in pork meat using Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23 isolated from beef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusegun A Olaoye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the antimicrobial activities of two lactic acid bacteria (LAB Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23 and L. lactis subsp. hordinae E91 against Brochothrix thermosphacta in pork during storage at ambient temperature (30oC over 7 days. Both the LAB strains and spoilage organism were inoculated on fresh pork samples at 1x106cfu/g. About 3 log reduction in the spoilage organism was obtained in LAB treated samples after 48 h of storage. The spoilage organism was confirmed to be sensitive to the bacteriocin nisin produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23. There were reductions in the counts of Salmonella typhimurium, Listeria monocytogenes, Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus in the treated samples. Conclusively, growth of B. thermosphacta could be effectively controlled by nisin producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis I23 in fresh pork during storage, thereby enhancing shelf life of the product.

  3. Association between milk antibody and interferon-gamma responses in cattle from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infected herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Jungersen, Gregers; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2009-01-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). It is possible to detect infection with paratuberculosis at different stages of disease by means of various diagnostic test strategies. The objective of the present study...

  4. Faecal bacterial composition in dairy cows shedding Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in faeces in comparison with nonshedding cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaevska, Marija; Videnska, Petra; Sedlar, Karel; Bartejsova, Iva; Kralova, Alena; Slana, Iva

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine possible differences in the faecal microbiota of dairy cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in comparison with noninfected cows from the same herds. Faecal samples from cows in 4 herds were tested for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by real-time PCR, and faecal bacterial populations were analysed by 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. The most notable differences between shedding and nonshedding cows were an increase in the genus Psychrobacter and a decrease in the genera Oscillospira, Ruminococcus, and Bifidobacterium in cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The present study is the first to report the faecal microbial composition in dairy cows infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  5. Antigenicity of Recombinant Maltose Binding Protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Fusion Proteins with and without Factor Xa Cleaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Bannantine, John P.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such proteins are hypothesized to be expressed in vivo, are recognized by the host immune system, and may be of potential use in the diagnosis of JD. In this study, 50 recombinant maltose binding protein (MBP)-M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins were evaluated using serum samples from sheep infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, and 29 (58%) were found to be antigenic. Among 50 fusion proteins, 10 were evaluated in MBP fusion and factor Xa-cleaved forms. A total of 31 proteins (62%) were found to be antigenic in either MBP fusion or factor Xa-cleaved forms. Antigenicity after cleavage and removal of the MBP tag was marginally enhanced. PMID:24132604

  6. Genetic control of resistance to soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp carotovora in Zantedeschia spp. (Araceae), section Aestivae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, R.C.; Lindhout, W.H.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2004-01-01

    The pattern of heredity of resistance to Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora in Zantedeschia spp. is investigated. Four species with different resistance levels (Z. albomaculata, Z. elliotiana, Z. pentlandii, Z. rehmannii) were compared to their reciprocal offspring. The occurrence of

  7. Germination, growth, and sporulation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in excreted food vacuoles of the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasherob, R; Ben-Dov, E; Zaritsky, A; Barak, Z

    1998-05-01

    Spores of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and their toxic crystals are bioencapsulated in the protozoan Tetrahymena pyriformis, in which the toxin remains stable. Each T. pyriformis cell concentrates the spores and crystals in its food vacuoles, thus delivering them to mosquito larvae, which rapidly die. Vacuoles containing undigested material are later excreted from the cells. The fate of spores and toxin inside the food vacuoles was determined at various times after excretion by phase-contrast and electron microscopy as well as by viable-cell counting. Excreted food vacuoles gradually aggregated, and vegetative growth of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis was observed after 7 h as filaments that stemmed from the aggregates. The outgrown cells sporulated between 27 and 42 h. The spore multiplication values in this system are low compared to those obtained in carcasses of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis-killed larvae and pupae, but this bioencapsulation represents a new possible mode of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis recycling in nontarget organisms.

  8. The Genome Sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. Infantis Reveals Adaptations for Milk Utilization within the Infant Microbiome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    D. A. Sela; J. Chapman; A. Adeuya; J. H. Kim; F. Chen; T. R. Whitehead; A. Lapidus; D. S. Rokhsar; C. B. Lebrilla; J. B. German; N. P. Price; P. M. Richardson; D. A. Mills

    2008-01-01

    .... Accordingly, the complete genome sequence of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC15697 reflects a competitive nutrient-utilization strategy targeting milk-borne molecules which lack a nutritive value to the neonate...

  9. Drug susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium Avium subsp. Avium isolates from naturally infected domestic pigeons to avian tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaveh Parvandar

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: We suggest drug susceptibility testing for more nontuberculous mycobateria, particularly M. avium complex isolated from infected birds and humans, as well as molecular basics of drug sensitivity in order to detect resistance genes of pathogenic M. avium subsp. avium.

  10. Transcriptome-Based Characterization of Interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in Lactose-Grown Chemostat Cocultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, F.; Sieuwerts, S.; De Hulster, E.; Almering, M.J.; Luttik, M.A.; Pronk, J.T.; Smid, E.J.; Bron, P.A.; Daran-Lapujade, P.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.

  11. Transcriptome-based characterization of interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in lactose-grown chemostat cocultures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendes, F.; Sieuwerts, S.; Hulster, de E.; Almering, M.J.; Luttik, M.A.H.; Pronk, J.T.; Smid, E.J.; Baron, P.A.; Daran-Lapujade, P.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp.

  12. Contrasting Results of Culture-Dependent and Molecular Analyses of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from Wood Bison

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Buck, Jeroen; Elkin, Brett; Kutz, Susan; van der Meer, Frank; Orsel, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Reduced to near extinction in the late 1800s, a number of wood bison populations (Bison bison athabascae) have been re-established through reintroduction initiatives. Although an invaluable tool for conservation, translocation of animals can spread infectious agents to new areas or expose animals to pathogens in their new environment. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, a bacterium that causes chronic enteritis in ruminants, is among the pathogens of potential concern for wood bison management and conservation. In order to inform translocation decisions, our objectives were to determine the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status of wood bison herds in Canada and to culture and genetically characterize the infective strain(s). We tested fecal samples from bison (n = 267) in nine herds using direct PCR for three M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific genetic targets with different copy numbers within the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genome. Restriction enzyme analysis (REA) and sequencing of IS1311 were performed on seven samples from five different herds. We also evaluated a panel of different culture conditions for their ability to support M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis growth from feces and tissues of direct-PCR-positive animals. Eighty-one fecal samples (30%) tested positive using direct IS900 PCR, with positive samples from all nine herds; of these, 75% and 21% were also positive using ISMAP02 and F57, respectively. None of the culture conditions supported the growth of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis from PCR-positive samples. IS1311 REA and sequencing indicate that at least two different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types exist in Canadian wood bison. The presence of different M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains among wood bison herds should be considered in the planning of translocations. PMID:23686265

  13. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in the IS900 Sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Are Strain Type Specific▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Elena; Aranaz, Alicia; de Juan, Lucia; Álvarez, Julio; Rodríguez, Sabrina; Romero, Beatriz; Bezos, Javier; Stevenson, Karen; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    Insertion sequence IS900 is used as a target for the identification of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Previous reports have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms within IS900. This study, which analyzed the IS900 sequences of a panel of isolates representing M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain types I, II, and III, revealed conserved type-specific polymorphisms that could be utilized as a tool for diagnostic and epidemiological purposes. PMID:19439536

  14. Transfer of the toxin protein genes of Bacillus sphaericus into Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis and their expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgouin, C.; Delécluse, A; LA TORRE, F.; Szulmajster, J

    1990-01-01

    The genes encoding the toxic determinants of Bacillus sphaericus have been expressed in a nontoxic and a toxic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis. In both cases, the B. sphaericus toxin proteins were produced at a high level during sporulation of B. thuringiensis and accumulated as crystalline structures. B. thuringiensis transformants expressing B. sphaericus and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis toxins did not show a significant enhancement of toxicity against Aedes aegyp...

  15. Virulence and immunity orchestrated by the global gene regulator sigL in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pallab; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease in ruminants, a chronic enteric disease responsible for severe economic losses in the dairy industry. Global gene regulators, including sigma factors are important in regulating mycobacterial virulence. However, the biological significance of such regulators in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis rremains elusive. To better decipher the role of sigma factors in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenesis, we targeted a key sigma factor gene, sigL, activated in mycobacterium-infected macrophages. We interrogated an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ΔsigL mutant against a selected list of stressors that mimic the host microenvironments. Our data showed that sigL was important in maintaining bacterial survival under such stress conditions. Survival levels further reflected the inability of the ΔsigL mutant to persist inside the macrophage microenvironments. Additionally, mouse infection studies suggested a substantial role for sigL in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis virulence, as indicated by the significant attenuation of the ΔsigL-deficient mutant compared to the parental strain. More importantly, when the sigL mutant was tested for its vaccine potential, protective immunity was generated in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. Overall, our study highlights critical role of sigL in the pathogenesis and immunity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, a potential role that could be shared by similar proteins in other intracellular pathogens. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Virulence and Immunity Orchestrated by the Global Gene Regulator sigL in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pallab; Steinberg, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease in ruminants, a chronic enteric disease responsible for severe economic losses in the dairy industry. Global gene regulators, including sigma factors are important in regulating mycobacterial virulence. However, the biological significance of such regulators in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis rremains elusive. To better decipher the role of sigma factors in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenesis, we targeted a key sigma factor gene, sigL, activated in mycobacterium-infected macrophages. We interrogated an M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ΔsigL mutant against a selected list of stressors that mimic the host microenvironments. Our data showed that sigL was important in maintaining bacterial survival under such stress conditions. Survival levels further reflected the inability of the ΔsigL mutant to persist inside the macrophage microenvironments. Additionally, mouse infection studies suggested a substantial role for sigL in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis virulence, as indicated by the significant attenuation of the ΔsigL-deficient mutant compared to the parental strain. More importantly, when the sigL mutant was tested for its vaccine potential, protective immunity was generated in a vaccine/challenge model of murine paratuberculosis. Overall, our study highlights critical role of sigL in the pathogenesis and immunity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, a potential role that could be shared by similar proteins in other intracellular pathogens. PMID:24799632

  17. Alterações patológicas em potros infectados por Actinobacillus equuli subsp. haemolyticus Pathological changes in foals infected with Actinobacillus equuli subsp. haemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Carloto Gomes

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, são descritos dois casos fatais de septicemia com lesões embólicas causadas por Actinobacillus equuli subsp. haemolyticus em potros recém-nascidos. Em um dos animais, foram observados, na necropsia, pequenos nódulos esbranquiçados de aproximadamente 0,2cm de diâmetro na cortical dos rins e no outro havia uma área de coloração acinzentada no lobo diafragmático esquerdo do pulmão. As principais alterações microscópicas observadas no primeiro animal foram rins com infiltrado inflamatório multifocal a coalescente acentuado, com predomínio de neutrófilos, associado com áreas basofílicas levemente granulares compostas por grumos bacterianos. No segundo animal, o pulmão apresentava infiltrado inflamatório neutrofílico, edema, congestão e colônias bacterianas intravasculares. Em ambos os casos, colônias bacterianas foram encontradas disseminadas por vários órgãos incluindo capilares cerebrais. Nos dois casos foi isolado e identificado A. equuli subsp. haemolyticus.This paper describes two fatal cases of embolic and septicaemic lesions caused by Actinobacillus equuli subsp. haemolyticus in two newborn foals. In one foal was observed at necropsy small whitish nodules of approximately 0,2cm in diameter on the renal cortex and the other foal had an area of gray color in the left diaphragmatic lobe of the lung. The main histologic changes were observed in the first foal kidneys with multifocal to coalescing inflammatory suppurative infiltrates associated with slightly granular basophilic bacterial colonies. In the second animal the lung showed neutrophilic inflammatory infiltrate, edema, congestion and presence of intravascular bacterial colonies. In both cases, the bacteria were disseminated by several organs including cerebral capillary cerebral. In both cases A. equuli subsp. haemolyticus was isolated and identified.

  18. Bacteriocinogenic Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF04Mi isolated from goat milk: characterization of the bacteriocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Danielle N; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Landgraf, Mariza; Destro, Maria T; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2014-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria capable of producing bacteriocins and presenting probiotic potential open innovative technological applications in the dairy industry. In this study, a bacteriocinogenic strain (Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi) was isolated from goat milk, and studied for its antimicrobial activity. The bacteriocin presented a broad spectrum of activity, was sensitive to proteolytic enzymes, resistant to heat and pH extremes, and not affected by the presence of SDS, Tween 20, Tween 80, EDTA or NaCl. Bacteriocin production was dependent on the components of the culture media, especially nitrogen source and salts. When tested by PCR, the bacteriocin gene presented 100% homology to nisin Z gene. These properties indicate that this L. lactis subsp. lactis DF4Mi can be used for enhancement of dairy foods safety and quality.

  19. Acacia tortilis subsp. heteracantha productivity in the Tugela Dry Valley Bushveld: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Milton

    1983-11-01

    Full Text Available Acacia tortilis Hayne subsp.  heteracantha (Burch. Brenan dominates secondary succession in the Tugela Dry Valley Bushveld of the Natal midlands. The parts of KwaZulu in this veld type are impoverished, overpopulated and over-grazed. Preliminary results indicate that at a density of 2 700 ± 600 trees/ha there is a standing crop of c.2,87 t/ha (DM of acacia twigs suitable for hand pruning and milling into fodder, but that this is a costly process. Herbage biomass peaked at 0,73 t/ha (DM. Veld condition assessments suggested a stocking rate of|0,l AU/ha (grazers, but actual grazer stocking rates may be many times this density. It is recommended that the browser/grazer ratio be altered to make use of the c. 1,05 t/ha (DM of shoot growth produced annually by A. tortilis subsp.  heteracantha.

  20. Genomic variations of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp capripneumoniae detected by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Bolske, G.; Ahrens, Peter

    2000-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae strains based on determination of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) is described. AFLP fingerprints of 38 strains derived from different countries in Africa and the Middle East consisted of over 100 bands in the size...... range of 40-500 bp. The similarity between individual AFLP profiles, calculated by Jaccard's coefficient, ranged from 0.92 to 1.0. On the basis of the polymorphisms detected, the analysed strains can explicitly be grouped into two major clusters, equivalent to two evolutionary lines of the organism...... found by 16S rDNA analysis. The present data support previous observations regarding genetic homogeneity of M. capricolum subsp. capripneumoniae, and confirm the two evolutionary lines of descent found by analysis of 16S rRNA genes....

  1. Mean effective sensitivity for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis infection in cattle herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Carsten; Græsbøll, Kaare; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infections in cattle are generally challenging to detect and cost-effective test strategies are consequently difficult to identify. MAP-specific antibody ELISAs for milk and serum are relatively inexpensive, but their utility is influe......Background: Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infections in cattle are generally challenging to detect and cost-effective test strategies are consequently difficult to identify. MAP-specific antibody ELISAs for milk and serum are relatively inexpensive, but their utility...... within and between groups, and in some groups we found a bimodal distribution of MES. Dairy herds generally showed higher MES than non-dairy herds. Dairy herds in a control programme for paratuberculosis showed a MES similar to all other dairy herds from which animals >2.0 years were tested (both groups...

  2. POTENSI BAKTERI ENDOFIT DALAM MENEKAN PENYAKIT LAYU STEWART (PANTOEA STEWARTII SUBSP. STEWARTII PADA TANAMAN JAGUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliatur Rahma

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Potential of endophytic bacteria to control stewart wilt disease (Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii in maize. The purpose of this study was to explore endophytic bacteria from seedling, maize roots and grass roots as well as to test the ability of endophytic bacteria which could potentially suppress stewart wilt disease development in maize. Characterization of endophytic bacteria as biocontrol agents including: do not induce HR on tobacco, synthesize IAA, dissolve phosphate, produce siderophores, and antibiotic to Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pnss. The results of research shoed 17 isolates of endophytic bacteria potentially as candidate biocontrol agents. Nine isolates were able to produce IAA, siderofores and phosphatase; two isolates produce IAA and phosphatase; six isolates produce IAA. Six isolates ie: AR1, AJ34, AJ15, AJ19, and AJ14 AN6, can increase maize plant resistance and suppress stewart wilt disease severity with a range of 48.95-55.60%.

  3. Chemical Composition of a New Taxon, Seseli gummiferum subsp. ilgazense, and its Larvicidal Activity against Aedesaegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Kurkcuoglu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mosquitoes are vectors for many pathogens and parasites that cause human diseases including dengue, yellow fever, West Nile, chikungunya, filariasis and malaria which cause high rates of human morbidity and mortality under extreme conditions. Plants are an excellent source for mosquito control agents because they constitute rich sources of bioactive chemicals. They are also biodegradable and environment-friendly. The present study reports on the larvicidal activity of the essential oil of Seseli gummiferum. subsp. ilgazense (Apiaceae against Aedes aegypti larvae. Essential oil showed 100 and 70% mortality at 125 and 62.6 ppm, respectively, with no mortality at 31.25 ppm. Aerial parts of S. gummiferum subsp. ilgazense were subjected to hydrodistillation to yield 0.6% oil. The essential oil was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS techniques. The main constituents in the oil were sabinene (28.8%, germacrene D (9.5% and α -pinene (7.2%.

  4. The cellodextrinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa consists of multiple functional domains.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, L M; Hazlewood, G P; Barker, P J; Gilbert, H J

    1991-01-01

    A genomic library of Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa DNA was constructed in pUC18 and Escherichia coli recombinants expressing 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-cellobioside-hydrolysing activity (MUCase) were isolated. Enzyme produced by MUCase-positive clones did not hydrolyse either cellobiose or cellotriose but converted cellotetraose into cellobiose and cleaved cellopentaose and cellohexaose, producing a mixture of cellobiose and cellotriose. There was no activity against CM-cellulose,...

  5. Volatile Constituents of Ferula communis L. subsp. communis Growing Spontaneously in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula Manolakou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oils of Greek Ferula communis subsp. communis from different plant parts were obtained by hydrodistillation and analyzed by means of GC and GC-MS. Ninety three compounds were identified in the total essential oils. Sesqui terpenes were the most dominant class of compounds in the leaves and inflorescences oils, while infructescences oils were rich in monoterpenes with α-pinene (35.2-40.6% being the dominant component.

  6. FUNCTIONAL DIOECY AND MOTH POLLINATION IN CABRALEA CANJERANA SUBSP. CANJERANA (MELIACEAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edivani V. Franceschinelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cabralea canjerana subsp . canjerana es una especie común en la Mata Atlántica del sudeste de Bra - sil ; sin embargo, poco se sabe acerca de sus estrategias reproductivas . Este estudio tiene como objetivo entender la biología reproductiva de esta subespecie , incluyendo su biología floral, sistema sexual y la biología de la polinización. Las plantas masculinas y femeninas tienen flores morfológicamente simi - lares, pero las plantas masculinas tienen inflorescencias más grandes con más flores que las femeninas. Además, las flores femeninas permanecen abiertas y receptivas por dos días, mientras que las flores masculinas duran sólo un día, compensando así el desequilibrio de la cantidad de flores por planta entre los dos sexos. Flores masculinas y femeninas semejantes , como se observan en C. canjerana subsp . canjerana , son poco comunes entre las especies dioicas . La alta frecuencia de las polillas que visitan las flores , el periodo de apertura de la flor y de la producción de néctar sugieren que las polillas son polini - zadores de esta subespecie. Contrastando con el dimorfismo floral encontrado en C. canjerana subsp . polytricha , las variaciones en la morfología floral no están relacionadas con el sexo de la planta en la subsp . canjerana . Este y otros resultados encontrados en este estudio sugieren que estas dos subspecies de C. canjerana podrían ser especies distintas.

  7. Adaptation and Response of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis to Bile: a Proteomic and Physiological Approach▿

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez García, Borja; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Anglade, Patricia; Baraige, Fabienne; González de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara; Johansen, Eric; Zagorec, Monique; Margolles Barros, Abelardo

    2007-01-01

    Bile salts are natural detergents that facilitate the digestion and absorption of the hydrophobic components of the diet. However, their amphiphilic nature makes them very inhibitory for bacteria and strongly influences bacterial survival in the gastrointestinal tract. Adaptation to and tolerance of bile stress is therefore crucial for the persistence of bacteria in the human colonic niche. Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis, a probiotic bacterium with documented health benefits, is appli...

  8. Is the Evolution of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Linked to Restriction-Modification Systems?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roer, Louise; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica bacteria are highly diverse foodborne pathogens that are subdivided into more than 1,500 serovars. The diversity is believed to result from mutational evolution, as well as intra- and interspecies recombination that potentially could be influenced by restriction...... to the conjugational mode of horizontal gene transfer in Salmonella. Thus, we conclude that other factors must be involved in shaping the evolution of bacteria....

  9. The importance of arbuscular mycorrhiza for Cyclamen purpurascens subsp. immaculatum endemic in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlová, Jana; Sýkorová, Zuzana; Slavíková, Renata; Turis, Peter

    2015-11-01

    At present, there is no relevant information on arbuscular mycorrhiza and the effect of the symbiosis on the growth of wild populations of cyclamens. To fill this gap, two populations of Cyclamen purpurascens subsp. immaculatum, endemic in Nízke Tatry (NT) mountains and Veľká Fatra (VF) mountains, Slovakia, were studied in situ as well as in a greenhouse pot experiment. For both populations, mycorrhizal root colonization of native plants was assessed, and mycorrhizal inoculation potential (MIP) of the soils at the two sites was determined in 3 consecutive years. In the greenhouse experiment, the growth response of cyclamens to cross-inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) was tested: plants from both sites were grown in their native soils and inoculated with a Septoglomus constrictum isolate originating either from the same or from the other plant locality. Although the MIP of soil at the NT site was significantly higher than at the VF site, the level of AMF root colonization of C. purpurascens subsp. immaculatum plants in the field did not significantly differ between the two localities. In the greenhouse experiment, inoculation with AMF generally accelerated cyclamen growth and significantly increased all growth parameters (shoot dry weight, leaf number and area, number of flowers, tuber, and root dry weight) and P uptake. The two populations of C. purpurascens subsp. immaculatum grown in their native soils, however, differed in their response to inoculation. The mycorrhizal growth response of NT plants was one-order higher compared to VF plants, and all their measured growth parameters were stimulated regardless of the fungal isolates' origin. In the VF plants, only the non-native (NT originating) isolate showed a significant positive effect on several growth traits. It can be concluded that mycorrhiza significantly increased fitness of C. purpurascens subsp. immaculatum, despite the differences between plant populations, implying that AMF

  10. Geography of Genetic Structure in Barley Wild Relative Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, Imke; Reeves, Patrick; Reilley, Ann; Engels, Johannes M M; Lohwasser, Ulrike; Börner, Andreas; Pillen, Klaus; Richards, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Informed collecting, conservation, monitoring and utilization of genetic diversity requires knowledge of the distribution and structure of the variation occurring in a species. Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) Thell., a primary wild relative of barley, is an important source of genetic diversity for barley improvement and co-occurs with the domesticate within the center of origin. We studied the current distribution of genetic diversity and population structure in H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum in Jordan and investigated whether it is correlated with either spatial or climatic variation inferred from publically available climate layers commonly used in conservation and ecogeographical studies. The genetic structure of 32 populations collected in 2012 was analyzed with 37 SSRs. Three distinct genetic clusters were identified. Populations were characterized by admixture and high allelic richness, and genetic diversity was concentrated in the northern part of the study area. Genetic structure, spatial location and climate were not correlated. This may point out a limitation in using large scale climatic data layers to predict genetic diversity, especially as it is applied to regional genetic resources collections in H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum.

  11. PCR-based identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis, the agent of rhinoscleroma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Fevre

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoscleroma is a chronic granulomatous infection of the upper airways caused by the bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis. The disease is endemic in tropical and subtropical areas, but its diagnosis remains difficult. As a consequence, and despite available antibiotherapy, some patients evolve advanced stages that can lead to disfiguration, severe respiratory impairment and death by anoxia. Because identification of the etiologic agent is crucial for the definitive diagnosis of the disease, the aim of this study was to develop two simple PCR assays. We took advantage of the fact that all Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis isolates are (i of capsular serotype K3; and (ii belong to a single clone with diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP. The complete sequence of the genomic region comprising the capsular polysaccharide synthesis (cps gene cluster was determined. Putative functions of the 21 genes identified were consistent with the structure of the K3 antigen. The K3-specific sequence of gene Kr11509 (wzy was exploited to set up a PCR test, which was positive for 40 K3 strains but negative when assayed on the 76 other Klebsiella capsular types. Further, to discriminate Klebsiella pneumoniae subsp. rhinoscleromatis from other K3 Klebsiella strains, a specific PCR assay was developed based on diagnostic SNPs in the phosphate porin gene phoE. This work provides rapid and simple molecular tools to confirm the diagnostic of rhinoscleroma, which should improve patient care as well as knowledge on the prevalence and epidemiology of rhinoscleroma.

  12. Acute septicemia caused by Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus in turkey poults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saumya, Dona; Wijetunge, S; Dunn, Patricia; Wallner-Pendleton, Eva; Lintner, Valerie; Matthews, Tammy; Pierre, Traci; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie

    2014-06-01

    Streptococcus gallolyticus, previously known as Streptococcus bovis biotypes I and II/2, is a well-known cause of sepsis and meningitis in humans and birds. The present case report describes an outbreak of fatal septicemia associated with S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus (S. bovis biotype II/2) in 11 turkey flocks in Pennsylvania between 2010 and 2013. Affected poults were 2-3 wk of age. Major clinical observation was sudden increase in mortality among turkey poults without any premonitory clinical signs. Postmortem examination findings revealed acute septicemia with lesions such as fibrinous pericarditis, meningitis, splenic multifocal fibrinoid necrosis, hepatitis, osteochondritis, myositis, and airsacculitis. Gram-positive cocci were isolated from several organs by routine bacterial culture. Biotyping identified bacteria as streptococci, whereas 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identified them as S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles revealed that all the strains isolated were sensitive to penicillin and erythromycin with different sensitivity profiles for other antibacterial agents tested. The present study reports the first confirmed case of acute septicemia in turkey poults caused by S. gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus.

  13. Identification of an Extracellular Endoglucanase That Is Required for Full Virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Tian; Li, Yanjiao; Sun, Dongling; Zhuo, Tao; Fan, Xiaojing; Zou, Huasong

    2016-01-01

    Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri causes citrus canker disease, which is characterized by the formation of water-soaked lesions, white or yellow spongy pustules and brown corky canker. In this work, we report the contribution of extracellular endoglucanase to canker development during infection. The ectopic expression of nine putative cellulases in Escherichia coli indicated that two endoglucanases, BglC3 and EngXCA, show carboxymethyl cellulase activity. Both bglC3 and engXCA genes were transcribed in X. citri subsp. citri, however, only BglC3 protein was detected outside the cell in western blot analysis. The deletion of bglC3 gene resulted in complete loss of extracellular carboxymethyl cellulase activity and delayed the onset of canker symptoms in both infiltration- and wound-inoculation assays. When growing in plant tissue, the cell density of bglC3 mutant was lower than that of the wild type. Our data demonstrated that BglC3 is an extracellular endoglucanase required for the full virulence of X. citri subsp. citri.

  14. Identification of an Extracellular Endoglucanase That Is Required for Full Virulence in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Xia

    Full Text Available Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri causes citrus canker disease, which is characterized by the formation of water-soaked lesions, white or yellow spongy pustules and brown corky canker. In this work, we report the contribution of extracellular endoglucanase to canker development during infection. The ectopic expression of nine putative cellulases in Escherichia coli indicated that two endoglucanases, BglC3 and EngXCA, show carboxymethyl cellulase activity. Both bglC3 and engXCA genes were transcribed in X. citri subsp. citri, however, only BglC3 protein was detected outside the cell in western blot analysis. The deletion of bglC3 gene resulted in complete loss of extracellular carboxymethyl cellulase activity and delayed the onset of canker symptoms in both infiltration- and wound-inoculation assays. When growing in plant tissue, the cell density of bglC3 mutant was lower than that of the wild type. Our data demonstrated that BglC3 is an extracellular endoglucanase required for the full virulence of X. citri subsp. citri.

  15. Production and characterization of bioemulsifier from a marine bacterium, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulnaree Phetrong

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine bacterium strain SM7 was isolated as a bioemulsifier-producing bacterium from oil-spilled seawater in Songkhla lagoon, Thailand. It was identified as Acinetobacter calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus based on morphology, biochemicalcharacteristics and 16S rRNA sequence. A. calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7 produced an extracellular emulsifying agent when grown in a minimal salt medium (pH 7.0 containing 0.3% (v/v n-heptadecane and 0.1% (w/v ammoniumhydrogen carbonate as carbon source and nitrogen source, respectively, at 30oC with agitation rate of 200 rpm. Crude bioemulsifier was recovered from the culture supernatant by ethanol precipitation with a yield of 2.94 g/l and had a criticalemulsifier concentration of 0.04 g/ml. The crude bioemulsifier was capable of emulsifying n-hexadecane in a broad pH range (6-12, temperatures (30-121oC and in the presence of NaCl up to 12% (w/v. The bioemulsifier was stable in saltsolution ranging from 0 to 0.1% (w/v of MgCl2 and CaCl2. The broad range of pH stability, thermostability and salt tolerance suggested that the bioemulsifier from A. calcoaceticus subsp. anitratus SM7 could be useful in environmentalapplication, especially bioremediation of oil-polluted seawater.

  16. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannans from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis alters the inflammatory response by bovine macrophages and suppresses killing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium organisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleverson Souza

    Full Text Available Analysis of the mechanisms through which pathogenic mycobacteria interfere with macrophage activation and phagosome maturation have shown that engagement of specific membrane receptors with bacterial ligands is the initiating event. Mannosylated lipoarabinomannan (Man-LAM has been identified as one of the ligands that modulates macrophage function. We evaluated the effects of Man-LAM derived from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP on bovine macrophages. Man-LAM induced a rapid and prolonged expression of IL-10 message as well as transient expression of TNF-α. Preincubation with Man-LAM for up to 16 h did not suppress expression of IL-12 in response to interferon-γ. Evaluation of the effect of Man-LAM on phagosome acidification, phagosome maturation, and killing of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA showed that preincubation of macrophages with Man-LAM before addition of MAA inhibited phagosome acidification, phagolysosome fusion, and reduced killing. Analysis of signaling pathways provided indirect evidence that inhibition of killing was associated with activation of the MAPK-p38 signaling pathway but not the pathway involved in regulation of expression of IL-10. These results support the hypothesis that MAP Man-LAM is one of the virulence factors facilitating survival of MAP in macrophages.

  17. Standardized broth microdilution antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica strains from Europe and rare Francisella species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Enrico; Schacht, Erik; Scholz, Holger C; Splettstoesser, Wolf D

    2012-10-01

    Tularaemia is a widespread zoonosis in Europe caused by Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica. Because of a lack of standardized CLSI-approved antibiotic susceptibility data from European Francisella strains, the antibiotic susceptibilities of a selection of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates originating from Germany, Austria, France, Spain and other European countries were determined. Rarely isolated species and subspecies of Francisella such as Francisella philomiragia, F. tularensis subsp. novicida and F. tularensis subsp. mediasiatica as well as the type strain of Francisella hispaniensis were included in this study. MIC data were obtained using cation-adjusted Mueller-Hinton broth with a 2% growth supplement. The broth microdilution testing system comprised 14 antibiotics, including gentamicin, streptomycin, ciprofloxacin and tetracycline. All of the 91 strains tested were susceptible to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracycline and chloramphenicol. The antimicrobial susceptibility of rare Francisellae was similar to the antibiotic profile of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica strains. For erythromycin, we detected two geographically distinct groups of F. tularensis subsp. holarctica isolates in western Europe. One group was resistant and the other one was susceptible. Both groups overlapped in a small region in Germany. Being performed in accordance with CLSI criteria, this study provides reliable data on antibiotic susceptibility patterns of European Francisella isolates. The standardized methodology of this study can be used for testing of suspicious colonies from clinical specimens for therapeutic guidance. Based on the results, aminoglycosides or quinolones are recommended as first-choice antibiotics for the therapy of F. hispaniensis, F. philomiragia or F. tularensis subsp. novicida infections in immunocompromised patients.

  18. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antimicrobial Characteristics of Streptococcus halichoeri Isolates from Humans, Proposal To Rename Streptococcus halichoeri as Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri, and Description of Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis subsp. nov., a Bacterium Associated with Human Clinical Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker, P L; Whitney, A M; Humrighouse, B W

    2016-03-01

    Phenotypic, genotypic, and antimicrobial characteristics of six phenotypically distinct human clinical isolates that most closely resembled the type strain of Streptococcus halichoeri isolated from a seal are presented. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN genes; comparative whole-genome analysis; conventional biochemical and Rapid ID 32 Strep identification methods; and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed on the human isolates, the type strain of S. halichoeri, and type strains of closely related species. The six human clinical isolates were biochemically indistinguishable from each other and showed 100% 16S rRNA, rpoB, sodA, and recN gene sequence similarity. Comparative 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis revealed 98.6% similarity to S. halichoeri CCUG 48324(T), 97.9% similarity to S. canis ATCC 43496(T), and 97.8% similarity to S. ictaluri ATCC BAA-1300(T). A 3,530-bp fragment of the rpoB gene was 98.8% similar to the S. halichoeri type strain, 84.6% to the S. canis type strain, and 83.8% to the S. ictaluri type strain. The S. halichoeri type strain and the human clinical isolates were susceptible to the antimicrobials tested based on CLSI guidelines for Streptococcus species viridans group with the exception of tetracycline and erythromycin. The human isolates were phenotypically distinct from the type strain isolated from a seal; comparative whole-genome sequence analysis confirmed that the human isolates were S. halichoeri. On the basis of these results, a novel subspecies, Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. hominis, is proposed for the human isolates and Streptococcus halichoeri subsp. halichoeri is proposed for the gray seal isolates. The type strain of the novel subspecies is SS1844(T) = CCUG 67100(T) = LMG 28801(T). Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antibody Response, Fecal Shedding, and Antibody Cross-Reactivity to Mycobacterium bovis in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Infected Cattle Herds Vaccinated against Johne's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovingh, Ernest; Linscott, Rick; Martel, Edmond; Lawrence, John; Wolfgang, David; Griswold, David

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination for Johne's disease with killed inactivated vaccine in cattle herds has shown variable success. The vaccine delays the onset of disease but does not afford complete protection. Johne's disease vaccination has also been reported to interfere with measurements of cell-mediated immune responses for the detection of bovine tuberculosis. Temporal antibody responses and fecal shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the causative agent of Johne's disease, were measured in 2 dairy cattle herds using Johne's disease vaccine (Mycopar) over a period of 7 years. Vaccination against Johne's disease resulted in positive serum M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody responses in both herds, and the responses persisted in vaccinated cattle up to 7 years of age. Some vaccinated animals (29.4% in herd A and 36.2% in herd B) showed no serological reactivity to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody responses were also detected in milk from Johne's disease-vaccinated animals, but fewer animals (39.3% in herd A and 49.4% in herd B) had positive results with milk than with serum samples. With vaccination against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, fecal shedding in both dairy herds was reduced significantly (P < 0.001). In addition, when selected Johne's disease-vaccinated and -infected animals were investigated for serological cross-reactivity to Mycobacterium bovis, no cross-reactivity was observed. PMID:24623626

  20. Effect of Soil Slope on the Appearance of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Water Running off Grassland Soil after Application of Contaminated Slurry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, M.; Salazar, F.; Troncoso, E.; Mitchell, R. M.; Ramirez, L.; Naguil, A.; Zamorano, P.; Collins, M. T.

    2013-01-01

    The study assessed the effect of soil slope on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transport into rainwater runoff from agricultural soil after application of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-contaminated slurry. Under field conditions, 24 plots of undisturbed loamy soil 1 by 2 m2 were placed on platforms. Twelve plots were used for water runoff: 6 plots at a 3% slope and 6 plots at a 15% slope. Half of the plots of each slope were treated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-contaminated slurry, and half were not treated. Using the same experimental design, 12 plots were established for soil sampling on a monthly basis using the same spiked slurry application and soil slopes. Runoff following natural rainfall was collected and analyzed for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, coliforms, and turbidity. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected in runoff from all plots treated with contaminated slurry and one control plot. A higher slope (15%) increased the likelihood of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis detection but did not affect the likelihood of finding coliforms. Daily rainfall increased the likelihood that runoff would have coliforms and the coliform concentration, but it decreased the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentration in the runoff. When there was no runoff, rain was associated with increased M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis concentrations. Coliform counts in runoff were related to runoff turbidity. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis presence/absence, however, was related to turbidity. Study duration decreased bacterial detection and concentration. These findings demonstrate the high likelihood that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in slurry spread on pastures will contaminate water runoff, particularly during seasons with high rainfall. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis contamination of water has potential consequences for both animal and human health. PMID:23542616

  1. Novel Feature of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, Highlighted by Characterization of the Heparin-Binding Hemagglutinin Adhesin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrancois, Louise H.; Bodier, Christelle C.; Cochard, Thierry; Canepa, Sylvie; Raze, Dominique; Lanotte, Philippe; Sevilla, Iker A.; Stevenson, Karen; Behr, Marcel A.; Locht, Camille

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis comprises two genotypically defined groups, known as the cattle (C) and sheep (S) groups. Recent studies have reported phenotypic differences between M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis groups C and S, including growth rates, infectivity for macrophages, and iron metabolism. In this study, we investigated the genotypes and biological properties of the virulence factor heparin-binding hemagglutinin adhesin (HBHA) for both groups. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, HBHA is a major adhesin involved in mycobacterium-host interactions and extrapulmonary dissemination of infection. To investigate HBHA in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, we studied hbhA polymorphisms by fragment analysis using the GeneMapper technology across a large collection of isolates genotyped by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive-unit–variable-number tandem-repeat (MIRU-VNTR) and IS900 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP-IS900) analyses. Furthermore, we analyzed the structure-function relationships of recombinant HBHA proteins of types C and S by heparin-Sepharose chromatography and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) analyses. In silico analysis revealed two forms of HBHA, corresponding to the prototype genomes for the C and S types of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. This observation was confirmed using GeneMapper on 85 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, including 67 strains of type C and 18 strains of type S. We found that HBHAs from all type C strains contain a short C-terminal domain, while those of type S present a long C-terminal domain, similar to that produced by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The purification of recombinant HBHA from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis of both types by heparin-Sepharose chromatography highlighted a correlation between their affinities for heparin and the lengths of their C-terminal domains, which was confirmed by SPR analysis. Thus, types C and S of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis may be

  2. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: presencia en los alimentos y su relación con la enfermedad de Crohn Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in food and its relationship with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Cirone

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available La paratuberculosis o enfermedad de Johne es una enteritis crónica producida por Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, que afecta a bovinos y a otras especies. En la Argentina se ha caracterizado en rodeos bovinos y de ciervos, con aislamientos tipificados en distintos patrones genéticos. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis ha sido vinculado en humanos con una inflamación crónica del intestino, denominada enfermedad de Crohn. Existen evidencias clínicas y experimentales que relacionan a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis con la enfermedad en el humano, mediante su detección por PCR y por cultivo a partir de biopsias de órganos, de leche materna y de sangre de pacientes afectados. La leche y sus subproductos serían posibles fuentes de infección y se ha sugerido que M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis resistiría las condiciones de pasteurización. Diversos trabajos de investigación demostraron que esta micobacteria podría estar presente en leches comercializadas en diversos países, como Reino Unido, Estados Unidos, República Checa, y también en la Argentina. La presencia de M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis en productos lácteos y agua de consumo ha sido relacionada con la resistencia del microorganismo tanto a los procesos de elaboración como a los factores climáticos adversos, lo que enfatiza el rol de los alimentos y del agua como vías de transmisión al humano. Las investigaciones en curso podrían ratificar el riesgo y las implicancias de la exposición del humano a M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis a través de los alimentos y del agua contaminados, para determinar la importancia de la paratuberculosis como enfermedad zoonótica.Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease is a chronic enteritis of the cattle and other small ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. In Argentina, the strains were characterized in beef and dairy cattle and deer in different genetic patterns by molecular tools. M. avium

  3. Distribution of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in Soil of a Swiss Wetland Reserve after 22 Years of Mosquito Control▿†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidi, Valeria; Patocchi, Nicola; Lüthy, Peter; Tonolla, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    Recurrent treatments with Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis are required to control the floodwater mosquito Aedes vexans that breeds in large numbers in the wetlands of the Bolle di Magadino Reserve in Canton Ticino, Switzerland. Interventions have been carried out since 1988. In the present study, the spatial distribution of resting B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores in the soil was measured. The B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis concentration was determined in soil samples collected along six transects covering different elevations within the periodically flooded zones. A total of 258 samples were processed and analyzed by quantitative PCR that targeted an identical fragment of 159 bp for the B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis cry4Aa and cry4Ba genes. B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores were found to persist in soils of the wetland reserve at concentrations of up to 6.8 log per gram of soil. Continuous accumulation due to regular treatments could be excluded, as the decrease in spores amounted to 95.8% (95% confidence interval, 93.9 to 97.7%). The distribution of spores was correlated to the number of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis treatments, the elevation of the sampling point, and the duration of the flooding periods. The number of B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis treatments was the major factor influencing the distribution of spores in the different topographic zones (P thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores are rather immobile after their introduction into the environment. PMID:21498758

  4. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis in a hot tub, as proven by IS1245 RFLP and rep-PCR typing☆

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    Rianne J.C van der Zanden

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A symptomatic patient had repeatedly positive cultures of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis after exposure to a hot tub contaminated with M. avium subsp. hominissuis. The pulmonary and tub water isolates were indistinguishable by IS1245 RFLP as well as rep-PCR typing. Discontinued use of the hot tub resulted in culture conversion.

