WorldWideScience

Sample records for pseudo-square-planar pyramidal environment

  1. Pyramid Comet Sampler Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Based on the sampling requirements, we propose an Inverted Pyramid sampling system. Each face of the pyramid includes a cutting blade which is independently actuated...

  2. Using Maslow's pyramid and the national database of nursing quality indicators(R) to attain a healthier work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groff-Paris, Lisa; Terhaar, Mary

    2010-12-07

    The strongest predictor of nurse job dissatisfaction and intent to leave is that of stress in the practice environment. Good communication, control over practice, decision making at the bedside, teamwork, and nurse empowerment have been found to increase nurse satisfaction and decrease turnover. In this article we share our experience of developing a rapid-design process to change the approach to performance improvement so as to increase engagement, empowerment, effectiveness, and the quality of the professional practice environment. Meal and non-meal breaks were identified as the target area for improvement. Qualitative and quantitative data support the success of this project. We begin this article with a review of literature related to work environment and retention and a presentation of the frameworks used to improve the work environment, specifically Maslow's theory of the Hierarchy of Inborn Needs and the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Survey. We then describe our performance improvement project and share our conclusion and recommendations.

  3. Rebuilding the Food Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willet, Walter C.; Stampfer, Meir J.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the old food guide pyramid released in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Contradicts the message that fat is bad, which was presented to the public by nutritionists, and the effects of plant oils on cholesterol. Introduces a new food pyramid. (YDS)

  4. The New Modern Mediterranean Diet Italian Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, V; Germani, A; Capuzzo Dolcetta, E; Donini, L M; Del Balzo, V

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have established the health benefits associated with the adherence to the MD (Mediterranean Diet), mainly in relation to reducing the risk of developing the non communicable diseases. The MD is a sustainable diet model that respects the environment, promotes the bio-diversity, the local cultural heritages, the social interaction and economic aspects. The pyramid is a graphical representation designed to represent the frequencies of consumption and portion sizes of each food according to the Mediterranean model and tradition. The pyramid was developed taking into account the LARN (Reference Intake of nutrients and energy for Italian Population) and the Italian Guidelines for a healthy diet. The frequency of consumption and the portion size recommended are located at the different level of the pyramid. At the base of the pyramid there are the foods that should be consumed every meal and some concepts typical of the Mediterranean culture. In the middle there are foods that should be consumed daily and at the top of the pyramid the foods consumed on a weekly basis. The new modern MD Italian Pyramid is an important tool to promote the MD and improve the adherence to the MD dietary pattern.

  5. Pyramid image codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1990-01-01

    All vision systems, both human and machine, transform the spatial image into a coded representation. Particular codes may be optimized for efficiency or to extract useful image features. Researchers explored image codes based on primary visual cortex in man and other primates. Understanding these codes will advance the art in image coding, autonomous vision, and computational human factors. In cortex, imagery is coded by features that vary in size, orientation, and position. Researchers have devised a mathematical model of this transformation, called the Hexagonal oriented Orthogonal quadrature Pyramid (HOP). In a pyramid code, features are segregated by size into layers, with fewer features in the layers devoted to large features. Pyramid schemes provide scale invariance, and are useful for coarse-to-fine searching and for progressive transmission of images. The HOP Pyramid is novel in three respects: (1) it uses a hexagonal pixel lattice, (2) it uses oriented features, and (3) it accurately models most of the prominent aspects of primary visual cortex. The transform uses seven basic features (kernels), which may be regarded as three oriented edges, three oriented bars, and one non-oriented blob. Application of these kernels to non-overlapping seven-pixel neighborhoods yields six oriented, high-pass pyramid layers, and one low-pass (blob) layer.

  6. Climbing the Needs Pyramids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Lomas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abraham Maslow’s theory of human adult motivation is often represented by a pyramid image showing two proposals: First, the five needs stages in emergent order of hierarchical ascension and second, a percentage of the adult population suggested to occupy each needs tier. Specifically, Maslow proposed that adults would be motivated to satisfy their unfilled needs until they reached the hierarchy’s apex and achieved self-transcendence. Yet how adults can purposefully ascend Maslow’s pyramid through satisfying unfilled needs remains elusive. This brief article challenges this on the theory’s 70th anniversary by presenting a new image of the needs hierarchy, based on ecological design principles to support adults’ purposeful endeavors to climb the needs pyramid.

  7. Pyramids and roundtables: a reflection on leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Kenric M

    2014-12-01

    By the nature of their career choice, surgeons are leaders at a variety of levels. The rise to leadership positions in surgery often requires scaling a steep pyramid. Many young surgeons are poorly prepared for what is frequently a competition with their peers. Some of the qualities young surgeons must possess to ascend the leadership pyramid are summarized by the "HOPES" of leadership: Honesty, recognition of Opportunity, having a Plan, knowing your Environment, and Self-assessment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. PYRAMIDS AND POPPIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Flying. Cheetahs is recommended to those potential readers who do not have ready access to the original thesis. Major I.J. van der Waag, Documenta- tion Service, Private Bag X289, Pretoria. 0001. PYRAMIDS AND POPPIES. The 1st SA Infantry Brigade in Libya,. France and Flanders. 1915-1919. Peter K.A. Digby. 1993.

  9. Climbing the Needs Pyramids

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Lomas

    2013-01-01

    Abraham Maslow’s theory of human adult motivation is often represented by a pyramid image showing two proposals: First, the five needs stages in emergent order of hierarchical ascension and second, a percentage of the adult population suggested to occupy each needs tier. Specifically, Maslow proposed that adults would be motivated to satisfy their unfilled needs until they reached the hierarchy’s apex and achieved self...

  10. Imaging the Cheops Pyramid

    CERN Document Server

    Bui, H D

    2012-01-01

    In this book Egyptian Archeology  and Mathematics meet. The author is an expert in theories and applications in Solid Mechanics and Inverse Problems, a former professor at Ecole Polytechnique and now works with Electricité de France on maintenance operations on nuclear power plants. In the Autumn of 1986, after the end of the operation on the King’s chamber conducted under the Technological and Scientific Sponsorship of EDF, to locate a cavity, he was called to solve a mathematical inverse problem, to find the unknown tomb of the King and the density structure of the whole pyramid based on measurements of microgravity made inside and outside of the pyramid. This book recounts the various search operations on the pyramid of Cheops made at the request of the Egyptian and French authorities in 1986-1987. After the premature end of the Cheops operation in the Autumn of 1986, following the fiasco of unsuccessful drillings in the area suspected by both architects G. Dormion and J.P. Goidin and microgravity aus...

  11. PYRAMID LAKE RENEWEABLE ENERGY PLAN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HIGH DESERT GEOCULTURE, LLC

    2009-06-06

    The Pyramid Lake Renewable Energy Plan covers these areas: energy potential (primarily focusing on geothermal resource potential, but also more generally addressing wind energy potential); renewable energy market potential; transmission system development; geothermal direct use potential; and business structures to accomplish the development objectives of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe.

  12. The Digital Von Fahrenheid Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bura, M.; Janowski, J.; Wężyk, P.; Zięba, K.

    2017-08-01

    3D Scanners Lab from Digital Humanities Laboratory at the University of Warsaw initiated the scientific project, the purpose of which was to call attention to systematically penetrated and devastated pyramid-shaped tomb from the XVIII/XIX century, of family von Fahrenheid in Rapa in Banie Mazurskie commune (NE Poland). By conducting a series of non-invasive studies, such as 3D inventory using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS), thermal imaging, georadar measurements (around and inside the tomb) and anthropological research of mummified remains as well - the complete dataset was collected. Through the integration of terrestrial (TLS) and airborne laser scanning (ALS) authors managed to analyse the surroundings of Fahrenheid pyriamid and influence of some objects (like trees) on the condition and visibility of the Pyramids in the landscape.

  13. The FINUT Healthy Lifestyles Guide: Beyond the Food Pyramid123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The WHO has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national, and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, with its 3 lateral faces corresponding to the facets of food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into 2 triangles. These faces show the following: 1) food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2) recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social, and cultural issues; and 3) selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other 2 faces, would contribute to better health for people in a sustainable planet. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of noncommunicable chronic diseases. PMID:24829489

  14. BASIC PRINCIPLES OF THE PYRAMIDS TEMPORAL BONE RADIOGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Krstić

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the possibilities and advantages of certain methods of temporal bone radiography in diagnosing pathological conditions and diseases of temporal bones, with description of basic techniques of radiological examinations: Mayer’s axial view of the pyramids, the Stenvers view of the pyramids, the Arcelini view of the pyramids, comparative pyramid radiography by Hass, comparative pyramid radiography by Gras-hey, comparative pyramid radiography in submentovertical projection and comparative pyramid radiography in verticosubmental projection.

  15. The Pyramidal Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens

    This paper introduces the Pyramidal Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (PCVRP) as a restricted version of the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem (CVRP). In the PCVRP each route is required to be pyramidal in a sense generalized from the Pyramidal Traveling Salesman Problem (PTSP). A pyramidal...... route is defined as a route on which the vehicle first visits customers in increasing order of customer index, and on the remaining part of the route visits customers in decreasing order of customer index. Provided that customers are indexed in nondecreasing order of distance from the depot, the shape...

  16. The pyramidal capacitated vehicle routing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces the pyramidal capacitated vehicle routing problem (PCVRP) as a restricted version of the capacitated vehicle routing problem (CVRP). In the PCVRP each route is required to be pyramidal in a sense generalized from the pyramidal traveling salesman problem (PTSP). A pyramidal...... route is defined as a route on which the vehicle first visits customers in increasing order of customer index, and on the remaining part of the route visits customers in decreasing order of customer index. Moreover, this paper develops an exact branch-and-cut-and-price (BCP) algorithm for the PCVRP...

  17. Urban Public Health: Is There a Pyramid?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meirong Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Early ecologists identified a pyramidal trophic structure in terms of number, biomass and energy transfer. In 1943, the psychologist Maslow put forward a pyramid model to describe layers of human needs. It is indicated that the pyramid principle is universally applicable in natural, humanistic and social disciplines. Here, we report that a pyramid structure also exists in urban public health (UPH. Based on 18 indicators, the UPH states of four cities (Beijing, Tokyo, New York, and London are compared from the point of view of five aspects, namely physical health, living conditions, social security, environmental quality, and education and culture. A pyramid structure was found in each city when focusing on 2000–2009 data. The pyramid of Beijing is relatively similar to that of Tokyo, and the pyramids of New York and London are similar to each other. A general development trend in UPH is proposed and represented by different pyramid modes. As a basic conjecture, the UPH pyramid model can be verified and developed with data of more cities over a longer period, and be used to promote healthy urban development.

  18. The pyramids of Greece: Ancient meridian observatories?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossiou, Efstratios; Manimanis, Vassilios N.; Dimitrijević, Milan S.; Katsiotis, Marco

    Pyramids, "Dragon Houses" ("Drakospita") and megalithic structures in general create always a special interest. We postulate that, as happens with the Drakospita of Euboea, the pyramid-like structures of Argolis (Eastern Peloponnese) were constructed by the Dryops. It is known that, in addition to Euboea and some Cyclades islands, this prehellenic people had also settled in Argolis, where they founded the city of Asine. We also propose that the pyramids of Argolis and in particular the pyramid of Hellinikon village were very likely, besides being a burial monument or guard house, might be served also for astronomical observations.

  19. PYRAMIDAL TOURS AND THE TRAVELING SALESMAN PROBLEM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEEN, JAA; SIERKSMA, G; VANDAL, R

    1991-01-01

    A traveling salesman problem is studied, containing a shortest Hamiltonian tour that is as long as a shortest pyramidal tour. A tour is pyramidal if it consists of a path from city 1 to n with cities in between visited in ascending order, and a path from n to 1 with cities in between visited in

  20. Personalizing the Food Pyramid. Teaching Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Donna

    1996-01-01

    Presents a strategy for health and home economics teachers to use in evaluating secondary students' eating and nutritional patterns. Students keep two-day food journals then complete a colorful personal food pyramid with the results. This creates a personal pyramid of food choices that lets students explore their eating habits. (SM)

  1. Challenges to rebuilding the US food pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinney, John M

    2005-01-01

    Twelve years have passed since the US Department of Agriculture introduced the Food Guide Pyramid as a single visual expression of the major food groups and their relative amounts in a healthy diet. Unfortunately, no regular review has been conducted to incorporate new knowledge. Some feel that the pyramid format is too limited for modern use, while others wish it to continue with new information. It seems timely to review what features of the pyramid design have been useful over past years and how it can be improved with new concepts while maintaining ease of understanding by the average consumer. Examples are presented of adapting the pyramid to diets promoted by a special group or to support particular dietary beliefs, in contrast to the goal of seeking a single standardized format. Inherent limitations of the pyramid format are discussed. One proposal is discussed which seeks to redesign the pyramid into a modern educational tool presenting current concepts supported by recent studies and outcomes data. Popular beliefs about what is a healthy diet have perhaps never been as varied as now. This is partly due to sharply differing opinions about which highly publicized weight-loss diet is most effective. The educational benefits of the pyramid format need objective study in view of the inherent limitations of that configuration. Only when the specific visual advantages for the consumer are shown can a decision be made as to the benefit of major new efforts to construct a single modern pyramid.

  2. [The finut healthy lifestyles guide: beyond the food pyramid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2015-05-01

    The World Health Organization has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active, healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberomerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, its three lateral faces corresponding to the binomials food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into two triangles. These faces show the following: 1. food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2. recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social and cultural issues; 3. selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other two faces, would contribute to better health and provide measures to promote environmental sustainability. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of non-communicable chronic diseases. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  3. The FINUT healthy lifestyles guide: Beyond the food pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Angel; Ruiz-Lopez, Maria Dolores; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Miguel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    The WHO has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national, and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information to the general population. However, wider recommendations are needed, with information on an active healthy lifestyle, not just healthy eating. The objective of the present work is to propose a three-dimensional pyramid as a new strategy for promoting adequate nutrition and active healthy lifestyles in a sustainable way. Indeed, the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles has been designed as a tetrahedron, with its 3 lateral faces corresponding to the facets of food and nutrition, physical activity and rest, and education and hygiene. Each lateral face is divided into 2 triangles. These faces show the following: 1) food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environment; 2) recommendations for rest and physical activity and educational, social, and cultural issues; and 3) selected hygiene and educational guidelines that, in conjunction with the other 2 faces, would contribute to better health for people in a sustainable planet. The new FINUT pyramid is addressed to the general population of all ages and should serve as a guide for living a healthy lifestyle within a defined social and cultural context. It includes an environmental and sustainability dimension providing measures that should contribute to the prevention of noncommunicable chronic diseases. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  4. Pascal Pyramids: a mathematical exploration using spreadsheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Baker

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The features of Pascal’s Triangle are generalised to 3-variable and 4-variable expressions resulting in the formation of pyramids of coefficients. The steps required to create the coefficients are also given.

  5. Evaluation of the Green Egyptian Pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Gamal Ammar

    2012-12-01

    The research concluded to the need of developing the Egyptian pyramid system through studying more global systems, in addition to the need to benefit from the Egyptian experience stock of solutions and environmental treatments in ancient architecture.

  6. Local Pyramidal Descriptors for Image Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenari, Lorenzo; Serra, Giuseppe; Bagdanov, Andrew D; Del Bimbo, Alberto

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method to improve the flexibility of descriptor matching for image recognition by using local multiresolution pyramids in feature space. We propose that image patches be represented at multiple levels of descriptor detail and that these levels be defined in terms of local spatial pooling resolution. Preserving multiple levels of detail in local descriptors is a way of hedging one's bets on which levels will most relevant for matching during learning and recognition. We introduce the Pyramid SIFT (P-SIFT) descriptor and show that its use in four state-of-the-art image recognition pipelines improves accuracy and yields state-of-the-art results. Our technique is applicable independently of spatial pyramid matching and we show that spatial pyramids can be combined with local pyramids to obtain further improvement. We achieve state-of-the-art results on Caltech-101 (80.1%) and Caltech-256 (52.6%) when compared to other approaches based on SIFT features over intensity images. Our technique is efficient and is extremely easy to integrate into image recognition pipelines.

  7. The Babinski sign and the pyramidal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gijn, J

    1978-01-01

    The presence or absence of a Babinski sign can be puzzling, but in the light of existing pathological studies it is more fruitful to consider which pyramidal tract fibres release it than whether they release it. This was investigated clinically, by looking for correlations with other reflex changes and with motor deficits in the leg. A survey of 50 patients with a unilateral Babinski sign and six patients who lacked it in spite of other pyramidal tract signs was supplemented with follow-up of the patients who had acute lesions. Appearance of the Bibinski sign proved to depend on the interaction of two factors: (1) activity (not necessarily hyperactivity) in the segmental pathways of the flexion synergy; (2) a motor deficit of the foot, in some cases consisting only in an impairment of rapid foot movements, and probably representing a disturbance of direct pyramidal tract projections to distal motoneurones. PMID:310447

  8. Tiling a Pyramidal Polycube with Dominoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Bodini

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The notion of pyramidal polycubes, namely the piling-up of bricks of a non-increasing size, generalizes in ℝ n the concept of trapezoidal polyominoes. In the present paper, we prove that n-dimensional dominoes can tile a pyramidal polycube if and only if the latter is balanced, that is, if the number of white cubes is equal to the number of black ones for a chessboard-like coloration, generalizing the result of [BC92] when n=2

  9. Parkinsonian-Pyramidal syndromes: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranchant, Christine; Koob, Meriam; Anheim, Mathieu

    2017-06-01

    Parkinsonian-Pyramidal syndrome (PPS), defined as the combination of both pyramidal and parkinsonian signs is a concept that recently emerged. PPS may manifest itself in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, many of these being inherited. Their diagnosis is a major challenge for the clinical management, for the prognosis, for genetic counselling and, in a few cases, which should not be neglected, for specific treatment. Our objective is to provide a review of PPS and an algorithm in order to guide their diagnosis in clinical practice. We performed an exhaustive PubMed and OMIM research matching the following key words: "Parkinsonism and pyramidal signs" or "Parkinsonism and spasticity" or "pallido-pyramidal syndrome" or "Parkinsonism and spastic paraplegia". English publications from the last ten years were included. We propose a pragmatic presentation based on several established classifications and we will distinguish inherited PPS found in complex hereditary spastic paraplegia, young onset parkinsonism, neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, primary familial brain calcifications, inborn errors of metabolism, and few rare others inherited neurodegenerative diseases, then non-inherited neurodegenerative PPS. We therefore suggest guidelines (based on age at onset, family history, associated clinical signs, brain MRI findings as well as certain laboratory investigations), for the diagnosis and the management of PPS. Many pathophysiological pathways may underlie PPS but the most frequent are those usually involved in both inherited Parkinson's disease and spastic paraplegia, i.e. mitochondrial pathway, vesicular trafficking including endosomal and lysosomal pathways as well as autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Traveling Salesman Problem: A Foveating Pyramid Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizlo, Zygmunt; Stefanov, Emil; Saalweachter, John; Li, Zheng; Haxhimusa, Yll; Kropatsch, Walter G.

    2006-01-01

    We tested human performance on the Euclidean Traveling Salesman Problem using problems with 6-50 cities. Results confirmed our earlier findings that: (a) the time of solving a problem is proportional to the number of cities, and (b) the solution error grows very slowly with the number of cities. We formulated a new version of a pyramid model. The…

  11. The Fruit Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating plenty of servings of fruit. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and…

  12. Food Pyramids and Bio-Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    Students learn about marine food chains, bioaccumulation, the energy pyramid, and potential ocean pollutants and their effects on ocean ecosystems in this activity which involves having students pull drawings of marine organisms which include diatoms, copepods, anchovies, bonito, and killer whale out of a bag, then demonstrating the food chain by…

  13. Vegetarian food guide pyramid: a conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, E H; Sabaté, J; Whitten, C G

    1999-09-01

    The purpose of this article and the accompanying vegetarian food guide pyramid graphic is to provide the conceptual framework for the development of a new and unique food guide. Food guides for vegetarians have tended to be adaptations of guides developed for the general nonvegetarian population instead of being designed to emphasize the healthy components of vegetarian dietary patterns. A subcommittee of the organizers of the Third International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition began a process that led to the development of a pyramid-shaped graphic illustration and a supporting document, both of which were introduced at the congress. The 5 major plant-based food groups (whole grains, legumes, vegetables, fruit, nuts, and seeds) form the trapezoid-shaped lower portion of the pyramid. Optional food groups, which may be avoided by some vegetarians (vegetable oils, dairy, eggs, and sweets), form the smaller, separate, triangle-shaped top portion of the pyramid. The supporting document discusses the concepts that affect vegetarian food guidance and the rationale for selecting the food groups. It is hoped that this framework will provide the impetus for further research and discussion and will lead to the development of a guide that is nutritionally adequate, is conducive to good health, and can be adopted by vegetarians of diverse eating practices.

  14. The Grain Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating sufficient servings of grains. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and…

  15. The Vegetable Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating plenty of vegetables. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  16. Pyramid Servings Database (PSDB) for NHANES III

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute developed a database to examine dietary data from the National Center for Health Statistics' Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in terms of servings from each of United States Department of Agriculture's The Food Guide Pyramid's major and minor food groups.

  17. Eating Right. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the food groups of the food guide pyramid. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases helps early readers learn new words.…

  18. The Dairy Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the dairy group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words and phrases…

  19. Jonestown in the Shadow of Maslow's Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, Edgar M.; Wigglesworth, David C.

    1979-01-01

    Reviews Maslow's hierarchy of needs in the light of the Jonestown tragedy. Maintains that members of the People's Temple felt frustrated in attaining the lower levels in the world of reality, and so moved outside the pyramid in search of the top, self-actualization. In the process, their primary needs were met. Journal availability: see SO 507…

  20. Nanopore formation on Au coated pyramid under electron beam irradiations (plasmonic nanopore on pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Soo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There have been tremendous interests about the single molecule analysis using a sold-state nanopore. The solid-state nanopore can be fabricated either by drilling technique, or diffusion technique by using electron beam irradiations. The solid-state SiN nanopore device with electrical detection technique recently fabricated, however, the solid-state Au nanopore with optical detection technique can be better utilized as the next generation single molecule sensor. In this report, the nanometer size openings with its size less than 10 nm on the diffused membrane on the 200 nm Au pyramid were fabricated by using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM electron beam irradiations, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, etc. After the sample was being kept under a room environment for several months, several Au (111 clusters with ~6 nm diameter formed via Ostwald ripening are observed using a high resolution TEM imaging. The nanopore with Au nanoclusters on the diffused membrane can be utilized as an optical nanopore device.

  1. agronomic qualities of genetic pyramids of common bean developed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2017-11-07

    Nov 7, 2017 ... (BCMNV); and Pythium ultimum (P.ult) root rots were combined into the same genotype at CIAT, a process referred to as pyramiding. Common bean genetic pyramids could, therefore, offer long-term strategies for managing major common bean diseases. However, in the process of developing pyramids ...

  2. Teacher Acquisition of Functional Analysis Methods Using Pyramidal Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Sacha T.; St. Peter, Claire C.; Giles, Aimee F.

    2014-01-01

    Pyramidal training involves an experienced professional training a subset of individuals who, in turn, train additional individuals. Pyramidal training is effective for training a variety of behavior-analytic skills with direct-care staff, parents, and teachers. As teachers' roles in behavioral assessment increase, pyramidal training may be…

  3. Idea Bank: Assessing Your Curriculum with the Creative Rights Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Matthew D.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a creative rights pyramid that was developed as part of the author's efforts to: (1) teach about copyright and intellectual property; and (2) increase students' awareness of their own intellectual property in and outside the music classroom. The pyramid is based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture's food pyramid to suggest…

  4. Using the Food Guide Pyramid: A Resource for Nutrition Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Anne; Fulton, Lois; Davis, Carole; Hogbin, Myrtle

    This booklet provides information to assist nutrition educators in helping their audiences use the Food Guide Pyramid to plan and prepare foods for a healthy diet. It reviews the objectives set in developing the Food Guide Pyramid and illustrates their impact on the application of the Food Guide Pyramid to planning menus. In particular, the…

  5. Tale of the Huanglongbing Disease Pyramid in the Context of the Citrus Microbiome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Stelinski, Lukasz L; Pelz-Stelinski, Kirsten S; Graham, James H; Zhang, Yunzeng

    2017-04-01

    The Huanglongbing (HLB) disease pyramid is composed of Liberibacters, psyllid vectors, citrus hosts, and the environment. The epidemiological outcomes for Liberibacter-associated plant diseases are collectively determined by the inherent relationships among plant-Liberibacters-psyllids, and how various environmental factors affect plant-Liberibacter-psyllid interactions. Citrus-Liberibacter-psyllid interactions occur in a complex microbiome system. In this review, we focus on the progress in understanding the HLB disease pyramid, and how the microbiome affects the HLB disease pyramid including the interaction between HLB and the citrus microbiome; the interaction between Liberibacters and psyllids; the interaction between Liberibacters and gut microbiota in psyllids; and the effect of HLB on selected above- and belowground citrus pathogens. Their implications for HLB management are also discussed.

  6. Graph pyramids for protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhan, Tushar; Yoo, Youngjun; Choi, Jin; Kim, Sun

    2015-01-01

    Uncovering the hidden organizational characteristics and regularities among biological sequences is the key issue for detailed understanding of an underlying biological phenomenon. Thus pattern recognition from nucleic acid sequences is an important affair for protein function prediction. As proteins from the same family exhibit similar characteristics, homology based approaches predict protein functions via protein classification. But conventional classification approaches mostly rely on the global features by considering only strong protein similarity matches. This leads to significant loss of prediction accuracy. Here we construct the Protein-Protein Similarity (PPS) network, which captures the subtle properties of protein families. The proposed method considers the local as well as the global features, by examining the interactions among 'weakly interacting proteins' in the PPS network and by using hierarchical graph analysis via the graph pyramid. Different underlying properties of the protein families are uncovered by operating the proposed graph based features at various pyramid levels. Experimental results on benchmark data sets show that the proposed hierarchical voting algorithm using graph pyramid helps to improve computational efficiency as well the protein classification accuracy. Quantitatively, among 14,086 test sequences, on an average the proposed method misclassified only 21.1 sequences whereas baseline BLAST score based global feature matching method misclassified 362.9 sequences. With each correctly classified test sequence, the fast incremental learning ability of the proposed method further enhances the training model. Thus it has achieved more than 96% protein classification accuracy using only 20% per class training data.

  7. Preserving the Pyramid of STI Using Buckets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Maly, Kurt

    2004-01-01

    The product of research projects is information. Through the life cycle of a project, information comes from many sources and takes many forms. Traditionally, this body of information is summarized in a formal publication, typically a journal article. While formal publications enjoy the benefits of peer review and technical editing, they are also often compromises in media format and length. As such, we consider a formal publication to represent an abstract to a larger body of work: a pyramid of scientific and technical information (STI). While this abstract may be sufficient for some applications, an in-depth use or analysis is likely to require the supporting layers from the pyramid. We have developed buckets to preserve this pyramid of STI. Buckets provide an archive- and protocol-independent container construct in which all related information objects can be logically grouped together, archived, and manipulated as a single object. Furthermore, buckets are active archival objects and can communicate with each other, people, or arbitrary network services. Buckets are an implementation of the Smart Object, Dumb Archive (SODA) DL model. In SODA, data objects are more important than the archives that hold them. Much of the functionality traditionally associated with archives is pushed down into the objects, such as enforcing terms and conditions, negotiating display, and content maintenance. In this paper, we discuss the motivation, design, and implication of bucket use in DLs with respect to grey literature.

  8. Centre of pressure correlates with pyramid performance in acrobatic gymnastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floría, Pablo; Gómez-Landero, Luis Arturo; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Acrobatic gymnasts need excellent balance control to execute pyramids where one gymnast is supported by another. The objectives of this study were: (1) to describe balance performance by assessing the centre of pressure displacement in a group of acrobatic gymnasts executing pyramids; (2) to determine the relationship between the parameters describing the centre of pressure oscillations and pyramid score; and (3) to examine the role of each foot in providing a solid base of support to maintain the balance of the pyramid. Sixteen acrobatic gymnasts grouped in pairs performed a Half pyramid and a Straddle pyramid held for 7 s on two force platforms. Path length, variance, range trajectory, and surface area of the centre of pressure of each foot were examined to analyse the balance of the pyramid. The path length was correlated with the pyramid score (Straddle: p = 0.692 [large]; Half: p = 0.407 [moderate]). There were differences in the functions of each leg to maintain balance, with the non-preferred leg supporting a higher weight of the pyramid while the preferred leg performed control movements to maintain balance. The results suggested that quantitative analysis of balance can provide important information on pyramid performance.

  9. Rate-distortion optimised video transmission using pyramid vector quantisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Syed; Nix, Andrew R; Bull, David R

    2012-08-01

    Conventional video compression relies on interframe prediction (motion estimation), intra frame prediction and variable-length entropy encoding to achieve high compression ratios but, as a consequence, produces an encoded bitstream that is inherently sensitive to channel errors. In order to ensure reliable delivery over lossy channels, it is necessary to invoke various additional error detection and correction methods. In contrast, techniques such as Pyramid Vector Quantisation have the ability to prevent error propagation through the use of fixed length codewords. This paper introduces an efficient rate distortion optimisation algorithm for intra-mode PVQ which offers similar compression performance to intra H.264/AVC and Motion JPEG 2000 while offering inherent error resilience. The performance of our enhanced codec is evaluated for HD content in the context of a realistic (IEEE 802.11n) wireless environment. We show that PVQ provides high tolerance to corrupted data compared to the state of the art while obviating the need for complex encoding tools.

  10. PyramidalExplorer: A New Interactive Tool to Explore Morpho-Functional Relations of Human Pyramidal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toharia, Pablo; Robles, Oscar D; Fernaud-Espinosa, Isabel; Makarova, Julia; Galindo, Sergio E; Rodriguez, Angel; Pastor, Luis; Herreras, Oscar; DeFelipe, Javier; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This work presents PyramidalExplorer, a new tool to interactively explore and reveal the detailed organization of the microanatomy of pyramidal neurons with functionally related models. It consists of a set of functionalities that allow possible regional differences in the pyramidal cell architecture to be interactively discovered by combining quantitative morphological information about the structure of the cell with implemented functional models. The key contribution of this tool is the morpho-functional oriented design that allows the user to navigate within the 3D dataset, filter and perform Content-Based Retrieval operations. As a case study, we present a human pyramidal neuron with over 9000 dendritic spines in its apical and basal dendritic trees. Using PyramidalExplorer, we were able to find unexpected differential morphological attributes of dendritic spines in particular compartments of the neuron, revealing new aspects of the morpho-functional organization of the pyramidal neuron.

  11. Mediterranean diet pyramids: towards the Italian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Balzo, V; Diolordi, L; Pinto, A; Giusti, A M; Vitiello, V; Cannella, C; Dernini, S; Donini, L M; Berry, E M

    2012-01-01

    There is a long history to the representation of the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid which may be seen as a form of cultural--culinary evolution as each country applies the foods best suited to its national diet. Different Mediterranean Diet pyramids have been designed for the population of Greece, Spain and Italy, tailored for their different food habits. These refer variously to portion sizes and frequency of consumption--daily, weekly and monthly and are not standardized. The 3rd CIISCAM Conference held in Parma, Italy was devoted to highlight the overall biodiversity and nutritional well being values and the sustainable benefits of the Mediterranean diet, recognised as one of the healthiest dietary pattern, and to reduce the rapid erosion of "lifestyle and food habits. It is necessary, therefore, to refer more to a Mediterranean Lifestyle of which diet is only a part. It should include physical and social activity, recreation and rest. It may be possible to construct a Mediterranean food lifestyle index both to assess such a holistic aspect and to correlate with improved morbidity & mortality.

  12. Virtual Reality Tumor Resection: The Force Pyramid Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Robin; Bugdadi, Abdulgadir; Azarnoush, Hamed; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Alotaibi, Fahad E; Bajunaid, Khalid; AlZhrani, Gmaan A; Alsideiri, Ghusn; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman J; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2017-09-05

    The force pyramid is a novel visual representation allowing spatial delineation of instrument force application during surgical procedures. In this study, the force pyramid concept is employed to create and quantify dominant hand, nondominant hand, and bimanual force pyramids during resection of virtual reality brain tumors. To address 4 questions: Do ergonomics and handedness influence force pyramid structure? What are the differences between dominant and nondominant force pyramids? What is the spatial distribution of forces applied in specific tumor quadrants? What differentiates "expert" and "novice" groups regarding their force pyramids? Using a simulated aspirator in the dominant hand and a simulated sucker in the nondominant hand, 6 neurosurgeons and 14 residents resected 8 different tumors using the CAE NeuroVR virtual reality neurosurgical simulation platform (CAE Healthcare, Montréal, Québec and the National Research Council Canada, Boucherville, Québec). Position and force data were used to create force pyramids and quantify tumor quadrant force distribution. Force distribution quantification demonstrates the critical role that handedness and ergonomics play on psychomotor performance during simulated brain tumor resections. Neurosurgeons concentrate their dominant hand forces in a defined crescent in the lower right tumor quadrant. Nondominant force pyramids showed a central peak force application in all groups. Bimanual force pyramids outlined the combined impact of each hand. Distinct force pyramid patterns were seen when tumor stiffness, border complexity, and color were altered. Force pyramids allow delineation of specific tumor regions requiring greater psychomotor ability to resect. This information can focus and improve resident technical skills training.

  13. Pyramidal nanowire tip for atomic force microscopy and thermal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burouni, N.; Sarajlic, Edin; Siekman, Martin Herman; Abelmann, Leon; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel 3D nanowire pyramid as scanning microscopy probe for thermal imaging and atomic force microscopy. This probe is fabricated by standard micromachining and conventional optical contact lithography. The probe features an AFM-type cantilever with a sharp pyramidal tip composed of four

  14. Tribonacci-like sequences and generalized Pascal's pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-11-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called Pascal's pyramid. Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the Feinberg's triangle associated to a suitable generalized Pascal's pyramid. The results also extend similar properties of Fibonacci-like sequences.

  15. Content-adaptive pyramid representation for 3D object classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Boulgouris, Nikolaos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a novel representation for the classification of 3D images. Unlike most current approaches, our representation is not based on a fixed pyramid but adapts to image content and uses image regions instead of rectangular pyramid scales. Image characteristics, such as depth...

  16. Estimation of Food Guide Pyramid Serving Sizes by College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaust, Gretchen; Foster, Irene M.

    2000-01-01

    College students (n=158) used the Food Guide Pyramid to select serving sizes on a questionnaire (73% had been instructed in its use). Overall mean scores (31% correct) indicated they generally did not know recommended serving sizes. Those who had read about or received instruction in the pyramid had higher mean scores. (SK)

  17. A study of correlation technique on pyramid processed images

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The pyramid algorithm is potentially a powerful tool for advanced television image processing and for pattern recognition. An attempt is made to design and develop both hardware and software for a system which performs decomposition and reconstruction of digitized images by implementing the Burt pyramid algorithm.

  18. Marker-assisted pyramiding of Thinopyrumderived leaf rust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-03-20

    Mar 20, 2017 ... Key words: Wheat, leaf rust, molecular marker, gene pyramiding,marker assisted selection. Abstract. The study was undertaken to pyramid two effective leaf rust resistance genes (Lr19 and Lr24) derived from Thinopyrum(syn.Agropyron), in the susceptible but agronomically superior wheat cultivar HD2733 ...

  19. Science and Technology Innovation for the Base of the Pyramid ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Science and Technology Innovation for the Base of the Pyramid (Southeast Asia). Approximately four billion of the world's people subsist at the base of the social and economic pyramid, while a mere 75-100 million make up the top. Despite the many challenges facing those at the base, it is the affluent minority at the top ...

  20. A multi octaves directive dielectric lens: The Pyramid Antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marliani, L.; Bruni, S.; Neto, A.

    2005-01-01

    Leaky wave antennas have been investigated for a long time and are typically an inexpensive solution for beam scanning antennas. We have designed a novel antenna topology, named the pyramid antenna, based on the broadband leaky concept. The pyramid antenna, currently covered by a patent application,

  1. Creating Gymnastic Pyramids and Balances. A Safe and Fun Approach!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodero, Joseph M.; Furblur, Ernest E.

    This guide to creating gymnastic pyramids and balances for physical educators, cheerleading coaches, and gymnastics instructors, has safety as its primary focus. It is pointed out that all pyramids and balances should meet the safety requirements of cheerleading and gymnastics organizations. The book provides thorough instructions and more than…

  2. The 2005 Food Guide Pyramid: an opportunity lost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuve, Stephanie E; Willett, Walter C

    2007-11-01

    Dietary quality has a vital role in the prevention of chronic disease. In 2005, the US Department of Agriculture released a new food guide, MyPyramid, because the previous pyramid was in substantial discordance with current scientific evidence. The US Department of Agriculture pyramids are the most visible source of US nutrition policy and dietary guidance and it is, therefore, imperative they provide scientifically derived recommendations for a healthy diet. Unfortunately, MyPyramid strays from much of the evidence generated through years of research and, in our opinion, fails to provide the public with clear information about healthy food choices. In this Review, we discuss the policy and process behind the development of MyPyramid, assess the current evidence linking diet to chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease, cancer and diabetes, and suggest potential alternatives for dietary recommendations.

  3. Imaging a Pyramid Interior by ERT-3D Methods, Preliminar Results at El Castillo Pyramid, Chichen Itza, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, R. E.; Tejero, A.; Cifuentes, G.; HernaNdez-Quintero, J. E.; Garcia-Serrano, A.

    2016-12-01

    The well known Pyramid El Castillo, located in the archaeological site of Chichen Itza, in the Yucatan Peninsula is the emblematic structure of this archaeological site and elected as one of the man-made world seven wonders. The archaeological team that restored this structure during the 1920's discovered a smaller pyramid inside this prehispanic body, which corresponded to an older Mayan period. The possibility of finding other constructive periods inside this edifice should be important to reconstruct the Mayan history. Previous geophysical studies carried out by us in 2014, employed novel Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) arrays that surrounded the pyramids surface with flat electrodes to obtain a 3D image of the subsoil. At that time, a low resistivity body was found beneath the pyramid, which was associated to a sinkhole filled with sweet water. Employing the same technique, a series of flat electrodes were deployed on each body conforming the pyramid, a total of 10 bodies were covered, employing a different number of electrodes trying to keep the distance between each electrode constant ( 3 m). Each body was treated as a single observation cube, where the apparent resistivity data measured was later inverted. A precise topographic control for each electrode was realized and introduced in the inversion process. 45,000 observation points within the pyramid were obtained. Initially, each working cube corresponding to a given pyramid's body was inverted. A composition of each inversion was assembled to form the resistivity distribution within the pyramid using a smooth interpolation method. A high resistivity anomaly was found towards the northern portion of the model that could be associated to the main stairway of the inner pyramid. The cavity detected during the 2014 survey was observed as a low resistivity anomaly found at the pyramid's base. At the moment, we are assembling the full observed resistivity data as a single file to compute an integrated

  4. Relevance of the pyramidal syndrome in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, N; Díez, L; Avellaneda, C; Serra, M; Rubio, M Á

    Pyramidal signs (hyperreflexia, spasticity, Babinski sign) are essential for the diagnosis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, these signs are not always present at onset and may vary over time, besides which their role in disease evolution is controversial. Our goal was to describe which pyramidal signs were present and how they evolved in a cohort of patients with ALS, as well as their role in prognosis. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected patients diagnosed with ALS in our centre from 1990 to 2015. Of a total of 130 patients with ALS, 34 (26.1%) patients showed no pyramidal signs at the first visit while 15 (11.5%) had a complete pyramidal syndrome. Of those patients without initial pyramidal signs, mean time of appearance of the first signs was 4.5 months. Babinski sign was positive in 64 (49.2%) patients, hyperreflexia in 90 (69.2%) and 22 (16.9%) patients had spasticity. Pyramidal signs tended to remain unchanged over time, although they seem to appear at later stages or even disappear with time in some patients. We found no association between survival and the presence of changes to pyramidal signs, although decreased spasticity was associated with greater clinical deterioration (ALSFR scale) (P<.001). A quarter of patients with ALS initially showed no pyramidal signs and in some cases they even disappear over time. These data support the need for tools that assess the pyramidal tract. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Papillary Carcinoma Arising from the Pyramidal Lobe of the Thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Gi; Lee, Sarah; Kim, Eun Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Kwak, Jin Young [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    The authors present a rare case of papillary carcinoma arising from the pyramidal lobe of the thyroid in a 54-year-old woman, who presented with a right submental palpable mass. An ultrasound evaluation depicted a 3 cm mixed echoic mass from the thyroid cartilage level without a focal lesion in the thyroid gland. Surgical specimens obtained during bilateral thyroidectomy confirmed papillary carcinoma of the pyramidal lobe. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report to describe papillary carcinoma arising from the pyramidal lobe of the thyroid gland

  6. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  7. How They (Should Have) Built the Pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Gregory; West, Joseph; Waters, Kevin

    2014-03-01

    A novel ``polygon method'' is proposed for moving large stone blocks. The method is implemented by the attachment of rods of analytically chosen radii to the block by means of rope. The chosen rods are placed on each side of the square-prism block in order to transform the square prism into a prism of higher order polygon, i.e. octagon, dodecagon etc. Experimental results are presented and compared to other methods proposed by the authors, including a dragging method and a rail method which includes the idea of dragging the block on rails made from arbitrarily chosen rod-shaped ``tracks,'' and to independent work by another group which utilized wooden attachments providing a cylindrical shape. It is found that the polygon method when used on small scale stone blocks across level open ground has an equivalent of a coefficient of friction order of 0.1. For full scale pyramid blocks, the wooden ``rods'' would need to be of order 30 cm in diameter, certainly within reason, given the diameter of wooden masts used on ships in that region during the relevant time period in Egypt. This project also inspired a ``spin-off'' project in which the behavior or rolling polygons is investigated and preliminary data is presented.

  8. Searching for Chambers and Caves in Teotihuacan's Sun Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, R.; Arrieta, E.; Barba P., L.; Becerril, A. D.; Belmont, E.; Carrillo, I.; Cabrera M., J. I.; Esquivel, O.; Grabski, V.; López R., J. M.; Manzanilla N., L.; Martínez D., A.; Menchaca R., A.; Moreno, M.; Núñez C., R.; Plascencia, J. C.; Rangel, M.; Villoro, M.

    2003-06-01

    In this work a status report of a search for caves in the Sun pyramid in Teotihuacan, México is presented. From an archeological perspective the main goal is to gather evidence to determine whether the pyramid was a state or a funerary temple. The general layout of the detector that is being built is an updated version of the one originally proposed by Alvarez et al..

  9. The "healthy lifestyle guide pyramid" for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gross, M; Gómez-Lorente, J J; Valtueña, J; Ortiz, J C; Meléndez, A

    2008-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that risk factors for chronic diseases are established during childhood and adolescence. Consensus about the need to increase prevention efforts makes the adoption of a healthy lifestyle seem desirable from early childhood onwards. After reviewing educational tools for children and adolescents aimed at promoting a healthy lifestyle, it was recognized that there was a need to develop a simple educational tool specifically designed for these age groups. Development of the healthy lifestyle pyramid for children and adolescents. We propose a three-dimensional, truncated and staggered pyramid with 4 faces and a base, which introduces a completely new concept that goes beyond other published pyramids. Each of the faces is oriented towards achieving a different goal. Two faces (faces 1 and 2) are formulated around achieving a goal on a daily basis (daily food intake, face 1, and daily activities, face 2). Face 3 is an adaptation of the traditional food guide pyramid, adapted to children's energy, nutritional and hydration needs. Face 4 deals with both daily and life-long habits. On the base of the pyramid, there is advice about adequate nutrition alternating with advice about physical activity and sports. The Healthy Lifestyle Pyramid is specifically developed for children and adolescents according to current scientific knowledge and evidence-based data and includes easy-to-follow advice and full colour pictures. Following these guidelines should improve health and reduce risk factors, promoting enjoyable and appropriate development towards adulthood.

  10. Optical design of infrared pyramid wavefront sensor for the MMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaojie; Sivanandam, Suresh; Liu, Siqi; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Hinz, Phil; Mieda, Etsuko; Hardy, Tim; Lardiere, Olivier

    2017-09-01

    We report the optical design of an infrared (0.85-1.8 μm) pyramid wavefront sensor (IRPWFS) that is designed for the 6.5m MMT on telescope adaptive optics system using the latest developments in low-noise infrared avalanche photodiode arrays. The comparison between the pyramid and the double-roof prism based wavefront sensors and the evaluation of their micro pupils' quality are presented. According to our analysis, the use of two double-roof prisms with achromatic materials produces the competitive performance when compared to the traditional pyramid prism, which is difficult to manufacture. The final micro pupils on the image plane have the residual errors of pupil position, chromatism, and distortion within 1/10 pixel over the 2×2 arcsecond field of view, which meet the original design goals.

  11. Pyramid Algorithm Framework for Real-Time Image Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangüesa, Adriá Arbués; Ene, Andreea-Daniela; Jørgensen, Nicolai Krogh

    2017-01-01

    Pyramid methods are useful for certain image processing techniques due to their linear time complexity. Implementing them using compute shaders provides a basis for rendering image effects with reduced impact on performance compared to conventional methods. Although pyramid methods are used...... in the game industry, they are not easily accessible to all developers because many game engines do not include built-in support. We present a framework for a popular game engine that allows users to take advantage of pyramid methods for developing image effects. In order to evaluate the performance...... and to demonstrate the framework, a few image effects were implemented. These effects were compared to built-in effects of the same game engine. The results showed that the built-in image effects performed slightly better. The performance of our framework could potentially be improved through optimisation, mainly...

  12. [Arabian food pyramid: unified framework for nutritional health messages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokr, Adel M

    2008-01-01

    There are several ways to present nutritional health messages, particularly pyramidic indices, but they have many deficiencies such as lack of agreement on a unified or clear methodology for food grouping and ignoring nutritional group inter-relation and integration. This causes confusion for health educators and target individuals. This paper presents an Arabian food pyramid that aims to unify the bases of nutritional health messages, bringing together the function, contents, source and nutritional group servings and indicating the inter-relation and integration of nutritional groups. This provides comprehensive, integrated, simple and flexible health messages.