  5. Highly Specific and Quick Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Feces and Gut Tissue of Cattle and Humans by Multiple Real-Time PCR Assays▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imirzalioglu, Can; Dahmen, Heinrich; Hain, Torsten; Billion, Andre; Kuenne, Carsten; Chakraborty, Trinad; Domann, Eugen

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle and may be associated with Crohn's disease (CD) in humans. It is the slowest growing of the cultivable mycobacteria, and culture from clinical, veterinary, food, or environmental specimens can take 4 months or even longer. Currently, the insertion element IS900 is used to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA. However, closely related IS900 elements are also present in other mycobacteria, thus limiting its specificity as a target. Here we describe the use of novel primer sets derived from the sequences of two highly specific single copy genes, MAP2765c and MAP0865, for the quantitative detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis within 6 h by using real-time PCR. Specificity of the target was established using 40 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolates, 67 different bacterial species, and two intestinal parasites. Using the probes and methods described, we detected 27 (2.09%) M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive stool specimens from 1,293 individual stool samples by the use of either IS900 or probes deriving from the MAP2765c and MAP0865 genes described here. In general, bacterial load due to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was uniformly low in these samples and we estimated 500 to 5,000 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria per gram of stool in assay-positive samples. Thus, the methods described here are useful for rapid and specific detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in clinical samples. PMID:21430100

  6. Cyt1Ab1 and Cyt2Ba1 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin and B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis Synergize Bacillus sphaericus against Aedes aegypti and Resistant Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Margaret C.; Delécluse, Armelle; Walton, William E.

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of two cytolytic toxins, Cyt1Ab from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin and Cyt2Ba from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, with Bacillus sphaericus was evaluated against susceptible and resistant Culex quinquefasciatus and the nonsensitive species Aedes aegypti. Mixtures of B. sphaericus with either cytolytic toxin were synergistic, and B. sphaericus resistance in C. quinquefasciatus was suppressed from >17,000- to 2-fold with a 3:1 mixture of B. sphaericus and Cyt1Ab. This trait may prove useful for combating insecticide resistance and for improving the activity of microbial insecticides. PMID:11425753

  7. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, D L; Dogenski, M; Thomazini, M; Heinemann, R J B; Favaro-Trindade, C S

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04) were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (10(3) CFU/g). The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at -18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved.

  8. Phenolic content and antioxidant property of the bark extracts of Ziziphus mucronata Willd. subsp. mucronata Willd

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Several plants traditionally used in treatment of a variety of infections in South Africa are reported in ethnobotanical surveys. Many of these plants including Ziziphus mucronata subsp. mucronata lack scientific reports to support their medicinal importance. Methods The antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the stems of Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. The total phenol, total flavonoids and proanthocyanidin content were determined spectrophotometrically. Quercetin, Tannic acid and catechin equivalents were used for these parameters. The antioxidant activities of the stem bark extracts of this plant were determined by ABTS, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) methods. Results The quantity of the phenolic compounds, flavonoids and proanthocyanidins detected differ significantly in the various extracts. The phenolics were significantly higher than the flavonoids and proanthocyanidin contents in all the extracts investigated. The ferric reducing ability and the radical scavenging activities of the extracts were very high and dose-dependent. The ethanol extract had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by the acetone extract while the aqueous extract was the least active. Reacting with ABTS, the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) were (0.0429 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for aqueous, (0.0317 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for acetone and (0.0306 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for ethanol extracts while they inhibited DPPH radical with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.0646 ± 0.02 mg/ml (aqueous), 0.0482 ± 0.02 mg/ml (acetone) and 0.0422 ± 0.03 mg/ml (ethanol). Conclusions A correlation between the antioxidant activity and the total phenolic contents of the extracts indicated that phenolic compounds were the dominant contributors to the antioxidant activity of the plant. This study, therefore, demonstrated that Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata has strong antioxidant

  9. First report of olive leaf scorch in Brazil, associated with Xylella fastidiosa subsp. pauca

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    Helvécio Della COLETTA-FILHO

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Olea europaea (L. trees displaying leaf scorching symptoms, identical to those recently reported for olive trees colonized by Xylella fastidiosa in Southern Italy and also in Argentina, were observed in commercial orchards of two counties in Southeastern Brazil. PCR-based diagnosis using conserved primers for X. fastidiosa strains (RST31/33 and also specific to X. fastidiaosa subsp. pauca (CVC1/272-2 int were positive for all symptomatic tested samples (n = 8 of 9, but no template was obtained using twigs from asymptomatic trees (n = 20. Bacterial colonies were isolated from symptomatic tissues on culture medium and confirmed by PCR using the set of primers specific to X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca. Comparative sequence analyses of seven MLST loci amplified from one tripled passaged colony (MFG01 perfectly matched with sequences of alleles leuA #7, petC #6, malF#8, cysG#10, holC#11, nuoL#8, and gltT#8, the allelic profile of Sequence Type-ST16, which is represented by the strain COF0238 isolated from Coffea arabica (L. in Brazil (http://pubmlst.org/xfastidiosa/. Phylogenetic analysis placed the ST16 into subspecies pauca, but genetically closer to ST11 and ST13, both obtained from Citrus sinensis (L. trees with citrus variegated chlorosis. The results confirm the association of olive plants showing leaf scorching with the presence of X. fastidiosa subsp. pauca , and represent the first report of this bacterium in Brazilian olive orchards.

  10. Phenolic content and antioxidant property of the bark extracts of Ziziphus mucronata Willd. subsp. mucronata Willd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajuyigbe Olufunmiso O

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several plants traditionally used in treatment of a variety of infections in South Africa are reported in ethnobotanical surveys. Many of these plants including Ziziphus mucronata subsp. mucronata lack scientific reports to support their medicinal importance. Methods The antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the stems of Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. The total phenol, total flavonoids and proanthocyanidin content were determined spectrophotometrically. Quercetin, Tannic acid and catechin equivalents were used for these parameters. The antioxidant activities of the stem bark extracts of this plant were determined by ABTS, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP methods. Results The quantity of the phenolic compounds, flavonoids and proanthocyanidins detected differ significantly in the various extracts. The phenolics were significantly higher than the flavonoids and proanthocyanidin contents in all the extracts investigated. The ferric reducing ability and the radical scavenging activities of the extracts were very high and dose-dependent. The ethanol extract had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by the acetone extract while the aqueous extract was the least active. Reacting with ABTS, the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50 were (0.0429 ± 0.04 mg/ml for aqueous, (0.0317 ± 0.04 mg/ml for acetone and (0.0306 ± 0.04 mg/ml for ethanol extracts while they inhibited DPPH radical with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 0.0646 ± 0.02 mg/ml (aqueous, 0.0482 ± 0.02 mg/ml (acetone and 0.0422 ± 0.03 mg/ml (ethanol. Conclusions A correlation between the antioxidant activity and the total phenolic contents of the extracts indicated that phenolic compounds were the dominant contributors to the antioxidant activity of the plant. This study, therefore, demonstrated that Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata has

  11. Phenolic content and antioxidant property of the bark extracts of Ziziphus mucronata Willd. subsp. mucronata Willd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olajuyigbe, Olufunmiso O; Afolayan, Anthony J

    2011-12-16

    Several plants traditionally used in treatment of a variety of infections in South Africa are reported in ethnobotanical surveys. Many of these plants including Ziziphus mucronata subsp. mucronata lack scientific reports to support their medicinal importance. The antioxidant activities and phenolic contents of the acetone, ethanol and aqueous extracts of the stems of Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata were evaluated using in vitro standard methods. The total phenol, total flavonoids and proanthocyanidin content were determined spectrophotometrically. Quercetin, Tannic acid and catechin equivalents were used for these parameters. The antioxidant activities of the stem bark extracts of this plant were determined by ABTS, DPPH, and ferrous reducing antioxidant property (FRAP) methods. The quantity of the phenolic compounds, flavonoids and proanthocyanidins detected differ significantly in the various extracts. The phenolics were significantly higher than the flavonoids and proanthocyanidin contents in all the extracts investigated. The ferric reducing ability and the radical scavenging activities of the extracts were very high and dose-dependent. The ethanol extract had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by the acetone extract while the aqueous extract was the least active. Reacting with ABTS, the 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50) were (0.0429 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for aqueous, (0.0317 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for acetone and (0.0306 ± 0.04 mg/ml) for ethanol extracts while they inhibited DPPH radical with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.0646 ± 0.02 mg/ml (aqueous), 0.0482 ± 0.02 mg/ml (acetone) and 0.0422 ± 0.03 mg/ml (ethanol). A correlation between the antioxidant activity and the total phenolic contents of the extracts indicated that phenolic compounds were the dominant contributors to the antioxidant activity of the plant. This study, therefore, demonstrated that Z. mucronata subsp. mucronata has strong antioxidant property and free radical scavenging

  12. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, D.L.; Dogenski, M.; Thomazini, M.; Heinemann, R.J.B.; Favaro-Trindade, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04) were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF), and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (103 CFU/g). The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at −18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved. PMID:24516445

  13. Microencapsulation of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis and Lactobacillus acidophilus in cocoa butter using spray chilling technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L. Pedroso

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the cells of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (BI-01 and Lactobacillus acidophilus (LAC-04 were encapsulated in cocoa butter using spray-chilling technology. Survival assays were conducted to evaluate the resistance of the probiotics to the spray-chilling process, their resistance to the simulated gastric and intestinal fluids (SGF and SIF, and their stability during 90 days of storage. The viability of the cells was not affected by microencapsulation. The free and encapsulated cells of B. animalis subsp. lactis were resistant to both SGF and SIF. The micro-encapsulated cells of L. acidophilus were more resistant to SGF and SIF than the free cells; the viability of the encapsulated cells was enhanced by 67%, while the free cells reached the detection limit of the method (10³ CFU/g. The encapsulated probiotics were unstable when they were stored at 20 °C. The population of encapsulated L. acidophilus decreased drastically when they were stored at 7 °C; only 20% of cells were viable after 90 days of storage. The percentage of viable cells of the encapsulated B. animalis subsp.lactis, however, was 72% after the same period of storage. Promising results were obtained when the microparticles were stored at -18 °C; the freeze granted 90 days of shelf life to the encapsulated cells. These results suggest that the spray-chilling process using cocoa butter as carrier protects L. acidophilus from gastrointestinal fluids. However, the viability of the cells during storage must be improved.

  14. Transcriptome-Based Characterization of Interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in Lactose-Grown Chemostat Cocultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Filipa; Sieuwerts, Sander; de Hulster, Erik; Almering, Marinka J. H.; Luttik, Marijke A. H.; Pronk, Jack T.; Smid, Eddy J.; Bron, Peter A.

    2013-01-01

    Mixed populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts and lactic acid bacteria occur in many dairy, food, and beverage fermentations, but knowledge about their interactions is incomplete. In the present study, interactions between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, two microorganisms that co-occur in kefir fermentations, were studied during anaerobic growth on lactose. By combining physiological and transcriptome analysis of the two strains in the cocultures, five mechanisms of interaction were identified. (i) Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus hydrolyzes lactose, which cannot be metabolized by S. cerevisiae, to galactose and glucose. Subsequently, galactose, which cannot be metabolized by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, is excreted and provides a carbon source for yeast. (ii) In pure cultures, Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus grows only in the presence of increased CO2 concentrations. In anaerobic mixed cultures, the yeast provides this CO2 via alcoholic fermentation. (iii) Analysis of amino acid consumption from the defined medium indicated that S. cerevisiae supplied alanine to the bacterium. (iv) A mild but significant low-iron response in the yeast transcriptome, identified by DNA microarray analysis, was consistent with the chelation of iron by the lactate produced by Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. (v) Transcriptome analysis of Lb. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus in mixed cultures showed an overrepresentation of transcripts involved in lipid metabolism, suggesting either a competition of the two microorganisms for fatty acids or a response to the ethanol produced by S. cerevisiae. This study demonstrates that chemostat-based transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool to investigate microbial interactions in mixed populations. PMID:23872557

  15. H(+) -ATPase-defective variants of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus contribute to inhibition of postacidification of yogurt during chilled storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhui; Ren, Hongyang; Liu, Dayu; Wang, Bing; Zhu, Wenyou; Wang, Wei

    2013-02-01

    Continued acid production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus during the chilled storage of yogurt is the major cause of postacidification, resulting in a short shelf life. Two H(+) -ATPase defective variants of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus were successfully isolated and their H(+) -ATPase activities were reduced by 51.3% and 34.3%, respectively. It was shown that growth and acid production of variants were remarkably inhibited. The variants were more sensitive to acidic condition and had a significant rate for inactivation of H(+) -ATPase by N, N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), along with a low H(+) -extrusion, suggesting that H(+) -ATPase is direct response for H(+) -extrusion. In addition, the variants were also more sensitive to NaCl, while H(+) -ATPase activities of variants and parent strain were significantly enhanced by NaCl stress. Obviously, H(+) -ATPase might be involved in Na(+) transportation. Furthermore, variants were inoculated in fermented milk to ferment yogurt. There was no significant difference in flavor, whereas the postacidification of yogurt during chilled storage was remarkably inhibited. It is suggested that application of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus with reduced H(+) -ATPase activity in yogurt fermentation is one of effect, economic and simple avenues of inhibiting postacidification of yogurt during refrigerated storage, giving a longer shelf life. During yogurt fermentation, continued acid production by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus during the chilled storage of yogurt leads to milk fermentation with high postacidification, resulting in a short shelf life. In this work, 2 acid-sensitive variant strains of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus were isolated. The characteristics related to H(+) -ATPase were compared and it was observed that milk fermented by the variants had lower postacidification, giving a longer shelf life. Application of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus with reduced H(+) -ATPase activity

  16. Insights into physiological traits of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 through membrane proteome analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Hjernø, Karin; Østerlund, Eva Christina

    2012-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 is a widely used probiotic strain associated with a variety of health-promoting traits. There is, however, only limited knowledge available regarding the membrane proteome and the proteins involved in oligosaccharide transport in BB-12. We applied two...... enrichment strategies to improve the identification of membrane proteins from BB-12 cultures grown on glucose and on xylo-oligosaccharides, the latter being an emerging prebiotic substrate recently reported to be fermented by BB-12. Our approach encompassed consecutive steps of detergent- and carbonate...

  17. Structural basis for arabinoxylo‐oligosaccharide capture by the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl‐04

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Ejby; Fredslund, Folmer; Vujicic‐Zagar, Andreja

    2013-01-01

    in the colon. Here we show how selectivity for AXOS uptake is established by the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl‐04. The binding protein BlAXBP, which is associated with an ATP‐binding cassette (ABC) transporter that mediates the uptake of AXOS, displays an exceptionally broad...... analyses show that BlAXBP is highly conserved within Bifidobacterium, but is lacking in other gut microbiota members. These data indicate niche adaptation within Bifidobacterium and highlight the metabolic syntrophy (cross‐feeding) among the gut microbiota....

  18. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk from clinically affected cows by PCR and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Steen Bjørck; Ahrens, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Milk and faeces samples from cows with clinical symptoms of paratuberculosis were examined for the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) by culture and PCR. M. paratuberculosis was cultivated in variable numbers from faeces or intestinal mucosa in eight of 11...... animals. In milk from five cows (all faeces culture positive), we cultivated a few colonies of M. paratuberculosis (... mucosa, but culture positive in milk, and two cows were negative in culture and PCR from both faeces and milk. In conclusion, the presence of M. paratuberculosis could be detected in raw milk by PCR, but cultivation of milk was more sensitive. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  19. Vegetative expression of the delta-endotoxin genes of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in Bacillus subtilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Shivakumar, A G; Gundling, G J; Benson, T A; Casuto, D; Miller, M F; Spear, B B

    1986-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki total DNA was digested with BglII and cloned into the BamHI site of plasmid pUC9 in Escherichia coli. A recombinant plasmid, pHBHE, expressed a protein of 135,000 daltons that was toxic to caterpillars. A HincII-SmaI double digest of pHBHE was then ligated to BglII-cut plasmid pBD64 and introduced into Bacillus subtilis by transformation. The transformants were identified by colony hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. A 135,000-dal...

  20. First Report of Cowpea Mild Mottle Carlavirus on Yardlong Bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis in Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgloris Marys

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Yardlong bean (Vigna unguiculata subsp. sesquipedalis plants with virus-like systemic mottling and leaf distortion were observed in both experimental and commercial fields in Aragua State, Venezuela. Symptomatic leaves were shown to contain carlavirus-like particles. RT-PCR analysis with carlavirus-specific primers was positive in all tested samples. Nucleotide sequences of the obtained amplicons showed 84%–74% similarity to corresponding sequences of Cowpea mild mottle virus (CPMMV isolates deposited in the GenBank database. This is the first report of CPMMV in Venezuela and is thought to be the first report of CPMMV infecting yardlong bean.

  1. Genome Sequence of the Cheese-Starter Strain Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Elvira Mar?a; Raya, Ra?l R.; Brown, Luc?a; Font de Valdez, Graciela; Savoy de Giori, Graciela; Taranto, Mar?a P?a

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 (1,911,137 bp, GC 49.7%), a proteolytic strain isolated from a homemade Argentinian hard cheese which has a key role in bacterial nutrition and releases bioactive healthbeneficial peptides from milk proteins. Fil: Hebert, Elvira Maria. Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas. Centro Científico Tecnológico Tucumán. Centro de Referencia para Lactobacilos (i); Argentina; Fil: Raya, Raul Ri...

  2. Novas ocorrências de Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora e de E. chrysanthemi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene M. G. Almeida

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available Em continuidade a trabalhos de caracterização de bactérias pectinolíticas do gênero Eruia ocorrendo no Brasil, são relacionadas novas ocorrências dessas fitobactérias em plantios comerciais, que ocasionam podridão mole em cinco espécies de plantas ornamentais. Testes bioquímicas, fisiológicos, culturais e de patogenicidade permitiram comprovar a ocorrência de Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora em plantas de afelandra, amarílis e copo-de-leite, e de Erwiniachr santhemiemcordilineekalanchoe.

  3. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12?

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkel Jungersen; Anette Wind; Eric Johansen; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Birgitte Stuer-Lauridsen; Dorte Eskesen

    2014-01-01

    This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®), which is the world’s most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12® has been determined and published. BB-12® originates from Chr. Hansen’s collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dri...

  4. Characterisation of an ELISA detecting immunoglobulin G to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine colostrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zervens, Lisa Marie-Louise; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    2013-01-01

    Although colostrum has been used to detect specific immunoglobulin (Ig) G to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in cattle, confounding, non-specific reactions can be a problem. The objectives of this study were to determine the proportion of non-specific ELISA reactions in samples...... of colostrum taken between 0 and 4days-in-milk (DIM), and to assess the probability of an animal testing positive for MAP specific IgG over this time-period. Non-specific reactions were found in 3/365 (0.8%) of samples. The odds of an animal testing positive on day of calving were 130 times higher than at 4...

  5. A modular esterase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa contains a non-catalytic cellulose-binding domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, L M; Wood, T M; Williamson, G; Faulds, C; Hazlewood, G P; Black, G W; Gilbert, H J

    1993-01-01

    The 5' regions of genes xynB and xynC, coding for a xylanase and arabinofuranosidase respectively, are identical and are reiterated four times within the Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa genome. To isolate further copies of the reiterated xynB/C 5' region, a genomic library of Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa DNA was screened with a probe constructed from the conserved region of xynB. DNA from one phage which hybridized to the probe, but not to sequences upstream or downstream of the ...

  6. High-Throughput Direct Fecal PCR Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Sheep and Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, Anna M.; Galea, Francesca; Whittington, Ann-Michele; Saunders, Vanessa F.; Begg, Douglas J.; de Silva, Kumudika; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic enteric disease caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis that affects ruminants. Transmission occurs by the fecal-oral route. A commonly used antemortem diagnostic test for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces is liquid culture; however, a major constraint is the 2- to 3-month incubation period needed for this method. Rapid methods for the detection of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis based on PCR have been reported, but comprehensive validation data are lacking. We describe here a new test, the high-throughput-Johnes (HT-J), to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in feces. Its diagnostic accuracy was compared with that of liquid radiometric (Bactec) fecal culture using samples from cattle (1,330 samples from 23 herds) and sheep (596 samples from 16 flocks). The multistage protocol involves the recovery of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells from a fecal suspension, cell rupture by bead beating, extraction of DNA using magnetic beads, and IS900 quantitative PCR. The limit of detection of the assay was 0.0005 pg, and the limit of quantification was 0.005 pg M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genomic DNA. Only M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from a panel of 51 mycobacterial isolates, including 10 with IS900-like sequences. Of the 549 culture-negative fecal samples from unexposed herds and flocks, 99% were negative in the HT-J test, while 60% of the bovine- and 84% of the ovine-culture-positive samples were positive in the HT-J test. As similar total numbers of samples from M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed animals were positive in culture and HT-J tests in both species, and as the results of a McNemar's test were not significant, these methods probably have similar sensitivities, but the true diagnostic sensitivities of these tests are unknown. These validation data meet the consensus-based reporting standards for diagnostic test accuracy studies for paratuberculosis and

  7. Use of novel recombinant antigens in the interferon gamma assay for detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, C.; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    2012-01-01

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection may be detected by measuring antigen specific cell-mediated immune responses by the interferon-gamma (IFN-¿) assay. Available IFN-¿ assay use purified protein derivate of Johnin (PPDj) leading to low specificity. The objectives.......85) which also had high specificity (0.92-1.00). Three latency proteins showed positive IFN-¿ tests that correlated highly with the case definition and one of these antigens (LATP-2) had no homologue sequence in the M. avium subsp. avium or M. bovis genome and could be a promising diagnostic antigen...

  8. Use of Novel Recombinant Antigens in the Interferon Gamma Assay for Detection of Mycobacterium Avium Subsp. Paratuberculosis Infection in Cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Aagaard, Claus; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose

    Early stage Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection can be detected by measuring antigen specific cell mediated immune responses by the interferon gamma (IFN-γ) assay. Available IFN-γ assay use purified protein derivate of Johnin (PPDj) leading to low specificity. The objectives...... high specificity (0.92-1.00). Three latency proteins showed positive IFN-γ tests that correlated highly with the case definition and one of these antigens (LATP-2) had no homologue sequence in the M. avium subsp. avium or M. bovis genome and could be a promising diagnostic antigen. The combination...

  9. Use of recombinant ESAT-6:CFP-10 fusion protein for differentiation of infections of cattle by Mycobacterium bovis and by M. avium subsp. avium and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, W R; Nonnecke, B J; Palmer, M V; Robbe-Austermann, S; Bannantine, J P; Stabel, J R; Whipple, D L; Payeur, J B; Estes, D M; Pitzer, J E; Minion, F C

    2004-07-01

    Immunological diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle is often confounded by cross-reactive responses resulting from exposure to other mycobacterial species, especially Mycobacterium avium. Early secretory antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10) are dominant gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-inducing antigens of tuberculous mycobacteria, and they are absent from many environmental nontuberculous mycobacteria. Because M. avium exposure is the primary confounding factor in the diagnosis of M. bovis-infected animals, in vitro responses to a recombinant ESAT-6:CFP-10 (rESAT-6:CFP-10) fusion protein by blood leukocytes from cattle naturally exposed to M. avium or experimentally challenged with Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium or Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis were compared to responses by M. bovis-infected cattle. Responses to heterogeneous mycobacterial antigens (i.e., purified protein derivatives [PPDs] and whole-cell sonicates [WCSs]) were also evaluated. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), IFN-gamma, and nitric oxide responses by M. bovis-infected cattle to rESAT-6:CFP-10 exceeded (P CFP-10 by blood leukocytes from M. bovis-infected calves exceeded (P CFP-10 proteins by M. avium and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, it appears that use of the rESAT-6:CFP-10 fusion protein will be useful for the detection of tuberculous cattle in herds with pre-existing sensitization to M. avium and/or M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

  10. Chemical differences in volatiles between Melittis melissophyllum L. subsp. melissophyllum and subsp. albida (Guss) P. W. Ball (Lamiaceae) determined by solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with GC/FID and GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Filippo; Conti, Fabio; Cristalli, Gloria; Giuliani, Claudia; Papa, Fabrizio; Sagratini, Gianni; Vittori, Sauro

    2011-02-01

    Melittis melissophyllum (Lamiaceae) is a perennial herb, typical of woody places, occurring in Italy with two subspecies, i.e., melissophyllum and albida. So far, the classification of these two taxa was only based on morphology, i.e., the presence of glandular trichomes, the dimension of the leaves, and the number of teeth on each side as the main discriminant characters. To find marker compounds to chemically discriminate the subsp. melissophyllum with respect to the subsp. albida, a solid-phase microextraction SPME analysis coupled with GC/FID (=flame ionization detector) and GC/MS was carried out. SPME proved to be a chemotaxonomically useful technique that permitted a clearly differentiation of the two subspecies at headspace level. The subsp. melissophyllum was characterized by high amount of the mushroom alcohol oct-1-en-3-ol and the phenolic coumarin, whilst the subsp. albida exhibited a high content in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, α-pinene, sabinene, and (E)-caryophyllene being the major compounds. Multivariate chemometric techniques, such as cluster analysis (CA) and principal-component analysis (PCA), were used to support chemical data and characterize the population according to the taxonomy. In addition, the micromorphology and distribution of glandular trichomes of both subspecies were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Copyright © 2011 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  11. Safety evaluation of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei LC-01, a probiotic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Yu; Sun, Jing; Guo, Zirui; Guo, Huiyuan; Ren, Fazheng

    2013-10-01

    The safety of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei LC-01 was evaluated for its use as a potential probiotic. In our in vitro study, the antibiotic resistance and the ability to produce biogenic amine were determined. The results showed that the strain was sensitive to all tested antibiotics and did not produce biogenic amine except for tyramine. The oral toxicity of this strain was evaluated in Balb/C mice. One hundred mice were divided into 10 groups. Four groups were administered 0, 10(8), 10(9), or 10(10) CFU/mouse per day dissolved in saline solution respectively, for 28 days. Three groups were injected intraperitoneally with 10(9) CFU/mouse dissolved in saline solution, and were killed 2, 5, and 10 days after injection. The last 3 groups were injected with the vehicle as controls respectively. The results showed that oral administration of the strain had no adverse effects on mouse body weight and that there was no treatment-associated bacterial translocation. Intraperitoneal administration caused a significant translocation to liver, spleen and kidney. However, this translocation did not cause illness or death throughout the experiment. The results suggest that L. paracasei subsp. paracasei LC-01 is likely to be safe for human consumption.

  12. treA Codifies for a Trehalase with Involvement in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Vessoni Alexandrino

    Full Text Available Citrus canker, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc, is a severe disease of citrus. Xcc presents broad spectrum of citrus hosts including economically important species whereas X. fuscans subsp. aurantifolii-type C (XauC causes a milder disease and only infects Citrus aurantifolia. Trehalase catalyzes hydrolysis of the disaccharide trehalose, a sugar that has been reported to be related to Xcc pathogenicity. We expressed the recombinant gene product and assessed Xcc trehalase structural and kinetics data. The recombinant protein presented 42.7% of secondary structures in α-helix and 13% in β-sheets, no quaternary structure in solution, and Michaelis-Menten constant (KM of 0.077 mM and Vmax 55.308 μMol glucose.min-1.mg protein-1 for trehalose. A Xcc mutant strain (XccΔtreA was produced by gene deletion from Xcc genome. Enzymatic activity of trehalase was determined in Xcc, XauC and XccΔtreA cellular lysates, showing the highest values for XauC in in vitro infective condition and no activity for XccΔtreA. Finally, leaves of Citrus aurantifolia infected with XccΔtreA showed much more drenching and necrosis than those infected by wild type Xcc. We concluded that trehalase contributes to alleviate bacterial virulence and that inability for trehalose hydrolysis may promote higher Xcc infectivity.

  13. Antioxidant Potential, Lipid Peroxidation Inhibition and Antimicrobial Activities of Satureja montana L. subsp. kitaibelii Extracts

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    Dragoljub D. Cvetković

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activity of different Satureja montana L. subsp. kitaibelii extracts was tested by measuring their ability to scavenge reactive hydroxyl radical during the Fenton reaction, using ESR spectroscopy. Also, the influence of these extracts on lipid peroxyl radicals obtained during lipid peroxidation of: (I sunflower oil (37°C, 3h inducedby 4,4'-azobis(4-cyanovaleric acid (ACVA and (II liposomes induced by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidino-propanedihydrochloride (AAPH was studied. n-Butanol extract had the bestantioxidant activity (100% at 0.5 mg/mL in Fenton reaction system; 89.21% at 5 mg/mL in system I; 83.38% at 5 mg/mL in system II. The antioxidant activities of the extracts significantly correlated with total phenolic content. The antimicrobial activity of Satureja montana L. subsp. kitaibelii extracts was investigated. Petroleum ether, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts expressed a wide range of inhibiting activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.

  14. Production of lactic acid from whey using Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana M. Rojas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research was to determine the proper growth conditions of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus for the production of lactic acid using serum as substract. This serum was obtain from the department of Cesar, Colombia. Lactic acid is the result of the extraction and purification of fermentation broths in which bacteria Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus are used, which are usually used for the production of yogurt. The substrate was supplemented with yeast extract, ammonium phosphate as a nitrogen source, and calcium carbonate as a neutralizer, in order to optimize the consumption, by the bacteria, of the main carbohydrate present in serum (lactose. During the fermentation (up to 72 h the inoculums concentration, and temperature were controlled. Purification consisted in esterification, filtration of solids formed during the reaction, and removing of water by evaporation and nitrogen influx. Finally, lactic acid was obtained with 78,0% purity (36.7 g/L, which was characterized by infrared spectroscopy

  15. Quinolone susceptibility and genetic characterization of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, B C J; Hossain, Sabrina; Wimalasena, S H M P; Pathirana, H N K S; Wendt, Mitchell; Heo, Gang-Joon

    2017-06-01

    Turtle-borne Salmonella enterica owns significance as a leading cause in human salmonellosis. The current study aimed to determine the quinolone susceptibility and the genetic characteristics of 21 strains of S. enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles. Susceptibility of four antimicrobials including nalidixic acid, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and levofloxacin was examined in disk diffusion and MIC tests where the majority of the isolates were susceptible to all tested quinolones. In genetic characterization, none of the isolates were positive for qnr or aac(6')-Ib genes and no any target site mutations could be detected in gyrA, gyrB, and parC quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDR). In addition, neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree derived using gyrA gene sequences exhibited two distinct clads comprising; first, current study isolates, and second, quinolone-resistant isolates of human and animal origin. All results suggest that studied strains of S. enterica subsp. enterica isolated from pet turtles are susceptible to quinolones and genetically more conserved with regards to gyrA gene region.

  16. Multilocus Sex Determination Revealed in Two Populations of Gynodioecious Wild Strawberry, Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashman, Tia-Lynn; Tennessen, Jacob A; Dalton, Rebecca M; Govindarajulu, Rajanikanth; Koski, Matthew H; Liston, Aaron

    2015-10-19

    Gynodioecy, the coexistence of females and hermaphrodites, occurs in 20% of angiosperm families and often enables transitions between hermaphroditism and dioecy. Clarifying mechanisms of sex determination in gynodioecious species can thus illuminate sexual system evolution. Genetic determination of gynodioecy, however, can be complex and is not fully characterized in any wild species. We used targeted sequence capture to genetically map a novel nuclear contributor to male sterility in a self-pollinated hermaphrodite of Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata from the southern portion of its range. To understand its interaction with another identified locus and possibly additional loci, we performed crosses within and between two populations separated by 2000 km, phenotyped the progeny and sequenced candidate markers at both sex-determining loci. The newly mapped locus contains a high density of pentatricopeptide repeat genes, a class commonly involved in restoration of fertility caused by cytoplasmic male sterility. Examination of all crosses revealed three unlinked epistatically interacting loci that determine sexual phenotype and vary in frequency between populations. Fragaria vesca subsp. bracteata represents the first wild gynodioecious species with genomic evidence of both cytoplasmic and nuclear genes in sex determination. We propose a model for the interactions between these loci and new hypotheses for the evolution of sex determining chromosomes in the subdioecious and dioecious Fragaria. Copyright © 2015 Ashman et al.

  17. Genome Analysis and Characterisation of the Exopolysaccharide Produced by Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum 35624™.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Altmann

    Full Text Available The Bifibobacterium longum subsp. longum 35624™ strain (formerly named Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis is a well described probiotic with clinical efficacy in Irritable Bowel Syndrome clinical trials and induces immunoregulatory effects in mice and in humans. This paper presents (a the genome sequence of the organism allowing the assignment to its correct subspeciation longum; (b a comparative genome assessment with other B. longum strains and (c the molecular structure of the 35624 exopolysaccharide (EPS624. Comparative genome analysis of the 35624 strain with other B. longum strains determined that the sub-speciation of the strain is longum and revealed the presence of a 35624-specific gene cluster, predicted to encode the biosynthetic machinery for EPS624. Following isolation and acid treatment of the EPS, its chemical structure was determined using gas and liquid chromatography for sugar constituent and linkage analysis, electrospray and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry for sequencing and NMR. The EPS consists of a branched hexasaccharide repeating unit containing two galactose and two glucose moieties, galacturonic acid and the unusual sugar 6-deoxy-L-talose. These data demonstrate that the B. longum 35624 strain has specific genetic features, one of which leads to the generation of a characteristic exopolysaccharide.

  18. An outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus in shelter dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jae Won; Yoon, Soon Seek; Woo, Gye-Hyeong; Jung, Byeong Yeal; Joo, Yi-Seok

    2009-09-01

    An outbreak of fatal hemorrhagic pneumonia with 70-90% morbidity and 50% mortality occurred in an animal shelter in Yangju, Gyeonggi Province, Korea. Clinically, the affected dogs showed severe respiratory distress within 48 h after arriving in the shelter. The dead were found mainly with nasal bleeding and hematemesis. At necropsy, hemothorax and hemorrhagic pneumonia along with severe pulmonary consolidation was observed, though histopathological analysis showed mainly hemorrhagic bronchopneumonia. Lymphoid depletion was inconsistently seen in the spleen, tonsil and bronchial lymph node. Gram-positive colonies were shown in blood vessels or parenchyma of cerebrum, lung, liver, spleen, and kidney. Also, Streptococcus (S.) equi subsp. zooepidemicus was isolated from the various organs in which the bacterium was microscopically and histologically detected. In addition, approximately 0.9 Kb specific amplicon, antiphagocytic factor H binding protein, was amplified in the bacterial isolates. In this study, we reported an outbreak of canine hemorrhagic bronchopneumonia caused by S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus in an animal shelter in Yangju, Korea.

  19. Proteolytic processing of the Cyt1Ab1 toxin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Escobar

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis produces d-endotoxins that require proteolytic processing to become active. The activation of the B. thuringiensis subsp. medellin 28 kDa (Cyt1Ab1 cytolytic toxin by trypsin, chymotrypsin and gut extract from Culex quinquefasciatus larvae was analyzed. The Cyt1Ab1 toxin of B. thuringiensis subsp. medellin was processed by all proteases tested to fragments between 23 and 25 kDa, while processing of the Cyt1Aa1 toxin produce fragments between 22.5 and 24.5 kDa. The Cyt1Ab1 toxin was preferentially processed at the alkaline pH of 12. The in vitro proteolytic processing of the Cyt1Ab1 toxin by C. quinquefasciatus larvae midgut extract showed a 25 kDa fragment; a similar result was observed when the activation was performed in the in vivo experiments. The solubilized Cyt1Ab1 toxin and the protease resistant cores generated by in vitro processing showed hemolytic activity but not mosquitocidal activity. Amino terminal sequence of the C. quinquefasciatus gut extract resistant fragment indicated that the cutting site was located between Lys31 and Asp32, with a sequence DDPNEKNNHNS; while for the trypsin-resistant fragment the cutting site was determined between Leu29 and Arg30, and for the chymotrypsin-resistant fragment between Arg30 and Lys31.

  20. Application of Raman spectroscopy for direct analysis of Carlina acanthifolia subsp. utzka root essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzemski, Maciej; Wójciak-Kosior, Magdalena; Sowa, Ireneusz; Agacka-Mołdoch, Monika; Drączkowski, Piotr; Matosiuk, Dariusz; Kurach, Łukasz; Kocjan, Ryszard; Dresler, Sławomir

    2017-11-01

    Carlina genus plants e.g. Carlina acanthifolia subsp. utzka have been still used in folk medicine of many European countries and its biological activity is mostly associated with root essential oils. In the present paper, Raman spectroscopy (RS) was applied for the first time for evaluation of essential oil distribution in root of C. acnthifolia subsp. utzka and identification of root structures containing the essential oil. Furthermore, RS technique was applied to assess chemical stability of oil during drying of plant material or distillation process. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of the essential oil. The identity of compounds was confirmed using Raman, ATR-IR and NMR spectroscopy. Carlina oxide was found to be the main component of the oil (98.96% ± 0.15). The spectroscopic study showed the high stability of essential oil and Raman distribution analysis indicated that the oil reservoirs were localized mostly in the structures of outer layer of the root while the inner part showed nearly no signal assigned to the oil. Raman spectroscopy technique enabled rapid, non-destructive direct analysis of plant material with minimal sample preparation and allowed straightforward, unambiguous identification of the essential oil in the sample. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Anti-angiogenesis properties of Crocus pallasii subsp. haussknechtii, a popular ethnic food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mosaddegh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Angiogenesis is essential for tumor survival. Inhibiting angiogenesis could be a mechanism for hindering tumor development. Numerous studies have now been focused on agiogenesis inhibitors and many of such studies have targeted plant materials. In the present study, Crocus pallasii subsp. haussknechtii has been evaluated for anti-angiogenesis properties. Methods: Anti-angiogenesis activity of the plant extracts and fractions has been investigated through wound healing assay in HUV-EC-C cells. The cytotoxic activity has also been evaluated by MTT assay. Results: The methanol extract and the methanol fraction of the corm along with the chloroform fraction of the aerial parts demonstrated to be cytotoxic to HUV-EC-C cells with IC50 values of 27.2, 74.1 and 60.0 μg/mL, respectively while the chloroform fraction of the corm showed the most considerable anti-angiogenesis property among the samples in wound healing assay. Conclusion: Regarding the results of the present study, Crocus pallasii subsp. haussknechtii is suggested for further studies in cancer research evaluations.

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility and multilocus sequence typing of Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatay-Dualde, Juan; Prats-van der Ham, Miranda; de la Fe, Christian; Paterna, Ana; Sánchez, Antonio; Corrales, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Antonio; Tola, Sebastiana; Gómez-Martin, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum is one of the causative agents of contagious agalactia (CA). Nevertheless, there is still a lack of information about its antimicrobial susceptibility and genetic characteristics. Therefore, the aim of this work was to study the antimicrobial and genetic variability of different Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. capricolum field isolates. For this purpose, the growth inhibition effect of 18 antimicrobials and a multilocus sequence typing (MLST) scheme based on five housekeeping genes (fusA, glpQ, gyrB, lepA and rpoB) were performed on 32 selected field isolates from Italy and Spain.The results showed a wide range of growth inhibitory effects for almost all the antimicrobials studied. Macrolides presented lower efficacy inhibiting Mcc growth than in previous works performed on other CA-causative mycoplasmas. Erythromycin was not able to inhibit the growth of any of the studied strains, contrary to doxycycline, which inhibited the growth of all of them from low concentrations. On the other hand, the study of the concatenated genes revealed a high genetic variability among the different Mcc isolates. Hence, these genetic variations were greater than the ones reported in prior works on other mycoplasma species.

  3. Multi-Method Approach for Characterizing the Interaction between Fusarium verticillioides and Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. Kurstaki

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Liliana O.; Tralamazza, Sabina Moser.; Reis, Gabriela M.; Rabinovitch, Leon; Barbosa, Cynara B.; Corrêa, Benedito

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial antagonists used as biocontrol agents represent part of an integrated management program to reduce pesticides in the environment. Bacillus thuringiensis is considered a good alternative as a biocontrol agent for suppressing plant pathogens such as Fusarium. In this study, we used microscopy, flow cytometry, indirect immunofluorescence, and high performance liquid chromatography to determine the interaction between B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki LFB-FIOCRUZ (CCGB) 257 and F. verticillioides MRC 826, an important plant pathogen frequently associated with maize. B. thuringiensis showed a strong in vitro suppressive effect on F. verticillioides growth and inhibited fumonisin production. Flow cytometry analysis was found to be adequate for characterizing the fungal cell oscillations and death during these interactions. Further studies of the antagonistic effect of this isolate against other fungi and in vivo testing are necessary to determine the efficacy of B. thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in controlling plant pathogens. This is the first report on the use of flow cytometry for quantifying living and apoptotic F. verticillioides cells and the B. thuringiensis Cry 1Ab toxin. PMID:24739804

  4. treA Codifies for a Trehalase with Involvement in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrino, André Vessoni; Goto, Leandro Seiji; Novo-Mansur, Maria Teresa Marques

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), is a severe disease of citrus. Xcc presents broad spectrum of citrus hosts including economically important species whereas X. fuscans subsp. aurantifolii-type C (XauC) causes a milder disease and only infects Citrus aurantifolia. Trehalase catalyzes hydrolysis of the disaccharide trehalose, a sugar that has been reported to be related to Xcc pathogenicity. We expressed the recombinant gene product and assessed Xcc trehalase structural and kinetics data. The recombinant protein presented 42.7% of secondary structures in α-helix and 13% in β-sheets, no quaternary structure in solution, and Michaelis-Menten constant (KM) of 0.077 mM and Vmax 55.308 μMol glucose.min-1.mg protein-1 for trehalose. A Xcc mutant strain (XccΔtreA) was produced by gene deletion from Xcc genome. Enzymatic activity of trehalase was determined in Xcc, XauC and XccΔtreA cellular lysates, showing the highest values for XauC in in vitro infective condition and no activity for XccΔtreA. Finally, leaves of Citrus aurantifolia infected with XccΔtreA showed much more drenching and necrosis than those infected by wild type Xcc. We concluded that trehalase contributes to alleviate bacterial virulence and that inability for trehalose hydrolysis may promote higher Xcc infectivity.