  13. Damage to the pyramidal tracts is necessary and sufficient for the production of the pyramidal syndrome in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira-Souza, Ricardo

    2015-07-01

    The causal role played by damage to the pyramidal tracts in the production of spastic hemiplegia in man has been hotly debated over the past hundred years. Two broad streams of thought have emerged from this dispute. The first, which is grounded on the clinicopathological schools of Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) and Paul Flechsig (1847-1929), claimed that the four cardinal signs of hemiplegia, namely (i) paralysis, (ii) spasticity, (iii) hyperactive phasic muscle reflexes ("tendon jerks") and (iv) the sign of Babinski, are caused by injury or dysfunction of the pyramidal tracts. The second school, championed by John Farquhar Fulton (1899-1960) and Derek Denny-Brown (1901-1981), reflects the increasing influence of experimental neurology on clinicopathological concepts after World War II. According to this school, most elements of the pyramidal syndrome are caused by the added release or injury of extrapyramidal structures at different levels of the forebrain and brainstem. Most symptoms of spastic hemiplegia were thus interpreted as signs of extrapyramidal (e.g., reticulospinal) release or damage. However, consensus on which symptoms of spastic hemiplegia were due to pyramidal or extrapyramidal changes was never reached. To add to this uncertainty, a number of clinicopathological cases that supported the old view were sporadically published over the same period. The purpose of the present essay is to provide clinicoanatomic perspective to the neurological literature in support of the hypothesis that damage to the pyramidal tracts is a necessary and sufficient condition for the production of the complete pyramidal syndrome in man. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Pyramidal anchor stone from Baga waters of Goa, west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tripati, S.

    Underwater exploration in the coastal region off Baga (Goa, India) led to the recovery of an isolated stone artefact, which resembles a pyramidal type of anchor stone. This anchor stone is unlike to other pyramidal anchor stones found elsewhere...

  15. Magnitude of genotype x environment interaction for bacterial leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Magnitude of genotype x environment interaction for bacterial leaf blight resistance in rice growing areas of Uganda. ... Low attack was observed on pyramided genotypes in all locations and two with single gene, i.e. IRBB8 and IRBB21, respectively. Interestingly, IR24 was as resistant as any of the pyramided combinations.

  16. Setting aside transactions from pyramid schemes as impeachable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The point of contention in this case was whether the illegality of the business of the scheme was a relevant consideration in determining whether the pay-outs were made in the ordinary course of business of the scheme. This paper discusses pyramid schemes in the context of impeachable dispositions in terms of the ...

  17. A pyramid algorithm for the Haar discrete wavelet packet transform ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WPT) in which Mallat's pyramid algorithm is applied to the multiresolution analysis (MRA) of both the approximation and detail subspaces of a signal. As a contribution to the computer-aided signal processing of non-stationary signals, this ...

  18. Marker-assisted pyramiding of Thinopyrum-derived leaf rust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mona Singh

    2017-12-08

    Dec 8, 2017 ... ilies carrying both Lr19 and Lr24 in homozygous state were developed. The details of gene pyramiding scheme are given in figure 1. Apart from the use of molecular markers, shuttle breed- ing was used to accelerate the development of NILs. Two generations in a year were raised; one at IARI, New Delhi,.

  19. Organizing innovation in base-of-the-pyramid projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, J. de; Steen, M.G.D.; Posthumus, A.L.

    2013-01-01

    Base-of-the-Pyramid (BoP) inclusive innovation projects aim to design, produce and market products and services for large and relatively poor market segments in developing countries, for example for people who have less than several dollars to spend per day. BoP projects have ‘normal’ goals,

  20. Nano-pyramid arrays for nano-particle trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Xingwu; Veltkamp, Henk-Willem; Berenschot, Johan W.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Tas, Niels Roelof

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this paper we present the drastic miniaturization of nano-wire pyramids fabricated by corner lithography. A particle trapping device was fabricated in a well-defined and symmetrical array. The entrance and exit hole-size can be tuned by adjusting fabrication parameters. We describe here

  1. The pyramid model as a structured way of quality management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Tuuk Adriani Willem

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Three quality systems that can be used in blood establishments are briefly explained. The Pyramid model is described as a tool to manage the quality systems. Finally, some experiences in other countries are given to prove the validity of the system.

  2. Surgical anatomy of the pyramidal lobe and its significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. The purpose of this prospective study was to highlight some new findings about anatomical and morphological variations of the thyroid pyramidal lobe and to emphasise the necessity and importance of exploration of the visceral compartment of the neck and resection of this structure in primary thyroid operations.

  3. Budding Architects: Exploring the Designs of Pyramids and Prisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavy, Aisling; Hourigan, Mairéad

    2015-01-01

    The context of students as architects is used to examine the similarities and differences between prisms and pyramids. Leavy and Hourigan use the Van Hiele Model as a tool to support teachers to develop expectations for differentiating geometry in the classroom using practical examples.

  4. Design data brochure for a pyramidal optics solar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    This Design Data Brochure provides information on a Pyramidal Optics Solar System for solar heating and domestic hot water. The system is made up of the collecting, storage, and distribution subsystems. Contained in the brochure are such items as system description, available accessories, installation arrangements, physical data, piping and wiring diagrams, and guide specifications.

  5. Catalyzing new product adoption at the base of the pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marinakis, Yorgos; Walsh, Steven Thomas; Harms, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    One of the more perplexing of the entrepreneurial issues at the Base of the Pyramid (BoP) is how to catalyze new product adoption by BoP consumers. Because S-shaped adoption dynamics are the result of cultural transmission bias, the question can be rephrased as, how can an entrepreneur overcome

  6. Microfinance for the Urban Bottom of the Pyramid Segment in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although mainstream research on investing in the Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP) segment focus heavily on investors' expected returns, there is less focus on the fast increasing gaps on the role of financial training in academic literature. In addition, there is a lack of deliberate focus on the wellbeing and success of targeted ...

  7. The Sphinx and the Pyramids at Giza. Educational Packet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliano, Sara; Rapport, Wendy

    This packet of materials was created to accompany the exhibit "The Sphinx and the Pyramids: 100 Years of American Archaeology at Giza" at the Semitic Museum of Harvard University. The lessons and teacher's guide focus on the following: (1) "The Mystery of the Secret Tomb" where students take on the role of an archaeologist by…

  8. The Meat and Protein Group. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and eating from the meat and protein group. Colorful photographs support early readers in understanding the text. The repetition of words…

  9. Fats, Oils, and Sweets. The Food Guide Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Helen

    This booklet for young children is part of a series that supports national science standards related to physical health and nutrition, describing and illustrating the importance of using the Food Guide Pyramid and avoiding excesses of fats, oils, and sweets. It presents appealing alternatives to these unhealthy foods. Colorful photographs support…

  10. Building trust at the Base of the Pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootveld, P.; Vermeulen, P.A.M.

    2014-01-01

    More and more companies are serving the poorest communities of our world, the so-called Base of the Pyramid (BoP). Wal-Mart, for example, moved into the Mexican retail-banking sector, claiming not only to “sell more stuff” but also to compete against the entrenched domestic businesses that are not

  11. Agronomic qualities of genetic pyramids of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nine superior lines with desirable qualities, such as earliness (95 days), high seed rate (290 seeds per plant), and climbing ability, were obtained. Pyramiding R genes did not affect yield traits, except time to flowering and number of flower buds per plant due to transgressive segregation. Key Words: Backcrossing, marker ...

  12. Using the Pyramid Approach to Teaching Marketing Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, James W.; Westfall, John; Ainscough, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    Underscores the need for teaching marketing research skills at the secondary level and shows how marketing research fits into marketing education. Provides an example of how to use the pyramid approach to research, which involves review of secondary sources, key informant interviews, focus groups, and quantitative research. (Author/JOW)

  13. [Diagnostic significance of pathologic synkinesis for detection of pyramidal pathology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliasnyĭ, M M

    1991-01-01

    Five types of pathological synkinesis (++blepharo-ocular, ++blepharo-facial, ++bucco-manual, ++digito-digital on the hands, ++pedo-digital) are described. They are of definite importance for revealing pyramidal pathology including its early stages as well as for objective evaluation and observation of the time-course of changes in the illness.

  14. Gene pyramiding as a Bt resistance management strategy: How ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Questions have been raised on the sustainability of gene pyramiding since the use of insecticide mixtures has shown that cross resistance and/or multiple resistance can render such strategies to be less effective in the long term. Current theoretical and practical evidence in insect population genetics suggest that gene ...

  15. Innovation at the Base of the Pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, P.A.M.; Curşeu, P.L.; Soers, B.

    2014-01-01

    In complex and changing environments, competition increases and the pace of change accelerates. Under these conditions firms need to invest in exploiting existing competencies and exploring new ones (Floyd & Lane, 2000). Cohen and Levinthal (1990: 128) claim that firms increasingly need to be able

  16. Development and validation of a food pyramid for Swiss athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Samuel; Mannhart, Christof; Colombani, Paolo C

    2009-10-01

    Food-guide pyramids help translate nutrient goals into a visual representation of suggested food intake on a population level. No such guidance system has ever been specifically designed for athletes. Therefore, the authors developed a Food Pyramid for Swiss Athletes that illustrates the number of servings per food group needed in relation to the training volume of an athlete. As a first step, an average energy expenditure of 0.1 kcal . kg(-1) . min(-1) for exercise was defined, which then was translated into servings of different food groups per hour of exercise per day. Variable serving sizes were defined for athletes' different body-mass categories. The pyramid was validated by designing 168 daily meal plans according to the recommendations of the pyramid for male and female athletes of different body-mass categories and training volumes of up to 4 hr/d. The energy intake of the meal plans met the calculated reference energy requirement by 97% +/- 9%. The carbohydrate and protein intakes were linearly graded from 4.6 +/- 0.6-8.5 +/- 0.8 g . kg(-1) . d(-1) and 1.6 +/- 0.2-1.9 +/- 0.2 g . kg(-1) . d(-1), respectively, for training volumes of 1-4 hr of exercise per day. The average micronutrient intake depended particularly on the dietary energy intake level but was well above the dietary reference intake values for most micronutrients. No tolerable upper intake level was exceeded for any micronutrient. Therefore, this Food Pyramid for Swiss Athletes may be used as a new tool in sports nutrition education (e.g., teaching and counseling).

  17. Ecosystem ecology: size-based constraints on the pyramids of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebilco, Rowan; Baum, Julia K; Salomon, Anne K; Dulvy, Nicholas K

    2013-07-01

    Biomass distribution and energy flow in ecosystems are traditionally described with trophic pyramids, and increasingly with size spectra, particularly in aquatic ecosystems. Here, we show that these methods are equivalent and interchangeable representations of the same information. Although pyramids are visually intuitive, explicitly linking them to size spectra connects pyramids to metabolic and size-based theory, and illuminates size-based constraints on pyramid shape. We show that bottom-heavy pyramids should predominate in the real world, whereas top-heavy pyramids indicate overestimation of predator abundance or energy subsidies. Making the link to ecological pyramids establishes size spectra as a central concept in ecosystem ecology, and provides a powerful framework both for understanding baseline expectations of community structure and for evaluating future scenarios under climate change and exploitation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Postsynaptic pyramidal target selection by descending layer III pyramidal axons: dual intracellular recordings and biocytin filling in slices of rat neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, A M; Bannister, A P

    1998-06-01

    Paired intracellular recordings in slices of adult rat neocortex with biocytin filling of synaptically connected neurons were used to investigate the pyramidal targets, in layer V, of layer III pyramidal axons. The time-course and sensitivity of excitatory postsynaptic potentials to current injected at the soma, and locations of close appositions between presynaptic axons and postsynaptic dendrites, indicated that the majority of contributory synapses were located in layer V. Within a "column" of tissue, radius < or = 250 microm, the probability that a randomly selected layer III pyramid innervated a layer V pyramid was 1 in 4 if the target cell was a burst firing pyramid with an apical dendritic tuft in layers II/I. If, however, the potential target was a regular spiking pyramid, the probability of connectivity was only 1 in 40, and none of the 13 anatomically identified postsynaptic layer V targets had a slender apical dendrite terminating in layers IV/III. Morphological reconstructions indicated that layer III pyramids select target layer V cells whose apical dendrites pass within 50-100 microm of the soma of the presynaptic pyramid in layer III and which have overlapping apical dendritic tufts in the superficial layers. The probability that a layer V cell would innervate a layer III pyramid lying within 250 microm of its apical dendrite was much lower (one in 58). Both presynaptic layer III pyramids and their large postsynaptic layer V targets could therefore access similar inputs in layers I/II, while small layer V pyramids could not. One prediction from the present data would be that neither descending layer V inputs to the striatum or thalamus, nor transcallosal connections would be readily activated by longer distance cortico-cortical "feedback" connections that terminated in layers I/II. These could, however, activate corticofugal pathways to the superior colliculus or pons, both directly and via layer III.

  19. Agronomic qualities of genetic pyramids of common bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The disease resistance genes (R) pyramided from four parents were: Co42 and Co-5 from G2333; Phg-2 from MEX54; Pythium ultimum Dennis from MLB49-89A and I & bc3 from MCM5001. The progeny lines were planted in an incomplete block design, and replicated thrice for two seasons (2015A and 2015B) in fields at ...

  20. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resista...

  1. Succeeding at the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boxenbaum, Eva; Olsen, Mette

    initiative to build a social impact venture at the interface of a multi-national corporation and a hybrid organization that is operating on the Bottom-of-the-Pyramid market. Our study identifies how corporate social entrepreneurs dynamically use framing and organizational anchoring strategies to build...... internal support and external legitimacy for a radically new social venture initiative. Our findings point to the challenges, opportunities, and strategies associated with straddling global events and internal corporate priorities when engaging in corporate social entrepreneurship....

  2. PLAN FOR PERFORMANCE ADMINISTRATION IN PYRAMIDAL STRUCTURE ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Alarcón Ortiz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance administration has become a current strategy in evaluating management within organizations, but its implementation often lacks an action plan, resulting from the valuation of climate and leadership styles embedded in the culture of the organization. This paper proposes a model action plan for performance management, which has been implemented, executed and evaluated in pyramidal organizational structure organizations where a diagnosis of the cultural climate and leadership styles recurring in the organization have been previously made.

  3. Surgical anatomy of the pyramidal lobe and its significance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surgical anatomy of the pyramidal lobe and its significance in thyroid surgery. R. ZIVIC, M.D., M.SC. D. RADOVANOVIC, M.D., PH.D. B. VEKIC, M.D., PH.D. Surgical Clinic, Dr Dragisa Misovic Clinical Centre, Belgrade, Serbia. I. MARKOVIC, M.D., M.SC. R. DZODIC, M.D., PH.D. Surgical Clinic, Institute of Oncology and ...

  4. Degeneration of pyramidal tract of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Tatsuhito; Harada, Noboru; Gotoh, Yasunobu; Imataka, Kiyoharu; Kinuta, Yuji; Okumura, Teizo; Niijima, Kyo; Taki, Waro; Kikuchi, Haruhiko.

    1988-02-01

    MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) examinaion was performed on cases of hemiplegia and hemiparesis. These included seven cases of intracerebral hemorrhage, four cases of subarachnoid hemorrhage, one case of cerebral infarct, and two cases of head trauma. The pyramidal tract in the brain stem was studied in five patients with complete hemiplegia and in nine with incomplete hemiparesis. The scanner of the MRI was a resistive type operating at a field of 0.2 Tesla. The inversion recovery (IR) and saturation recovery (SR) techniques were utilized. The pyramidal tract at the level of the midbrain and the pons was recognized as a low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image (IR 150043) in the cases of complete hemiplegia. However, it was recognized as a high intensity area on the SR image (SR 100060) and the T/sub 2/ image (SR 2000100). No abnormal signal intensity was found in the cases of incomplete hemiparesis. A low intensity area on the T/sub 1/ image and a high intensity area on the T/sub 2/ image were recognized in the ventral portion of the midbrain and the pons on the affected side. These findings indicate a degeneration of the pyramidal tract at the level of the brain stem in patients with complete hemiplegia.

  5. Presence of ESBL/AmpC -Producing Escherichia coli in the Broiler Production Pyramid: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierikx, Cindy M.; van der Goot, Jeanet A.; Smith, Hilde E.; Kant, Arie; Mevius, Dik J.

    2013-01-01

    Broilers and broiler meat products are highly contaminated with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and are considered to be a source for human infections. Both horizontal and vertical transmission might play a role in the presence of these strains in broilers. As not much is known about the presence of these strains in the whole production pyramid, the epidemiology of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in the Dutch broiler production pyramid was examined. Cloacal swabs of Grandparent stock (GPS) birds (one−/two-days (breed A and B), 18 and 31 weeks old (breed A)), one-day old Parent stock birds (breed A and B) and broiler chickens of increasing age (breed A) were selectively cultured to detect ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates were found at all levels in the broiler production pyramid in both broiler breeds examined. Prevalence was already relatively high at the top of the broiler production pyramid. At broiler farms ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli were still present in the environment of the poultry house after cleaning and disinfection. Feed samples taken in the poultry house also became contaminated with ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli after one or more production weeks. The prevalence of ESBL/AmpC-positive birds at broiler farms increased within the first week from 0–24% to 96–100% independent of the use of antibiotics and stayed 100% until slaughter. In GPS breed A, prevalence at 2 days, 18 weeks and 31 weeks stayed below 50% except when beta-lactam antibiotics were administered. In that case prevalence increased to 100%. Interventions minimizing ESBL/AmpC contamination in broilers should focus on preventing horizontal and vertical spread, especially in relation to broiler production farms. PMID:24244401

  6. MyPyramid.gov: assessment of literacy, cultural and linguistic factors in the USDA food pyramid web site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhauser, Linda; Rothschild, Rebeccah; Rodríguez, Fátima M

    2007-01-01

    MyPyramid.gov, a major national Web site about healthful eating and physical activity, was analyzed for literacy, cultural, and linguistic factors relevant to consumers. The assessment used 4 standardized readability tests, 1 navigational test, availability of non-English content, and new criteria for cultural factors. Readability scores averaged between grade levels 8.8 and 10.8, and half the navigation criteria were met. The Web site was available in Spanish, but it had little cultural tailoring for English speakers. It is recommended that MyPyramid's readability, navigation, and cultural tailoring be improved. References are provided to help educators learn more about assessing and using Internet communication with diverse audiences.

  7. Design and comparison of gene-pyramiding schemes in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, F P; Jiang, L; Gao, H J; Ding, X D; Zhang, Q

    2009-08-01

    Marker-assisted gene pyramiding provides a promising way to develop new animal breeds or lines, in which genes responsible for certain favorable characters identified in different breeds or lines are incorporated. In consideration of features of animal populations, we proposed five schemes for pyramiding three genes, denoted Scheme A-E, and five schemes for pyramiding four genes, denoted Scheme F-J. These schemes are representative of the possible alternatives. We also provided an algorithm to compute the population sizes needed in each generation. We compared these schemes with respect to the total population size and the number of generations required under different situations. The results show that there is no scheme that is optimal in all cases. Among the schemes for pyramiding three genes from three lines (L1, L2 and L3), Scheme D (a three-way cross between the three lines are first performed, followed by a backcross to L1 and a subsequent intercross to obtain the desired genotype) has a significant advantage over the other schemes when the recombination rate between adjacent genes ranges from 0.1 to 0.4, while Scheme A (a two-way cross between L1 and L2 and a subsequent intercross are performed, followed by a cross with L3 and a subsequent intercross to obtain the desired genotype) is optimal when recombination rate is 0.5. Among schemes for pyramiding four genes from four lines (L1, L2, L3 and L4), Scheme I (seperately, a two-way cross between L1 and L2 (L3 and L4) followed by a backcross to L1 (L3) and a subsequent intercross are performed, then the offspring from the two sides are crossed and followed by a backcross to L1 and a subsequent intercross to obtain the desired genotype) is optimal when the recombination rate ranges from 0.1 to 0.4, while Scheme F (cross and subsequent intercross between the four lines are performed successively) is the optimal when the recombination rate is 0.5. We also disscuss how the animals' reproductive capacity, the

  8. CA1 pyramid-pyramid connections in rat hippocampus in vitro: dual intracellular recordings with biocytin filling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuchars, J; Thomson, A M

    1996-10-01

    In adult rat hippocampus, simultaneous intracellular recordings from 989 pairs of CA1 pyramidal cells revealed nine monosynaptic, excitatory connections. Six of these pairs were sufficiently stable for electrophysiological analysis. Mean excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude recorded at a postsynaptic membrane potential between -67 and -70 mV was 0.7 +/- 0.5 mV (0.17-1.5 mV), mean 10-90% rise time was 2.7 +/- 0.9 ms (1.5-3.8 ms) and mean width at half-amplitude was 16.8 +/- 4.1 ms (11.6-25 ms). Cells were labelled with biocytin and identified histologically. For one pair that was fully reconstructed morphologically, excitatory postsynaptic potential average amplitude was 1.5 mV, 10-90% rise time 2.8 ms and width at half-amplitude 11.6 ms (at -67 mV). In this pair, correlated light and electron microscopy revealed that the presynaptic axon formed two synaptic contacts with third-order basal dendrites of the postsynaptic pyramid, one with a dendritic spine, the other with a dendritic shaft. In the four pairs tested, postsynaptic depolarization increased excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude and duration. In two, D-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (50 microM) reduced the amplitude and duration of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. The remainder of the excitatory postsynaptic potential now increased with postsynaptic hyperpolarization and was abolished by 20 microM 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (n = 1). Paired-pulse depression was evident in the four excitatory postsynaptic potentials tested. This depression decreased with increasing inter-spike interval. These results provide the first combined electrophysiological and morphological illustration of synaptic contacts between pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus and confirm that connections between CA1 pyramidal neurons are mediated by both N-methyl-D-aspartate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate/kainate receptors.

  9. Pyramidal and Chiral Groupings of Gold Nanocrystals Assembled Using DNA Scaffolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Claridge, Shelley; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-03-30

    Nanostructures constructed from metal and semiconductor nanocrystals conjugated to, and organized by DNA are an emerging class of material with collective optical properties. We created discrete pyramids of DNA with gold nanocrystals at the tips. By taking small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurments from solutions of these pyramids we confirmed that this pyramidal geometry creates structures which are more rigid in solution than linear DNA. We then took advantage of the tetrahedral symmetry to demonstrate construction of chiral nanostructures.

  10. MR findings of the pyramidal tract in ALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segawa, Fuminori (Toho Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1993-08-01

    MR imaging using the conventional spin each technique along with diffusion weighted imaging and water-fat imaging was performed in 16 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), 20 normal subjects, and 113 controls with other neurological disorders. Diffusion weighted images in the patients with ALS and the controls disclosed a high signal band from the subcortical area to the medullary pyramids. The high signal band on the diffusion weighted images corresponded to the pyramidal tract in the anatomical atlas described by Talairach. The T1- and T2-relaxation times, proton density, diffusion coefficient and diffusion anisotropy were measured at the points where high signal bands appeared on the diffusion weighted images. The T2-weighted images revealed high signal areas on the posterior limbs of the internal capsules in all the patients with ALS, 60% of the normal subjects, and 73% of the disease controls. The T1-weighted images disclosed high signal areas on the posterior limbs in 62% of the patients with ALS, but not in any of the normal subjects and the disease controls. The proton weighted images disclosed high signal areas on the posterior limbs in all the patients with ALS and 5% of the disease controls, but not in any of the normal subjects. Analysis of diffusion weighted images revealed no significant difference between the patients with ALS and the normal subjects in diffusion coefficient and diffusion anisotropy on the posterior limbs. Measurement of MR parameters (T1- and T2-relaxation times and proton density) showed that the proton density at the posterior limbs increased in ALS. Water-fat images using the method of Dixon revealed abnormal signals in the water images. These signal abnormalities were more prominent in the internal capsule than in the medullary pyramids. Our findings confirm that there is an increase in water molecules that have normal diffusion coefficient and diffusion anisotropy values in patients with ALS. (author).

  11. Pyramidal growth of ceria nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bârcă, E.S. [Pitesti University, Faculty of Mechanics and Technology, 110040 Pitesti, Arges (Romania); Filipescu, M., E-mail: mihaela.filipescu@gmail.com [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Luculescu, C.; Birjega, R.; Ion, V.; Dumitru, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Nistor, L.C. [National Institute of Materials Physics, 077125 Magurele, Ilfov (Romania); Stanciu, G. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele (Romania); University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Material Science, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Abrudeanu, M. [Pitesti University, Faculty of Mechanics and Technology, 110040 Pitesti, Arges (Romania); Munteanu, C. [Technical University “Gheorghe Asachi” of Iasi, Faculty of Mechanics, 700050, Iasi (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125 Magurele (Romania)

    2016-02-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Growth of ceria thin films with pyramidal morphology suitable for catalytic and sensor applications. • Ceria thin films with hierarchical structures combination of columnar and dendritic growth and crystalline cubic structure are obtained by pulsed laser deposition. • High substrate temperature influences the appearance of these hierarchical structures. - Abstract: We report in this paper on the deposition and characterization of CeO{sub 2} nanostructured thin films with hierarchical morphology. Micro-sized ceria powder (CeO{sub 2}, 99.9% purity) was pressed to obtain a ceramic target. An ArF laser working at 193 nm irradiated the target in controlled oxygen gas flow at constant pressure (0.1 mbar). Silicon wafers used as substrates for thin films were heated at different temperatures, up to 773 K. The influence of substrate temperature on the structure and surface morphology of ceria thin films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The refractive indices and information about roughness and thickness were revealed by spectroellipsometry. Crystalline cubic ceria thin films exhibiting a hierarchical structure that combines columnar and dendritic growth were obtained at temperatures above 473 K. For the samples obtained at 773 K, columns ending in pyramidal formations with sharp edges and sizes of hundreds of nanometers were observed, indicating a high crystallinity of the layer. XRD analysis reveals a consistent increase of the X-ray coherence length/crystallite size along the [111] direction with increasing temperature. Using a semi-empirical formula, Raman crystallites sizes were calculated and it was found that size increases with the temperature increasing. The spectroellipsometry investigations evidenced the increasing of refractive index with the substrate temperature increase. High surface roughness and pyramidal

  12. Astronomical Orientation of Pyramid Tombs in North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusell Tiede, Vance

    2010-01-01

    Two ancient Chinese texts, the Chou Bei Suan Ching and Chou Li (Western Han Dynasty, ca. 100 BC), record that the Imperial Astronomer (Feng Hsian Shin) made solar observations to determine the solstices and equinoxes, and for determining the cardinal directions with a circle and gnomon. By combining the techniques of astro-archaeology (G. S. Hawkins, 1968) with both overhead imagery and ground survey, the present study seeks to link historical Chinese descriptions of astronomical phenomena with contemporary architectural orientation. In the process, several unexpected astronomical orientation patterns emerged which apparently do not appear in the surviving historical record. For example, at the imperial Western Han capital of Ch'ang-an (N 34° latitude), the diagonals of cardinally oriented square pyramid mounds (ling) align to zenith (+34° declination) and nadir (-34° declination) star rise and set points on the skyline. This is in accord with the Chou (Zhou) Dynasty's name of Chung-Kuo, meaning Central Country or Middle Kingdom. That is, the imperial capital is centered both politico-geographically with respect to its vassal states of the Eastern Yi, Southern Man, Western Rong, and Northern Di, as well as astro-geomantically regarding the color-coded Five Sacred Directions East-South-West-North-Zenith/Nadir in the Cosmos. Our ground survey also confirmed pyramid orientation to the lunar standstills (+28°, +18° and +5° declination) that we reported from overhead imagery in 1980 (155th AAS Meeting, HAD 18.CE.12, Lunar and Solar Alignments of Ancient Chinese Pyramids). Grateful acknowledgment is given to the Chinese Academy of Sciences for the invitation to conduct an astro-archaeological survey of the Wei-ho valley, Shensi (Shaanxi) Province.

  13. A sodium-pump-mediated afterhyperpolarization in pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulledge, Allan T; Dasari, Sameera; Onoue, Keita; Stephens, Emily K; Hasse, J Michael; Avesar, Daniel

    2013-08-07

    The sodium-potassium ATPase (i.e., the "sodium pump") plays a central role in maintaining ionic homeostasis in all cells. Although the sodium pump is intrinsically electrogenic and responsive to dynamic changes in intracellular sodium concentration, its role in regulating neuronal excitability remains unclear. Here we describe a physiological role for the sodium pump in regulating the excitability of mouse neocortical layer 5 and hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Trains of action potentials produced long-lasting (∼20 s) afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) that were insensitive to blockade of voltage-gated calcium channels or chelation of intracellular calcium, but were blocked by tetrodotoxin, ouabain, or the removal of extracellular potassium. Correspondingly, the AHP time course was similar to the decay of activity-induced increases in intracellular sodium, whereas intracellular calcium decayed at much faster rates. To determine whether physiological patterns of activity engage the sodium pump, we replayed in vitro a place-specific burst of 15 action potentials recorded originally in vivo in a CA1 "place cell" as the animal traversed the associated place field. In both layer 5 and CA1 pyramidal neurons, this "place cell train" generated small, long-lasting AHPs capable of reducing neuronal excitability for many seconds. Place-cell-train-induced AHPs were blocked by ouabain or removal of extracellular potassium, but not by intracellular calcium chelation. Finally, we found calcium contributions to the AHP to be temperature dependent: prominent at room temperature, but largely absent at 35°C. Our results demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for the sodium-potassium ATPase in regulating the excitability of neocortical and hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

  14. Your Guide to Healthy Eating Using the Food Pyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health (Ireland)

    2012-01-01

    Do you want to feel good and have more energy? Do you want to maintain a healthy weight and help reduce your risk of becoming ill from high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer and other chronic diseases?Eating healthy food and being physically active are two of the most importantsteps that you can take to improve your health. To help you do this, follow the Healthy Eating Guidelines, use the Food Pyramid Guide and the Physical Activity Guidelines. Cl...

  15. Pyramidal Image-Processing Code For Hexagonal Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.; Ahumada, Albert J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Algorithm based on processing of information on intensities of picture elements arranged in regular hexagonal grid. Called "image pyramid" because image information at each processing level arranged in hexagonal grid having one-seventh number of picture elements of next lower processing level, each picture element derived from hexagonal set of seven nearest-neighbor picture elements in next lower level. At lowest level, fine-resolution of elements of original image. Designed to have some properties of image-coding scheme of primate visual cortex.

  16. The Maslowian Portfolio Theory Versus the Pyramid Portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majewski Sebastian

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to De Brouwer’s modification of portfolio selection from 2009. He modified the existing portfolio’s theories so that they could take into account the Maslov’s hierarchy of needs. This proposal could be also an alternative concept to the behavioural portfolio theory. Another theoretical concept which includes not only the hierarchy of needs but the pyramid portfolio is presented in this paper as well. The base point in this case is Markowitz’s model and the safety-first criterion by Roy. Such a construction should be a starting point for building an application in this field.

  17. A New Fuzzy System Based on Rectangular Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mingzuo; Yuan, Xuehai; Li, Hongxing; Wang, Jiaxia

    2015-01-01

    A new fuzzy system is proposed in this paper. The novelty of the proposed system is mainly in the compound of the antecedents, which is based on the proposed rectangular pyramid membership function instead of t-norm. It is proved that the system is capable of approximating any continuous function of two variables to arbitrary degree on a compact domain. Moreover, this paper provides one sufficient condition of approximating function so that the new fuzzy system can approximate any continuous function of two variables with bounded partial derivatives. Finally, simulation examples are given to show how the proposed fuzzy system can be effectively used for function approximation. PMID:25874253

  18. Papillary thyroid microcarcinoma in a thyroid pyramidal lobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Tae Kwan; Kim, Dong Wook; Park, Ha Kyoung; Jung, Soo Jin [Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We report an extremely rare case of papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC) in the thyroid pyramidal lobe (TPL). A 48-year-old woman underwent ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration for a small thyroid nodule in the right lobe in local clinic, and it revealed a malignant cytology. On preoperative ultrasonography for tumor staging in our hospital, another small suspiciously malignant hypoechoic nodule was detected in the left TPL. Total thyroidectomy and central nodal dissection were performed. Histopathology confirmed PTMCs in the left TPL and both thyroid lobes. Ultrasonography for TPL should be required for complete evaluation of possible multifocality of thyroid malignancy.

  19. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-14

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resistance has been lacking. Here, we developed near-isogenic experimental lines representing all possible combinations of four QTL alleles from a durably resistant cultivar. These lines enabled us to evaluate the QTLs singly and in combination in a homogeneous genetic background. We present evidence that pyramiding QTL alleles, each controlling a different response to M. oryzae, confers strong, non-race-specific, environmentally stable resistance to blast disease. Our results suggest that this robust defence system provides durable resistance, thus avoiding an evolutionary "arms race" between a crop and its pathogen.

  20. TRH regulates action potential shape in cerebral cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Molina, Víctor; Patiño, Javier; Vargas, Yamili; Sánchez-Jaramillo, Edith; Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2014-07-07

    Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a neuropeptide with a wide neural distribution and a variety of functions. It modulates neuronal electrophysiological properties, including resting membrane potential, as well as excitatory postsynaptic potential and spike frequencies. We explored, with whole-cell patch clamp, TRH effect on action potential shape in pyramidal neurons of the sensorimotor cortex. TRH reduced spike and after hyperpolarization amplitudes, and increased spike half-width. The effect varied with dose, time and cortical layer. In layer V, 0.5µM of TRH induced a small increase in spike half-width, while 1 and 5µM induced a strong but transient change in spike half-width, and amplitude; after hyperpolarization amplitude was modified at 5µM of TRH. Cortical layers III and VI neurons responded intensely to 0.5µM TRH; layer II neurons response was small. The effect of 1µM TRH on action potential shape in layer V neurons was blocked by G-protein inhibition. Inhibition of the activity of the TRH-degrading enzyme pyroglutamyl peptidase II (PPII) reproduced the effect of TRH, with enhanced spike half-width. Many cortical PPII mRNA+ cells were VGLUT1 mRNA+, and some GAD mRNA+. These data show that TRH regulates action potential shape in pyramidal cortical neurons, and are consistent with the hypothesis that PPII controls its action in this region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Nutritional pyramid for post-gastric bypass patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moizé, Violeta L; Pi-Sunyer, Xavier; Mochari, Heidi; Vidal, Josep

    2010-08-01

    Life-long nutrition education and diet evaluation are key to the long-term success of surgical treatment of obesity. Diet guidelines provided for bariatric surgery patients generally focus on a progression through dietary stages, from the immediate post-surgical period to 6 months after surgery. However, long-term dietary guidelines for those surgically treated for obesity are not readily available. Therefore, there is a need for dietary recommendations for meal planning and nutritional supplementation for bariatric surgery patients beyond the short-term, post-operative period. The purpose of this paper is to construct an educational tool to provide long-term nutritional and behavioral advice for the post-bariatric patient. The manuscript summarizes the current knowledge on dietary strategies and behaviors associated with beneficial nutritional outcomes in the long term of post-bariatric surgery patients. Dietary and nutritional recommendations are presented in the form of a "bariatric food pyramid" designed to be easily disseminated to patients. The development of educational tools that are easy to understand and follow is essential for effective patient management during the surgery follow-up period. The pyramid can be used as a tool to help both therapists and patients to understand nutrition recommendations and thus promote a healthy long-term post-op dietary pattern based on high-quality protein, balanced with nutrient-dense complex carbohydrates and healthy sources of essential fatty acids.

  2. Renal Pelviceal Keratinizing Squamous Metaplasia with Sparing of Pyramidal Zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Siderits

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metaplastic changes in the urothelium of the upper urinary tract are relatively infrequent. Metaplasia may present as either squamous or less often glandular differentiation. The process may be associated with chronic inflammation or associated chronic infections. There may be malignant transformation to either squamous cell carcinoma or adenocarcinoma. The demarcation of the metaplastic process in the minor calyces has not been well documented to date. We report the case of a 74-year-old female patient who presented with a history of chronic renal disease and acute pyohydronephrosis. The patient underwent a nephroureterectomy which revealed keratinizing desquamative squamous metaplasia throughout the renal pelvis and upper urinary tract with abrupt termination of metaplasia at the junction of the renal pelvis and the minor calyx (pyramidal zone. Immunohistochemical evaluation documents metaplastic urothelium stained positive for CK5, before converting sharply to simple cuboidal epithelium in the minor calyx (pyramidal zones which stained positive CK7. At the junction of the metaplastic components and low cuboidal lined minor calyceal surfaces, the underlying stroma showed loss of ureteral muscularis mucosa with transition to renal parenchymal type stroma. We believe that this observation is unique and potentially relevant to the etiology and pathophysiology of pelviceal metaplasia.

  3. Brief bursts self-inhibit and correlate the pyramidal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas K Berger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory pathways are an essential component in the function of the neocortical microcircuitry. Despite the relatively small fraction of inhibitory neurons in the neocortex, these neurons are strongly activated due to their high connectivity rate and the intricate manner in which they interconnect with pyramidal cells (PCs. One prominent pathway is the frequency-dependent disynaptic inhibition (FDDI formed between layer 5 PCs and mediated by Martinotti cells (MCs. Here, we show that simultaneous short bursts in four PCs are sufficient to exert FDDI in all neighboring PCs within the dimensions of a cortical column. This powerful inhibition is mediated by few interneurons, leading to strongly correlated membrane fluctuations and synchronous spiking between PCs simultaneously receiving FDDI. Somatic integration of such inhibition is independent and electrically isolated from monosynaptic excitation formed between the same PCs. FDDI is strongly shaped by I(h in PC dendrites, which determines the effective integration time window for inhibitory and excitatory inputs. We propose a key disynaptic mechanism by which brief bursts generated by a few PCs can synchronize the activity in the pyramidal network.

  4. Sensory deprivation differentially impacts the dendritic development of pyramidal versus non-pyramidal neurons in layer 6 of mouse barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chien; Tam, Danny; Brumberg, Joshua C

    2012-04-01

    Early postnatal sensory experience can have profound impacts on the structure and function of cortical circuits affecting behavior. Using the mouse whisker-to-barrel system we chronically deprived animals of normal sensory experience by bilaterally trimming their whiskers every other day from birth for the first postnatal month. Brain tissue was then processed for Golgi staining and neurons in layer 6 of barrel cortex were reconstructed in three dimensions. Dendritic and somatic parameters were compared between sensory-deprived and normal sensory experience groups. Results demonstrated that layer 6 non-pyramidal neurons in the chronically deprived group showed an expansion of their dendritic arbors. The pyramidal cells responded to sensory deprivation with increased somatic size and basilar dendritic arborization but overall decreased apical dendritic parameters. In sum, sensory deprivation impacted on the neuronal architecture of pyramidal and non-pyramidal neurons in layer 6, which may provide a substrate for observed physiological and behavioral changes resulting from whisker trimming.

  5. Pyramid of Interventions: Results of a School Counselor's Action Research Study at One Suburban Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicholas J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the implementation of the Pyramid of Interventions (POI) at a suburban Georgia Middle School through an examination of teacher understanding, assessment of overall effectiveness, and the need for further professional development. The Pyramid of Interventions is the response to intervention (RTI) component of the Individuals…

  6. Tribonacci-Like Sequences and Generalized Pascal's Pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatriello, Giuseppina; Vincenzi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A well-known result of Feinberg and Shannon states that the tribonacci sequence can be detected by the so-called "Pascal's pyramid." Here we will show that any tribonacci-like sequence can be obtained by the diagonals of the "Feinberg's triangle" associated to a suitable "generalized Pascal's pyramid."…

  7. The Teaching of Food Guide Pyramid Concepts by Nebraska Elementary School Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, H. Darlene; Driskell, Judy A.

    2001-01-01

    In an analysis of food selection education using the Food Guide Pyramid for students in grades 1-4, over two-thirds of teachers (n=464) responded that nutrition should be a high priority in the elementary curriculum. Fewer than half teach pyramid concepts consistently or frequently, younger teachers (20-29) more rarely than older teachers.…

  8. Provisions for the pyramid builders: new evidence from the ancient site of Giza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Murray

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The great pyramids of Giza are famous emblems of ancient Egyptian civilization, but until recently little was known about where and how the pyramid builders lived. The site of their large settlement has now been found, and excavation is revealing its complex layout and providing evidence of the plants and animals on which the builders depended for their food supply.

  9. Somal size of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia: differential effects across neuronal subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierri, Joseph N; Volk, Christine L E; Auh, Sungyoung; Sampson, Allan; Lewis, David A

    2003-07-15

    Cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia may be related to morphologic abnormalities of pyramidal neurons in the dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC) and the largest pyramidal neurons in deep layer 3 may be most affected. Immunoreactivity (IR) for the nonphosphorylated epitopes of neurofilament protein (NNFP) identifies a subset of large dPFC deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons. We tested the hypotheses that the average size of NNFP-IR neurons is smaller in schizophrenia and that the decrease in size of these neurons is greater than that observed in the general population of deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons. We estimated the mean somal volume of NNFP-IR neurons in deep layer 3 of 9 in 13 matched pairs of control and schizophrenia subjects and compared the differences in somal size of NNFP-IR neurons to the differences in size of all deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons identified in Nissl-stained material. In subjects with schizophrenia, the somal volume of NNFP-IR neurons was nonsignificantly decreased by 6.6%, whereas that of the Nissl-stained pyramidal neurons was significantly decreased by 14.2%. These results suggest that the NNFP-IR subpopulation of dPFC pyramidal neurons are not preferentially affected in schizophrenia. Thus, a subpopulation of dPFC deep layer 3 pyramidal neurons, other than those identified by NNFP-IR, may be selectively vulnerable in schizophrenia.

  10. The Conflict Pyramid: A Holistic Approach to Structuring Conflict Resolution in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakvoort, Ilse

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines how the conflict pyramid, originally defined and used by Richard Cohen, can be used as a model to describe the relations between different conflict resolution education programs and activities included in the programs. The central questions posed in the paper are: How can Richard Cohen's conflict pyramid be used as a model for…

  11. The roles of exploration and exploitation in the export market integration of Beninese producers at the base of the pyramid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adékambi, S.A.

    2015-01-01

    Keywords: Base of the pyramid, Bottom of the pyramid, Supply chains, Export market integration, Market learning, Developing and Emerging countries, Exploitation and Exploration, Institutional arrangements, Transaction cost economics, Livelihood performance, BoP producers

  12. Mediterranean Diet Pyramid: A Proposal for Italian People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annunziata D'Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top.

  13. Mediterranean diet pyramid: a proposal for Italian people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Annunziata; De Pergola, Giovanni

    2014-10-16

    Bread was a staple in the traditional Mediterranean diet of the early 1960s, as well as nowadays; however, it was a stone ground sourdough bread in Nicotera and probably in the Greek cohorts of the Seven Countries Study. In the present review, the nutritional characteristics of this food are analyzed in relation to its protective effects on coronary heart disease, metabolic diseases and cancer. According to our traditions, cultural heritage and scientific evidence, we propose that only cereal foods with low glycemic index (GI) and rich in fiber have to be placed at the base of the Mediterranean diet pyramid, whereas refined grains and high GI starchy foods have to be sited at the top.

  14. Value Chain and Innovation at the Base of the Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esko, Siim; Zeromskis, Mindaugas; Hsuan, Juliana

    2013-01-01

    and financial measurements. Working in the value chain requires diverse thinking in terms of interactivity, partners, setup, and governance. Involving customers and consumers in the innovation process is crucial. The venture also needs to make its offerings accessible, affordable, acceptable, available......Purpose – This paper aims to investigate the factors a multinational corporation should adapt when doing business at the bottom of the pyramid (BoP) markets. Design/methodology/approach – Based on a systematic literature review on BoP, value chain and innovation, an integrative framework...... is introduced for analysing business readiness in BoP: organisation, value chain and strategy. Four diverse cases were analysed: GE’s reverse innovation project, GrameenPhone, Essilor, and P&G’s PuR. Findings – BoP project should be a top-down supported separate entity with its own strategic processes...

  15. Pyramidal growth of ceria nanostructures by pulsed laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bârcă, E. S.; Filipescu, M.; Luculescu, C.; Birjega, R.; Ion, V.; Dumitru, M.; Nistor, L. C.; Stanciu, G.; Abrudeanu, M.; Munteanu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2016-02-01

    We report in this paper on the deposition and characterization of CeO2 nanostructured thin films with hierarchical morphology. Micro-sized ceria powder (CeO2, 99.9% purity) was pressed to obtain a ceramic target. An ArF laser working at 193 nm irradiated the target in controlled oxygen gas flow at constant pressure (0.1 mbar). Silicon wafers used as substrates for thin films were heated at different temperatures, up to 773 K. The influence of substrate temperature on the structure and surface morphology of ceria thin films was studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The refractive indices and information about roughness and thickness were revealed by spectroellipsometry. Crystalline cubic ceria thin films exhibiting a hierarchical structure that combines columnar and dendritic growth were obtained at temperatures above 473 K. For the samples obtained at 773 K, columns ending in pyramidal formations with sharp edges and sizes of hundreds of nanometers were observed, indicating a high crystallinity of the layer. XRD analysis reveals a consistent increase of the X-ray coherence length/crystallite size along the [111] direction with increasing temperature. Using a semi-empirical formula, Raman crystallites sizes were calculated and it was found that size increases with the temperature increasing. The spectroellipsometry investigations evidenced the increasing of refractive index with the substrate temperature increase. High surface roughness and pyramidal structures were noticed from the atomic force microscopy images for layers deposited at substrate temperature above 473 K.

  16. Low-resistance gateless high electron mobility transistors using three-dimensional inverted pyramidal AlGaN/GaN surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    So, Hongyun, E-mail: hyso@stanford.edu [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Senesky, Debbie G. [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2016-01-04

    In this letter, three-dimensional gateless AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were demonstrated with 54% reduction in electrical resistance and 73% increase in surface area compared with conventional gateless HEMTs on planar substrates. Inverted pyramidal AlGaN/GaN surfaces were microfabricated using potassium hydroxide etched silicon with exposed (111) surfaces and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of coherent AlGaN/GaN thin films. In addition, electrical characterization of the devices showed that a combination of series and parallel connections of the highly conductive two-dimensional electron gas along the pyramidal geometry resulted in a significant reduction in electrical resistance at both room and high temperatures (up to 300 °C). This three-dimensional HEMT architecture can be leveraged to realize low-power and reliable power electronics, as well as harsh environment sensors with increased surface area.

  17. The 2005 USDA Food Guide Pyramid is associated with more adequate nutrient intakes within energy constraints than the 1992 Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Wilde, Parke E; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Tucker, Katherine L

    2006-05-01

    The USDA issued the Food Guide Pyramid (FGP) to help Americans choose healthy diets. We examined whether adherence to the 1992 and 2005 FGP was associated with moderate energy and adequate nutrient intakes. We used data for 2138 men and 2213 women > 18 y old, from the 2001-2002 U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Quadratic programming was used to generate diets with minimal departure from intakes reported for the NHANES 2001-02. We examined the effect of the number of servings/d of Food Pyramid groups set at 1992 and at 2005 FGP recommendations for 1600, 2200, and 2800 kcal (1 kcal = 4.184 kJ) levels. We calculated energy and nutrients provided by different FGP dietary patterns. Within current U.S. dietary practices, following the 1992 FGP without sodium restriction may provide 200 more kcal than recommended for each energy level. Although it can meet most of old nutrient recommendations (1989), it fails to meet the latest dietary reference intakes, especially for the 1600 kcal level. The 2005 FGP appears to provide less energy and more adequate nutrient intakes, with the exception of vitamin E and potassium for some groups. However, without discretionary energy restriction, Americans are at risk of having excessive energy intake even if they follow the 2005 FGP food serving recommendations. Our analysis suggests that following the 2005 FGP may be associated with lower energy and optimal nutrient intake. Careful restriction of discretionary calories appears necessary for appropriate energy intakes to be maintained.