  5. Flavonoids in Adaptation of Begonia grandis Dryander subsp. grandis Introduced in West Siberia (Novosibirsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karpova E.A.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of flavonoids (flavones and flavonols in leaves of Begonia grandis Dryander subsp. grandis plants introduced in Western Siberia (Central Siberian Botanical Garden, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk during the growing season in the greenhouse and the open ground were studied for the first time. The ranges of flavonoid fractions and individual flavonoids contents in a favorable environment and during periods of temperature drops and frost were established. Under favorable conditions in the greenhouse and in the open ground B. grandis subsp. grandis leaves were characterized by relatively low content of the sum of flavonoids (up to 10.1 mg/g. During periods of temperature drops in the greenhouse it was decreased (down to 5.2 mg/g, and in conditions of more considerable temperature drops and frost in open ground it was increased by several times (up to 28.3 mg/g. During the period of the action of stress factors content of the sum of flavonoid aglycones in the leaves was increased both in the greenhouse (including quercetin, luteolin and in the open ground (including quercetin, kaempferol, luteolin, in the open ground content of major constituent, luteolin 8-C-glucoside (orientin, was increased. The most significant transformations during the growing season were observed in the O-glycosides and free aglycones fractions, their contents of compounds and composition were varied. Four O-glycosides, including isoquercitrin, are detected only in the leaves of open ground plants.

  6. Essential oils composition of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Labill.) Markgraf (Apocynaceae-Periplocoideae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, P; Sajeva, M; Bruno, M; Rosselli, S; Maggio, A; Senatore, F

    2013-01-01

    The essential oil of roots, branches, leaves, flowers and fruits of Periploca laevigata Aiton subsp. angustifolia (Apocynaceae) from Lampedusa Island has been obtained by hydrodistillation and its composition analysed. The analyses allowed the identification and quantification of 86 volatile compounds. Branches showed the higher diversity with 57 compounds followed by fruits with 33, roots with 23, flowers with 16 and leaves with six compounds, respectively. In the matrices examined three constituents, heneicosane, docosane and tricosane are in common, although with different percentages. At least the most abundant compounds found in the matrices have been reported to have several biological activities. 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde identified in the roots as the most abundant component (70.7%) and present with 8.3% in the branches is a potent tyrosinase inhibitor present in several African medicinal plants, and thus being used as an ingredient in cosmetic and other medicinal products, primarily in relation to hyperpigmentation. Among the compounds identified, several play a role as semiochemicals for many animals, and 28 allomones, 43 pheromones, 21 kairomones have been identified. P. laevigata subsp. angustifolia in Lampedusa Island is host to a community of visitors, and the possible ecological role of the volatiles found is briefly discussed.

  7. Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis at a Farm-Scale Biogas Plant Supplied with Manure from Paratuberculosis-Affected Dairy Cattle▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slana, I.; Pribylova, R.; Kralova, A.; Pavlik, I.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, products from all steps of anaerobic digestion at a farm-scale biogas plant supplied with manure from paratuberculosis-affected dairy cattle were examined and quantified for the presence of the causal agent of paratuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, using culture and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were detected using culture in fermentors for up to 2 months; the presence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (101 cells/g) was demonstrated in all anaerobic fermentors and digestate 16 months after initiation of work at a biogas plant, using IS900 qPCR. F57 qPCR was able to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA (102 cells/g) at up to 12 months. According to these results, a fermentation process that extended beyond 2 months removed all viable M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells and therefore rendered its product M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free. However, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was found during all the examined periods (more than 1 year), which could be explained by either residual DNA being released from dead cells or by the presence of viable cells whose amount was under the limit of cultivability. As the latter hypothesis cannot be excluded, the safety of the final products of digestion used for fertilization or animal bedding cannot be defined, and further investigation is necessary to confirm or refute this risk. PMID:21398476

  8. Isolation of Bartonella henselae and Two New Bartonella Subspecies, Bartonellakoehlerae Subspecies boulouisii subsp. nov. and Bartonella koehlerae Subspecies bothieri subsp. nov. from Free-Ranging Californian Mountain Lions and Bobcats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B; Molia, Sophie; Kasten, Rickie W; Borgo, Gina M; Stuckey, Matthew J; Maruyama, Soichi; Chang, Chao-Chin; Haddad, Nadia; Koehler, Jane E

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats are the natural reservoir of Bartonella henselae, B. clarridgeiae and B. koehlerae. To determine the role of wild felids in the epidemiology of Bartonella infections, blood was collected from 14 free-ranging California mountain lions (Puma concolor) and 19 bobcats (Lynx rufus). Bartonella spp. were isolated from four (29%) mountain lions and seven (37%) bobcats. These isolates were characterized using growth characteristics, biochemical reactions, molecular techniques, including PCR-RFLP of selected genes or interspacer region, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), partial sequencing of several genes, and DNA-DNA hybridization. Two isolates were identical to B. henselae genotype II. All other isolates were distinguished from B. henselae and B. koehlerae by PCR-RFLP of the gltA gene using endonucleases HhaI, TaqI and AciI, with the latter two discriminating between the mountain lion and the bobcat isolates. These two novel isolates displayed specific PFGE profiles distinct from B. henselae, B. koehlerae and B. clarridgeiae. Sequences of amplified gene fragments from the three mountain lion and six bobcat isolates were closely related to, but distinct from, B. henselae and B. koehlerae. Finally, DNA-DNA hybridization studies demonstrated that the mountain lion and bobcat strains are most closely related to B. koehlerae. We propose naming the mountain lion isolates B. koehlerae subsp. boulouisii subsp. nov. (type strain: L-42-94), and the bobcat isolates B. koehlerae subsp. bothieri subsp. nov. (type strain: L-17-96), and to emend B. koehlerae as B. koehlerae subsp. koehlerae. The mode of transmission and the zoonotic potential of these new Bartonella subspecies remain to be determined.

  9. Isolation of Bartonella henselae and Two New Bartonella Subspecies, Bartonella koehlerae Subspecies boulouisii subsp. nov. and Bartonella koehlerae Subspecies bothieri subsp. nov. from Free-Ranging Californian Mountain Lions and Bobcats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomel, Bruno B.; Molia, Sophie; Kasten, Rickie W.; Borgo, Gina M.; Stuckey, Matthew J.; Maruyama, Soichi; Chang, Chao-chin; Haddad, Nadia; Koehler, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Domestic cats are the natural reservoir of Bartonella henselae, B. clarridgeiae and B. koehlerae. To determine the role of wild felids in the epidemiology of Bartonella infections, blood was collected from 14 free-ranging California mountain lions (Puma concolor) and 19 bobcats (Lynx rufus). Bartonella spp. were isolated from four (29%) mountain lions and seven (37%) bobcats. These isolates were characterized using growth characteristics, biochemical reactions, molecular techniques, including PCR-RFLP of selected genes or interspacer region, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), partial sequencing of several genes, and DNA-DNA hybridization. Two isolates were identical to B. henselae genotype II. All other isolates were distinguished from B. henselae and B. koehlerae by PCR-RFLP of the gltA gene using endonucleases HhaI, TaqI and AciI, with the latter two discriminating between the mountain lion and the bobcat isolates. These two novel isolates displayed specific PFGE profiles distinct from B. henselae, B. koehlerae and B. clarridgeiae. Sequences of amplified gene fragments from the three mountain lion and six bobcat isolates were closely related to, but distinct from, B. henselae and B. koehlerae. Finally, DNA-DNA hybridization studies demonstrated that the mountain lion and bobcat strains are most closely related to B. koehlerae. We propose naming the mountain lion isolates B. koehlerae subsp. boulouisii subsp. nov. (type strain: L-42-94), and the bobcat isolates B. koehlerae subsp. bothieri subsp. nov. (type strain: L-17-96), and to emend B. koehlerae as B. koehlerae subsp. koehlerae. The mode of transmission and the zoonotic potential of these new Bartonella subspecies remain to be determined. PMID:26981874

  10. De Novo whole genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex strain BB01 from blueberry in Georgia, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study reports a de novo assembled draft genome sequence of Xylella fastidiosa subsp. multiplex strain BB01 causing blueberry bacterial leaf scorch in Georgia, USA. The BB01 genome is 2,517,579 bp with a G+C content of 51.8% and 2,943 open reading frames (ORFs) and 48 RNA genes....

  11. Heterologous Gene Expression in Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis : Synthesis, Secretion, and Processing of the Bacillus subtilis Neutral Protease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guchte, Maarten van de; Kodde, Jan; Vossen, Jos M.B.M. van der; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard

    1990-01-01

    The Bacillus subtilis nprE gene lacking its own promoter sequence was inserted in the lactococcal expression vector pMG36e. Upon introduction of the recombinant plasmid into Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis strain MG1363, neutral protease activity could be visualized by the appearance of large

  12. The extracellular proteome of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB‐12 reveals proteins with putative roles in probiotic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilad, Ofir; Svensson, Birte; Viborg, Alexander Holm

    2011-01-01

    Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB‐12, proteins secreted by the bacterium, i.e. belonging to the extracellular proteome present in the culture medium, were identified by 2‐DE coupled with MALDI‐TOF MS. Among the 74 distinct proteins identified, 31 are predicted to carry out their physiological role either...

  13. Draft Genome Sequences of Four Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Enteritidis Strains Implicated in Infections of Avian and Human Hosts

    KAUST Repository

    An, Ran

    2018-01-24

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a wide-host-range pathogen. Occasionally, it is involved in invasive infections, leading to a high mortality rate. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of four S Enteritidis strains obtained from human and avian hosts that had been involved in bacteremia, gastroenteritis, and primary infections.

  14. Predictive modeling of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12 growth in cow’s, goat’s and soy milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Slačanac

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to use a predictive model to analyse the growth of a probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12 in cow’s, goat’s and soy milk. The Gompertz model was used, and the suitability of the model was estimated by the Schnute algorithm. Except for the analysis of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12 growth, the Gompertz model was also used for the analysis of pH changes during the fermentation process. Experimental results, as well as the values of kinetic parameters obtained in this study, showed that the highest growth rate of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12 was obtained in goat’s milk, and the lowest in soy milk. Contrary to the growth of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bb-12, pH decreased faster in soy milk than in cow’s milk. The highest rate of pH decrease was also observed in goat’s milk, which is in correspondence with results of various previous studies. The Gompertz model proved to be highly suitable for analysing the course and the fermentation kinetics in these three kinds of milk, and might be used to analyse the growth kinetics of other probiotic and starter cultures in milk.

  15. Complete genomic sequence of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni HS:19 strain RM1285 that was isolated from packaged chicken

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poultry products serve as the main source of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni (Cjj) infections in humans. Cjj infections are a leading cause of foodborne gastroenteritis and are a prevalent antecedent to Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). This study describes the genome of Cjj HS:19 strain RM1285 isol...

  16. Generation of tomato seeds artificially infected with a GFP – tagged strain of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, D.H.; Souza, R.M.; Wolf, van der J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) is an economically-important seed-borne pathogen that causes bacterial canker and bacterial wilt of tomato. In this study, a procedure was developed to generate tomato seed (internally-) infected with Cmm. These seeds can be used to evaluate

  17. UV Light Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Milk as Assessed by FASTPlaqueTB Phage Assay and Culture▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altic, Leslie C.; Rowe, Michael T.; Grant, Irene R.

    2007-01-01

    UV light inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Middlebrook 7H9 broth and whole and semiskim milk was investigated using a laboratory-scale UV machine that incorporated static mixers within UV-penetrable pipes. UV treatment proved to be less effective in killing M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis suspended in milk (0.5- to 1.0-log10 reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml) than that suspended in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (2.5- to 3.3-log10 reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml). The FASTPlaqueTB phage assay provided more rapid enumeration of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (within 24 h) than culture on Herrold's egg yolk medium (6 to 8 weeks). Despite the fact that plaque counts were consistently 1 to 2 log10 lower than colony counts throughout the study, UV inactivation rates for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis derived using the phage assay and culture results were not significantly different (P = 0.077). PMID:17435001

  18. UV light inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk as assessed by FASTPlaqueTB phage assay and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altic, Leslie C; Rowe, Michael T; Grant, Irene R

    2007-06-01

    UV light inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Middlebrook 7H9 broth and whole and semiskim milk was investigated using a laboratory-scale UV machine that incorporated static mixers within UV-penetrable pipes. UV treatment proved to be less effective in killing M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis suspended in milk (0.5- to 1.0-log(10) reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml) than that suspended in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (2.5- to 3.3-log(10) reduction per 1,000 mJ/ml). The FASTPlaqueTB phage assay provided more rapid enumeration of surviving M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (within 24 h) than culture on Herrold's egg yolk medium (6 to 8 weeks). Despite the fact that plaque counts were consistently 1 to 2 log(10) lower than colony counts throughout the study, UV inactivation rates for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis derived using the phage assay and culture results were not significantly different (P = 0.077).

  19. Analysis of the exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2772 grown in continuous culture on glucose and fructose.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grobben, G.J.; Casteren, van W.H.M.; Schols, H.A.; Oosterveld, A.; Sala, G.; Smith, M.R.; Sikkema, J.; Bont, de J.A.M.

    1997-01-01

    The exopolysaccharides produced by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus NCFB 2772 grown in defined medium were investigated. At equal cell densities, the strain produced 95 mg l−1 exopolysaccharides with glucose and 30 mg l−1 with fructose as the carbohydrate source. High-performance

  20. Occurrence of transgenic feral alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa L.) in alfalfa seed production areas in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetically-engineered glyphosate-resistant alfalfa (Medicago sativa subsp. sativa) was commercialized in 2011. The potential risk of transgene dispersal into the environment is not clearly understood for alfalfa, a perennial crop that is cross-pollinated by insects. We gathered data on feral and tr...

  1. Antigenicity of recombinant maltose binding protein-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis fusion proteins with and without factor Xa cleaving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne’s disease (JD) in ruminants. Proteomic studies have shown that MAP expresses certain proteins when exposed to in vitro physiological stress conditions similar to the conditions experienced within a host during natural infection. Such prot...

  2. Isolation and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni subsp jejuni from macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus) in the subantarctic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broman, T.; Bergstrom, S.; On, Stephen L.W.

    2000-01-01

    On Bird Island, South Georgia, albatrosses (n = 140), penguins (n = 100), and fur seals (n = 206) were sampled for Campylobacter jejuni. C. jejuni subsp. jejuni was recovered from three macaroni penguins (Eudyptes chrysolophus). These isolates, the first reported for the subantarctic region, showed...

  3. Biological control of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) using Aeromonas phage PAS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J H; Choresca, C H; Shin, S P; Han, J E; Jun, J W; Park, S C

    2015-02-01

    The potential control efficacy of Aeromonas phage PAS-1 was evaluated against Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) model in this study. The phage was co-cultured with the virulent A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strain AS05 that possesses the type III secretion system (TTSS) ascV gene, and efficient bacteriolytic activity was observed against the bacteria. The administration of PAS-1 in rainbow trout demonstrated that the phage was cleared from the fish within 200 h post-administration, and a temporal neutralizing activity against the phage was detected in the sera of phage-administrated fish. The administration of PAS-1 (multiplicity of infection: 10 000) in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infected rainbow trout model showed notable protective effects, with increased survival rates and mean times to death. These results demonstrated that Aeromonas phage PAS-1 could be considered as an alternative biological control agent against A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida infections in rainbow trout culture. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  4. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mutant libraries reveals loci-dependent transcription biases and strategies to novel mutant discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants and it has been implicated as a cause of Crohn’s disease in humans. The generation of comprehensive random mutant banks by transposon mutagenesis is a fundamental wide genomic technology utilized...

  5. Identification of new antigen candidates for the early diagnosis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souriau, Armel; Freret, Sandrine; Foret, Benjamin; Willemsen, Peter T.J.; Bakker, Douwe; Guilloteau, Laurence A.

    2017-01-01

    Currently Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection is diagnosed through indirect tests based on the immune response induced by the infection. The antigens commonly used in IFN-γ release assays (IGRA) are purified protein derivative tuberculins (PPD). However, PPDs, lack both

  6. Potentiating day-old blood samples for detection of interferon-gamma responses following infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Heidi; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Jungersen, Gregers

    The interferon gamma (IFN-γ) test measuring specific cell-mediated immune responses in whole blood can be used for diagnosis at an early stage of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. A major obstacle for the practical use of IFN-γ testing is the recommended maximum 8 hour...

  7. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  8. Complete genomic sequences of two outbreak strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson associated with cilantro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH -99A2345) are clinical isolates from 1999, putatively related to an outbreak in California from contaminated cilantro. We report the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S. Thompson...

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis FM03 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FM06 Isolated from Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mastrigt, Oscar; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J

    2017-07-13

    Here, the genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis FM03 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FM06, both isolated from cheese, are presented. FM03 and FM06 contain 7 and 3 plasmids, respectively, that carry genes encoding functions important for growth and survival in dairy fermentations. Copyright © 2017 van Mastrigt et al.

  10. Complete genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis FM03 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FM06 isolated from cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mastrigt, van Oscar; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, the genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis FM03 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FM06, both isolated from cheese, are presented. FM03 and FM06 contain 7 and 3 plasmids, respectively, that carry genes encoding functions important for growth and survival in dairy

  11. Complete Genome Sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis FM03 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FM06 Isolated from Cheese

    OpenAIRE

    van Mastrigt, Oscar; Abee, Tjakko; Smid, Eddy J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here, the genome sequences of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis FM03 and Leuconostoc mesenteroides FM06, both isolated from cheese, are presented. FM03 and FM06 contain 7 and 3 plasmids, respectively, that carry genes encoding functions important for growth and survival in dairy fermentations.

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Two Outbreak Strains of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Thompson Associated with Cilantro

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Craig T.; Huynh, Steven; Gorski, Lisa; Cooper, Kerry K.; Miller, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Thompson strains RM1984 (CADPH-99A2334) and RM1986 (CADPH-99A2345) are associated with a 1999 outbreak in contaminated cilantro. We report here the complete genome sequences and annotation of these two S.?Thompson strains. These genomes are distinct and provide additional data for our understanding of S. enterica.

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic changes in wild barley (Hordeum vulgare subsp. spontaneum) during a period of climate change in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change and other anthropogenic disturbances can lead to the loss of genetic variation and thereby affect evolutionary potential and survival of plant populations in the wild. We examined these predictions in the primary wild relative of barley, Hordeum vulgare L. subsp. spontaneum (K. Koch) ...

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Infantis Strain SPE101, Isolated from a Chronic Human Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriarte, Andrés; Giner-Lamia, Joaquín; Silva, Claudia; Betancor, Laura; Astocondor, Lizeth; Cestero, Juan J; Ochoa, Theresa; García, Coralith; Puente, José L; Chabalgoity, José A; García-Del Portillo, Francisco

    2017-07-20

    We report a 4.99-Mb draft genome sequence of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis strain SPE101, isolated from feces of a 5-month-old breast-fed female showing diarrhea associated with severe dehydration and malnutrition. The infection prolonged for 6 months despite antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2017 Iriarte et al.

  15. Deciphering the conserved genetic loci implicated in plant disease control through comparative genomics of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad J Hossain

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available To understand the growth-promoting and disease-inhibiting activities of plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR strains, the genomes of 12 Bacillus subtilis group strains with PGPR activity were sequenced and analyzed. These B. subtilis strains exhibited high genomic diversity, whereas the genomes of B. amyloliquefaciens strains (a member of the B. subtilis group are highly conserved. A pairwise BLASTp matrix revealed that gene family similarity among Bacillus genomes ranges from 32- 90%, with 2,839 genes within the core genome of B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum. Comparative genomic analyses of B. amyloliquefaciens strains identified genes that are linked with biological control and colonization of roots and/or leaves, including 73 genes uniquely associated with subsp. plantarum strains that have predicted functions related to signaling, transportation, secondary metabolite production, and carbon source utilization. Although B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains contain gene clusters that encode many different secondary metabolites, only polyketide biosynthetic clusters that encode difficidin and macrolactin are conserved within this subspecies. To evaluate their role in plant pathogen biocontrol, genes involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis were deleted in B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strain, revealing that difficidin expression is critical in reducing the severity of disease, caused by Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. vesicatoria in tomato plants. This study defines genomic features of PGPR strains and links them with biocontrol activity and with host colonization.

  16. Genetic variation in Zantedeschia spp. (Araceae) for resisance to soft rot caused by Erwina carotovora subsp. carotovora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, R.C.; Cho, H.; Hendriks, M.M.W.B.; Lindhout, W.H.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2004-01-01

    Bacterial soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora is a major disease in Zantedeschia spp., particularly in cultivars from the section Aestivae. The disease can partially be controlled by cultivation measures, so a combination with resistant cultivars could effectively protect the

  17. A Case of Bacteremia Due to Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus and Importance of Gram Stain at Laboratory Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Müşerref TATMAN OTKUN; Gülten AYDIN TUTAK; Emrah GÜLŞEN; Özgen, Zeren

    2009-01-01

    Campylobacter fetus subsp. fetus is related with bacteriemia and extraintestinal system infections at immunodeficient patients. Bacteriemia may cause systemic complications like septic abortus, septic arthritis, abscess, menengitidis, endocarditis, micotic aneurisym, trombophlebitis, peritonitis and salphengitis. In this case report, a 92 years old male patient with secondary chronic renal failure due to chronic pylenophritis developed bacteriemia possibly after a gastrointestinal infection c...

  18. Culture- and Quantitative IS900 Real-Time PCR-Based Analysis of the Persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in a Controlled Dairy Cow Farm Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravkova, M.; Babak, V.; Kralova, A.; Pavlik, I.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to monitor the persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in environmental samples taken from a Holstein farm with a long history of clinical paratuberculosis. A herd of 606 head was eradicated, and mechanical cleaning and disinfection with chloramine B with ammonium (4%) was carried out on the farm; in the surrounding areas (on the field and field midden) lime was applied. Environmental samples were collected before and over a period of 24 months after destocking. Only one sample out of 48 (2%) examined on the farm (originating from a waste pit and collected before destocking) was positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis by cultivation on solid medium (Herrold's egg yolk medium). The results using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) showed that a total of 81% of environmental samples with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 3.09 × 103 were positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis before destocking compared to 43% with an average mean M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cell number of 5.86 × 102 after 24 months. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-positive samples were detected in the cattle barn as well as in the calf barn and surrounding areas. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis was detected from different matrices: floor and instrument scrapings, sediment, or scraping from watering troughs, waste pits, and cobwebs. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis DNA was also detected in soil and plants collected on the field midden and the field 24 months after destocking. Although the proportion of positive samples decreased from 64% to 23% over time, the numbers of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis cells were comparable. PMID:22773642

  19. In Silico Identification of Epitopes in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Proteins That Were Upregulated under Stress Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, Ratna B.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Begg, Douglas J.

    2012-01-01

    Johne's disease in ruminants is caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection is difficult, especially in the early stages. To date, ideal antigen candidates are not available for efficient immunization or immunodiagnosis. This study reports the in silico selection and subsequent analysis of epitopes of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins that were found to be upregulated under stress conditions as a means to identify immunogenic candidate proteins. Previous studies have reported differential regulation of proteins when M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is exposed to stressors which induce a response similar to dormancy. Dormancy may be involved in evading host defense mechanisms, and the host may also mount an immune response against these proteins. Twenty-five M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins that were previously identified as being upregulated under in vitro stress conditions were analyzed for B and T cell epitopes by use of the prediction tools at the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource. Major histocompatibility complex class I T cell epitopes were predicted using an artificial neural network method, and class II T cell epitopes were predicted using the consensus method. Conformational B cell epitopes were predicted from the relevant three-dimensional structure template for each protein. Based on the greatest number of predicted epitopes, eight proteins (MAP2698c [encoded by desA2], MAP2312c [encoded by fadE19], MAP3651c [encoded by fadE3_2], MAP2872c [encoded by fabG5_2], MAP3523c [encoded by oxcA], MAP0187c [encoded by sodA], and the hypothetical proteins MAP3567 and MAP1168c) were identified as potential candidates for study of antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses within infected hosts. PMID:22496492

  20. Infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Results in Rapid Interleukin-1β Release and Macrophage Transepithelial Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Elise A.; O'Grady, Scott M.; Davis, William C.; Eckstein, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Pathogen processing by the intestinal epithelium involves a dynamic innate immune response initiated by pathogen-epithelial cell cross talk. Interactions between epithelium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have not been intensively studied, and it is currently unknown how the bacterium-epithelial cell cross talk contributes to the course of infection. We hypothesized that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis harnesses host responses to recruit macrophages to the site of infection to ensure its survival and dissemination. We investigated macrophage recruitment in response to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis using a MAC-T bovine macrophage coculture system. We show that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection led to phagosome acidification within bovine epithelial (MAC-T) cells as early as 10 min, which resulted in upregulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at transcript and protein levels. Within 10 min of infection, macrophages were recruited to the apical side of MAC-T cells. Inhibition of phagosome acidification or IL-1β abrogated this response, while MCP-1/CCL-2 blocking had no effect. IL-1β processing was dependent upon Ca2+ uptake from the extracellular medium and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations, as determined by EGTA and BAPTA-AM [1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester)] treatments. Thus, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is an opportunist that takes advantage of extracellular Ca2+-dependent phagosome acidification and IL-1β processing in order to efficiently transverse the epithelium and enter its niche—the macrophage. PMID:22778093

  1. Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Exo-β-1,3-Galactanase, an Enzyme for the Degradation of Type II Arabinogalactan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Takenori; Sakamoto, Ayami; Shimokawa, Michiko; Kitahara, Kanefumi

    2014-01-01

    Type II arabinogalactan (AG-II) is a suitable carbohydrate source for Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum, but the degradative enzymes have never been characterized. In this study, we characterized an exo-β-1,3-galactanase, BLLJ_1840, belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 43 from B. longum subsp. longum JCM1217. The recombinant BLLJ_1840 expressed in Escherichia coli hydrolyzed β-1,3-linked galactooligosaccharides but not β-1,4- and β-1,6-linked galactooligosaccharides. The enzyme also hydrolyzed larch wood arabinogalactan (LWAG), which comprises a β-1,3-linked galactan backbone with β-1,6-linked galactan side chains. The kcat/Km ratio of dearabinosylated LWAG was 24-fold higher than that of β-1,3-galactan. BLLJ_1840 is a novel type of exo-β-1,3-galactanase with a higher affinity for the β-1,6-substituted β-1,3-galactan than for nonsubstituted β-1,3-galactan. BLLJ_1840 has 27% to 28% identities with other characterized exo-β-1,3-galactanases from bacteria and fungi. The homologous genes are conserved in several strains of B. longum subsp. longum and B. longum subsp. infantis but not in other bifidobacteria. Transcriptional analysis revealed that BLLJ_1840 is intensively induced with BLLJ_1841, an endo-β-1,6-galactanase candidate, in the presence of LWAG. This is the first report of exo-β-1,3-galactanase in bifidobacteria, which is an enzyme used for the acquisition of AG-II in B. longum subsp. longum. PMID:24837371

  2. Strain-dependent effects of inoculation of Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum on fermentation quality of paddy rice (Oryza sativa L. subsp. japonica) silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohno, Masanori; Kobayashi, Hisami; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Uegaki, Ryuichi

    2012-12-01

    Paddy rice has been of particular interest as a forage crop in Japan. In this study, the isolated strains TO1000, TO1001, TO1002, and TO1003 were characterized by phenotypic and genotypic approaches. These strains were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum subsp. plantarum by species-specific PCR. Phenotypic characteristics varied among different strains of the same subspecies, and the strains represented unique and diverse phenotypes related to fermentation factors, such as carbohydrate assimilation and range of pH and temperature allowing growth. PCR analysis revealed that the patterns of presence/absence of known plantaricin genes differed in a strain-specific manner. Using these strains as inoculants for preparation of whole crop paddy rice silage, fermentation quality was significantly improved, as shown by lower pH, higher lactic acid content, and inhibition of the growth of undesirable microorganisms such as molds, coliform bacteria, and clostridia, after 30 and 60 days of storage, with effectiveness differing from strain to strain. These observations suggest that suitable candidates for bacterial inoculants in silage preparation should be screened at the strain level. Strain TO1002 may be useful for producing silage inoculants for the production of well-preserved whole crop paddy rice silage. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Intoxicação espontânea por Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa (Convolvulaceae em bovinos no Pantanal Matogrossense Spontaneous Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa (Convolvulaceae poisoning of cattle in the Brazilian Pantanal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia A.B. Antoniassi

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Relata-se a intoxicação espontânea por Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa (canudo, algodoeiro em bovinos no Pantanal Matogrossense. As investigações iniciaram após a morte de 12 bovinos, de um rebanho de 500 animais, criados em uma extensa área intensamente infestada por I. carnea subsp. fistulosa com escassa disponibilidade de outra forragem. As mortes ocorreram entres os meses de junho e setembro de 2006. O quadro clínico foi caracterizado por emagrecimento e sinais neurológicos com dificuldade locomotora. Um bovino foi necropsiado sem que se observassem alterações macroscópicas significativas. Histologicamente havia tumefação e vacuolização celular, em neurônios, células acinares pancreáticas, tubulares renais e foliculares da tireóide. Bovinos com quadro clínico similar foram retirados da área invadida por I. carnea subsp. fistulosa e colocadas em áreas com pastagem nativa e de Brachiaria sp. e apresentaram melhora clínica após período de 15 dias.A spontaneous Ipomoea carnea subsp. fistulosa (canudo, algodoeiro poisoning of cattle in the county of Poconé, Brazilian Pantanal, is reported. The investigation began after 12 cattle had died from a flock of 500 animals maintained in an extensive area intensely infested by I. carnea subsp. fistulosa with scarce availability of other fodder plants. The deaths occurred from June to September of 2006. Clinical signs were loss of weight and neurological deficits with hypermetry and incoordination. No significant gross lesions were observed at postmortem examination of one bovine. Histological changes comprised widespread cytoplasmic vacuolation of neurons, cells of the thyroid, kidney and pancreas. Cattle with similar clinical picture, that had been removed from the area invaded by I. carnea subsp. fistulosa and placed into areas with native and Brachiaria sp. pasture, recovered clinically within 15 days.

  4. Proteotyping of Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota) provenances through proteomic analysis of acorn flour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, José Valero; Fernández, Raquel González; Valledor, Luis; Cerrillo, Rafael Ma Navarro; Jorrin-Novo, Jesus V

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics has become a powerful tool to characterize biodiversity and natural variability in plant species, as well as to catalogue and establish phylogenetic relationships and distances among populations, provenances or ecotypes. In this chapter, we describe the standard proteomics workflow that we currently use in cataloguing Holm oak (Quercus ilex subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.) populations. Proteins are extracted from acorn flour or pollen by TCA/acetone or TCA/acetone-phenol methods, resolved by one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, and gel images are captured and analyzed by appropriate software and statistical packages. Quantitative or qualitative variable bands or spots are subjected to MS analysis in order to identify them and correlate differences in the protein profile with the phenotypes or environmental conditions.

  5. The investigation of some bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna subsp. monogyna Jacq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keser, Serhat; Celik, Sait; Turkoglu, Semra; Yilmaz, Ökkes; Turkoglu, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    The antioxidant and pharmacological effects of hawthorn have mainly been attributed to the polyphenolic contents. The aim of this research is to determine some bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of hawthorn aqueous and ethanol extracts of leaves, flowers, and ripened fruits. For this purpose, antioxidant activities of extracts were assessed on DPPH•, ABTS•+, superoxide scavenging, reducing power and ferrous metal chelating activity assays and phenolic content of extracts was determined by Folin-Cioacalteu's reagent. The flavonoids including rutin, apigenin, myricetin, quercetin, naringenin and kaempferol, were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography in the hawthorn extract. It was observed the aqueous and ethanol extracts of Crataegus monogyna subsp. monogyna fruits showed the highest activity in reducing power and metal chelating activity assays. In addition, it was determined that the aqueous flower extract showed higher flavonoid content than aqueous leaves extract. The antioxidant and pharmacological effects of hawthorn have mainly been attributed to the polyphenolic contents.

  6. The Investigation of Some Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Properties of Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna subsp. monogyna jacq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serhat KESER

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant and pharmacological effects of hawthorn have mainly been attributed to the polyphenolic contents. The aim of this research is to determine some bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of hawthorn aqueous and ethanol extracts of leaves, flowers and ripened fruits. For this purpose, antioxidant activities of extracts were assessed on DPPH and #8226;, ABTS and #8226;+, superoxide scavenging, reducing power and ferrous metal chelating activity assays and phenolic content of extracts was determined by Folin-Cioacalteu and #8217;s reagent. The flavonoids including rutin, apigenin, myricetin, quercetin, naringenin and kaempferol, were identified by HPLC in the hawthorn extract. It was observed the aqueous and ethanol extracts of Crataegus monogyna subsp. monogyna fruits showed highest activity in reducing power and metal chelating activity assays. Additionally, it was determined that the aqueous flower extract showed higher flavonoid content than aqueous leaves extract. [J Intercult Ethnopharmacol 2014; 3(2.000: 51-55

  7. Association of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis with multiple sclerosis in Sardinian patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Cossu

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP infection is highly spread in the ruminant herds of Sardinia, in the Western Mediterranean. The objective of this study was to investigate prevalence of MAP infection in association with Multiple Sclerosis (MS using clinical specimen from patients and controls. We analyzed samples for the presence of MAP specific DNA and to demonstrate humoral response to a MAP protein (MAP2694, a predicted homologue of the T-cell receptor gamma-chain/complement component 1 of the host. We found presence of MAP DNA in 42% of the MS patients and an extremely significant humoral immune response revealed by the MS patients against the MAP protein. In our opinion, this is the first report that significantly associates MAP infection with MS. Further studies will be required to confirm if MAP could be one of the triggers of MS, according to the molecular mimicry theory, in susceptible (and genetically at risk individuals.

  8. Inflammation-related pro-apoptotic activity of exopolysaccharides isolated from Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Wang, G; Pan, D; Guo, Y; Zeng, X; Sun, Y; Cao, J

    2016-11-30

    Exopolysaccharides (EPS) have attracted attention recently for possible use in suppressing early stage breast cancer. In this study, a mannan EPS produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis was found to affect the production of inflammatory cytokines. EPS (300 μg/ml) can significantly enhance tumour necrosis factor alpha and inducible NO synthase release in MCF-7 cells compared to control cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Also the intracellular calcium level was found to increase with the concentration of EPS. After EPS-treatment, a significant reduction in mitochondrial potential was observed, as was nuclear condensation and cell shrinkage. These results may be helpful in further understanding the anti-tumour properties of lactic acid bacteria.

  9. Phytochemical characterization of the threatened specie Fraxinus caroliniana Mill subsp. cubensis (Griseb. Borhidi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mabelkis Terry Rosabal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fraxinus caroliniana Mill subsp. cubensis (Griseb. Borhidi is commonly known as buffalo, represents an endemic subspecies and categorized as critical danger of extinction in Cuba. This work aimed to characterize the phytochemical composition of plants of F. caroliniana in two localities of the Matanzas province. The presence of secondary metabolites in leaf extracts was qualitatively analyzed and reductive and total sugars were quantified. The results indicated the presence of flavonoids, terpenes, steroids, saponins, tannins and anthraquinones in leaves that could be considered for further systematic studies and application in agriculture. The plants from the Ciénaga de Zapata showed contents of reducing sugars and totals higher than those obtained in the plants of Martí. These results provide information for the identification of characters of possible taxonomic and conservation value in this species.   Keywords: anthraquinons, extracts, swamp ash, steroids, tannins, terpens

  10. Phenylpropanoids, Sesquiterpenoids and Flavonoids from Pimpinella tragium Vill . subsp. lithophila (Schischkin Tutin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilal Özbek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new sesquiterpenoid named germacradiene-6 -O-(6'-O-acetyl-β-D-glucoside (1 and a new flavonol glycoside named rhamnetin-3-O-(2′′-O- β-D-glucopyranosyl- β-D-galactopyranoside (2, along with three known sesquiterpenoids dictamnol (3, radicol (4, germacradiene glucoside (5; three phenylpropanoids 4-methoxy-2-(3-methyloxiranyl-phenyl 2-methylbutanoate (6, 4-methoxy-2-(3-methyloxiranyl-phenyl angelate (7, thellungianin E (8; and a flavonol glycoside platanoside (9 were isolated from the aerial parts of Pimpinella tragium Vill . subsp. lithophila (Schischkin Tutin. Their structures were elucidated by detailed analyses of 1D and 2D NMR, UV, IR and HR-ESI-MS data.

  11. Produksi Asam Laktat oleh Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus dengan Sumber Karbon Tetes Tebu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laita Nurjannah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Senyawa asam laktat sangat dibutuhkan di dunia industri. Namun produksi dengan menggunakan mikrob masih menggunakan bahan pangan sebagai substratnya. Alternatif substrat untuk produksi asam laktat  sebagai pengganti penggunaan bahan pangan  sangat diperlukan industri. Tetes tebu merupakan salah satu substrat yang kaya akan sumber  karbon yang dapat digunakan sebagai komponen media pertumbuhan bakteri. Ketersediaannya melimpah dan harganya murah. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah tetes tebu dapat digunakan sebagai alternatif  sumber karbon bakteri Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus untuk menghasilkan asam laktat. Langkah penelitian ini meliputi hidrolisis dan detoksifikasi tetes tebu, uji kualitatif gula pereduksi tetes tebu, analisis gula total dengan metode fenol sulfat, penentuan kurva pertumbuhan bakteri, produksi dan ekstraksi asam laktat, serta analisis kualitatif asam laktat dengan menggunakan kromatografi cair kinerja tinggi. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa tetes tebu dapat digunakan sebagai alternatif sumber karbon. Hal ini terbukti bakteri dapat tumbuh dengan baik ketika media diberi 0.5% tetes tebu. Konsentrasi gula total tetes tebu adalah 1090 g/L. Uji gula pereduksi menunjukkan hasil yang positif untuk uji Selliwanof, uji Benedict, dan uji Barfoed. Pertumbuhan optimum L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus terjadi pada suhu 42°C dengan agitasi 150 rpm. Produksi asam laktat dilakukan selama 24 jam. Kadar asam laktat yang dihasilkan sebesar 2.80% dengan biomassa sel kering sebesar 0.002 g/L dan pH media fermentasi sebesar 4.0. Hasil analisis kualitatif kromatografi cair kinerja tinggi juga menunjukkan bahwa produk dari hasil fermentasi adalah asam laktat. Abstract. Lactic acid is needed as an industrial feed. However, by using a microbial production still uses food material as a substrate. Alternative substrates for the production of lactic acid is needed in industry. Molasses are potential substrates due to the richness in

  12. Antioxidant activity of polyphenol and ultrasonic extracts from fruits of Crataegus pentagyna subsp. elburensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiei, Kh; Bekhradnia, S; Nabavi, S M; Nabavi, S F; Ebrahimzadeh, M A

    2012-01-01

    The effects of two extracting methods on the total phenolic and total flavonoid contents of Crataegus pentagyna subsp. elburensis Waldst. & Kit. ex Willd fruit extracts were investigated. Antioxidant activities of polyphenol (PP) fraction and ultrasonic (US) extraction were evaluated with four different in vitro antioxidant tests. IC(50) for DPPH radical-scavenging activity was 32.2 ± 1.6 for PP fraction and 36.7 ± 1.5 µg mL(-1) for US extract. Reducing powers of extracts increased with the increase of their concentrations. PP fraction exhibited high reducing power at 2-32 µg mL(-1). Extracts exhibited good H(2)O(2) radical scavenging and Fe(2+) chelating ability. Their high phenolic and flavonoid contents could be responsible for their antioxidant activity and pharmacologic actions.

  13. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Milk from Clinically Affected Cows by PCR and culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giese, Steen Bjørck; Ahrens, Peter

    1999-01-01

    -negative on intestinal mucosa, but culture-positive in milk, and both faeces and milk were negative in culture and PCR from 2 cows. In conclusion the presence of M. a. paratuberculosis could be detected in raw milk by PCR but cultivation of milk was more sensitive in detecting the organism.......Milk and faecal samples from cows with clinical symptoms of paratuberculosis were examined for the presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp.paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis) by culture and PCR. M. a. paratuberculosis was isolated in varied numbers from faeces or intestinal mucosa in 8 of 11...... animals. In milk from 5 cows (all faecal culture-positive) we cultivated a few colonies of M. a. paratuberculosis (less than 100 CFU per mi). Milk samples from 2 cows were PCR-positive (both animals were faecal culture-positive, and 1 cow was milk culture positive). One cow was culture...

  14. Impact of salt concentration on persistence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Iranian UF white cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Hanifian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Mycobacterium paratuberculosis is considered as a potential significant public health threat due to its possible association with Crohn’s disease in humans. This is a study aimed to investigate the effect of different salt concentrations on survival of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis during ripening and storage of Iranian ultra-filtrate-white cheese (IUFWC. For this purpose, retentate was inoculated with 2 Log cfu/g of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. Afterwards, model cheeses were prepared with 2%, 3% and 4% of salt. Quantity of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was estimated throughout the ripening and storage of IUFWC using F57-quantitative real time PCR (F57-qPCR and culture assay. Along with, the populations of lactic acid bacteria as well as physicochemical properties of cheese samples were determined. According to the results, at the early stage of storage period (1 to 30 days the number of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis was almost constant; however, it was decreased significantly (p

  15. Spread of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis through soil and grass on a mouflon (Ovis aries) pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaevska, Marija; Lvoncik, S; Lamka, J; Pavlik, I; Slana, I

    2014-10-01

    The aims of this study were to describe spatial contamination of the environment on a mouflon pasture, as well as to assess the contamination of grass and roots after surface contamination and in depth contamination with feces and buried tissues from animals infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. a. paratuberculosis). Samples of soil, roots, and aerial parts of plants were collected from different locations inside the mouflon pasture, and one control sample site was chosen outside the area where the animals are living. M. a. paratuberculosis DNA was present in all the examined sites and was more often detected in roots than in soil. DNA was detected at up to 80 cm of depth and was spatially more widespread than the initial hypothesis of M. a. paratuberculosis leaching vertically into deeper layers of soil. This study broadens our knowledge of the spread and persistence of M. a. paratuberculosis in an environment with highly infected animals.