  18. Ultrasonic-Assisted Incremental Microforming of Thin Shell Pyramids of Metallic Foil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Obikawa

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Single point incremental forming is used for rapid prototyping of sheet metal parts. This forming technology was applied to the fabrication of thin shell micropyramids of aluminum, stainless steel, and titanium foils. A single point tool used had a tip radius of 0.1 mm or 0.01 mm. An ultrasonic spindle with axial vibration was implemented for improving the shape accuracy of micropyramids formed on 5–12 micrometers-thick aluminum, stainless steel, and titanium foils. The formability was also investigated by comparing the forming limits of micropyramids of aluminum foil formed with and without ultrasonic vibration. The shapes of pyramids incrementally formed were truncated pyramids, twisted pyramids, stepwise pyramids, and star pyramids about 1 mm in size. A much smaller truncated pyramid was formed only for titanium foil for qualitative investigation of the size reduction on forming accuracy. It was found that the ultrasonic vibration improved the shape accuracy of the formed pyramids. In addition, laser heating increased the forming limit of aluminum foil and it is more effective when both the ultrasonic vibration and laser heating are applied.

  19. The force pyramid: a spatial analysis of force application during virtual reality brain tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarnoush, Hamed; Siar, Samaneh; Sawaya, Robin; Zhrani, Gmaan Al; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Alotaibi, Fahad Eid; Bugdadi, Abdulgadir; Bajunaid, Khalid; Marwa, Ibrahim; Sabbagh, Abdulrahman Jafar; Del Maestro, Rolando F

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Virtual reality simulators allow development of novel methods to analyze neurosurgical performance. The concept of a force pyramid is introduced as a Tier 3 metric with the ability to provide visual and spatial analysis of 3D force application by any instrument used during simulated tumor resection. This study was designed to answer 3 questions: 1) Do study groups have distinct force pyramids? 2) Do handedness and ergonomics influence force pyramid structure? 3) Are force pyramids dependent on the visual and haptic characteristics of simulated tumors? METHODS Using a virtual reality simulator, NeuroVR (formerly NeuroTouch), ultrasonic aspirator force application was continually assessed during resection of simulated brain tumors by neurosurgeons, residents, and medical students. The participants performed simulated resections of 18 simulated brain tumors with different visual and haptic characteristics. The raw data, namely, coordinates of the instrument tip as well as contact force values, were collected by the simulator. To provide a visual and qualitative spatial analysis of forces, the authors created a graph, called a force pyramid, representing force sum along the z-coordinate for different xy coordinates of the tool tip. RESULTS Sixteen neurosurgeons, 15 residents, and 84 medical students participated in the study. Neurosurgeon, resident and medical student groups displayed easily distinguishable 3D "force pyramid fingerprints." Neurosurgeons had the lowest force pyramids, indicating application of the lowest forces, followed by resident and medical student groups. Handedness, ergonomics, and visual and haptic tumor characteristics resulted in distinct well-defined 3D force pyramid patterns. CONCLUSIONS Force pyramid fingerprints provide 3D spatial assessment displays of instrument force application during simulated tumor resection. Neurosurgeon force utilization and ergonomic data form a basis for understanding and modulating resident force

  20. Searching for possible hidden chambers in the Pyramid of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, R.; Belmont, E.; Grabski, V.; Manzanilla, L.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Moreno, M.; Sandoval, A.

    The Pyramid of the Sun, at Teotihuacan, Mexico, is being searched for possible hidden chambers, using a muon tracking technique inspired in the experiment carried out by Luis Alvarez over 30 years ago at the Chephren Pyramid, in Giza. A fortunate similarity between this monument and the Pyramid of the Sun is a tunnel, running 8 m below the base and ending close to the symmetry axis, which permits the use muon attenuation measurements. A brief account of the project, including planning, detector design, construction and simulations, as well as the current status of the project is presented

  1. Introduction of a pyramid guiding process for general musculoskeletal physical rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stark Timothy W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Successful instruction of a complicated subject as Physical Rehabilitation demands organization. To understand principles and processes of such a field demands a hierarchy of steps to achieve the intended outcome. This paper is intended to be an introduction to a proposed pyramid scheme of general physical rehabilitation principles. The purpose of the pyramid scheme is to allow for a greater understanding for the student and patient. As the respected Food Guide Pyramid accomplishes, the student will further appreciate and apply supported physical rehabilitation principles and the patient will understand that there is a progressive method to their functional healing process.

  2. The offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid of P-waves in homogeneous orthorhombic media

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2016-07-18

    The offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid describes the diffraction traveltime of a point diffractor in homogeneous media. We have developed an analytic approximation for the P-wave offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid for homogeneous orthorhombic media. In this approximation, a perturbation method and the Shanks transform were implemented to derive the analytic expressions for the horizontal slowness components of P-waves in orthorhombic media. Numerical examples were shown to analyze the proposed traveltime pyramid formula and determined its accuracy and the application in calculating migration isochrones and reflection traveltime. The proposed offset-midpoint traveltime formula is useful for Kirchhoff prestack time migration and migration velocity analysis for orthorhombic media.

  3. The possible consequences for cognitive functions of external electric fields at power line frequency on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliore, Rosanna; De Simone, Giada; Leinekugel, Xavier; Migliore, Michele

    2017-04-01

    The possible effects on cognitive processes of external electric fields, such as those generated by power line pillars and household appliances are of increasing public concern. They are difficult to study experimentally, and the relatively scarce and contradictory evidence make it difficult to clearly assess these effects. In this study, we investigate how, why and to what extent external perturbations of the intrinsic neuronal activity, such as those that can be caused by generation, transmission and use of electrical energy can affect neuronal activity during cognitive processes. For this purpose, we used a morphologically and biophysically realistic three-dimensional model of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The simulation findings suggest that an electric field oscillating at power lines frequency, and environmentally measured strength, can significantly alter both the average firing rate and temporal spike distribution properties of a hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neuron. This effect strongly depends on the specific and instantaneous relative spatial location of the neuron with respect to the field, and on the synaptic input properties. The model makes experimentally testable predictions on the possible functional consequences for normal hippocampal functions such as object recognition and spatial navigation. The results suggest that, although EF effects on cognitive processes may be difficult to occur in everyday life, their functional consequences deserve some consideration, especially when they constitute a systematic presence in living environments. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Active appearance pyramids for object parametrisation and fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Bhalerao, Abhir; Dickenson, Edward; Hutchinson, Charles

    2016-08-01

    Object class representation is one of the key problems in various medical image analysis tasks. We propose a part-based parametric appearance model we refer to as an Active Appearance Pyramid (AAP). The parts are delineated by multi-scale Local Feature Pyramids (LFPs) for superior spatial specificity and distinctiveness. An AAP models the variability within a population with local translations of multi-scale parts and linear appearance variations of the assembly of the parts. It can fit and represent new instances by adjusting the shape and appearance parameters. The fitting process uses a two-step iterative strategy: local landmark searching followed by shape regularisation. We present a simultaneous local feature searching and appearance fitting algorithm based on the weighted Lucas and Kanade method. A shape regulariser is derived to calculate the maximum likelihood shape with respect to the prior and multiple landmark candidates from multi-scale LFPs, with a compact closed-form solution. We apply the 2D AAP on the modelling of variability in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and validate its performance on 200 studies consisting of routine axial and sagittal MRI scans. Intervertebral sagittal and parasagittal cross-sections are typically used for the diagnosis of LSS, we therefore build three AAPs on L3/4, L4/5 and L5/S1 axial cross-sections and three on parasagittal slices. Experiments show significant improvement in convergence range, robustness to local minima and segmentation precision compared with Constrained Local Models (CLMs), Active Shape Models (ASMs) and Active Appearance Models (AAMs), as well as superior performance in appearance reconstruction compared with AAMs. We also validate the performance on 3D CT volumes of hip joints from 38 studies. Compared to AAMs, AAPs achieve a higher segmentation and reconstruction precision. Moreover, AAPs have a significant improvement in efficiency, consuming about half the memory and less than 10% of

  5. Breast cancer screening and the changing population pyramid of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Ken; Ohashi, Hitoshi; Kinoshita, Satoki; Nogi, Hiroko; Kato, Kumiko; Toriumi, Yasuo; Yamashita, Akinori; Kamio, Makiko; Mimoto, Rei; Takeyama, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer has been the most prevalent cancer in Japan since the 1990s. The mortality from breast cancer is increasing in Japan, whereas in other industrialized countries it has been decreasing since 1990. On the other hand, Japan faces unparalleled growth in its aging population. The aim of this study was to report the mammography screening among Japanese women and the related upcoming changes in the population pyramid of Japan. The reference data for our study were obtained from the Center for Cancer Control and Information Services, Japan Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications, Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, the Japanese Cancer Society, and the National Institute of Population and Social Security. The survey data were obtained from breast cancer and mammography screenings in the Tokyo Prefecture in 2008. The following parameters were analyzed: annual breast cancer incidence, current screening rates, average life-span, and predicted demographic statistics. Our results showed that breast cancer incidence and mortality have been increasing annually in Japan. The average age of breast cancer patients increased to 58.40 years in 2010. The incidence of breast cancer in women aged 65 years and older increased from 25.3 to 32.9 % in the last 10 years and is expected to continue to increase in the future. The check-up rate was 16.0-20.0 % for women aged 65-74 years and 43.0-46.0 % for women aged 40-54 years. According to our questionnaire survey, concerns about breast cancer and mammography screening were high in the young and low in the elderly women. The Japanese population aged 65 years and older was 30,740 (24.1 %) in 2012 and is estimated to increase by 40 % over the next 20 years despite Japan's declining population size. Breast cancer incidence has increased in Japan, even among patients aged 65 years and older. Breast cancer has become increasingly prevalent in older Japanese women. As the population pyramid of Japan changes, women aged 65

  6. An Efficient Tile-Pyramids Building Method for Fast Visualization of Massive Geospatial Raster Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUO, N.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Building tile-pyramids is an effective way for publishing and accessing the map visualization service of large-scale geospatial data in the web. But it is a time-consuming task in Geographic Information System (GIS to build tile-pyramids using traditional methods. In this article, an adaptive multilevel tiles generation method is proposed, which first builds grid index for the geospatial raster dataset, and then generates tiles according to different hierarchy level numbers in the tile-pyramid. With the optimized map rendering engine implemented, a parallel tiles pyramid generation method for large-scale geospatial raster dataset is integrated into a high performance GIS platform. Proved by experiments, the new method shows acceptable applicability, stability and scalability besides its high efficiency.

  7. A muon detector to be installed at the Pyramid of the Sun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro, R.; Belmont M, E.; Cervantes, A.; Grabski, V.; Lopez R, J.M.; Manzanilla, L.; Martinez D, A.; Moreno, M.; Menchaca R, A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    Is the Pyramid of the Sun at Teotihuacan a mausoleum, or just a ceremonial monument? A similar question inspired Luis Alvarez over 30 years ago to carry out his famous muon detection experiment at the Chephren Pyramid, in Giza. A fortunate similarity between this monument and the Pyramid of the Sun is a tunnel, running 8 m below the base and ending close to the symmetry axis, which allows us to emulate Alvarez in a search for possible hidden chambers in one of the largest pyramids in Latin America. Here we elaborate on what is known about this monument, on a description of the proposed detector design, and its expected performance based on simulations. (Author)

  8. The azimuth-dependent offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid in 3D HTI media

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2013-09-22

    Analytical representation of offset-midpoint traveltime equation is very important for pre-stack Kirchhoff migration and velocity inversion in anisotropic media. For VTI media, the offset-midpoint traveltime resembles the shape of Cheop\\'s pyramid. In this study, we extend the offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid to the case of 3D HTI media. We employ the stationary phase method to derive the analytical representation of traveltime equation, and then use Shanks transformation to improve the accuracy of horizontal and vertical slownesses. The traveltime pyramid is derived in both the depth- and time-domain. Numerical examples indicate that the azimuthal characteristics of both the traveltime pyramid and the migration isochrones are very obvious in HTI media due to the effect of anisotropy.

  9. Activity-dependent Regulation of h Channel Distribution in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Minyoung Shin; Dane M. Chetkovich

    2007-01-01

    ...) channel subunits, HCN1 and HCN2. Pyramidal neuron h channels within hippocampal area CA1 are remarkably enriched in distal apical dendrites, and this unique distribution pattern is critical for regulating dendritic excitability...

  10. THE MORPHOLOGICAL PYRAMID AND ITS APPLICATIONS TO REMOTE SENSING: MULTIRESOLUTION DATA ANALYSIS AND FEATURES EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laporterie Florence

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In remote sensing, sensors are more and more numerous, and their spatial resolution is higher and higher. Thus, the availability of a quick and accurate characterisation of the increasing amount of data is now a quite important issue. This paper deals with an approach combining a pyramidal algorithm and mathematical morphology to study the physiographic characteristics of terrestrial ecosystems. Our pyramidal strategy involves first morphological filters, then extraction at each level of resolution of well-known landscapes features. The approach is applied to a digitised aerial photograph representing an heterogeneous landscape of orchards and forests along the Garonne river (France. This example, simulating very high spatial resolution imagery, highlights the influence of the parameters of the pyramid according to the spatial properties of the studied patterns. It is shown that, the morphological pyramid approach is a promising attempt for multi-level features extraction by modelling geometrical relevant parameters.

  11. Effect of varying durations of pyramid exposure — an indication towards a possibility of overexposure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhat, Surekha; Rao, Guruprasad; Murthy, K Dilip; Bhat, P Gopalakrishna

    2009-01-01

    .... The present study was aimed to analyze the effects of prolonged pyramid exposure on plasma cortisol level, markers of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense in erythrocytes of adult female Wistar rats...

  12. [Babinski and Chaddock signs without apparent pyramidal disfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Dib, Eduardo; Ribeiro, Rodrigo Gaspar

    2005-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to verify, in one hundred in-patients from the Serviço de Clínica Médica do Hospital Universitário Clementino Fraga Filho da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro who did not have a history of clinical symptoms of pyramidal disfunction, the presence of the Babinski and Chaddock signs. As a secondary objective, we looked for a prevalence of one of the signs over the other, and the influence of the head position regarding the obtained responses. The patients were examined while supine with their heads in three different positions. Out of the one hundred patients, ten of them (10%) showed hallux extension uni or bilateral. The Babinski sign was positive 18 times (40%), and the Chaddock sign was positive 27 times (60%). The Chaddock sign occurred more frequently than the Babinski sign, the abnormal reflex occurred twice as much on the left foot than the right, and apparently there was no interference regarding the head position in relation to the obtained results.

  13. Mediterranean diet pyramid today. Science and cultural updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach-Faig, Anna; Berry, Elliot M; Lairon, Denis; Reguant, Joan; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Dernini, Sandro; Medina, F Xavier; Battino, Maurizio; Belahsen, Rekia; Miranda, Gemma; Serra-Majem, Lluís

    2011-12-01

    To present the Mediterranean diet (MD) pyramid: a lifestyle for today. A new graphic representation has been conceived as a simplified main frame to be adapted to the different nutritional and socio-economic contexts of the Mediterranean region. This review gathers updated recommendations considering the lifestyle, dietary, sociocultural, environmental and health challenges that the current Mediterranean populations are facing. Mediterranean region and its populations. Many innovations have arisen since previous graphical representations of the MD. First, the concept of composition of the 'main meals' is introduced to reinforce the plant-based core of the dietary pattern. Second, frugality and moderation is emphasised because of the major public health challenge of obesity. Third, qualitative cultural and lifestyle elements are taken into account, such as conviviality, culinary activities, physical activity and adequate rest, along with proportion and frequency recommendations of food consumption. These innovations are made without omitting other items associated with the production, selection, processing and consumption of foods, such as seasonality, biodiversity, and traditional, local and eco-friendly products. Adopting a healthy lifestyle and preserving cultural elements should be considered in order to acquire all the benefits from the MD and preserve this cultural heritage. Considering the acknowledgment of the MD as an Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO (2010), and taking into account its contribution to health and general well-being, we hope to contribute to a much better adherence to this healthy dietary pattern and its way of life with this new graphic representation.

  14. Location-dependent excitatory synaptic interactions in pyramidal neuron dendrites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardia F Behabadi

    Full Text Available Neocortical pyramidal neurons (PNs receive thousands of excitatory synaptic contacts on their basal dendrites. Some act as classical driver inputs while others are thought to modulate PN responses based on sensory or behavioral context, but the biophysical mechanisms that mediate classical-contextual interactions in these dendrites remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that if two excitatory pathways bias their synaptic projections towards proximal vs. distal ends of the basal branches, the very different local spike thresholds and attenuation factors for inputs near and far from the soma might provide the basis for a classical-contextual functional asymmetry. Supporting this possibility, we found both in compartmental models and electrophysiological recordings in brain slices that the responses of basal dendrites to spatially separated inputs are indeed strongly asymmetric. Distal excitation lowers the local spike threshold for more proximal inputs, while having little effect on peak responses at the soma. In contrast, proximal excitation lowers the threshold, but also substantially increases the gain of distally-driven responses. Our findings support the view that PN basal dendrites possess significant analog computing capabilities, and suggest that the diverse forms of nonlinear response modulation seen in the neocortex, including uni-modal, cross-modal, and attentional effects, could depend in part on pathway-specific biases in the spatial distribution of excitatory synaptic contacts onto PN basal dendritic arbors.

  15. Wiring Economy of Pyramidal Cells in the Juvenile Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larra?aga, Pedro; Defelipe, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Cajal hypothesized that the structure of neurons is designed in such a way as to save space, time and matter, numerous researchers have analyzed wiring properties at different scales of brain organization. Here we test the hypothesis that individual pyramidal cells, the most abundant type of neuron in the cerebral cortex, optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. In this study, we analyze the neuronal wiring of complete basal arborizations of pyramidal neurons in layer...

  16. Discovery of a big void in Khufu's Pyramid by observation of cosmic-ray muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Kunihiro; Kuno, Mitsuaki; Nishio, Akira; Kitagawa, Nobuko; Manabe, Yuta; Moto, Masaki; Takasaki, Fumihiko; Fujii, Hirofumi; Satoh, Kotaro; Kodama, Hideyo; Hayashi, Kohei; Odaka, Shigeru; Procureur, Sébastien; Attié, David; Bouteille, Simon; Calvet, Denis; Filosa, Christopher; Magnier, Patrick; Mandjavidze, Irakli; Riallot, Marc; Marini, Benoit; Gable, Pierre; Date, Yoshikatsu; Sugiura, Makiko; Elshayeb, Yasser; Elnady, Tamer; Ezzy, Mustapha; Guerriero, Emmanuel; Steiger, Vincent; Serikoff, Nicolas; Mouret, Jean-Baptiste; Charlès, Bernard; Helal, Hany; Tayoubi, Mehdi

    2017-12-21

    The Great Pyramid, or Khufu's Pyramid, was built on the Giza plateau in Egypt during the fourth dynasty by the pharaoh Khufu (Cheops), who reigned from 2509 bc to 2483 bc. Despite being one of the oldest and largest monuments on Earth, there is no consensus about how it was built. To understand its internal structure better, we imaged the pyramid using muons, which are by-products of cosmic rays that are only partially absorbed by stone. The resulting cosmic-ray muon radiography allows us to visualize the known and any unknown voids in the pyramid in a non-invasive way. Here we report the discovery of a large void (with a cross-section similar to that of the Grand Gallery and a minimum length of 30 metres) situated above the Grand Gallery. This constitutes the first major inner structure found in the Great Pyramid since the nineteenth century. The void, named ScanPyramids' Big Void, was first observed with nuclear emulsion films installed in the Queen's chamber, then confirmed with scintillator hodoscopes set up in the same chamber and finally re-confirmed with gas detectors outside the pyramid. This large void has therefore been detected with high confidence by three different muon detection technologies and three independent analyses. These results constitute a breakthrough for the understanding of the internal structure of Khufu's Pyramid. Although there is currently no information about the intended purpose of this void, these findings show how modern particle physics can shed new light on the world's archaeological heritage.

  17. The Effect of Food Guide Pyramid Education on the Knowledge of 5 to 6 Year Old Pre-School Children in one of the Districts of Shiraz, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ahmadi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of food guide pyramid education on the knowledge of 5 to 6 year-old children in kindergarten in Shiraz, Iran, using play and show methods. Materials & Methods: 62 children, 5 to 6 years old, were selected from one of the districts of Shiraz pre-schools by random cluster sampling. Subjects were divided into two groups. One group was educated by show and the other group by play and drawings. However, in both groups, they were educated using the same subjects about the food guide pyramid. The results were recorded by some tests before and after the intervention and were analyzed by the SPSS software using two sample t-test and Mann-Whitney U-test. Results: In both groups, after being taught about food guide pyramids, their knowledge about the number of food groups and recognizing them were improved (P<0.001. In both groups, their knowledge about the priority of any good and bad snack improved after the intervention, but this increase was significant only in the drawing and playing group (P<0.05. Conclusion: In a happy environment, children can gain good capacities for nutrition education and also playing and drawing can provide good interactions. Therefore, this method can be a useful choice for informing the children.

  18. PYRAMID - digital control technology for a 110-kV switchyard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, P. [ABB Calor Emag Schaltanlagen AG, Mannheim (Germany); Stepken, A. [ABB Calor Emag Schaltanlagen AG, Mannheim (Germany)

    1995-05-01

    Modern substations are equipped with numerous secondary systems for handling functions such as local and remote control, monitoring, measurement, logic operations and interlocking. To give substation operators total control of these functions ABB developed PYRAMID, a digital control system based on microprocessor technology, fiber optics and bus communication. ABB installed PYRAMID in the 110-kV Bergedorf switchyard of HEW, an electric utility based in Hamburg, Germany, during a recent substation upgrade. The success of the project engineering and commissioning as well as initial operating experience with the installed system show that PYRAMID ensures the kind of substation reliability and performance that can be expected with advanced digital control technology. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zum modernen Schaltanlagenbetrieb gehoeren sekundaertechnische Aufgaben, wie Steuern, Ueberwachen, Messen, Fernwirken sowie logische Verknuepfungen und Verriegelungen. Zu ihrer rationellen und zuverlaessigen Bewaeltigung hat ABB das digitale Leittechniksystem PYRAMID fuer Schaltanlagen entwickelt. Es nutzt moderne Techniken, wie Mikroprozessoren, Lichtwellenleiter und Bustechnik. ABB hat die 110-kV-Freiluft-Schaltanlage Bergedorf der Hamburgischen Elektricitaets-Werke AG mit PYRAMID erweitert und modernisiert. Abwicklung, erfolgreiche Inbetriebnahme und erste Betriebserfahrungen zeigen, dass mit PYRAMID ein leistungsfaehiges, zuverlaessiges Leittechniksystem zur Verfuegung steht. (orig.)

  19. Distinctive transcriptome alterations of prefrontal pyramidal neurons in schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arion, D; Corradi, J P; Tang, S; Datta, D; Boothe, F; He, A; Cacace, A M; Zaczek, R; Albright, C F; Tseng, G; Lewis, D A

    2015-11-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with alterations in working memory that reflect dysfunction of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) circuitry. Working memory depends on the activity of excitatory pyramidal cells in DLPFC layer 3 and, to a lesser extent, in layer 5. Although many studies have profiled gene expression in DLPFC gray matter in schizophrenia, little is known about cell-type-specific transcript expression in these two populations of pyramidal cells. We hypothesized that interrogating gene expression, specifically in DLPFC layer 3 or 5 pyramidal cells, would reveal new and/or more robust schizophrenia-associated differences that would provide new insights into the nature of pyramidal cell dysfunction in the illness. We also sought to determine the impact of other variables, such as a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder or medication use at the time of death, on the patterns of gene expression in pyramidal neurons. Individual pyramidal cells in DLPFC layers 3 or 5 were captured by laser microdissection from 36 subjects with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and matched normal comparison subjects. The mRNA from cell collections was subjected to transcriptome profiling by microarray followed by quantitative PCR validation. Expression of genes involved in mitochondrial (MT) or ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) functions were markedly downregulated in the patient group (P-values for MT-related and UPS-related pathways were schizoaffective disorder subjects (diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder was the most significant covariate, Pschizoaffective disorder, providing a potential molecular-cellular basis of differences in clinical phenotypes.

  20. Asymmetric intramembrane charge movement in mouse hippocampal pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameau, P; Bournaud, R; Shimahara, T

    1995-12-08

    Intramembrane charge movement was recorded from freshly dissociated hippocampal pyramidal cells from mice using the whole cell clamp technique. Once the ionic currents were suppressed, a depolarizing pulse from a holding potential of -80 mV elicited a capacitive transient outward current at onset and a capacitive inward current at offset of the pulse. The amount of charge displaced at the onset of the pulse (Qon) was equivalent to the charge moved at repolarization (Qoff). The relationship between the amount of charge moved and pulse potential could be expressed by a simple two states Boltzmann equation: Q = Qmax/(1 + exp[-(V-V1/2)/k]), where Qmax is the maximum charge, V1/2 the membrane potential at which Q is half of Qmax and k is a slope factor. On average, Qmax was 10.90 +/- 0.62 nC/microF, V1/2 was 1.70 +/- 2.90 mV, and k was 18.80 +/- 1.20 mV (n = 16). Phenylglyoxal (10 mM), an arginine modifying reagent, reduced the maximum amount of charge movement to 14% of control. The inhibitory effect of phenylglyoxal was time dependent and the decline time course of maximum amount of charge movement could be fitted by a single exponential curve with a time constant of 5.79 min. The dihydropyridine (DHP) receptor antagonist, nifedipine, immobilized 54% of the charge movement. These results suggest that a part of the charge movement reflects the conformational change of the DHP receptors upon membrane depolarization.

  1. The mammalian neocortical pyramidal cell: a new theory on prenatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eMarín-Padilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mammals’ new cerebral cortex (neocortex and the new type of pyramidal neuron are mammalian innovations that have evolved for operating their increasing motor capabilities using essentially analogous anatomical and neural makeups. The human neocortex starts to develop in the 6-week-old embryo with the establishment of a primordial cortical organization that resembles the primitive cortices of amphibian and reptiles that operated his early motor activities. From the 8th to the 15th week of age, the new pyramidal neurons, of ependymal origin, are progressively incorporated within this primordial cortex forming a cellular plate that divide its components into those above it (neocortex first lamina and those below it (neocortex subplate elements. From the 16th week of age to birth and postnatally, the new pyramidal neurons continue to elongate functionally their apical dendrite by adding synaptic membrane to incorporate the needed sensory information for operating the animal muscular activities. The new pyramidal neuron’ distinguishing feature is the capacity of elongating anatomically and functionally its apical dendrite (its main receptive surface without losing its original attachment to first lamina or the location of its soma retaining its essential nature. The number of pyramidal cell functional strata established in the motor cortex increases and reflects each mammalian species motor capabilities: the hedgehog needs 2 pyramidal cell functional strata to carry out all its motor activities, the mouse three, cat four, primates 5 and humans 6. The presence of six pyramidal cell functional strata distinguish the human motor cortex from that of others primates. Homo sapiens represent a new evolutionary stage that have transformed his primate brain for operating his unique motor capabilities, such as speaking, writing, painting, sculpturing including thinking as a premotor activity.

  2. What's a Pregnant Woman to Eat? A Review of Current USDA Dietary Guidelines and MyPyramid

    OpenAIRE

    Fowles, Eileen R.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to clarify the nutritional recommendations for pregnant women in light of the new Food Guide Pyramid, known as “MyPyramid,” along with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005 and recommendations by the Institute of Medicine. The differences between the Food Guide Pyramid (introduced in 1992) and the more recent, color-coded MyPyramid (introduced in 2005) are discussed. A list of nutritional recommendations for pregnant women is presented, which may serve as a ...

  3. The National Cancer Institute diet history questionnaire: validation of pyramid food servings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, Amy E; Midthune, Douglas; Thompson, Frances E; Kipnis, Victor; Subar, Amy F

    2006-02-01

    The performance of the National Cancer Institute's food frequency questionnaire, the Diet History Questionnaire (DHQ), in estimating servings of 30 US Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid food groups was evaluated in the Eating at America's Table Study (1997-1998), a nationally representative sample of men and women aged 20-79 years. Participants who completed four nonconsecutive, telephone-administered 24-hour dietary recalls (n = 1,301) were mailed a DHQ; 965 respondents completed both the 24-hour dietary recalls and the DHQ. The US Department of Agriculture's Pyramid Servings Database was used to estimate intakes of pyramid servings for both diet assessment tools. The correlation (rho) between DHQ-reported intake and true intake and the attenuation factor (lambda) were estimated using a measurement error model with repeat 24-hour dietary recalls as the reference instrument. Correlations for energy-adjusted pyramid servings of foods ranged from 0.43 (other starchy vegetables) to 0.84 (milk) among women and from 0.42 (eggs) to 0.80 (total dairy food) among men. The mean rho and lambda after energy adjustment were 0.62 and 0.60 for women and 0.63 and 0.66 for men, respectively. This food frequency questionnaire validation study of foods measured in pyramid servings allowed for a measure of food intake consistent with national dietary guidance.

  4. Pyramidal cells make specific connections onto smooth (GABAergic neurons in mouse visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Bopp

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the hallmarks of neocortical circuits is the predominance of recurrent excitation between pyramidal neurons, which is balanced by recurrent inhibition from smooth GABAergic neurons. It has been previously described that in layer 2/3 of primary visual cortex (V1 of cat and monkey, pyramidal cells filled with horseradish peroxidase connect approximately in proportion to the spiny (excitatory, 95% and 81%, respectively and smooth (GABAergic, 5% and 19%, respectively dendrites found in the neuropil. By contrast, a recent ultrastructural study of V1 in a single mouse found that smooth neurons formed 51% of the targets of the superficial layer pyramidal cells. This suggests that either the neuropil of this particular mouse V1 had a dramatically different composition to that of V1 in cat and monkey, or that smooth neurons were specifically targeted by the pyramidal cells in that mouse. We tested these hypotheses by examining similar cells filled with biocytin in a sample of five mice. We found that the average composition of the neuropil in V1 of these mice was similar to that described for cat and monkey V1, but that the superficial layer pyramidal cells do form proportionately more synapses with smooth dendrites than the equivalent neurons in cat or monkey. These distributions may underlie the distinct differences in functional architecture of V1 between rodent and higher mammals.

  5. Effect of Pyramidal Dome Geometry on the Acoustical Characteristics in A Mosque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dg. H. Kassim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As an important symbol in Islam, a mosque is built with architectural grandeur. Among the characteristics is its high ceiling and it is usually constructed with a typical spherical dome shape. Some mosques, however, are influenced by the local culture and the dome can be of a different shape, such as pyramidal, as found in mosques in Malacca, Malaysia. This paper presents an assessment of the internal acoustical characteristics of a mosque having a pyramidal dome. The study is conducted by means of computer simulation using CATT indoor acoustic software. Reverberation time and clarity are taken to evaluate the intelligibility of speech. The effect of the angle and height of the dome on the acoustical parameters is discussed. It is found that a pyramidal dome with a steeper angle contributes to poor acoustic clarity.

  6. Effective lifetime of minority carriers in black silicon nano-textured by cones and pyramids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onyshchenko, V.F.; Karachevtseva, L.A.; Lytvynenko, O.O.

    2017-01-01

    We calculated the dependence of effective lifetime of minority carriers in black silicon nano-textured by cones and pyramids on the diameter of the cone base, the side of the pyramid base, the height of cone and pyramid. The numerical calculation shows that n-type polished plate of single crystal...... silicon and n-type plate of black silicon have a high minority carrier lifetime both in the bulk and on the silicon surface, indicating a high purity of both the bulk of silicon and its surface. However, the measured experimentally effective lifetime of minority carriers in the n-type black silicon is 1.......55 ms and is determined by the surface lifetime. The measured effective lifetime of minority charge carriers in the p-type polished silicon is 1.24 ms. The minority carrier lifetime in the bulk of the polished p-type silicon is lower than the surface one....

  7. Micro-pyramidal structure fabrication on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) by Si (100) KOH wet etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Shinae; Lim, Kyungsuk; Shin, Hyeseon; Lee, Seongjae; Jang, Moongyu

    2017-10-01

    A high degree of accuracy in bulk micromachining is essential to fabricate micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) devices. A series of etching experiments is carried out using 40 wt% KOH solutions at the constant temperature of 70 °C. Before wet etching, SF6 and O2 are used as the dry etching gas to etch the masking layers of a 100 nm thick Si3N4 and SiO2, respectively. The experimental results indicate that (100) silicon wafer form the pyramidal structures with (111) single crystal planes. All the etch profiles are analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and the wet etch rates depend on the opening sizes. The manufactured pyramidal structures are used as the pattern of silicon mold. After a short hardening of coated polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer, micro pyramidal structures are easily transferred to PDMS layer.

  8. The food pyramid adapted to physically active adolescents as a nutrition education tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Brandão Gonçalves

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the understanding of the Food Pyramid Adapted to Physically Active Adolescents as an educational tool to improve nutrition knowledge. Adolescents engaged in sport training responded to a nutrition knowledge questionnaire before and after the intervention. The pyramid intervention group received the printed educational material, and the broad intervention group received the printed material followed by a lecture. As a result, mean initial nutrition knowledge was average (59.9 ± 18 points, increasing (p<0.001 after the intervention (69.1 ± 20 points without significant difference between interventions. In conclusion, adolescents' nutrition knowledge improved, even with the use of the Food Pyramid alone, indicating its use to promote nutritional knowledge.

  9. Fractal Analysis of Laplacian Pyramidal Filters Applied to Segmentation of Soil Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. de Castro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The laplacian pyramid is a well-known technique for image processing in which local operators of many scales, but identical shape, serve as the basis functions. The required properties to the pyramidal filter produce a family of filters, which is unipara metrical in the case of the classical problem, when the length of the filter is 5. We pay attention to gaussian and fractal behaviour of these basis functions (or filters, and we determine the gaussian and fractal ranges in the case of single parameter a. These fractal filters loose less energy in every step of the laplacian pyramid, and we apply this property to get threshold values for segmenting soil images, and then evaluate their porosity. Also, we evaluate our results by comparing them with the Otsu algorithm threshold values, and conclude that our algorithm produce reliable test results.

  10. Fabrication and Analysis of Chemically-Derived Graphene/Pyramidal Si Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wen-Chieh; Tsai, Meng-Lin; Chen, You-Ling; Tu, Wei-Chen

    2017-04-01

    In the study, the chemically-derived reduced graphene oxide flakes on the pyramidal Si substrate to construct the heterojunction solar cells via simple spin-coating process have been presented. The total reflectance of chemically-derived graphene on pyramidal Si is ~12% at the wavelength of 550 nm which is remarkably reduced compared with that of reduced graphene oxide on planar Si. By modifying the density and distribution of reduced graphene oxide flakes on Si, the power conversion efficiency of 5.20% is achieved. Additionally, the simulated absorbance of different-thick graphene is implemented to optimize the performance of graphene/pyramidal Si devices. The fabrication technique for rGO-based devices has the merits of simplicity, large scale, high throughput and low cost, which is a new starting point in the direction of graphene-based material for the applications of next generation optoelectronics.

  11. Action-potential discharge in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: current source-density analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, T L; Turner, R W; Miller, J J

    1987-11-01

    1. The site of origin of evoked action-potential discharge in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons was investigated using the in vitro rat hippocampal slice preparation. 2. Action-potential discharge in pyramidal cells was evoked by stimulation of efferent pyramidal cell fibers in the alveus (antidromic) or afferent synaptic inputs in stratum oriens (SO) or stratum radiatum (SR). Laminar profiles of evoked extracellular field potentials were recorded at 25-micron intervals along the entire dendrosomatic axis of the pyramidal cell and a one-dimensional current source-density analysis was applied. 3. Suprathreshold stimulation of the alveus evoked an antidromic population spike response and current sink with the shortest peak latency in stratum pyramidale or proximal stratum oriens. A biphasic positive/negative potential associated with a current source/sink was recorded in dendritic regions, with both components increasing in peak latency with distance from the border of stratum pyramidale. 4. Suprathreshold stimulation of SO or SR evoked a population spike response superimposed upon the underlying synaptic depolarization at all levels of the dendrosomatic axis. The shortest latency population spike and current sink were recorded in stratum pyramidale or proximal stratum oriens. In dendritic regions, a biphasic positive/negative potential and current source/sink conducted with increasing latency from the border of stratum pyramidale. 5. A direct comparison of alvear- and SR-evoked responses revealed a basic similarity in population spike potentials and associated sink/source relationships at both the somatic and dendritic level and a similar shift in peak latency of spike components along the pyramidal cell axis. 6. It is concluded that the initial site for generation of a spike along the dendrosomatic axis of the pyramidal cell following antidromic or orthodromic stimulation is in the region of the cell body layer (soma or axon hillock). Action-potential discharge in

  12. A pyramid-based approach to visual exploration of a large volume of vehicle trajectory data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Li, Xiang

    2012-12-01

    Advances in positioning and wireless communicating technologies make it possible to collect large volumes of trajectory data of moving vehicles in a fast and convenient fashion. These data can be applied to traffic studies. Behind this application, a methodological issue that still requires particular attention is the way these data should be spatially visualized. Trajectory data physically consists of a large number of positioning points. With the dramatic increase of data volume, it becomes a challenge to display and explore these data. Existing commercial software often employs vector-based indexing structures to facilitate the display of a large volume of points, but their performance downgrades quickly when the number of points is very large, for example, tens of millions. In this paper, a pyramid-based approach is proposed. A pyramid method initially is invented to facilitate the display of raster images through the tradeoff between storage space and display time. A pyramid is a set of images at different levels with different resolutions. In this paper, we convert vector-based point data into raster data, and build a gridbased indexing structure in a 2D plane. Then, an image pyramid is built. Moreover, at the same level of a pyramid, image is segmented into mosaics with respect to the requirements of data storage and management. Algorithms or procedures on grid-based indexing structure, image pyramid, image segmentation, and visualization operations are given in this paper. A case study with taxi trajectory data in Shanghai is conducted. Results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the existing commercial software.

  13. Housing in Pyramid Counteracts Neuroendocrine and Oxidative Stress Caused by Chronic Restraint in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Surekha Bhat

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The space within the great pyramid and its smaller replicas is believed to have an antistress effect. Research has shown that the energy field within the pyramid can protect the hippocampal neurons of mice from stress-induced atrophy and also reduce neuroendocrine stress, oxidative stress and increase antioxidant defence in rats. In this study, we have, for the first time, attempted to study the antistress effects of pyramid exposure on the status of cortisol level, oxidative damage and antioxidant status in rats during chronic restraint stress. Adult female Wistar rats were divided into four groups as follows: normal controls (NC housed in home cage and left in the laboratory; restrained rats (with three subgroups subject to chronic restraint stress by placing in a wire mesh restrainer for 6 h per day for 14 days, the restrained controls (RC having their restrainers kept in the laboratory; restrained pyramid rats (RP being kept in the pyramid; and restrained square box rats (RS in the square box during the period of restraint stress everyday. Erythrocyte malondialdehyde (MDA and plasma cortisol levels were significantly increased and erythrocyte-reduced glutathione (GSH levels, erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were significantly decreased in RC and RS rats as compared to NC. However, these parameters were maintained to near normal levels in RP rats which showed significantly decreased erythrocyte MDA and plasma cortisol and significantly increased erythrocyte GSH levels, erythrocyte GSH-Px and SOD activities when compared with RS rats. The results showed that housing in pyramid counteracts neuroendocrine and oxidative stress caused by chronic restraint in rats.

  14. Reduced pyramidal cell somal volume in auditory association cortex of subjects with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Robert A; Pierri, Joseph N; Auh, Sungyoung; Sampson, Allan R; Lewis, David A

    2003-03-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia have decreased gray matter volume of auditory association cortex in structural imaging studies, and exhibit deficits in auditory sensory memory processes subserved by this region. In dorsal prefrontal cortex (dPFC), similar in vivo observations of reduced regional volume and working memory deficits in subjects with schizophrenia have been related to reduced somal volume of deep layer 3 pyramidal cells. We hypothesized that deep layer 3 pyramidal cell somal volume would also be reduced in auditory association cortex (BA42) in schizophrenia. We used the nucleator to estimate the somal volume of pyramidal neurons in deep layer 3 of BA42 in 18 subjects with schizophrenia, each of whom was matched to one normal comparison subject for gender, age, and post-mortem interval. For all subject pairs, somal volume of pyramidal neurons in deep layer 3 of dPFC (BA9) had previously been determined. In BA42, somal volume was reduced by 13.1% in schizophrenic subjects (p=0.03). Reductions in somal volume were not associated with the history of antipsychotic use, alcohol dependence, schizoaffective disorder, or death by suicide. The percent change in somal volume within-subject pairs was highly correlated between BA42 and BA9 (r=0.67, p=0.002). Deep layer 3 pyramidal cell somal volume is reduced in BA42 of subjects with schizophrenia. This reduction may contribute to impairment in auditory function. The correlated reductions of somal volume in BA42 and BA9 suggest that a common factor may affect deep layer 3 pyramidal cells in both regions.

  15. Electronic microscopy and EDX characterization of Teotihuacan prehispanic mortar from the cave under the Sun Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, T; Martinez, G; Mendoza, D; Juarez, F; Cabrera, L

    2005-01-01

    A cave (102 m long) under the structure of the Sun pyramid of the prehispanic Teotihuacan City indicates the importance of the pyramid. Studies of the cave mortar samples using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed no difference in the chemical elemental composition. The elements can be distributed in three groups: major, minor and trace elements. The minerals identified were compatible with the origins of the cave and with the magnetic pattern.

  16. Novel nootropic dipeptide Noopept increases inhibitory synaptic transmission in CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratenko, Rodion V; Derevyagin, Vladimir I; Skrebitsky, Vladimir G

    2010-05-31

    Effects of newly synthesized nootropic and anxiolytic dipeptide Noopept on inhibitory synaptic transmission in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were investigated using patch-clamp technique in whole-cell configuration. Bath application of Noopept (1 microM) significantly increased the frequency of spike-dependant spontaneous IPSCs whereas spike-independent mIPSCs remained unchanged. It was suggested that Noopept mediates its effect due to the activation of inhibitory interneurons terminating on CA1 pyramidal cells. Results of current clamp recording of inhibitory interneurons residing in stratum radiatum confirmed this suggestion. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A pyramidal approach for automatic segmentation of multiple sclerosis lesions in brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachai, C; Zhu, Y M; Grimaud, J; Hermier, M; Dromigny-Badin, A; Boudraa, A; Gimenez, G; Confavreux, C; Froment, J C

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative assessment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) lesion load of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most objective approach for a better understanding of the history of the pathology, either natural or modified by therapies. To achieve an accurate and reproducible quantification of MS lesions in conventional brain MRI, an automatic segmentation algorithm based on a multiresolution approach using pyramidal data structures is proposed. The systematic pyramidal decomposition in the frequency domain provides a robust and flexible low level tool for MR image analysis. Context-dependent rules regarding MRI findings in MS are used as high level considerations for automatic lesion detection.

  18. Electronic microscopy and EDX characterization of teotihuacan prehispanic mortar from the cave under the sun pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, T. [Faculty of Chemistry, National University of Mexico, Building D, CU (O4510) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: tmc@servidor.unam.mx; Martinez, G. [Coordinacion Nacional de Conservacion del Patrimonio Cultural. Xicontencatl y General Anaya s/n. (04120) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Mendoza, D. [National Institute of Nuclear Research.. Carr. Mexico-Toluca Km 36.5 (52045), Salazar, Ocoyoacac, Edo. de Mexico (Mexico); Juarez, F. [Institute of Geophysics, National University of Mexico, Circuito Institutos, CU (04510) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Cabrera, L. [Faculty of Chemistry, National University of Mexico, Building D, CU (O4510) Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-12-01

    A cave (102 m long) under the structure of the Sun pyramid of the prehispanic Teotihuacan City indicates the importance of the pyramid. Studies of the cave mortar samples using energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed no difference in the chemical elemental composition. The elements can be distributed in three groups: major, minor and trace elements. The minerals identified were compatible with the origins of the cave and with the magnetic pattern.

  19. Innovation Intensity and Adoption at the Base of the Pyramid Market: A Study of Household Appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Koki da Costa Nogami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the innovation intensity and adoption characteristics at the base of the pyramid market. The innovation intensity is configured as radical and incremental, while the innovation adoption is configured as early and tardy. As an empirical approach it was conducted a study type survey. Data analysis is based on non-parametric statistics. The results indicate that the base of the pyramid consumers is characterized by adopting incremental innovations tardily, as pointed out by the literature. Furthermore, it was also observed that women have greater decision-making power in the families of this segment.

  20. Evaluating the Implementation of the "Pyramid Model for Promoting Social-Emotional Competence" in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmeter, Mary Louise; Snyder, Patricia A.; Fox, Lise; Algina, James

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a potential efficacy trial examining the effects of classroom-wide implementation of the "Pyramid Model for Promoting Young Children's Social-Emotional Competence" on teachers' implementation of "Pyramid Model" practices and children's social-emotional skills and challenging behavior. Participants were 40 preschool…

  1. Data Decision-Making and Program-Wide Implementation of the Pyramid Model. Roadmap to Effective Intervention Practices #7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Lise; Veguilla, Myrna; Perez Binder, Denise

    2014-01-01

    The Technical Assistance Center on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children (TACSEI) Roadmap on "Data Decision-Making and Program-Wide Implementation of the Pyramid Model" provides programs with guidance on how to collect and use data to ensure the implementation of the Pyramid Model with fidelity and decision-making that…

  2. Effectively Improved Field Emission Properties of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes/Graphenes Composite Field Emitter by Covering on the Si Pyramidal Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Leifeng; Yu, Hua; Zhong, Jiasong

    2015-01-01

    The composite nanostructure emitter of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and graphenes was deposited on pyramidal silicon substrate by the simple larger scale electrophoretic deposition process. The field emission (FE) properties of the composite/pyramidal Si device were greatly improved compared...

  3. Oxytocin stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis via oxytocin receptor expressed in CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Ting; Chen, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chiung-Chun; Nishimori, Katsuhiko; Hsu, Kuei-Sen

    2017-09-14

    In addition to the regulation of social and emotional behaviors, the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin has been shown to stimulate neurogenesis in adult dentate gyrus; however, the mechanisms underlying the action of oxytocin are still unclear. Taking advantage of the conditional knockout mouse model, we show here that endogenous oxytocin signaling functions in a non-cell autonomous manner to regulate survival and maturation of newly generated dentate granule cells in adult mouse hippocampus via oxytocin receptors expressed in CA3 pyramidal neurons. Through bidirectional chemogenetic manipulations, we also uncover a significant role for CA3 pyramidal neuron activity in regulating adult neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus. Retrograde neuronal tracing combined with immunocytochemistry revealed that the oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular nucleus project directly to the CA3 region of the hippocampus. Our findings reveal a critical role for oxytocin signaling in adult neurogenesis.Oxytocin (OXT) has been implicated in adult neurogenesis. Here the authors show that CA3 pyramidal cells in the adult mouse hippocampus express OXT receptors and receive inputs from hypothalamic OXT neurons; activation of OXT signaling in CA3 pyramidal cells promotes the survival and maturation of newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus in a non-cell autonomous manner.

  4. Strengthening Socio-Emotional Competencies in a School Setting: Data from the Pyramid Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Madeleine; Fox, Pauline; Mitchell, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    Background: Development of socio-emotional competencies is key to children's successful social interaction at home and at school. Aims: This study examines the efficacy of a UK primary school-based intervention, the Pyramid project, in strengthening children's socio-emotional competencies. Sample: Participants were 385 children from seven schools…

  5. Pyramiding B genes in cotton achieves broader but not always higher resistance to bacterial blight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essenberg, Margaret; Bayles, Melanie B; Pierce, Margaret L; Verhalen, Laval M

    2014-10-01

    Near-isogenic lines of upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) carrying single, race-specific genes B4, BIn, and b7 for resistance to bacterial blight were used to develop a pyramid of lines with all possible combinations of two and three genes to learn whether the pyramid could achieve broad and high resistance approaching that of L. A. Brinkerhoff's exceptional line Im216. Isogenic strains of Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. malvacearum carrying single avirulence (avr) genes were used to identify plants carrying specific resistance (B) genes. Under field conditions in north-central Oklahoma, pyramid lines exhibited broader resistance to individual races and, consequently, higher resistance to a race mixture. It was predicted that lines carrying two or three B genes would also exhibit higher resistance to race 1, which possesses many avr genes. Although some enhancements were observed, they did not approach the level of resistance of Im216. In a growth chamber, bacterial populations attained by race 1 in and on leaves of the pyramid lines decreased significantly with increasing number of B genes in only one of four experiments. The older lines, Im216 and AcHR, exhibited considerably lower bacterial populations than any of the one-, two-, or three-B-gene lines. A spreading collapse of spray-inoculated AcBIn and AcBInb7 leaves appears to be a defense response (conditioned by BIn) that is out of control.

  6. Indledende hydrauliske undersøgelser af bølgeenergianlægget Power Pyramid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Jens Peter; Frigaard, Peter

    Power Pyramid er et flydende overskyls-bølgeenergianlæg, dvs. energien udvindes af bølgerne ved at bølgerne overskyller reservoirer beliggende over middelvandstanden og det således opsamlede vand ledes tilbage til havet via en eller flere turbiner. Turbinen driver en generator, hvorved den opnåede...

  7. Spatial Pyramids and Two-layer Stacking SVM classifiers for Image Categorization: A Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdullah, Azizi; Veltkamp, Remco C.; Wiering, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Recent research in image recognition has shown that combining multiple descriptors is a very useful way to improve classification performance. Furthermore, the use of spatial pyramids that compute descriptors at multiple spatial resolution levels generally increases the discriminative power of the

  8. An investigation on thermo-hydraulic performance of a flat-plate channel with pyramidal protrusions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebrahimi, Amin; Naranjani, Benyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a flat-plate channel configured with pyramidal protrusions are numerically analysed for the first time. Simulations of laminar single-phase fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics are developed using a finite-volume approach under steady-state condition. Pure water is selected

  9. Designing a framework to design a business model for the 'bottom of the pyramid' population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ver loren van Themaat, Tanye; Schutte, Cornelius S.L.; Lutters, Diederick

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a framework for developing and designing a business model to target the bottom of the pyramid (BoP) population. Using blue ocean strategy and business model literature, integrated with research on the BoP, the framework offers a systematic approach for organisations to analyse

  10. Methods for determining the effect of flatness deviations, eccentricity and pyramidal errors on angle measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, OA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available , eccentricity and pyramidal errors of the measuring faces. Deviations in the flatness of angle surfaces have been held responsible for the lack of agreement in angle comparisons. An investigation has been carried out using a small-angle generator...

  11. State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost in cortical pyramidal neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallermann, Stefan; de Kock, Christiaan P. J.; Stuart, Greg J.; Kole, Maarten H. P.

    2012-01-01

    Action potential generation and conduction requires large quantities of energy to restore Na+ and K+ ion gradients. We investigated the subcellular location and voltage dependence of this metabolic cost in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons. Using Na+/K+ charge overlap as a measure of action

  12. State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost in cortical pyramidal neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hallermann, S.; de Kock, C.P.J.; Stuart, G.J.; Kole, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Action potential generation and conduction requires large quantities of energy to restore Na + and K + ion gradients. We investigated the subcellular location and voltage dependence of this metabolic cost in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons. Using Na +K + charge overlap as a measure of action

  13. Integrating Producers at the Base of the Pyramid with Global Markets: A Market Learning Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adékambi, S.A.; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Trijp, van J.C.M.

    2015-01-01

    International marketing literature suggests that through market learning, businesses develop market-valued capabilities
    that are the basis of their performance. Therefore, market learning is also of importance to producers at the base of the
    pyramid (BoP), whose ability to climb out of

  14. Interlaminar differences in the pyramidal cell phenotype in parietal cortex of an Indian bat, cynopterus sphinx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, U C; Pathak, S V

    2010-10-30

    To study interlaminar phenotypic variations in the pyramidal neurons of parietal isocortex in bat (Cynopterus sphinx), Golgi and Nissl methods have been employed. The parietal isocortex is relatively thin in the bat as compared to prototheria with layer III, V and VI accounting for more than two—thirds of total cortical thickness. Thick cell free layer I and thinnest accentuated layer II are quite in connotation with other chiropterids. Poor demarcation of layer III/IV in the present study is also in connotation with primitive eutherian mammal (i.e. prototherian) and other chiropterids. Most of the pyramidal cells in the different layers of the parietal isocortex are of typical type as seen in other eutherians but differ significantly in terms of soma shape and size, extent of dendritic arbor, diameter of dendrites and spine density. Percentage of pyramidal neurons, diameter of apical dendrite and spine density on apical dendrite appear to follow an increasing trend from primitive to advanced mammals; but extent of dendrites are probably governed by the specific life patterns of these mammals. It is thus concluded that 'typical' pyramidal neurons in parietal isocortex are similar in therians but different from those in prototherians. It is possible that these cells might have arisen among early eutherians after divergence from prototherian stock.

  15. Science Student Teachers' Cognitive Structure on the Concept of "Food Pyramid"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çinar, Derya

    2016-01-01

    The current study aims to determine science student teachers' cognitive structure on the concept of food pyramid. Qualitative research method was applied in this study. Fallacies detected in the pre-service teachers' conceptual structures are believed to result in students' developing misconceptions in their future classes and will adversely…

  16. Ketogenic food pyramid for patients with refractory epilepsy: From theory to clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Baldini PRUDENCIO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To develop a graphical representation in the form of a food pyramid for a ketogenic diet for dietary treatment in children and adolescents with refractory epilepsy. Methods: The pyramid was constructed based on: the estimation of energy requirements for different age groups, macronutrient distribution, food groups, and the number of servings and respective amounts of food according to the ketogenic diet. Serving sizes were based on the calculation of energy and macronutrient requirements according to age and nutritional status. Results: The pyramid was divided into three tiers and 5 food groups (fats, proteins, type 1 vegetables, type 2 vegetables, and fruits. Four portion size lists were defined for the following age groups: 1-3 years, 4-6 years, 7-10 years, and 11-19 years. Conclusion: The ketogenic diet food pyramid can be used as nutritional guidance for patients undergoing this dietary therapy by illustrating the variety of foods that can be eaten during the treatment, optimizing adherence to the treatment, and guaranteeing beneficial effects on seizure control.

  17. Food Guide Pyramid Menus for Preschoolers--Adequacy of Selected Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzler, Ann A.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Menus planned by nonnutritionists for preschoolers were evaluated using the Food Guide Pyramid. Protein averaged above 100% of Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA); calcium and vitamins C and A were around 100%; and one-quarter of menus were below 70% of the iron RDA. Lack of variety of food choices, especially infrequent use of dark green and…

  18. Let the pyramid guide your food choices: capturing the total diet concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, L B; Cronin, F J; Krebs-Smith, S M

    2001-02-01

    This paper discusses how the guideline "Eat a variety of foods" became "Let the Pyramid guide your food choices," presents background information on the food guidance system upon which the Food Guide Pyramid is based and reviews methods that have been used to assess aspects of the total diet, i.e., the variety, moderation and proportionality, promoted by this guidance. The methods include measures of dietary variety, patterns based on Pyramid food group intakes and scoring methods comprised of multiple dietary components. Highlights of results from these methods include the following. Although approximately one third of the U.S. population eat at least some food from all Pyramid food groups, only approximately 1-3% eat the recommended number of servings from all food groups on a given day. Fruits are the most commonly omitted food group. Vegetables and meat are the groups most commonly met by adults, and dairy the most commonly met by youth. Intakes of specific types of vegetables (i.e., dark green, deep yellow) and of grains (i.e., whole grains) are well below that recommended; intakes of total fat and added sugars exceed current recommendations. Scoring methods show those diets of the majority of the population require improvement, and that diets improve with increases in education and income. This paper also discusses the limitations and strengths of these approaches, and concludes with suggestions to improve current food guidance and methods to assess the total diet.

  19. What To Do When the Pyramid Crumbles: The Path from XA to YB Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambier, Robert F.

    Teachers are alienated and dissatisfied with their jobs and often "burn out" because they must work in a bureaucratic structure in which all or most decisions are made by administrators and are expected to be carried out by the professionals, rather than being made by the professionals or in collaboration. This pyramidal structure or organization…

  20. Large pyramid shaped single crystals of BiFeO{sub 3} by solvothermal synthesis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sornadurai, D.; Ravindran, T. R.; Paul, V. Thomas; Sastry, V. Sankara [Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group, Physical Metallurgy Division, Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Condensed Matter Physics Division, Materials Science Group (India)

    2012-06-05

    Synthesis parameters are optimized in order to grow single crystals of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3}. 2 to 3 mm size pyramid (tetrahedron) shaped single crystals were successfully obtained by solvothermal method. Scanning electron microscopy with EDAX confirmed the phase formation. Raman scattering spectra of bulk BiFeO3 single crystals have been measured which match well with reported spectra.

  1. "Reaching Every Student" with a Pyramid of Intervention Approach: One District's Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howery, Kathy; McClellan, Tony; Pedersen-Bayus, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a description of ongoing work of an Alberta school district that is working to support and enhance effective inclusive practices that reach and teach every student. The district is implementing a Pyramid of Supports model that is built upon four critical elements: a belief in social justice and the value of every child, a…

  2. Investigations into early rift development and geothermal resources in the Pyramid Lake fault zone, Western Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G.; Driscoll, N. [UCSD; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R. [USGS; Louie, J. [UNR; Pullammanappallil, S. [Optim

    2016-08-01

    A. K. Eisses, A. M. Kell, G. Kent, N. W. Driscoll, R. E. Karlin, R. L. Baskin, J. N. Louie, S. Pullammanappallil, 2010, Investigations into early rift development and geothermal resources in the Pyramid Lake fault zone, Western Nevada: Abstract T33C-2278 presented at 2010 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 13-17 Dec.

  3. Culturally Responsive Pyramid Model Practices: Program-Wide Positive Behavior Support for Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Rosemarie; Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    This conceptual article reviews current research on racial disparities in disciplinary practices in early childhood education and work to address these issues within a positive behavior support (PBS) framework. Building largely on the Pyramid Model, recommendations and a culturally responsive approach are suggested for use within a program-wide…

  4. Reviewing a decade of research on the "Base/Bottom of the Pyramid" (BOP) concept.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A.; Rivera-Santos, M.; Rufín, C.

    2014-01-01

    In 1998-1999, Prahalad and colleagues introduced the base/bottom of the pyramid (BOP) concept in an article and a working paper. This article’s goal is to answer the following question: What has become of the concept over the decade following its first systematic exposition in 1999? To answer this

  5. Factors Affecting Energy Barriers for Pyramidal Inversion in Amines and Phosphines: A Computational Chemistry Lab Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2013-01-01

    An undergraduate exercise in computational chemistry that investigates the energy barrier for pyramidal inversion of amines and phosphines is presented. Semiempirical calculations (PM3) of the ground-state and transition-state energies for NR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] and PR[superscript 1]R[superscript 2]R[superscript 3] allow…

  6. Gravitational attraction of a vertical pyramid model of flat top-and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we propose a vertical pyramid model with depth-wise parabolic density contrast variation. Initially, we validate our analytic expression against the gravity effect of a right rectangular parallelepiped of constant density contrast. We provide two synthetic examples and a case study for illustrating the effectiveness of our ...

  7. Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudley, Colton; Dorsey, Alison; Louie, John [UNR; Schwering, Paul; Pullammanappallil, Satish

    2016-08-01

    Colton Dudley, Alison Dorsey, Paul Opdyke, Dustin Naphan, Marlon Ramos, John Louie, Paul Schwering, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2013, Near-surface geophysical characterization of Holocene faults conducive to geothermal flow near Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Amer. Assoc. Petroleum Geologists, Pacific Section Annual Meeting, Monterey, Calif., April 19-25.

  8. Group Coaching on Pre-School Teachers' Implementation of Pyramid Model Strategies: A Program Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fettig, Angel; Artman-Meeker, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe a group coaching model and present preliminary evidence of its impact on teachers' implementation of Pyramid Model practices. In particular, we described coaching strategies used to support teachers in reflecting and problem solving on the implementation of the evidence-based strategies. Preliminary…

  9. Installation, operation, and maintenance for the pyramidal optics solar system installed at Yacht Cove, Columbia, SC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    Information is presented concerning the installation, operation, and maintenance of the pyramidal Solar System for space heating and domestic hot water. Included are such items as principles of operation, sequence of installation, and procedures for the operation and maintenance of each subsystem making up the solar system. Also included are trouble-shooting charts and maintenance schedules.

  10. Morphological Characteristics of Electrophysiologically Characterized Layer Vb Pyramidal Cells in Rat Barrel Cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staiger, J.F.; Loucif, A.J.; Schubert, D.; Mock, M.

    2016-01-01

    Layer Vb pyramidal cells are the major output neurons of the neocortex and transmit the outcome of cortical columnar signal processing to distant target areas. At the same time they contribute to local tactile information processing by emitting recurrent axonal collaterals into the columnar

  11. The Bottom of the Pyramid: Much ado, but is it enough?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crabtree, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Although Prahalad does not address the issues surrounding multidimensional poverty, many of his cases fit the notion of multidimensional poverty better than they suit income poverty suggesting that we should re-focus BOP from the Bottom of the Pyramid to Multidimensional Poverty solutions....

  12. Gravitational attraction of a vertical pyramid model of flat top-and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    pyramid model with depth-wise parabolic density contrast variation. Initially, we validate our analytic ..... vity forward modelling. For present day computer infrastructure, complicated analytic expressions such as equations ... an advance in gravity forward modelling and it is quite effective as a building block in comparison to.

  13. Pyramids and Prejudice: A Study of Cultural Discrimination in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... nine-to-five working environment, rural Bantu culture, and the ambiguous location of “African Whiteness.” The paper establishes that the life of each character betrays culture's negative discriminating power and the amplification of negativity by State policy. Keywords: prejudice, culture, apartheid, industrialism, patriarchy ...

  14. XAFS study of copper(II) complexes with square planar and square pyramidal coordination geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, A.; Klysubun, W.; Nitin Nair, N.; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure of six Cu(II) complexes, Cu2(Clna)4 2H2O (1), Cu2(ac)4 2H2O (2), Cu2(phac)4 (pyz) (3), Cu2(bpy)2(na)2 H2O (ClO4) (4), Cu2(teen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (5) and Cu2(tmen)4(OH)2(ClO4)2 (6) (where ac, phac, pyz, bpy, na, teen, tmen = acetate, phenyl acetate, pyrazole, bipyridine, nicotinic acid, tetraethyethylenediamine, tetramethylethylenediamine, respectively), which were supposed to have square pyramidal and square planar coordination geometries have been investigated. The differences observed in the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) features of the standard compounds having four, five and six coordination geometry points towards presence of square planar and square pyramidal geometry around Cu centre in the studied complexes. The presence of intense pre-edge feature in the spectra of four complexes, 1-4, indicates square pyramidal coordination. Another important XANES feature, present in complexes 5 and 6, is prominent shoulder in the rising part of edge whose intensity decreases in the presence of axial ligands and thus indicates four coordination in these complexes. Ab initio calculations were carried out for square planar and square pyramidal Cu centres to observe the variation of 4p density of states in the presence and absence of axial ligands. To determine the number and distance of scattering atoms around Cu centre in the complexes, EXAFS analysis has been done using the paths obtained from Cu(II) oxide model and an axial Cu-O path from model of a square pyramidal complex. The results obtained from EXAFS analysis have been reported which confirmed the inference drawn from XANES features. Thus, it has been shown that these paths from model of a standard compound can be used to determine the structural parameters for complexes having unknown structure.

  15. Cortex, cognition and the cell: new insights into the pyramidal neuron and prefrontal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N

    2003-11-01

    Arguably the most complex cortical functions are seated in human cognition, the how and why of which have been debated for centuries by theologians, philosophers and scientists alike. In his best-selling book, An Astonishing Hypothesis: A Scientific Search for the Soul, Francis Crick refined the view that these qualities are determined solely by cortical cells and circuitry. Put simply, cognition is nothing more, or less, than a biological function. Accepting this to be the case, it should be possible to identify the mechanisms that subserve cognitive processing. Since the pioneering studies of Lorent de Nó and Hebb, and the more recent studies of Fuster, Miller and Goldman-Rakic, to mention but a few, much attention has been focused on the role of persistent neural activity in cognitive processes. Application of modern technologies and modelling techniques has led to new hypotheses about the mechanisms of persistent activity. Here I focus on how regional variations in the pyramidal cell phenotype may determine the complexity of cortical circuitry and, in turn, influence neural activity. Data obtained from thousands of individually injected pyramidal cells in sensory, motor, association and executive cortex reveal marked differences in the numbers of putative excitatory inputs received by these cells. Pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex have, on average, up to 23 times more dendritic spines than those in the primary visual area. I propose that without these specializations in the structure of pyramidal cells, and the circuits they form, human cognitive processing would not have evolved to its present state. I also present data from both New World and Old World monkeys that show varying degrees of complexity in the pyramidal cell phenotype in their prefrontal cortices, suggesting that cortical circuitry and, thus, cognitive styles are evolving independently in different species.

  16. The Respiratory Pyramid: From Symptoms to Disease in World Trade Center Exposed Firefighters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Justin K.; Webber, Mayris P.; Cohen, Hillel W.; Hall, Charles B.; Zeig-Owens, Rachel; Ye, Fen; Glaser, Michelle S.; Weakley, Jessica; Weiden, Michael D.; Aldrich, Thomas K.; Nolan, Anna; Glass, Lara; Kelly, Kerry J.; Prezant, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Background This study utilizes a four-level pyramid framework to understand the relationship between symptom reports and/or abnormal pulmonary function and diagnoses of airway diseases (AD), including asthma, recurrent bronchitis and COPD/emphysema in WTC-exposed firefighters. We compare the distribution of pyramid levels at two time-points: by 9/11/2005 and by 9/11/2010. Methods We studied 6,931 WTC-exposed FDNY firefighters who completed a monitoring exam during the early period and at least two additional follow-up exams 9/11/2005–9/11/2010. Results By 9/11/2005 the pyramid structure was as follows: 4,039 (58.3%) in Level 1, no respiratory evaluation or treatment; 1,608 (23.2%) in Level 2, evaluation or treatment without AD diagnosis; 1,005 (14.5%) in Level 3, a single AD diagnosis (asthma, emphysema/COPD, or recurrent bronchitis); 279 (4.0%) in Level 4, asthma and another AD. By 9/11/2010, the pyramid distribution changed considerably, with Level 1 decreasing to 2,612 (37.7% of the cohort), and Levels 3 (N = 1,530) and 4 (N = 796) increasing to 22.1% and 11.5% of the cohort, respectively. Symptoms, spirometry measurements and healthcare utilization were associated with higher pyramid levels. Conclusions Respiratory diagnoses, even four years after a major inhalation event, are not the only drivers of future healthcare utilization. Symptoms and abnormal FEV-1 values must also be considered if clinicians and healthcare administrators are to accurately anticipate future treatment needs, years after initial exposure. PMID:23788055

  17. Pyramidal cells in V1 of African rodents are bigger more branched and more spiny than those in primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eElston

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Pyramidal cells are characterised by markedly different sized dendritic trees, branching patterns and spine density across the cortical mantle. Moreover, pyramidal cells have been shown to differ in structure among homologous cortical areas in different species; however, most of these studies have been conducted in primates. Whilst pyramidal cells have been quantified in a few cortical areas in some other species there are, as yet, no uniform comparative data on pyramidal cell structure in a homologous cortical area among species in different Orders. Here we studied layer III pyramidal cells in V1 of three species of rodents, the greater cane rat, highveld gerbil and four-striped mouse, by the same methodology used to sample data from layer III pyramidal cells in primates. The data reveal markedly different trends between rodents and primates: there is an appreciable increase in the size, branching complexity and number of spines in the dendritic trees of pyramidal cells with increasing size of V1 in the brain in rodents, whereas there is relatively little difference in primates. Moreover, pyramidal cells in rodents are larger, more branched and more spinous than those in primates. For example, the dendritic trees of pyramidal cells in V1 of the cane rat are nearly three times larger, and have more than ten times the number of spines in their basal dendritic trees, than those in V1 of the macaque (7900 and 600, respectively, which has a V1 40 times the size that of the cane rat. It remains to be determined to what extent these differences may result from developmental differences or reflect evolutionary and/or processing specializations.

  18. High-efficiency si/polymer hybrid solar cells based on synergistic surface texturing of Si nanowires on pyramids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lining; Lai, Donny; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Changyun; Rusli

    2012-06-11

    An efficient Si/PEDOT:PSS hybrid solar cell using synergistic surface texturing of Si nanowires (SiNWs) on pyramids is demonstrated. A power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 9.9% is achieved from the cells using the SiNW/pyramid binary structure, which is much higher than similar cells based on planar Si, pyramid-textured Si, and SiNWs. The PCE is the highest reported to-date for hybrid cells based on Si nanostructures and PEDOT. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Characterization of the porcine FBX07 gene: the first step towards generation of a pig model for Parkinsonian pyramidal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Parkinsonian pyramidal syndrome, also named pallido-pyramidal syndrome (PKPS), is the combination of early-onset progressive Parkinsonism with pyramidal tract signs. FBXO7, an F-box protein, is a component of modular E3 ubiquitin protein ligases called SCFs (SKP1, cullin, F-box proteins), which...... functions in phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination. FBXO7 mutations cause autosomal recessive, early-onset PKPS. Here we report the molecular cloning and characterization of two isoforms of FBXO7 cDNA from pigs. The encoded FBXO7 protein displays a very high homology to human FBXO7 with an amino acid...

  20. Fast pedestrian detection using deformable part model and pyramid layer location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Lei; Liu, Yang; Xiao, Zhitao; Li, Yuelong; Zhang, Fang

    2017-05-01

    The majority of pedestrian detection approaches use multiscale detection and the sliding window search scheme with high computing complexity. We present a fast pedestrian detection method using the deformable part model and pyramid layer location (PLL). First, the object proposal method is used rather than the traditional sliding window to obtain pedestrian proposal regions. Then, a PLL method is proposed to select the optimal root level in the feature pyramid for each candidate window. On this basis, a single-point calculation scheme is designed to calculate the scores of candidate windows efficiently. Finally, pedestrians can be located from the images. The Institut national de recherche en informatique et en automatique dataset for human detection is used to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can reduce the number of feature maps and windows requiring calculation in the detection process. Consequently, the computing cost is significantly reduced, with fewer false positives.

  1. State and location dependence of action potential metabolic cost in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallermann, Stefan; de Kock, Christiaan P J; Stuart, Greg J; Kole, Maarten H P

    2012-06-03

    Action potential generation and conduction requires large quantities of energy to restore Na(+) and K(+) ion gradients. We investigated the subcellular location and voltage dependence of this metabolic cost in rat neocortical pyramidal neurons. Using Na(+)/K(+) charge overlap as a measure of action potential energy efficiency, we found that action potential initiation in the axon initial segment (AIS) and forward propagation into the axon were energetically inefficient, depending on the resting membrane potential. In contrast, action potential backpropagation into dendrites was efficient. Computer simulations predicted that, although the AIS and nodes of Ranvier had the highest metabolic cost per membrane area, action potential backpropagation into the dendrites and forward propagation into axon collaterals dominated energy consumption in cortical pyramidal neurons. Finally, we found that the high metabolic cost of action potential initiation and propagation down the axon is a trade-off between energy minimization and maximization of the conduction reliability of high-frequency action potentials.

  2. Adults and children prefer a plate food guide relative to a pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Zenobia; Pettigrew, Simone; Moore, Sarah; Pratt, Iain S

    2017-01-01

    This study explored attitudes toward two food guides currently being widely used in Australia: the Healthy Eating Pyramid and the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating Plate. Ten focus groups were conducted with adults (aged 18+ years) and children (aged 10-17 years) across various locations in Perth, Western Australia. The discussions focused on liked and disliked aspects of each food guide and the implications for participants' perceptions of their relative usefulness. When asked to state their preference, a large majority of participants nominated the plate as their preferred nutrition guide. The style of presentation used for the plate was reportedly clearer and more aesthetically pleasing. The plate was also perceived to be more complex while the pyramid was considered by adults to be more child-friendly. This study provides information on consumers' reactions to different food guides and the implications for perceived relevance and utility.

  3. Using the base-of-the-pyramid perspective to catalyze interdependence-based collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Ted; Anupindi, Ravi

    2012-07-31

    Improving food security and nutrition in the developing world remains among society's most intractable challenges and continues despite a wide variety of investments. Both donor- and enterprise-led initiatives, for example, have explored including smallholder farmers in their value chains. However, these efforts have had only modest success, partly because the private and development sectors prefer to maintain their independence. Research from the base-of-the-pyramid domain offers new insights into how collaborative interdependence between sectors can enhance the connection between profits and the alleviation of poverty. In this article, we identify the strengths and weaknesses of donor-led and enterprise-led value chain initiatives. We then explore how insights from the base-of-the-pyramid domain yield a set of interdependence-based collaboration strategies that can achieve more sustainable and scalable outcomes.

  4. Performance analysis of coherent free space optical communications with sequential pyramid wavefront sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Yao, Kainan; Chen, Lu; Huang, Danian; Cao, Jingtai; Gu, Haijun

    2018-03-01

    Based-on the previous study on the theory of the sequential pyramid wavefront sensor (SPWFS), in this paper, the SPWFS is first applied to the coherent free space optical communications (FSOC) with more flexible spatial resolution and higher sensitivity than the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, and with higher uniformity of intensity distribution and much simpler than the pyramid wavefront sensor. Then, the mixing efficiency (ME) and the bit error rate (BER) of the coherent FSOC are analyzed during the aberrations correction through numerical simulation with binary phase shift keying (BPSK) modulation. Finally, an experimental AO system based-on SPWFS is setup, and the experimental data is used to analyze the ME and BER of homodyne detection with BPSK modulation. The results show that the AO system based-on SPWFS can increase ME and decrease BER effectively. The conclusions of this paper provide a new method of wavefront sensing for designing the AO system for a coherent FSOC system.

  5. Sources of error and nutritional adequacy of the food guide pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavelli, S; Beerman, K; Shultz, J E; Heiss, C

    1998-09-01

    The authors assessed the accuracy of college students' use of the Food Guide Pyramid (FGP) in their diets and evaluated sources of error and nutritional adequacy of the pyramid. Students enrolled in an undergraduate nutrition class (N = 346) completed 3-day dietary records that were analyzed, using computer software, to determine individual recommended dietary allowance (RDA) values and the extent to which the students' diets met those values. The students' most common error in using the FGP was underestimating serving sizes. Only 8% of the students consumed the minimum recommended number of servings for all food groups, but diets that satisfied FGP recommendations also tended to satisfy RDA requirements. Less than 2% of the students who met the minimal number of FGP servings did not satisfy their RDA values, but less than 45% of the survey participants, regardless of gender or residence, met the recommended intake for dietary fiber. The FGP was judged to be a good indicator of dietary adequacy.

  6. Formation of pyramid-like nanostructures in MBE-grown Si films on Si(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galiana, N.; Martin, P.P.; Rodriguez-Canas, E.; Esteban-Betegon, F.; Alonso, M.; Ruiz, A. [CSIC, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Garzon, L.; Ocal, C. [CSIC, Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Munuera, C. [CSIC, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); CSIC, Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Varela, M. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-03-15

    The growth of Si homoepitaxial layers on Si(001) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy is analyzed for a set of growth conditions in which diverse nanometer-scale features develop. Using Si substrates prepared by exposure to HF vapor and annealing in ultra-high vacuum, a rich variety of surface morphologies is found for different deposited layer thicknesses and substrate temperatures in a reproducible way, showing a critical dependence on both. Arrays of 3D islands (truncated pyramids), percolated ridge networks, and square pit (inverted pyramid) distributions are observed. We analyze the obtained arrangements and find remarkable similarities to other semiconductor though heteroepitaxial systems. The nanoscale entities (islands or pits) display certain self assembly and ordering, concerning size, shape, and spacing. Film growth sequence follows the 'islands-coalescence-2D growth' pathway, eventually leading to optimum flat morphologies for high enough thickness and temperature. (orig.)

  7. Wafer-bonding AlGaInP light emitting diodes with pyramidally patterned metal reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiyuan, Zuo; Wei, Xia; Gang, Wang; Xiangang, Xu

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate and introduce here a pyramidally patterned metal reflector into wafer-bonding AlGaInP light emitting diodes (LEDs) to improve the light extraction efficiency by using a photo-assisted chemical etched GaP:Mg layer. The pyramid patterns were fabricated employing a HF and H2O2 mixed solution in combination with a 532 nm laser on a GaP:Mg surface firstly, and then a gold reflector layer was evaporated onto the patterned GaP:Mg surface. After the whole chip process, the patterned gold reflector structure was confirmed to be efficient for light extraction and a 18.55% enhancement of the electroluminescent flux has been obtained by an integrating sphere, compared to the surface textured LEDs with flat reflectors.

  8. Zbtb20-Induced CA1 Pyramidal Neuron Development and Area Enlargement in the Cerebral Midline Cortex of Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob V; Blom, Jonas B; Noraberg, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Expression of the transcriptional repressor Zbtb20 is confined to the hippocampal primordium of the developing dorsal midline cortex in mice. Here, we show that misexpression of Zbtb20 converts projection neurons of the subiculum and postsubiculum (dorsal presubiculum) to CA1 pyramidal neurons...... that are innervated by Schaffer collateral projections in ectopic strata oriens and radiatum. The Zbtb20-transformed neurons express Bcl11B, Satb2, and Calbindin-D28k, which are markers of adult CA1 pyramidal neurons. Downregulation of Zbtb20 expression by RNA interference impairs the normal maturation of CA1...... pyramidal neurons resulting in deficiencies in Calbindin-D28k expression and in reduced apical dendritic arborizations in stratum lacunosum moleculare. Overall, the results show that Zbtb20 is required for various aspects of CA1 pyramidal neuron development such as the postnatal extension of apical...

  9. Adherence to the Food Guide Pyramid recommendations among Japanese Americans, Native Hawaiians, and whites: results from the Multiethnic Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sangita; Murphy, Suzanne P; Wilkens, Lynne R; Shen, Lucy; Hankin, Jean H; Henderson, Brian; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2003-09-01

    The Food Guide Pyramid is designed to help Americans make healthful food choices. Whereas national data have been collected to examine adherence to the pyramid recommendations in whites, African-Americans, and Latinos, there are virtually no data available for Japanese Americans or Native Hawaiians. Here we present data on intakes of the Food Guide Pyramid food groups (as servings per day) as well as of the components of the pyramid tip (discretionary fat, added sugar, and alcohol) in these ethnic groups and examine adherence to each of the food group recommendations. Degree of adherence to the fruit group recommendation was similar among the ethnic groups and energy-intake categories, but adherence to the other recommendations was greatest for those consuming more than 2,800 kilocalories per day. However, subjects in this energy-intake group also consumed more than three times as much discretionary fat, added sugar, and alcohol.

  10. Enhancement of thermoelectric characteristics in AlGaN/GaN films deposited on inverted pyramidal Si surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalamarthy, Ananth Saran; So, Hongyun; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2017-07-01

    In this letter, we demonstrate an engineering strategy to boost thermoelectric power factor via geometry-induced properties of the pyramid structure. Aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN)/GaN heterostructured films grown on inverted pyramidal silicon (Si) demonstrate higher power factor as compared to those grown on conventional flat Si substrates. We found that the magnitude of the Seebeck coefficient at room temperature increased from approximately 297 μVK-1 for the flat film to approximately 849 μVK-1 for the film on inverted pyramidal Si. In addition, the "effective" electrical conductivity of the AlGaN/GaN on the inverted pyramidal structure increased compared to the flat structure, generating an enhancement of thermoelectric power factor. The results demonstrate how manipulation of geometry can be used to achieve better thermoelectric characteristics in a manner that could be scaled to a variety of different material platforms.

  11. Study of the lithology, petrology and rock chemistry for the Pyramid Mountains, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, S. K.

    1985-01-01

    Rock and soil samples were collected at 24 sites within the Pyramid Mountains of southwestern New Mexico. The site locations are specified as 10-acre plots within the Section, Township, and Range land survey system. Hand specimen are described. The specimen were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence. The technique is designed to obtain good analysis for silica. The other elements are run so that matrix factor logic can be used to adjust the silica intensities, and to compensate for the element interaction.

  12. Conserved size and periodicity of pyramidal patches in layer 2 of medial/caudal entorhinal cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Robert K.; Ray, Saikat; Prokop, Stefan; Las, Liora; Heppner, Frank L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To understand the structural basis of grid cell activity, we compare medial entorhinal cortex architecture in layer 2 across five mammalian species (Etruscan shrews, mice, rats, Egyptian fruit bats, and humans), bridging ∼100 million years of evolutionary diversity. Principal neurons in layer 2 are divided into two distinct cell types, pyramidal and stellate, based on morphology, immunoreactivity, and functional properties. We confirm the existence of patches of calbindin‐positive pyramidal cells across these species, arranged periodically according to analyses techniques like spatial autocorrelation, grid scores, and modifiable areal unit analysis. In rodents, which show sustained theta oscillations in entorhinal cortex, cholinergic innervation targeted calbindin patches. In bats and humans, which only show intermittent entorhinal theta activity, cholinergic innervation avoided calbindin patches. The organization of calbindin‐negative and calbindin‐positive cells showed marked differences in entorhinal subregions of the human brain. Layer 2 of the rodent medial and the human caudal entorhinal cortex were structurally similar in that in both species patches of calbindin‐positive pyramidal cells were superimposed on scattered stellate cells. The number of calbindin‐positive neurons in a patch increased from ∼80 in Etruscan shrews to ∼800 in humans, only an ∼10‐fold over a 20,000‐fold difference in brain size. The relatively constant size of calbindin patches differs from cortical modules such as barrels, which scale with brain size. Thus, selective pressure appears to conserve the distribution of stellate and pyramidal cells, periodic arrangement of calbindin patches, and relatively constant neuron number in calbindin patches in medial/caudal entorhinal cortex. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:783–806, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26223342

  13. z calibration of the atomic force microscope by means of a pyramidal tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Flemming

    1993-01-01

    A new method for imaging the probe tip of an atomic force microscope cantilever by the atomic force microscope itself (self-imaging) is presented. The self-imaging is accomplished by scanning the probe tip across a sharper tip on the surface. By using a pyramidal probe tip with a very well......-defined aspect ratio, this technique provides an excellent z-calibration standard for the atomic force microscope....

  14. Delayed oedema in the pyramidal tracts remote from intracerebral missile path following gunshot injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiex, R.; Uhl, E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany); Thron, A. [Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen University, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52057, Aachen (Germany)

    2004-02-01

    A 60-year-old man developed a severe left hemiparesis and central facial palsy, accompanied by somnolence and dysarthria 9 days after a gunshot wound to the right temporal region, from which he slowly recovered over 3 months. MRI disclosed bilateral oedema of the pyramidal tracts. This was interpreted as a consequence of the impact of the pressure wave caused by the bullet, after excluding an infectious or vascular cause. (orig.)

  15. Lercanidipine Rescues Hippocampus Pyramidal Neurons from Mild Ischemia-Induced Delayed Neuronal Death in SHRSP.

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai-Yamashita, Yasuko; Harada, Noboru; Niwa, Masami

    2011-01-01

    Stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSPs) are vulnerable to ischemia and delayed neuronal death (DND) of hippocampus pyramidal cells when bilateral carotid arteries are occluded for only 10 min. Since this occlusion induces just mild ischemia, the resulting DND may be an appropriate animal model for dementia in patient with essential hypertension exposed to small ischemic insults. This study was designed to compare the effects of the antihypertensive drugs lercanidipine, nicardipi...

  16. Distribution and function of HCN channels in the apical dendritic tuft of neocortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnett, Mark T; Magee, Jeffrey C; Williams, Stephen R

    2015-01-21

    The apical tuft is the most remote area of the dendritic tree of neocortical pyramidal neurons. Despite its distal location, the apical dendritic tuft of layer 5 pyramidal neurons receives substantial excitatory synaptic drive and actively processes corticocortical input during behavior. The properties of the voltage-activated ion channels that regulate synaptic integration in tuft dendrites have, however, not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we use electrophysiological and optical approaches to examine the subcellular distribution and function of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated nonselective cation (HCN) channels in rat layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Outside-out patch recordings demonstrated that the amplitude and properties of ensemble HCN channel activity were uniform in patches excised from distal apical dendritic trunk and tuft sites. Simultaneous apical dendritic tuft and trunk whole-cell current-clamp recordings revealed that the pharmacological blockade of HCN channels decreased voltage compartmentalization and enhanced the generation and spread of apical dendritic tuft and trunk regenerative activity. Furthermore, multisite two-photon glutamate uncaging demonstrated that HCN channels control the amplitude and duration of synaptically evoked regenerative activity in the distal apical dendritic tuft. In contrast, at proximal apical dendritic trunk and somatic recording sites, the blockade of HCN channels decreased excitability. Dynamic-clamp experiments revealed that these compartment-specific actions of HCN channels were heavily influenced by the local and distributed impact of the high density of HCN channels in the distal apical dendritic arbor. The properties and subcellular distribution pattern of HCN channels are therefore tuned to regulate the interaction between integration compartments in layer 5B pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/351024-14$15.00/0.

  17. Experimentally Verified Parameter Sets for Modelling Heterogeneous Neocortical Pyramidal-Cell Populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Harrison

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of neocortical networks are increasingly including the diversity of excitatory and inhibitory neuronal classes. Significant variability in cellular properties are also seen within a nominal neuronal class and this heterogeneity can be expected to influence the population response and information processing in networks. Recent studies have examined the population and network effects of variability in a particular neuronal parameter with some plausibly chosen distribution. However, the empirical variability and covariance seen across multiple parameters are rarely included, partly due to the lack of data on parameter correlations in forms convenient for model construction. To addess this we quantify the heterogeneity within and between the neocortical pyramidal-cell classes in layers 2/3, 4, and the slender-tufted and thick-tufted pyramidal cells of layer 5 using a combination of intracellular recordings, single-neuron modelling and statistical analyses. From the response to both square-pulse and naturalistic fluctuating stimuli, we examined the class-dependent variance and covariance of electrophysiological parameters and identify the role of the h current in generating parameter correlations. A byproduct of the dynamic I-V method we employed is the straightforward extraction of reduced neuron models from experiment. Empirically these models took the refractory exponential integrate-and-fire form and provide an accurate fit to the perisomatic voltage responses of the diverse pyramidal-cell populations when the class-dependent statistics of the model parameters were respected. By quantifying the parameter statistics we obtained an algorithm which generates populations of model neurons, for each of the four pyramidal-cell classes, that adhere to experimentally observed marginal distributions and parameter correlations. As well as providing this tool, which we hope will be of use for exploring the effects of heterogeneity in neocortical

  18. Renovating the Pyramid of Needs: Contemporary Extensions Built Upon Ancient Foundations

    OpenAIRE

    Kenrick, Douglas T.; Griskevicius, Vladas; Neuberg, Steven L.; Schaller, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Maslow’s pyramid of human needs, proposed in 1943, has been one of the most cognitively contagious ideas in the behavioral sciences. Anticipating later evolutionary views of human motivation and cognition, Maslow viewed human motives as based in innate and universal predispositions. We revisit the idea of a motivational hierarchy in light of theoretical developments at the interface of evolutionary biology, anthropology, and psychology. After considering motives at three different levels of a...

  19. Color Face Recognition Based on Steerable Pyramid Transform and Extreme Learning Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşegül Uçar

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel color face recognition algorithm by means of fusing color and local information. The proposed algorithm fuses the multiple features derived from different color spaces. Multiorientation and multiscale information relating to the color face features are extracted by applying Steerable Pyramid Transform (SPT) to the local face regions. In this paper, the new three hybrid color spaces, YSCr, Z n SCr, and B n SCr, are firstly constructed using the Cb and Cr component i...

  20. Relational Database Extension Oriented, Self-adaptive Imagery Pyramid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HU Zhenghua

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the development of remote sensing technology, especially the improvement of sensor resolution, the amount of image data is increasing. This puts forward higher requirements to manage huge amount of data efficiently and intelligently. And how to access massive remote sensing data with efficiency and smartness becomes an increasingly popular topic. In this paper, against current development status of Spatial Data Management System, we proposed a self-adaptive strategy for image blocking and a method for LoD(level of detailmodel construction that adapts, with the combination of database storage, network transmission and the hardware of the client. Confirmed by experiments, this imagery management mechanism can achieve intelligent and efficient storage and access in a variety of different conditions of database, network and client. This study provides a feasible idea and method for efficient image data management, contributing to the efficient access and management for remote sensing image data which are based on database technology under network environment of C/S architecture.

  1. Nanopore fabricated in pyramidal HfO2 film by dielectric breakdown method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Chen, Qi; Deng, Tao; Liu, Zewen

    2017-10-01

    The dielectric breakdown method provides an innovative solution to fabricate solid-state nanopores on insulating films. A nanopore generation event via this method is considered to be caused by random charged traps (i.e., structural defects) and high electric fields in the membrane. Thus, the position and number of nanopores on planar films prepared by the dielectric breakdown method is hard to control. In this paper, we propose to fabricate nanopores on pyramidal HfO2 films (10-nm and 15-nm-thick) to improve the ability to control the location and number during the fabrication process. Since the electric field intensity gets enhanced at the corners of the pyramid-shaped film, the probability of nanopore occurrence at vertex and edge areas increases. This priority of appearance provides us chance to control the location and number of nanopores by monitoring a sudden irreversible discrete increase in current. The experimental results showed that the probability of nanopore occurrence decreases in an order from the vertex area, the edge area to the side face area. The sizes of nanopores ranging from 30 nm to 10 nm were obtained. Nanopores fabricated on the pyramid-shaped HfO2 film also showed an obvious ion current rectification characteristic, which might improve the nanopore performance as a biomolecule sequencing platform.

  2. Uniform Local Binary Pattern for Fingerprint Liveness Detection in the Gaussian Pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujia Jiang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Fingerprint recognition schemas are widely used in our daily life, such as Door Security, Identification, and Phone Verification. However, the existing problem is that fingerprint recognition systems are easily tricked by fake fingerprints for collaboration. Therefore, designing a fingerprint liveness detection module in fingerprint recognition systems is necessary. To solve the above problem and discriminate true fingerprint from fake ones, a novel software-based liveness detection approach using uniform local binary pattern (ULBP in spatial pyramid is applied to recognize fingerprint liveness in this paper. Firstly, preprocessing operation for each fingerprint is necessary. Then, to solve image rotation and scale invariance, three-layer spatial pyramids of fingerprints are introduced in this paper. Next, texture information for three layers spatial pyramids is described by using uniform local binary pattern to extract features of given fingerprints. The accuracy of our proposed method has been compared with several state-of-the-art methods in fingerprint liveness detection. Experiments based on standard databases, taken from Liveness Detection Competition 2013 composed of four different fingerprint sensors, have been carried out. Finally, classifier model based on extracted features is trained using SVM classifier. Experimental results present that our proposed method can achieve high recognition accuracy compared with other methods.

  3. Effect of Lures and Colors on Capture of Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Tedders Pyramidal Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, E A; Cottrell, T E

    2015-10-01

    Purposeful attraction and aggregation of adult Coccinellidae at target sites would be useful for sampling purposes and pest suppression. We field-tested 1) lures in yellow and black pyramidal traps and 2) pyramidal traps that had been painted one or two colors (without lures) to determine if lures or trap color affected capture of adult Coccinellidae. In only one experiment with lures did a single rate of limonene increase trap capture, whereas no other lure ever did. Yellow traps, regardless of using a lure, always captured significantly more lady beetles than black traps. When single-color red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, black, and white traps (without lures) were tested, yellow traps captured significantly more lady beetles. Of all species of Coccinellidae captured in these single-color traps, 95% were the exotic species Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and Coccinella septempunctata L. H. axyridis alone dominated trap capture comprising 74.1% of all lady beetles. Two-color traps (yellow-green, yellow-orange, yellow-white, and yellow-black) never captured more than single-color yellow traps. These results demonstrate that yellow pyramidal traps can be used to purposefully attract, and when used without a collection device, possibly aggregate adult Coccinellidae at targeted field sites. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  4. The reverse pyramid: a quali-quantitative study about food advertising inside children's television programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellai, A; Vetrano, S; Nobile, M; Luti, C

    2012-02-01

    Considering how eating habits affect the health of children and taking into account the influence of advertising messages, we wanted to investigate the quantity and the typology of advertising on air during children's television programmes. The research was conducted beginning in January 2008 up to March 2008. During this period all children's television programmes, in which cartoons are aired were recorded during third week of each month, for a total of 179 hours 27 minutes and 18 seconds. The research allowed to analyze 3495 adverts; 485 (13.88%) of them promoted foodstuffs, and among these a massive presence of confectionery product ads (304 out of 485, i.e. 62.68%) stands out. In conclusion a food pyramid based exclusively on the typology of foodstuffs advertised in the examined adverts has been built, in order to compare it to the correct food pyramid. The base of the pyramid we obtained is constantly composed by sweets and the top by fruits and vegetables. A child watching a television program addressed to him, must see commercials that advertise foodstuffs in 42.45% of cases, and among these 58.59% advertise sweets. This highlights the absolute need to protect children from aggressive marketing and advertising of foodstuffs through alimentary and media educational programmes, as well as through legislation regulating food commercials directed to children, as already happens in many European countries.