  16. Apparent prevalence of beef carcasses contaminated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis sampled from Danish slaughter cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okura, Hisako; Toft, Nils; Pozzato, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    of two dairy cows were positive by culture whereas 4% of the animals were estimated with =10¿CFU/gram muscle based on realtime PCR. Age was found to be associated with carcass contamination with MAP. The observed viable MAP prevalence in beef carcasses was low. However, detection of MAP and MAP DNA......Presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in beef has been reported as a public health concern because asymptomatically infected cattle may contain MAP in tissues that are used for human consumption. Associations between MAP carcasses contamination and animal characteristics...... such as age, breed, production type, and carcass classification were assessed. Cheek muscles from 501 carcasses were sampled cross-sectionally at a Danish abattoir and tested for presence of viable MAP and MAP DNA by bacterial culture and IS900 realtime PCR, respectively. Cheek muscle tissues from carcasses...

  17. Apparent Prevalence of Beef Carcasses Contaminated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Sampled from Danish Slaughter Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Okura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Presence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP in beef has been reported as a public health concern because asymptomatically infected cattle may contain MAP in tissues that are used for human consumption. Associations between MAP carcasses contamination and animal characteristics such as age, breed, production type, and carcass classification were assessed. Cheek muscles from 501 carcasses were sampled cross-sectionally at a Danish abattoir and tested for presence of viable MAP and MAP DNA by bacterial culture and IS900 realtime PCR, respectively. Cheek muscle tissues from carcasses of two dairy cows were positive by culture whereas 4% of the animals were estimated with ≥10 CFU/gram muscle based on realtime PCR. Age was found to be associated with carcass contamination with MAP. The observed viable MAP prevalence in beef carcasses was low. However, detection of MAP and MAP DNA in muscle tissues suggested that bacteremia occurred in slaughtered cattle.

  18. Two new species of Lactarius associated with Alnus acuminata subsp. arguta in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Leticia; Bandala, Victor M; Garay, Edith

    2014-01-01

    In pure stands of Alnus acuminata subsp. arguta trees from Sierra Norte de Puebla (central Mexico) two undescribed ectomycorrhizal species of Lactarius were discovered. Distinction of the two new species is based on morphological characters and supported with phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS region and part of the gene that encodes for the second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2). The phylogenies inferred recovered the two species in different clades strongly supported by posterior probabilities and bootstrap values. The new Lactarius species are recognized as part of the assemblage of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with Alnus acuminata. Information about these taxa includes the morphological variation achieved along 16 monitories 2010-2013. Descriptions are provided. They are accompanied by photos including SEM photomicrographs of basidiospores and information on differences between them and other related taxa from Europe and the United States. © 2014 by The Mycological Society of America.

  19. Podridão em cravo causada por Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora no Brasil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene M. G. Almeida

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available De fevereiro a abril de 1999, coletaram-se estacas e mudas de cravo (Dianthus caryophyllus em propriedades dos municípios paulistas de Atibaia e Santo Antônio de Posse. Esse material apresentava sintomas caracterizados por não-emissão de raízes ou por podridão de raízes, colo e folhas basais, diferindo daqueles da doença denominada "slow wilt" e dos de escurecimento de vasos e necrose na região do colo, haste e folhas, já relatados em cravo. A partir de material com tais sintomas, isolaram-se bactérias, caracterizadas, mediante testes bioquímicos, culturais, fisiológicos e de patogenicidade, como Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. Trata-se do primeiro relato desse patógeno em cravo no Brasil.

  20. Plantas medicinales españolas. Vitis vinifera L. subsp. vinifera (Vitaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Santos Bobillo, María Teresa; Alonso Beato, María Teresa; Ladero Santos, Ignacio; Martín Rodríguez, María Asunción

    2005-01-01

    Se realiza un estudio monográfico de Vitis vinifera L. subsp. vinifera, que comprende: la descripción botánica de la especie, el hábitat y el cultivo; la recolección y la conservación de la droga; el estudio y descripción de las características morfológicas y anatómico-microscópicas de los órganos oficinales, que permiten identificar la droga en trociscos. Se incluye la composición química y la acción farmacológica, y se indican las aplicaciones terapéuticas. Finalmente, se citan algunos tipo...

  1. Mechanism of inhibited growth of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, D L; Odame-Darkwah, J K

    1994-04-01

    Physiological studies were conducted in an attempt to elucidate the mechanism of inhibition of Bacillus pumilus by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii. Inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii occurred in media supplemented with 1% glucose, indicating that glucose utilization by the latter bacterium was not responsible for growth inhibition of the former bacterium. The medium pH in which P. shermanii inhibited the growth of B. pumilus was 4.3. Propionic acid was positively identified in the culture medium in which B. pumilus was inhibited by P. shermanii. The presence of propionic acid and a low medium pH may account for the inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii. Sodium lactate concentrations of 0.8-1.0% were essential for the continuous growth of and propionic acid production by P. shermanii. Thus, use of P. shermanii to inhibit B. pumilus in foods would likely require a lactate source.

  2. High-level relatedness among Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense strains from widely separated outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettelin, Hervé; Davidson, Rebecca M; Agrawal, Sonia; Aitken, Moira L; Shallom, Shamira; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Strong, Michael; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; De Groote, Mary Ann; Duarte, Rafael S; Hine, Erin; Parankush, Sushma; Su, Qi; Daugherty, Sean C; Fraser, Claire M; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Wallace, Richard J; Holland, Steven M; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Olivier, Kenneth N; Jackson, Mary; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2014-03-01

    Three recently sequenced strains isolated from patients during an outbreak of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. massiliense infections at a cystic fibrosis center in the United States were compared with 6 strains from an outbreak at a cystic fibrosis center in the United Kingdom and worldwide strains. Strains from the 2 cystic fibrosis outbreaks showed high-level relatedness with each other and major-level relatedness with strains that caused soft tissue infections during an epidemic in Brazil. We identified unique single-nucleotide polymorphisms in cystic fibrosis and soft tissue outbreak strains, separate single-nucleotide polymorphisms only in cystic fibrosis outbreak strains, and unique genomic traits for each subset of isolates. Our findings highlight the necessity of identifying M. abscessus to the subspecies level and screening all cystic fibrosis isolates for relatedness to these outbreak strains. We propose 2 diagnostic strategies that use partial sequencing of rpoB and secA1 genes and a multilocus sequence typing protocol.

  3. Essential Oil of Thymus munbyanus subsp. coloratus from Algeria: Chemotypification and in vitro Biological Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendif, Hamdi; Boudjeniba, Messaoud; Miara, Mohamed Djamel; Biqiku, Loreta; Bramucci, Massimo; Lupidi, Giulio; Quassinti, Luana; Vitali, Luca A; Maggi, Filippo

    2017-03-01

    Thymus munbyanus subsp. coloratus (Lamiaceae) is a small shrub endemic to Algeria and Morocco where is found in lawns, rockeries and mountainous regions. From a phytochemical point of view this taxon has never been characterized. In this work we have analysed the chemical compositions of the essential oils obtained from inflorescences and vegetative parts by GC/MS. A new chemotype, i.e. borneol-chemotype, was characterized for the first time in the species. Furthermore, we assessed the biological activities of essential oils, namely the antioxidant, antimicrobial and cytotoxicity on tumor cells that were evaluated by the DPPH, ABTS, and FRAP, disc diffusion, and MTT methods, respectively. Biological assays highlighted a moderate inhibitory effect on Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans (inhibition zone diameter in the range 9 - 10 mm), and noteworthy cytotoxicity on A375 human melanoma cells (IC50 of 46.95 μg/ml). © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  4. Morphological and ultrastructural studies on Ulva flexuosa subsp. pilifera (Chlorophyta from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Messyasz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ulva flexuosa subsp. pilifera (Kütz. M. J. Wynne 2005 (= Enteromorpha pilifera Kützing 1845 was previously found in Argentina, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Romania, Slovakia and Sweden, recently also in Poland. The genus Ulva was first time described as Enteromorpha. Interestingly, Enteromorpha is used nowadays as a synonym for Ulva, a development which is based on molecular data. The morphologies of both young and mature specimens were studied, and most life cycle stages could be observed. Further, the formation of calcium carbonate crystals on the surface of Ulva thalli seems to influence the arrangement of the cells. A detailed ultrastructural (TEM analysis of cell walls is presented. The TEM reveals in great details highly complex, irregular structures with stratification lines.

  5. Draft genome of a South African strain of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khayalethu Ntushelo

    Full Text Available Abstract The draft genome of Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliense (Pcb which causes blackleg of potato was submitted to the NCBI and released with reference number NZ_LGRF00000000.1. The estimated genome size based on the draft genome assembly is 4,820,279 bp from 33 contigs ranging in length from 444 to 1,660,019 nucleotides. The genome annotation showed 4250 putative genes, 4114 CDS and 43 pseudo-genes. Three complete rRNA gene species were detected: nine 5S, one 16S and one 23S. Other partial rRNA gene fragments were also identified, nine 16S rRNA and three 23S rRNA. A total of 69 tRNA genes and one ncRNA gene were also annotated in this genome.

  6. Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum – the Causal Agent of Calla Soft Rot in Serbia and Montenegro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Ivanović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial strains were isolated from above- and underground parts of diseased calla plants originating from different localities in Serbia and one locality in Montenegro. They were characterized by studying their pathogenic, cultural, biochemical and physiologicalcharacteristics. All investigated strains caused soft rot of calla leaf stalks, potato slices and aloe leaves, and induced hypersensitive reaction on tobacco. Bacteriological properties of the strains indicated that symptoms on calla plants were caused by Gram-negative, nonfluorescent, oxidase negative, catalase positive and facultatively anaerobic bacterium belonging to the genus Pectobacterium. The investigated strains grew at 37ºC and in 5% NaCl, utilised lactose and trechalose, and produced neither indol nor lecitinase. These results, as well as the characteristic growth on Logan’s differential medium indicated that soft rot of tuber and stem base of calla plants was caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum. This is the first report of this pathogen affecting calla plants in Serbia.

  7. Purification and properties of a beta-lactamase from Alcaligenes dentrificans subsp. xylosoxydans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, T; Sato, K; Inoue, M; Mitsuhashi, S

    1985-09-01

    A penicillin beta-lactamase was purified from a strain of Alcaligenes dentrificans subsp. xylosoxydans resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics. The purified enzyme preparation gave a single protein band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its molecular weight was 18,000 from sodium dodecylsulphate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis and gel filtration. Its isoelectric point was 9.8, the optimal pH was 8.5 and the optimal temperature was 35 degrees C. The enzyme hydrolyzed penicillin G and ampicillin more rapidly than cephalosporins. Relative rates, with penicillin G as 100, were: ampicillin, 102; carbenicillin, 15; cloxacillin, less than 1; piperacillin, 9; cephaloridine, 41; cefoperazone, 36; cefpiramide, 36 and cefmenoxime, 14. Clavulanic acid, sulbactam, imipenem, and cephamycins had low affinities for the enzyme. The enzyme activity was inhibited by iodine, Hg2+, clavulanic acid and sulbactam.

  8. Rapid and Quantitative Detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli in Sugarcane Stalk Juice Using a Real-Time Fluorescent (TaqMan) PCR Assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hua-Ying Fu; Sheng-Ren Sun; Jin-Da Wang; Kashif Ahmad; Heng-Bo Wang; Ru-Kai Chen; San-Ji Gao

    2016-01-01

      Ratoon stunting disease (RSD) of sugarcane, one of the most important diseases seriously affecting the productivity of sugarcane crops, was caused by the bacterial agent Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx...

  9. Effect of Weather on the Occurrence of Puccinia Graminis Subsp. Graminicola and Puccinia Coronata F. Sp. Lolii at Lolium Perenne L. and Deschampsia Caespitosa (L. P. B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Novotná

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring of Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola and Puccinia coronata f. sp. lolii was carried out in Plant breeding station called Větrov. The pathogens were estimated on turf grass (Lolium perenne L., Deschampsia caespitosa (L. P. B. from 2009 to 2014. Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola was detected in the increased level in 2009 and 2012. The highest amount of mixed infections was determined in 2014 because of the warmest winter from all monitored years and low precipitations. Significant differences were found out in the resistance of similar plant materials grown in different fields. Significant effect of weather conditions and supposed effect of different infectious pressure on various fields were reflected in these facts. At evaluated grasses, the highest (P < 0.05 occurence of Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola. Lolium perenne L. was observed and the infection of Puccinia graminis subsp. graminicola (P < 0.05 was determined higher than in Deschampsia caespitosa (L. P. B.

  10. Genome sequencing reveals a new lineage associated with lablab bean and genetic exchange between Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and Xanthomonas fuscans subsp. fuscans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aritua, Valente; Harrison, James; Sapp, Melanie; Buruchara, Robin; Smith, Julian; Studholme, David J

    2015-01-01

    .... We sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 26 strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. phaseoli and X. fuscans subsp. fuscans, the causative agents of this disease, collected over four decades and six continents...

  11. Development of immunofluorescence colony staining (IFC) for detection of Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp michiganensis in tomato seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nemeth, J.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.

    2006-01-01

    Immunofluorescence colony-staining (IFC) is based on sample pour plating in combination with immunofluorescence staining for recognition of the target colony. IFC was optimised for detecting Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) in

  12. The cellodextrinase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa consists of multiple functional domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L M; Hazlewood, G P; Barker, P J; Gilbert, H J

    1991-11-01

    A genomic library of Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa DNA was constructed in pUC18 and Escherichia coli recombinants expressing 4-methylumbelliferyl beta-D-cellobioside-hydrolysing activity (MUCase) were isolated. Enzyme produced by MUCase-positive clones did not hydrolyse either cellobiose or cellotriose but converted cellotetraose into cellobiose and cleaved cellopentaose and cellohexaose, producing a mixture of cellobiose and cellotriose. There was no activity against CM-cellulose, insoluble cellulose or xylan. On this basis, the enzyme is identified as an endo-acting cellodextrinase and is designated cellodextrinase C (CELC). Nucleotide sequencing of the gene (celC) which directs the synthesis of CELC revealed an open reading frame of 2153 bp, encoding a protein of Mr 80,189. The deduced primary sequence of CELC was confirmed by the Mr of purified CELC (77,000) and by the experimentally determined N-terminus of the enzyme which was identical with residues 38-47 of the translated sequence. The N-terminal region of CELC showed strong homology with endoglucanase, xylanases and an arabinofuranosidase of Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa; homologous sequences included highly conserved serine-rich regions. Full-length CELC bound tightly to crystalline cellulose. Truncated forms of celC from which the DNA sequence encoding the conserved domain had been deleted, directed the synthesis of a functional cellodextrinase that did not bind to crystalline cellulose. This is consistent with the N-terminal region of CELC comprising a non-catalytic cellulose-binding domain which is distinct from the catalytic domain. The role of the cellulose-binding region is discussed.

  13. Cloning, Expression and Toxicity of a Mosquitocidal Toxin Gene of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. medellin

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    Nora Restrepo

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt subsp. medellin (Btmed produces parasporal crystalline inclusions which are toxic to mosquito larvae. It has been shown that the inclusions of this bacterium contain mainly proteins of 94, 68 and 28-30 kDa. EcoRI partially digested total DNA of Btmed was cloned by using the Lambda Zap II cloning kit. Recombinant plaques were screened with a mouse policlonal antibody raised against the 94 kDa crystal protein of Btmed. One of the positive plaques was selected, and by in vivo excision, a recombinant pBluescript SK(- was obtained. The gene encoding the 94 kDa toxin of Btmed DNA was cloned in a 4.4 kb DNA fragment. Btmed DNA was then subcloned as a EcoRI/EcoRI fragment into the shuttle vector pBU4 producing the recombinant plasmid pBTM3 and used to transform by electroporation Bt subsp. israelensis (Bti crystal negative strain 4Q2-81. Toxicity to mosquito larvae was estimated by using first instar laboratory reared Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus larvae challenged with whole crystals. Toxicity results indicate that the purified inclusions from the recombinant Bti strain were toxic to all mosquito species tested, although the toxicity was not as high as the one produced by the crystal of the Btmed wild type strain. Poliacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicate that the inclusions produced by the recombinant strain Bti (pBTM3 were mainly composed of the 94 kDa protein of Btmed, as it was determined by Western blot

  14. Long lasting persistence of Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. israelensis (Bti in mosquito natural habitats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Tilquin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The detrimental effects of chemical insecticides on the environment and human health have lead to the call for biological alternatives. Today, one of the most promising solutions is the use of spray formulations based on Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis (Bti in insect control programs. As a result, the amounts of Bti spread in the environment are expected to increase worldwide, whilst the common belief that commercial Bti is easily cleared from the ecosystem has not yet been clearly established. METHODOLOGY/MAIN FINDINGS: In this study, we aimed to determine the nature and origin of the high toxicity toward mosquito larvae found in decaying leaf litter collected in several natural mosquito breeding sites in the Rhône-Alpes region. From the toxic fraction of the leaf litter, we isolated B. cereus-like bacteria that were further characterized as B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis using PCR amplification of specific toxin genes. Immunological analysis of these Bti strains showed that they belong to the H14 group. We finally used amplified length polymorphism (AFLP markers to show that the strains isolated from the leaf litter were closely related to those present in the commercial insecticide used for field application, and differed from natural worldwide genotypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results raise the issue of the persistence, potential proliferation and environmental accumulation of human-spread Bti in natural mosquito habitats. Such Bti environmental persistence may lengthen the exposure time of insects to this bio-insecticide, thereby increasing the risk of resistance acquisition in target insects, and of a negative impact on non-target insects.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Three Previously Undescribed Crystal Proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunjun; Zhao, Qiang; Ding, Xuezhi; Hu, Quanfang; Federici, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    The total protoxin complement in the parasporal body of mosquitocidal strain, Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan 367, was determined by use of a polyacrylamide gel block coupled to mass spectrometry. A total of eight protoxins were identified from this strain, including five reported protoxins (Cry11Ba, Cry19Aa, Cry24Aa, Cry25Aa, and Cyt2Bb), as well as three previously undescribed (Cry30Ca, Cry60Aa, and Cry60Ba) in this isolate. It was interesting that the encoding genes of three new protoxins existed as cry30Ca-gap-orf2 and cry60Ba-gap-cry60Aa. The cry30Ca and a downstream orf2 gene were oriented in the same direction and separated by 114 bp, and cry60Ba was located 156 bp upstream from and in the same orientation to cry60Aa. The three new protoxin genes were cloned from B. thuringiensis subsp. jegathesan and expressed in an acrystalliferous strain under the control of cyt1A gene promoters and the STAB-SD stabilizer sequence. Recombinant strain containing only cry30Ca did not produce visible inclusion under microscope observation, while that containing both cry30Ca and orf2 could produce large inclusions. Cry60Aa and Cry60Ba synthesized either alone or together in the acrystalliferous host could yield large inclusions. In bioassays using the fourth-instar larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus, Cry60Aa and Cry60Ba alone or together had estimated 50% lethal concentrations of 2.9 to 7.9 μg/ml; however, Cry30Ca with or without ORF2 was not toxic to this mosquito. PMID:23524673

  16. Characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Musa acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amorim Edson P

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Banana is a nutritionally important crop across tropical and sub-tropical countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America and Asia. Although cultivars have evolved from diploid, triploid and tetraploid wild Asian species of Musa acuminata (A genome and Musa balbisiana (B genome, many of today's commercial cultivars are sterile triploids or diploids, with fruit developing via parthenocarpy. As a result of restricted genetic variation, improvement has been limited, resulting in a crop frequently lacking resistance to pests and disease. Considering the importance of molecular tools to facilitate development of disease resistant genotypes, the objectives of this study were to develop polymorphic microsatellite markers from BAC clone sequences for M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4. This wild diploid species is used as a donor cultivar in breeding programs as a source of resistance to diverse biotic stresses. Findings Microsatellite sequences were identified from five Calcutta 4 BAC consensi datasets. Specific primers were designed for 41 loci. Isolated di-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, followed by tri-nucleotides. From 33 tested loci, 20 displayed polymorphism when screened across 21 diploid M. acuminata accessions, contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from two to four, with a total of 56. Six repeat classes were identified, with di-nucleotides the most abundant. Expected heterozygosity values for polymorphic markers ranged from 0.31 to 0.75. Conclusions This is the first report identifying polymorphic microsatellite markers from M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4 across accessions contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. These BAC-derived polymorphic microsatellite markers are a useful resource for banana, applicable for genetic map development, germplasm characterization, evolutionary studies and marker

  17. Characterization of novel microsatellite markers in Musa acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert Ng; Passos, Marco An; Menezes, Natalia Np; Souza, Manoel T; do Carmo Costa, Marcos M; Rennó Azevedo, Vânia C; Amorim, Edson P; Pappas, Georgios J; Ciampi, Ana Y

    2010-05-27

    Banana is a nutritionally important crop across tropical and sub-tropical countries in sub-Saharan Africa, Central and South America and Asia. Although cultivars have evolved from diploid, triploid and tetraploid wild Asian species of Musa acuminata (A genome) and Musa balbisiana (B genome), many of today's commercial cultivars are sterile triploids or diploids, with fruit developing via parthenocarpy. As a result of restricted genetic variation, improvement has been limited, resulting in a crop frequently lacking resistance to pests and disease. Considering the importance of molecular tools to facilitate development of disease resistant genotypes, the objectives of this study were to develop polymorphic microsatellite markers from BAC clone sequences for M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4. This wild diploid species is used as a donor cultivar in breeding programs as a source of resistance to diverse biotic stresses. Microsatellite sequences were identified from five Calcutta 4 BAC consensi datasets. Specific primers were designed for 41 loci. Isolated di-nucleotide repeat motifs were the most abundant, followed by tri-nucleotides. From 33 tested loci, 20 displayed polymorphism when screened across 21 diploid M. acuminata accessions, contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. The number of alleles per SSR locus ranged from two to four, with a total of 56. Six repeat classes were identified, with di-nucleotides the most abundant. Expected heterozygosity values for polymorphic markers ranged from 0.31 to 0.75. This is the first report identifying polymorphic microsatellite markers from M. acuminata subsp. burmannicoides, var. Calcutta 4 across accessions contrasting in resistance to Sigatoka diseases. These BAC-derived polymorphic microsatellite markers are a useful resource for banana, applicable for genetic map development, germplasm characterization, evolutionary studies and marker assisted selection for traits.

  18. PRESENCE OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM SUBSP. PARATUBERCULOSIS IN ALPACAS (LAMA PACOS) INHABITING THE CHILEAN ALTIPLANO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Miguel; Sevilla, Iker; Rios, Carolina; Crossley, Jorge; Tejeda, Carlos; Manning, Elizabeth

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of paratuberculosis. The organism causes disease in both domestically managed and wild ruminant species. South American camelids have a long, shared history with indigenous people in the Andes. Over the last few decades, increasing numbers of alpacas were exported to numerous countries outside South America. No paratuberculosis surveillance has been reported for these source herds. In this study, individual fecal samples from 85 adult alpacas were collected from six separate herds in the Chilean Altiplano. A ParaTB mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture of each individual fecal sample, followed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol was used for confirmation. DNA extracts from a subset of confirmed MAP isolates were subjected to mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) typing. Fifteen alpaca were fecal culture test-positive. Five false-positive culture samples were negative on PCR analysis for Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (MAA), Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis), and the 16 S rDNA gene. Three MAP isolates subset-tested belonged to the same MIRU-VNTR type, showing four repeats for TR292 (locus 1) in contrast to the three repeats typical of the MAP reference strain K10. The number of repeats found in the remaining loci was identical to that of the K10 strain. It is not known how nor when MAP was introduced into the alpaca population in the Chilean Altiplano. The most plausible hypothesis to explain the presence of MAP in these indigenous populations is transmission by contact with infected domestic small ruminant species that may on occasion share pastures or range with alpacas. Isolation of this mycobacterial pathogen from such a remote region suggests that MAP has found its way beyond the confines of intensively managed domestic agriculture premises.

  19. Phylogenomics of Brazilian epidemic isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii reveals relationships of global outbreak strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca M.; Hasan, Nabeeh A.; de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Jackson, Mary; Strong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly growing, non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) in the Mycobacterium abscessus (MAB) species are emerging pathogens that cause various diseases including skin and respiratory infections. The species has undergone recent taxonomic nomenclature refinement, and is currently recognized as two subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus (MAB-A) and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii (MAB-B). The recently reported outbreaks of MAB-B in surgical patients in Brazil from 2004 to 2009 and in cystic fibrosis patients in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2006 to 2012 underscore the need to investigate the genetic diversity of clinical MAB strains. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of two Brazilian MAB-B epidemic isolates (CRM-0019 and CRM-0020) derived from an outbreak of skin infections in Rio de Janeiro, two unrelated MAB strains from patients with pulmonary infections in the United States (US) (NJH8 and NJH11) and one type MAB-B strain (CCUG 48898) and compared them to 25 publically available genomes of globally diverse MAB strains. Genome-wide analyses of 27,598 core genome single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed that the two Brazilian derived CRM strains are nearly indistinguishable from one another and are more closely related to UK outbreak isolates infecting CF patients than to strains from the US, Malaysia or France. Comparative genomic analyses of six closely related outbreak strains revealed geographic-specific large-scale insertion/deletion variation that corresponds to bacteriophage insertions and recombination hotspots. Our study integrates new genome sequence data with existing genomic information to explore the global diversity of infectious M. abscessus isolates and to compare clinically relevant outbreak strains from different continents. PMID:24055961

  20. Prevention of hypertension-induced vascular dementia by Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101-fermented products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Meng-Chun; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2017-12-01

    Numerous etiological studies have established positive clinical association between hypertension and vascular dementia (VaD). Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101-fermented products have been shown to decrease vascular risk factors such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, hyperlipidemia and obesity. This study investigated the effect of ethanol extract of Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101-fermented products (NTU101F) in hypertension-induced VaD in rats. Hypertension was promoted by subcutaneous injection of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA, 25 mg/kg body weight/day, twice a week) and substitution of drinking water with 1.0% NaCl and 0.2% KCl. The NTU101F groups (0.5, 1.0, and 5.0) administered NTU101F at the concentrations 11, 22, and 110 mg/kg body weight/day, respectively, starting from day 51 day of DOCA-salt treatment. Morris water maze (MWM) was used for testing learning and memory. Different biochemical estimations were used to assess oxidative stress and inflammatory response in hippocampus. Oral administration of NTU101F in DOCA-salt hypertension-induced VaD rats resulted in a significant decrease in blood pressure by 18.3-23.2% (p < 0.001), which was regulated by increasing eNOS density (about 3-fold) in the aorta, promoting NO production, and decreasing of matrix metallopeptidase 9 activity (about 2-fold) in the hippocampus, in addition to improve the kidney function and structure, decrease escape latency and increase the times spent in the target quadrant by 23.5-27.8% (p < 0.05). Overall, our findings suggest that NTU101F could exert neuroprotection in the brain and attenuate hypertension-induced VaD.

  1. New Claims for Wild Carrot (Daucus carota subsp. carota Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M. Alves-Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The essential oil of Daucus carota subsp. carota from Portugal, with high amounts of geranyl acetate (29.0%, α-pinene (27.2%, and 11αH-himachal-4-en-1β-ol (9.2%, was assessed for its biological potential. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, yeasts, dermatophytes, and Aspergillus strains. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC and minimal lethal concentration (MLC were evaluated showing a significant activity towards Gram-positive bacteria (MIC = 0.32–0.64 μL/mL, Cryptococcus neoformans (0.16 μL/mL, and dermatophytes (0.32–0.64 μL/mL. The inhibition of the germ tube formation and the effect of the oil on Candida albicans biofilms were also unveiled. The oil inhibited more than 50% of filamentation at concentrations as low as 0.04 μL/mL (MIC/128 and decreased both biofilm mass and cell viability. The antioxidant capacity of the oil, as assessed by two in chemico methods, was not relevant. Still, it seems to exhibit some anti-inflammatory potential by decreasing nitric oxide production around 20% in LPS-stimulated macrophages, without decreasing macrophages viability. Moreover, the oils safety profile was assessed on keratinocytes, alveolar epithelial cells, macrophages, and hepatocytes. Overall, the oil demonstrated a safety profile at concentrations below 0.64 μL/mL. The present work highlights the bioactive potential of D. carota subsp. carota suggesting its industrial exploitation.

  2. A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 for maintenance of remission in ulcerative colitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildt, Signe; Nordgaard, Inge; Hansen, Ulla

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the clinical effect of treatment with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (Probio-Tec AB-25) to maintain remission in patients with ulcerative colitis.......To investigate the clinical effect of treatment with Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5 and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 (Probio-Tec AB-25) to maintain remission in patients with ulcerative colitis....

  3. RNA-Seq reveals transcriptomic interactions of Bacillus subtilis natto and Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis in whole soybean solid-state co-fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai Kuan; Ng, Yi Kai; Koh, Eileen; Yao, Lina; Chien, Ang Sze; Lin, Hui Xin; Lee, Yuan Kun

    2015-10-01

    Bifidobacteria are anaerobes and are difficult to culture in conventional fermentation system. It was observed that Bacillus subtilis natto enhanced growth of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis v9 by about 3-fold in a whole soybean solid-state co-fermentation, in a non-anaerobic condition. For the purpose of understanding the metabolic interactions between Bif. animalis subsp. lactis v9 and Ba. subtilis natto, the transcriptome of Bif. animalis subsp. lactis v9 and Ba. subtilis natto was analyzed in single and mixed cultures using RNA-Seq. Compared with the single culture, 459 genes of Bif. animalis subsp. lactis v9 were up regulated and 21 were down regulated in the mixed culture with Ba. subtilis natto, with more than 2-fold difference. Predictive metagenomic analyses suggested that Ba. subtilis natto up regulated transport functions, complex carbohydrates and amino acid metabolism, DNA repair, oxydative stress-related functions, and cell growth of Bif. animalis subsp. lactis v9. In the mixed culture with Bif. animalis subsp. lactis v9, only 3 transcripts of Ba. subtilis natto were over-expressed and 3115 were under-expressed with more than 2-fold difference. The highest down-regulated genes were those involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. The data presented here demonstrated a parasitic-like interaction regulated at the transcription level, between Ba. subtilis natto and Bif. animalis subsp. lactis in the mixed culture. The over-expression of genes involved in substrate uptake and metabolism in Bif. animalis subsp. lactis in the mixed culture nevertheless, led to its higher cell concentration in the nutrient rich whole soybean medium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Inhibits Gamma Interferon-Induced Signaling in Bovine Monocytes: Insights into the Cellular Mechanisms of Johne's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Ryan J.; Li, Yue; Bell, Kelli; Doig, Kimberley; Potter, Andrew; Griebel, Philip J.; Kusalik, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle and may have implications for human health. Establishment of chronic infection by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis depends on its subversion of host immune responses. This includes blocking the ability of infected macrophages to be activated by gamma interferon (IFN-γ) for clearance of this intracellular pathogen. To define the mechanism by which M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis subverts this critical host cell function, patterns of signal transduction to IFN-γ stimulation of uninfected and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected bovine monocytes were determined through bovine-specific peptide arrays for kinome analysis. Pathway analysis of the kinome data indicated activation of the JAK-STAT pathway, a hallmark of IFN-γ signaling, in uninfected monocytes. In contrast, IFN-γ stimulation of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected monocytes failed to induce patterns of peptide phosphorylation consistent with JAK-STAT activation. The inability of IFN-γ to induce differential phosphorylation of peptides corresponding to early JAK-STAT intermediates in infected monocytes indicates that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis blocks responsiveness at, or near, the IFN-γ receptor. Consistent with this hypothesis, increased expression of negative regulators of the IFN-γ receptors SOCS1 and SOCS3 as well as decreased expression of IFN-γ receptor chains 1 and 2 is observed in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected monocytes. These patterns of expression are functionally consistent with the kinome data and offer a mechanistic explanation for this critical M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis behavior. Understanding this mechanism may contribute to the rational design of more effective vaccines and/or therapeutics for Johne's disease. PMID:22689821

  5. Key Role for the Alternative Sigma Factor, SigH, in the Intracellular Life of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during Macrophage Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Pallab; Wu, Chia-wei

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis causes Johne's disease, an enteric infection in cattle and other ruminants, greatly afflicting the dairy industry worldwide. Once inside the cell, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is known to survive harsh microenvironments, especially those inside activated macrophages. To improve our understanding of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis pathogenesis, we examined phagosome maturation associated with transcriptional responses of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis during macrophage infection. Monitoring cellular markers, only live M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacilli were able to prevent phagosome maturation and reduce its acidification. On the transcriptional level, over 300 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis genes were significantly and differentially regulated in both naive and IFN-γ-activated macrophages. These genes include the sigma factor H (sigH) that was shown to be important for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis survival inside gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-activated bovine macrophages. Interestingly, an sigH-knockout mutant showed increased sensitivity to a sustained level of thiol-specific oxidative stress. Large-scale RNA sequence analysis revealed that a large number of genes belong to the sigH regulon, especially following diamide stress. Genes involved in oxidative stress and virulence were among the induced genes in the sigH regulon with a putative consensus sequence for SigH binding that was recognized in a subset of these genes (n = 30), suggesting direct regulation by SigH. Finally, mice infections showed a significant attenuation of the ΔsigH mutant compared to its parental strain, suggesting a role for sigH in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis virulence. Such analysis could identify potential targets for further testing as vaccine candidates against Johne's disease. PMID:23569115

  6. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection Causes Suppression of RANTES, Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1, and Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha Expression in Peripheral Blood of Experimentally Infected Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Joram J.; Mori, Yasuyuki; Bari, Abusaleh M.; Hikono Aodon-geril, Hirokazu; Hirayama, Sachiyo; Shu, Yujing; Momotani, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Blood from cattle with subclinical Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection was stimulated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens, and expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), RANTES, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), and IL-8 was measured. Expression of TNF-α, RANTES, and MCP-1 was lower in infected than in uninfected cattle. The reduced response may weaken protective immunity and perpetuate infection. PMID:14638822

  7. Effect of a Ropy Exopolysaccharide-Producing Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Strain Orally Administered on DSS-Induced Colitis Mice Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Algieri, Francesca; Rodriguez-Nogales,Alba; Vezza, Teresa; Martínez-Camblor, Pablo; Margolles, Abelardo; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Gálvez, Julio

    2016-01-01

    Exopolysaccharide (EPS)-producing bifidobacteria, particularly Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains, are used in the functional food industry as promising probiotics with purported beneficial effects. We used three isogenic strains of B. animalis subsp. lactis, with different EPS producing phenotypes (mucoid-ropy and non-ropy), in order to determine their capability to survive the murine gastrointestinal tract transit, as well as to evaluate their role in improving clinical outcomes...

  8. Involvement of phenazine-1-carboxylic acid in the interaction between Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens strain M71 and Seiridium cardinale in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raio, Aida; Reveglia, Pierluigi; Puopolo, Gerardo; Cimmino, Alessio; Danti, Roberto; Evidente, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens encompasses bacterial strains that effectively control phytopathogenic fungi through the production of the natural antibiotics named phenazines. In this work, the involvement of phenazine production in the interaction between the biological control agent P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens M71 and the fungus Seiridium cardinale, a serious cypress pathogen, was investigated. Field trials were carried out to assess the role of phenazines in the control of S. cardinale in vivo. Results showed that P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens M71 and 30-84, both able to produce phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA), drastically reduced the canker development incited by S. cardinale. Conversely, strain M71b, a natural gacA mutant of P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens M71, showed a decrease in PCA production and a reduction in controlling S. cardinale. These results were enforced by the reduction of canker size higher than 94% registered when 6μg of pure PCA was directly applied on each cypress wound. Furthermore, PCA was detected in cypress plant tissues only when P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens M71 was interacting with S. cardinale for 30 days. All these data support that the biological control of S. cardinale achieved by the application of P. chlororaphis subsp. aureofaciens M71 relies mainly on the ability of the bacterial strain to produce PCA in planta. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Some biological compounds, radical scavenging capacities and antimicrobial activities in the seeds of Nepeta italica L. and Sideritis montana L. subsp. montana from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emre, I.; Kursat, M.; Yilmaz, O.; Erecevit, P.

    2011-07-01

    This study determined some biological compounds (fatty acid compositions, lipid-soluble vitamins, sterols, flavonoids), radical scavenging capacities and antimicrobial activities in the seeds of Nepeta italica L. and Sideritis montana L. subsp. montana. It was found that palmitic acid (C16:0; 8.54+-0.13-3.05+-0.04%), oleic acid (C18:1 n9, 22.41+-0.8-18.83+-0.1%) and a-inolenic acid were the dominant fatty acids in both Nepeta italica L. and Sideritis montana L. subsp. montana. It was concluded that both Nepeta italica L. and Sideritis montana L. subsp. montana contained stigmasterol and ergosterol as well as beta-sitosterol. The present findings show that Nepeta italica L. contains morin, catechin, naringin and Sideritis montana L. subsp. montana contains morin, naringenin as major flavonoids. It was also determined that methanol extracts of Nepeta italica L. and Sideritis montana L. subsp. montana were most effective against DPPH radicals. The results of the present study show that the vitamins, flavonoids and fatty acid extracts in the seeds of N. italica L. and S. montana L. subsp. montana prevented the growth of the microorganisms used in the tests at different ratios. (Author).

  10. Prevalence and comparison of Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus in raw and fermented dairy products from East and West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Christoph; Kaindi, Dasel Wambua Mulwa; Böck, Désirée; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Kouamé-Sina, Sylvie Mireille; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius (Sii) and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus are members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) associated with human infections. SBSEC-related endocarditis was furthermore associated with rural residency in Southern Europe. SBSEC members are increasingly isolated as predominant species from fermented dairy products in Europe, Asia and Africa. African variants of Sii displayed dairy adaptations to lactose metabolism paralleling those of Streptococcus thermophilus including genome decay. In this study, the aim was to assess the prevalence of Sii and possibly other SBSEC members in dairy products of East and West Africa in order to identify their habitat, estimate their importance in dairy fermentation processes and determine geographic areas affected by this potential health risk. Presumptive SBSEC members were isolated on semi-selective M17 and SM agar media. Subsequent genotypic identification of isolates was based on rep-PCR fingerprinting and SBSEC-specific16S rRNA gene PCR assay. Detailed identification was achieved through application of novel primers enhancing the binding stringency in partial groES/groEL gene amplification and subsequent DNA sequencing. The presence of S. thermophilus-like lacS and lacZ genes in the SBSEC isolates was determined to elucidate the prevalence of this dairy adaptation. Isolates (n = 754) were obtained from 72 raw and 95 fermented milk samples from Côte d'Ivoire and Kenya on semi-selective agar media. Colonies of Sii were not detected from raw milk despite high microbial titers of approximately 106 CFU/mL on M17 agar medium. However, after spontaneous milk fermentation Sii was genotypically identified in 94.1% of Kenyan samples and 60.8% of Kenyan isolates. Sii prevalence in Côte d'Ivoire displayed seasonal variations in samples from 32.3% (June) to 40.0% (Dec/Jan) and isolates from 20.5% (June) to 27.7% (Dec/Jan) present at titers of 106–108

  11. Prevalence and comparison of Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus in raw and fermented dairy products from East and West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Christoph; Kaindi, Dasel Wambua Mulwa; Böck, Désirée; Njage, Patrick Murigu Kamau; Kouamé-Sina, Sylvie Mireille; Bonfoh, Bassirou; Lacroix, Christophe; Meile, Leo

    2013-10-15

    Streptococcus infantarius subsp. infantarius (Sii) and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. macedonicus are members of the Streptococcus bovis/Streptococcus equinus complex (SBSEC) associated with human infections. SBSEC-related endocarditis was furthermore associated with rural residency in Southern Europe. SBSEC members are increasingly isolated as predominant species from fermented dairy products in Europe, Asia and Africa. African variants of Sii displayed dairy adaptations to lactose metabolism paralleling those of Streptococcus thermophilus including genome decay. In this study, the aim was to assess the prevalence of Sii and possibly other SBSEC members in dairy products of East and West Africa in order to identify their habitat, estimate their importance in dairy fermentation processes and determine geographic areas affected by this potential health risk. Presumptive SBSEC members were isolated on semi-selective M17 and SM agar media. Subsequent genotypic identification of isolates was based on rep-PCR fingerprinting and SBSEC-specific16S rRNA gene PCR assay. Detailed identification was achieved through application of novel primers enhancing the binding stringency in partial groES/groEL gene amplification and subsequent DNA sequencing. The presence of S. thermophilus-like lacS and lacZ genes in the SBSEC isolates was determined to elucidate the prevalence of this dairy adaptation. Isolates (n = 754) were obtained from 72 raw and 95 fermented milk samples from Côte d'Ivoire and Kenya on semi-selective agar media. Colonies of Sii were not detected from raw milk despite high microbial titers of approximately 10(6)CFU/mL on M17 agar medium. However, after spontaneous milk fermentation Sii was genotypically identified in 94.1% of Kenyan samples and 60.8% of Kenyan isolates. Sii prevalence in Côte d'Ivoire displayed seasonal variations in samples from 32.3% (June) to 40.0% (Dec/Jan) and isolates from 20.5% (June) to 27.7% (Dec/Jan) present at titers of 10

  12. Identification of genomic differences between Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni and C. jejuni subsp. doylei at the nap locus leads to the development of a C. jejuni subspeciation multiplex PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heath Sekou

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human bacterial pathogen Campylobacter jejuni contains two subspecies: C. jejuni subsp. jejuni (Cjj and C. jejuni subsp. doylei (Cjd. Although Cjd strains are isolated infrequently in many parts of the world, they are obtained primarily from human clinical samples and result in an unusual clinical symptomatology in that, in addition to gastroenteritis, they are associated often with bacteremia. In this study, we describe a novel multiplex PCR method, based on the nitrate reductase (nap locus, that can be used to unambiguously subspeciate C. jejuni isolates. Results Internal and flanking napA and napB primer sets were designed, based on existing C. jejuni and Campylobacter coli genome sequences to create two multiplex PCR primer sets, nap mpx1 and nap mpx2. Genomic DNA from 161 C. jejuni subsp. jejuni (Cjj and 27 C. jejuni subsp. doylei (Cjd strains were amplified with these multiplex primer sets. The Cjd strains could be distinguished clearly from the Cjj strains using either nap mpx1 or mpx2. In addition, combination of either nap multiplex method with an existing lpxA speciation multiplex method resulted in the unambiguous and simultaneous speciation and subspeciation of the thermophilic Campylobacters. The Cjd nap amplicons were also sequenced: all Cjd strains tested contained identical 2761 bp deletions in napA and several Cjd strains contained deletions in napB. Conclusion The nap multiplex PCR primer sets are robust and give a 100% discrimination of C. jejuni subspecies. The ability to rapidly subspeciate C. jejuni as well as speciate thermophilic Campylobacter species, most of which are pathogenic in humans, in a single amplification will be of value to clinical laboratories in strain identification and the determination of the environmental source of campylobacterioses caused by Cjd. Finally, the sequences of the Cjd napA and napB loci suggest that Cjd strains arose from a common ancestor, providing clues as to

  13. Salmonella enterica subsp houtenae serogroup O:16 in a HIV positive patient: case report Salmonella enterica subsp houtenae sorogrupo O:16 em um paciente HIV positivo: relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina S. Lourenço

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available We described a case of salmonellosis in a 33-year old HIV-infected patient. The patient presented oral and esophageal candidiasis, intense epigastric and retrosternal pain. During the physical examination he was hypochloraemic, acyanotic, hypohydrated, anicteric and afebrile. Admittance laboratorial tests indicated: red cells 3.6 millions/mm³; hemoglobin, 10.1 g/dL; leukocyte count, 3,000/mm³, with 1% of eosinophils, 14% of non-segmented and 53% of segmented neutrophils and 31% of lymphocytes. The blood culture was positive for Salmonella enterica subsp houtenae serogroup O:16. This is probably the first human report of bacteremia due to Salmonella enterica subsp houtenae in Brazil associated to HIV-infected patient.Descreve-se um caso clínico de salmonelose ocorrido em paciente HIV positivo de 33 anos, portador de candidíase oral e esofágica, com intensa dor abdominal superior e dor retro-esternal. Ao exame clínico apresentou-se hipocorado, acianótico, hipohidratado, anictérico e afebril. A investigação laboratorial na admissão apresentou: hemácias, 3,6 milhões/mm³; hemoglobina, 10,1 g/dL; contagem de leucócitos, 3.000/mm³, com 1% de eosinófilos, 14% de bastões; 53% de neutrófilos segmentados e 31% de linfócitos. A hemocultura foi positiva para Salmonella enterica subsp houtenae sorogrupo O:16. Provavelmente, este é o primeiro relato de caso clínico humano com bacteremia causado por Salmonella enterica subsp houtenae no Brasil associado a paciente HIV-infectado.