  5. Thermochemical hydrogen sensor based on Pt-coated nanofiber catalyst deposited on pyramidally textured thermoelectric film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seil; Song, Yoseb; Lee, Young-In; Choa, Yong-Ho

    2017-09-01

    The hydrogen gas-sensing performance has been systemically investigated of a new type of thermochemical hydrogen (TCH) sensor, composed of pyramidally textured thermoelectric (TE) film and catalytic Pt-coated nanofibers (NFs) deposited over the TE film. The TE film was composed of stoichiometric Bi2Te3, synthesized by means of cost-effective electrochemical deposition onto a textured silicon wafer. The resulting pyramidally textured TE film played a critical role in maximizing hydrogen gas flow around the overlying Pt NFs, which were synthesized by means of electrospinning followed by sputtering and acted as a heating catalyst. The optimal temperature increase of the Pt NFs was determined by means of optimizations of the electrospinning and sputtering durations. The output voltage signal of the optimized TCH sensor based on Pt NFs was 17.5 times higher than that of a Pt thin film coated directly onto the pyramidal TE material by using the same sputtering duration, under the fixed conditions of 3 vol% H2 in air at room temperature. This observation can be explained by the increased surface area of (111) planes accessible on the Pt-coated NFs. The best response time and recovery time observed for the optimized TCH sensor based on Pt-coated NFs were respectively 17 and 2 s under the same conditions. We believe that this type of TCH sensor can be widely used for supersensitive hydrogen gas detection by employing small-size Pt NFs and various chalcogenide thin films with high thermoelectric performance.

  6. The "phosphorus pyramid": a visual tool for dietary phosphate management in dialysis and CKD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Alessandro, Claudia; Piccoli, Giorgina B; Cupisti, Adamasco

    2015-01-20

    Phosphorus retention plays a pivotal role in the onset of mineral and bone disorders (MBD) in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Phosphorus retention commonly occurs as a result of net intestinal absorption exceeding renal excretion or dialysis removal. The dietary phosphorus load is crucial since the early stages of CKD, throughout the whole course of the disease, up to dialysis-dependent end-stage renal disease.Agreement exits regarding the need for dietary phosphate control, but it is quite challenging in the real-life setting. Effective strategies to control dietary phosphorus intake include restricting phosphorus-rich foods, preferring phosphorus sourced from plant origin, boiling as the preferred cooking procedure and avoiding foods with phosphorus-containing additives. Nutritional education is crucial in this regard.Based on the existing literature, we developed the "phosphorus pyramid", namely a novel, visual, user-friendly tool for the nutritional education of patients and health-care professionals. The pyramid consists of six levels in which foods are arranged on the basis of their phosphorus content, phosphorus to protein ratio and phosphorus bioavailability. Each has a colored edge (from green to red) that corresponds to recommended intake frequency, ranging from "unrestricted" to "avoid as much as possible".The aim of the phosphorus pyramid is to support dietary counseling in order to reduce the phosphorus load, a crucial aspect of integrated CKD-MBD management.

  7. Caffeine Controls Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission and Pyramidal Neuron Excitability in Human Neocortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkhofs, Amber; Xavier, Ana C.; da Silva, Beatriz S.; Canas, Paula M.; Idema, Sander; Baayen, Johannes C.; Ferreira, Samira G.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2018-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive drug, bolstering attention and normalizing mood and cognition, all functions involving cerebral cortical circuits. Whereas studies in rodents showed that caffeine acts through the antagonism of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors (A1R), neither the role of A1R nor the impact of caffeine on human cortical neurons is known. We here provide the first characterization of the impact of realistic concentrations of caffeine experienced by moderate coffee drinkers (50 μM) on excitability of pyramidal neurons and excitatory synaptic transmission in the human temporal cortex. Moderate concentrations of caffeine disinhibited several of the inhibitory A1R-mediated effects of adenosine, similar to previous observations in the rodent brain. Thus, caffeine restored the adenosine-induced decrease of both intrinsic membrane excitability and excitatory synaptic transmission in the human pyramidal neurons through antagonism of post-synaptic A1R. Indeed, the A1R-mediated effects of endogenous adenosine were more efficient to inhibit synaptic transmission than neuronal excitability. This was associated with a distinct affinity of caffeine for synaptic versus extra-synaptic human cortical A1R, probably resulting from a different molecular organization of A1R in human cortical synapses. These findings constitute the first neurophysiological description of the impact of caffeine on pyramidal neuron excitability and excitatory synaptic transmission in the human temporal cortex, providing adequate ground for the effects of caffeine on cognition in humans. PMID:29354052

  8. Caffeine Controls Glutamatergic Synaptic Transmission and Pyramidal Neuron Excitability in Human Neocortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Kerkhofs

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive drug, bolstering attention and normalizing mood and cognition, all functions involving cerebral cortical circuits. Whereas studies in rodents showed that caffeine acts through the antagonism of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors (A1R, neither the role of A1R nor the impact of caffeine on human cortical neurons is known. We here provide the first characterization of the impact of realistic concentrations of caffeine experienced by moderate coffee drinkers (50 μM on excitability of pyramidal neurons and excitatory synaptic transmission in the human temporal cortex. Moderate concentrations of caffeine disinhibited several of the inhibitory A1R-mediated effects of adenosine, similar to previous observations in the rodent brain. Thus, caffeine restored the adenosine-induced decrease of both intrinsic membrane excitability and excitatory synaptic transmission in the human pyramidal neurons through antagonism of post-synaptic A1R. Indeed, the A1R-mediated effects of endogenous adenosine were more efficient to inhibit synaptic transmission than neuronal excitability. This was associated with a distinct affinity of caffeine for synaptic versus extra-synaptic human cortical A1R, probably resulting from a different molecular organization of A1R in human cortical synapses. These findings constitute the first neurophysiological description of the impact of caffeine on pyramidal neuron excitability and excitatory synaptic transmission in the human temporal cortex, providing adequate ground for the effects of caffeine on cognition in humans.

  9. Graphene-pyramid textured silicon heterojunction for sensitive near-infrared light photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Ren, Zhi-Fei; Wang, Kui-Yuan; He, Shu-Juan; Luo, Lin-Bao

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we report on the fabrication of a near-infrared (NIR) light photodiode, which was constructed by transferring monolayer graphene films onto pyramid textured silicon etched by an aqueous solution method. It is found that the photodiode exhibits an obvious rectification characteristic, with a rectification ratio as high as 1.5  ×  104. What is more, the as-fabricated graphene-pyramid textured silicon Schottky photodiode could function as an efficient light photodetector that was highly sensitive to NIR irradiation with a high on/off ratio, and good reproducibility. In addition, such an NIR photodiode is able to monitor a fast-switching optical signal with a frequency as high as 2000 Hz. The rise/fall times were estimated to be 96/160 µs, respectively, which are comparable to or even higher than other Si nanostructure-based devices. The generality of the above results implies that the present graphene-pyramid textured silicon Schottky photodiode would have possible potential for future optoelectronic device applications.

  10. Glutamatergic Nonpyramidal Neurons From Neocortical Layer VI and Their Comparison With Pyramidal and Spiny Stellate Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andjelic, Sofija; Gallopin, Thierry; Cauli, Bruno; Hill, Elisa L.; Roux, Lisa; Badr, Sammy; Hu, Emilie; Tamás, Gábor; Lambolez, Bertrand

    2009-01-01

    The deeper part of neocortical layer VI is dominated by nonpyramidal neurons, which lack a prominent vertically ascending dendrite and predominantly establish corticocortical connections. These neurons were studied in rat neocortical slices using patch-clamp, single-cell reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction, and biocytin labeling. The majority of these neurons expressed the vesicular glutamate transporter but not glutamic acid decarboxylase, suggesting that a high proportion of layer VI nonpyramidal neurons are glutamatergic. Indeed, they exhibited numerous dendritic spines and established asymmetrical synapses. Our sample of glutamatergic nonpyramidal neurons displayed a wide variety of somatodendritic morphologies and a subset of these cells expressed the Nurr1 mRNA, a marker for ipsilateral, but not commissural corticocortical projection neurons in layer VI. Comparison with spiny stellate and pyramidal neurons from other layers showed that glutamatergic neurons consistently exhibited a low occurrence of GABAergic interneuron markers and regular spiking firing patterns. Analysis of electrophysiological diversity using unsupervised clustering disclosed three groups of cells. Layer V pyramidal neurons were segregated into a first group, whereas a second group consisted of a subpopulation of layer VI neurons exhibiting tonic firing. A third heterogeneous cluster comprised spiny stellate, layer II/III pyramidal, and layer VI neurons exhibiting adaptive firing. The segregation of layer VI neurons in two different clusters did not correlate either with their somatodendritic morphologies or with Nurr1 expression. Our results suggest that electrophysiological similarities between neocortical glutamatergic neurons extend beyond layer positioning, somatodendritic morphology, and projection specificity. PMID:19052106

  11. Working toward Healthy and Sustainable Diets: The “Double Pyramid Model” Developed by the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition to Raise Awareness about the Environmental and Nutritional Impact of Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruini, Luca Fernando; Ciati, Roberto; Pratesi, Carlo Alberto; Marino, Massimo; Principato, Ludovica; Vannuzzi, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    The Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition has produced an updated version of the traditional food pyramid based on the Mediterranean diet in order to assess the simultaneous impact that food has on human health and the environment. The Double Pyramid Model demonstrates how the foods recommended to be consumed most frequently are also those exerting less environmental impact, whereas the foods that should be consumed less frequently are those characterized by a higher environmental impact. The environmental impacts resulting from three different menus were compared. All menus were equally balanced and comparable in terms of nutrition, but they differed in relation to the presence of absence of animal flesh and animal products. The first dietary pattern (omnivorous) included both animal flesh and products; the second (lacto-ovo-vegetarian) included animal products (eggs and dairy) but no flesh; and the third (vegan) was solely plant-based. The results obtained suggest that a diet based on the principles of the Mediterranean diet, as suggested by the Double Pyramid, generates a lower environmental impact compared to diets that are heavily based on daily meat consumption. PMID:25988137

  12. Working towards healthy and sustainable diets: the ‘Double Pyramid Model’ developed by the Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition to raise awareness about the environmental and nutritional impact of foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Fernando Ruini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition (BCFN has produced an updated version of the traditional Food Pyramid based on the Mediterranean Diet in order to assess the simultaneous impact that food has on human health and the environment. The Double Pyramid model demonstrates how the foods recommended to be consumed most frequently are also those exerting less environmental impact, whereas the foods that should be consumed more periodically are those characterized by a higher environmental impact. The environmental impacts resulting from three different menus were compared. All menus were equally balanced and comparable in terms of nutrition, but they differed in relation to the presence of absence of animal flesh and animal products. The first dietary pattern (omnivorous included both animal flesh and products; the second (lacto-ovo-vegetarian included animal products (eggs and dairy but no flesh; and the third (vegan was solely plant-based. The results obtained suggest that a diet based on the principles of the Mediterranean Diet, as suggested by the Double Pyramid, generates a lower environmental impact compared to diets that are heavily based on daily meat consumption

  13. Working toward Healthy and Sustainable Diets: The "Double Pyramid Model" Developed by the Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition to Raise Awareness about the Environmental and Nutritional Impact of Foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruini, Luca Fernando; Ciati, Roberto; Pratesi, Carlo Alberto; Marino, Massimo; Principato, Ludovica; Vannuzzi, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    The Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition has produced an updated version of the traditional food pyramid based on the Mediterranean diet in order to assess the simultaneous impact that food has on human health and the environment. The Double Pyramid Model demonstrates how the foods recommended to be consumed most frequently are also those exerting less environmental impact, whereas the foods that should be consumed less frequently are those characterized by a higher environmental impact. The environmental impacts resulting from three different menus were compared. All menus were equally balanced and comparable in terms of nutrition, but they differed in relation to the presence of absence of animal flesh and animal products. The first dietary pattern (omnivorous) included both animal flesh and products; the second (lacto-ovo-vegetarian) included animal products (eggs and dairy) but no flesh; and the third (vegan) was solely plant-based. The results obtained suggest that a diet based on the principles of the Mediterranean diet, as suggested by the Double Pyramid, generates a lower environmental impact compared to diets that are heavily based on daily meat consumption.

  14. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex pyramidal cells have a temporal dynamic role in recall and extinction of cocaine-associated memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Oever, Michel C; Rotaru, Diana C; Heinsbroek, Jasper A; Gouwenberg, Yvonne; Deisseroth, Karl; Stuber, Garret D; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Smit, August B

    2013-11-13

    In addicts, associative memories related to the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse can evoke powerful craving and drug seeking urges, but effective treatment to suppress these memories is not available. Detailed insight into the neural circuitry that mediates expression of drug-associated memory is therefore of crucial importance. Substantial evidence from rodent models of addictive behavior points to the involvement of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in conditioned drug seeking, but specific knowledge of the temporal role of vmPFC pyramidal cells is lacking. To this end, we used an optogenetics approach to probe the involvement of vmPFC pyramidal cells in expression of a recent and remote conditioned cocaine memory. In mice, we expressed Channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) or Halorhodopsin (eNpHR3.0) in pyramidal cells of the vmPFC and studied the effect of activation or inhibition of these cells during expression of a cocaine-contextual memory on days 1-2 (recent) and ∼3 weeks (remote) after conditioning. Whereas optical activation of pyramidal cells facilitated extinction of remote memory, without affecting recent memory, inhibition of pyramidal cells acutely impaired recall of recent cocaine memory, without affecting recall of remote memory. In addition, we found that silencing pyramidal cells blocked extinction learning at the remote memory time-point. We provide causal evidence of a critical time-dependent switch in the contribution of vmPFC pyramidal cells to recall and extinction of cocaine-associated memory, indicating that the circuitry that controls expression of cocaine memories reorganizes over time.

  15. Structural Setting of the Emerson Pass Geothermal Anomaly, Pyramid Lake Paiute Reservation, Western Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. B.; Faulds, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Pyramid Lake area is favorable for geothermal development due to the tectonic setting of the region. The Walker Lane belt, a dextral shear zone that accommodates ~20% relative motion between the Pacific and North American plates, terminates northwestward in northeast California. NW-directed dextral shear is transferred to WNW extension accommodated by N-to -NNE striking normal faults of the Basin and Range. As a consequence, enhanced dilation occurs on favorably oriented faults generating high geothermal potential in the northwestern Great Basin. The NW-striking right-lateral Pyramid Lake fault, a major structure of the northern Walker Lane, terminates at the southern end of Pyramid Lake and transfers strain to the NNE-striking down to the west Lake Range fault, resulting in high geothermal potential. Known geothermal systems in the area have not been developed due to cultural considerations of the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe. Therefore, exploration has been focused on discovering blind geothermal systems elsewhere on the reservation by identifying structurally favorable settings and indicators of past geothermal activity. One promising area is the northeast end of Pyramid Lake, where a broad left step between the west-dipping range-bounding faults of the Lake and Fox Ranges has led to the formation of a broad, faulted relay ramp. Furthermore, tufa mounds, mineralized veins, and altered Miocene rocks occur proximal to a thermal anomaly discovered by a 2-m shallow temperature survey at the north end of the step-over in Emerson Pass. Detailed geologic mapping has revealed a system of mainly NNE-striking down to the west normal faults. However, there are three notable exceptions to this generality, including 1) a prominent NW-striking apparent right-lateral fault, 2) a NW-striking down to the south fault which juxtaposes the base of the mid-Miocene Pyramid sequence against younger late Tertiary sedimentary rocks, and 3) a NNE-striking down to the east normal fault

  16. Wiring Economy of Pyramidal Cells in the Juvenile Rat Somatosensory Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Cajal hypothesized that the structure of neurons is designed in such a way as to save space, time and matter, numerous researchers have analyzed wiring properties at different scales of brain organization. Here we test the hypothesis that individual pyramidal cells, the most abundant type of neuron in the cerebral cortex, optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. In this study, we analyze the neuronal wiring of complete basal arborizations of pyramidal neurons in layer II, III, IV, Va, Vb and VI of the hindlimb somatosensory cortical region of postnatal day 14 rats. For each cell, we search for the optimal basal arborization and compare its length with the length of the real dendritic structure. Here the optimal arborization is defined as the arborization that has the shortest total wiring length provided that all neuron bifurcations are respected and the extent of the dendritic arborizations remain unchanged. We use graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques to search for the minimal wiring arborizations. Despite morphological differences between pyramidal neurons located in different cortical layers, we found that the neuronal wiring is near-optimal in all cases (the biggest difference between the shortest synthetic wiring found for a dendritic arborization and the length of its real wiring was less than 5%). We found, however, that the real neuronal wiring was significantly closer to the best solution found in layers II, III and IV. Our studies show that the wiring economy of cortical neurons is related not to the type of neurons or their morphological complexities but to general wiring economy principles.

  17. Wiring Economy of Pyramidal Cells in the Juvenile Rat Somatosensory Cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Anton-Sanchez

    Full Text Available Ever since Cajal hypothesized that the structure of neurons is designed in such a way as to save space, time and matter, numerous researchers have analyzed wiring properties at different scales of brain organization. Here we test the hypothesis that individual pyramidal cells, the most abundant type of neuron in the cerebral cortex, optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. In this study, we analyze the neuronal wiring of complete basal arborizations of pyramidal neurons in layer II, III, IV, Va, Vb and VI of the hindlimb somatosensory cortical region of postnatal day 14 rats. For each cell, we search for the optimal basal arborization and compare its length with the length of the real dendritic structure. Here the optimal arborization is defined as the arborization that has the shortest total wiring length provided that all neuron bifurcations are respected and the extent of the dendritic arborizations remain unchanged. We use graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques to search for the minimal wiring arborizations. Despite morphological differences between pyramidal neurons located in different cortical layers, we found that the neuronal wiring is near-optimal in all cases (the biggest difference between the shortest synthetic wiring found for a dendritic arborization and the length of its real wiring was less than 5%. We found, however, that the real neuronal wiring was significantly closer to the best solution found in layers II, III and IV. Our studies show that the wiring economy of cortical neurons is related not to the type of neurons or their morphological complexities but to general wiring economy principles.

  18. Wiring Economy of Pyramidal Cells in the Juvenile Rat Somatosensory Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Ever since Cajal hypothesized that the structure of neurons is designed in such a way as to save space, time and matter, numerous researchers have analyzed wiring properties at different scales of brain organization. Here we test the hypothesis that individual pyramidal cells, the most abundant type of neuron in the cerebral cortex, optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. In this study, we analyze the neuronal wiring of complete basal arborizations of pyramidal neurons in layer II, III, IV, Va, Vb and VI of the hindlimb somatosensory cortical region of postnatal day 14 rats. For each cell, we search for the optimal basal arborization and compare its length with the length of the real dendritic structure. Here the optimal arborization is defined as the arborization that has the shortest total wiring length provided that all neuron bifurcations are respected and the extent of the dendritic arborizations remain unchanged. We use graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques to search for the minimal wiring arborizations. Despite morphological differences between pyramidal neurons located in different cortical layers, we found that the neuronal wiring is near-optimal in all cases (the biggest difference between the shortest synthetic wiring found for a dendritic arborization and the length of its real wiring was less than 5%). We found, however, that the real neuronal wiring was significantly closer to the best solution found in layers II, III and IV. Our studies show that the wiring economy of cortical neurons is related not to the type of neurons or their morphological complexities but to general wiring economy principles. PMID:27832100

  19. Assessing schoolchildren's ability to make proper use of a food and nutrition pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górnicka, Magdalena; Wiszniewska, Zuzanna; Wojtaś, Malwina; Wawrzyniak, Agata; Kanigowska, Aleksandra

    2013-01-01

    Being acquainted with nutritional recommendations does not necessarily imply that they are fully understood, nor on how they can be applied when correctly planning an adequate diet. To determine whether children can recognise single portion sizes of various foodstuffs and to test their ability for planning a daily menu in accordance to the guidelines from a Food and Nutrition Pyramid. Subjects under survey were n = 100 children aged 10-11 years, attending two elementary schools: in Warsaw and Piaseczno. The school in Warsaw participated in two national education programmes on food and nutrition (ie. 'Fruit at School' and 'A Glass of Milk') whilst the other did not participate in any such programmes. The study tool was a questionnaire consisting of closed questions together with practical exercises on planning a dietary balanced menu using the Food and Nutrition Pyramid recommendations. Children could easily recognise single portion sizes (73% correct replies), however they found it more difficult to plan a suitable menu, where 60% met the given specifications; ie. numbers of different food type portions, menu diversity, number of meals as well as taking physical activity into account. Girls were significantly better at planning menus. It was also found that, compared to the guidelines, wheat and dairy products, vegetables and fats were under-represented whereas meat and fruit were chosen in excess. Nearly 80% of menus were sufficiently diverse but only 48% were composed of a typical/normal selection of foodstuffs. Despite being provided with guidelines for preparing appropriate menus, most children failed this task. This was likely due to either not fully understanding the instructions or a lack of skills in adopting the Food and Nutrition Pyramid recommendations. Thus it is necessary to give more comprehensive explanations when teaching nutrition during school lessons as well as letting the children practice doing the practical aspects.

  20. Public Health Activist Skills Pyramid: A Model for Implementing Health in All Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damari, Behzad; Ehsani Chimeh, Elham

    2017-01-01

    Affecting public health for society requires various competencies. In fact, the prerequisite for the implementation of health in all policies should be effectiveness of public health activists (PHAs) in these competencies. This study aims to determine the competencies of the activists in public health. The present qualitative study reviewed the literature and adopted qualitative methods like content analysis, stakeholder interviews, and conducted focus group discussions with related experts. In each stage, the required competencies were extracted through drawing the main action processes of a PHA. Thereafter, the authors reached an ultimately best-suited working model by classifying and approving extracted competencies. The competencies comprise a pyramid set of three main categories of basic, specialized/professional, and individual updating competencies. Personal management, communication, teamwork, project management, ability to apply principles and concepts of public health, anatomy, physiology, and pathology in the organizations of the society should be included in the basic category. Specialized skills should include ability to plan, public participation, intersectoral collaboration, social marketing, working with the media/media friendly attitude, advocacy, research management and knowledge translation, evaluation of health programs, network establishment and management, deployment and institutionalization, operational research, empowerment and consultation, and protocol and service pack design. Last but not least, individual updating is defined as being informed of the latest scientific articles and reports about health and its situation in different countries as well as determinants that affect health. Implementation of this pyramid requires design and establishment of specific centers for transferring effective public health competencies. This pyramid has also functional use for the revision of educational curriculums in all health study fields. Moreover

  1. Calibration of Electrochemical Capacitance-voltage Method on Pyramid Texture Surface Using Scanning Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Y.; Cesar, I. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O.Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Harata, D. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Schuring, E.W. [ECN Environment and Energy Engineering, P.O.Box 1, 1755ZG Petten (Netherlands); Vlooswijk, A.H.G.; Venema, P.R. [Tempress Systems BV, Radeweg 31, 8171MD Vaassen (Netherlands); Katori, S.; Fujita, S. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    The electrochemical capacitance-voltage (ECV) technique can practically profile carrier concentrations on textured surfaces, but reliable calibration of the surface area is strongly demanded since it plays a decisive role in calculating both the carrier concentration and the profiling depth. In this work, we calibrate the area factor of pyramidally textured surfaces by comparing ECV profiles with cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy image, and found out it is 1.66, and not 1.73 which was formerly assumed. Furthermore, the calibrated area factor was applied to POCl3 and BBr3 diffusions which resulted in comparable diffusion profiles for both textured and polished surfaces.

  2. Transient hyperechogenicity of the renal medullary pyramids: incidence in the healthy term newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoory, B J; Andreis, I A; Vino, L; Fanos, V

    1999-01-01

    A screening program was performed on 1881 clinically healthy term newborns, aimed at detecting eventual pathological conditions not diagnosed during pregnancy. Seventy-three cases of transient hyperechogenicity of the renal medullary pyramids were observed, involving one or both kidneys with either sectorial or diffuse pattern. None of the neonates examined had evidence of renal dysfunction and follow-up ultrasound scans demonstrated complete resolution of the sonographic picture. Medullary hyperechogenicity is not rare in healthy term newborns (3.9%); it presents rapid resolution and should be considered in differential diagnosis of pathological conditions.

  3. Cuboidal-to-pyramidal shape transition of a strained island on a substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbes, Fatima Z.; Durinck, Julien; Talea, Mohamed; Grilhé, Jean; Colin, Jérôme

    2017-10-01

    The stability of a strained cuboidal island deposited on a substrate has been numerically investigated by means of finite element simulations in the case where the structure is submitted to misfit strain resulting from the lattice mismatch between the island and the substrate. In the hypothesis where the surface energy is isotropic, it is found that, depending on the island volume, the formation of a truncated or inverted truncated pyramid can be favored by the misfit strain with respect to the cuboidal shape. A shape diagram is finally provided as a function of the misfit strain and island volume.

  4. Compact MEMS-driven pyramidal polygon reflector for circumferential scanned endoscopic imaging probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Xiaojing; Zhou, Guangya; Yu, Hongbin; Du, Yu; Feng, Hanhua; Tsai, Julius Ming Lin; Chau, Fook Siong

    2012-03-12

    A novel prototype of an electrothermal chevron-beam actuator based microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) platform has been successfully developed for circumferential scan. Microassembly technology is utilized to construct this platform, which consists of a MEMS chevron-beam type microactuator and a micro-reflector. The proposed electrothermal microactuators with a two-stage electrothermal cascaded chevron-beam driving mechanism provide displacement amplification, thus enabling a highly reflective micro-pyramidal polygon reflector to rotate a large angle for light beam scanning. This MEMS platform is ultra-compact, supports circumferential imaging capability and is suitable for endoscopic optical coherence tomography (EOCT) applications, for example, for intravascular cancer detection.

  5. Wavelet primal sketch representation using Marr wavelet pyramid and its reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Ville, Dimitri; Unser, Michael

    2009-08-01

    Based on the class of complex gradient-Laplace operators, we show the design of a non-separable two-dimensional wavelet basis from a single and analytically defined generator wavelet function. The wavelet decomposition is implemented by an efficient FFT-based filterbank. By allowing for slight redundancy, we obtain the Marr wavelet pyramid decomposition that features improved translation-invariance and steerability. The link with Marr's theory of early vision is due to the replication of the essential processing steps (Gaussian smoothing, Laplacian, orientation detection). Finally, we show how to find a compact multiscale primal sketch of the image, and how to reconstruct an image from it.

  6. Statistical study of stacked/coupled site-controlled pyramidal quantum dots and their excitonic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroni, S. T.; Chung, T. H.; Juska, G.; Gocalinska, A.; Pelucchi, E.

    2017-08-01

    We report on stacked multiple quantum dots (QDs) formed inside inverted pyramidal recesses, which allow for the precise positioning of the QDs themselves. Specifically, we fabricated double QDs with varying inter-dot distances and ensembles with more than two nominally highly symmetric QDs. For each, the effect of the interaction between QDs is studied by characterizing a large number of QDs through photoluminescence spectroscopy. A clear red-shift of the emission energy is observed together with a change in the orientation of its polarization, suggesting an increasing interaction between the QDs. Finally, we show how stacked QDs can help influencing the charging of the excitonic complexes.

  7. Selectivity of pyramidal cells and interneurons in the human medial temporal lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormann, Florian; Cerf, Moran; Koch, Christof; Fried, Itzhak; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian

    2011-01-01

    Neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond selectively to pictures of specific individuals, objects, and places. However, the underlying mechanisms leading to such degree of stimulus selectivity are largely unknown. A necessary step to move forward in this direction involves the identification and characterization of the different neuron types present in MTL circuitry. We show that putative principal cells recorded in vivo from the human MTL are more selective than putative interneurons. Furthermore, we report that putative hippocampal pyramidal cells exhibit the highest degree of selectivity within the MTL, reflecting the hierarchical processing of visual information. We interpret these differences in selectivity as a plausible mechanism for generating sparse responses. PMID:21715671

  8. Growth and reductive transformation of a gold shell around pyramidal cadmium selenide nanocrystals

    OpenAIRE

    Meyns, Michaela; Bastus, Neus G.; Cai, Yuxue; Kornowski, Andreas; Juarez, Beatriz H.; Weller, Horst; Klinke, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We report the growth of an unstable shell-like gold structure around dihexagonal pyramidal CdSe nanocrystals in organic solution and the structural transformation to spherical domains by two means: i) electron beam irradiation (in situ) and (ii) addition of a strong reducing agent during synthesis. By varying the conditions of gold deposition, such as ligands present or the geometry of the CdSe nanocrystals, we were able to tune the gold domain size between 1.4 nm to 3.9 nm and gain important...

  9. Development of inhibitory synaptic inputs on layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in the rat medial prefrontal cortex

    KAUST Repository

    Virtanen, Mari A.

    2018-01-10

    Inhibitory control of pyramidal neurons plays a major role in governing the excitability in the brain. While spatial mapping of inhibitory inputs onto pyramidal neurons would provide important structural data on neuronal signaling, studying their distribution at the single cell level is difficult due to the lack of easily identifiable anatomical proxies. Here, we describe an approach where in utero electroporation of a plasmid encoding for fluorescently tagged gephyrin into the precursors of pyramidal cells along with ionotophoretic injection of Lucifer Yellow can reliably and specifically detect GABAergic synapses on the dendritic arbour of single pyramidal neurons. Using this technique and focusing on the basal dendritic arbour of layer 2/3 pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex, we demonstrate an intense development of GABAergic inputs onto these cells between postnatal days 10 and 20. While the spatial distribution of gephyrin clusters was not affected by the distance from the cell body at postnatal day 10, we found that distal dendritic segments appeared to have a higher gephyrin density at later developmental stages. We also show a transient increase around postnatal day 20 in the percentage of spines that are carrying a gephyrin cluster, indicative of innervation by a GABAergic terminal. Since the precise spatial arrangement of synaptic inputs is an important determinant of neuronal responses, we believe that the method described in this work may allow a better understanding of how inhibition settles together with excitation, and serve as basics for further modelling studies focusing on the geometry of dendritic inhibition during development.

  10. Nutrition behavior of the middle-aged and elderly: Compliance with dietary recommendations of the food pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Doreen; Bütikofer, Ueli; Chollet, Magali; Schmid, Alexandra; Altintzoglou, Themistoklis; Honkanen, Pirjo; Stoffers, Helena; Walther, Barbara; Piccinali, Patrizia

    2016-06-01

    During the aging process, human physiology changes noticeably, mostly to the disadvantage of the individual. A healthy lifestyle that includes sufficient physical activity as well as a balanced and diverse diet contributes to healthy aging. One key factor that elderly people need to be aware of is compliance with nutritional recommendations. There is very little data concerning eating patterns, consumption behavior, and compliance with food guides (food pyramid) and nutritional recommendations among the Swiss, particularly for the middle-aged and elderly. The objective of this study was to gather new and representative information about these issues, concentrating on people aged 50+ and living in Switzerland. A questionnaire in online and written form was distributed to a representative sample of middle-aged and elderly people living in Switzerland. In total, 632 people returned the survey. Of those respondents, 71% knew the Swiss Food Pyramid but only 38% said they comply with it. Based on self-reports, only a few participants met the recommendations for the different food groups listed in the food pyramid, whether in the pyramid-comply or pyramid-non-comply group. The survey shows that the middle-aged and elderly living in Switzerland need more nutritional guidance to help them to meet dietary recommendations. As usage and understanding of food guides seem limited among this population group, new tools must be explored for transfer of recommendations to real applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  11. Neonatal food restriction and binaural ear occlusion interfere with the maturation of cortical motor pyramids in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrero, Carmen; Regalado, Mirelta; Perez, Esther; Rubio, Lorena; Salas, Manuel

    2005-02-01

    Golgi-Cox-impregnated pyramidal neurons of layer five motor cortical area were investigated in control, binaural ear-occluded control, undernourished and binaural ear-occluded undernourished Wistar rats of 12, 20 and 30 days of age. In neonatally undernourished, binaural ear-occluded-undernourished and partly in ear-occluded-control subjects, there were significant reductions in both the number and extent of the distal part of the dendritic branches of motor pyramids compared to their controls. Moreover, minimal effects on perikarya measurements were observed. These findings suggest that neonatal undernutrition and the concurrent reduction of auditory cues affect dendritic arbor development and possibly the convergence of the auditory experience upon motor pyramids and may interfere with the neocortical modulation of postural and movements activities.

  12. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagsma, J. A.; Geenen, P. L.; Ethelberg, S.

    2013-01-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the hea......By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data......, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach...

  13. The offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid in 3D transversely isotropic media with a horizontal symmetry axis

    KAUST Repository

    Hao, Qi

    2014-12-30

    Analytic representation of the offset-midpoint traveltime equation for anisotropy is very important for prestack Kirchhoff migration and velocity inversion in anisotropic media. For transversely isotropic media with a vertical symmetry axis, the offset-midpoint traveltime resembles the shape of a Cheops’ pyramid. This is also valid for homogeneous 3D transversely isotropic media with a horizontal symmetry axis (HTI). We extended the offset-midpoint traveltime pyramid to the case of homogeneous 3D HTI. Under the assumption of weak anellipticity of HTI media, we derived an analytic representation of the P-wave traveltime equation and used Shanks transformation to improve the accuracy of horizontal and vertical slownesses. The traveltime pyramid was derived in the depth and time domains. Numerical examples confirmed the accuracy of the proposed approximation for the traveltime function in 3D HTI media.

  14. NK-3 receptor activation depolarizes and induces an after-depolarization in pyramidal neurons in gerbil cingulate cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2004-01-01

    M), a selective NK3 receptor agonist, induced a transient increase in spontaneous EPSPs in layer V pyramidal neurons, accompanied by a small depolarization ( approximately 4 mV). EPSPs during senktide had a larger amplitude and faster 10-90% rise time than during control. Senktide induced a transient...... depolarization in layer II/III pyramidal neurons, which often reached threshold for spikes. The depolarization ( approximately 6 mV) persisted in TTX, and was accompanied by an increase in input resistance. Senktide also transiently induced a slow after-depolarization, which appeared following a depolarizing...... pulse. The slow after-depolarization persisted in TTX. These data suggest that activation of NK3 receptors on layer II/III pyramidal neurons induce post-synaptic depolarization and an after-depolarization, which could be mediated by blockade of a leak potassium conductance and a non-selective cation...

  15. Pyramidal dislocation induced strain relaxation in hexagonal structured InGaN/AlGaN/GaN multilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, P. F.; Du, K.; Sui, M. L.

    2012-10-01

    Due to the special dislocation slip systems in hexagonal lattice, dislocation dominated deformations in hexagonal structured multilayers are significantly different from that in cubic structured systems. In this work, we have studied the strain relaxation mechanism in hexagonal structured InGaN/AlGaN/GaN multilayers with transmission electron microscopy. Due to lattice mismatch, the strain relaxation was found initiated with the formation of pyramidal dislocations. Such dislocations locally lie at only one preferential slip direction in the hexagonal lattice. This preferential slip causes a shear stress along the basal planes and consequently leads to dissociation of pyramidal dislocations and operation of the basal plane slip system. The compressive InGaN layers and "weak" AlGaN/InGaN interfaces stimulate the dissociation of pyramidal dislocations at the interfaces. These results enhance the understanding of interactions between dislocations and layer interfaces and shed new lights on deformation mechanism in hexagonal-lattice multilayers.

  16. Synaptogenesis and development of pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology in the chimpanzee neocortex resembles humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Serena; Stimpson, Cheryl D; Duka, Tetyana; Larsen, Michael D; Janssen, William G M; Collins, Zachary; Bauernfeind, Amy L; Schapiro, Steven J; Baze, Wallace B; McArthur, Mark J; Hopkins, William D; Wildman, Derek E; Lipovich, Leonard; Kuzawa, Christopher W; Jacobs, Bob; Hof, Patrick R; Sherwood, Chet C

    2013-06-18

    Neocortical development in humans is characterized by an extended period of synaptic proliferation that peaks in mid-childhood, with subsequent pruning through early adulthood, as well as relatively delayed maturation of neuronal arborization in the prefrontal cortex compared with sensorimotor areas. In macaque monkeys, cortical synaptogenesis peaks during early infancy and developmental changes in synapse density and dendritic spines occur synchronously across cortical regions. Thus, relatively prolonged synapse and neuronal maturation in humans might contribute to enhancement of social learning during development and transmission of cultural practices, including language. However, because macaques, which share a last common ancestor with humans ≈ 25 million years ago, have served as the predominant comparative primate model in neurodevelopmental research, the paucity of data from more closely related great apes leaves unresolved when these evolutionary changes in the timing of cortical development became established in the human lineage. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and Golgi staining to characterize synaptic density and dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurons in primary somatosensory (area 3b), primary motor (area 4), prestriate visual (area 18), and prefrontal (area 10) cortices of developing chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We found that synaptogenesis occurs synchronously across cortical areas, with a peak of synapse density during the juvenile period (3-5 y). Moreover, similar to findings in humans, dendrites of prefrontal pyramidal neurons developed later than sensorimotor areas. These results suggest that evolutionary changes to neocortical development promoting greater neuronal plasticity early in postnatal life preceded the divergence of the human and chimpanzee lineages.

  17. Robust ellipse detection based on hierarchical image pyramid and Hough transform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chung-Fang; Cheng, Yu-Che; Lin, Ta-Te

    2011-04-01

    In this research we propose a fast and robust ellipse detection algorithm based on a multipass Hough transform and an image pyramid data structure. The algorithm starts with an exhaustive search on a low-resolution image in the image pyramid using elliptical Hough transform. Then the image resolution is iteratively increased while the candidate ellipses with higher resolution are updated at each step until the original image resolution is reached. After removing the detected ellipses, the Hough transform is repeatedly applied in multiple passes to search for remaining ellipses, and terminates when no more ellipses are found. This approach significantly reduces the false positive error of ellipse detection as compared with the conventional randomized Hough transform method. The analysis shows that the computing complexity of this algorithm is Θ(n(5/2)), and thus the computation time and memory requirement are significantly reduced. The developed algorithm was tested with images containing various numbers of ellipses. The effects of noise-to-signal ratio combined with various ellipse sizes on the detection accuracy were analyzed and discussed. Experimental results revealed that the algorithm is robust to noise. The average detection accuracies were all above 90% for images with less than seven ellipses, and slightly decreased to about 80% for images with more ellipses. The average false positive error was less than 2%. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  18. On Applications of Pyramid Doubly Joint Bilateral Filtering in Dense Disparity Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadpour, Arash

    2014-06-01

    Stereopsis is the basis for numerous tasks in machine vision, robotics, and 3D data acquisition and processing. In order for the subsequent algorithms to function properly, it is important that an affordable method exists that, given a pair of images taken by two cameras, can produce a representation of disparity or depth. This topic has been an active research field since the early days of work on image processing problems and rich literature is available on the topic. Joint bilateral filters have been recently proposed as a more affordable alternative to anisotropic diffusion. This class of image operators utilizes correlation in multiple modalities for purposes such as interpolation and upscaling. In this work, we develop the application of bilateral filtering for converting a large set of sparse disparity measurements into a dense disparity map. This paper develops novel methods for utilizing bilateral filters in joint, pyramid, and doubly joint settings, for purposes including missing value estimation and upscaling. We utilize images of natural and man-made scenes in order to exhibit the possibilities offered through the use of pyramid doubly joint bilateral filtering for stereopsis.

  19. Power to the poor: sustainable energy at the base of the pyramid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarsky, Lyuba [Monterey Institute of International Studies, Monterey, CA (United States); Wilson, Emma

    2009-11-15

    Four billion people – over half of humanity – live on less than US$2 a day, effectively forming the bottom of the world economic pyramid. This majority may have minimal access to cash but they need, and will pay for, essential goods and services – including energy. 'The fortune at the bottom of the pyramid,' a 2002 article, argues that if global corporations target this 4 billion, they can reduce poverty and make profit. That the private sector is already playing a key role in meeting development challenges, such as energy poverty, is increasingly recognised. 'Inclusive' and 'shared value' business approaches have begun to multiply. International energy companies, including hydrocarbon and renewable energy producers, can (and do) facilitate local access to energy in poorer regions of the world. To reach the poorest and to effectively contribute to sustainable local development in the long term, however, standard business models need to be modified, and alliances forged with government, local enterprises, donors and NGOs. Smaller local firms are often the ones that reach the poor more effectively. They just need the right support.

  20. Color Face Recognition Based on Steerable Pyramid Transform and Extreme Learning Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül Uçar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel color face recognition algorithm by means of fusing color and local information. The proposed algorithm fuses the multiple features derived from different color spaces. Multiorientation and multiscale information relating to the color face features are extracted by applying Steerable Pyramid Transform (SPT to the local face regions. In this paper, the new three hybrid color spaces, YSCr, ZnSCr, and BnSCr, are firstly constructed using the Cb and Cr component images of the YCbCr color space, the S color component of the HSV color spaces, and the Zn and Bn color components of the normalized XYZ color space. Secondly, the color component face images are partitioned into the local patches. Thirdly, SPT is applied to local face regions and some statistical features are extracted. Fourthly, all features are fused according to decision fusion frame and the combinations of Extreme Learning Machines classifiers are applied to achieve color face recognition with fast and high correctness. The experiments show that the proposed Local Color Steerable Pyramid Transform (LCSPT face recognition algorithm improves seriously face recognition performance by using the new color spaces compared to the conventional and some hybrid ones. Furthermore, it achieves faster recognition compared with state-of-the-art studies.

  1. Setting aside Transactions from Pyramid Schemes as Impeachable Dispositions under South African Insolvency Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zingapi Mabe

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available South African courts have experienced a rise in the number of cases involving schemes that promise a return on investment with interest rates which are considerably above the maximum amount allowed by law, or schemes which promise compensation from the active recruitment of participants. These schemes, which are often referred to as pyramid or Ponzi schemes, are unsustainable operations and give rise to problems in the law of insolvency. Investors in these schemes are often left empty-handed upon the scheme’s eventual collapse and insolvency. Investors who received pay-outs from the scheme find themselves in the defence against the trustee’s claims for the return of the pay-outs to the insolvent estate. As the schemes are illegal and the pay-outs are often in terms of void agreements, the question arises whether they can be returned to the insolvent estate. A similar situation arose in Griffiths v Janse van Rensburg 2015 ZASCA 158 (26 October 2015. The point of contention in this case was whether the illegality of the business of the scheme was a relevant consideration in determining whether the pay-outs were made in the ordinary course of business of the scheme. This paper discusses pyramid schemes in the context of impeachable dispositions in terms of the Insolvency Act 24 of 1936.

  2. Au nanoparticle-decorated silicon pyramids for plasmon-enhanced hot electron near-infrared photodetection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhiyang; Zhai, Yusheng; Wen, Long; Wang, Qilong; Chen, Qin; Iqbal, Sami; Chen, Guangdian; Xu, Ji; Tu, Yan

    2017-07-01

    The heterojunction between metal and silicon (Si) is an attractive route to extend the response of Si-based photodiodes into the near-infrared (NIR) region, so-called Schottky barrier diodes. Photons absorbed into a metallic nanostructure excite the surface plasmon resonances (SPRs), which can be damped non-radiatively through the creation of hot electrons. Unfortunately, the quantum efficiency of hot electron detectors remains low due to low optical absorption and poor electron injection efficiency. In this study, we propose an efficient and low-cost plasmonic hot electron NIR photodetector based on a Au nanoparticle (Au NP)-decorated Si pyramid Schottky junction. The large-area and lithography-free photodetector is realized by using an anisotropic chemical wet etching and rapid thermal annealing (RTA) of a thin Au film. We experimentally demonstrate that these hot electron detectors have broad photoresponsivity spectra in the NIR region of 1200-1475 nm, with a low dark current on the order of 10-5 A cm-2. The observed responsivities enable these devices to be competitive with other reported Si-based NIR hot electron photodetectors using perfectly periodic nanostructures. The improved performance is attributed to the pyramid surface which can enhance light trapping and the localized electric field, and the nano-sized Au NPs which are beneficial for the tunneling of hot electrons. The simple and large-area preparation processes make them suitable for large-scale thermophotovoltaic cell and low-cost NIR detection applications.

  3. Multilayered pyramidal dissolving microneedle patches with flexible pedestals for improving effective drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Shinying; Fei, Jie; Liu, Haoran; Chen, Weixing; Liu, Ran

    2016-08-26

    Dissolving microneedles have been employed as a safe and convenient transdermal delivery system for drugs and vaccines. To improve effective drug delivery, a multilayered pyramidal dissolving microneedle patch, composed of silk fibroin tips with the ability of robust mechanical strength, rapid dissolution and drug release supported on a flexible polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) pedestal is reported. To show the utility of this approach the ability of the fabricated microneedles to deliver insulin is demonstrated. The dissolving microneedles have sufficient mechanical strength to be inserted into abdomen skin of mice to a depth of approximately 150μm, and release their encapsulated insulin into the skin to cause a hypoglycemic effect. The fabrication of microneedles avoids high temperature which benefits storage stability at room temperature for 20d. This result indicates >99.4% of insulin remained in the microneedles. In comparison to traditional needle-based administration, the proposed multilayered pyramidal dissolving microneedle patches enable self-administration, miniaturization, pain-free administration, drug delivery and drug stability, all being important features in needle free drug delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Renovating the Pyramid of Needs: Contemporary Extensions Built Upon Ancient Foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenrick, Douglas T; Griskevicius, Vladas; Neuberg, Steven L; Schaller, Mark

    2010-05-01

    Maslow's pyramid of human needs, proposed in 1943, has been one of the most cognitively contagious ideas in the behavioral sciences. Anticipating later evolutionary views of human motivation and cognition, Maslow viewed human motives as based in innate and universal predispositions. We revisit the idea of a motivational hierarchy in light of theoretical developments at the interface of evolutionary biology, anthropology, and psychology. After considering motives at three different levels of analysis, we argue that the basic foundational structure of the pyramid is worth preserving, but that it should be buttressed with a few architectural extensions. By adding a contemporary design feature, connections between fundamental motives and immediate situational threats and opportunities should be highlighted. By incorporating a classical element, these connections can be strengthened by anchoring the hierarchy of human motives more firmly in the bedrock of modern evolutionary theory. We propose a renovated hierarchy of fundamental motives that serves as both an integrative framework and a generative foundation for future empirical research. © The Author(s) 2010.

  5. Parallel Aligned Mesopore Arrays in Pyramidal-Shaped Gallium Nitride and Their Photocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee Jun; Park, Joonmo; Ye, Byeong Uk; Yoo, Chul Jong; Lee, Jong-Lam; Ryu, Sang-Wan; Lee, Heon; Choi, Kyoung Jin; Baik, Jeong Min

    2016-07-20

    Parallel aligned mesopore arrays in pyramidal-shaped GaN are fabricated by using an electrochemical anodic etching technique, followed by inductively coupled plasma etching assisted by SiO2 nanosphere lithography, and used as a promising photoelectrode for solar water oxidation. The parallel alignment of the pores of several tens of micrometers scale in length is achieved by the low applied voltage and prepattern guided anodization. The dry etching of single-layer SiO2 nanosphere-coated GaN produces a pyramidal shape of the GaN, making the pores open at both sides and shortening the escape path of evolved gas bubbles produced inside pores during the water oxidation. The absorption spectra show that the light absorption in the UV range is ∼93% and that there is a red shift in the absorption edge by 30 nm, compared with the flat GaN. It also shows a remarkable enhancement in the photocurrent density by 5.3 times, compared with flat GaN. Further enhancement (∼40%) by the deposition of Ni was observed due to the generation of an electric field, which increases the charge separation ratio.

  6. Mendelizing all components of a pyramid of three yield QTL in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit eGur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Molecular markers allowed breeders to Mendelize quantitative trait loci (QTL providing another demonstration that quantitative traits are governed by the same principles as single qualitative genes. This research extends the QTL analysis to two and three QTL and tests our ability to Mendelize an oligogenic trait. In tomato, agricultural yield is determined by the weight of the fruits harvested per unit area and the total soluble solids (% Brix–sugars and acids. The current study explores the segregation of multiple independent yield-related QTL that were identified and mapped using introgression lines (IL of Solanum pennellii in cultivated processing tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. We screened 45 different double and triple IL-QTL combinations for agricultural yield, to identify QTL pyramids that behaved in an additive manner and were suitable substrate for Mendelizing an oligogenic trait. A pyramid of three independent QTL that significantly improved Brix*Yield (BXY - the soluble solids output per unit area compared to M82 was selected. In the progenies of the tri-hybrid we bred using markers a nearly isogenic 'immortalized F2'. While the common mode of QTL-QTL interactions across the 45 IL-QTLs combinations was less than additive, the three QTLs in the selected triple-stack performed in an additive manner which made it an exceptional material for breeding. This study demonstrates that using the phenotypic effect of all 27 possible QTL-alleles combinations it is possible to make reliable predictions about the genotypes that will maximize the yield.

  7. Marketing to the Bottom of the Pyramid and subsistence markets – A research agenda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash G. Mulky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concepts of Bottom of the Pyramid (BOP and subsistence markets have attracted substantial academic and managerial attention in recent years. The BOP thesis states that there are opportunities for multinational companies to achieve significant revenues and profitability by designing and implementing marketing programs aimed at people who occupy the lowest tier in the world’s economic pyramid. The number of people in this segment has been estimated to be between 2.7 billion and 4 billion. This paper reviews the academic literature on BOP and subsistence markets and identifies important issues related to marketing to these consumers. The review is based on journal articles that have appeared in peer-reviewed journals and on case studies published by reputed academic institutions. The literature review first identifies a number of business issues like size of BOP market, motivations for undertaking BOP initiatives, ethics and linkages. Then specific marketing issues related to the BOP segment such as consumer analysis, company analysis, collaborators, competition and context, segmentation and positioning and issues relating to marketing program design and implementation are analyzed. Based on this analysis, the paper develops a research agenda for future research on BOP and subsistence markets.

  8. Recursive Pyramid Algorithm-Based Discrete Wavelet Transform for Reactive Power Measurement in Smart Meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin K. Atiq

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the active, reactive, and apparent power is one of the most fundamental tasks of smart meters in energy systems. Recently, a number of studies have employed the discrete wavelet transform (DWT for power measurement in smart meters. The most common way to implement DWT is the pyramid algorithm; however, this is not feasible for practical DWT computation because it requires either a log N cascaded filter or O (N word size memory storage for an input signal of the N-point. Both solutions are too expensive for practical applications of smart meters. It is proposed that the recursive pyramid algorithm is more suitable for smart meter implementation because it requires only word size storage of L × Log (N-L, where L is the length of filter. We also investigated the effect of varying different system parameters, such as the sampling rate, dc offset, phase offset, linearity error in current and voltage sensors, analog to digital converter resolution, and number of harmonics in a non-sinusoidal system, on the reactive energy measurement using DWT. The error analysis is depicted in the form of the absolute difference between the measured and the true value of the reactive energy.

  9. Vortioxetine disinhibits pyramidal cell function and enhances synaptic plasticity in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Elena; Zhang, Hong; Leiser, Steven C; Xiao, Yixin; Lu, Dunguo; Yang, Charles R; Plath, Niels; Sanchez, Connie

    2014-10-01

    Vortioxetine, a novel antidepressant with multimodal action, is a serotonin (5-HT)3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, a 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and a 5-HT transporter (SERT) inhibitor. Vortioxetine has been shown to improve cognitive performance in several preclinical rat models and in patients with major depressive disorder. Here we investigated the mechanistic basis for these effects by studying the effect of vortioxetine on synaptic transmission, long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular correlate of learning and memory, and theta oscillations in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex. Vortioxetine was found to prevent the 5-HT-induced increase in inhibitory post-synaptic potentials recorded from CA1 pyramidal cells, most likely by 5-HT3 receptor antagonism. Vortioxetine also enhanced LTP in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Finally, vortioxetine increased fronto-cortical theta power during active wake in whole animal electroencephalographic recordings. In comparison, the selective SERT inhibitor escitalopram showed no effect on any of these measures. Taken together, our results indicate that vortioxetine can increase pyramidal cell output, which leads to enhanced synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Given the central role of the hippocampus in cognition, these findings may provide a cellular correlate to the observed preclinical and clinical cognition-enhancing effects of vortioxetine. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Structured Dendritic Inhibition Supports Branch-Selective Integration in CA1 Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloss, Erik B; Cembrowski, Mark S; Karsh, Bill; Colonell, Jennifer; Fetter, Richard D; Spruston, Nelson

    2016-03-02

    Neuronal circuit function is governed by precise patterns of connectivity between specialized groups of neurons. The diversity of GABAergic interneurons is a hallmark of cortical circuits, yet little is known about their targeting to individual postsynaptic dendrites. We examined synaptic connectivity between molecularly defined inhibitory interneurons and CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites using correlative light-electron microscopy and large-volume array tomography. We show that interneurons can be highly selective in their connectivity to specific dendritic branch types and, furthermore, exhibit precisely targeted connectivity to the origin or end of individual branches. Computational simulations indicate that the observed subcellular targeting enables control over the nonlinear integration of synaptic input or the initiation and backpropagation of action potentials in a branch-selective manner. Our results demonstrate that connectivity between interneurons and pyramidal cell dendrites is more precise and spatially segregated than previously appreciated, which may be a critical determinant of how inhibition shapes dendritic computation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabry-Pérot Oscillation and Room Temperature Lasing in Perovskite Cube-Corner Pyramid Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Mi, Yang

    2018-01-10

    Recently, organometal halide perovskite-based optoelectronics, particularly lasers, have attracted intensive attentions because of its outstanding spectral coherence, low threshold, and wideband tunability. In this work, high-quality CH3 NH3 PbBr3 single crystals with a unique shape of cube-corner pyramids are synthesized on mica substrates using chemical vapor deposition method. These micropyramids naturally form cube-corner cavities, which are eminent candidates for small-sized resonators and retroreflectors. The as-grown perovskites show strong emission ≈530 nm in the vertical direction at room temperature. A special Fabry-Pérot (F-P) mode is employed to interpret the light confinement in the cavity. Lasing from the perovskite pyramids is observed from 80 to 200 K, with threshold ranging from ≈92 µJ cm-2 to 2.2 mJ cm-2 , yielding a characteristic temperature of T0 = 35 K. By coating a thin layer of Ag film, the threshold is reduced from ≈92 to 26 µJ cm-2 , which is accompanied by room temperature lasing with a threshold of ≈75 µJ cm-2 . This work advocates the prospect of shape-engineered perovskite crystals toward developing micro-sized optoelectronic devices and potentially investigating light-matter coupling in quantum optics.

  12. Diabetes impairs learning performance and affects the mitochondrial function of hippocampal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lin; Wang, Feng; Yang, Rui-Hua

    2011-09-09

    Previous research has demonstrated that diabetes induces learning and memory deficits. However, the mechanism of memory impairment induced by diabetes is poorly understood. The present study investigated the effect of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes on spatial learning and memory using the Morris Water Maze. The effects of diabetes on CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampus were also examined. Diabetes impaired spatial learning and memory of rats. Diabetes induced the apoptosis of neurons and translocation of Bax from cytoplasm to mitochondria. On the contrary, diabetes induced cytochrome c release into the cytoplasm from mitochondria. Release of Cyt-c from mitochondria into cytoplasm may play a role in apoptosis of the CA1 pyramidal neurons, which resulted in a decrease of the number of neurons in hippocampus and impaired the performance function. These results partially explain the mechanism of the effect of diabetes on learning and memory. To protect mitochondrial function is possible candidate for preventing the impairments of diabetes on hippocampal function. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Permanent reduction of seizure threshold in post-ischemic CA3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congar, P; Gaïarsa, J L; Popovici, T; Ben-Ari, Y; Crépel, V

    2000-04-01

    The effects of ischemia were examined on CA3 pyramidal neurons recorded in hippocampal slices 2-4 mo after a global forebrain insult. With intracellular recordings, CA3 post-ischemic neurons had a more depolarized resting membrane potential but no change of the input resistance, spike threshold and amplitude, fast and slow afterhyperpolarization (AHP) or ADP, and firing properties in response to depolarizing pulses. With both field and whole-cell recordings, synaptic responses were similar in control and post-ischemic neurons. Although there were no spontaneous network-driven discharges, the post-ischemic synaptic network had a smaller threshold to generate evoked and spontaneous synchronized burst discharges. Thus lower concentrations of convulsive agents (kainate, high K(+)) triggered all-or-none network-driven synaptic events in post-ischemic neurons more readily than in control ones. Also, paired-pulse protocol generates, in post-ischemics but not controls, synchronized field burst discharges when interpulse intervals ranged from 60 to 100 ms. In conclusion, 2-4 mo after the insult, the post-ischemic CA3 pyramidal cells are permanently depolarized and have a reduced threshold to generate synchronized bursts. This may explain some neuropathological and behavioral consequences of ischemia as epileptic syndromes observed several months to several years after the ischemic insult.

  14. Optimized breeding strategies for multiple trait integration: II. Process efficiency in event pyramiding and trait fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Ting; Sun, Xiaochun; Mumm, Rita H

    2014-01-01

    Multiple trait integration (MTI) is a multi-step process of converting an elite variety/hybrid for value-added traits (e.g. transgenic events) through backcross breeding. From a breeding standpoint, MTI involves four steps: single event introgression, event pyramiding, trait fixation, and version testing. This study explores the feasibility of marker-aided backcross conversion of a target maize hybrid for 15 transgenic events in the light of the overall goal of MTI of recovering equivalent performance in the finished hybrid conversion along with reliable expression of the value-added traits. Using the results to optimize single event introgression (Peng et al. Optimized breeding strategies for multiple trait integration: I. Minimizing linkage drag in single event introgression. Mol Breed, 2013) which produced single event conversions of recurrent parents (RPs) with ≤8 cM of residual non-recurrent parent (NRP) germplasm with ~1 cM of NRP germplasm in the 20 cM regions flanking the event, this study focused on optimizing process efficiency in the second and third steps in MTI: event pyramiding and trait fixation. Using computer simulation and probability theory, we aimed to (1) fit an optimal breeding strategy for pyramiding of eight events into the female RP and seven in the male RP, and (2) identify optimal breeding strategies for trait fixation to create a 'finished' conversion of each RP homozygous for all events. In addition, next-generation seed needs were taken into account for a practical approach to process efficiency. Building on work by Ishii and Yonezawa (Optimization of the marker-based procedures for pyramiding genes from multiple donor lines: I. Schedule of crossing between the donor lines. Crop Sci 47:537-546, 2007a), a symmetric crossing schedule for event pyramiding was devised for stacking eight (seven) events in a given RP. Options for trait fixation breeding strategies considered selfing and doubled haploid approaches to achieve homozygosity

  15. Growth, characterization, and application of well-defined separated GaN-based pyramid array on micropatterned sapphire substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhenhuan; Li, Yufeng; Su, Xilin; Feng, Lungang; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Minyan; Ding, Wen; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Ye; Guo, Maofeng; Yun, Feng; Lee, S. W. Ricky

    2017-09-01

    We tried to obtain microstructures on a three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned substrate by laser drilling. The influences of the dimensions of the drilling holes on the morphology and the material quality of the grown structures were studied. Uniform micropyramid arrays with relatively low dislocation density can be achieved by adjusting the laser drilling parameters. The internal quantum efficiency was estimated to be improved by a factor of 3 for a pyramid structure compared with that of planar LEDs. We fabricated 5 × 7 mm2 flexible LEDs employing the pyramid structure and the devices exhibited good flexibility without performance reduction after bending.

  16. Input specificity and dependence of spike timing-dependent plasticity on preceding postsynaptic activity at unitary connections between neocortical layer 2/3 pyramidal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zilberter, M.; Holmgren, C.D.; Shemer, I.; Silberberg, G.; Grillner, S.; Harkany, T.; Zilberter, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal cells receive excitatory afferent input both from neighbouring pyramidal cells and from cortical and subcortical regions. The efficacy of these excitatory synaptic inputs is modulated by spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP). Here we report that synaptic connections

  17. [Taurodontism and the pyramidal tooth at the level of the molar. Prevalence in the Senegalese population 15 to 19 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, M; Toure, B; Kane, A W; Fall, F; Wone, M M

    2000-03-01

    This study was done to establish the prevalence of taurodontism and pyramidal molars in Senegalese people using the criteria of SCHIFFFMAN and CHANANNEL for taurodontism and the criteria of BRABANT for pyramidal molar, the first and second molars on the panoramic radiograph of 150 consecutive 15-19 year-old Senegalese people were assessed. Results have shown that taurodontism and pyramidal molars were present in 48.6% of patients (20% of teeth). Taurodontism was present in 48% (18.8% of teeth) of patients whereas prevalence of pyramidal molar was 4.6% (1.6% of teeth). Taurodontism was alone in 91.6% of case while pyramidal molar was alone in 8.6% of case.

  18. Basal Dendritic Morphology of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons in Williams Syndrome: Prefrontal Cortex and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branka Hrvoj-Mihic

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Williams syndrome (WS is a unique neurodevelopmental disorder with a specific behavioral and cognitive profile, which includes hyperaffiliative behavior, poor social judgment, and lack of social inhibition. Here we examined the morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons in the cortex of two rare adult subjects with WS. Specifically, we examined two areas in the prefrontal cortex (PFC—the frontal pole (Brodmann area 10 and the orbitofrontal cortex (Brodmann area 11—and three areas in the motor, sensory, and visual cortex (BA 4, BA 3-1-2, BA 18. The findings suggest that the morphology of basal dendrites on the pyramidal neurons is altered in the cortex of WS, with differences that were layer-specific, more prominent in PFC areas, and displayed an overall pattern of dendritic organization that differentiates WS from other disorders. In particular, and unlike what was expected based on typically developing brains, basal dendrites in the two PFC areas did not display longer and more branched dendrites compared to motor, sensory and visual areas. Moreover, dendritic branching, dendritic length, and the number of dendritic spines differed little within PFC and between the central executive region (BA 10 and BA 11 that is part of the orbitofrontal region involved into emotional processing. In contrast, the relationship between the degree of neuronal branching in supra- versus infra-granular layers was spared in WS. Although this study utilized tissue held in formalin for a prolonged period of time and the number of neurons available for analysis was limited, our findings indicate that WS cortex, similar to that in other neurodevelopmental disorders such as Down syndrome, Rett syndrome, Fragile X, and idiopathic autism, has altered morphology of basal dendrites on pyramidal neurons, which appears more prominent in selected areas of the PFC. Results were examined from developmental perspectives and discussed in the context of other

  19. Altered intrinsic excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in aged PDAPP mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eTamagnini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Amyloidopathy involves the accumulation of insoluble amyloid β (Aβ species in the brain’s parenchyma and is a key histopathological hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Work on transgenic mice that overexpress A suggests that elevated A levels in the brain are associated with aberrant epileptiform activity and increased intrinsic excitability of CA1 hippocampal neurons. In this study we examined if similar changes could be observed in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons from aged PDAPP mice (20-23 month old, Indiana mutation: V717F on APP gene compared to their age-matched WT littermate controls. Whole-cell current clamp recordings revealed that sub-threshold intrinsic properties, such as input resistance, resting membrane potential and hyperpolarization activated sag were unaffected, but capacitance was significantly decreased in the transgenic animals. No differences between genotypes were observed in the overall number of action potentials (AP elicited by 500 ms supra-threshold current stimuli. PDAPP neurons, however, exhibited higher instantaneous firing frequencies after accommodation in response to high intensity current injections. The AP waveform was narrower and shorter in amplitude in PDAPP mice: these changes, according to our in silico model of a CA1/3 pyramidal neuron, depended on the respective reduction and increase of Na+ and K+ voltage-gated channels maximal conductances. Finally, the after-hyperpolarization (AHP, seen after the first AP evoked by a +300 pA current injection and after 50 Hz AP bursts, was more pronounced in PDAPP mice.These data show that Aβ-overexpression in aged mice altered the capacitance, the neuronal firing and the AP waveform of CA1 pyramidal neurons. Some of these findings are consistent with previous work on younger PDAPP, they also show important differences that can be potentially ascribed to the interaction between amyloidopathy and ageing. Such a change of IE properties over time

  20. Climate change vulnerabilities- an integrated assessment in Pyramid Lake Paiute Indian Reservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, M. R.; Chief, K.; Wilde, K.; Smith, W.

    2011-12-01

    There are increasing concerns of potential climate change impacts that may place the Truckee River Basin in Nevada under unprecedented stress. We hypothesized that Pyramid Lake, a terminal lake of Truckee River, is prone to climatic as well as non-climatic stressors stemming from cumulative impacts from upstream urban areas and activities. Thus climate change may impair the ability of a major downstream water user, the Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe (PLPT), to cope and adapt. The conventional approach in assessing vulnerability primarily focuses on hazards or biophysical vulnerabilities, such as water availability, floods, and drought impact. However, we found it inadequate to address the overall vulnerability of the PLPT. Thus in addition to biophysical vulnerabilities, intrinsic and external vulnerabilities were considered such as socio-economic variables (e.g. adaptive capacity) and policy and legal drivers (e.g. water rights). We proposed an elaborate framework for an integrated vulnerability assessment by adapting IPCC framework for vulnerability assessment, the Exposure-Sensitivity-Adaptive Capacity, and applied it to PLPT. Analysis of projected climate change dataset pointed towards increased incidences of floods and droughts and a warming trend over the whole basin with a higher rate at the lower basin in the future. In effort to understand how climatic trends trigger the vulnerability of PLPT, a multi-pronged approach was employed to understand key tribal livelihood assets including an in-depth analysis of the adaptive capacity of PLPT, a climate change survey, and a historical analysis of water conflict and negotiation. Results of the survey identified key natural assets as the lake, endangered fish, rangeland, and wetlands. The framework of a casual-loop diagram was developed in a system dynamic model that incorporated opinions of tribal stakeholders and other experts to evaluate how potential future climate changes might impact the endangered Cui ui fish

  1. THE COMPETITIVENESS AND ITS MEASUREMENT BY MEANS OF THE PYRAMID MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy Tunde Orsolya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The competition itself, the fighting for the scarce resources is as old as the mankind. However, the naming ‘competitiveness’ has been present in the specialized literature since the 1980s. Nowadays, by crescendo of the international competition, concept of the competitiveness has become increasingly important among the decision makers at national economic and corporate levels alike. However, almost everyone means something different by competitiveness, even the researchers dealing with it have not created a uniform definition accepted by everyone. Most of them have worded their competitiveness definition with regard to corporate and national economic levels. The localization appears more pronouncedly in the economic formed and changed by effect of the globalization; economic roles of the regions, sub-regions are increasingly revaluated. This procedure is also mirrored by the competitiveness-themed theoretical and practical researches of the recent years; a significant part of them is aimed at some local levels. Topic of present treatise is the investigation of competitiveness of the regional level, among the local levels. This choice is justified by the fact the European Union decides about disbursement of the financial sources improving the competitiveness, with regard to the regional level NUTS 2. Models dealing with examination of the regional competitiveness can basically be grouped around two basic models. Members of the model family built on the benefits have largely a case study nature while the pyramid model to be presented belongs to the so called input-performance-output models. Basis of the model is the success factors which influence the region’s competitiveness in a long term through metastases. And the success factors determine such basic factors as the research-development; the organizational background of the region’s economy; investments from the outside; infrastructure and human capital; as well as the institutions and

  2. Light trapping of crystalline Si solar cells by use of nanocrystalline Si layer plus pyramidal texture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Kentaro; Nonaka, Takaaki; Onitsuka, Yuya; Irishika, Daichi; Kobayashi, Hikaru, E-mail: h.kobayashi@sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Ultralow reflectivity Si wafers with light trapping effect can be obtained by forming a nanocrystalline Si layer on pyramidal textured Si surfaces. • Surface passivation using phosphosilicate glass improved minority carrier lifetime of the nanocrystalline Si layer/Si structure. • A high photocurrent density of 40.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, and a high conversion efficiency of 18.5% were achieved. - Abstract: The surface structure chemical transfer (SSCT) method has been applied to fabrication of single crystalline Si solar cells with 170 μm thickness. The SSCT method, which simply involves immersion of Si wafers in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} plus HF solutions and contact of Pt catalyst with Si taking only ∼30 s for 6 in. wafers, can decrease the reflectivity to less than 3% by the formation of a nanocrystalline Si layer. However, the reflectivity of the nanocrystalline Si layer/flat Si surface/rear Ag electrode structure in the wavelength region longer than 1000 nm is high because of insufficient absorption of incident light. The reflectivity in the long wavelength region is greatly decreased by the formation of the nanocrystalline Si layer on pyramidal textured Si surfaces due to an increase in the optical path length. Deposition of phosphosilicate glass (PSG) on the nanocrystalline Si layer for formation of pn-junction does not change the ultralow reflectivity because the surface region of the nanocrystalline Si layer possesses a refractive index of 1.4 which is nearly the same as that of PSG of 1.4–1.5. The PSG layer is found to passivate the nanocrystalline Si layer, which is evident from an increase in the minority carrier lifetime from 12 to 44 μs. Hydrogen treatment at 450 °C further increases the minority carrier lifetime approximately to a doubled value. The solar cells with the pyramidal Si substrate/boron-diffused back surface field/Ag rear electrode> structure show a high conversion efficiency of 18

  3. Specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the sensory-motor cortex of the vervet monkey (Cercopethicus pygerythrus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, G N; Benavides-Piccione, R; Elston, A; Defelipe, J; Manger, P R

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed systematic differences in the pyramidal cell structure between functionally related cortical areas of primates. Trends for a parallel in pyramidal cell structure and functional complexity have been reported in visual, somatosensory, motor, cingulate and prefrontal cortex in the macaque monkey cortex. These specializations in structure have been interpreted as being fundamental in determining cellular and systems function, endowing circuits in these different cortical areas with different computational power. In the present study we extend our initial finding of systematic specialization of pyramidal cell structure in sensory-motor cortex in the macaque monkey [Cereb Cortex 12 (2002) 1071] to the vervet monkey. More specifically, we investigated pyramidal cell structure in somatosensory and motor areas 1/2, 5, 7, 4 and 6. Neurones in fixed, flat-mounted, cortical slices were injected intracellularly with Lucifer Yellow and processed for a light-stable 3,3'-diaminobenzidine reaction product. The size of, number of branches in, and spine density of the basal dendritic arbors varied systematically such that there was a trend for increasing complexity in arbor structure with progression through 1/2, 5 and 7. In addition, cells in area 6 were larger, more branched, and more spinous than those in area 4.

  4. Using a Modified Pyramidal Training Model to Teach Special Education Teachers to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Bloom, Sarah E.; Samaha, Andrew L.; Lignugaris/Kraft, Benjamin; Dayton, Elizabeth; Harris, Shannon K.

    2013-01-01

    Functional behavioral assessments are commonly used in school settings to assess and develop interventions for problem behavior. The trial-based functional analysis is an approach that teachers can use in their classrooms to identify the function of problem behavior. The current study evaluates the effectiveness of a modified pyramidal training…

  5. ERK1/2 Activation Is Necessary for BDNF to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Mariana; Medina, Jorge H.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS, acting both pre- and postsynaptically. We demonstrated recently that BDNF/TrkB signaling increases dendritic spine density in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. Here, we tested whether activation of the prominent ERK (MAPK) signaling…

  6. US adolescents and MyPyramid: Associations between fast-food consumption and lower likelihood of meeting recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goals of this study were to determine the effect of fast food consumption on adolescents’ food group intakes and likelihood of meeting recommendations outlined in USDA’s MyPyramid Food Guidance System. Two days of 24-hour recall data from 1,956 adolescents 12-19 years of age collected in What W...

  7. Sodium fluoride does not affect the working memory and number of pyramidal cells in rat medial prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulungan, Zulhaini Sartika A; Sofro, Zaenal Muttaqien; Partadiredja, Ginus

    2018-01-01

    Fluoride is a chemical compound known to bring about fluorosis. It is thought to disrupt the central nervous system because of its ability to induce excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. Any damage of pyramidal cells in the prefrontal cortex would result in cognitive function and working memory regulation disorders. The present study aimed at investigating the effects of sodium fluoride (NaF) on the working memory and estimated total number of medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal cells of adult male rats. Thirty-two male Wistar rats were assigned into four groups, namely control and three treated groups receiving 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg BW, respectively, of oral NaF solution for 30 days. The working memory test was carried out using a Y-maze. The number of pyramidal cells in the medial prefrontal cortex was estimated using an unbiased stereological method. There was no significant difference among groups in the working memory and number of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex cells.

  8. The effect of pyramiding Phytophthora infestans resistance genes R Pi-mcd1 and R Pi-ber in potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, M.Y.A.; Hutten, R.C.B.; Visser, R.G.F.; Eck, van H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Despite efforts to control late blight in potatoes by introducing R(pi)-genes from wild species into cultivated potato, there are still concerns regarding the durability and level of resistance. Pyramiding R(pi)-genes can be a solution to increase both durability and level of resistance. In this

  9. The Effect of Nutrition Education on Third Graders' School Lunch Consumption in a School Offering Food Pyramid Choice Menus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    Elementary school lunches planned and served under Oregon's Food Pyramid Choice Menus (FPCM) system are based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and they comply with the current U.S. Department of Agriculture menu standards for school lunches. The study discussed in this report was conducted from February through April 1997; data were…

  10. Food quality in the late postoperative period of bariatric surgery: an evaluation using the bariatric food pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Fernando Lucas; Bissoni de Sousa, Larissa; Corradi-Perini, Carla; Ramos da Cruz, Magda Rosa; Nunes, Mario Gilberto Jesus; Branco-Filho, Alcides José

    2014-09-01

    Bariatric surgery is an effective intervention in the treatment of obesity, but lifestyle and diet should be monitored after this procedure to ensure success. The Bariatric Food Pyramid was created basing on long-term nutritional care that proposes a standard of healthy living and eating habits considering gastric capacity and specific nutritional needs. The purpose of the current study is to evaluate the life habits and diet quality of patients who have undergone bariatric surgery (who have been recovering for at least 6 months) based on the specific food pyramid. Retrospective data analysis was performed using medical records of patients who had been followed for at least 6 months after bariatric surgery. The following data were collected from patient records: age, gender, education level (years), BMI (preoperative and postoperative), percentage of excess weight loss (EWL) relative to the time of surgery, frequency of physical activity, use of nutritional supplements, usual dietary intake history, and fluid intake. Results were analyzed using descriptive statistics. We evaluated 172 patient records. In this study, there was a low prevalence of physical activity, use of vitamin-mineral supplements, and water intake. There also was low consumption of protein, fruit, vegetables, and vegetable oils. In addition, intake of carbohydrates, sugars, and fats were higher than the recommendations established by the pyramid. The results indicate that patients who have undergone bariatric surgery have an inadequate diet according to food evaluation with the specific pyramid. In the long term, this may lead to weight gain and vitamin and mineral deficiencies.

  11. First Measurements of Ambient Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM at the EvK2CNR Pyramid Observatory in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gratz L. E.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, a global-scale network of ground-based atmospheric monitoring sites is being developed with the objective of expanding the global coverage of atmospheric mercury (Hg measurements and improving our understanding of global atmospheric Hg transport. An important addition to the GMOS monitorng network has been the high altitude EvK2CNR Pyramid Observatory, located at an elevation of 5,050 meters a.s.l. in the eastern Himalaya Mountains of Nepal. Monitoring of total gaseous mercury (TGM using the Tekran 2537A Mercury Vapor Analyzer began at the EvK2CNR Pyramid Observatory in November 2011. From 17 November 2011 to 23 April 2012, the mean concentration of TGM at the Pyramid was 1.2 ng m−3. A range of concentrations from 0.7 to 2.6 ng m−3 has been observed. These are the first reported measurements of atmospheric Hg in Nepal, and currently this is the highest altitude monitoring station for atmospheric Hg in the world. It is anticipated that these high quality measurements, in combination with the other continuous atmospheric measurments being collected at the Pyramid station, will help to further our understanding of Hg concentrations in the free troposphere and the transport of atmospheric Hg on the global scale.

  12. Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus c92 Protein Responsible for the Formation of Pyramid-Like Cellular Lysis Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snyder, Jamie C; Brumfield, Susan K; Peng, Nan

    2011-01-01

    Host cells infected by Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) have been shown to produce unusual pyramid-like structures on the cell surface. These structures represent a virus-induced lysis mechanism that is present in Archaea and appears to be distinct from the holin/endolysin system...

  13. Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G. [UNR; Driscoll, N. [UCSD; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R. [USGS; Louie, J. [UNR; Pullammanappallil, S. [Optim

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie M. Kell, Graham Kent, Neal W. Driscoll, Robert E. Karlin, Robert L. Baskin, John N. Louie, Kenneth D. Smith, Sathish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic investigation of geothermal potential, tectonic structure, and earthquake hazards in Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting, San Francisco, Dec. 5-9, abstract NS14A-08.

  14. Fractal dimension of apical dendritic arborization differs in the superficial and the deep pyramidal neurons of the rat cerebral neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puškaš, Nela; Zaletel, Ivan; Stefanović, Bratislav D; Ristanović, Dušan

    2015-03-04

    Pyramidal neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex have specific structure and pattern of organization that involves the presence of apical dendrite. Morphology of the apical dendrite is well-known, but quantification of its complexity still remains open. Fractal analysis has proved to be a valuable method for analyzing the complexity of dendrite morphology. The aim of this study was to establish the fractal dimension of apical dendrite arborization of pyramidal neurons in distinct neocortical laminae by using the modified box-counting method. A total of thirty, Golgi impregnated neurons from the rat brain were analyzed: 15 superficial (cell bodies located within lamina II-III), and 15 deep pyramidal neurons (cell bodies situated within lamina V-VI). Analysis of topological parameters of apical dendrite arborization showed no statistical differences except in total dendritic length (p=0.02), indicating considerable homogeneity between the two groups of neurons. On the other hand, average fractal dimension of apical dendrite was 1.33±0.06 for the superficial and 1.24±0.04 for the deep cortical neurons, showing statistically significant difference between these two groups (pfractal dimension values, apical dendrites of the superficial pyramidal neurons tend to show higher structural complexity compared to the deep ones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Storyline and Associations Pyramid as Methods of Creativity Enhancement: Comparison of Effectiveness in 5-Year-Old Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smogorzewska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study comparing the originality, the length, the number of neologisms and the syntactic complexity of fairy tales created with "Storyline" and "Associations Pyramid." Both methods were developed to enhance children's language abilities and their creative thinking. One hundred twenty eight 5-year-old children…

  16. Tonal response on the stairway of the main pyramid at La Ciudadela, Teotihuacan archaeological site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beristain, Sergio; Coss, Cecilia; Aquino, Gabriela; Negrete, Jose; Lizana, Pablo

    2002-11-01

    This paper presents new research on the very interesting audible effects produced by the stairways of many archaeological sites in Mexico. This investigation was made at the main stairway of the pyramid at La Ciudadela, Teotihuacan archaeological site. The effect previously studied was a chirped echo reflected from the stairway at normal incidence, which resembles the singing of the Quetzal. Now it is presented with the impulsive sound source and the listeners located at different angles, where apart from the characteristic chirped sound, several musical notes could be obtained and identified, covering a range of at least one half an octave. This evaluation was made at the site, where the effect is clearly audible, and it is supported with simple mathematics.

  17. The Pentagonal-Pyramidal Hexamethylbenzene Dication: The Many Shades of Coordination Chemistry at Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johannes E M N; Havenith, Remco W A; Knizia, Gerald

    2018-01-17

    A recent report of the crystal structure of the pentagonal-pyramidal hexamethylbenzene dication C6(CH3)62+ by Malischewski and Seppelt [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2017, 56, 368.] confirmed the structural proposal made in the first report of this compound in 1973 by Hogeveen and Kwant [Tetrahedron Lett. 1973, 14, 1665]. The widespread attention that this compound quickly gained led us to reinvestigate its electronic structure. Based on intrinsic bond orbital analysis, effective oxidation state analysis, ring current analysis and comparison to well established coordination complexes, we demonstrate that the central carbon atom behaves like a transition metal. The central (apical) carbon atom, although best described as a highly Lewis-acidic carbon atom coordinated with an anionic cyclopentadienyl ligand, is also capable to act as an electron pair donor to a formal CH3+ group. The different roles of coordination chemistry are discussed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Anatomy and physiology of the thick-tufted layer 5 pyramidal neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Srikanth; Markram, Henry

    2015-01-01

    The thick-tufted layer 5 (TTL5) pyramidal neuron is one of the most extensively studied neuron types in the mammalian neocortex and has become a benchmark for understanding information processing in excitatory neurons. By virtue of having the widest local axonal and dendritic arborization, the TTL5 neuron encompasses various local neocortical neurons and thereby defines the dimensions of neocortical microcircuitry. The TTL5 neuron integrates input across all neocortical layers and is the principal output pathway funneling information flow to subcortical structures. Several studies over the past decades have investigated the anatomy, physiology, synaptology, and pathophysiology of the TTL5 neuron. This review summarizes key discoveries and identifies potential avenues of research to facilitate an integrated and unifying understanding on the role of a central neuron in the neocortex.

  19. Fusion of remote sensing images based on pyramid decomposition with Baldwinian Clonal Selection Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haiyan; Xing, Bei; Wang, Lei; Wang, Yanyan

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we put forward a novel fusion method for remote sensing images based on the contrast pyramid (CP) using the Baldwinian Clonal Selection Algorithm (BCSA), referred to as CPBCSA. Compared with classical methods based on the transform domain, the method proposed in this paper adopts an improved heuristic evolutionary algorithm, wherein the clonal selection algorithm includes Baldwinian learning. In the process of image fusion, BCSA automatically adjusts the fusion coefficients of different sub-bands decomposed by CP according to the value of the fitness function. BCSA also adaptively controls the optimal search direction of the coefficients and accelerates the convergence rate of the algorithm. Finally, the fusion images are obtained via weighted integration of the optimal fusion coefficients and CP reconstruction. Our experiments show that the proposed method outperforms existing methods in terms of both visual effect and objective evaluation criteria, and the fused images are more suitable for human visual or machine perception.

  20. Excitability of prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons is modulated by activation of intracellular type-2 cannabinoid receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Boon, Femke S; Chameau, Pascal; Schaafsma-Zhao, Qiluan; van Aken, Willem; Bari, Monica; Oddi, Sergio; Kruse, Chris G; Maccarrone, Mauro; Wadman, Wytse J; Werkman, Taco R

    2012-02-28

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system is widely expressed throughout the central nervous system (CNS) and the functionality of type-1 cannabinoid receptors in neurons is well documented. In contrast, there is little knowledge about type-2 cannabinoid receptors (CB(2)Rs) in the CNS. Here, we show that CB(2)Rs are located intracellularly in layer II/III pyramidal cells of the rodent medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and that their activation results in IP(3)R-dependent opening of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels. To investigate the functional role of CB(2)R activation, we induced neuronal firing and observed a CB(2)R-mediated reduction in firing frequency. The description of this unique CB(2)R-mediated signaling pathway, controlling neuronal excitability, broadens our knowledge of the influence of the eCB system on brain function.

  1. Dynamic of Innovation in Services for Consumers at the Bottom of the Pyramid

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    Gibson Meira Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to analyze the dynamic of innovation in services for consumers at the bottom of the pyramid (BoP. For this purpose, a framework composed of innovation dimensions, capabilities and infrastructure was developed. To assess the framework behavior in the business practice, a case study was carried out in a retail firm operating in Brazil’s Northeast region whose target consumers are at the BoP. The results showed adherence of the proposed framework to the dynamics of innovation conducted by the studied firm. Considering the theoretical- academic perspective, the framework helps explain the interaction between dimensions, capabilities, and elements of the market infrastructure. As for its practical relevance, it explains how service innovations occur and how to adapt them to the BoP market. In addition, as the structure of the proposed framework includes both external and internal elements, innovation is then considered from different perspectives.

  2. Anatomy and Physiology of the Thick-tufted Layer 5 Pyramidal Neuron

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    Srikanth eRamaswamy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The thick-tufted layer 5 (TTL5 pyramidal neuron is one of the most extensively studied neuron types in the mammalian neocortex and has become a benchmark for understanding information processing in excitatory neurons. By virtue of having the widest local axonal and dendritic arborization, the TTL5 neuron encompasses various local neocortical neurons and thereby defines the dimensions of neocortical microcircuitry. The TTL5 neuron integrates input across all neocortical layers and is the principal output pathway funneling information flow to subcortical structures. Several studies over the past decades have investigated the anatomy, physiology, synaptology, and pathophysiology of the TTL5 neuron. This review summarizes key discoveries and identifies potential avenues of research to facilitate an integrated and unifying understanding on the role of a central neuron in the neocortex.

  3. Student Analogy Reasons When Solving Area Concepts in Pyramids and Prisms

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    Mashuri, A.; Sudjadi, I.; Pramudya, I.; Gembong, S.

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the reasoning of students’ analogies in solving the broad concept problem in pyramids and prisms. This research method using descriptive qualitative. Data collection uses analogous reasoning tests and interviews. After that tested to 32 students of Junior High School. Based on the results of the analysis can be concluded that (1) 16% of students solve the problem of source and target problem correctly. (2) 29% of students correctly solve source problems and target problems incorrectly. (3) 55% solve source problems and target problems wrong. This is because students tend to memorize formulas not using analogy reasoning to solve new problems. Finally, the students have difficulties in solving new problems, because students are not accustomed to using the experience they have gained to solve new problems.

  4. The skin health and beauty pyramid: a clinically based guide to selecting topical skincare products.

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    Mayoral, Flor A; Kenner, Julie R; Draelos, Zoe Diana

    2014-04-01

    The use of cosmeceuticals by patients is now commonplace. Without consultation and direction from an informed clinician, marketing pressures can lead consumers to make poor product choices that can result in wasted money and unsatisfactory outcomes. Skin professionals need a scientifically based, succinct tool to guide their patients toward best topical skincare practices. The Skin Health and Beauty Pyramid is an educational framework and product guide created from extensive scientific literature and study review on ingredients, formulations and technologies affecting skin biology. This clinical tool can simplify product choices for physicians and clinicians in the process of professionally guiding patients toward the optimal use of topical products to achieve best outcomes for skin health and beauty.

  5. Gene Pyramiding of Peptidase Inhibitors Enhances Plant Resistance to the Spider Mite Tetranychus urticae

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    Santamaria, Maria Estrella; Cambra, Inés; Martinez, Manuel; Pozancos, Clara; González-Melendi, Pablo; Grbic, Vojislava; Castañera, Pedro; Ortego, Felix; Diaz, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae is a damaging pest worldwide with a wide range of host plants and an extreme record of pesticide resistance. Recently, the complete T. urticae genome has been published and showed a proliferation of gene families associated with digestion and detoxification of plant secondary compounds which supports its polyphagous behaviour. To overcome spider mite adaptability a gene pyramiding approach has been developed by co-expressing two barley proteases inhibitors, the cystatin Icy6 and the trypsin inhibitor Itr1 genes in Arabidopsis plants by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The presence and expression of both transgenes was studied by conventional and quantitative real time RT-PCR assays and by indirect ELISA assays. The inhibitory activity of cystatin and trypsin inhibitor was in vitro analysed using specific substrates. Single and double transformants were used to assess the effects of spider mite infestation. Double transformed lines showed the lowest damaged leaf area in comparison to single transformants and non-transformed controls and different accumulation of H2O2 as defence response in the leaf feeding site, detected by diaminobenzidine staining. Additionally, an impact on endogenous mite cathepsin B- and L-like activities was observed after feeding on Arabidopsis lines, which correlates with a significant increase in the mortality of mites fed on transformed plants. These effects were analysed in view of the expression levels of the target mite protease genes, C1A cysteine peptidase and S1 serine peptidase, identified in the four developmental mite stages (embryo, larvae, nymphs and adults) performed using the RNA-seq information available at the BOGAS T. urticae database. The potential of pyramiding different classes of plant protease inhibitors to prevent plant damage caused by mites as a new tool to prevent pest resistance and to improve pest control is discussed. PMID:22900081

  6. Understanding socio-economic inequalities in food choice behaviour: can Maslow's pyramid help?

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    van Lenthe, Frank J; Jansen, Tessa; Kamphuis, Carlijn B M

    2015-04-14

    Socio-economic groups differ in their material, living, working and social circumstances, which may result in different priorities about their daily-life needs, including the priority to make healthy food choices. Following Maslow's hierarchy of human needs, we hypothesised that socio-economic inequalities in healthy food choices can be explained by differences in the levels of need fulfilment. Postal survey data collected in 2011 (67·2 % response) from 2903 participants aged 20-75 years in the Dutch GLOBE (Gezondheid en Levens Omstandigheden Bevolking Eindhoven en omstreken) study were analysed. Maslow's hierarchy of human needs (measured with the Basic Need Satisfaction Inventory) was added to age- and sex-adjusted linear regression models that linked education and net household income levels to healthy food choices (measured by a FFQ). Most participants (38·6 %) were in the self-actualisation layer of the pyramid. This proportion was highest among the highest education group (47·6 %). Being in a higher level of the hierarchy was associated with a higher consumption of fruits and vegetables as well as more healthy than unhealthy bread, snack and dairy consumption. Educational inequalities in fruit and vegetable intake (B= -1·79, 95 % CI -2·31, -1·28 in the lowest education group) were most reduced after the hierarchy of needs score was included (B= -1·57, 95 % CI - ·09, -1·05). Inequalities in other healthy food choices hardly changed after the hierarchy of needs score was included. People who are satisfied with higher-level needs make healthier food choices. Studies aimed at understanding socio-economic inequalities in food choice behaviour need to take differences in the priority given to daily-life needs by different socio-economic groups into account, but Maslow's pyramid offers little help.

  7. Ionic mechanisms of endogenous bursting in CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neurons: a model study.

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    Jun Xu

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A critical property of some neurons is burst firing, which in the hippocampus plays a primary role in reliable transmission of electrical signals. However, bursting may also contribute to synchronization of electrical activity in networks of neurons, a hallmark of epilepsy. Understanding the ionic mechanisms of bursting in a single neuron, and how mutations associated with epilepsy modify these mechanisms, is an important building block for understanding the emergent network behaviors. We present a single-compartment model of a CA3 hippocampal pyramidal neuron based on recent experimental data. We then use the model to determine the roles of primary depolarizing currents in burst generation. The single compartment model incorporates accurate representations of sodium (Na(+ channels (Na(V1.1 and T-type calcium (Ca(2+ channel subtypes (Ca(V3.1, Ca(V3.2, and Ca(V3.3. Our simulations predict the importance of Na(+ and T-type Ca(2+ channels in hippocampal pyramidal cell bursting and reveal the distinct contribution of each subtype to burst morphology. We also performed fast-slow analysis in a reduced comparable model, which shows that our model burst is generated as a result of the interaction of two slow variables, the T-type Ca(2+ channel activation gate and the Ca(2+-dependent potassium (K(+ channel activation gate. The model reproduces a range of experimentally observed phenomena including afterdepolarizing potentials, spike widening at the end of the burst, and rebound. Finally, we use the model to simulate the effects of two epilepsy-linked mutations: R1648H in Na(V1.1 and C456S in Ca(V3.2, both of which result in increased cellular excitability.

  8. Cdk5 Is Essential for Amphetamine to Increase Dendritic Spine Density in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

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    Soledad Ferreras

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychostimulant drugs of abuse increase dendritic spine density in reward centers of the brain. However, little is known about their effects in the hippocampus, where activity-dependent changes in the density of dendritic spine are associated with learning and memory. Recent reports suggest that Cdk5 plays an important role in drug addiction, but its role in psychostimulant’s effects on dendritic spines in hippocampus remain unknown. We used in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that amphetamine increases dendritic spine density in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Primary cultures and organotypic slice cultures were used for cellular, molecular, pharmacological and biochemical analyses of the role of Cdk5/p25 in amphetamine-induced dendritic spine formation. Amphetamine (two-injection protocol increased dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons of thy1-green fluorescent protein (GFP mice, as well as in hippocampal cultured neurons and organotypic slice cultures. Either genetic or pharmacological inhibition of Cdk5 activity prevented the amphetamine–induced increase in dendritic spine density. Amphetamine also increased spine density in neurons overexpressing the strong Cdk5 activator p25. Finally, inhibition of calpain, the protease necessary for the conversion of p35 to p25, prevented amphetamine’s effect on dendritic spine density. We demonstrate, for the first time, that amphetamine increases the density of dendritic spine in hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vivo and in vitro. Moreover, we show that the Cdk5/p25 signaling and calpain activity are both necessary for the effect of amphetamine on dendritic spine density. The identification of molecular mechanisms underlying psychostimulant effects provides novel and promising therapeutic approaches for the treatment of drug addiction.