  14. Quorum sensing in Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. achromogenes and the effect of the autoinducer synthase AsaI on bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwenteit, Johanna; Gram, Lone; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2011-01-01

    The Gram-negative fish pathogenic bacterium Aeromonas salmonicida possesses the LuxIRtype quorum sensing (QS) system, termed AsaIR. In this study the role of QS in A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes virulence and pigment production was investigated. Five wild-type Asa strains induced the N......Ideficient mutant was 20-fold higher than that of the isogenic wt strain and the mean day to death of the mutant was significantly prolonged. Furthermore, the expression of two virulence factors (a toxic protease, AsaP1, and a cytotoxic factor) and a brown pigment were reduced in the mutant. AsaP1 productionwas...... an important virulence factor, AsaP1, without affecting bacterial growth, makes A. salmonicida subsp. achromogenes an interesting target organism to study the effects of QS in disease development and QSI in disease control....

  15. Case-control study: Determination of potential risk factors for the colonization of healthy volunteers with Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessika Dumke

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus was identified in humans and animals as commensal of the gut and can act as a causative agent of endocarditis and septicemia. A case-control study was performed to identify yet unknown risk factors for the transmission of this facultative pathogen. The prevalence in the gut of 99 healthy volunteers was determined using real-time polymerase chain reaction resulting in 62.5% S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus positive excrements. Subsequent cultivation offered three isolates and epidemiological analysis based on MLST revealed sequence type (ST 3 and ST 7, previously detected from bovine and endocarditis patients. These results support the hypotheses of the zoonotic potential of this bacterium. Participant questionnaires were evaluated concerning personal characteristics, nutritional habits and animal contact. Specifically, closer contact between participants and animals influenced the colonization of the human gut significantly and was further affected if volunteers used excrement for the fertilization of plants.

  16. Gene Replacement and Fluorescent Labeling to Study the Functional Role of Exopolysaccharides in Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Bravo, Nuria; Hidalgo-Cantabrana, Claudio; Rodriguez-Carvajal, Miguel A; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Margolles, Abelardo

    2017-01-01

    An extracellular layer of exopolysaccharides (EPS) covers the surface of some Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis strains, which could be of relevance for its probiotic performance. In order to understand the functional characteristics of B. animalis subsp. lactis, two isogenic strains that differ in their EPS-producing phenotype, due to a single mutation in the gene Balat_1410, were studied. By means of a double crossover recombination strategy, successfully used for the first time in bifidobacteria, Balat_1410 in the type strain B. animalis subsp. lactis DSM10140 was replaced by a mutated gene containing a non-synonymous mutation previously associated with the appearance of a mucoid-ropy phenotype. Nuclear magnetic resonance and SEC-MALS analyses showed that the novel strain harboring the mutation acquired a ropy phenotype, due to the production of a high molecular weight (HMW)-EPS that is not produced in the wild-type strain. Fluorescence labeling of both strains with two fluorescent proteins, m-Cherry and Green Fluorescent Protein, was achieved by expressing the corresponding genes under the control of a native selected promoter (the elongation factor Tu promoter). Remarkably, qualitative and quantitative fluorescence analyses demonstrated that the ropy strain displays a lower capability to adhere to human intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, the presence of the HMW-EPS reduced the capability of the producing strain to form biofilms upon three different abiotic surfaces. This work also highlights the fact that different EPS confer variable functional characteristics to the bifidobacterial surface, which may be relevant for the performance of B. animalis subsp. lactis as a probiotic. The construction of molecular tools allowing the functional characterization of surface structures in next generation probiotics is still a challenging issue that deserves further attention, given the relevant role that such molecules must play in the interaction with the

  17. Review of the traditional uses, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of giant fennel (Ferula communis L. subsp. communis)

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Akaberi; Milad Iranshahy; Mehrdad Iranshahi

    2015-01-01

    Ferula communis L., subsp. communis, namely giant fennel, has extensively been used in traditional medicine for a wide range of ailments. Fresh plant materials, crude extracts and isolated components of F. communis showed a wide spectrum of in vitro and in vivo pharmacological properties including antidiabetic, antimicrobial, antiproliferative, and cytotoxic activities. The present paper, reviews the traditional uses, botany, phytochemistry, pharmacology and toxicology of F. communis in order...

  18. Comparison of culture and PCR methods for detection of Mycobacteriumavium subsp. paratuberculosis in raw milk of apparently healthy cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Anzabi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the etiological agent for Johne’s disease which is known as chronic disease in cattle and may attribute to Crohn’s disease in human. High prevalence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis has been reported in dairy cattle worldwide. Recognition of infected animals is a major factor to control the spread of the organism. In this regard, detection of the bacterium in milk of clinically suspicious and apparently healthy cows is the best way to control the infection. Although isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis by culture assay is considered as the gold standard, PCR method helps us to recognize the occurrence of slow-growing microorganisms in a short period of time with high sensitivity. In this survey, a total number of 160 cow milk was sampled and cream layer together with the pellet of each sample was tested by PCR and culture technique. Using Kappa statistics it was revealed an almost perfectagreement between culture and PCR assay with a product size of 400 bp; however, the agreement between culture and PCR with product size of 228 bp was found substantial. Results showed a substantial agreement between PCR with product sizes of 400 bp and 228 bp. Comparing the agreement between the two PCR approaches with culture assay as gold standard test, it was assumed that PCR could be a robust and rapid method to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk. Consequently, PCR can be introduced as a screening test for detection of the bacterium in cow milk.

  19. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase, Tryptophan Catabolism, and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a Model for Chronic Mycobacterial Infections ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plain, Karren M.; de Silva, Kumudika; Earl, John; Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Virulent mycobacterial infections progress slowly, with a latent period that leads to clinical disease in a proportion of cases. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that causes paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD), a chronic intestinal disease of ruminants. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that regulates tryptophan metabolism, was originally reported to have a role in intracellular pathogen killing and has since been shown to have an important immunoregulatory role in chronic immune diseases. Here we demonstrate an association between increased IDO levels and progression to clinical mycobacterial disease in a natural host, characterizing gene expression, protein localization, and functional effects. IDO mRNA levels were significantly increased in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected monocytic cells. Levels of both IDO gene and protein expression were significantly upregulated within the affected tissues of sheep with JD, particularly at the site of primary infection, the ileum, of animals with severe multibacillary disease. Lesion severity was correlated with the level of IDO gene expression. IDO gene expression was also increased in the peripheral blood cells of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed sheep and cattle. IDO breaks down tryptophan, and systemic increases were functional, as shown by decreased plasma tryptophan levels, which correlated with the onset of clinical signs, a stage well known to be associated with Th1 immunosuppression. IDO may be involved in downregulating immune responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and other virulent mycobacteria, which may be an example of the pathogen harnessing host immunoregulatory pathways to aid survival. These findings raise new questions about the host-mycobacterium interactions in the progression from latent to clinical disease. PMID:21730087

  20. Improving the insecticidal activity of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. aizawai against Spodoptera exigua by chromosomal expression of a chitinase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamthiankul, S; Moar, W J; Miller, M E; Panbangred, W

    2004-08-01

    A transcriptionally fused gene comprising the P19 gene from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis fused with a chitinase gene (chiBlA) from B. licheniformis was integrated into the B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai BTA1 genome by homologous recombination. The resulting B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai strain (INT1) showed growth and sporulation comparable with that of the wild-type strain. INT1 produced four chitinases of different molecular masses (i.e., 66, 55, 39, 36 kDa). Three of these (66, 55, 36 kDa) were derived from the cloned chiBlA gene, whereas the 39-kDa chitinase originated from BTA1. Using surface contamination bioassays, the 50% lethal concentration of lyophilized whole culture broth of INT1 against Spodoptera exigua neonate larvae was 12.2 microg/cm2, compared with 30.8 microg/cm2 for BTA1. Bioassays using filtered culture supernatant of INT1 (110 microg/cm2) together with trypsin-activated purified Cry1C protein of B. thuringiensis (1,280 ng/cm2) showed 75.0% mortality, compared with 56.7% mortality for Cry1C combined with BTA1 at the same concentration. Using scanning electron microscopy, clear perforations were observed in S. exigua fifth instar peritrophic membranes incubated with either crude or purified chitinase, or isolated from fifth instar S. exigua fed purified chitinase since the first instar. These results show that chitinase can increase the activity of B. thuringiensis subsp. aizawai against S. exigua. This is the first documentation of expressing a chimeric chitinase gene on the chromosome of B. thuringiensis; and chromosomal integration might be used as a potential technique for strain improvement.

  1. Estudio de la actividad antimicrobiana y antioxidante del aceite esencial del rizoma de Renealmia Thyrsoidea Subsp. Thyrsoidea (Zingiberaceae).

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida Velasco, Giselle Alejandra; Suárez Cedillo, Sandra Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The present research aimed to study the biological activity of the essential oil from the rhizome of Renealmia thyrsoidea subsp. thyrsoidea. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against pathogenic microorganism Escherichia coli ATCC8739TM, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027TM , Staphylococcus aureusATCC6538PTM, Streptococcus mutans ATCC 25175 TM , Candida albicans ATCC 10231 and Candida tropicalis ATCC 13803 , the disk diffusion method was used in agar test allowed to measure the in vitro s...

  2. Effects of Pistacia atlantica (subsp. Mutica oil extracts on antioxidant activities during experimentally induced cutaneous wound healing in rats

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    Ahmad Reza Hamidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The fruits of Pistacia atlantica (subsp. mutica have been used traditionally for the treatment of peptic ulcer, as a mouth freshener and have recently been introduced as a source of antioxidant vegetable oils. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant activity of the gel forms, from P. atlantica (subsp. mutica oil extraction on enzymatic antioxidants in experimental wound created in rat. A square-shaped skin defect (2×2 cm was created aseptically by surgical excision at the first thoracic vertebrae. Then animals were randomly allocated in four groups (I, untreated controls; II, topically treated base gel; III, topically treated 5% gel; IV, topically treated 10% gel. Blood sampling was accomplished at 3, 7, 10, 14 and 21 days post-injury. Samples were collected for measuring antioxidant enzymes activities (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity in red cells and lipid peroxidation (plasma malondialdehyde. The data analysis generally evidenced that the activities of the main antioxidant enzymes began to decrease significantly at 7 days after the wound was created in control and base gel groups. This remarkable decline became more evident in the period between 10 to 21 days post injury but increased progressively in P. atlantica (subsp. mutica treatment groups, especially in gel 10% treatment group during wound healing. The results of this study suggest that excision of the wound leads to oxidative stress and topical administration of P. atlantica (subsp. mutica gels causes remarkable changes in antioxidant parameter during wound closure (especially gel 10% via pro-oxidative, and antioxidant activity can improve oxidative stress.

  3. Antimicrobial Effects of a Hexapetide KCM21 against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

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    Jeahyuk Choi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are small but effective cationic peptides with variable length. In previous study, four hexapeptides were identified that showed antimicrobial activities against various phytopathogenic bacteria. KCM21, the most effective antimicrobial peptide, was selected for further analysis to understand its modes of action by monitoring inhibitory effects of various cations, time-dependent antimicrobial kinetics, and observing cell disruption by electron microscopy. The effects of KCM21 on Gram-negative strain, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 and Gram-positive strain, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis were compared. Treatment with divalent cations such as Ca²⁺ and Mg²⁺ inhibited the bactericidal activities of KCM21 significantly against P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000. The bactericidal kinetic study showed that KCM21 killed both bacteria rapidly and the process was faster against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. The electron microscopic analysis revealed that KCM21 induced the formation of micelles and blebs on the surface of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells, while it caused cell rupture against C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells. The outer membrane alteration and higher sensitivity to Ca²⁺ suggest that KCM21 interact with the outer membrane of P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 cells during the process of killing, but not with C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis cells that lack outer membrane. Considering that both strains had similar sensitivity to KCM21 in LB medium, outer membrane could not be the main target of KCM21, instead common compartments such as cytoplasmic membrane or internal macromolecules might be a possible target(s of KCM21.

  4. Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus en líquido cefalorraquídeo de un paciente pediátrico

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    Liz M Vélez Balestro

    Full Text Available Hasta la fecha se han descrito casos de meningitis por Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. pasteurianus en adultos, y de los pocos casos pediátricos, el mayor número se presentó en neonatos. En este trabajo presentamos un caso de meningitis y bacteriemia por este estreptococo en un paciente de 9 meses, con reiteradas hospitalizaciones por enfermedades respiratorias; este constituye el primer aislamiento documentado del citado microorganismo en Santa Fe.

  5. Composition of the essential oil of two Salvia taxa (Salvia sclarea and Salvia verticillata subsp. verticillata) from Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Hayta, Sukru; Dogan, Gulden; Yuce, Ebru; Bagci, Eyup

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The essential oil composition of two Salvia taxa (Salvia sclarea and Salvia verticillata subsp. verticillata) analysed and yield of compositions were analysedMaterial and Methods: The essential oil was extracted by hydro distillation using a modified Clevenger apparatus coupled to a 2 L round-bottom flask. A total of 100 g of fresh plant material (aerial parts) and 1 L of water were used for the extraction. Gas chromatography / Mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis were applied to ext...

  6. The Host Genotype and Environment Affect Strain Types of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Inhabiting the Intestinal Tracts of Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Hang, Xiaomin; Tan, Jing; Yang, Hong

    2015-07-01

    To investigate the influences of host genotype and environment on Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum inhabiting human intestines at the strain level, six pairs of twins, divided into two groups (children and adults), were recruited. Each group consisted of two monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs and one dizygotic (DZ) twin pair. Child twins had been living together from birth, while adult twins had been living separately for 5 to 10 years. A total of 345 B. longum subsp. longum isolates obtained from 60 fecal samples from these twins were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and 35 sequence types (STs) were finally acquired. Comparison of strains within and between the twin pairs showed that no strains with identical STs were observed between unrelated individuals or within adult DZ twin pairs. Eight STs were found to be monophyletic, existing within MZ twins and child DZ twins. The similarity of strain types within child cotwins was significantly higher than that within adult cotwins, which indicated that environment was one of the important determinants in B. longum subsp. longum strain types inhabiting human intestines. However, although these differences between MZ and DZ twins were observed, it is still difficult to reach an exact conclusion about the impact of host genotype. This is mainly because of the limited number of subjects tested in the present study and the lack of strain types tracing in the same twin pairs from birth until adulthood. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Can glandular hair density be a breeding marker for Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum with high essential oil content?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Krisztina; Sárosi, Szilvia; Cserháti, Beatrix; Ferenczy, Antal

    2010-09-01

    Origanum vulgare subsp. hirtum (Link) Ietswaart is an essential oil rich plant traditionally used as oregano. Based on the interest of the essential oil producing sector, in 2000 we have started a breeding program of O. vulgare subsp. hirtum. Plant material for our breeding work consists of 6 progeny. Individual evaluation of the plant material was carried out in 2008-2009 with the primary aim of finding mother plants with appropriate morphological features, high essential oil content (> 7%) and with carvacrol as the main essential oil component. Among the survey of morphological characteristics special attention was given to glandular hair density in order to test the usability of it as a morphological marker for screening progeny for high essential oil content. The characteristics of the progeny can be described with high variability ensuring the possibility of a good selection base. Evaluating the morphology, essential oil content and constitution of the individuals, 20 plants were selected on the grounds of their high (7-8.6%) essential oil content, high ratio (70-93%) of carvacrol in the essential oil and typical morphological features of O. vulgare subsp. hirtum. From the results of glandular hair density it can be stated that the correlation between glandular hair density of the upper, middle and lower leaves either on vegetative or generative shoots and essential oil content was never strong enough (correlation coefficient < or = 0.5) to use it exclusively as a morphological marker for individual selection.

  8. Reclassification of the larval pathogen for marine bivalves Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus as Vibrio europaeus sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubert, Javier; Romalde, Jesús L; Spinard, Edward J; Nelson, David R; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Barja, Juan L

    2016-11-01

    The Orientalis clade has a relevant significance for bivalve aquaculture since it includes the pathogens Vibrio bivalvicida, Vibrio tubiashii subsp. tubiashii and Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus. However, the previous taxonomic description of the subspecies of V. tubiashii shows some incongruities that should be emended. In the genomic age, the comparison between genome assemblies is the key to clarify the taxonomic position of both subspecies. With this purpose, we have tested the ability of multilocus sequence analysis based on eight housekeeping gene sequences (gapA, gyrB, ftsZ, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA), different in silico genome-to-genome comparisons, chemotaxonomic features and phenotypic traits to reclassify the subspecies V. tubiashii subsp. europaeus within the Orientalis clade. This polyphasic approach clearly demonstrated that this subspecies is phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from V. tubiashii and should be elevated to the rank of species as Vibrio europaeus sp. nov. This reclassification allows us to update the Orientalis clade (V. bivalvicida,V. brasiliensis, V. crosai, V. hepatarius, V. orientalis, V. sinaloensis, V. tubiashii and V. europaeus sp. nov.) and reconstruct a better phylogeny of the genus Vibrio. An emended description of V. tubiashii is provided. Finally, the proposed novel species is represented by emergent bivalve pathogens [type strain PP-638T (=CECT 8136T=DSM 27349T), PP2-843 and 07/118 T2] responsible for high mortalities in Spanish and French hatcheries.

  9. Milk-derived angiotensin-I-converting enzymeinhibitory peptides generated by Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581

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    Villegas Josefina M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several strains of Lactobacillus helveticus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis were evaluated for their ability to release angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory peptides from α-casein (α-CN and β-casein (β-CN. Casein peptides resulting from L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581-mediated hydrolysis exhibited the highest ACE-inhibitory (ACEI activities, with values of 53 and 40% for α-CN and β-CN, respectively. The casein hydrolysates were fractionated by reversedphase high pressure liquid chromatography and some of the active peptides were identified by mass spectrometry. The fraction with the highest ACEI activity arose from β-CN and contained a mixture of the β-CN f194-206 (QEPVLGPVRGPFP and f198-206 (LGPVRGPFP peptides. Furthermore, the ACEI tripeptide IPP was identified in all β-CN hydrolysates; L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 produced the highest amount of this peptide. The bioactive peptides released by CRL 581 strain may be used in the formulation of functional foods and nutraceuticals, representing a healthier and natural alternative for regulating blood pressure.

  10. Improved trehalose production from biodiesel waste using parent and osmotically sensitive mutant of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhal, Rohit; Choudhury, Bijan

    2012-08-01

    Trehalose is an important nutraceutical of wide commercial interest in the food processing industry. Recently, crude glycerol was reported to be suitable for the production of trehalose using a food microbe, Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii, under static flask conditions. Similarly, enhanced trehalose yield was reported in an osmotically sensitive mutant of the same strain under anaerobic conditions. In the present study, an effort was made to achieve higher production of trehalose, propionic acid, and lactic acid using the parent and an osmotically sensitive mutant of P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii under aeration conditions. Under aeration conditions (200 rpm in shake flasks and 30 % air saturation in a batch reactor), biomass was increased and approximately 98 % of crude glycerol was consumed. In the parent strain, a trehalose titre of 361 mg/l was achieved, whereas in the mutant strain a trehalose titre of 1.3 g/l was produced in shake flask conditions (200 rpm). In the mutant strain, propionic and lactic acid yields of 0.53 and 0.21 g/g of substrate were also achieved with crude glycerol. Similarly, in controlled batch reactor culturing conditions a final trehalose titre of approximately 1.56 g/l was achieved with the mutant strain using crude glycerol as the substrate. Enhanced production of trehalose using P. freudenreichii subsp. shermanii from waste under aeration conditions is reported here. Higher production of trehalose was not due to a higher yield of trehalose but to a higher final biomass concentration.

  11. Response surface modeling for the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spores by chlorine dioxide gas in an enclosed space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Qi, Jiancheng; Wu, Jinhui; Hao, Limei; Yi, Ying; Lin, Song; Zhang, Zongxing

    2016-05-01

    Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spores are a commonly used biological indicator to evaluate the disinfection of an enclosed space. In the present study, chlorine dioxide (ClO2) gas was applied to inactivate B. subtilis subsp. niger spores in an enclosed space. The effects of the ClO2 gas concentration (1-3 mg/l), relative humidity (RH, 30-70%) and exposure time (30-90 min) were investigated using a response surface methodology (RSM). A three-factor Box-Behnken experimental design was used. The obtained data were adequately fitted to a second-order polynomial model with an R2adj of 0.992. The ClO2 gas concentration, RH and exposure time all significantly (Pgas concentration and RH as well as that between the exposure time and RH indicated significant and synergistic effects (Pgas. The inactivation of indoor biological contaminants plays an important role in preventing the transmission of pathogens and ensuring human safety. The predictive model using response surface methodology indicates the influence and interaction of the main factors on the inactivation of Bacillus subtilis subsp. niger spores by ClO2 gas, and can predict a ClO2 gas treatment condition to achieve an effective sterilization of enclosed spaces. The results in this paper will provide a reference for the application of ClO2 gas treatments for indoor disinfection.

  12. Isolation and Genomic Characterization of the T4-Like Bacteriophage PM2 Infecting Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum

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    Jeong-A Lim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to control Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum, a novel virulent bacteriophage PM2 was isolated. Bacteriophage PM2 can infect 48% of P. carotovorum subsp. carotovorum and 78% of P. carotovorum subsp. brasilliensis but none of atrosepticum, betavasculorum, odoriferum and wasabiae isolates had been infected with PM2. PM2 phage belongs to the family Myoviridae, and contains a large head and contractile tail. It has a 170,286 base pair genome that encodes 291 open reading frames (ORFs and 12 tRNAs. Most ORFs in bacteriophage PM2 share a high level of homology with T4-like phages including IME08, RB69, and JS98. Phylogenetic analysis based on the amino acid sequence of terminase large subunits confirmed that PM2 is classified as a T4-like phage. It contains no integrase- or no repressor-coding genes related to the lysogenic cycle, and lifestyle prediction using PHACT software suggested that PM2 is a virulent bacteriophage.

  13. Production and proteomic characterisation of purified protein derivative from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

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    Wynne James W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective diagnosis of Johne's disease (JD, particularly at the stage of early subclinical infection, remains one of the greatest challenges for the control of JD worldwide. The IFN-γ test of cell mediated immunity is currently one of the most suitable diagnostics for subclinical infections, however a major limitation of this test is the lack of a standardised purified protein derivative (PPD antigen (also referred to as Johnin PPD or PPDj. While attempting to replace PPDj with more specific individual antigens is an attractive proposition, bacterial culture derived PPDj remains the most effective antigen preparation for the diagnosis of subclinical JD. It may be possible to increase the reproducibility and specificity of PPDj preparations by further characterising and standardising the PPDj production. Results Using a standardised protocol, five in-house preparations of PPDj were prepared from cultures of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. Compared to PPDs obtained from other institutes/laboratories, these preparations appeared to perform similarly well in the IFN-γ test. Although the broad proteomic composition of all PPDj preparations was remarkably similar, the absolute abundance of individual proteins varied markedly between preparations. All PPDj preparations contained common immunogenic proteins which were also observed in PPD preparations from Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium (PPDa and Mycobacterium bovis (PPDb. Temporal difference in protein secretion of in vitro cultured MAP was observed between 20 and 34 weeks suggesting that the age of MAP culture used for PPDj preparations may markedly influence PPDj composition. Conclusions This study describes a protocol for the production of PPDj and its subsequent proteomic characterisation. The broad proteomic composition of different preparations of PPDj was, for the most part, highly similar. Compositional differences between PPDj preparations were found

  14. The genome of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449: insights into the evolution of a fish pathogen

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    Murphy Colleen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida is a Gram-negative bacterium that is the causative agent of furunculosis, a bacterial septicaemia of salmonid fish. While other species of Aeromonas are opportunistic pathogens or are found in commensal or symbiotic relationships with animal hosts, A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida causes disease in healthy fish. The genome sequence of A. salmonicida was determined to provide a better understanding of the virulence factors used by this pathogen to infect fish. Results The nucleotide sequences of the A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida A449 chromosome and two large plasmids are characterized. The chromosome is 4,702,402 bp and encodes 4388 genes, while the two large plasmids are 166,749 and 155,098 bp with 178 and 164 genes, respectively. Notable features are a large inversion in the chromosome and, in one of the large plasmids, the presence of a Tn21 composite transposon containing mercury resistance genes and an In2 integron encoding genes for resistance to streptomycin/spectinomycin, quaternary ammonia compounds, sulphonamides and chloramphenicol. A large number of genes encoding potential virulence factors were identified; however, many appear to be pseudogenes since they contain insertion sequences, frameshifts or in-frame stop codons. A total of 170 pseudogenes and 88 insertion sequences (of ten different types are found in the A. salmonicida genome. Comparison with the A. hydrophila ATCC 7966T genome reveals multiple large inversions in the chromosome as well as an approximately 9% difference in gene content indicating instances of single gene or operon loss or gain. A limited number of the pseudogenes found in A. salmonicida A449 were investigated in other Aeromonas strains and species. While nearly all the pseudogenes tested are present in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida strains, only about 25% were found in other A. salmonicida subspecies and none were detected in other

  15. Identification of Quorum Sensing Signal Molecule of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaoyang; Liu, Cuiping; Lyu, Pengcheng; Zhang, Shuwen; Liu, Lu; Lu, Jing; Ma, Changlu; Lv, Jiaping

    2016-12-14

    Many bacteria in nature use quorum sensing (QS) to regulate gene expression. The quorum sensing system plays critical roles in the adaptation of bacteria to the surrounding environment. Previous studies have shown that during high-density fermentation, the autolysis of lactic acid bacteria was regulated by the QS system, and the two-component system (TCS, LBUL_RS00115/LBUL_RS00110) is involved in the autolysis of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus. However, the QS signal molecule, which regulates this pathway, has not been identified. In this study, we compared the genome of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365 with the locus of seven lactobacillus QS systems; the position of the QS signal molecule of Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC BAA-365 was predicted by bioinformatics tool. Its function was identified by in vitro experiments. Construction of TCS mutant by gene knockout of LBUL_RS00115 confirmed that the signal molecule regulates the density of the flora by the TCS (LBUL_RS00115/LBUL_RS00110). This study indicated that quorum quenching and inhibition based on the signal molecule might serve as an approach to reduce the rate of autolysis of LAB and increase the number of live bacteria in fermentation.

  16. Bioactive organocopper compound from Pseudomonas aeruginosa inhibits the growth of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

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    Admilton Gonçalves de Oliveira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Citrus canker is a lot destructive disease of citrus species. The challenge is to find new compounds that show strong antibiotic activity, low toxicity to plants and the environment. The objectives of the present study are (1 produce, purify and evaluate the antibiotic activity of secondary metabolites produced by induction by P. aeruginosa LV strain in vitro against Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (strain 306, (2 study the potential for semi-purified secondary metabolites on foliar application to control citrus canker under greenhouse conditions, (3 identify the antibiotic activity in orange leaf mesophyll infected with strain 306 by electron microscopy. Two pure bioactive compounds were isolated, organocopper antibiotic compound and phenazine-1-carboxamide. The phenazine-1-carboxamide did not show any antibiotic activity under the experimental conditions used in this study. The organocopper antibiotic compound showed a high level of antibiotic activity with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.12 µg mL-1. In greenhouse tests for control of citrus canker in orange trees, the semi-purified fraction F3d, reduced lesion formation about 97%. The concentration used was five hundred times lower than recommended commercial product of metallic copper-based. Electron microscopy showed that F3d altered the exopolysaccharide matrix and causing cell lysis of the pathogen inside the citrus canker lesions. These results suggest that secondary metabolites produced by induction by P. aeruginosa LV strain has a high potential to be used as a bioproduct to control citrus canker.

  17. Detection and Characterization of Histamine-Producing Strains of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae Isolated from Mullets

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    Marcello Trevisani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae (Pdd is considered to be an emerging pathogen of marine fish and has also been implicated in cases of histamine food poisoning. In this study, eight strains isolated from mullets of the genera Mugil and Liza captured in the Ligurian Sea were characterized, and a method to detect histamine-producing Pdd from fish samples was developed. The histamine-producing potential of the strains was evaluated in culture media (TSB+ using a histamine biosensor. Subsequently, two strains were used to contaminate mackerel fillets (4 or 40 CFU/g, simulating a cross-contamination on the selling fish stalls. Sample homogenates were enriched in TSB+. The cultures were then inoculated on thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar (TCBS and the dark green colonies were cultured on Niven agar. The violet isolates were characterized using specific biochemical and PCR based tests. All Pdd strains were histamine producers, yielding concentration varying from 167 and 8977 µg/mL in TSB+ cultures incubated at 30 °C for 24 h. Pdd colonies were detected from the inoculated mackerel samples and their histidine decarboxylase gene was amplified using species-specific primer pairs designed for this study. The results indicate that mullets can be source of Pdd and the fish retailers needs to evaluate the risk posed by cross-contamination on the selling fish stalls.

  18. Safety of Bifidobacterium animalis Subsp. Lactis (B. lactis) Strain BB-12-Supplemented Yogurt in Healthy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tina P; Ba, Zhaoyong; Sanders, Mary E; D'Amico, Frank J; Roberts, Robert F; Smith, Keisha H; Merenstein, Daniel J

    2017-02-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that may provide health benefits to the individual when consumed in sufficient quantities. For studies conducted on health or disease endpoints on probiotics in the United States, the Food and Administration has required those studies to be conducted as investigational new drugs. This phase I, double-blinded, randomized, controlled safety study represents the first requirement of this pathway. The purpose of the study was to determine the safety of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis (B lactis) strain BB-12 (BB-12)-supplemented yogurt when consumed by a generally healthy group of children. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of BB-12-supplemented yogurt on the gut microbiota of the children. Sixty children ages 1 to 5 years were randomly assigned to consume 4 ounces of either BB-12-supplemented yogurt or nonsupplemented control yogurt daily for 10 days. The primary outcome was to assess safety and tolerability, as determined by the number of reported adverse events. A total of 186 nonserious adverse events were reported, with no significant differences between the control and BB-12 groups. No significant changes due to probiotic treatment were observed in the gut microbiota of the study cohort. BB-12-supplemented yogurt is safe and well-tolerated when consumed by healthy children. The present study will form the basis for future randomized clinical trials investigating the potential effects of BB-12-supplemented yogurt in different disease states.

  19. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersen, Mikkel; Wind, Anette; Johansen, Eric; Christensen, Jeffrey E; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Eskesen, Dorte

    2014-03-28

    This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12(®) (BB-12(®)), which is the world's most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12(®) has been determined and published. BB-12(®) originates from Chr. Hansen's collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dried powders. Strain characteristics and mechanisms of BB-12(®) have been established through extensive in vitro testing. BB-12(®) exhibits excellent gastric acid and bile tolerance; it contains bile salt hydrolase, and has strong mucus adherence properties, all valuable probiotic characteristics. Pathogen inhibition, barrier function enhancement, and immune interactions are mechanisms that all have been demonstrated for BB-12(®). BB-12(®) has proven its beneficial health effect in numerous clinical studies within gastrointestinal health and immune function. Clinical studies have demonstrated survival of BB-12(®) through the gastrointestinal tract and BB-12(®) has been shown to support a healthy gastrointestinal microbiota. Furthermore, BB-12(®) has been shown to improve bowel function, to have a protective effect against diarrhea, and to reduce side effects of antibiotic treatment, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In terms of immune function, clinical studies have shown that BB-12(®) increases the body's resistance to common respiratory infections as well as reduces the incidence of acute respiratory tract infections.

  20. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in an Italian Cohort of Type 1 Diabetes Pediatric Patients

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    Maria Luisa Manca Bitti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is the etiological agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants. Recent studies have linked MAP to type 1 diabetes (T1D in the Sardinian population. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of MAP infection in a T1D cohort from continental Italy compared with healthy control subjects. 247 T1D subjects and 110 healthy controls were tested for the presence of MAP. MAP DNA was detected using IS900-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The presence of antibodies towards a MAP antigen, heparin binding hemoagglutinin (HBHA, was detected by ELISA. We demonstrated a higher MAP DNA prevalence in plasma samples from T1D patients and a stronger immune response towards MAP HBHA, compared with healthy control subjects. Moreover, in the recent onset patients, we observed an association between anti-MAP antibodies and HLA DQ2 (DQA1 0201/DQB1 0202. These findings taken together support the hypothesis of MAP as an environmental risk factor for the development of T1D in genetically predisposed subjects, probably involving a mechanism of molecular mimicry between MAP antigens and pancreatic islet β-cells.

  1. Safety and mutagenicity evaluation of Vigiis 101 powder made from Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wei-Ting; Shih, Tsung-Wei; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present work was to assess the genotoxic activity and the potential for toxicity upon repeated dosing of "Vigiis 101" powder, a probiotic consisting of dried bacteria Lactobacillus paracasei subsp. paracasei NTU 101. Results of the Ames test in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA1537, TA98, TA100, TA102, and TA1535 showed that Vigiis 101 (⩽5 mg per plate) was not mutagenic. We used experiments on ICR mice to evaluate the genotoxicity of Vigiis 101. Compared to the control, high-dose Vigiis 101 administration (16.72 g per kg of body weight) did not cause significant changes either in the number of reticulocytes or in the percentage (occurrence) of micronucleated reticulocytes. A mammalian chromosomal aberration test showed that the number of Chinese hamster ovary cells with abnormal chromosomes was <4% after Vigiis 101 treatment (maximal concentration was 5 mg/ml). A 28-day oral toxicity assay in Wistar rats was performed to assess the no-observed-adverse-effect level of Vigiis 101. Compared to the control, high-dose Vigiis 101 administration (5000 mg/kg/day) had no effects on mortality and body weight and did not cause toxicopathological lesions. Taken together, these results show that Vigiis 101 has no significant mutagenic or toxic effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization and expression in Escherichia coli of an endoglucanase gene of Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, A; Dartois, V; Colson, C

    1988-07-13

    An endoglucanase gene of Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa present on plasmid pRUCL150 and expressed in Escherichia coli was subcloned in plasmid pBR322. Plasmid pRUCL153 contained the smallest DNA insert (2.9 kb) with endoglucanase activity. The plasmids directed the synthesis of a mostly periplasmic enzyme in E. coli and the level of enzyme activity was comparable in several strains. Analysis by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the endoglucanase produced with various recombinant plasmids showed that it was unique. The endoglucanase gene on plasmid pRUCL153 was localized by physical mapping of independent transposon Tn5 insertions. Hence, its size was estimated to be approx. 1.3 kb. In vivo radioactive labelling of plasmid-encoded proteins using minicells, followed by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, allowed us to determine the size of the endoglucanase: Mr 40,000 for the precursor and Mr 38,000 for the mature enzyme. It was demonstrated that no cellulase operon, but a single gene, was cloned. The direction of transcription of the gene was determined by placing it under the control of the promoter of the lactose operon.

  3. The nucleotide sequence of a carboxymethylcellulase gene from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, J; Gilbert, H J

    1988-07-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the gene coding for one of the carboxymethylcellulases (CMCase), expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa, has been determined. The structural gene consists of an open reading frame, commencing with an ATG start codon, of 2886 base pairs followed by a TAA stop codon. The gene was shown to code for a signal peptide which closely resembles the signal peptides of other secreted proteins. Unlike most Pseudomonas genes, the CMCase sequence does not have a high G + C (51%) content and there is no marked preference for codons ending in G or C. Upstream of the structural gene there are no sequences which bear a strong resemblance to consensus Escherichia coli promoters. A sequence is present, however, which exhibits homology to the consensus DNA sequence that binds the catabolic activator protein (CAP). Bal31 deletions of the structural gene revealed the extent by which the gene could be modified and still encode a functional CMCase. Subclones of the cellulase gene have been constructed in pUC18 and pUC19. One of the resultant plasmids, pJHS1 directs a 20-fold increase in CMCase synthesis, when compared to the original construct, pJHH2. Analysis of cells harbouring pJHS1 showed the cellulase polypeptide to have a molecular weight of 106000. This is in close agreement with the predicted size of the enzyme deduced from the nucleotide sequence data.

  4. Sugarcane transcriptome analysis in response to infection caused by Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae.

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    Ailton B Santa Brigida

    Full Text Available Sugarcane is an important tropical crop mainly cultivated to produce ethanol and sugar. Crop productivity is negatively affected by Acidovorax avenae subsp avenae (Aaa, which causes the red stripe disease. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms triggered in response to the infection. We have investigated the molecular mechanism activated in sugarcane using a RNA-seq approach. We have produced a de novo transcriptome assembly (TR7 from sugarcane RNA-seq libraries submitted to drought and infection with Aaa. Together, these libraries present 247 million of raw reads and resulted in 168,767 reference transcripts. Mapping in TR7 of reads obtained from infected libraries, revealed 798 differentially expressed transcripts, of which 723 were annotated, corresponding to 467 genes. GO and KEGG enrichment analysis showed that several metabolic pathways, such as code for proteins response to stress, metabolism of carbohydrates, processes of transcription and translation of proteins, amino acid metabolism and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites were significantly regulated in sugarcane. Differential analysis revealed that genes in the biosynthetic pathways of ET and JA PRRs, oxidative burst genes, NBS-LRR genes, cell wall fortification genes, SAR induced genes and pathogenesis-related genes (PR were upregulated. In addition, 20 genes were validated by RT-qPCR. Together, these data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms triggered by the Aaa in sugarcane and opens the opportunity for the development of molecular markers associated with disease tolerance in breeding programs.

  5. Sugarcane transcriptome analysis in response to infection caused by Acidovorax avenae subsp. avenae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grativol, Clícia; de Armas, Elvismary M.; Entenza, Júlio O. P.; Thiebaut, Flávia; Lima, Marcelo de F.; Farrinelli, Laurent; Hemerly, Adriana S.; Lifschitz, Sérgio; Ferreira, Paulo C. G.