  9. Loss of Sleep Affects the Ultrastructure of Pyramidal Neurons in the Adolescent Mouse Frontal Cortex.

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    de Vivo, Luisa; Nelson, Aaron B; Bellesi, Michele; Noguti, Juliana; Tononi, Giulio; Cirelli, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    The adolescent brain may be uniquely affected by acute sleep deprivation (ASD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR), but direct evidence is lacking. We used electron microscopy to examine how ASD and CSR affect pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of adolescent mice, focusing on mitochondria, endosomes, and lysosomes that together perform most basic cellular functions, from nutrient intake to prevention of cellular stress. Adolescent (1-mo-old) mice slept (S) or were sleep deprived (ASD, with novel objects and running wheels) during the first 6-8 h of the light period, chronically sleep restricted (CSR) for > 4 days (using novel objects, running wheels, social interaction, forced locomotion, caffeinated water), or allowed to recover sleep (RS) for ∼32 h after CSR. Ultrastructural analysis of 350 pyramidal neurons was performed (S = 82; ASD = 86; CSR = 103; RS = 79; 4 to 5 mice/group). Several ultrastructural parameters differed in S versus ASD, S versus CSR, CSR versus RS, and S versus RS, although the different methods used to enforce wake may have contributed to some of the differences between short and long sleep loss. Differences included larger cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondria in CSR versus S, and higher number of secondary lysosomes in CSR versus S and RS. We also found that sleep loss may unmask interindividual differences not obvious during baseline sleep. Moreover, using a combination of 11 ultrastructural parameters, we could predict in up to 80% of cases whether sleep or wake occurred at the single cell level. Ultrastructural analysis may be a powerful tool to identify which cellular organelles, and thus which cellular functions, are most affected by sleep and sleep loss. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  10. Co-precipitation of dissolved organic matter by calcium carbonate in Pyramid Lake, Nevada

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    Leenheer, Jerry A.; Reddy, Michael M.

    2008-01-01

    Our previous research has demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) influences calcium carbonate mineral formation in surface and ground water. To better understand DOM mediation of carbonate precipitation and DOM co-precipitation and/or incorporation with carbonate minerals, we characterized the content and speciation of DOM in carbonate minerals and in the lake water of Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA. A 400-gram block of precipitated calcium carbonate from the Pyramid Lake shore was dissolved in 8 liters of 10% acetic acid. Particulate matter not dissolved by acetic acid was removed by centrifugation. DOM from the carbonate rock was fractionated into nine portions using evaporation, dialysis, resin adsorption, and selective precipitations to remove acetic acid and inorganic constituents. The calcium carbonate rock contained 0.23% DOM by weight. This DOM was enriched in polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids in comparison with the present lake water. DOM in lake water was composed of aliphatic, alicyclic polycarboxylic acids. These compound classes were found in previous studies to inhibit calcium carbonate precipitation. DOM fractions from the carbonate rock were 14C-age dated at about 3,100 to 3,500 years before present. The mechanism of DOM co-precipitation and/or physical incorporation in the calcium carbonate is believed to be due to formation of insoluble calcium complexes with polycarboxylic proteinaceous acids and hydroxy-acids that have moderately large stability constants at the alkaline pH of the lake. DOM co-precipitation with calcium carbonate and incorporation in precipitated carbonate minerals removes proteinaceous DOM, but nearly equivalent concentrations of neutral and acidic forms of organic nitrogen in DOM remain in solution. Calcium carbonate precipitation during lime softening pretreatment of drinking water may have practical applications for removal of proteinaceous disinfection by-product precursors.

  11. Pirâmides alimentares: uma leitura semiótica Food guide pyramids: a semiotic way of reading

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    Haydée Serrão Lanzillotti

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available A semiótica é uma ciência que sistematiza e desvela o mundo dos signos, descrevendo-os e classificando-os segundo uma lógica. Existem três espécies de signos: ícones, índices e símbolos. As pirâmides alimentares são, primeiramente, ícones que podem se desenvolver até símbolos. Sob o enfoque da Nutrição, as pirâmides alimentares são consideradas ferramentas de orientação que podem transmitir conhecimentos relativos a uma alimentação considerada adequada. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o potencial comunicativo da pirâmide alimentar na perspectiva da semiótica. Neste ensaio, foram analisadas três pirâmides alimentares: United State Departament of Agriculture de 1992, de Philippi, de 1999 e de Willet e Stampfer, de 2003. O nível hierárquico em que o grupo de alimentos se encontra é o elemento informativo fundamental.Semiotics is a science that systematizes and reveals the world of signs, describing and classifying them according to logic. There are three kinds of sign: icons, indexes and symbols. The food guide pyramids are, in first place, icons, which can develop into symbols. Considering the focus of Nutrition, the food guide pyramids are considered as orientation tools that can transmit knowledge related to feeding considered adequate. The objective of this paper was to show the communicative potential of the food guide pyramids from the semiotics perspective. In this trial, three food guide pyramids were analyzed. The United States Department of Agriculture, 1992, Philippi, 1999 and Willet & Stampfer, 2003. In every food guide pyramid the hierarchic "level" in which a group of foods is found is the primordial informative element.

  12. Electrophysiological effects of SKF83959 on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: potential mechanisms for the drug's neuroprotective effects.

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    Hong-Yuan Chu

    Full Text Available Although the potent anti-parkinsonian action of the atypical D₁-like receptor agonist SKF83959 has been attributed to the selective activation of phosphoinositol(PI-linked D₁ receptor, whereas the mechanism underlying its potent neuroprotective effect is not fully understood. In the present study, the actions of SKF83959 on neuronal membrane potential and neuronal excitability were investigated in CA1 pyramidal neurons of rat hippocampal slices. SKF83959 (10-100 µM caused a concentration-dependent depolarization, associated with a reduction of input resistance in CA1 pyramidal neurons. The depolarization was blocked neither by antagonists for D₁, D₂, 5-HT(2A/2C receptors and α₁-adrenoceptor, nor by intracellular dialysis of GDP-β-S. However, the specific HCN channel blocker ZD7288 (10 µM antagonized both the depolarization and reduction of input resistance caused by SKF83959. In voltage-clamp experiments, SKF83959 (10-100 µM caused a concentration-dependent increase of Ih current in CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was independent of D₁ receptor activation. Moreover, SKF83959 (50 µM caused a 6 mV positive shift in the activation curve of Ih and significantly accelerated the activation of Ih current. In addition, SKF83959 also reduced the neuronal excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was manifested by the decrease in the number and amplitude of action potentials evoked by depolarizing currents, and by the increase of firing threshold and rhoebase current. The above results suggest that SKF83959 increased Ih current through a D₁ receptor-independent mechanism, which led to the depolarization of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. These findings provide a novel mechanism for the drug's neuroprotective effects, which may contributes to its therapeutic benefits in Parkinson's disease.

  13. Age-dependent expression of Nav1.9 channels in medial prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlak, Maciej; Szulczyk, Bartłomiej; Berłowski, Adam; Grzelka, Katarzyna; Stachurska, Anna; Pełka, Justyna; Czarzasta, Katarzyna; Małecki, Maciej; Kurowski, Przemysław; Nurowska, Ewa; Szulczyk, Paweł

    2017-12-01

    Developmental changes that occur in the prefrontal cortex during adolescence alter behavior. These behavioral alterations likely stem from changes in prefrontal cortex neuronal activity, which may depend on the properties and expression of ion channels. Nav1.9 sodium channels conduct a Na + current that is TTX resistant with a low threshold and noninactivating over time. The purpose of this study was to assess the presence of Nav1.9 channels in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) layer II and V pyramidal neurons in young (20-day old), late adolescent (60-day old), and adult (6- to 7-month old) rats. First, we demonstrated that layer II and V mPFC pyramidal neurons in slices obtained from young rats exhibited a TTX-resistant, low-threshold, noninactivating, and voltage-dependent Na + current. The mRNA expression of the SCN11a gene (which encodes the Nav1.9 channel) in mPFC tissue was significantly higher in young rats than in late adolescent and adult rats. Nav1.9 protein was immunofluorescently labeled in mPFC cells in slices and analyzed via confocal microscopy. Nav1.9 immunolabeling was present in layer II and V mPFC pyramidal neurons and was more prominent in the neurons of young rats than in the neurons of late adolescent and adult rats. We conclude that Nav1.9 channels are expressed in layer II and V mPFC pyramidal neurons and that Nav1.9 protein expression in the mPFC pyramidal neurons of late adolescent and adult rats is lower than that in the neurons of young rats. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 1371-1384, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Potential Synaptic Connectivity of Different Neurons onto Pyramidal Cells in a 3D Reconstruction of the Rat Hippocampus

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    Deepak eRopireddy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Most existing connectomic data and ongoing efforts focus either on individual synapses (e.g. with electron microscopy or on regional connectivity (tract tracing. An individual pyramidal cell extends thousands of synapses over macroscopic distances (~cm. The contrasting requirements of high resolution and large field of view make it too challenging to acquire the entire synaptic connectivity for even a single typical cortical neuron. Light microscopy can image whole neuronal arbors and resolve dendritic branches. Analyzing connectivity in terms of close spatial appositions between axons and dendrites could thus bridge the opposite scales, from synaptic level to whole systems. In the mammalian cortex, structural plasticity of spines and boutons makes these ‘potential synapses’ functionally relevant to learning capability and memory capacity. To date, however, potential synapses have only been mapped in the surrounding of a neuron and relative to its local orientation rather than in a system-level anatomical reference. Here we overcome this limitation by estimating the potential connectivity of different neurons embedded into a detailed 3D reconstruction of the rat hippocampus. Axonal and dendritic trees were oriented with respect to hippocampal cytoarchitecture according to longitudinal and transversal curvatures. We report the potential connectivity onto pyramidal cell dendrites from the axons of a dentate granule cell, three CA3 pyramidal cells, one CA2 pyramidal cell, and 13 CA3b interneurons. The numbers, densities, and distributions of potential synapses were analyzed in each sub-region (e.g. CA3 vs. CA1, layer (e.g. oriens vs. radiatum, and septo-temporal location (e.g. dorsal vs. ventral. The overall ratio between the numbers of actual and potential synapses was ~0.20 for the granule and CA3 pyramidal cells. All potential connectivity patterns are strikingly dependent on the anatomical location of both pre-synaptic and post

  15. High speed and high precision pyramid wavefront sensor: In labs validation and preparation to on sky demonstration

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    El Hadi, K.; Fusco, T.; Sauvage, J.-F.; Neichel, B.

    2014-07-01

    Since the introduction of the pyramid wavefront sensor [P-WFS] concept (Ragazzoni), numerous investigations have clearly shown its ability to achieve better performance (sensitivity, dynamic range) than the standard Shack-Hartman [SH-WFS]. It has recently been successfully implemented on LBT and has already been provided very interesting results (Esposito et al). Then, most of the future adaptive optics [AO] systems, mainly for ELT instrumentation, will probably integrate one or several pyramidal sensors. However, the pyramid behavior still needs to be extensively studied in order to ensure its optimization in real conditions of operation. So, the coupling in an AO loop and the control of this type of sensor is fundamental for an efficient implementation in the future AO systems. At LAM, we recently carried out in labs demonstration of an extremely performant pyramid sensor (up to 60x60), using particularly an OCAM2 detector (1.5 kHz, RON close to zero). Both modulated and fixed configurations are investigated and compared with numerical models. The P-WFS is being coupled with a dedicated RTC and a 12×12 DM to achieve a first AO closed loop operation. For modulation, a fine control is needed: a specific electronic module, interfaced with the RTC, is being developed to drive the TT mirror (OCAM2 triggering). Then, various TT mirrors are under test to determine a suitable one. After tests of the pyramid specificities (optimiziation, calibration and operation procedures), the P-WFS will be tested on-sky and compared with an already existing SH-WFS (using the same OCAM²) on the ONERA bench.

  16. Quantitative analysis of axon collaterals of single pyramidal cells of the anterior piriform cortex of the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Junli; Litscher, Gerhard; Sun, Zhongren; Tang, Qiang; Kishi, Kiyoshi; Oda, Satoko; Takayanagi, Masaaki; Sheng, Zemin; Liu, Yang; Guo, Wenhai; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Lu; Gaischek, Ingrid; Litscher, Daniela; Lippe, Irmgard Th; Kuroda, Masaru

    2017-02-08

    The role of the piriform cortex (PC) in olfactory information processing remains largely unknown. The anterior part of the piriform cortex (APC) has been the focus of cortical-level studies of olfactory coding, and associative processes have attracted considerable attention as an important part in odor discrimination and olfactory information processing. Associational connections of pyramidal cells in the guinea pig APC were studied by direct visualization of axons stained and quantitatively analyzed by intracellular biocytin injection in vivo. The observations illustrated that axon collaterals of the individual cells were widely and spatially distributed within the PC, and sometimes also showed a long associational projection to the olfactory bulb (OB). The data showed that long associational axons were both rostrally and caudally directed throughout the PC, and the intrinsic associational fibers of pyramidal cells in the APC are omnidirectional connections in the PC. Within the PC, associational axons typically followed rather linear trajectories and irregular bouton distributions. Quantitative data of the axon collaterals of two pyramidal cells in the APC showed that the average length of axonal collaterals was 101 mm, out of which 79 mm (78% of total length) were distributed in the PC. The average number of boutons was 8926 and 7101, respectively, with 79% of the total number of boutons being distributed in the PC. The percentage of the total area of the APC and the posterior piriform cortex occupied by the average distribution region of the axon collaterals of two superficial pyramidal (SP) cells was about 18 and 5%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that omnidirectional connection of pyramidal cells in the APC provides a substrate for recurrent processes. These findings indicate that the axon collaterals of SP cells in the PC could make synaptic contacts with all granule cells in the OB. This study provides the morphological evidence for understanding

  17. High In-content InGaN nano-pyramids: Tuning crystal homogeneity by optimized nucleation of GaN seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Zhaoxia; Gustafsson, Anders; Lenrick, Filip; Lindgren, David; Hultin, Olof; Wallenberg, L. Reine; Ohlsson, B. Jonas; Monemar, Bo; Samuelson, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Uniform arrays of submicron hexagonal InGaN pyramids with high morphological and material homogeneity, reaching an indium composition of 20%, are presented in this work. The pyramids were grown by selective area metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy and nucleated from small openings in a SiN mask. The growth selectivity was accurately controlled with diffusion lengths of the gallium and indium species, more than 1 μm on the SiN surface. High material homogeneity of the pyramids was achieved by inserting a precisely formed GaN pyramidal seed prior to InGaN growth, leading to the growth of well-shaped InGaN pyramids delimited by six equivalent {" separators="| 10 1 ¯ 1 } facets. Further analysis reveals a variation in the indium composition to be mediated by competing InGaN growth on two types of crystal planes, {" separators="| 10 1 ¯ 1 } and (0001). Typically, the InGaN growth on {" separators="| 10 1 ¯ 1 } planes is much slower than on the (0001) plane. The formation of the (0001) plane and the growth of InGaN on it were found to be dependent on the morphology of the GaN seeds. We propose growth of InGaN pyramids seeded by {" separators="| 10 1 ¯ 1 }-faceted GaN pyramids as a mean to avoid InGaN material grown on the otherwise formed (0001) plane, leading to a significant reduction of variations in the indium composition in the InGaN pyramids. The InGaN pyramids in this work can be used as a high-quality template for optoelectronic devices having indium-rich active layers, with a potential of reaching green, yellow, and red emissions for LEDs.

  18. Fe as hydrogen/halogen bond acceptor in square pyramidal Fe(CO)5.

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    Aiswaryalakshmi, P; Mani, Devendra; Arunan, E

    2013-08-05

    Hydrogen bonded complexes formed between the square pyramidal Fe(CO)5 with HX (X = F, Cl, Br), showing X-H···Fe interactions, have been investigated theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) including dispersion correction. Geometry, interaction energy, and large red shift of about 400 cm(-1) in the HX stretching frequency confirm X-H···Fe hydrogen bond formation. In the (CO)5Fe···HBr complex, following the significant red-shift, the HBr stretching mode is coupled with the carbonyl stretching modes. This clearly affects the correlation between frequency shift and binding energy, which is a hallmark of hydrogen bonds. Atoms in Molecule (AIM) theoretical analyses show the presence of a bond critical point between the iron and the hydrogen of HX and significant mutual penetration. These X-H···Fe hydrogen bonds follow most but not all of the eight criteria proposed by Koch and Popelier (J. Phys. Chem. 1995, 99, 9747) based on their investigations on C-H···O hydrogen bonds. Natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis indicates charge transfer from the organometallic system to the hydrogen bond donor. However, there is no correlation between the extent of charge transfer and interaction energy, contrary to what is proposed in the recent IUPAC recommendation (Pure Appl. Chem. 2011, 83, 1637). The "hydrogen bond radius" for iron has been determined to be 1.60 ± 0.02 Å, and not surprisingly it is between the covalent (1.27 Å) and van der Waals (2.0) radii of Fe. DFT and AIM theoretical studies reveal that Fe in square pyramidal Fe(CO)5 can also form halogen bond with ClF and ClH as "halogen bond donor". Both these complexes show mutual penetration as well, though the Fe---Cl distance is closer to the sum of van der Waals radii of Fe and Cl in (CO)5Fe···ClH, and it is about 1 Å less in (CO)5Fe···ClF.

  19. Dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurones of the visual cortex of the rat. IV: Electrical geometry.

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    Larkman, A U; Major, G; Stratford, K J; Jack, J J

    1992-09-08

    Features of the dendritic morphology of pyramidal neurones of the visual cortex of the rat that are relevant to the development of models of their passive electrical geometry were investigated. The sample of 39 neurones that was used came from layers 2/3 and 5. They had been recorded from and injected intracellularly with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in vitro as part of a previous study (Larkman and Mason, J. Neurosci 10:1407, 1990). These cells had been reconstructed and measured previously by light microscopy. The relationship between the diameters of parent and daughter dendrites during branching was examined. It was found that most dendrites did not closely obey the "3/2 branch power relationship" required for representation of the dendrites as single equivalent cylinders. Estimates of total neuronal membrane area ranged from 27,100 +/- 7,900 microns2 for layer 2/3 cells to 52,200 +/- 11,800 microns2 for thick layer 5 cells. Dendritic spines contributed approximately half the total membrane area. Both neuronal input resistance and the ratio of membrane time constant to input resistance were correlated with neuronal membrane area as measured anatomically. The relative electrical lengths of the different dendrites of individual neurones were investigated, by using simple transformations to take account of the differences in diameter and spine density between dendritic segments. A novel "morphotonic" transformation is described that represents the purely morphological component of electrotonic length. Morphotonic lengths can be converted into electrotonic lengths by division by a "morphoelectric factor" ([Rm/Ri]1/2). This procedure has the advantage of separating the steps involving anatomical and electrical parameters. These transformations indicated that the dendrites of the apical terminal arbor were much longer electrically than the basal or apical oblique dendrites. In relative electrical terms, most apical oblique trees arose extremely close to the soma, and

  20. Foxp1 in Forebrain Pyramidal Neurons Controls Gene Expression Required for Spatial Learning and Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Daniel J; Toriumi, Kazuya; Escamilla, Christine O; Kulkarni, Ashwinikumar; Anderson, Ashley G; Harper, Matthew; Usui, Noriyoshi; Ellegood, Jacob; Lerch, Jason P; Birnbaum, Shari G; Tucker, Haley O; Powell, Craig M; Konopka, Genevieve

    2017-11-08

    Genetic perturbations of the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 (FOXP1) are causative for severe forms of autism spectrum disorder that are often comorbid with intellectual disability. Recent work has begun to reveal an important role for FoxP1 in brain development, but the brain-region-specific contributions of Foxp1 to autism and intellectual disability phenotypes have yet to be determined fully. Here, we describe Foxp1 conditional knock-out (Foxp1cKO) male and female mice with loss of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the neocortex and the CA1/CA2 subfields of the hippocampus. Foxp1cKO mice exhibit behavioral phenotypes that are of potential relevance to autism spectrum disorder, including hyperactivity, increased anxiety, communication impairments, and decreased sociability. In addition, Foxp1cKO mice have gross deficits in learning and memory tasks of relevance to intellectual disability. Using a genome-wide approach, we identified differentially expressed genes in the hippocampus of Foxp1cKO mice associated with synaptic function and development. Furthermore, using magnetic resonance imaging, we uncovered a significant reduction in the volumes of both the entire hippocampus as well as individual hippocampal subfields of Foxp1cKO mice. Finally, we observed reduced maintenance of LTP in area CA1 of the hippocampus in these mutant mice. Together, these data suggest that proper expression of Foxp1 in the pyramidal neurons of the forebrain is important for regulating gene expression pathways that contribute to specific behaviors reminiscent of those seen in autism and intellectual disability. In particular, Foxp1 regulation of gene expression appears to be crucial for normal hippocampal development, CA1 plasticity, and spatial learning.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Loss-of-function mutations in the transcription factor Forkhead Box P1 (FOXP1) lead to autism spectrum disorder and intellectual disability. Understanding the potential brain-region-specific contributions of

  1. Precipitation radar nowcasting in complex orography: a pyramidal-dynamical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, M.; Marzano, F. S.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays, quantitative forecast of rainfall is usually obtained with Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models that allow to obtain reliable forecasts up to few hours. Due to physical basis these models are able to predict the formation of new rainy systems but often fail to forecast them at small scales because of, for example, their coarse temporal and spatial resolution. On the other hand, applications in the fields of hydrology, civil protection, flight assistance, agriculture warning, require quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPF) at high resolution in space and in time. These concepts lead to the need of so called short-term forecasts till few hours in advance (here referred as nowcasting) that can be used, in a operational framework, complementing the NWP models in order to fill their weakness at smaller temporal and spatial scales. Nowcasting techniques usually are based on the extrapolations of weather conditions in the future assuming no significant changes in the future general behavior of the forecasted precipitation pattern. Starting from the work of Seed, 2003, a new nowcasting algorithm, based on ground based radar observations, named SPARE (Spectral Pyramidal Advection Radar Estimator) has been recently developed by the authors of this work. SPARE algorithm deal with the prediction problem separating the component associated with the growth of precipitation field (or roughly speaking its temporal evolution) and the component associated with changes in the field motion. An auto-regressive model of order 1 (indicated by AR(1)) revealed adequate to account the evolution component where for the field motion a multi scale field advection approach, labeled as Pyramidal Phase Correlation Motion Estimation (PPCME) method, has been set up In this work further refinements of the SPARE algorithm are shown and discussed. Firstly the PPCME technique is reinforced by considering a variable past time history of radar observations, instead of only two; secondly

  2. Community incidence of pathogen-specific gastroenteritis: reconstructing the surveillance pyramid for seven pathogens in seven European Union member states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagsma, J A; Geenen, P L; Ethelberg, S; Fetsch, A; Hansdotter, F; Jansen, A; Korsgaard, H; O'Brien, S J; Scavia, G; Spitznagel, H; Stefanoff, P; Tam, C C; Havelaar, A H

    2013-08-01

    By building reconstruction models for a case of gastroenteritis in the general population moving through different steps of the surveillance pyramid we estimated that millions of illnesses occur annually in the European population, leading to thousands of hospitalizations. We used data on the healthcare system in seven European Union member states in relation to pathogen characteristics that influence healthcare seeking. Data on healthcare usage were obtained by harmonized cross-sectional surveys. The degree of under-diagnosis and underreporting varied by pathogen and country. Overall, underreporting and under-diagnosis were estimated to be lowest for Germany and Sweden, followed by Denmark, The Netherlands, UK, Italy and Poland. Across all countries, the incidence rate was highest for Campylobacter spp. and Salmonella spp. Incidence estimates resulting from the pyramid reconstruction approach are adjusted for biases due to different surveillance systems and are therefore a better basis for international comparisons than reported data.

  3. Solar house heating system using reflective pyramid optical condensing system. Evaluation of performance, June 1, 1975--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    The prototype system, previously built on Westover Road, Stamford, Connecticut, was upgraded, instrumented, and evaluated. It was found to perform essentially as expected, but the open construction was found to have problems. A fully enclosed model Pyramidal Optics house was built by Better Homes of Delaware near Rehoboth, Delaware. After a number of significant improvements were made in the optical concentrating system and the flat plate receiver assembly, the system was monitored throughout the winter of 1976/1977 and found to perform very well. The solar contribution to heating amounted to 70 percent during the severe winter months and is expected to exceed 80 percent throughout the year. The Pyramidal Optics system has been found to have a number of economic and operational advantages. It is planned to evaluate additional systems in other locations and different climatic conditions.

  4. Stereodivergent quaternization of 2-alkyl-2-p-tolylsulfinylacetonitriles: NMR spectroscopic evidence of planar and pyramidal benzylic carbanions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Ruano, José Luis; Martín-Castro, Ana M; Tato, Francisco; Torrente, Esther; Poveda, Ana M

    2010-06-01

    Enantiomerically enriched alpha,alpha-disubstituted phenylacetonitriles have been readily prepared by stereoselective quaternization of 2-alkyl-2-[2-(p-tolylsulfinyl)phenyl]acetonitriles with different alkylating electrophiles in the presence of bases. The use of potassium hexamethyldisilazane (KHMDS)/[18]crown-6 ether and NHMDS with alkyl halides afforded S,S(S) and R,S(S) diastereoisomers, respectively, in high enantiomeric purities, thus providing stereodivergent processes for synthesizing both isomers. The dependence of the stereochemical course of the reactions on the experimental conditions (mainly on the counterion) has been rationalized by assuming a planar or pyramidal structure for the benzylic carbanions. This hypothesis has been supported by NMR spectroscopic studies, which permit one to assign a chelated pyramidal structure to the sodium benzylic carbanions and an almost planar naked carbanionic structure to the potassium benzylic carbanions generated in the presence of [18]crown-6 ether.

  5. SERS detection of R6G based on a novel graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C; Jiang, S Z; Huo, Y Y; Liu, A H; Xu, S C; Liu, X Y; Sun, Z C; Xu, Y Y; Li, Z; Man, B Y

    2015-09-21

    We present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/silicon pyramid arrays structure (GO/Ag/PSi). The SERS behaviors are discussed and compared by the detection of R6G. Based on the contrast experiments with PSi, GO/PSi, Ag/PSi and GO/AgA/PSi as SERS substrate, the perfect bio-compatibility, good homogeneity and chemical stability were confirmed. We also calculated the electric field distributions using Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) analysis to further understand the GO/Ag/PSi structure as a perfect SERS platform. These experimental and theoretical results imply that the GO/Ag/PSi with regular pyramids array is expected to be an effective substrate for label-free sensitive SERS detections in areas of medicine, food safety and biotechnology.

  6. Freestanding carbon nanodots/poly (vinyl alcohol) films with high photoluminescent quantum yield realized by inverted-pyramid structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Linna; Ba, Lixiang; Pan, Wei; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) have attracted great attention for their biocompatibility and strong tunable photoluminescence (PL). However, aggregation-induced PL quenching blocks their practical application in solid-state optoelectronics. Here, we report a luminescent C-dots freestanding film with a substantially enhanced high quantum yield (QY) of 72.3%. A facile template method, rather than complicate lithography and etching technique is proposed to fabricate the C-dots composite films with large-area (8 inch × 8 inch) ordered micro-scale inverted-pyramid patterns on the surface. The control experiment and theoretical analysis demonstrate the key success to QY enhancement lies in the separation of C-dots and the pattern of surface inverted-pyramid structure. This work realizes the QY enhancement simply by geometrical optics, not the chemical treatment of luminescent particles. It provides a general approach to fabricate large-area freestanding luminescent composite film with high QY.

  7. Activation of functional α7-containing nAChRs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by physiological levels of choline in the presence of PNU-120596.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bopanna I Kalappa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The level of expression of functional α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is believed to be very low compared to hippocampal CA1 interneurons, and for many years this expression was largely overlooked. However, high densities of expression of functional α7-containing nAChRs in CA1 pyramidal neurons may not be necessary for triggering important cellular and network functions, especially if activation of α7-containing nAChRs occurs in the presence of positive allosteric modulators such as PNU-120596.An approach previously developed for α7-containing nAChRs expressed in tuberomammillary neurons was applied to investigate functional CA1 pyramidal α7-containing nAChRs using rat coronal hippocampal slices and patch-clamp electrophysiology. The majority (∼71% of tested CA1 pyramidal neurons expressed low densities of functional α7-containing nAChRs as evidenced by small whole-cell responses to choline, a selective endogenous agonist of α7 nAChRs. These responses were potentiated by PNU-120596, a novel positive allosteric modulator of α7 nAChRs. The density of functional α7-containing nAChRs expressed in CA1 pyramidal neurons (and thus, the normalized net effect of activation, i.e., response net charge per unit of membrane capacitance per unit of time was estimated to be ∼5% of the density observed in CA1 interneurons. The results of this study demonstrate that despite low levels of expression of functional pyramidal α7-containing nAChRs, physiological levels of choline (∼10 µM are sufficient to activate these receptors and transiently depolarize and even excite CA1 pyramidal neurons in the presence of PNU-120596. The observed effects are possible because in the presence of 10 µM choline and 1-5 µM PNU-120596, a single opening of an individual pyramidal α7-containing nAChR ion channel appears to transiently depolarize (∼4 mV the entire pyramidal neuron and occasionally

  8. Models of neocortical layer 5b pyramidal cells capturing a wide range of dendritic and perisomatic active properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etay Hay

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The thick-tufted layer 5b pyramidal cell extends its dendritic tree to all six layers of the mammalian neocortex and serves as a major building block for the cortical column. L5b pyramidal cells have been the subject of extensive experimental and modeling studies, yet conductance-based models of these cells that faithfully reproduce both their perisomatic Na(+-spiking behavior as well as key dendritic active properties, including Ca(2+ spikes and back-propagating action potentials, are still lacking. Based on a large body of experimental recordings from both the soma and dendrites of L5b pyramidal cells in adult rats, we characterized key features of the somatic and dendritic firing and quantified their statistics. We used these features to constrain the density of a set of ion channels over the soma and dendritic surface via multi-objective optimization with an evolutionary algorithm, thus generating a set of detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the back-propagating action potential activated Ca(2+ spike firing and the perisomatic firing response to current steps, as well as the experimental variability of the properties. Furthermore, we show a useful way to analyze model parameters with our sets of models, which enabled us to identify some of the mechanisms responsible for the dynamic properties of L5b pyramidal cells as well as mechanisms that are sensitive to morphological changes. This automated framework can be used to develop a database of faithful models for other neuron types. The models we present provide several experimentally-testable predictions and can serve as a powerful tool for theoretical investigations of the contribution of single-cell dynamics to network activity and its computational capabilities.

  9. A gradual depth-dependent change in connectivity features of supragranular pyramidal cells in rat barrel cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Jochen F; Bojak, Ingo; Miceli, Stéphanie; Schubert, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests a finer genetic, structural and functional subdivision of the layers which form a cortical column. The classical layer II/III (LII/III) of rodent neocortex integrates ascending sensory information with contextual cortical information for behavioral read-out. We systematically investigated to which extent regular-spiking supragranular pyramidal neurons, located at different depths within the cortex, show different input-output connectivity patterns. Combining glutamate uncaging with whole-cell recordings and biocytin filling, we revealed a novel cellular organization of LII/III: (1) "Lower LII/III" pyramidal cells receive a very strong excitatory input from lemniscal LIV and much fewer inputs from paralemniscal LVa. They project to all layers of the home column, including a feedback projection to LIV, whereas transcolumnar projections are relatively sparse. (2) "Upper LII/III" pyramidal cells also receive their strongest input from LIV, but in addition, a very strong and dense excitatory input from LVa. They project extensively to LII/III as well as LVa and Vb of their home and neighboring columns. (3) "Middle LII/III" pyramidal cell shows an intermediate connectivity phenotype that stands in many ways in between the features described for lower versus upper LII/III. "Lower LII/III" intracolumnarly segregates and transcolumnarly integrates lemniscal information, whereas "upper LII/III" seems to integrate lemniscal with paralemniscal information. This suggests a fine-grained functional subdivision of the supragranular compartment containing multiple circuits without any obvious cytoarchitectonic, other structural or functional correlate of a laminar border in rodent barrel cortex.

  10. Segmentation and Positioning in the Brazilian Kids Market: A Case Study on the Bottom of the Pyramid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Rodriguez Veloso

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article approaches the kids market, focusing on the Bottom of the Pyramid. A case study is developed within the toy industry. Because few studies have been developed on this subject (kids marketing, the option of this study is to focus on basic marketing strategies, market segmentation and positioning. Results exemplify how can a company structure its marketing strategy in order to have a clear focus on a given segment of the kids market.

  11. Adherence to recommendations of the German food pyramid and risk of chronic diseases: results from the EPIC-Potsdam study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ruesten, A; Illner, A-K; Buijsse, B; Heidemann, C; Boeing, H

    2010-11-01

    The German food pyramid was set up to foster and communicate healthy food choices. The adherence to recommendations of the food pyramid was translated into an index (German Food Pyramid Index (GFPI)) by scoring the ratio of consumed and recommended daily servings of eight food groups, wherein higher scores indicated greater adherence. The GFPI was calculated for 23 531 subjects who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Potsdam study and were recruited between 1994 and 1998. Associations between quintiles of GFPI scores and risk of incident cardiovascular diseases (CVD), type-2 diabetes (T2D) and cancer were evaluated using Cox proportional hazard regression models. During 183 740 person-years of follow-up, 363 incident cases of CVD (myocardial infarction or stroke), 837 incident cases of T2D and 844 incident cases of cancer occurred. The GFPI was inversely related to CVD risk in men (multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for highest versus lowest quintiles=0.56; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.34-0.94) but not in women (HR=1.39; 95% CI: 0.76-2.55). No association between GFPI and cancer was observed. An inverse relation between GFPI and T2D (men: HR= 0.71 (0.52-0.97); women: HR= 0.69 (0.50-0.96)) in age-adjusted models was substantially attenuated after multivariable adjustments, particularly by body mass index (BMI) (men: HR=0.94 (0.69-1.30); women: HR=1.09 (0.77-1.54)). The same was observed for overall major chronic disease risk (CVD, T2D and total cancer). Adherence to the German food pyramid recommendations is not associated with a decreased risk of chronic diseases when considering BMI as confounder, except of CVD in men.

  12. Activation of Ih and TTX-sensitive sodium current at subthreshold voltages during CA1 pyramidal neuron firing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada-Hanff, Jason; Bean, Bruce P

    2015-10-01

    We used dynamic clamp and action potential clamp techniques to explore how currents carried by tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and HCN channels (Ih) regulate the behavior of CA1 pyramidal neurons at resting and subthreshold voltages. Recording from rat CA1 pyramidal neurons in hippocampal slices, we found that the apparent input resistance and membrane time constant were strongly affected by both conductances, with Ih acting to decrease apparent input resistance and time constant and sodium current acting to increase both. We found that both Ih and sodium current were active during subthreshold summation of artificial excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) generated by dynamic clamp, with Ih dominating at less depolarized voltages and sodium current at more depolarized voltages. Subthreshold sodium current-which amplifies EPSPs-was most effectively recruited by rapid voltage changes, while Ih-which blunts EPSPs-was maximal for slow voltage changes. The combined effect is to selectively amplify rapid EPSPs. We did similar experiments in mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons, doing voltage-clamp experiments using experimental records of action potential firing of CA1 neurons previously recorded in awake, behaving animals as command voltages to quantify flow of Ih and sodium current at subthreshold voltages. Subthreshold sodium current was larger and subthreshold Ih was smaller in mouse neurons than in rat neurons. Overall, the results show opposing effects of subthreshold sodium current and Ih in regulating subthreshold behavior of CA1 neurons, with subthreshold sodium current prominent in both rat and mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons and additional regulation by Ih in rat neurons. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Recessive Distal Motor Neuropathy with Pyramidal signs in an Omani Kindred: Underlying Novel Mutation in the SIGMAR1 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandhagopal, Ramachandiran; Meftah, Douja; Al-Kalbani, Sami; Scott, Patrick

    2017-11-08

    Distal hereditary motor neuropathy (dHMN) due to sigma nonopiod intracellular receptor 1 gene (SIGMAR1) mutation (OMIM 601978.0003) is a rare neuromuscular disorder characterized by prominent amyotrophic distal limb weakness and co-existing pyramidal signs initially described in a Chinese family in the recent year. We report an extended consanguineous Omani family segregating dHMN with pyramidal signs in an autosomal recessive pattern and describe a novel mutation in the SIGMAR1 gene underlying this motor phenotype. We also provide an update on the reported phenotypic profile of SIGMAR1 mutations. We utilized homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing of leucocyte DNA obtained from three affected members of an Omani family who manifested with a length-dependent motor neuropathy and pyramidal signs. We identified a novel C>T transition at nucleotide position 238 (c.238C>T) in exon 2 of SIGMAR1 gene. Sanger sequencing and segregation analysis confirmed the presence of two copies of the variant in the affected subjects, unlike the unaffected healthy parents/sibling carrying at most a single copy. The T allele is predicted to cause a truncating mutation (p.Gln80*), likely flagging the mRNA for nonsense mediated decay (NMD) leading to a complete loss of function, thereby potentially contributing to the disease process. Our finding expands the spectrum of SIGMAR1 mutations causing recessive dHMN and indicates that this disorder is panethnic. SIGMAR1 mutation should be included in the diagnostic panel of a dHMN, especially if there are co-existing pyramidal signs and autosomal recessive inheritance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. On Absorption-Enhanced Organic Photovoltaic By Incorporating Metallic Nano Pyramid Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qasem, Hussamaldeen Saif

    A lattice structure of metallic Nano pyramids (NPY) particles was planted on the interface between hole transport layer (HTL) and the transparent conductive layer (TCL) of an organic photovoltaic (OPV) cell. Standard metal evaporation along with Nano sphere lithography was used to grow the metallic NPY mesh structure. Silver (Ag) and Gold (Au) were the primary choice of the NPY mesh structure due to the excellent overlap of their peak localized surface Plasmon resonance (LSPR) frequency with the active layer absorption wavelengths. The current-voltage curve displayed an improvement in the efficiency and fill factor values of OPVs that used NPY lattice structure over devices that used regular sphere-shaped Nano particles. Despite the better-shaped and strong (LSPR) peak frequency of the Ag NPY lattice structure, Au NPY lattice structure exhibited an enhanced absorption and overall efficiency, which was owed to the wider (LSPR) frequency peak that Au possesses. The effect of NPY lattice structure could be further investigated with several approaches such as using different NPY materials, using core-shill approach, and growing the NPY on different layers or interfaces.

  15. Optimizing the Precision of Case Fatality Ratio Estimates Under the Surveillance Pyramid Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelat, Camille; Ferguson, Neil M.; White, Peter J.; Reed, Carrie; Finelli, Lyn; Cauchemez, Simon; Fraser, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In the management of emerging infectious disease epidemics, precise and accurate estimation of severity indices, such as the probability of death after developing symptoms—the symptomatic case fatality ratio (sCFR)—is essential. Estimation of the sCFR may require merging data gathered through different surveillance systems and surveys. Since different surveillance strategies provide different levels of precision and accuracy, there is need for a theory to help investigators select the strategy that maximizes these properties. Here, we study the precision of sCFR estimators that combine data from several levels of the severity pyramid. We derive a formula for the standard error, which helps us find the estimator with the best precision given fixed resources. We further propose rules of thumb for guiding the choice of strategy: For example, should surveillance of a particular severity level be started? Which level should be preferred? We derive a formula for the optimal allocation of resources between chosen surveillance levels and provide a simple approximation that can be used in thinking more heuristically about planning surveillance. We illustrate these concepts with numerical examples corresponding to 3 influenza pandemic scenarios. Finally, we review the equally important issue of accuracy. PMID:25255809

  16. Dendritic Properties Control Energy Efficiency of Action Potentials in Cortical Pyramidal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang; Wei, Xile; Deng, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Neural computation is performed by transforming input signals into sequences of action potentials (APs), which is metabolically expensive and limited by the energy available to the brain. The metabolic efficiency of single AP has important consequences for the computational power of the cell, which is determined by its biophysical properties and morphologies. Here we adopt biophysically-based two-compartment models to investigate how dendrites affect energy efficiency of APs in cortical pyramidal neurons. We measure the Na + entry during the spike and examine how it is efficiently used for generating AP depolarization. We show that increasing the proportion of dendritic area or coupling conductance between two chambers decreases Na + entry efficiency of somatic AP. Activating inward Ca 2+ current in dendrites results in dendritic spike, which increases AP efficiency. Activating Ca 2+ -activated outward K + current in dendrites, however, decreases Na + entry efficiency. We demonstrate that the active and passive dendrites take effects by altering the overlap between Na + influx and internal current flowing from soma to dendrite. We explain a fundamental link between dendritic properties and AP efficiency, which is essential to interpret how neural computation consumes metabolic energy and how biophysics and morphologies contribute to such consumption.

  17. Treatment of alveolar cleft performing a pyramidal pocket and an autologous bone grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Paolo Giovanni; Giuliani, Renzo; Pinto, Valentina; Oranges, Carlo Maria; Negosanti, Luca; Tavaniello, Beatrice; Morellini, Andrea

    2009-09-01

    Alveolar cleft repair is a debate topic in cleft lip and palate treatment.The aim of this article is to analyze the outcomes and the advantages of the autologous bone grafting performed during the period between 1981 and 2006. In our plastic surgery unit, 468 patients with alveolar clefts have been treated. According to our protocol, the timing for the closure of the alveolar cleft ranged from 7 to 11 years (mean, 9.4 years). Autologous bone was taken from the skull in the 45% of patients, from the iliac crest in 35% of cases, and from the chin in 20% of cases. The surgical technique of creating a pyramidal pocket to secure the bone graft was central to achieving a good result. The postoperative evaluation of the results, using clinical criteria and endoral radiography, orthopantomography, and teleradiography at 3, 6, 12 months after surgery, and more recently, in the last 82 cases by a three-dimensional computed tomography, allows us to assert that we obtained optimal results in 50% of treated cases, good results in 40%, sufficient in 4%, partial failure in 5.4%, and complete failure in 0.6%.

  18. Symmetric analysis, categorization, and optical spectrum of ideal pyramid quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Belling, Samuel W.

    2017-11-01

    Self-assembled quantum dots possess an intrinsic geometric symmetry. Applying group representation theory, we systematically analyze the symmetric properties of the bound states for ideal pyramid quantum dots, which neglect band mixing and strain effects. We label each bound state by its symmetry group’s corresponding irreducible representation and define a concept called the quantum dots’ symmetry category. A class of quantum dots with the same irreducible representation sequence of bound states are characterized as belonging to a specific symmetry category. This category concept generally describes the symmetric order of Hilbert space or wavefunction space. We clearly identify the connection between the symmetry category and the geometry of quantum dots by the symmetry category graph or map. The symmetry category change or transition corresponds to an accidental degeneracy of the bound states. The symmetry category and category transition are observable from the photocurrent spectroscopy or optical spectrum. For simplicity’s sake, in this paper, we only focus on inter-subband transition spectra, but the methodology can be extended to the inter-band transition cases. We predict that from the spectral measurements, the quantum dots’ geometric information may be inversely extracted.

  19. Computer-Aided Panoramic Images Enriched by Shadow Construction on a Prism and Pyramid Polyhedral Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Dzwierzynska

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to develop an efficient and practical method of a direct mapping of a panoramic projection on an unfolded prism and pyramid polyhedral projection surface with the aid of a computer. Due to the fact that straight lines very often appear in any architectural form we formulate algorithms which utilize data about lines and draw panoramas as plots of functions in Mathcad software. The ability to draw panoramic images of lines enables drawing a wireframe image of an architectural object. The application of the multicenter projection, as well as the idea of shadow construction in the panoramic representation, aims at achieving a panoramic image close to human perception. The algorithms are universal as the application of changeable base elements of panoramic projection—horizon height, station point location, number of polyhedral walls—enables drawing panoramic images from various viewing positions. However, for more efficient and easier drawing, the algorithms should be implemented in some graphical package. The representation presented in the paper and the method of its direct mapping on a flat unfolded projection surface can find application in the presentation of architectural spaces in advertising and art when drawings are displayed on polyhedral surfaces and can be observed from multiple viewing positions.

  20. Pyramidal cells of rodent presubiculum express a tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ current.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricker, Desdemona; Dinocourt, Céline; Eugène, Emmanuel; Wood, John N; Wood, John; Miles, Richard

    2009-09-01

    Presubicular neurons are activated physiologically by a specific preferred head direction. Here we show that firing in these neurones is characterized by action potentials with a large overshoot and a reduced firing frequency adaptation during repetitive firing. We found that a component of the sodium current of presubicular cells was not abolished by tetrodotoxin (TTX, 10 mum) and was activated at more depolarized voltages than TTX-sensitive currents. This inward current was completely abolished by the removal of external sodium, suggesting that sodium is the charge carrier of this TTX-insensitive (TTX-I) current. The channels responsible for the TTX-I sodium current seemed to be expressed at sites distant from the soma, giving rise to a voltage-dependent delay in current activation. The voltage required for half-maximal activation was 21 mV, and 36 mV for inactivation, which is similar to that reported for Na(V)1.8 sodium channels. However, the kinetics were considerably slower, with a time constant of current decay of 1.4 s. The current was not abolished in pyramidal cells from animals lacking either the Na(V)1.8 or the Na(V)1.9 subunit. This, possibly novel, TTX-I sodium current could contribute to the coding functions of presubicular neurons, specifically the maintained firing associated with signalling of a stable head position.

  1. Template Matching of Colored Image Based on Quaternion Fourier Transform and Image Pyramid Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. KHALIL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Template matching method is one of the most significant object recognition techniques and it has many applications in the field of digital signal processing and image processing and it is the base for object tracking in computer vision field. The traditional template matching by correlation is performed between gray template image w and the candidate gray image f where the template’s position is to be determined in the candidate image. This task can be achieved by measuring the similarity between the template image and the candidate image to identify and localize the existence of object instances within an image. When applying this method to colored image, the image must be converted to a gray one or decomposed to its RGB components to be processed separately. The current paper aims to apply the template matching technique to colored images via generating the quaternion Fourier transforms of both the template and candidate colored image and hence performing the cross-correlation between those transforms. Moreover, this approach is improved by representing both the image and template as pyramid multi-resolution format to reduce the time of processing. The proposed algorithm is implemented and applied to different images and templates using Matlab functions.