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane is an important tropical crop mainly cultivated to produce ethanol and sugar. Crop productivity is negatively affected by Acidovorax avenae subsp avenae (Aaa), which causes the red stripe disease. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms triggered in response to the infection. We have investigated the molecular mechanism activated in sugarcane using a RNA-seq approach. We have produced a de novo transcriptome assembly (TR7) from sugarcane RNA-seq libraries submitted to drought and infection with Aaa. Together, these libraries present 247 million of raw reads and resulted in 168,767 reference transcripts. Mapping in TR7 of reads obtained from infected libraries, revealed 798 differentially expressed transcripts, of which 723 were annotated, corresponding to 467 genes. GO and KEGG enrichment analysis showed that several metabolic pathways, such as code for proteins response to stress, metabolism of carbohydrates, processes of transcription and translation of proteins, amino acid metabolism and biosynthesis of secondary metabolites were significantly regulated in sugarcane. Differential analysis revealed that genes in the biosynthetic pathways of ET and JA PRRs, oxidative burst genes, NBS-LRR genes, cell wall fortification genes, SAR induced genes and pathogenesis-related genes (PR) were upregulated. In addition, 20 genes were validated by RT-qPCR. Together, these data contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms triggered by the Aaa in sugarcane and opens the opportunity for the development of molecular markers associated with disease tolerance in breeding programs. PMID:27936012

  6. Development of a Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for Rapid Detection of the Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sören Hansen

    Full Text Available The detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP infections in ruminants is crucial to control spread among animals and to humans. Cultivation of MAP is seen as the gold standard for detection, although it is very time consuming and labour intensive. In addition, several PCR assays have been developed to detect MAP in around 90 minutes, but these assays required highly sophisticated equipment as well as lengthy and complicated procedure.In this study, we have developed a rapid assay for the detection of MAP based on the recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA assay targeting a MAP specific region, the IS900 gene. The detection limit was 16 DNA molecules in 15 minutes as determined by the probit analysis on eight runs of the plasmid standard. Cross reactivity with other mycobacterial and environmentally associated bacterial strains was not observed. The clinical performance of the MAP RPA assay was tested using 48 MAP-positive and 20 MAP-negative blood, sperm, faecal and tissue samples. All results were compared with reads of a highly sensitive real-time PCR assay. The specificity of the MAP RPA assay was 100%, while the sensitivity was 89.5%.The RPA assay is quicker and much easier to handle than real-time PCR. All RPA reagents were cold-chain independent. Moreover, combining RPA assay with a simple extraction protocol will maximize its use at point of need for rapid detection of MAP.

  7. Dendroclimatic potential of plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) from the Northern Great Plains, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonson, Jesse; Friedman, Jonathan; Meko, David; Touchan, Ramzi; Scott, Julian; Edmonson, Alan

    2014-01-01

    A new 368-year tree-ring chronology (A.D. 1643–2010) has been developed in western North Dakota using plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) growing on the relatively undisturbed floodplain of the Little Missouri River in the North Unit of Theodore Roosevelt National Park. We document many slow-growing living trees between 150–370 years old that contradict the common understanding that cottonwoods grow fast and die young. In this northern location, cottonwood produces distinct annual rings with dramatic interannual variability that strongly crossdate. The detrended tree-ring chronology is significantly positively correlated with local growing season precipitation and soil moisture conditions (r  =  0.69). This time series shows periods of prolonged low radial tree growth during the known droughts of the instrumental record (e.g. 1931–1939 and 1980–1981) and also during prehistory (e.g. 1816–1823 and 1856–1865) when other paleoclimate studies have documented droughts in this region. Tree rings of cottonwood will be a useful tool to help reconstruct climate, streamflow, and the floodplain history of the Little Missouri River and other northern river systems.

  8. Cytotoxicity Analysis of Three Bacillus thuringiensis Subsp. israelensis δ-Endotoxins towards Insect and Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Corrêa, Roberto Franco; Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2012-01-01

    Three members of the δ-endotoxin group of toxins expressed by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Cyt2Ba, Cry4Aa and Cry11A, were individually expressed in recombinant acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strains for in vitro evaluation of their toxic activities against insect and mammalian cell lines. Both Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins, activated with either trypsin or Spodoptera frugiperda gastric juice (GJ), resulted in different cleavage patterns for the activated toxins as seen by SDS-PAGE. The GJ-processed proteins were not cytotoxic to insect cell cultures. On the other hand, the combination of the trypsin-activated Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins yielded the highest levels of cytotoxicity to all insect cells tested. The combination of activated Cyt2Ba and Cry11A also showed higher toxic activity than that of toxins activated individually. When activated Cry4Aa, Cry11A and Cyt2Ba were used simultaneously in the same assay a decrease in toxic activity was observed in all insect cells tested. No toxic effect was observed for the trypsin-activated Cry toxins in mammalian cells, but activated Cyt2Ba was toxic to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) when tested at 20 µg/mL. PMID:23029407

  9. A protein expression system for tandem affinity purification in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri

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    Giordanni C. Dantas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Citrus canker, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xac, is one of the most devastating diseases to affect citrus crops. There is no treatment for citrus canker; effective control against the spread of Xac is usually achieved by the elimination of affected plants along with that of asymptomatic neighbors. An in depth understanding of the pathogen is the keystone for understanding of the disease; to this effect we are committed to the development of strategies to ease the study of Xac. Genome sequencing and annotation of Xac revealed that ∼37% of the genome is composed of hypothetical ORFs. To start a systematic characterization of novel factors encoded by Xac, we constructed integrative-vectors for protein expression specific to this bacterium. The vectors allow for the production of TAP-tagged proteins in Xac under the regulation of the xylose promoter. In this study, we show that a TAP-expression vector, integrated into the amy locus of Xac, does not compromise its virulence. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that the polypeptide TAP can be overproduced in Xac and purified from the soluble phase of cell extracts. Our results substantiate the use of our vectors for protein expression in Xac thus contributing a novel tool for the characterization of proteins and protein complexes generated by this bacterium in vivo.

  10. Essential oils of Daucus carota subsp. carota of Tunisia obtained by supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzouki, Hanen; Khaldi, Abdelhamid; Falconieri, Danilo; Piras, Alessandra; Marongiu, Bruno; Molicotti, Paola; Zanetti, Stefania

    2010-12-01

    The essential oils and supercritical CO2 extracts of wild Daucus carota L. subsp. carota from two different sites in Tunisia were investigated. The main components of the essential oil of the flowering and mature umbels with seeds from Sejnane were eudesm-7(11)-en-4-ol (8.2 - 8.5%), carotol (3.5 - 5.2%), sabinene (12.0 -14.5%), a-selinene (7.4 - 8.6) and 11-alpha-(H)-himachal-4-en-1-beta-ol (12.7 - 17.4%), whereas the oils from Tunis were predominantly composed of elemicin (31.5 - 35.3%) and carotol (48.0 - 55.7%). The antimicrobial activity of the essential oils were assayed by using the broth dilution method on Escherichia coli ATCC 35218 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 43300, and clinical strains of Candida albicans and C. tropicalis 1011 RM. The MIC values obtained were all > 2.5% (v/v).

  11. Antibacterial, anticandidal and antioxidant properties of Tanacetum argenteum (Lam.) Willd. subsp. flabellifolium (Boiss. & Heldr.) Grierson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Yavuz Bulent; Iscan, Gokalp; Goger, Fatih; Demirci, Betul; Elmacı, Ceren

    2017-11-01

    In the present study hydrodistilled essential oil and total methanol extracts of Tanacetum argenteum subsp. flabellifolium have been evaluated for their antimicrobial and antioxidant effects. The chemical composition of the oil and the crude extract were determined by GC/FID, GC/MS and LC/DAD/ESI-MS systems respectively. β-thujone (47.1%), α-pinene (19.1%) and α-thujone (10.5%) were the main compounds of the essential oil while the 5-Ocaffeoylquinic acid, 1,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 4,5-O-dicaffeoylquinic acid were identified as flavonoid content of the crude extract. The oil and the methanol extract were demonstrated moderate antimicrobial effects (MIC range; 0,062-2,0 mg/mL) against 21 different pathogenic micro organism. Total phenolic content was determined as 63 mg GAE in g extract and the DPPH radical scavenging effect was determined as 0.16 mg/mL (IC50) and TEAC was determined as 0.21mMol.

  12. Gene cluster responsible for validamycin biosynthesis in Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. jinggangensis 5008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yi; Bai, Linquan; Minagawa, Kazuyuki; Jian, Xiaohong; Li, Lei; Li, Jialiang; Chen, Shuangya; Cao, Erhu; Mahmud, Taifo; Floss, Heinz G; Zhou, Xiufen; Deng, Zixin

    2005-09-01

    A gene cluster responsible for the biosynthesis of validamycin, an aminocyclitol antibiotic widely used as a control agent for sheath blight disease of rice plants, was identified from Streptomyces hygroscopicus subsp. jinggangensis 5008 using heterologous probe acbC, a gene involved in the cyclization of D-sedoheptulose 7-phosphate to 2-epi-5-epi-valiolone of the acarbose biosynthetic gene cluster originated from Actinoplanes sp. strain SE50/110. Deletion of a 30-kb DNA fragment from this cluster in the chromosome resulted in loss of validamycin production, confirming a direct involvement of the gene cluster in the biosynthesis of this important plant protectant. A sequenced 6-kb fragment contained valA (an acbC homologue encoding a putative cyclase) as well as two additional complete open reading frames (valB and valC, encoding a putative adenyltransferase and a kinase, respectively), which are organized as an operon. The function of ValA was genetically demonstrated to be essential for validamycin production and biochemically shown to be responsible specifically for the cyclization of D-sedoheptulose 7-phosphate to 2-epi-5-epi-valiolone in vitro using the ValA protein heterologously overexpressed in E. coli. The information obtained should pave the way for further detailed analysis of the complete biosynthetic pathway, which would lead to a complete understanding of validamycin biosynthesis.

  13. Development of Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification for Detection of Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli in Sugarcane

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    Jing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ratoon stunt, caused by the xylem-limited coryneform bacterium Leifsonia xyli subsp. xyli (Lxx, is a deep bacteriosis and prevalent in most of sugarcane-producing countries. Based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP, we developed a method for detecting Lxx. The major advantages of the LAMP method are visual judgment by color and time saving with only 60 min for identification of Lxx and without the need for costly PCR apparatus and gel scanner. In the present study, positive and negative samples detected by the LAMP method were clearly distinguishable. When total DNA extracted from internode juice was used as the template, the sensitivity of LAMP was 10 times higher than that of the conventional PCR detection. The LAMP assay is a highly specific, rapid, and sensitive method for the diagnosis of ratoon stunt caused by Lxx in sugarcane. This is the first report of LAMP-based assay for the detection of Lxx in sugarcane.

  14. New Insights into the Enterococcus faecium and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus Host Interaction Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Hernández, Beatriz; Conde-Moreno, Elisa; Kwak, Young-Keun; Zamora, Javier; Colque-Navarro, Patricia; Möllby, Roland; Ruiz-Garbajosa, Patricia; Cantón, Rafael; García-Bermejo, Laura; del Campo, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus) were classically clustered into the Lancefield Group D streptococci and despite their taxonomic reclassification still share a similar genetic content and environment. Both species are considered as opportunistic pathogens. E. faecium is often associated with nosocomial bacteraemia, and S. gallolyticus is sporadically found in endocarditis of colorectal cancer patients. In both cases, the source of infection is commonly endogenous with a translocation process that launches through the intestinal barrier. To get new insights into the pathological processes preceding infection development of both organisms, we used an in vitro model with Caco-2 cells to study and compare the adhesion, invasion and translocation inherent abilities of 6 E. faecium and 4 S. gallolyticus well-characterized isolates. Additionally, biofilm formation on polystyrene, collagen I and IV was also explored. Overall results showed that E. faecium translocated more efficiently than S. gallolyticus, inducing a destabilization of the intestinal monolayer. Isolates Efm106, Efm121 and Efm113 (p < .001 compared to Ef222) exhibited the higher translocation ability and were able to adhere 2–3 times higher than S. gallolyticus isolates. Both species preferred the collagen IV coated surfaces to form biofilm but the S. gallolyticus structures were more compact (p = .01). These results may support a relationship between biofilm formation and vegetation establishment in S. gallolyticus endocarditis, whereas the high translocation ability of E. faecium high-risk clones might partially explain the increasing number of bacteraemia. PMID:27463203

  15. Inferring biomarkers for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and disease progression in cattle using experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magombedze, Gesham; Shiri, Tinevimbo; Eda, Shigetoshi; Stabel, Judy R.

    2017-03-01

    Available diagnostic assays for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) have poor sensitivities and cannot detect early stages of infection, therefore, there is need to find new diagnostic markers for early infection detection and disease stages. We analyzed longitudinal IFN-γ, ELISA-antibody and fecal shedding experimental sensitivity scores for MAP infection detection and disease progression. We used both statistical methods and dynamic mathematical models to (i) evaluate the empirical assays (ii) infer and explain biological mechanisms that affect the time evolution of the biomarkers, and (iii) predict disease stages of 57 animals that were naturally infected with MAP. This analysis confirms that the fecal test is the best marker for disease progression and illustrates that Th1/Th2 (IFN-γ/ELISA antibodies) assays are important for infection detection, but cannot reliably predict persistent infections. Our results show that the theoretical simulated macrophage-based assay is a potential good diagnostic marker for MAP persistent infections and predictor of disease specific stages. We therefore recommend specifically designed experiments to test the use of a based assay in the diagnosis of MAP infections.

  16. Secretory structures and essential oil composition in Stachys officinalis (L.) Trevisan subsp. officinalis (Lamiaceae) from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Claudia; Pellegrino, Roberto Maria; Selvaggi, Roberta; Tani, Corrado; Tirillini, Bruno; Maleci Bini, Laura

    2017-05-01

    The secretory structures and the volatile fraction of Stachys officinalis (L.) Trevisan subsp. officinalis (Lamiaceae) from Italy were studied for the first time. Peltate and small capitate trichomes were observed on the whole plant (leaves and inflorescences). In the peltate trichomes, an unusual polyphenols content was evidenced by the histochemical methods. The volatile fraction was obtained by a solvent extract from the distillation water of leaves and inflorescences and analysed by GC-MS. Forty-four constituents for leaves, representing 94.1% of the total volatiles, and 57 compounds for flowers, accounting for 90.1% of the total volatiles, were identified. (E)-caryophyllene (20.1%), (E)-nerolidol (14.3%), caryophyllene oxide (6.1%) and γ-cadinene (5.7%) were recognised as the main constituents for the leaf volatile fraction, while caryophyllene oxide (16.5%), (E)-nerolidol (15.4%), humulene epoxide II (9.2%) and α-pinene (7.0%) were the main compounds for the flower volatile fraction.

  17. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis sheep strains isolated from Cyprus sheep and goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapi, M; Botsaris, G; Slana, I; Moravkova, M; Babak, V; Avraam, M; Di Provvido, A; Georgiadou, S; Pavlik, I

    2015-04-01

    Paratuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map), is a chronic incurable infection of intestinal tract of animals. Molecular characterization of Map isolates classifies them into two major groups, 'Cattle' or Type II and 'Sheep' or Type I/III with a different phenotype, epidemiology, virulence and pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to examine 192 Map ELISA-positive sheep and goats from Cyprus using faecal culture and genotype Map isolates using IS1311 PCR and restriction endonuclease analysis (IS1311 PCR-REA) with HinfI restriction enzyme. Map was isolated from only four (4.6%) faecal samples out of 88 sheep and 15 (14.4%) faecal samples out of 104 goats. Genotyping of the isolates using IS1311 PCR-REA revealed that sheep and goat populations on the island are infected primarily by 'Sheep' strains. Only three Map isolates from goats originated from one farm were characterized as 'Cattle' strains. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Generation and screening of a comprehensive Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transposon mutant bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Lamont, Elise A; Harris, N Beth; Fenton, Robert J; Zinniel, Denise K; Liu, Xiaofei; Sotos, Josh; Feng, Zhengyu; Livneh-Kol, Ayala; Shpigel, Nahum Y; Czuprynski, Charles J; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Barletta, Raúl G

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne's Disease in ruminants. This enteritis has significant economic impact and worldwide distribution. Vaccination is one of the most cost effective infectious disease control measures. Unfortunately, current vaccines reduce clinical disease and shedding, but are of limited efficacy and do not provide long-term protective immunity. Several strategies have been followed to mine the MAP genome for virulence determinants that could be applied to vaccine and diagnostic assay development. In this study, a comprehensive mutant bank of 13,536 MAP K-10 Tn5367 mutants (P > 95%) was constructed and screened in vitro for phenotypes related to virulence. This strategy was designated to maximize identification of genes important to MAP pathogenesis without relying on studies of other mycobacterial species that may not translate into similar effects in MAP. This bank was screened for mutants with colony morphology alterations, susceptibility to D-cycloserine, impairment in siderophore production or secretion, reduced cell association, and decreased biofilm and clump formation. Mutants with interesting phenotypes were analyzed by PCR, Southern blotting and DNA sequencing to determine transposon insertion sites. These insertion sites mapped upstream from the MAP1152-MAP1156 cluster, internal to either the Mod operon gene MAP1566 or within the coding sequence of lsr2, and several intergenic regions. Growth curves in broth cultures, invasion assays and kinetics of survival and replication in primary bovine macrophages were also determined. The ability of vectors carrying Tn5370 to generate stable MAP mutants was also investigated.

  19. A seroepidemiological survey of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in sheep from North of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C Coelho

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was evaluate the risk factors for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map seroprevalence in sheep in the North of Portugal. The effects on seroprevalence of several variables such as individual characteristics, management practices, farm characteristics, animal health, and available veterinary services were evaluated. This information was then used in a multivariable logistic regression model in order to identify risk factors for Map seropositivity. Univariable analysis was used to screen the variables used in the logistic regression model. Variables that showed p values of <0.15 were retained for the multivariable analysis. Fifteen variables were associated with paratuberculosis in univariable analysis. The multivariable logistic regression model identified a number of variables as risk factors for seropositivity like sheep pure local and/or a cross of a local breed (OR=2.02, herd size with 31-60 head (OR=2.14, culling during the Spring-Summer season (OR=1.69 and the use of an anti-parasitic treatment such as Ivermectin as the only anti-parasitic medication (OR=5.60. Potential risk factors identified in this study support current recommendations for the control of paratuberculosis.

  20. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine milk from the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Pedro Paulo Feitosa de; Santos, André de Souza; Souza Neto, Orestes Luiz de; Kim, Pomy de Cássia Peixoto; Cavalcanti, Erika Fernanda Torres Samico Fernandes; Oliveira, Júnior Mário Baltazar de; Mota, Rinaldo Aparecido; Júnior, José Wilton Pinheiro

    The aim of this study was to detect the IS900 region of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in bovine milk samples using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and conventional PCR, and to study the agreement between these tests. A total of 121 bovine milk samples were collected from herds considered positive for MAP, from the State of Pernambuco, Brazil. MAP DNA was detected in 20 samples (16.5%) using conventional PCR and in 34 samples (28.1%) using qPCR. MAP DNA was detected in all of the 6 animal farms studied. Moderate agreement was found between qPCR and conventional PCR results, where the sensitivity and specificity of conventional PCR in relation to qPCR were 50% and 96.6%, respectively. Thus, the IS900 region of MAP was found in bovine milk samples from the State of Pernambuco. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of MAP DNA found in bovine milk in Northeast Brazil. We also demonstrated the qPCR technique is more sensitive than conventional PCR with respect to detection of MAP in milk samples. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  1. Leaching of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Soil under In Vitro Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran A. Raizman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (Map, the causative agent of Johne's disease, has a robust ability to survive in the environment. However, the ability of Map to migrate through soil to drainage tiles or ground water, leave the farm, and leak into local watersheds is inadequately documented. In order to assess the ability of Map to leach through soil, two laboratory experiments were conducted. In the first study, 8 columns (30 cm long each of a sandy loam soil were treated with pure cultures of Map. Two soil moisture levels and two Map concentrations were used. The columns were leached with 500 mL of water once a week for three weeks, the leachate was collected, and detection analysis was conducted. In the second experiment, manure from Map negative cows (control and Map high shedder cows (treatment were deposited on 8 similar columns and the columns were leached with 500 mL of water once a week for four weeks. Map detection and numeration in leachate samples were done with RT-PCR and culture techniques, respectively. Using RT-PCR, Map could be detected in the leachates in both experiments for several weeks but could only be recovered using culture techniques in experiment one. Combined, these experiments indicate the potential for Map to move through soil as a result of rainfall or irrigation following application.

  2. Interferon gamma response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis specific lipopentapeptide antigen L5P in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Sébastien; Branger, Maxime; Souriau, Armel; Lamoureux, Bérénice; Ganneau, Christelle; Richard, Gaëlle; Cochard, Thierry; Tholoniat, Christophe; Bay, Sylvie; Winter, Nathalie; Moyen, Jean Louis; Biet, Franck

    2015-10-01

    After Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) infection the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response indicative of early Th1 activation may be detected using interferon-gamma release assay (IGRA). Currently, the purified protein derivatives (PPDs), i.e., the total extract of mycobacteria antigens are used to recall CMI responses against Map. This study aimed to assess the ability of the chemically synthesized Map specific cell wall lipopentapeptide L5P to induce CMI response in cows infected by Map compared to PPD. L5P and PPD elicited an IFN-γ response in 12 and 35 animals from two Map infected herds respectively, but IFN-γ was not detected in the 13 cows recruited from a non-infected herd. Levels of IFN-γ detected were higher with PPD than with L5P. There was no correlation between the IFN-γ response and the humoral response to Map or faecal culture. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Germination and conjugation of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis in the intestine of gnotobiotic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcks, A; Smidt, L; Bahl, M I; Hansen, B M; Andrup, L; Hendriksen, N B; Licht, T R

    2008-05-01

    To study the ability of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis spores to germinate and subsequently transfer a conjugative plasmid in the intestinal tract of gnotobiotic rats. Germination was studied by feeding germ-free rats with spores of a B. thuringiensis strain harbouring a plasmid encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP), which enabled quantification of germinated bacteria by flow cytometry. To study in vivo conjugation, germ-free rats were first associated with a B. thuringiensis recipient strain and after 1 week an isogenic donor strain harbouring the conjugative plasmid pXO16 was introduced. Both strains were given as spores and transfer of pXO16 was observed from the donor to the recipient strain. Bacillus thuringiensis is able to have a full life cycle in the intestine of gnotobiotic rats including germination of spores, several cycles of growth and sporulation of vegetative cells. For the first time conjugative plasmid transfer in a mammalian intestinal tract was shown between two B. thuringiensis strains. Strains of B. thuringiensis are used worldwide to combat insect pests, and this study brings new insights into the nature of B. thuringiensis showing the potential of the bacteria to germinate and transfer DNA in the mammalian intestinal tract.

  4. Oligosaccharide binding proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveal a preference for host glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido, Daniel; Kim, Jae Han; German, J Bruce; Raybould, Helen E; Mills, David A

    2011-03-15

    Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO). Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs), part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB) and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  5. Oligosaccharide binding proteins from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis reveal a preference for host glycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Garrido

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis is a common member of the infant intestinal microbiota, and it has been characterized by its foraging capacity for human milk oligosaccharides (HMO. Its genome sequence revealed an overabundance of the Family 1 of solute binding proteins (F1SBPs, part of ABC transporters and associated with the import of oligosaccharides. In this study we have used the Mammalian Glycan Array to determine the specific affinities of these proteins. This was correlated with binding protein expression induced by different prebiotics including HMO. Half of the F1SBPs in B. infantis were determined to bind mammalian oligosaccharides. Their affinities included different blood group structures and mucin oligosaccharides. Related to HMO, other proteins were specific for oligomers of lacto-N-biose (LNB and polylactosamines with different degrees of fucosylation. Growth on HMO induced the expression of specific binding proteins that import HMO isomers, but also bind blood group and mucin oligosaccharides, suggesting coregulated transport mechanisms. The prebiotic inulin induced other family 1 binding proteins with affinity for intestinal glycans. Most of the host glycan F1SBPs in B. infantis do not have homologs in other bifidobacteria. Finally, some of these proteins were found to be adherent to intestinal epithelial cells in vitro. In conclusion, this study represents further evidence for the particular adaptations of B. infantis to the infant gut environment, and helps to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in this process.

  6. The anti-infective activity of punicalagin against Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanghui; Feng, Yuqing; Xu, Yunfeng; Wu, Qian; Han, Qi'an; Liang, Xiujun; Yang, Baowei; Wang, Xin; Xia, Xiaodong

    2015-07-01

    Punicalagin, a major bioactive component of pomegranate peel, has been proven to have antioxidant, antiviral, anti-apoptosis, and hepatoprotective properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-infective activity of punicalagin in a mouse model. C57BL/6 mice were initially challenged with Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar typhimurium (S. typhimurium) and then treated with punicalagin. Food and water consumption and body weight were recorded daily. On day 8 post infection, the mice were sacrificed to examine pathogen counts in tissues, hematological parameters, cytokine levels, and histological changes. Compared to mice only infected with S. typhimurium, punicalagin-treated mice had more food consumption and less weight loss. A higher survival rate and lower counts of viable S. typhimurium in feces, liver, spleen, and kidney were found in the punicalagin-treated mice. The enzyme linked immunosorbent assay showed that the levels of IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ in serum and the spleen and TNF-α in serum, the spleen and the liver were reduced by punicalagin. Moreover, more neutrophils and higher neutrophil-to-mononuclear cell ratios in the punicalagin-treated mice were observed. Histological examination showed that punicalagin protected cells in the liver and spleen from hemorrhagic necrosis. It is concluded that punicalagin has a beneficial effect against S. typhimurium infection in mice. The anti-infective properties, together with other nutritionally beneficial effects, make punicalagin a promising supplement in human food or animal feeds to prevent disease associated with S. typhimurium.

  7. Evaluation of the in vitro activity of gallium nitrate against Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fecteau, Marie-Eve; Fyock, Terry L; McAdams, Susan C; Boston, Raymond C; Whitlock, Robert H; Sweeney, Raymond W

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the in vitro susceptibility of various field isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (MAP) to gallium nitrate. 10 isolates of MAP, including 4 isolated from cattle, 2 isolated from bison, 1 isolated from an alpaca, and 3 isolated from humans. The in vitro susceptibility to gallium nitrate was tested by use of broth culture with detection of MAP growth by means of a nonradiometric automated detection method. For each MAP isolate, a series of 7 dilutions of gallium nitrate (concentrations ranging from 200 to 1,000 μM) were tested. Gallium nitrate was considered to have caused 90% and 99% inhibition of the MAP growth when the time to detection for culture of the MAP stock solution and a specific concentration of gallium nitrate was delayed and was similar to that obtained for culture of the MAP stock solution (without the addition of gallium nitrate) diluted 1:10 and 1:100, respectively. Gallium nitrate inhibited MAP growth in all 10 isolates. The susceptibility to gallium nitrate was variable among isolates, and all isolates of MAP were inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Overall, the concentration that resulted in 90% inhibition ranged from Gallium nitrate had activity against all 10 isolates of MAP tested in vitro and could potentially be used as a prophylactic agent to aid in the control of MAP infections during the neonatal period.

  8. Red brome (Bromus rubens subsp. madritensis) in North America: Possible modes for early introductions, subsequent spread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salo, L.F.

    2005-01-01

    Although invasions by exotic plants have increased dramatically as human travel and commerce have increased, few have been comprehensively described. Understanding the patterns of invasive species spread over space and time will help guide management activities and policy. Tracing the earliest appearances of an exotic plant reveals likely sites of introduction, paving the way for genetic studies to quantify founder events and identify potential source populations. Red brome (Bromus madritensis subsp. rubens) is a Mediterranean winter annual grass that has invaded even relatively undisturbed areas of western North America, where it threatens native plant communities. This study used herbarium records and contemporary published accounts to trace the early introductions and subsequent spread of red brome in western North America. The results challenge the most frequently cited sources describing the early history of this grass and suggest three possible modes for early introductions: the California Gold Rush and Central Valley wheat, southern California shipping, and northern California sheep. Subsequent periods of most rapid spread into new areas, from 1930 to 1942, and of greatest spread into new regions, during the past 50 years, coincide with warm Pacific Decadal Oscillation regimes, which are linked to increased winter precipitation in the southwestern USA and northern Mexico. Global environmental change, including increased atmospheric CO2 levels and N deposition, may be contributing to the success of red brome, relative to native species.

  9. Patterns of cytotype variation of Turnera sidoides subsp. pinnatifida (Turneraceae) in mountain ranges of central Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elías, Gabriela; Sartor, María; Solís Neffa, Viviana G

    2011-01-01

    Cytogeographical variability among 564 plants from 26 populations of Turnera sidoides subsp. pinnatifida in mountain ranges of central Argentina was analysed with meiotic chromosome counts and flow cytometry and is described at regional and local scales. Populations were primarily tetraploids (2n = 4x = 28), although diploid (2n = 2x = 14), hexaploid (2n = 2x = 42), and mixed populations of diploids and triploids (2n = 3x = 21) were also found. Diploids, triploids, and hexaploids were fewer in number and restricted to narrow areas, while tetraploids were the most common and geographically widespread cytotype. Diploids grew at higher altitudes and in colder and wet locations; tetraploids had the broadest ecological spectrum, while hexaploids occurred at the lowest altitudes and in drier conditions. The cytotypes were also spatially segregated at a microgeographical scale. Diploids grew in the piedmont, tetraploids were in the adjacent valley, and in the contact zone of both cytotypes, patches of diploids and triploids were found. At a regional scale, the distribution of the cytotypes may be governed by a combination of ecological and historical variables, while segregation in the contact zone may be independent of the selective environment because the cytotypes are unable to coexist as a result of reproductive exclusion. The role of triploids is also discussed.

  10. Cytotoxicity analysis of three Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis δ-endotoxins towards insect and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira Corrêa, Roberto Franco; Ardisson-Araújo, Daniel Mendes Pereira; Monnerat, Rose Gomes; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2012-01-01

    Three members of the δ-endotoxin group of toxins expressed by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. israelensis, Cyt2Ba, Cry4Aa and Cry11A, were individually expressed in recombinant acrystalliferous B. thuringiensis strains for in vitro evaluation of their toxic activities against insect and mammalian cell lines. Both Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins, activated with either trypsin or Spodoptera frugiperda gastric juice (GJ), resulted in different cleavage patterns for the activated toxins as seen by SDS-PAGE. The GJ-processed proteins were not cytotoxic to insect cell cultures. On the other hand, the combination of the trypsin-activated Cry4Aa and Cry11A toxins yielded the highest levels of cytotoxicity to all insect cells tested. The combination of activated Cyt2Ba and Cry11A also showed higher toxic activity than that of toxins activated individually. When activated Cry4Aa, Cry11A and Cyt2Ba were used simultaneously in the same assay a decrease in toxic activity was observed in all insect cells tested. No toxic effect was observed for the trypsin-activated Cry toxins in mammalian cells, but activated Cyt2Ba was toxic to human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) when tested at 20 µg/mL.

  11. Chemical composition and antioxidant activity of Origanum vulgare subsp. vulgare essential oil from Iran

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    M. Vazirian

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Essential oils are very complex mixture of components and their composition may vary in different species or varieties or even within the same variety. Origanum vulgare L. subsp. vulgare is one of the most distributed subspecies within the genus Origanum and has been found to be a poor-oil, categorized in cymyl, bornane or sabinyl chemotypes with higher proportion of sesquiterpenes. In this experiment, the Iranian sample was studied for the chemical composition of the oil and evaluation of its antioxidant activity. Methods: Essential oil was obtained by hydro-distillation and analyzed by GC/MS for determination of components. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by radical scavenging ability (DPPH method and reducing power (FRAP assay. Results: The sample belonged to “thymol” chemotype with the main components as thymol (37.13%, gama-terpinene (9.67%, carvacrol (9.57%, carvacrol methyl ether (6.88, cis-alpha-bisabolene (6.80%, eucalyptol (3.82%, p-cymene (3.58% and elemol (2.04%. The oil of plant showed very strong antioxidant activity (IC50=2.5 µg/mL in DPPH method, which was stronger than the standard antioxidants (Vit E and BHA, p

  12. Propionic acid production in glycerol/glucose co-fermentation by Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2013-06-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii can ferment glucose and glycerol to propionic acid with acetic and succinic acids as two by-products. Propionic acid production from glucose was relatively fast (0.19 g/Lh) but gave low product yield (~0.39 g/g) and selectivity (P/A: ~2.6; P/S: ~4.8). In contrast, glycerol with a more reduced state gave a high propionic acid yield (~0.65 g/g) and selectivity (P/A: ~31; P/S: ~11) but low productivity (0.11 g/L h). On the other hand, co-fermentation of glycerol and glucose at an appropriate mass ratio gave both a high yield (0.54-0.65 g/g) and productivity (0.18-0.23 g/L h) with high product selectivity (P/A: ~14; P/S: ~10). The carbon flux distributions in the co-fermentation as affected by the ratio of glycerol/glucose were investigated. Finally, co-fermentation with cassava bagasse hydrolysate and crude glycerol in a fibrous-bed bioreactor was demonstrated, providing an efficient way for economic production of bio-based propionic acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Interactive behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bacillus pumilus and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odame-Darkwah, J K; Marshall, D L

    1993-09-01

    Prevention of ropy bread caused by mucoid variants of certain bacilli presents a major problem for developing countries where cost of preservatives is prohibitive. Control of ropiness may be achieved by using propionic acid-producing bacteria in mixed culture with leavening yeasts. Therefore, interaction studies between Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii, Bacillus pumilus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were conducted in a chemically defined medium to test the relevance of such an approach. Growth of vegetative cells and germination of spores of B. pumilus were inhibited in media preincubated with P. shermanii at 30 degrees C for 13 h. Inhibition was bacteriostatic for the first 6 h of incubation, becoming bactericidal between 6 and 12 h. Inhibition of B. pumilus spore germination was greater than inhibition of growth of vegetative cells of the bacterium. Culturing of either P. shermanii with S. cerevisiae or B. pumilus with S. cerevisiae did not produce inhibitory effects on any of the organisms. Inhibition of B. pumilus by P. shermanii may be useful for prevention of ropiness in bread prepared by the sponge method, involving fermentation of a portion of the dough.

  14. [Isolation and purification of a protective protein from Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. Shermanii].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, A A; Vorob'eva, L I; Gordeeva, E A; Khodzhaev, E Iu; Ponomareva, G M; Nokel', E A

    1998-01-01

    A protein responsible for the protective and reactivating activities of two active fractions (AF1 and AF2) of the cells of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii was isolated. The active fraction AF1 was obtained by fractional precipitation of the cell-free extract of propionic acid bacteria between 20 and 40% ammonium sulfate saturation, whereas fraction AF2 was precipitated between 60 and 80% saturation. Further fractionation of AF1 and AF2 by gel filtration on Sephacryl S-200 and by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose yielded seven active subfractions, as revealed by testing for their protective activity on UV-inactivated cells of Escherichia coli. Analysis of subfraction AF2-2.5 by SDS-electrophoresis and HPLC showed that it contained an apparently homogeneous protein with a molecular mass of 44 +/- 2 kDa. The concentrational dependence of the protective activity of this protein was derived. Peptides of subfractions AF2-2.1 and AF2-2.2 with molecular masses lower than 15 kDa also exhibited protective activity.

  15. Development of healthy whey drink with Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacterium bifidum and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.K. Maity

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey beverage was prepared by utilizing Lactobacillus rhamnosus NCDO 243, Bifidobacterium bifidum NCDO 2715 and Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii MTCC 1371 in order to make a fermented probiotic healthy drink. The product made with 4 % mixed culture (1:1:1 inoculated (initial count - lactobacilli 6.2 x 107 CFU/mL, bifidobacteria 5.4 x 107 CFU/mL, propionibacteria 3.9 x 107 CFU/mL in deprotienized whey (4.6 % lactose, 0.62 % ash, 0.48 % fat and 0.5 % protein adjusted to pH 6.4 and incubated at 37 °C for 8 h has a good technological and dietetic criteria required for a probiotic product. Total bacterial count, lactobacilli count, bifidobacteria count, propionibacteria count, titratable acidity, β-D galactosidase activity, concentration of lactic acid and sensory properties were monitored during storage period. The whey beverage fermented for 8 h and prepared with 4 % inoculum of mixed culture (1:1:1 met the probiotic criterion by maintaining each type of bacterial population at counts greater than 108 CFU/mL up to 10 days of storage period. The titratable acidity as well as sensory properties did not change appreciably during first 7 days of storage. At the end of 15 days of storage, slight acidification was detected, although the beverage still retained an acceptable flavour.

  16. Lettuce genotype resistance to "soft rot" caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum

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    Kátia Cilene da Silva Felix

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot, caused by Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc, is the main bacterial disease affecting lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. crops in Brazil and leads to significant yield losses. This study aimed to assess the reaction of lettuce genotypes to soft rot induced by a virulent isolate and the stability of the resistance to three isolates varying in virulence. Using a descriptive ordinal scale ranging from 1 to 9 a classification system was defined: class 1 = resistant (R: severity (Sev 3.5. Of the 41 tested genotypes, 14 were classified as MR and 27 as S when inoculated with a Pcc isolate of intermediate virulence. Eleven of these genotypes (four S and seven MR were selected to test their resistance stability against three other isolates with an increasing degree of virulence (Pcc36 < Pcc-A1.1 < Pcc-23. Out of the 11 genotypes eight retained the original classification and three moved from S to MR resistant class when challenged with the least virulent isolate. Vitória de Santo Antão was the only genotype classified as MR for all tested isolates and is a promising candidate for durable soft rot resistance breeding.

  17. Purification and characterization of a bacteriocin from an oenological strain of Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dündar, Halil; Salih, Bekir; Bozoğlu, Faruk

    2016-05-18

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF), which improves organoleptic properties and biologic stability of some wines, may cause wine spoilage if uncontrolled. Bacteriocins were reported as efficient preservatives to control MLF through their bactericidal effect on malolactic bacteria. Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. cremoris W3 isolated from wine produces an inhibitory substance that is bactericidal against malolactic bacteria in model wine medium. Treatment of the culture supernatant of strain W3 with proteases eliminated the inhibitory activity, which proved that it is a true bacteriocin and we tentatively termed it mesentericin W3. The bacteriocin inhibited the growth of food-borne pathogenic bacteria such as Enterococcus faecalis, Listeria monocytogenes, and malolactic bacteria. It was active over a wide pH range and stable to organic solvents and heat. Mesentericin W3 was purified to homogeneity by a pH-mediated cell adsorption-desorption method, cation exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and reverse-phase chromatography. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy (MS) and partial amino acid sequence analysis revealed that mesentericin W3 was identical to mesentericin Y105.

  18. New Insights into the Enterococcus faecium and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus Host Interaction Mechanisms.

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    Ana María Sánchez-Díaz

    Full Text Available Enterococcus faecium and Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus were classically clustered into the Lancefield Group D streptococci and despite their taxonomic reclassification still share a similar genetic content and environment. Both species are considered as opportunistic pathogens. E. faecium is often associated with nosocomial bacteraemia, and S. gallolyticus is sporadically found in endocarditis of colorectal cancer patients. In both cases, the source of infection is commonly endogenous with a translocation process that launches through the intestinal barrier. To get new insights into the pathological processes preceding infection development of both organisms, we used an in vitro model with Caco-2 cells to study and compare the adhesion, invasion and translocation inherent abilities of 6 E. faecium and 4 S. gallolyticus well-characterized isolates. Additionally, biofilm formation on polystyrene, collagen I and IV was also explored. Overall results showed that E. faecium translocated more efficiently than S. gallolyticus, inducing a destabilization of the intestinal monolayer. Isolates Efm106, Efm121 and Efm113 (p < .001 compared to Ef222 exhibited the higher translocation ability and were able to adhere 2-3 times higher than S. gallolyticus isolates. Both species preferred the collagen IV coated surfaces to form biofilm but the S. gallolyticus structures were more compact (p = .01. These results may support a relationship between biofilm formation and vegetation establishment in S. gallolyticus endocarditis, whereas the high translocation ability of E. faecium high-risk clones might partially explain the increasing number of bacteraemia.

  19. Comparison of rapid diagnostic tests to detect Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis disseminated infection in bovine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Mehdi; Ghorbanpour, Masoud; Tajbakhsh, Samaneh; Mosavari, Nader

    2017-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis in cattle and other domestic and wild ruminants. The presence of MAP in tissues other than intestines and associated lymph nodes, such as meat and liver, is a potential public health concern. In the present study, the relationship between the results of rapid diagnostic tests of the Johne's disease, such as serum ELISA, rectal scraping PCR, and acid-fast staining, and the presence of MAP in liver was evaluated. Blood, liver, and rectal scraping samples were collected from 200 slaughtered cattle with unknown Johne's disease status. ELISA was performed to determine the MAP antibody activity in the serum. Acid-fast staining was performed on rectal scraping samples, and PCR was performed on rectal scraping and liver samples. PCR-positive liver samples were used for mycobacterial culture. Overall, the results of this study demonstrated that MAP can be detected and cultured from liver of slaughtered cattle and rapid diagnostic tests of Johne's disease have limited value in detecting cattle with MAP infection in liver. These findings show that the presence of MAP in liver tissue may occur in cows with negative results for rapid diagnostic tests and vice versa. Hence, liver might represent another possible risk of human exposure to MAP. Given concerns about a potential zoonotic role for MAP, these results show the necessity to find new methods for detecting cattle with MAP disseminated infection.

  20. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, A; Duarte, E; Amado, A; Ferronha, H; Botelho, A

    2008-07-01

    To compare three methods for DNA extraction from Mycobacterium bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The DNA was extracted from mycobacterial cultures using enzymatic extraction, combined bead beating and enzymatic extraction and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) extraction. The yield and quality of DNA were compared by spectrophotometry, agarose gel electrophoresis, restriction endonuclease analysis and PCR. The combined bead beating and enzymatic extraction method yielded more DNA. However, that method produced some sheared DNA, visible either by agarose gel electrophoresis or by restriction endonuclease analysis. All methods were appropriate for PCR amplification of a 123 bp fragment of IS6110 in M. bovis and M. tuberculosis, and of a 1700 bp fragment of FR300 region in M. avium avium. Combined bead beating and enzymatic extraction method was the most efficient and easy method for extracting DNA from bacteria of the M. tuberculosis complex. The results reveal important differences among the DNA extraction methods for mycobacteria, which are relevant for the success of further downstream molecular analysis.

  1. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection.

  2. Recent Advances in Understanding Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Pathogenesis and Citrus Canker Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ference, Christopher M; Gochez, Alberto M; Behlau, Franklin; Wang, Nian; Graham, James H; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2017-11-04

    Taxonomic status: Bacteria; Phylum Proteobacteria; Class Gammaproteobacteria; Order Xanthomonadles; Family Xanthomonadaceae; Genus Xanthomonas; Species Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc). Host range: Compatible hosts vary in their susceptibility to CC, with grapefruit, lime, and lemon being most susceptible, sweet orange being moderately susceptible, and kumquat and calamondin being among the least susceptible (Gottwald et al., 1993). Microbiological properties: Xcc is a rod-shaped (1.5 - 2.0 X 0.5 - 0.75 µm) gram-negative, aerobic bacterium with a single polar flagellum. The bacterium forms yellow colonies on culture media due to the production of xanthomonadin. Distribution: Present in South America, the British Virgin Islands, Africa, the Middle East, India, Asia, and the South Pacific islands. Localized incidence in the United States, Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia, Uruguay, Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Tanzania, Iran, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, and Bangladesh. Widespread throughout Paraguay, Comoros, China, Japan, Malaysia, and Vietnam. Eradicated from South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand. Absent from Europe. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The type III protein secretion system contributes to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri biofilm formation

    KAUST Repository

    Zimaro, Tamara

    2014-04-18

    Background: Several bacterial plant pathogens colonize their hosts through the secretion of effector proteins by a Type III protein secretion system (T3SS). The role of T3SS in bacterial pathogenesis is well established but whether this system is involved in multicellular processes, such as bacterial biofilm formation has not been elucidated. Here, the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (X. citri) was used as a model to gain further insights about the role of the T3SS in biofilm formation. Results: The capacity of biofilm formation of different X. citri T3SS mutants was compared to the wild type strain and it was observed that this secretion system was necessary for this process. Moreover, the T3SS mutants adhered proficiently to leaf surfaces but were impaired in leaf-associated growth. A proteomic study of biofilm cells showed that the lack of the T3SS causes changes in the expression of proteins involved in metabolic processes, energy generation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production and bacterial motility as well as outer membrane proteins. Furthermore, EPS production and bacterial motility were also altered in the T3SS mutants. Conclusions: Our results indicate a novel role for T3SS in X. citri in the modulation of biofilm formation. Since this process increases X. citri virulence, this study reveals new functions of T3SS in pathogenesis. 2014 Zimaro et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  4. Characterization of a Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium Operon Associated with Virulence and Drug Detoxification

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    Mariana Noelia Viale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lprG-p55 operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis is involved in the transport of toxic compounds. P55 is an efflux pump that provides resistance to several drugs, while LprG is a lipoprotein that modulates the host's immune response against mycobacteria. The knockout mutation of this operon severely reduces the replication of both mycobacterial species during infection in mice and increases susceptibility to toxic compounds. In order to gain insight into the function of LprG in the Mycobacterium avium complex, in this study, we assayed the effect of the deletion of lprG gene in the D4ER strain of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. The replacement of lprG gene with a hygromycin cassette caused a polar effect on the expression of p55. Also, a twofold decrease in ethidium bromide susceptibility was observed and the resistance to the antibiotics rifampicin, amikacin, linezolid, and rifabutin was impaired in the mutant strain. In addition, the mutation decreased the virulence of the bacteria in macrophages in vitro and in a mice model in vivo. These findings clearly indicate that functional LprG and P55 are necessary for the correct transport of toxic compounds and for the survival of MAA in vitro and in vivo.

  5. Preventive effect of taraxasteryl acetate from Inula britannica subsp. japonica on experimental hepatitis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, K; Kiyohara, H; Tanaka, M; Matsumoto, T; Cyong, J C; Yamada, H

    1995-02-01

    The survival rate for acute hepatic failure induced by Propionibacterium acnes and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was increased when a hot water extract from the flowers of Inula britannica L. subsp. japonica Kitam. was injected into the experimental hepatitis mice, and anti-hepatitis substances could be extracted with CHCl3. The CHCl3 extract from I.britannica was fractionated and anti-hepatitis fractions IB-3-2 and IB-3-3 were obtained. IB-3-3 had the most potent anti-hepatitis activity among the fractions but further purification of the active compound was not achieved because of the low yield. IB-3-2 contained only one substance which was identified to be taraxasteryl acetate by 1H- and 13C-NMR and MS. Taraxasteryl acetate showed potent preventive activity against acute hepatic failure induced by P.acnes and LPS in a dose-dependent manner, however deacetylation and modification of the olefinic bonds significantly decreased the anti-hepatitis activity of taraxasteryl acetate. Taraxasteryl acetate also inhibited the increment of plasma transaminase on acute hepatic failure induced by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) or D-galactosamine. From a histological study it appeared that degeneration and necrosis, which were observed in the liver from CCl4 mice, were not found in the liver cells from taraxasteryl acetate treated mice. These results indicates that taraxasteryl acetate shows preventive effects on experimental hepatitis caused by either immunologically induced injuries or hepatotoxic chemicals.

  6. In vitro assessment of the antimicrobial susceptibility of caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, A; Tatay-Dualde, J; Amores, J; Prats-van der Ham, M; Sánchez, A; de la Fe, C; Contreras, A; Corrales, J C; Gómez-Martín, Á

    2016-08-01

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum mycoplasmacidal concentration (MMC) of 17 antimicrobials against 41 Spanish caprine isolates of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. capri (Mmc) obtained from different specimens (milk, external auricular canal and semen) were determined using a liquid microdilution method. For half of the isolates, the MIC was also estimated for seven of the antimicrobials using an epsilometric test (ET), in order to compare both methods and assess the validity of ET. Mutations in genes gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE conferring fluoroquinolone resistance, which have been recently described in Mmc, were investigated using PCR. The anatomical origin of the isolate had no effect on its antimicrobial susceptibility. Moxifloxacin and doxycycline had the lowest MIC values. The rest of the fluoroquinolones studied (except norfloxacin), together with tylosin and clindamycin, also had low MIC values, although the MMC obtained for clindamycin was higher than for the other antimicrobials. For all the aminoglycosides, spiramycin and erythromycin, a notable level of resistance was observed. The ET was in close agreement with broth microdilution at low MICs, but not at intermediate or high MICs. The analysis of the genomic sequences revealed the presence of an amino acid substitution in codon 83 of the gene gyrA, which has not been described previously in Mmc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reducing the Bitterness of Tuna (Euthynnus pelamis Dark Meat with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393

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    Ernani S. Sant’Anna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available During the process of canning tuna fish, considerable amounts of dark tuna meat are left over because of its bitterness, which are then used in the production of animal food. Fermentation with Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei ATCC 393 was used as an alternative to reduce this bitter taste. Samples of meat were prepared, vacuum packed and then stored at –18 °C. The frozen dark meat was used immediately after defrosting and the experiment was carried out with 2 and 4 % of NaCl with the addition of 2 and 4 % of glucose, respectively. The dark tuna meat was inoculated with lactic acid bacteria (LAB and fermented at 10 °C for 30 days. The fermentation process was monitored through bacteriological and chemical analyses, when an increase of acidity and the corresponding decrease of pH were observed due to the prevalence of LAB. Sensorial analysis, using a test of multiple comparison, was carried out with pastes of fermented dark tuna meat and presented a significant difference when compared to the paste control, indicating the reduction of bitter taste.

  8. Ciclo de vida de Pellaea ternifolia (Cav. Link subsp. ternifolia (Pteridaceae-Polypodiidae

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    Jorge Huerta-Zavala

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Se describe el ciclo de vida dePellaea ternifolia(Cav. Link subsp.ternifolia. Los especímenes fueron recolectados en un bosque dePinusperturbado en San Miguel de los Alcanfores, municipio de Tlaxco, Tlaxcala, México. Las esporas fueron sembradas en vasos de unicel de 262 ml con cerámica (barro molido, piedra de río, tela de mosquitero y tres soportes de cultivo (tierra, maquique y musgo, todo previamente esterilizado y cerrado con plástico y alambre de cobre. El ciclo fue isospórico con desarrollo del protalo tipoAdiantum. En la fase cordada se apreciaron gametófitos con anteridios y arquegonio en una proporción cercana al 70% y el otro 30% fueron gametófitos apogámicos. Los esporófitos jóvenes se obtuvieron a partir de los 63 días.

  9. Antioxidant activity and phenolic profile of different organs of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica from Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toul, Fethi; Belyagoubi-Benhammou, Nabila; Zitouni, Amel; Atik-Bekkara, Fawzia

    2017-03-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant activity of 21 extracts prepared from seven parts of Pistacia atlantica Desf. subsp. atlantica. (Fruits, leaves, buds, stems, roots, internal and external trunk barks) collected from Tlemcen, Algeria. Total phenolic, flavonoid and flavonol contents were determined and the antioxidant properties were measured using different assays: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), ferric antioxidant reducing power and β-carotene bleaching assay. BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) was used for comparison purposes. The results showed that the extracts of leaves and buds had the highest phenolic contents with 255.789 ± 4.733 and 233.946 ± 6.205 mg GAE/g DM, respectively. For the antioxidant activity, values of EC50 concentrations ranged from 0.059 to 5.712 mg/mL for DPPH, 0.015 to 3.141 mg/mL for reducing power and 0.068 to 5.021 mg/mL for β-carotene method, for all studied extracts. Analysing the phenolic composition, 10 components were identified in different parts of the plant.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus in interaction with THP-1 macrophage-like cells.

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    Imke Grimm

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus (S. gallolyticus is a pathogen of infective endocarditis. It was observed previously that this bacterium survives longer in macrophages than other species and the phagocytic uptake by and survival in THP-1 macrophages is strain-dependent.The phagocytosis assay was performed with THP-1 macrophages. S. gallolyticus specific whole genome microarrays were used for transcriptome analysis.Better survival in macrophages was observed for UCN34, BAA-2069 and ATCC43143 than for DSM16831 and LMG17956. S. gallolyticus strains show high resistance to tested bactericidal agents (acid, lysozyme and hydrogen peroxide. S. gallolyticus stimulates significant lower cytokine gene expression and causes less lysis of macrophages compared to the control strain Staphylococcus aureus. S. gallolyticus reacts to oxidative burst with a higher gene expression of NADH oxidase initially at the early phase. Expression of genes involved in D-alanylation of teichoic acid, carbohydrate metabolism and transport systems were upregulated thereafter.S. gallolyticus is very resistant to bactericidal agents normally causing degradation of bacteria in phagolysosomes. Additionally, the D-alanylation of teichoic acid is an important factor for survival.

  11. A protein expression system for tandem affinity purification in Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Giordanni C; Martins, Paula M M; Martins, Daniela A B; Gomes, Eleni; Ferreira, Henrique

    2016-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by the Gram-negative bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xac), is one of the most devastating diseases to affect citrus crops. There is no treatment for citrus canker; effective control against the spread of Xac is usually achieved by the elimination of affected plants along with that of asymptomatic neighbors. An in depth understanding of the pathogen is the keystone for understanding of the disease; to this effect we are committed to the development of strategies to ease the study of Xac. Genome sequencing and annotation of Xac revealed that ∼37% of the genome is composed of hypothetical ORFs. To start a systematic characterization of novel factors encoded by Xac, we constructed integrative-vectors for protein expression specific to this bacterium. The vectors allow for the production of TAP-tagged proteins in Xac under the regulation of the xylose promoter. In this study, we show that a TAP-expression vector, integrated into the amy locus of Xac, does not compromise its virulence. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that the polypeptide TAP can be overproduced in Xac and purified from the soluble phase of cell extracts. Our results substantiate the use of our vectors for protein expression in Xac thus contributing a novel tool for the characterization of proteins and protein complexes generated by this bacterium in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Pilot Plant Production of Lactic acid by Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei

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    S.S Mirdamadi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of present study, was to scale up the production of L (+ lactic acid from the laboratory to pilot plant using Lactobacillus casei subsp. casei PTCC 1608. Moreover, the minimum inhibitory concentration of the produced lactic acid and sodium lactate against 4 test strains including Staphylococcus aureus PTCC 1113, Microccoccus luteus PTTC 1110, Escherichia coli PTCC 1330 and Listeria monocytogenes PTCC 1304 were evaluated. According to the results, the specific growth rate of each test strain was decreased by lactic acid. The inhibitory effect of the sodium lactate was lower than lactic acid in all of the experiments. The best carbon (glucose, lactose and whey and nitrogen (corn steep powder sources were optimized in batch and fed batch system and also pH, temperature and aeration were improved in shake flask incubator, 20 l and 750 l stirred tank reactors (STR. Glucose (80 g/l supplemented with (50 g/l whey was found as the best production medium.Productivity and yield of calcium lactate production in laboratory scale were 0.51 g/lh and 0.56%, respectively. Fed batch production of calcium lactate in 20 l bioreactor increased the productivity and yield up to 2.47 and 0.83%. Production and productivity was increased up to 350 g/l and 5.4 g/lh, respectively in scaled up processes by 750 liters bioreactor (STR.

  13. Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum – the causal agent of broccoli soft rot in Serbia

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    Katarina Gašić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Soft rot symptoms were observed on broccoli plants in several commercial fields in the western part of Serbia. Six strains of bacteria were isolated from diseased tissues and identified as Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum using conventional bacteriological and molecular methods. All strains were non-fluorescent, gram-negative, facultative anaerobes, oxidase-negative and catalase-positive, causing soft rot on potato and carrot slices and did not induce hypersensitive reaction on tobacco leaves. They grew in 5% NaCl and at 37°C, did not produce acid from α-methyl glucoside, sorbitol and maltose, nor reducing substances from sucrose, but utilized lactose and trehalose, and did not produce indole or lecithinase. The investigated strains showed characteristic growth on Logan’s medium and did not produce blue pigmented indigoidine on GYCA medium nor “fried egg” colonies on PDA. The identity of strains was confirmed by ITS-PCR and ITS-RFLP analyses and by sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. In a pathogenicity assay, all strains caused tissue discoloration and soft rot development on inoculated broccoli head tissue fragments.

  14. The role of IL-10 in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tariq; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Zhao, Deming; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an intracellular pathogen and is the causative agent of Johne's disease of domestic and wild ruminants. Johne's disease is characterized by chronic granulomatous enteritis leading to substantial economic losses to the livestock sector across the world. MAP persistently survives in phagocytic cells, most commonly in macrophages by disrupting its early antibacterial activity. MAP triggers several signaling pathways after attachment to pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) of phagocytic cells. MAP adopts a survival strategy to escape the host defence mechanisms via the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. The signaling mechanism initiated through toll like receptor 2 (TLR2) activates MAPK-p38 results in up-regulation of interleukin-10 (IL-10), and subsequent repression of inflammatory cytokines. The anti-inflammatory response of IL-10 is mediated through membrane-bound IL-10 receptors, leading to trans-phosphorylation and activation of Janus Kinase (JAK) family receptor-associated tyrosine kinases (TyKs), that promotes the activation of latent transcription factors, signal transducer and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). IL-10 is an important inhibitory cytokine playing its role in blocking phagosome maturation and apoptosis. In the current review, we describe the importance of IL-10 in early phases of the MAP infection and regulatory mechanisms of the IL-10 dependent pathways in paratuberculosis. We also highlight the strategies to target IL-10, MAPK and STAT3 in other infections caused by intracellular pathogens.

  15. The isolation and characterization of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni from domestic geese (Anser anser).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, F; Atabay, H I; Akan, M

    2001-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the presence of thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in free range domestic geese, and to characterize isolated strains using phenotyping criteria and SDS-PAGE of whole-cell proteins. Forty cloacal swabs from two different flocks of domestic geese were examined. All Camp. jejuni strains isolated from geese were biotyped using the Lior biotyping scheme. Twelve Camp. jejuni isolates were also tested for their susceptibility to 17 different antibacterial agents by a disc diffusion Fourteen of the isolates were also subjected to SDS-PAGE. All of the geese examined were found to harbour Camp. jejuni. Six geese carried more than one species of Campylobacter. All strains examined were susceptible to various antibiotics but resistant to penicillin G and cephalothin. Eleven strains (92%) were resistant to sodium cefuroxime, and eight (67%) were resistant to cloxacillin, ampicillin and colistin sulphate. Three strains (25%) were resistant to tetracycline, and one strain was resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim and kanamycin. Nine strains were subtyped as Camp. jejuni subsp. jejuni biotype II and the remaining ones as biotype I. There were 96% and 100% similarities between all the strains examined by SDS-PAGE. This study showed that Camp. jejuni were common in the intestinal tract of domestic geese. Geese should be considered as potential reservoirs for human and animal campylobacteriosis. The antibiotic resistance data from this study also showed that fluoroquinolone resistance, which appears to be a problem in poultry isolates in some countries, is not yet a problem in these geese.

  16. Ectopic accumulation of linalool confers resistance to Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri in transgenic sweet orange plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Takehiko; Endo, Tomoko; Rodríguez, Ana; Fujii, Hiroshi; Goto, Shingo; Matsuura, Takakazu; Hojo, Yuko; Ikeda, Yoko; Mori, Izumi C; Fujikawa, Takashi; Peña, Leandro; Omura, Mitsuo

    2017-05-01

    In order to clarify whether high linalool content in citrus leaves alone induces strong field resistance to citrus canker caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), and to assess whether this trait can be transferred to a citrus type highly sensitive to the bacterium, transgenic 'Hamlin' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) plants over-expressing a linalool synthase gene (CuSTS3-1) were generated. Transgenic lines (LIL) with the highest linalool content showed strong resistance to citrus canker when spray inoculated with the bacterium. In LIL plants inoculated by wounding (multiple-needle inoculation), the linalool level was correlated with the repression of the bacterial titer and up-regulation of defense-related genes. The exogenous application of salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate or linalool triggered responses similar to those constitutively induced in LIL plants. The linalool content in Ponkan mandarin leaves was significantly higher than that of leaves from six other representative citrus genotypes with different susceptibilities to Xcc. We propose that linalool-mediated resistance might be unique to citrus tissues accumulating large amounts of volatile organic compounds in oil cells. Linalool might act not only as a direct antibacterial agent, but also as a signal molecule involved in triggering a non-host resistance response against Xcc. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Estudo dos parâmetros da ultrafiltração de permeado de soro de queijo fermentado por Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis Ultrafiltration conditions of whey permeate fermented by Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis

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    Viviane BRONSTEIN

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available Permeado de soro doce, suplementado com extrato de levedura e peptona, foi utilizado como meio de crescimento para Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. No final da fase exponencial de crescimento, o meio de cultura fermentado foi submetido a uma ultrafiltração com o objetivo de concentrar o microrganismo. Foram realizados 6 processamentos diferentes, nos quais variou-se as condições iniciais da ultrafiltração, tendo sido avaliados os seguintes parâmetros: porosidade da membrana, pH e número de células viáveis no permeado e no retentado, a fim de ser estudado a influência de cada parâmetro na taxa de permeação da ultrafiltração. As membranas utilizadas foram eficazes como meio de barragem para o microrganismo Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, ficando o retentado com uma média celular de 10(8 ufc/ml e o permeado com uma média celular de 10² ufc/ml. Membranas de diferentes porosidades tiveram taxas de fluxo semelhantes. O aumento da concentração celular provocou a diminuição do fluxo. O pH também influenciou a taxa de permeação, havendo um aumento do fluxo quando foi utilizado um pH inicial mais alto.Cheese whey permeate supplemented with yeast extract and peptone was used as a growth medium for the bacteria Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. At the end of the exponential growth phase, the fermented growth medium was ultrafiltered to concentrate the microorganism and to evaluate the effect of the membrane porosity, inicial UF pH and cellular concentration in permeation rate during the ultrafiltration process. The membranes used were efficient as a mean of a barrage for the Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. On average, the cellular concentrations were 10(8 CFU/mL and 10² CFU/mL for retentate and permeate, respectively. Membranes of different porosities had very similar flux rates. Better flow rates were obtained with inicial UF pH 6,5 and with the minors micrrorganism concentration.

  18. Biosystematic studies on Dactylis L. 2. Personal research. 2.1. Morphological differentiation and occurrence of representatives of the genus Dactylis in Poland. 2.1.3. Distribution of D. glomerata subsp. aschersoniana (Graebn. Thell. in Poland

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    Marta Mizianty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the author presents the distribution of D. g. subsp. aschersoniana (Graebn. Thell. in 198 localities in Poland. The studies on distribution were based mainly on revision and verification of materials from Polish herbaria. It is stated that subsp. aschersoniana occurs in deciduous forests in lowlands and on plateaus as well as in lower mountain altitudes. Part of the localities are situated beyond the present eastern limit of the Fagus sylvatica distribution. This confirms the opinion that this subspecies is not connected with beech woods but rather with oak-hornbeam forests. Sometimes subsp. glomerata, subsp. slovenica and subsp. aschersoniana were found in one locality. This fact is very important in the context of gene-flow between these three subspecies.

  19. [The relationship of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni enterotoxigenicity and the increase of cAMP and electrolyte changes in the rat intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, H; Toro, J

    1998-08-01

    Small intestine alterations produced by the enterotoxigenic capacity of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni are similar to the hydric, electrolytic and pathological changes caused by choleraic and thermolabile Escherichia coli toxins. To study the enterotoxigenic capacity of 4 strains of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni using the intestinal loop model. Rat intestinal loops were inoculated with culture filtrates of the four strains. Enterotoxigenicity was assessed by fluid accumulation, the increase in Na+ and Cl- in the loop fluid, and cAMP increase in loop tissues. An enterotoxigenic Escherichia coil strain and sterile Brucella both were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The filtrates of two strains produced fluid accumulation in the loops, significantly increased Na+ and Cl- secretion to the intestinal lumen and increased tissue cAMP levels. Some strains of Campylobacter jejuni subsp. jejuni are able to show enterotoxigenicity in vivo, increasing cAMP levels in the intestinal cells and altering electrolyte exchange mechanisms.

  20. Sensitive and specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detecting serum antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in fallow deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, José M; Balseiro, Ana; Casais, Rosa; Abendaño, Naiara; Fitzgerald, Liam E; Garrido, Joseba M; Juste, Ramon A; Alonso-Hearn, Marta

    2014-08-01

    The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the diagnostic test most commonly used in efforts to control paratuberculosis in domestic ruminants. However, commercial ELISAs have not been validated for detecting antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in wild animals. In this study, we compared the sensitivities and specificities of five ELISAs using individual serum samples collected from 41 fallow deer with or without histopathological lesions consistent with paratuberculosis. Two target antigenic preparations were selected, an ethanol-treated protoplasmic preparation obtained from a fallow deer M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis isolate (ELISAs A and B) and a paratuberculosis protoplasmic antigen (PPA3) (ELISAs C and D). Fallow deer antibodies bound to the immobilized antigens were detected by using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated anti-fallow deer IgG antibody (ELISAs A and C) or HRP-conjugated protein G (ELISAs B and D). A commercially available assay, ELISA-E, which was designed to detect M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibodies in cattle, sheep, and goats, was also tested. Although ELISAs A, C, and E had the same sensitivity (72%), ELISAs A and C were more specific (100%) for detecting fallow deer with lesions consistent with paratuberculosis at necropsy than was the ELISA-E (87.5%). In addition, the ELISA-A was particularly sensitive for detecting fallow deer in the latent stages of infection (62.5%). The antibody responses detected with the ELISA-A correlated with both the severity of enteric lesions and the presence of acid-fast bacteria in gut tissue samples. In summary, our study shows that the ELISA-A can be a cost-effective diagnostic tool for preventing the spread of paratuberculosis among fallow deer populations. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Gene clusters located on two large plasmids determine spore crystal association (SCA) in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. finitimus strain YBT-020.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yiguang; Ji, Fang; Shang, Hui; Zhu, Qian; Wang, Pengxia; Xu, Chengchen; Deng, Yun; Peng, Donghai; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Crystals in Bacillus thuringiensis are usually formed in the mother cell compartment during sporulation and are separated from the spores after mother cell lysis. In a few strains, crystals are produced inside the exosporium and are associated with the spores after sporulation. This special phenotype, named 'spore crystal association' (SCA), typically occurs in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus. Our aim was to identify genes determining the SCA phenotype in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus strain YBT-020. Plasmid conjugation experiments indicated that the SCA phenotype in this strain was tightly linked with two large plasmids (pBMB26 and pBMB28). A shuttle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of strain YBT-020 was constructed. Six fragments from BAC clones were screened from this library and discovered to cover the full length of pBMB26; four others were found to cover pBMB28. Using fragment complementation testing, two fragments, each of approximately 35 kb and located on pBMB26 and pBMB28, were observed to recover the SCA phenotype in an acrystalliferous mutant, B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. Furthermore, deletion analysis indicated that the crystal protein gene cry26Aa from pBMB26, along with five genes from pBMB28, were indispensable to the SCA phenotype. Gene disruption and frame-shift mutation analyses revealed that two of the five genes from pBMB28, which showed low similarity to crystal proteins, determined the location of crystals inside the exosporium. Gene disruption revealed that the three remaining genes, similar to spore germination genes, contributed to the stability of the SCA phenotype in strain YBT-020. Our results thus identified the genes determining the SCA phenotype in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus.

  2. Gene clusters located on two large plasmids determine spore crystal association (SCA in Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. finitimus strain YBT-020.

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    Yiguang Zhu

    Full Text Available Crystals in Bacillus thuringiensis are usually formed in the mother cell compartment during sporulation and are separated from the spores after mother cell lysis. In a few strains, crystals are produced inside the exosporium and are associated with the spores after sporulation. This special phenotype, named 'spore crystal association' (SCA, typically occurs in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus. Our aim was to identify genes determining the SCA phenotype in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus strain YBT-020. Plasmid conjugation experiments indicated that the SCA phenotype in this strain was tightly linked with two large plasmids (pBMB26 and pBMB28. A shuttle bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC library of strain YBT-020 was constructed. Six fragments from BAC clones were screened from this library and discovered to cover the full length of pBMB26; four others were found to cover pBMB28. Using fragment complementation testing, two fragments, each of approximately 35 kb and located on pBMB26 and pBMB28, were observed to recover the SCA phenotype in an acrystalliferous mutant, B. thuringiensis strain BMB171. Furthermore, deletion analysis indicated that the crystal protein gene cry26Aa from pBMB26, along with five genes from pBMB28, were indispensable to the SCA phenotype. Gene disruption and frame-shift mutation analyses revealed that two of the five genes from pBMB28, which showed low similarity to crystal proteins, determined the location of crystals inside the exosporium. Gene disruption revealed that the three remaining genes, similar to spore germination genes, contributed to the stability of the SCA phenotype in strain YBT-020. Our results thus identified the genes determining the SCA phenotype in B. thuringiensis subsp. finitimus.

  3. Molecular characterization of a DNA fragment harboring the replicon of pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis

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    Yu Ziniu

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of Gram-positive and spore-forming bacteria. Most isolates of B. thuringiensis can bear many endogenous plasmids, and the number and size of these plasmids can vary widely among strains or subspecies. As far as we know, the replicon of the plasmid pBMB165 is the first instance of a plasmid replicon being isolated from subsp. tenebrionis and characterized. Results A 20 kb DNA fragment containing a plasmid replicon was isolated from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 and characterized. By Southern blot analysis, this replicon region was determined to be located on pBMB165, the largest detected plasmid (about 82 kb of strain YBT-1765. Deletion analysis revealed that a replication initiation protein (Rep165, an origin of replication (ori165 and an iteron region were required for replication. In addition, two overlapping ORFs (orf6 and orf10 were found to be involved in stability control of plasmid. Sequence comparison showed that the replicon of pBMB165 was homologous to the pAMβ1 family replicons, indicating that the pBMB165 replicon belongs to this family. The presence of five transposable elements or remnants thereof in close proximity to and within the replicon control region led us to speculate that genetic exchange and recombination are potentially responsible for the divergence among the replicons of this plasmid family. Conclusion The replication and stability features of the pBMB165 from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 were identified. Of particular interest is the homology and divergence shared between the pBMB165 replicon and other pAMβ1 family replicons.

  4. Molecular characterization of a DNA fragment harboring the replicon of pBMB165 from Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junyan; Guo, Suxia; Mahillon, Jacques; Van der Auwera, Géraldine A; Wang, Li; Han, Dongmei; Yu, Ziniu; Sun, Ming

    2006-10-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis belongs to the Bacillus cereus sensu lato group of Gram-positive and spore-forming bacteria. Most isolates of B. thuringiensis can bear many endogenous plasmids, and the number and size of these plasmids can vary widely among strains or subspecies. As far as we know, the replicon of the plasmid pBMB165 is the first instance of a plasmid replicon being isolated from subsp. tenebrionis and characterized. A 20 kb DNA fragment containing a plasmid replicon was isolated from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 and characterized. By Southern blot analysis, this replicon region was determined to be located on pBMB165, the largest detected plasmid (about 82 kb) of strain YBT-1765. Deletion analysis revealed that a replication initiation protein (Rep165), an origin of replication (ori165) and an iteron region were required for replication. In addition, two overlapping ORFs (orf6 and orf10) were found to be involved in stability control of plasmid. Sequence comparison showed that the replicon of pBMB165 was homologous to the pAMbeta1 family replicons, indicating that the pBMB165 replicon belongs to this family. The presence of five transposable elements or remnants thereof in close proximity to and within the replicon control region led us to speculate that genetic exchange and recombination are potentially responsible for the divergence among the replicons of this plasmid family. The replication and stability features of the pBMB165 from B. thuringiensis subsp. tenebrionis YBT-1765 were identified. Of particular interest is the homology and divergence shared between the pBMB165 replicon and other pAMbeta1 family replicons.

  5. The mosaic architecture of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida pAsa4 plasmid and its consequences on antibiotic resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine H. Tanaka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, the causative agent of furunculosis in salmonids, is an issue especially because many isolates of this bacterium display antibiotic resistances, which limit treatments against the disease. Recent results suggested the possible existence of alternative forms of pAsa4, a large plasmid found in A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida and bearing multiple antibiotic resistance genes. The present study reveals the existence of two newly detected pAsa4 variants, pAsa4b and pAsa4c. We present the extensive characterization of the genomic architecture, the mobile genetic elements and the antimicrobial resistance genes of these plasmids in addition to the reference pAsa4 from the strain A449. The analysis showed differences between the three architectures with consequences on the content of resistance genes. The genomic plasticity of the three pAsa4 variants could be partially explained by the action of mobile genetic elements like insertion sequences. Eight additional isolates from Canada and Europe that bore similar antibiotic resistance patterns as pAsa4-bearing strains were genotyped and specific pAsa4 variants could be attributed to phenotypic profiles. pAsa4 and pAsa4c were found in Europe, while pAsa4b was found in Canada. In accordance with their content in conjugative transfer genes, only pAsa4b and pAsa4c can be transferred by conjugation in Escherichia coli. The plasticity of pAsa4 variants related to the acquisition of antibiotic resistance indicates that these plasmids may pose a threat in terms of the dissemination of antimicrobial-resistant A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida bacteria.

  6. Screening in a Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus collection to select a strain able to survive to the human intestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Clotilde; Botella-Carretero, José I; García-Albiach, Raimundo; Pozuelo, María J; Rodríguez-Baños, Mercedes; Baquero, Fernando; Baltadjieva, María A; del Campo, Rosa

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity and resistance of Lactobacillus bulgaricus sbsp. delbrueckii collection with 100 isolates from different home-made yogurt in rural Bulgarian areas were determined. The strain K98 was the most resistant to bile salts and low pH. Survival and effects on short chain fatty acids production were tested in 20 healthy volunteers. High genetic diversity was observed in the L. bulgaricus collection by RAPD, whereas the ability of tolerate high deoxycholic acid concentrations, and different acid pHs was variable. The strain K98 was selected and used to prepare a homemade yogurt which was administered to 20 healthy volunteers (500 ml/day during 15d). A basal faecal sample and another after yogurt intake were recovered. DGGE experiments, using both universal and Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) primers, demonstrated no significant changes in the qualitative composition of gut microbiota. A band corresponding to L. bulgaricus was observed in all 20 samples. Viable L. bulgaricus K98 strain was only recovered in one volunteer. After yogurt intake we found an increase of LAB and Clostridium perfringens, and a decrease of Bacteroides- Prevotella-Porphyromonas. In addition, increases of acetic, butyric and 2-hydroxy-butyric acids in faeces were detected. Genetic diversity of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus especie is high We have isolated a probiotic resistant strain to bile and high acidity, L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus-K98. Qualitative and quantitative changes in the intestinal microbiota are found after ingestion of a homemade yogurt containing this strain, with a concomitant increase in faecal SCFA. Our findings support the interest in developing further studies providing different amounts of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus-K98, and should evaluate its clinical effects in human disease. Copyright © AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2013. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  7. Marked Differences in Mucosal Immune Responses Induced in Ileal versus Jejunal Peyer's Patches to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Secreted Proteins following Targeted Enteric Infection in Young Calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facciuolo, Antonio; Gonzalez-Cano, Patricia; Napper, Scott; Griebel, Philip J; Mutharia, Lucy M

    2016-01-01

    In cattle, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection is primarily mediated through M cells overlying Peyer's patches (PP) in the ileum. The capacity of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis to invade ileal PP (IPP) versus discrete PP in the jejunum (JPP) and subsequent differences in mucosal immune responses were investigated. Intestinal segments were surgically prepared in both mid-jejunum, containing two JPPs, and in terminal small intestine containing continuous IPP. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (109 CFU) was injected into the lumen of half of each intestinal segment when calves were 10-14 days-old and infection confirmed 1-2 months later by PCR and immunohistochemistry. Thirteen recombinant M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins, previously identified as immunogenic, were used to analyze pathogen-specific B- and T-cell responses in PP and mesenteric lymph nodes. IgA plasma cell responses to 9 of 13 recombinant proteins were detected in JPP but not in IPP. Secretory IgA reacting in ELISA with 9 of the 13 recombinant proteins was detected in luminal contents from both jejunal and ileal segments. These observations support the conclusion that pathogen-specific IgA B cells were induced in JPP but not IPP early after a primary infection. The presence of secretory IgA in intestinal contents is consistent with dissemination of IgA plasma cells from the identified mucosa-associated immune induction sites. This is the first direct evidence for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis uptake by bovine JPP and for local induction of pathogen-specific IgA plasma cell responses after enteric infection. We also provide evidence that bacterial invasion of IPP, a primary B lymphoid tissue, provides a novel strategy to evade induction of mucosal immune responses. Over 60% of PPs in the newborn calf small intestine is primary lymphoid tissue, which has significant implications when designing oral vaccines or diagnostic tests to detect early M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis

  8. Genetic structure of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis population in cattle herds in Quebec as revealed by using a combination of multilocus genomic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohal, Jagdip Singh; Arsenault, Julie; Labrecque, Olivia; Fairbrother, Julie-Hélène; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Fecteau, Gilles; L'Homme, Yvan

    2014-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the etiological agent of paratuberculosis, a granulomatous enteritis affecting a wide range of domestic and wild ruminants worldwide. A variety of molecular typing tools are used to distinguish M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains, contributing to a better understanding of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis epidemiology. In the present study, PCR-based typing methods, including mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units/variable-number tandem repeats (MIRU-VNTR) and small sequence repeats (SSR) in addition to IS1311 PCR-restriction enzyme analysis (PCR-REA), were used to investigate the genetic heterogeneity of 200 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strains from dairy herds located in the province of Quebec, Canada. The majority of strains were of the "cattle type," or type II, although 3 strains were of the "bison type." A total of 38 genotypes, including a novel one, were identified using a combination of 17 genetic markers, which generated a Simpson's index of genetic diversity of 0.876. Additional analyses revealed no differences in genetic diversity between environmental and individual strains. Of note, a spatial and spatiotemporal cluster was evidenced regarding the distribution of one of the most common genotypes. The population had an overall homogeneous genetic structure, although a few strains stemmed out of the consensus cluster, including the bison-type strains. The genetic structure of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis populations within most herds suggested intraherd dissemination and microevolution, although evidence of interherd contamination was also revealed. The level of genetic diversity obtained by combining MIRU-VNTR and SSR markers shows a promising avenue for molecular epidemiology investigations of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis transmission patterns. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. The Science behind the Probiotic Strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungersen, Mikkel; Wind, Anette; Johansen, Eric; Christensen, Jeffrey E.; Stuer-Lauridsen, Birgitte; Eskesen, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    This review presents selected data on the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12® (BB-12®), which is the world’s most documented probiotic Bifidobacterium. It is described in more than 300 scientific publications out of which more than 130 are publications of human clinical studies. The complete genome sequence of BB-12® has been determined and published. BB-12® originates from Chr. Hansen’s collection of dairy cultures and has high stability in foods and as freeze dried powders. Strain characteristics and mechanisms of BB-12® have been established through extensive in vitro testing. BB-12® exhibits excellent gastric acid and bile tolerance; it contains bile salt hydrolase, and has strong mucus adherence properties, all valuable probiotic characteristics. Pathogen inhibition, barrier function enhancement, and immune interactions are mechanisms that all have been demonstrated for BB-12®. BB-12® has proven its beneficial health effect in numerous clinical studies within gastrointestinal health and immune function. Clinical studies have demonstrated survival of BB-12® through the gastrointestinal tract and BB-12® has been shown to support a healthy gastrointestinal microbiota. Furthermore, BB-12® has been shown to improve bowel function, to have a protective effect against diarrhea, and to reduce side effects of antibiotic treatment, such as antibiotic-associated diarrhea. In terms of immune function, clinical studies have shown that BB-12® increases the body’s resistance to common respiratory infections as well as reduces the incidence of acute respiratory tract infections. PMID:27682233

  10. Mycobacterium avium Subsp. paratuberculosis Induces Specific IgE Production in Japanese People with Allergies

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    D. Cossu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The prevalence of allergies is steadily increasing worldwide; however, the pathogenesis is still unclear. We hypothesized that Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP may contribute to allergy development. This organism can be present in dairy foods, it can elicit an immunomodulatory switch from a Th1 to a Th2 response, and it has been speculated that it is linked to several human autoimmune diseases. To determine the contribution, sera from 99 individuals with various atopic disorders and 45 healthy nonallergic controls were assessed for total IgE levels and successively for MAP-specific IgE by ELISA. Results. The mean total serum IgE level in allergic patients was 256±235 IU/mL, and in the healthy controls it was 62±44 IU/mL (AUC = 0.88; p<0.0001. Among the patient groups, 50 of the 99 subjects had increased IgE total level ≥ 150 IU/mL, while 49 subjects had IgE ≤ 150 IU/mL (mean level: 407±256 IU/mL versus 106±16 IU/mL; p<0.0001. Additionally, 6 out of 50 subjects (12% with IgE ≥ 150 IU/mL and none (0% with IgE ≤ 150 IU/mL were positive for specific MAP IgE (AUC = 0.63; p=0.03. Conclusion. The present study revealed that MAP has the ability to induce specific IgE and might contribute to the induction of allergic inflammation in genetically predisposed individuals.

  11. Lanthanide-labeled immunochromatographic strips for the rapid detection of Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Zou, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Yanfei; Qi, Xiaohua; Xue, Qiang

    2014-01-15

    The lateral flow immunoassay is used in commercial pregnancy detection, and is an accepted point-of-care testing technique. The most widely used format for lateral flow immunochromatographic strips uses gold nanoparticles for colorimetric detection. However, this method often suffers from poor quantitative discrimination and low analytical sensitivity. To address these limitations, lanthanide chelate-loaded silica nanoparticles have been used as fluorescent labels. The fluorescent nanoparticles can easily bind to antibodies, with dextran as a linker. The strip reader described here was based on a sandwich immunoreaction performed on a strip, using lanthanide-labeled antibodies that served as signal vehicles for the fluorescent readout. The strip reader was used as a quantitative test system. In this work, Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pss) was used as a model analyte to demonstrate the use of the strip reader. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit was determined as 10(3)cfu/mL. The quantification limit was calculated to be 10(4)cfu/mL. The detection limit for Pss was 100 times lower than those displayed by colloidal gold-labeled strips or ELISAs. No cross-reactions were observed with the other nine strains, indicating the good specificity of the Pss strip. This strip showed good stability in repeated tests. The tests using the fluorescence immunochromatographic strip were easy to perform, rapid, and sensitive. Methods using fluorescence strips and a strip reader have the potential to be a powerful tool for the quantification of bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimization of growth and bacteriocin production by Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei2a.

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    Malheiros, Patrícia S; Sant'Anna, Voltaire; Todorov, Svetoslav D; Franco, Bernadette D G M

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus sakei subsp. sakei 2a is a bacteriocinogenic lactic acid bacterium isolated from Brazilian pork sausage, capable of inhibiting the growth of microbial pathogens, mainly Listeria monocytogenes. In order to optimize bacteriocin production for industrial applications, this study evaluated the effect of supplementation of MRS broth with glucose, Tween 20, Tween 80, sodium citrate, potassium chloride and cysteine, and effect of the initial pH and temperature of incubation of the medium on production of bacteriocins by L. sakei 2a. Adding glucose and Tween 20 to the medium, an initial pH of 5.0 or 5.5, and incubation temperatures of 25 °C or 30 °C resulted to the highest bacteriocin yields. Thus, a 2(4) factorial design with the four variables was performed, and statistical analysis showed that it was an adequate model (R (2) = 0.8296). In the studied range, the four parameters significantly influenced bacteriocin production, with the maximum yield produced at an initial pH between 5.5 and 7.0, a temperature between 25 and 30 °C and supplementation of the MRS broth with glucose from 3.25 to 6.0 g L(-1) and Tween 20 from 0.575 to 1.15% (v/v). Response Surface Methodology analysis indicated that the highest bacteriocin production (12800 AU mL(-1)) occurred in the MRS broth supplemented with 5.5 g L(-1) glucose and 1.05% Tween 20 at an initial pH of 6.28 and an incubation temperature of 25 °C. The amount of bacteriocin produced in commercial MRS broths under the same conditions was only 5600AU mL(-1).

  13. Characterization of a novel plasmid, pMAH135, from Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis.

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    Kei-ichi Uchiya

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC causes mainly two types of disease. The first is disseminated disease in immunocompromised hosts, such as individuals infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. The second is pulmonary disease in individuals without systemic immunosuppression, and the incidence of this type is increasing worldwide. M. avium subsp. hominissuis, a component of MAC, causes infection in pigs as well as in humans. Many aspects of the different modes of M. avium infection and its host specificity remain unclear. Here, we report the characteristics and complete sequence of a novel plasmid, designated pMAH135, derived from M. avium strain TH135 in an HIV-negative patient with pulmonary MAC disease. The pMAH135 plasmid consists of 194,711 nucleotides with an average G + C content of 66.5% and encodes 164 coding sequences (CDSs. This plasmid was unique in terms of its homology to other mycobacterial plasmids. Interestingly, it contains CDSs with sequence homology to mycobactin biosynthesis proteins and type VII secretion system-related proteins, which are involved in the pathogenicity of mycobacteria. It also contains putative conserved domains of the multidrug efflux transporter. Screening of isolates from humans and pigs for genes located on pMAH135 revealed that the detection rate of these genes was higher in clinical isolates from pulmonary MAC disease patients than in those from HIV-positive patients, whereas the genes were almost entirely absent in isolates from pigs. Moreover, variable number tandem repeats typing analysis showed that isolates carrying pMAH135 genes are grouped in a specific cluster. Collectively, the pMAH135 plasmid contains genes associated with M. avium's pathogenicity and resistance to antimicrobial agents. The results of this study suggest that pMAH135 influence not only the pathological manifestations of MAC disease, but also the host specificity of MAC infection.

  14. Epidemiology of a Salmonella enterica subsp. Enterica serovar Typhimurium strain associated with a songbird outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blehert, David S.; Hernandez, Sonia M.; Keel, Kevin; Sanchez, Susan; Trees, Eija; ,

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium is responsible for the majority of salmonellosis cases worldwide. This Salmonella serovar is also responsible for die-offs in songbird populations. In 2009, there was an S. Typhimurium epizootic reported in pine siskins in the eastern United States. At the time, there was also a human outbreak with this serovar that was associated with contaminated peanuts. As peanuts are also used in wild-bird food, it was hypothesized that the pine siskin epizootic was related to this human outbreak. A comparison of songbird and human S. Typhimurium pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns revealed that the epizootic was attributed not to the peanut-associated strain but, rather, to a songbird strain first characterized from an American goldfinch in 1998. This same S. Typhimurium strain (PFGE type A3) was also identified in the PulseNet USA database, accounting for 137 of 77,941 total S. Typhimurium PFGE entries. A second molecular typing method, multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), confirmed that the same strain was responsible for the pine siskin epizootic in the eastern United States but was distinct from a genetically related strain isolated from pine siskins in Minnesota. The pine siskin A3 strain was first encountered in May 2008 in an American goldfinch and later in a northern cardinal at the start of the pine siskin epizootic. MLVA also confirmed the clonal nature of S. Typhimurium in songbirds and established that the pine siskin epizootic strain was unique to the finch family. For 2009, the distribution of PFGE type A3 in passerines and humans mirrored the highest population density of pine siskins for the East Coast.

  15. Proteome of the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri: a global expression profile

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    Ferro Jesus A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citrus canker is a disease caused by Xantomonas citri subsp.citri (Xac, and has emerged as one of the major threats to the worldwide citrus crop because it affects all commercial citrus varieties, decreases the production and quality of the fruits and can spread rapidly in citrus growing areas. In this work, the first proteome of Xac was analyzed using two methodologies, two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D LC and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS. Results In order to gain insight into the metabolism of Xac, cells were grown on two different media (NB - Nutrient Broth and TSE - Tryptone Sucrose broth enriched with glutamic acid, and proteins were proteolyzed with trypsin and examined by 2D LC-MS/MS. Approximately 39% of all predicted proteins by annotation of Xac were identified with their component peptides unambiguously assigned to tandem mass spectra. The proteins, about 1,100, were distributed in all annotated functional categories. Conclusions This is the first proteomic reference map for the most aggressive strain of Xanthomonas pathogen of all orange varieties. The compilation of metabolic pathways involved with bacterial growth showed that Xac expresses a complete central and intermediary metabolism, replication, transcription and translation machineries and regulation factors, distinct membrane transporters (ABC, MFS and pumps and receptors (MCP, TonB dependent and metabolites acquisition, two-component systems (sensor and regulatory components and response regulators. These data corroborate the growth curve in vitro and are the first reports indicating that many of these genome annotated genes are translated into operative in Xac. This proteomic analysis also provided information regarding the influence of culture medium on growth and protein expression of Xac.

  16. Potential Factors Enabling Human Body Colonization by Animal Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszewski, Marcin; Szewczyk, Eligia M

    2017-05-01

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) is a pyogenic, Lancefield C or G streptococcal pathogen. Until recently, it has been considered as an exclusive animal pathogen. Nowadays, it is responsible for both animal infections in wild animals, pets, and livestock and human infections often clinically similar to the ones caused by group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). The risk of zoonotic infection is the most significant in people having regular contact with animals, such as veterinarians, cattlemen, and farmers. SDSE is also prevalent on skin of healthy dogs, cats, and horses, which pose a risk also to people having contact with companion animals. The main aim of this study was to evaluate if there are features differentiating animal and human SDSE isolates, especially in virulence factors involved in the first stages of pathogenesis (adhesion and colonization). Equal groups of human and animal SDSE clinical strains were obtained from superficial infections (skin, wounds, abscesses). The presence of five virulence genes (prtF1, prtF2, lmb, cbp, emm type) was evaluated, as well as ability to form bacterial biofilm and produce BLIS (bacteriocin-like inhibitory substances) which are active against human skin microbiota. The study showed that the presence of genes coding for fibronectin-binding protein and M protein, as well as BLIS activity inhibiting the growth of Corynebacterium spp. strains might constitute the virulence factors which are necessary to colonize human organism, whereas they are not crucial in animal infections. Those virulence factors might be horizontally transferred from human streptococci to animal SDSE strains, enabling their ability to colonize human organism.

  17. Molecular characterization of invasive Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis. Multicenter study: Argentina 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Fernando; Blanco, Alejandra; Villalón, Pilar; Beratz, Noelia; Sáez Nieto, Juan Antonio; Lopardo, Horacio

    Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) has virulence factors similar to those of Streptococcus pyogenes. Therefore, it causes pharyngitis and severe infections indistinguishable from those caused by the classic pathogen. The objectives of this study were: to know the prevalence of SDSE invasive infections in Argentina, to study the genetic diversity, to determine the presence of virulence genes, to study antibiotic susceptibility and to detect antibiotic resistance genes. Conventional methods of identification were used. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by the disk diffusion and the agar dilution methods and the E-test. Twenty eight centers from 16 Argentinean cities participated in the study. Twenty three isolates (16 group G and 7 group C) were obtained between July 1 2011 and June 30 2012. Two adult patients died (8.7%). Most of the isolates were recovered from blood (60.9%). All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. stG62647, stG653 and stG840 were the most frequent emm types. Nineteen different PFGE patterns were detected. All isolates were susceptible to penicillin and levofloxacin, 6 (26.1%) showed resistance or reduced susceptibility to erythromycin [1 mef(A), 3 erm(TR), 1 mef(A)+erm(TR) and 1 erm(TR)+erm(B)] and 7 (30.4%) were resistant or exhibited reduced susceptibility to tetracycline [2 tet(M), 5 tet(M)+tet(O)]. The prevalence in Argentina was of at least 23 invasive infections by SDSE. A wide genetic diversity was observed. All isolates carried speJ and ssa genes. Similarly to other studies, macrolide resistance (26.1%) was mainly associated to the MLS B phenotype. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Distribution and Invasion Potential of Limonium ramosissimum subsp. provinciale in San Francisco Estuary Salt Marshes

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    Gavin Archbald

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-native sea lavenders (Limonium spp. are invasive in salt marshes of southern California and were first documented in the San Francisco Estuary (the estuary in 2007. In this study, we mapped distributions of L. ramosissimum subsp. provinciale (LIRA and L. duriusculum within the estuary and investigated how the invasion potential of the more common species, LIRA, varies with elevation and edaphic conditions. We contacted colleagues and conducted field searches to find and then map sea lavender populations. In addition, we measured LIRA’s elevational range at three salt marshes. Across this range we measured (1 soil properties: salinity, moisture, bulk density, and texture; and (2 indicators of invasion potential: LIRA size, seed production, percent cover, spread (over 1 year, recruitment, and competition with native halophytes (over 6 months. We found LIRA in 15,144 m2 of upper salt marsh habitat in central and south San Francisco bays and L. duriusculum in 511 m2 in Richardson and San Pablo bays. LIRA was distributed from mean high water (MHW to 0.42 m above mean higher high water (MHHW. In both spring and summer, soil moisture and salinity were lowest at higher elevations within LIRA’s range, which corresponded with greater rosette size, inflorescence and seed production (up to 17,400 seeds per plant, percent cover, and recruitment. LIRA cover increased on average by 11% in 1 year across marshes and elevations. Cover of the native halophytes Salicornia pacifica, Jaumea carnosa, and Distichlis spicata declined significantly at all elevations if LIRA were present in plots (over a 6-month, fall–winter period. Results suggest LIRA’s invasion potential is highest above MHHW where salinity and moisture are lower, but that LIRA competes with native plants from MHW to above MHHW. We recommend removal efforts with emphasis on the salt marsh-terrestrial ecotone where LIRA seed output is highest.

  19. Detection of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica Serovar Cubana from Naturally Contaminated Chick Feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benahmed, Faiza; Wang, Hua; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Gopinath, Gopal R; Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Hanes, Darcy E; Hammack, Thomas S; Rasmussen, Mark; Davidson, Maureen K

    2017-10-04

    Because some significant outbreaks of human salmonellosis have been traced to contaminated animal feed, the rapid and efficient detection of Salmonella in feed is essential. However, the current U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual (BAM) culture method that uses lactose broth as a preenrichment medium has not reliably supported the results of real-time PCR assays for certain foods. We evaluated the BAM culture method and a quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using two preenrichment media, modified buffered peptone water and lactose broth, to detect Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Cubana in naturally contaminated chick feed. After 24 h of incubation, the qPCR method was as sensitive as the culture method when modified buffered peptone water was used as the preenrichment medium but less sensitive than culture when lactose broth was used. After 48 h of incubation, detection of Salmonella Cubana by qPCR and by culture in either preenrichment medium was equivalent. We also compared the performance of the traditional serotyping method, which uses pure cultures of Salmonella grown on blood agar, to two molecular serotyping methods. The serotyping method based on whole genome sequencing also requires pure cultures, but the PCR-based molecular serotyping method can be done directly with the enriched culture medium. The PCR-based molecular serotyping method provided simple and rapid detection and identification of Salmonella Cubana. However, whole genome sequencing allows accurate identification of many Salmonella serotypes and highlights variations in the genomes, even in tight genomic clusters. We also compared the genome of the chick feed isolate with 58 Salmonella Cubana strains in GenBank and found that the chick feed isolate was very closely related to an isolate from a foodborne outbreak involving alfalfa sprouts.

  20. The Effect of Citrus Essential Oils and Their Constituents on Growth of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei-Najafgholi, Hossein; Tarighi, Saeed; Golmohammadi, Morteza; Taheri, Parissa

    2017-04-14

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), is the most devastating of the citrus diseases worldwide. During our study, we found that Essential oils (EOs) of some citrus cultivars are effective on Xcc. Therefore, it prompted us to determine the plant metabolites responsible for the antibacterial properties. We obtained EOs from some locally cultivated citrus by using a Clevenger apparatus and their major constituents were identified by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effect of Citrus aurantium, C. aurantifolia, Fortunella sp. EOs and their major constituents were evaluated against Xcc-KVXCC1 using a disk diffusion assay. Minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentration of the EOs and their constituents were determined using the broth microdilution method. C. aurantium, C. aurantifolia Eos, and their major constituents including citral, linalool, citronellal, geraniol, α-terpineol, and linalyl acetate indicated antibacterial effects against Xcc. The C. aurantifolia EO and citral showed the highest antibacterial activity among the tested EOs and constituents with inhibition zones of 15 ± 0.33 mm and 16.67 ± 0.88 mm, respectively. Synergistic effects of the constituents were observed between α-terpineol-citral, citral-citronellal, citral-geraniol, and citronellal-geraniol by using a microdilution checkerboard assay. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that exposure of Xcc cells to citral caused cell wall damage and altered cytoplasmic density. We introduced C. aurantifolia and C. aurantium EOs, and their constituents citral, α-terpineol, citronellal, geraniol, and linalool as possible control agents for CBC.

  1. Evaluation of a PCR assay on overgrown environmental samples cultured for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

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    Arango-Sabogal, Juan C; Labrecque, Olivia; Paré, Julie; Fairbrother, Julie-Hélène; Roy, Jean-Philippe; Wellemans, Vincent; Fecteau, Gilles

    2016-11-01

    Culture of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the definitive antemortem test method for paratuberculosis. Microbial overgrowth is a challenge for MAP culture, as it complicates, delays, and increases the cost of the process. Additionally, herd status determination is impeded when noninterpretable (NI) results are obtained. The performance of PCR is comparable to fecal culture, thus it may be a complementary detection tool to classify NI samples. Our study aimed to determine if MAP DNA can be identified by PCR performed on NI environmental samples and to evaluate the performance of PCR before and after the culture of these samples in liquid media. A total of 154 environmental samples (62 NI, 62 negative, and 30 positive) were analyzed by PCR before being incubated in an automated system. Growth was confirmed by acid-fast bacilli stain and then the same PCR method was again applied on incubated samples, regardless of culture and stain results. Change in MAP DNA after incubation was assessed by converting the PCR quantification cycle (Cq) values into fold change using the 2-ΔCq method (ΔCq = Cq after culture - Cq before culture). A total of 1.6% (standard error [SE] = 1.6) of the NI environmental samples had detectable MAP DNA. The PCR had a significantly better performance when applied after culture than before culture (p = 0.004). After culture, a 66-fold change (SE = 17.1) in MAP DNA was observed on average. Performing a PCR on NI samples improves MAP culturing. The PCR method used in our study is a reliable and consistent method to classify NI environmental samples. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Metabolomic profiling in cattle experimentally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

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    Jeroen De Buck

    Full Text Available The sensitivity of current diagnostics for Johne's disease, a slow, progressing enteritis in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, is too low to reliably detect all infected animals in the subclinical stage. The objective was to identify individual metabolites or metabolite profiles that could be used as biomarkers of early MAP infection in ruminants. In a monthly follow-up for 17 months, calves infected at 2 weeks of age were compared with aged-matched controls. Sera from all animals were analyzed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Spectra were acquired, processed, and quantified for analysis. The concentration of many metabolites changed over time in all calves, but some metabolites only changed over time in either infected or non-infected groups and the change in others was impacted by the infection. Hierarchical multivariate statistical analysis achieved best separation between groups between 300 and 400 days after infection. Therefore, a cross-sectional comparison between 1-year-old calves experimentally infected at various ages with either a high- or a low-dose and age-matched non-infected controls was performed. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (OPLS DA yielded distinct separation of non-infected from infected cattle, regardless of dose and time (3, 6, 9 or 12 months after infection. Receiver Operating Curves demonstrated that constructed models were high quality. Increased isobutyrate in the infected cattle was the most important agreement between the longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis. In general, high- and low-dose cattle responded similarly to infection. Differences in acetone, citrate, glycerol and iso-butyrate concentrations indicated energy shortages and increased fat metabolism in infected cattle, whereas changes in urea and several amino acids (AA, including the branched chain AA, indicated increased protein turnover. In conclusion, metabolomics

  3. Fabrication of a Novel Conductometric Biosensor for Detecting Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Antibodies

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    Steven Bolin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Johne’s disease (JD is one of the most costly bacterial diseases in cattle. In the U.S., economic losses from the disease have been estimated to exceed $1,500,000,000 per year, mainly from the effects of reduced milk production. Current diagnostic tests for JD are laboratory based and many of those tests require specialized equipment and training. Development of rapid and inexpensive diagnostic assays, which are adapted for point-ofcare applications, would aid in the control of JD. In this study, a polyaniline (Pani-based conductometric biosensor, in an immunomigration format, was fabricated for the detection of serum antibody (IgG against the causal organism of JD, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. Immobilized Mycobacterium avium purified proteins in the capture membrane were used to detect MAP IgG, previously bound with Pani/anti-bovine IgG* conjugate in the conjugate membrane. After detection, the Pani in the sandwiched captured complex bridges an electrical circuit between the silver electrodes, flanking the capture membrane. The electrical conductance, caused by Pani, was measured as drop in electrical resistance. Testing of the biosensor with known JD positive and negative serum samples demonstrated a significant difference in the mean resistance observed between the groups. This proof-of-concept study demonstrated that a conductometric biosensor could detect MAP IgG in 2 minutes. The biosensor’s speed of detection and the equipment involved would, among other things, support its application towards the various point-ofcare opportunities aimed at JD management and control.

  4. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  5. Generation and screening of a comprehensive Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis transposon mutant bank

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    Govardhan eRathnaiah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP is the etiologic agent of Johne’s Disease in ruminants. This enteritis has significant economic impact and worldwide distribution. Vaccination is one of the most cost effective infectious disease control measures. Unfortunately, current vaccines reduce clinical disease and shedding, but are of limited efficacy and do not provide long-term protective immunity. Several strategies have been followed to mine the MAP genome for virulence determinants that could be applied to vaccine and diagnostic assay development. In this study, a comprehensive mutant bank of 13,536 MAP K-10 Tn5367 mutants (P > 95% was constructed and screened in vitro for phenotypes related to virulence. This strategy was designated to maximize identification of genes important to MAP pathogenesis without relying on studies of other mycobacterial species that may not translate into similar effects in MAP. This bank was screened for mutants with colony morphology alterations, susceptibility to D-cycloserine, impairment in siderophore production or secretion, reduced cell association, and decreased biofilm and clump formation. Mutants with interesting phenotypes were analyzed by PCR, Southern blotting and DNA sequencing to determine transposon insertion sites. These insertion sites mapped upstream from the MAP1152-MAP1156 cluster, internal to either the Mod operon gene MAP1566 or within the coding sequence of lsr2, and several intergenic regions. Growth curves in broth cultures, invasion assays and kinetics of survival and replication in primary bovine macrophages were also determined. The ability of vectors carrying Tn5370 to generate stable MAP mutants was also investigated.

  6. Vegetative expression of the delta-endotoxin genes of Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivakumar, A G; Gundling, G J; Benson, T A; Casuto, D; Miller, M F; Spear, B B

    1986-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. kurstaki total DNA was digested with BglII and cloned into the BamHI site of plasmid pUC9 in Escherichia coli. A recombinant plasmid, pHBHE, expressed a protein of 135,000 daltons that was toxic to caterpillars. A HincII-SmaI double digest of pHBHE was then ligated to BglII-cut plasmid pBD64 and introduced into Bacillus subtilis by transformation. The transformants were identified by colony hybridization and confirmed by Southern blot hybridization. A 135,000-dalton protein which bound to an antibody specific for the crystal protein of B. thuringiensis was detected from the B. subtilis clones containing the toxin gene insert in either orientation. A toxin gene insert cloned into a PvuII site distal from the two drug resistance genes of the pBD64 vector also expressed a 135,000-dalton protein. These results suggest that the toxin gene is transcribed from its own promoter. Western blotting of proteins expressed at various stages of growth revealed that the crystal protein expression in B. subtilis begins early in the vegetative phase, while in B. thuringiensis it is concomitant with the onset of sporulation. The cloned genes when transferred to a nonsporulating strain of B. subtilis also expressed a 135,000-dalton protein. These results suggest that toxin gene expression in B. subtilis is independent of sporulation. Another toxin gene encoding a 130,000- to 135,000-dalton protein was cloned in E. coli from a library of B. thuringiensis genes established in lambda 1059. This gene was then subcloned in B. subtilis. The cell extracts from both clones were toxic to caterpillars. Electron microscope studies revealed the presence of an irregular crystal inclusion in E. coli and a well-formed bipyramidal crystal in B. subtilis clones similar to the crystals found in B. thuringiensis.

  7. Ultrasound improves chemical reduction of natural contaminant microbiota and Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica on strawberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Rosário, Denes Kaic Alves; da Silva Mutz, Yhan; Peixoto, Jaqueline Moreira Curtis; Oliveira, Syllas Borburema Silva; de Carvalho, Raquel Vieira; Carneiro, Joel Camilo Souza; de São José, Jackline Freitas Brilhante; Bernardes, Patrícia Campos

    2017-01-16

    New sanitization methods have been evaluated to improve food safety and food quality and to replace chlorine compounds. However, these new methods can lead to physicochemical and sensory changes in fruits and vegetables. The present study evaluated the effects of acetic acid, peracetic acid, and sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate isolated or combined with 5min of ultrasound treatment (40kHz, 500W) on strawberry quality over 9days of storage at 8°C. The strawberry natural contaminant microbiota (molds and yeasts, mesophilic aerobic and lactic acid bacteria), physicochemical quality (pH, total titratable acidity, total soluble solids, vitamin C, and color), sensory quality (triangle test) and inactivation of Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica intentionally inoculated onto strawberries were analyzed. Ultrasound increased the effect of all chemical compounds in the reduction of aerobic mesophilic, molds and yeasts. The best treatment for those groups of microorganisms was ultrasound combined with peracetic acid (US+PA) that reduced 1.8 and 2.0logcfu/g during 9days of storage. Bactericidal effect of peracetic acid was also improved by ultrasound inactivation of S. enterica, reaching a decimal reduction of 2.1logcfu/g. Moreover, synergistic effects were observed in contaminant natural microbiota inactivation for all tested compounds during storage, without any major physicochemical or sensory alteration to the strawberries. Therefore, ultrasound treatment can improve the effect of sanitizers that are substitutes of chlorine compounds without altering the quality of strawberries during storage. Acetic acid (PubChem CID: 176); Peracetic acid (PubChem CID: 6585); Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (PubChem CID: 18372154). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A biosensor assay for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanan, Vijayarani; Nugen, Sam R; Baeumner, Antje J; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2009-03-01

    A simple, membrane-strip-based lateral-flow (LF) biosensor assay and a high-throughput microtiter plate assay have been combined with a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of a small number (ten) of viable Mycobacterium (M.) avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) cells in fecal samples. The assays are based on the identification of the RNA of the IS900 element of MAP. For the assay, RNA was extracted from fecal samples spiked with a known quantity of (10(1) to 10(6)) MAP cells and amplified using RT-PCR and identified by the LF biosensor and the microtiter plate assay. While the LF biosensor assay requires only 30 min of assay time, the overall process took 10 h for the detection of 10 viable cells. The assays are based on an oligonucleotide sandwich hybridization assay format and use either a membrane flow through system with an immobilized DNA probe that hybridizes with the target sequence or a microtiter plate well. Signal amplification is provided when the target sequence hybridizes to a second DNA probe that has been coupled to liposomes encapsulating the dye, sulforhodamine B. The dye in the liposomes provides a signal that can be read visually, quantified with a hand-held reflectometer, or with a fluorescence reader. Specificity analysis of the assays revealed no cross reactivity with other mycobacteria, such as M. avium complex, M. ulcerans, M. marium, M. kansasii, M. abscessus, M. asiaticum, M. phlei, M. fortutitum, M. scrofalaceum, M. intracellular, M. smegmatis, and M. bovis. The overall assay for the detection of live MAP organisms is comparatively less expensive and quick, especially in comparison to standard MAP detection using a culture method requiring 6-8 weeks of incubation time, and is significantly less expensive than real-time PCR.

  9. Metabolic adaptation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis to the gut environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigoldt, Mathias; Meens, Jochen; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Pich, Andreas; Gerlach, Gerald F; Goethe, Ralph

    2013-02-01

    Knowledge on the proteome level about the adaptation of pathogenic mycobacteria to the environment in their natural hosts is limited. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) causes Johne's disease, a chronic and incurable granulomatous enteritis of ruminants, and has been suggested to be a putative aetiological agent of Crohn's disease in humans. Using a comprehensive LC-MS-MS and 2D difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) approach, we compared the protein profiles of clinical strains of MAP prepared from the gastrointestinal tract of diseased cows with the protein profiles of the same strains after they were grown in vitro. LC-MS-MS analyses revealed that the principal enzymes for the central carbon metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the tricaboxylic acid cycle and the pentose phosphate pathway, were present under both conditions. Moreover, a broad spectrum of enzymes for β-oxidation of lipids, nine of which have been shown to be necessary for mycobacterial growth on cholesterol, were detected in vivo and in vitro. Using 2D-DIGE we found increased levels of several key enzymes that indicated adaptation of MAP to the host. Among these, FadE5, FadE25 and AdhB indicated that cholesterol is used as a carbon source in the bovine intestinal mucosa; the respiratory enzymes AtpA, NuoG and SdhA suggested increased respiration during infection. Furthermore higher levels of the pentose phosphate pathway enzymes Gnd2, Zwf and Tal as well as of KatG, SodA and GroEL indicated a vigorous stress response of MAP in vivo. In conclusion, our results provide novel insights into the metabolic adaptation of a pathogenic mycobacterium in its natural host.

  10. Dynamics of specific anti-Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis antibody response through age.

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    Søren Saxmose Nielsen

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP causes a chronic infection in cattle. MAP infected cattle with humoral immune (HI reactions with IgG antibodies are usually those where latency of infection has ceased and their infection is progressing towards reduced milk yield, weight loss and significant bacterial excretion in feces. The proportion of detectable infections among all infected animals that will develop disease is often referred to as 'the tip of the iceberg'. The purpose of this study was to estimate this proportion. Test-records from 18,972 Danish dairy cows with MAP specific IgG antibodies on their final test-record were used to estimate age-specific sensitivities (Se. These cows were the infected ones considered to develop disease in a population with a representative age-distribution and were defined as cases. The specificity (Sp of the test was estimated based on test-results from 166,905 cows, which had no MAP IgG antibodies in their final four test-records. The Sp, age-specific Se and maximum Se were used to estimate the probability of having HI at a given age resulting in the proportion of infected cows with HI at a given age. For cows 2 years of age, the proportion of detectable cases was 0.33, while it was 0.94 for cows 5 years of age. Thus, there was a significant shift in the tip of the iceberg with aging. This study provided a model for estimating the proportion of latent chronic infections that would progress to disease, and the results can be used to model infection dynamics.

  11. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami Kugadas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophage and MAC-T cells and coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increase bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5 conditions. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  12. Hairy root culture optimization and resveratrol production from Vitis vinifera subsp. sylvesteris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Sayed Mehdi; Bahramnejad, Bahman; Douleti Baneh, Hamed; Emamifar, Aryo; Goodwin, Paul H

    2017-04-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound produced in very low levels in grapes. To achieve high yield of resveratrol in wild grape, three Agrobacterium rhizogenes strains, Ar318, ArA4 and LBA9402, were used to induce hairy roots following infection of internodes, nodes or petioles of in vitro grown Vitis vinifera subsp. sylvesteris accessions W2 and W16, and cultivar Rasha. The effects of inoculation time, age of explants, bacterial concentration and co-cultivation times were examined on the efficiency of the production of hairy roots. Strains Ar318, ArA4 and LBA9402 all induced hairy roots in the tested genotypes, but the efficiency of ArA4 strain was higher than the other strains. The highest hairy root production was with using internodes as explants. The transformation of hairy roots lines was confirmed by PCR detection of rolB gene. Half Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium was better for biomass production compared with MS medium. HPLC analysis of resveratrol production in the hairy root cultures showed that all the genotypes produced higher amounts of resveratrol than control roots. The highest amount of resveratrol was produced from W16 internode cultures, which was 31-fold higher than that of control root. Furthermore, TLC analysis showed that treatments of hairy roots with sodium acetate and jasmonate elevated resveratrol levels both in hairy root tissue and excreted into the half MS medium. These results demonstrate that endogenous and exogenous factors can affect resveratrol production in hairy root culture of grape, and this strategy could be used to increase low resveratrol production in grapes.

  13. Inactivation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis during cooking of hamburger patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Philipp; Walte, Hans-Georg C; Matzen, Sönke; Hensel, Jann; Kiesner, Christian

    2013-07-01

    The role of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in Crohn's disease in humans has been debated for many years. Milk and milk products have been suggested as possible vectors for transmission since the beginning of this debate, whereas recent publications show that slaughtered cattle and their carcasses, meat, and organs can also serve as reservoirs for MAP transmission. The objective of this study was to generate heat-inactivation data for MAP during the cooking of hamburger patties. Hamburger patties of lean ground beef weighing 70 and 50 g were cooked for 6, 5, 4, 3, and 2 min, which were sterilized by irradiation and spiked with three different MAP strains at levels between 10² and 10⁶ CFU/ml. Single-sided cooking with one flip was applied, and the temperatures within the patties were recorded by seven thermocouples. Counting of the surviving bacteria was performed by direct plating onto Herrold's egg yolk medium and a three-vial most-probable-number method by using modified Dubos medium. There was considerable variability in temperature throughout the patties during frying. In addition, the log reduction in MAP numbers showed strong variations. In patties weighing 70 g, considerable bacterial reduction of 4 log or larger could only be achieved after 6 min of cooking. For all other cooking times, the bacterial reduction was less than 2 log. Patties weighing 50 g showed a 5-log or larger reduction after cooking times of 5 and 6 min. To determine the inactivation kinetics, a log-linear regression model was used, showing a constant decrease of MAP numbers over cooking time.

  14. Changes in protein synthesis during thermal adaptation of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastasiou, Rania; Leverrier, Pauline; Krestas, Ioannis; Rouault, Annette; Kalantzopoulos, George; Boyaval, Patrick; Tsakalidou, Effie; Jan, Gwénaël

    2006-05-01

    Dairy propionibacteria are present in Graviera Kritis, a traditional Gruyère-type cheese made without added propionic starter. Ten isolated strains were identified by a combination of SDS-PAGE, species-specific PCR and according to their ability to ferment lactose. They were all found to belong to the Propionibacterium freudenreichii subsp. shermanii species. Because of the stressing Gruyère technology, which includes cooking at 52 to 53 degrees C their thermotolerance was investigated at 55 degrees C. Thermotolerant and thermosensitive strains were clearly discriminated. Interestingly, the reference strain CIP 103027 belongs to the sensitive subset. One sensitive strain, ACA-DC 1305 and one tolerant, ACA-DC 1451, were selected for further study and compared to CIP 103027. For the sensitive strains ACA-DC 1305 and CIP 103027, heat pre-treatment at 42 degrees C conferred thermoprotection of cells at the lethal temperature of 55 degrees C, while there was less effect on the tolerant ACA-DC 1451. No cross-protection of salt-adapted cells against heat stress was observed for none of the strains. Differential proteomic analysis revealed distinct but overlapping cell responses to heat stress between sensitive and tolerant strains. Thermal adaptation upregulated typical HSPs involved in protein repair or turnover in the sensitive one. In the tolerant one, a distinct subset of proteins was overexpressed, whatever the temperature used, in addition to HSPs. This included enzymes involved in propionic fermentation, amino acid metabolism, oxidative stress remediation and nucleotide phosphorylation. These results bring new insights into thermoprotection in propionibacteria and the occurrence of divergent phenotypes within a same subspecies.

  15. Essential oil composition and antibacterial activity of Origanum vulgare subsp. glandulosum Desf. at different phenological stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béjaoui, Afef; Chaabane, Hédia; Jemli, Maroua; Boulila, Abdennacer; Boussaid, Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    Variation in the quantity and quality of the essential oil (EO) of wild population of Origanum vulgare at different phenological stages, including vegetative, late vegetative, and flowering set, is reported. The oils of air-dried samples were obtained by hydrodistillation. The yield of oils (w/w%) at different stages were in the order of late vegetative (2.0%), early vegetative (1.7%), and flowering (0.6%) set. The oils were analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In total, 36, 33, and 16 components were identified and quantified in vegetative, late vegetative, and flowering set, representing 94.47%, 95.91%, and 99.62% of the oil, respectively. Carvacrol was the major compound in all samples. The ranges of major constituents were as follows: carvacrol (61.08-83.37%), p-cymene (3.02-9.87%), and γ-terpinene (4.13-6.34%). Antibacterial activity of the oils was tested against three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria by the disc diffusion method and determining their diameter of inhibition and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values. The inhibition zones and MIC values for bacterial strains, which were sensitive to the EO of O. vulgare subsp. glandulosum, were in the range of 9-36 mm and 125-600 μg/mL, respectively. The oils of various phenological stages showed high activity against all tested bacteria, of which Bacillus subtilis was the most sensitive and resistant strain, respectively. Thus, they represent an inexpensive source of natural antibacterial substances that exhibited potential for use in pathogenic systems.

  16. Dysbiosis of the Fecal Microbiota in Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

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    Marie-Eve Fecteau

    Full Text Available Johne's disease (JD is a chronic, intestinal infection of cattle, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP. It results in granulomatous inflammation of the intestinal lining, leading to malabsorption, diarrhea, and weight loss. Crohn's disease (CD, a chronic, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease of humans, has many clinical and pathologic similarities to JD. Dysbiosis of the enteric microbiota has been demonstrated in CD patients. It is speculated that this dysbiosis may contribute to the intestinal inflammation observed in those patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity patterns of fecal bacterial populations in cattle infected with MAP, compared to those of uninfected control cattle, using phylogenomic analysis. Fecal samples were selected to include samples from 20 MAP-positive cows; 25 MAP-negative herdmates; and 25 MAP-negative cows from a MAP-free herd. The genomic DNA was extracted; PCR amplified sequenced on a 454 Roche platform, and analyzed using QIIME. Approximately 199,077 reads were analyzed from 70 bacterial communities (average of 2,843 reads/sample. The composition of bacterial communities differed between the 3 treatment groups (P < 0.001; Permanova test. Taxonomic assignment of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs identified 17 bacterial phyla across all samples. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes constituted more than 95% of the bacterial population in the negative and exposed groups. In the positive group, lineages of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria increased and those of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes decreased (P < 0.001. Actinobacteria was highly abundant (30% of the total bacteria in the positive group compared to exposed and negative groups (0.1-0.2%. Notably, the genus Arthrobacter was found to predominate Actinobacteria in the positive group. This study indicates that MAP-infected cattle have a different composition of their fecal microbiota than MAP-negative cattle.

  17. Identification and Phytotoxicity Assessment of Phenolic Compounds in Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (Boneseed)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harun, Md Abdullah Yousuf; Johnson, Joshua; Uddin, Md Nazim; Robinson, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed), a weed of national significance in Australia, threatens indigenous species and crop production through allelopathy. We aimed to identify phenolic compounds produced by boneseed and to assess their phytotoxicity on native species. Phenolic compounds in water and methanol extracts, and in decomposed litter-mediated soil leachate were identified using HPLC, and phytotoxicity of identified phenolics was assessed (repeatedly) through a standard germination bioassay on native Isotoma axillaris. The impact of boneseed litter on native Xerochrysum bracteatum was evaluated using field soil in a greenhouse. Collectively, we found the highest quantity of phenolic compounds in boneseed litter followed by leaf, root and stem. Quantity varied with extraction media. The rank of phenolics concentration in boneseed was in the order of ferulic acid > phloridzin > catechin > p-coumaric acid and they inhibited germination of I. axillaris with the rank of ferulic acid > catechin > phloridzin > p-coumaric acid. Synergistic effects were more severe compared to individual phenolics. The litter-mediated soil leachate (collected after15 days) exhibited strong phytotoxicity to I. axillaris despite the level of phenolic compounds in the decomposed leachate being decreased significantly compared with their initial level. This suggests the presence of other unidentified allelochemicals that individually or synergistically contributed to the phytotoxicity. Further, the dose response phytotoxic impacts exhibited by the boneseed litter-mediated soil to native X. bracteatum in a more naturalistic greenhouse experiment might ensure the potential allelopathy of other chemical compounds in the boneseed invasion. The reduction of leaf relative water content and chlorophyll level in X. bracteatum suggest possible mechanisms underpinning plant growth inhibition caused by boneseed litter allelopathy. The presence of a substantial quantity of free

  18. Identification and Phytotoxicity Assessment of Phenolic Compounds in Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (Boneseed).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Harun, Md Abdullah Yousuf; Johnson, Joshua; Uddin, Md Nazim; Robinson, Randall W

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemoides monilifera subsp. monilifera (boneseed), a weed of national significance in Australia, threatens indigenous species and crop production through allelopathy. We aimed to identify phenolic compounds produced by boneseed and to assess their phytotoxicity on native species. Phenolic compounds in water and methanol extracts, and in decomposed litter-mediated soil leachate were identified using HPLC, and phytotoxicity of identified phenolics was assessed (repeatedly) through a standard germination bioassay on native Isotoma axillaris. The impact of boneseed litter on native Xerochrysum bracteatum was evaluated using field soil in a greenhouse. Collectively, we found the highest quantity of phenolic compounds in boneseed litter followed by leaf, root and stem. Quantity varied with extraction media. The rank of phenolics concentration in boneseed was in the order of ferulic acid > phloridzin > catechin > p-coumaric acid and they inhibited germination of I. axillaris with the rank of ferulic acid > catechin > phloridzin > p-coumaric acid. Synergistic effects were more severe compared to individual phenolics. The litter-mediated soil leachate (collected after15 days) exhibited strong phytotoxicity to I. axillaris despite the level of phenolic compounds in the decomposed leachate being decreased significantly compared with their initial level. This suggests the presence of other unidentified allelochemicals that individually or synergistically contributed to the phytotoxicity. Further, the dose response phytotoxic impacts exhibited by the boneseed litter-mediated soil to native X. bracteatum in a more naturalistic greenhouse experiment might ensure the potential allelopathy of other chemical compounds in the boneseed invasion. The reduction of leaf relative water content and chlorophyll level in X. bracteatum suggest possible mechanisms underpinning plant growth inhibition caused by boneseed litter allelopathy. The presence of a substantial quantity of free

  19. Prevalence of emm types and antimicrobial susceptibility of Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Eva; Zollner-Schwetz, Ines; Zarfel, Gernot; Masoud-Landgraf, Lilian; Gehrer, Michael; Wagner-Eibel, Ute; Grisold, Andrea J; Feierl, Gebhard

    2015-12-01

    An increase of severe infections caused by Streptococcus dysgalactiae subsp. equisimilis (SDSE) similar to infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes has been reported over the last years. Little is known about infections with SDSE in Austria. Therefore, we investigated a collection of 113 SDSE invasive and non-invasive isolates from different infection sites and type of infections as well as patients' characteristics. The isolates were phenotypically identified and emm typed using the enlarged emm database from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, 13 antimicrobial agents were tested using EUCAST guidelines and virulence genes were investigated. Severe SDSE infections were most common in elderly men with underlying diseases especially diabetes mellitus. With VitekMS identification of SDSE isolates was successful to the species level only. Emm typing revealed 24 different emm types, one new type and one new subtype. StG485, stG6, stC74a, stG643, and stG480 were the predominant types in this study, stC74a and stG652 in invasive infections and stG643, stC74a and stG485 in non-invasive infections. Resistance was observed to tetracycline (62%), macrolides (13%) with one M phenotype, and clindamycin (12%) presenting 6 constitutive MLS(B) phenotypes and 8 inducible MLS(B) phenotypes. Levofloxacin resistance was detected only in one isolate. All isolates tested for virulence genes were positive for scpA, ska, saga and slo. Superantigenic genes were negative except speG(dys) (positive 17/34; 50%). This paper presents the first report of SDSE infections in Austria. Severe SDSE infections were found mainly in elderly men with underlying diseases. SDSE isolates demonstrated substantial emm type diversity without association with infections site or invasiveness. Analysis of virulence genes showed no significant difference between invasive and non-invasive infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Discovery of novel small molecule modulators of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiulan eXu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm is a Gram-positive seed-transmitted bacterial phytopathogen responsible for substantial economic losses by adversely affecting tomato production worldwide. A high-throughput, cell-based screen was adapted to identify novel small molecule growth inhibitors to serve as leads for future bactericide development. A library of 4,182 compounds known to be bioactive against Saccharomyces cerevisiae was selected for primary screening against Cmm wild-type strain C290 for whole-cell growth inhibition. Four hundred sixty-eight molecules (11.2% hit rate were identified as bacteriocidal or bacteriostatic against Cmm at 200 M. Seventy-seven candidates were selected based on Golden Triangle analyses for secondary screening. Secondary screens showed that several of these candidates were strain-selective. Several compounds were inhibitory to multiple Cmm strains as well as Bacillus subtilis, but not Pseudomonas fluorescens, Mitsuaria sp., Lysobacter enzymogenes, Lactobacillus rhamnosus, Bifidobacter animalis, or Escherichia coli. Most of the compounds were not phytotoxic and did not show overt host toxicity. Using a novel 96-well bioluminescent Cmm seedling infection assay, we assessed effects of selected compounds on pathogen infection. The 12 most potent novel molecules were identified by compiling the scores from all secondary screens combined with the reduction of pathogen infection in planta. When tested for ability to develop resistance to the top-12 compounds, no resistant Cmm were recovered, suggesting that the discovered compounds are unlikely to induce resistance. In conclusion, here we report top-12 compounds that provide chemical scaffolds for future Cmm-specific bactericide development.