  2. Regulation of action potential waveforms by axonal GABAA receptors in cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xia

    Full Text Available GABAA receptors distributed in somatodendritic compartments play critical roles in regulating neuronal activities, including spike timing and firing pattern; however, the properties and functions of GABAA receptors at the axon are still poorly understood. By recording from the cut end (bleb of the main axon trunk of layer -5 pyramidal neurons in prefrontal cortical slices, we found that currents evoked by GABA iontophoresis could be blocked by picrotoxin, indicating the expression of GABAA receptors in axons. Stationary noise analysis revealed that single-channel properties of axonal GABAA receptors were similar to those of somatic receptors. Perforated patch recording with gramicidin revealed that the reversal potential of the GABA response was more negative than the resting membrane potential at the axon trunk, suggesting that GABA may hyperpolarize the axonal membrane potential. Further experiments demonstrated that the activation of axonal GABAA receptors regulated the amplitude and duration of action potentials (APs and decreased the AP-induced Ca2+ transients at the axon. Together, our results indicate that the waveform of axonal APs and the downstream Ca2+ signals are modulated by axonal GABAA receptors.

  3. SAR target recognition and posture estimation using spatial pyramid pooling within CNN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lijiang; Liu, Xiaohua; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Hui, Mei; Zhao, Yuejin

    2018-01-01

    Many convolution neural networks(CNN) architectures have been proposed to strengthen the performance on synthetic aperture radar automatic target recognition (SAR-ATR) and obtained state-of-art results on targets classification on MSTAR database, but few methods concern about the estimation of depression angle and azimuth angle of targets. To get better effect on learning representation of hierarchies of features on both 10-class target classification task and target posture estimation tasks, we propose a new CNN architecture with spatial pyramid pooling(SPP) which can build high hierarchy of features map by dividing the convolved feature maps from finer to coarser levels to aggregate local features of SAR images. Experimental results on MSTAR database show that the proposed architecture can get high recognition accuracy as 99.57% on 10-class target classification task as the most current state-of-art methods, and also get excellent performance on target posture estimation tasks which pays attention to depression angle variety and azimuth angle variety. What's more, the results inspire us the application of deep learning on SAR target posture description.

  4. Ancient and Modern Laminated Composites - From the Great Pyramid of Gizeh to Y2K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J.; Lesuer, D.R.

    2000-03-14

    Laminated metal composites have been cited in antiquity; for example, a steel laminate that may date as far back as 2750 B.C., was found in the Great Pyramid in Gizeh in 1837. A laminated shield containing bronze, tin, and gold layers, is described in detail by Homer. Well-known examples of steel laminates, such as an Adze blade, dating to 400 B.C. can be found in the literature. The Japanese sword is a laminated composite at several different levels and Merovingian blades were composed of laminated steels. Other examples are also available, including composites from China, Thailand, Indonesia, Germany, Britain, Belgium, France, and Persia. The concept of lamination to provide improved properties has also found expression in modern materials. Of particular interest is the development of laminates including high carbon and low carbon layers. These materials have unusual properties that are of engineering interest; they are similar to ancient welded Damascus steels. The manufacture of collectable knives, labeled ''welded Damascus'', has also been a focus of contemporary knifemakers. Additionally, in the Former Soviet Union, laminated composite designs have been used in engineering applications. Each of the above areas will be briefly reviewed, and some of the metallurgical principles will be described that underlie improvement in properties by lamination. Where appropriate, links are made between these property improvements and those that may have been present in ancient artifacts.

  5. Characterization of voltage-gated Ca(2+ conductances in layer 5 neocortical pyramidal neurons from rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Almog

    Full Text Available Neuronal voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels are involved in electrical signalling and in converting these signals into cytoplasmic calcium changes. One important function of voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels is generating regenerative dendritic Ca(2+ spikes. However, the Ca(2+ dependent mechanisms used to create these spikes are only partially understood. To start investigating this mechanism, we set out to kinetically and pharmacologically identify the sub-types of somatic voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels in pyramidal neurons from layer 5 of rat somatosensory cortex, using the nucleated configuration of the patch-clamp technique. The activation kinetics of the total Ba(2+ current revealed conductance activation only at medium and high voltages suggesting that T-type calcium channels were not present in the patches. Steady-state inactivation protocols in combination with pharmacology revealed the expression of R-type channels. Furthermore, pharmacological experiments identified 5 voltage-gated Ca(2+ channel sub-types - L-, N-, R- and P/Q-type. Finally, the activation of the Ca(2+ conductances was examined using physiologically derived voltage-clamp protocols including a calcium spike protocol and a mock back-propagating action potential (mBPAP protocol. These experiments enable us to suggest the possible contribution of the five Ca(2+ channel sub-types to Ca(2+ current flow during activation under physiological conditions.

  6. Controllable Nanoscale Inverted Pyramids for High-Efficient Quasi-Omnidirectional Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyuan; Zhong, Sihua; Zhuang, Yufeng; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-11-14

    Nanoscale inverted pyramid structures (NIPs) have always been regarded as one of the most paramount light management schemes to achieve the extraordinary performance in various devices, especially in solar cells, due to their outstanding antireflection ability with relative lower surface enhancement ratio. However, the current approaches to fabricating the NIPs are complicated and not cost-effective for the massive cell production in the photovoltaic industry. Here, controllable NIPs are fabricated on crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers by Ag catalyzed chemical etching and alkaline modification, which is a preferable all-solution-processed method. Through applying the NIPs to c-Si solar cells and optimizing the cell design, we have successfully achieved highly efficient NIPs textured solar cells with the champion efficiency of 20.5%. Importantly, the NIPs textured solar cells are further demonstrated to possess the quasi-omnidirectional property over the broad sunlight incident angles of approximately 0°-60°. Moreover, the NIPs are theoretically revealed to offer light trapping advantage for ultrathin c-Si solar cells. Hence, the NIPs formed by the controllable method exhibit a great potential to be used in the future photovoltaic industry as surface texture. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. The N-terminal region of reelin regulates postnatal dendritic maturation of cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chameau, Pascal; Inta, Dragos; Vitalis, Tania; Monyer, Hannah; Wadman, Wytse J; van Hooft, Johannes A

    2009-04-28

    Cajal-Retzius cells, located in layer I of the cortex, synthesize and secrete the glycoprotein reelin, which plays a pivotal role in neuronal migration during embryonic development. Cajal-Retzius cells persist after birth, but their postnatal role is unknown. Here we show that Cajal-Retzius cells receive a major excitatory synaptic input via serotonin 5-HT(3) receptors. Blocking this input using pharmacological tools or neutralization of reelin signaling results in hypercomplexity of apical, but not basal, dendrites of cortical layer II/III pyramidal neurons. A similar hypercomplexity is observed in the cortex of the 5-HT(3A) receptor knockout mouse. The increased dendritic complexity can be rescued by application of recombinant full-length reelin or its N-terminal fragment, but not by the central fragment of reelin, and involves a signal transduction pathway independent of the activation of the canonical reelin receptors. Taken together, our results reveal a novel role of serotonin, Cajal-Retzius cells, and reelin in the postnatal maturation of the cortex.

  8. Distorted food pyramid in kids programmes: a content analysis of television advertising watched in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Simone K; Schulz, Peter J

    2011-06-01

    In the light of increasing childhood obesity, the role of food advertisements relayed on television (TV) is of high interest. There is evidence of food commercials having an impact on children's food preferences, choices, consumption and obesity. We describe the product categories advertised during kids programmes, the type of food promoted and the characteristics of food commercials targeting children. A content analysis of the commercials aired during the kids programmes of six Swiss, one German and one Italian stations was conducted. The commercials were collected over a 6-month period in 2006. Overall, 1365 h of kids programme were recorded and 11 613 advertisements were found: 3061 commercials (26.4%) for food, 2696 (23.3%) promoting toys, followed by those of media, cleaning products and cosmetics. Regarding the broadcast food advertisements, 55% were for fast food restaurants or candies. The results of the content analysis suggest that food advertising contributes to the obesity problem: every fourth advertisement is for food, half of them for products high in sugar and fat and hardly any for fruit or vegetables. Long-term exposure to this distortion of the pyramid of recommended food should be considered in the discussion of legal restrictions for food advertising targeting children.

  9. Synaptic conductances during interictal discharges in pyramidal neurons of rat entorhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Amakhin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In epilepsy, the balance of excitation and inhibition underlying the basis of neural network activity shifts, resulting in neuronal network hyperexcitability and recurrent seizure-associated discharges. Mechanisms involved in ictal and interictal events are not fully understood, in particular, because of controversial data regarding the dynamics of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances. In the present study, we estimated AMPAR-, NMDAR-, and GABAAR-mediated conductances during two distinct types of interictal discharge (IID in pyramidal neurons of rat entorhinal cortex in cortico-hippocampal slices. Repetitively emerging seizure-like events and IIDs were recorded in high extracellular potassium, 4-aminopyridine, and reduced magnesium-containing solution. An original procedure for estimating synaptic conductance during IIDs was based on the differences among the current-voltage characteristics of the synaptic components. The synaptic conductance dynamics obtained revealed that the first type of IID is determined by activity of GABAAR channels with depolarized reversal potential. The second type of IID is determined by the interplay between excitation and inhibition, with prominent early AMPAR and prolonged depolarized GABAAR and NMDAR-mediated components. The study then validated the contribution of these components to IIDs by intracellular pharmacological isolation. These data provide new insights into the mechanisms of seizures generation, development, and cessation.

  10. Accuracy of the Babinski sign in the identification of pyramidal tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaza Jaramillo, Sandra Patricia; Uribe Uribe, Carlos Santiago; García Jimenez, Francisco A; Cornejo-Ochoa, William; Alvarez Restrepo, Juan Felipe; Román, Gustavo C

    2014-08-15

    The extensor plantar response described by Joseph Babinski (1896) indicates pyramidal tract dysfunction (PTD) but has significant inter-observer variability and inconsistent accuracy. The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Babinski sign in subjects with verified PTD. We studied 107 adult hospitalized and outpatient subjects evaluated by neurology. The reference standard was the blinded and independent diagnosis of an expert neurologist based on anamnesis, physical examination, imaging and complementary tests. Two neurologists elicited the Babinski sign in each patient independently, blindly and in a standardized manner to measure inter-observer variability; each examination was filmed to quantify intra-observer variability. Compared with the reference standard, the Babinski sign had low sensitivity (50.8%, 95%CI 41.5-60.1) but high specificity (99%, 95%CI 97.7-100) in identifying PTD with a positive likelihood ratio of 51.8 (95%CI 16.6-161.2) and a calculated inter-observer variability of 0.73 (95%CI 0.598-0.858). The intraevaluator reliability was 0.571 (95%CI 0.270-0.873) and 0.467 (95%, CI 0.019-0.914) respectively, for each examiner. The presence of the Babinski sign obtained by a neurologist provides valid and reliable evidence of PTD; due to its low sensitivity, absence of the Babinski sign still requires additional patient evaluation if PTD is suspected. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Marker-Assisted Selection to Pyramid Nematode Resistance and the High Oleic Trait in Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic challenges of peanut ( L. farming demand a quick response from breeders to develop new cultivars, a process that can be aided by the application of molecular markers. With the goal to pyramid nematode resistance and the trait for high oleic:linoleic acid (high O:L ratio in seeds, nematode-resistant cultivar Tifguard was used as the recurrent female parent and high O:L cultivars Georgia-02C and Florida-07 were used as donor parents for the high O:L trait. ‘Tifguard High O/L’ was generated through three rounds of accelerated backcrossing using BCF progenies selected with molecular markers for these two traits as the pollen donors. Selfed BCF plants yielded marker-homozygous individuals identified as Tifguard High O/L, compressing the hybridization and selection phases of the cultivar development process to less than 3 yr. The accuracy of marker-assisted selection (MAS was confirmed by phenotyping a subset of F populations from both parental combinations. Once additional molecular markers linked with traits of interest are designed to be compatible with high-throughput screening platforms, MAS will be more widely integrated into peanut breeding programs.

  12. Mixed Electrical-Chemical Transmission between Hippocampal Mossy Fibers and Pyramidal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivar, Carmen; Traub, Roger D.; Gutiérrez, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Morphological and electrophysiological studies have shown that granule cell axons, the mossy fibers (MFs), establish gap junctions and, therefore, electrical communication among them. That granule cells express gap junctional proteins in their axons suggests the possibility that their terminals express them as well. If this were to be the case, mixed electrical-chemical communication could be supported, as MF terminals normally use glutamate for fast communication with their target cells. Here we present electrophysiological and modeling studies consistent with this hypothesis. We show that MF activation produced fast spikelets followed by excitatory postsynaptic potentials in pyramidal cells (PCs), which, unlike the spikelets, underwent frequency potentiation and were strongly depressed by activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors, as expected from transmission of MF origin. The spikelets, which persisted during blockade of chemical transmission, wee potentiated by dopamine and suppressed by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. The various waveforms evoked by MF stimulation were replicated in a multi-compartment model of a PC by brief current pulse injections into the proximal apical dendritic compartment, where MFs are known to contact PCs. Mixed electrical and glutamatergic communication between granule cells and some PCs in CA3 may ensure the activation of sets of PCs, bypassing the strong action of concurrent feed-forward inhibition that granule cells activate. Importantly, MF-to-PC electrical coupling may allow bidirectional, possibly graded communication that can be faster than chemical synapses and subject to different forms of modulation. PMID:22151275

  13. Dendritic Properties Control Energy Efficiency of Action Potentials in Cortical Pyramidal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosheng Yi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Neural computation is performed by transforming input signals into sequences of action potentials (APs, which is metabolically expensive and limited by the energy available to the brain. The metabolic efficiency of single AP has important consequences for the computational power of the cell, which is determined by its biophysical properties and morphologies. Here we adopt biophysically-based two-compartment models to investigate how dendrites affect energy efficiency of APs in cortical pyramidal neurons. We measure the Na+ entry during the spike and examine how it is efficiently used for generating AP depolarization. We show that increasing the proportion of dendritic area or coupling conductance between two chambers decreases Na+ entry efficiency of somatic AP. Activating inward Ca2+ current in dendrites results in dendritic spike, which increases AP efficiency. Activating Ca2+-activated outward K+ current in dendrites, however, decreases Na+ entry efficiency. We demonstrate that the active and passive dendrites take effects by altering the overlap between Na+ influx and internal current flowing from soma to dendrite. We explain a fundamental link between dendritic properties and AP efficiency, which is essential to interpret how neural computation consumes metabolic energy and how biophysics and morphologies contribute to such consumption.

  14. Interplay between global and pathway-specific synaptic plasticity in CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberich, Sven; Pohle, Jörg; Pollard, Marie; Barroso-Flores, Janet; Köhr, Georg

    2017-12-06

    Mechanisms underlying information storage have been depicted for global cell-wide and pathway-specific synaptic plasticity. Yet, little is known how these forms of plasticity interact to enhance synaptic competition and network stability. We examined synaptic interactions between apical and basal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons in mouse hippocampal slices. Bursts (50 Hz) of three action potentials (AP-bursts) paired with preceding presynaptic stimulation in stratum radiatum specifically led to LTP of the paired pathway in adult mice (P75). At adolescence (P28), an increase in burst frequency (>50 Hz) was required to gain timing-dependent LTP. Surprisingly, paired radiatum and unpaired oriens pathway potentiated, unless the pre-post delay was shortened from 10 to 5 ms, which selectively potentiated paired radiatum pathway, since unpaired oriens pathway decreased back to baseline. Conversely, the exact same 5 ms pairing in stratum oriens potentiated both pathways, as did AP-bursts alone, which potentiated synaptic efficacy as well as current-evoked postsynaptic spiking. L-type voltage-gated Ca 2+ channels were involved in mediating synaptic potentiation in oriens, whereas NMDA and adenosine receptors counteracted unpaired stratum oriens potentiation following pairing in stratum radiatum. This asymmetric plasticity uncovers important insights into alterations of synaptic efficacy and intrinsic neuronal excitability for pathways that convey hippocampal and extra-hippocampal information.

  15. Human gait recognition by pyramid of HOG feature on silhouette images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guang; Yin, Yafeng; Park, Jeanrok; Man, Hong

    2013-03-01

    As a uncommon biometric modality, human gait recognition has a great advantage of identify people at a distance without high resolution images. It has attracted much attention in recent years, especially in the fields of computer vision and remote sensing. In this paper, we propose a human gait recognition framework that consists of a reliable background subtraction method followed by the pyramid of Histogram of Gradient (pHOG) feature extraction on the silhouette image, and a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) based classifier. Through background subtraction, the silhouette of human gait in each frame is extracted and normalized from the raw video sequence. After removing the shadow and noise in each region of interest (ROI), pHOG feature is computed on the silhouettes images. Then the pHOG features of each gait class will be used to train a corresponding HMM. In the test stage, pHOG feature will be extracted from each test sequence and used to calculate the posterior probability toward each trained HMM model. Experimental results on the CASIA Gait Dataset B1 demonstrate that with our proposed method can achieve very competitive recognition rate.

  16. ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal rat neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J. T.; Nie, H.-Y.; Taylor, A. R.; Walzak, M. J.; Chang, W. H.; MacFabe, D. F.; Lau, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the power of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) cluster ion imaging to characterize biological structures, such as that of the rat central nervous system. A large number of the studies to date have been carried out on the "structural scale" imaging several mm 2 using mounted thin sections. In this work, we present our ToF-SIMS cluster ion imaging results on hippocampal rat brain neurons, at the cellular and sub-cellular levels. As a part of an ongoing investigation to examine gut linked metabolic factors in autism spectrum disorders using a novel rat model, we have observed a possible variation in hippocampal Cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neuron geometry in thin, paraformaldehyde fixed brain sections. However, the fixation process alters the tissue matrix such that much biochemical information appears to be lost. In an effort to preserve as much as possible this original information, we have established a protocol using unfixed thin brain sections, along with low dose, 500 eV Cs + pre-sputtering that allows imaging down to the sub-cellular scale with minimal sample preparation.

  17. Putting the pyramid into action: the Healthy Eating Index and Food Quality Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    Consumption patterns are changing globally. As a result both researchers and policy makers require simple, easy to use measures of diet quality. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI) was developed as a single, summary measure of diet quality. The original HEI was a ten component index based on the US Dietary Guidelines and the Food Guide Pyramid. Research on the HEI indicates that the index correlates significantly with the RDA's for a range of nutrients and with an individual's self-rating of their diet. The revised HEI provides a more disaggregated version of the original index based on the 2005 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Within each of the five major food groups, some foods are more nutrient dense than others. Nutrient Density algorithms have been developed to rate foods within food groups. The selection of the most nutrient dense foods within food groups lead to a dietary pattern with a higher HEI. The implications of using the HEI and nutrient density to develop interventions are discussed in this presentation.

  18. Shock-induced stacking fault pyramids in Ni/Al multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Henggao; Li, Haitao; Fu, Tao; Zhu, Weibin; Huang, Cheng; Yang, Bo; Peng, Xianghe

    2018-01-01

    The formations of stacking fault tetrahedra in {111}fcc/{111}fcc multilayers have been studied extensively, but the researches related to {001}fcc/{001}fcc interfaces can rarely be found in the literature. Using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, the shock-induced dislocation structure in Ni/Al multilayers was studied in this article, the stacking fault pyramids (SFPs) initiated from Ni/Al interface was firstly observed, and the corresponding mechanism was explored. It was shown that the Shockley partial dislocations dissociated from the rectangular misfit dislocations along Ni/Al interface are first emitted into the Al interlayer and subsequently intersect with each other to form SFPs. With the propagation of the shock front in the multilayers, two adjacent SFPs interact with each other and form Lomer-Cottrell locks. The dislocation sheet composed of SFPs and Lomer-Cottrell locks can act as a barrier to dislocation transmission. The effect of shock piston velocity on the nucleation site of dislocation was also studied. It was shown that dislocations would originate from the interface at a low piston speed (<1.1 km/s), and appear at the shock front if the piston speed exceeds 1.2 km/s.

  19. Sub-national mapping of population pyramids and dependency ratios in Africa and Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzulo, Carla; Hornby, Graeme M.; Sorichetta, Alessandro; Gaughan, Andrea E.; Linard, Catherine; Bird, Tomas J.; Kerr, David; Lloyd, Christopher T.; Tatem, Andrew J.

    2017-07-01

    The age group composition of populations varies substantially across continents and within countries, and is linked to levels of development, health status and poverty. The subnational variability in the shape of the population pyramid as well as the respective dependency ratio are reflective of the different levels of development of a country and are drivers for a country's economic prospects and health burdens. Whether measured as the ratio between those of working age and those young and old who are dependent upon them, or through separate young and old-age metrics, dependency ratios are often highly heterogeneous between and within countries. Assessments of subnational dependency ratio and age structure patterns have been undertaken for specific countries and across high income regions, but to a lesser extent across the low income regions. In the framework of the WorldPop Project, through the assembly of over 100 million records across 6,389 subnational administrative units, subnational dependency ratio and high resolution gridded age/sex group datasets were produced for 87 countries in Africa and Asia.

  20. Multiparametric MR investigation of the motor pyramidal system in patients with 'truly benign' multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Barbara; Cercignani, Mara; Basile, Barbara; Romano, Silvia; Mannu, Rosalba; Centonze, Diego; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bramanti, Placido; Nocentini, Ugo; Bozzali, Marco

    2010-02-01

    One possible explanation for the mismatch between tissue damage and preservation of neurological functions in patients with benign multiple sclerosis (BMS) is that the pathophysiology differs from that occurring in other multiple sclerosis (MS) phenotypes. The objective of this study was to identify pathologically specific patterns of tissue integrity/damage characteristics of patients with BMS, and markers of potential prognostic value. The pyramidal system was investigated in 10 BMS patients and 20 controls using voxel-based morphometry to assess grey matter (GM) atrophy, and diffusion tractography and quantitative magnetization transfer to quantify the microstructural damage in the corticospinal tracts (CSTs). Widespread reductions in GM volume were found in patients compared with controls, including the primary motor cortex. A significant decrease was observed in the mean macromolecular pool ratio (F) of both CSTs, with no fractional anisotropy (FA) change. GM volume of the primary motor areas was associated with clinical scores but not with the CST parameters. The mismatch between F and FA suggests the presence of extensive demyelination in the CSTs of patients with BMS, in the absence of axonal damage. The lack of correlation with GM volume indicates a complex interaction between disruptive and reparative mechanisms in BMS.

  1. Kv1 channels control spike threshold dynamics and spike timing in cortical pyramidal neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J

    2011-11-01

    Previous studies showed that cortical pyramidal neurones (PNs) have a dynamic spike threshold that functions as a high-pass filter, enhancing spike timing in response to high-frequency input. While it is commonly assumed that Na(+) channel inactivation is the primary mechanism of threshold accommodation, the possible role of K(+) channel activation in fast threshold changes has not been well characterized. The present study tested the hypothesis that low-voltage activated Kv1 channels affect threshold dynamics in layer 2-3 PNs, using α-dendrotoxin (DTX) or 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to block these conductances. We found that Kv1 blockade reduced the dynamic changes of spike threshold in response to a variety of stimuli, including stimulus-evoked synaptic input, current steps and ramps of varied duration, and noise. Analysis of the responses to noise showed that Kv1 channels increased the coherence of spike output with high-frequency components of the stimulus. A simple model demonstrates that a dynamic spike threshold can account for this effect. Our results show that the Kv1 conductance is a major mechanism that contributes to the dynamic spike threshold and precise spike timing of cortical PNs.

  2. Efficiency enhancement of pyramidal Si solar cells with reduced graphene oxide hybrid electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Wei-Chen; Huang, Chun-Ying; Fang, Chang-Wen; Lin, Ming-Yi; Lee, Wen-Chieh; Liu, Xiang-Sheng; Uen, Wu-Yih

    2016-12-01

    Developing a transparent and cost-effective electrode for a textured and large-scale optoelectronic device is an important requirement for high-throughput products. Here, we propose a costly fabrication procedure using reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid materials composed of rGO, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) and Ag nanowires (AgNWs) top electrodes for structured Si solar cells via a spin coating method. This work overcomes the obstacle of graphene damage during the transferred process and provides a simple way to form large-scale graphene-based films on textured surfaces. Due to the spin-coated rGO being uniform along with AgNW frameworks and plasmonic AuNPs, the pyramidal Si solar cell exhibits a significant improved efficiency of 10.75% compared with solar cells using pure rGO flakes as the top electrodes. Our study realizes the rGO hybrid materials deposited on a textured surface and has great potential for integration into transparent and structured devices for next-generation industrial production.

  3. Valproic acid inhibits TTX-resistant sodium currents in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczyk, Bartlomiej; Nurowska, Ewa

    2017-09-16

    Valproic acid is frequently prescribed and used to treat epilepsy, bipolar disorder and other conditions. However, the mechanism of action of valproic acid has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of valproic acid (200 μM) on TTX-resistant sodium currents in mPFC pyramidal neurons. Valproic acid inhibited the maximal amplitude and did not change the activation parameters of TTX-resistant sodium currents. Moreover, valproic acid (2 μM and 200 μM) shifted the TTX-resistant sodium channel inactivation curve towards hyperpolarisation. In the presence of valproic acid, TTX-resistant sodium currents recovered from inactivation more slowly. Valproic acid did not influence the use-dependent blockade of TTX-resistant sodium currents. This study suggests that a potential new mechanism of the antiepileptic action of valproic acid is, among others, inhibition of TTX-resistant sodium currents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Optimal design at inner core of the shaped pyramidal truss structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung-Uk; Yang, Dong-Yol [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST 291 Daehak-ro (373-1 Guseong-dong), Yuseong-gu, Dae-jeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16

    Sandwich material is a type of composite material with lightweight, high strength, good dynamic properties and high bending stiffness-to-weight ratio. This can be found well such structures in the nature (for example, internal structure of bones, plants, etc.). New trend which prefers eco-friendly products and energy efficiency is emerging in industries recently. Demand for materials with high strength and light weight is also increasing. In line with these trends, researches about manufacturing methods of sandwich material have been actively conducted. In this study, a sandwich structure named as “Shaped Pyramidal Truss Structure” is proposed to improve mechanical strength and to apply a manufacturing process suitable for massive production. The new sandwich structure was designed to enhance compressive strength by changing the cross-sectional shape at the central portion of the core. As the next step, optimization of the shape was required. Optimization technique used here was the SZGA(Successive Zooming Genetic Algorithm), which is one of GA(Genetic Algorithm) methods gradually reducing the area of design variable. The objective function was defined as moment of inertia of the cross-sectional shape of the strut. The control points of cubic Bezier curve, which was assumed to be the shape of the cross section, were used as design variables. By using FEM simulation, it was found that the structure exhibited superior mechanical properties compared to the simple design of the prior art.

  5. Dopamine D3 receptors inhibit hippocampal gamma oscillations by disturbing CA3 pyramidal cell firing synchrony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément E. Lemercier

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gamma oscillations are associated with cognitive processes and are altered in several neuropsychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. Since dopamine D3 receptors are possible targets in treatment of these conditions, it is of great importance to understand their role in modulation of gamma oscillations. The effect of D3 receptors on gamma oscillations and the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated by extracellular local field potential and simultaneous intracellular sharp micro-electrode recordings in the CA3 region of the hippocampus in vitro. D3 receptors decreased the power and broadened the bandwidth of gamma oscillations induced by acetylcholine or kainate. Blockade of the D3 receptors resulted in faster synchronization of the oscillations, suggesting that endogenous dopamine in the hippocampus slows down the dynamics of gamma oscillations by activation of D3 receptors. Investigating the underlying cellular mechanisms for these effects showed that D3 receptor activation decreased the rate of action potentials during gamma oscillations and reduced the precision of the action potential phase coupling to the gamma cycle in CA3 pyramidal cells. The results may offer an explanation how selective activation of D3 receptors may impair cognition and how, in converse, D3 antagonists may exert pro-cognitive and antipsychotic effects.

  6. Doing Business at the Base of the Pyramid: The Reality of Emerging Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reuben Abraham

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The role of business has traditionally been ignored in the global debates around economic development and poverty alleviation.  The recent global success of the mobile telephony industry, and the rapid growth in emerging markets over the last two decades has, however, forced a rethink. Instead of top-down, development aid-driven strategies, more discussions now focus on providing goods and services profitably to the base of the economic pyramid (BOP, like mobile phone companies have.Research teams at the Centre for Emerging Markets Solutions (CEMS have found that while it is possible to profitably serve BOP markets, it requires some departure from strategies advocated in the traditional BOP literature. In particular, it requires addressing issues around the macro-economic and business climate of the country; mispricing of risk; entrepreneurship; and a shift of focus away from multi-national corporations to the small business sector, and the transaction costs that bedevil it.This piece also examines a few commercially sustainable business models that have worked in these markets, and investigates a few sectors that commercial capital will find highly attractive and investable. Finally, we look at how to structure and commercialize the huge business opportunities that exist in addressing the inefficiencies of BOP markets, using a combination of business model innovation (especially around reduced cost structures, research, entrepreneurship, and patient capital.

  7. Probable Earthquake Archaeological Effects in the ancient pyramids of Quetzalcóatl and Sun in Teotihuacán (Central Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Lopez, Raul; Rodríguez-Pascua, Miguel Angel; Garduño-Monroy, Victor Hugo; Oliveros, Arturo; Giner-Robles, Jorge L.; Silva, Pablo G.

    2010-05-01

    Teotihuacán was one of the blooming and greater cities of the Prehispanic cultural period within the central valley of México and one of the best archaeological findings of the Earth. During the period of splendour (Middle-Late Classic Period, 350-650 AD), almost 125.000 inhabitants lived in a vast city with more than 2000 stucco and block buildings, including the great religious and ceremonial pyramids: the Great Sun Pyramid, built between 1- 150 AD, the Moon Pyramid, built during a large time span (1-650 AD) and the outstanding Quetzalcóatl Pyramid (Feathered Snake Temple), built in two phases: the first original edifice built before 350 AD and the second one mainly are repairs of the west side and dated post-350 AD. The Quetzalcóatl Pyramid (Q- pyramid) shows a quadrangular base of ca. 3500 m2 with an extraordinary decoration of feathered snakes (attributed to the God Quetzalcóatl) and lizards. The second phase of construction consisted in a townhouse façade covering the west side of the pyramid (post 350AD), up to now with no evidence to justify such annexed wrapper of this west side. This ceremonial building was built within the Citadel, a complex area of Teotihuacán with residential and common zones as well (i.e. market). A detailed view of the steps of the west side stairs, displays different patterns of deformation affecting the blocks of the stair. The original and ancient stair exhibits rotated, overturned and displaced blocks, being stronger this deformation at the base of the pyramid. Moreover, the upper corners of the blocks appear broken in a similar form than the seismic-related feature defined as dipping broken corners or chipped corners. However, the horizontal disposition of the blocks suggests lateral vibration between them from horizontal shaking propagation. Besides, this feature appears lesser evident affecting the lower blocks of the annexed west façade, the only originally preserved ones. We have carried out a systematic measurement

  8. A Simulation Study on the Effects of Dendritic Morphology on Layer V Prefontal Pyramidal Cell Firing Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria ePsarrou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Pyramidal cells, the most abundant neurons in neocortex, exhibit significant structural variability across different brain areas and layers in different species. Moreover, in response to a somatic step current, these cells display a range of firing behaviors, the most common being (1 repetitive action potentials (Regular Spiking - RS, and (2 an initial cluster of 2-5 action potentials with short ISIs followed by single spikes (Intrinsic Bursting - IB. A correlation between firing behavior and dendritic morphology has recently been reported. In this work we use computational modeling to investigate quantitatively the effects of the basal dendritic tree morphology on the firing behavior of 112 three-dimensional reconstructions of layer V PFC rat pyramidal cells. Particularly, we focus on how different morphological (diameter, total length, volume and branch number and passive (Mean Electrotonic Path length features of basal dendritic trees shape somatic firing when the spatial distribution of ionic mechanisms in the basal dendritic trees is uniform or non-uniform. Our results suggest that total length, volume and branch number are the best morphological parameters to discriminate the cells as RS or IB, regardless of the distribution of ionic mechanisms in basal trees. The discriminatory power of total length, volume and branch number remains high in the presence of different apical dendrites. These results suggest that morphological variations in the basal dendritic trees of layer V pyramidal neurons in the PFC influence their firing patterns in a predictive manner and may in turn influence the information processing capabilities of these neurons.

  9. Diffusion tensor tractography of the brainstem pyramidal tract; A study on the optimal reduction factor in parallel imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yun Jung; Park, Jong Bin; Kim, Jae Hyoung; Choi, Byung Se; Jung, Cheol Kyu [Dept. of of Radiology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Parallel imaging mitigates susceptibility artifacts that can adversely affect diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) of the pons depending on the reduction (R) factor. We aimed to find the optimal R factor for DTT of the pons that would allow us to visualize the largest possible number of pyramidal tract fibers. Diffusion tensor imaging was performed on 10 healthy subjects at 3 Tesla based on single-shot echo-planar imaging using the following parameters: b value, 1000 s/mm{sup 2}; gradient direction, 15; voxel size, 2 × 2 × 2 mm{sup 3}; and R factors, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5. DTT of the right and left pyramidal tracts in the pons was conducted in all subjects. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), image distortion, and the number of fibers in the tracts were compared across R factors. SNR, image distortion, and fiber number were significantly different according to R factor. Maximal SNR was achieved with an R factor of 2. Image distortion was minimal with an R factor of 5. The number of visible fibers was greatest with an R factor of 3. R factor 3 is optimal for DTT of the pontine pyramidal tract. A balanced consideration of SNR and image distortion, which do not have the same dependence on the R factor, is necessary for DTT of the pons.

  10. The attraction of the pyramids: virtual realization of Hutton's suggestion to improve Maskelyne's 1774 Earth density estimate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Smallwood

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Charles Hutton suggested in 1821 that the pyramids of Egypt be used to site an experiment to measure the deflection of the vertical by a large mass. The suggestion arose as he had estimated the attraction of a Scottish mountain as part of Nevil Maskelyne's (1774 "Schiehallion Experiment", a demonstration of Isaac Newton's law of gravitational attraction and the earliest reasonable quantitative estimate of Earth's mean density. I present a virtual realization of an experiment at the Giza pyramids to investigate how Hutton's concept might have emerged had it been undertaken as he suggested. The attraction of the Great Pyramid would have led to inward north–south deflections of the vertical totalling 1.8 arcsec (0.0005°, and east–west deflections totalling 2.0 arcsec (0.0006°, which although small, would have been within the contemporaneous detectable range, and potentially given, as Hutton wished, a more accurate Earth density measurement than he reported from the Schiehallion experiment.

  11. The attraction of the pyramids: virtual realization of Hutton's suggestion to improve Maskelyne's 1774 Earth density estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, John R.

    2018-01-01

    Charles Hutton suggested in 1821 that the pyramids of Egypt be used to site an experiment to measure the deflection of the vertical by a large mass. The suggestion arose as he had estimated the attraction of a Scottish mountain as part of Nevil Maskelyne's (1774) "Schiehallion Experiment", a demonstration of Isaac Newton's law of gravitational attraction and the earliest reasonable quantitative estimate of Earth's mean density. I present a virtual realization of an experiment at the Giza pyramids to investigate how Hutton's concept might have emerged had it been undertaken as he suggested. The attraction of the Great Pyramid would have led to inward north-south deflections of the vertical totalling 1.8 arcsec (0.0005°), and east-west deflections totalling 2.0 arcsec (0.0006°), which although small, would have been within the contemporaneous detectable range, and potentially given, as Hutton wished, a more accurate Earth density measurement than he reported from the Schiehallion experiment.

  12. Kinetic properties and adrenergic control of TREK-2-like channels in rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ładno, W; Gawlak, M; Szulczyk, P; Nurowska, E

    2017-06-15

    TREK-2-like channels were identified on the basis of electrophysiological and pharmacological tests performed on freshly isolated and enzymatically/mechanically dispersed pyramidal neurons of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). Single-channel currents were recorded in cell-attached configuration and the impact of adrenergic receptors (α1, α2, β) stimulation on spontaneously appearing TREK-2-like channel activity was tested. The obtained results indicate that noradrenaline decreases the mean open probability of TREK-2-like channel currents by activation of β1 but not of α1- and α2-adrenergic receptors. Mean open time and channel conductance were not affected. The system of intracellular signaling pathways depends on the activation of protein kinase A. We also show that adrenergic control of TREK-2-like channel currents by adrenergic receptors was similar in pyramidal neurons isolated from young, adolescent, and adult rats. Immunofluorescent confocal scans of mPFC slices confirmed the presence of the TREK-2 protein, which was abundant in layer V pyramidal neurons. The role of TREK-2-like channel control by adrenergic receptors is discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The effect of pyramiding Phytophthora infestans resistance genes R Pi-mcd1 and R Pi-ber in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M Y Adillah; Hutten, Ronald C B; Visser, Richard G F; van Eck, Herman J

    2010-06-01

    Despite efforts to control late blight in potatoes by introducing R(pi)-genes from wild species into cultivated potato, there are still concerns regarding the durability and level of resistance. Pyramiding R(pi)-genes can be a solution to increase both durability and level of resistance. In this study, two resistance genes, R(Pi-mcd1) and R(Pi-ber), introgressed from the wild tuber-bearing potato species Solanum microdontum and S. berthaultii were combined in a diploid S. tuberosum population. Individual genotypes from this population were classified after four groups, carrying no R(pi)-gene, with only R (Pi-mcd1), with only R(Pi-ber), and a group with the pyramided R(Pi-mcd1) and R (Pi-ber) by means of tightly linked molecular markers. The levels of resistance between the groups were compared in a field experiment in 2007. The group with R(Pi-mcd1) showed a significant delay to reach 50% infection of the leaf area of 3 days. The group with R ( Pi-ber ) showed a delay of 3 weeks. The resistance level in the pyramid group suggested an additive effect of R (Pi-mcd1) with R(Pi-ber). This suggests that potato breeding can benefit from combining individual R(pi)-genes, irrespective of the weak effect of R(Pi-mcd1) or the strong effect of R(Pi-ber).

  14. Isodirectional tuning of adjacent interneurons and pyramidal cells during working memory: evidence for microcolumnar organization in PFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S G; Williams, G V; Goldman-Rakic, P S

    1999-04-01

    Studies on the cellular mechanisms of working memory demonstrated that neurons in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dPFC) exhibit directionally tuned activity during an oculomotor delayed response. To determine the particular contributions of pyramidal cells and interneurons to spatial tuning in dPFC, we examined both individually and in pairs the tuning properties of regular-spiking (RS) and fast-spiking (FS) units that represent putative pyramidal cells and interneurons, respectively. Our main finding is that FS units possess spatially tuned sensory, motor, and delay activity (i. e., "memory fields") similar to those found in RS units. Furthermore, when recorded simultaneously at the same site, the majority of neighboring neurons, whether FS or RS, displayed isodirectional tuning, i.e., they shared very similar tuning angles for the sensory and delay phases of the task. As the trial entered the response phase of the task, many FS units shifted their direction of tuning and became cross-directional to adjacent RS units by the end of the trial. These results establish that a large part of inhibition in prefrontal cortex is spatially oriented rather than being untuned and simply regulating the threshold response of pyramidal cell output. Moreover, the isodirectional tuning between adjacent neurons supports a functional microcolumnar organization in dPFC for spatial memory fields similar to that found in other areas of cortex for sensory receptive fields.

  15. The Usefulness of the TOAST Classification and Prognostic Significance of Pyramidal Symptoms During the Acute Phase of Cerebellar Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziadkowiak, Edyta; Chojdak-Łukasiewicz, Justyna; Guziński, Maciej; Noga, Leszek; Paradowski, Bogusław

    2016-04-01

    Cerebellar stroke is a rare condition with very nonspecific clinical features. The symptoms in the acute phase could imitate acute peripheral vestibular disorders or a brainstem lesion. The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of the Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment (TOAST) classification in cerebellar stroke and the impact of clinical features on the prognosis. We retrospectively analyzed 107 patients with diagnosed ischemic cerebellar infarction. We studied the clinical features and compared them based on the location of the ischemic lesion and its distribution in the posterior interior cerebellar artery (PICA), superior cerebellar artery (SCA), and anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territories. According to the TOAST classification, stroke was more prevalent in atrial fibrillation (26/107) and when the lesion was in the PICA territory (39/107). Pyramidal signs occurred in 29/107 of patients and were more prevalent when the lesion was distributed in more than two vascular regions (p = 0.00640). Mortality was higher among patients with ischemic lesion caused by cardiac sources (p = 0.00094) and with pyramidal signs (p = 0.00640). The TOAST classification is less useful in assessing supratentorial ischemic infarcts. Cardioembolic etiology, location of the ischemic lesion, and pyramidal signs support a negative prognosis.

  16. The influence of phospho-tau on dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Serrais, Paula; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The dendritic spines on pyramidal cells represent the main postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses and they are fundamental structures in memory, learning and cognition. In the present study, we used intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow in fixed tissue to analyse over 19 500 dendritic spines that were completely reconstructed in three dimensions along the length of the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Following intracellular injection, sections were immunostained for anti-Lucifer yellow and with tau monoclonal antibodies AT8 and PHF-1, which recognize tau phosphorylated at Ser202/Thr205 and at Ser396/404, respectively. We observed that the diffuse accumulation of phospho-tau in a putative pre-tangle state did not induce changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas the presence of tau aggregates forming intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles was associated with progressive alteration of dendritic spines (loss of dendritic spines and changes in their morphology) and dendrite atrophy, depending on the degree of tangle development. Thus, the presence of phospho-tau in neurons does not necessarily mean that they suffer severe and irreversible effects as thought previously but rather, the characteristic cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease is likely to depend on the relative number of neurons that have well developed tangles. PMID:23715095

  17. Areal specialization of pyramidal cell structure in the visual cortex of the tree shrew: a new twist revealed in the evolution of cortical circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Elston, Alejandra; Casagrande, Vivien; Kaas, Jon H

    2005-05-01

    Cortical pyramidal cells, while having a characteristic morphology, show marked phenotypic variation in primates. Differences have been reported in their size, branching structure and spine density between cortical areas. In particular, there is a systematic increase in the complexity of the structure of pyramidal cells with anterior progression through occipito-temporal cortical visual areas. These differences reflect area-specific specializations in cortical circuitry, which are believed to be important for visual processing. However, it remains unknown as to whether these regional specializations in pyramidal cell structure are restricted to primates. Here we investigated pyramidal cell structure in the visual cortex of the tree shrew, including the primary (V1), second (V2) and temporal dorsal (TD) areas. As in primates, there was a trend for more complex branching structure with anterior progression through visual areas in the tree shrew. However, contrary to the trend reported in primates, cells in the tree shrew tended to become smaller with anterior progression through V1, V2 and TD. In addition, pyramidal cells in V1 of the tree shrew are more than twice as spinous as those in primates. These data suggest that variables that shape the structure of adult cortical pyramidal cells differ among species.

  18. Regional specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the limbic cortex of the vervet monkey (Cercopithecus pygerythrus): an intracellular injection study of the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; Manger, Paul; Defelipe, Javier

    2005-12-01

    The pyramidal cell phenotype varies quite dramatically in structure among different cortical areas in the primate brain. Comparative studies in visual cortex, in particular, but also in sensorimotor and prefrontal cortex, reveal systematic trends for pyramidal cell specialization in functionally related cortical areas. Moreover, there are systematic differences in the extent of these trends between different primate species. Recently we demonstrated differences in pyramidal cell structure in the cingulate cortex of the macaque monkey; however, in the absence of other comparative data it remains unknown as to whether the neuronal phenotype differs in cingulate cortex between species. Here we extend the basis for comparison by studying the structure of the basal dendritic trees of layer III pyramidal cells in the posterior and anterior cingulate gyrus of the vervet monkey (Brodmann's areas 23 and 24, respectively). Cells were injected with Lucifer Yellow in flat-mounted cortical slices, and processed for a light-stable DAB reaction product. Size, branching pattern, and spine density of basal dendritic arbors were determined, and somal areas measured. As in the macaque monkey, we found that pyramidal cells in anterior cingulate gyrus (area 24) were more branched and more spinous than those in posterior cingulate gyrus (area 23). In addition, the extent of the difference in pyramidal cell structure between these two cortical regions was less in the vervet monkey than in the macaque monkey.

  19. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons’ Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Urrego

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1. It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans.

  20. Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons' Dendritic Remodeling and Increased Microglial Density in Primary Motor Cortex in a Murine Model of Facial Paralysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego, Diana; Troncoso, Julieta; Múnera, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This work was aimed at characterizing structural changes in primary motor cortex layer 5 pyramidal neurons and their relationship with microglial density induced by facial nerve lesion using a murine facial paralysis model. Adult transgenic mice, expressing green fluorescent protein in microglia and yellow fluorescent protein in projecting neurons, were submitted to either unilateral section of the facial nerve or sham surgery. Injured animals were sacrificed either 1 or 3weeks after surgery. Two-photon excitation microscopy was then used for evaluating both layer 5 pyramidal neurons and microglia in vibrissal primary motor cortex (vM1). It was found that facial nerve lesion induced long-lasting changes in the dendritic morphology of vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons and in their surrounding microglia. Dendritic arborization of the pyramidal cells underwent overall shrinkage. Apical dendrites suffered transient shortening while basal dendrites displayed sustained shortening. Moreover, dendrites suffered transient spine pruning. Significantly higher microglial cell density was found surrounding vM1 layer 5 pyramidal neurons after facial nerve lesion with morphological bias towards the activated phenotype. These results suggest that facial nerve lesions elicit active dendrite remodeling due to pyramidal neuron and microglia interaction, which could be the pathophysiological underpinning of some neuropathic motor sequelae in humans. PMID:26064916

  1. Modulation of pyramidal cell output in the medial prefrontal cortex by mGluR5 interacting with CB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiritoshi, Takaki; Sun, Hao; Ren, Wenjie; Stauffer, Shaun R; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Neugebauer, Volker

    2013-03-01

    The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) serves executive cognitive functions such as decision-making that are impaired in neuropsychiatric disorders and pain. We showed previously that amygdala-driven abnormal inhibition and decreased output of mPFC pyramidal cells contribute to pain-related impaired decision-making (Ji et al., 2010). Therefore, modulating pyramidal output is desirable therapeutic goal. Targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype mGluR5 has emerged as a cognitive-enhancing strategy in neuropsychiatric disorders, but synaptic and cellular actions of mGluR5 in the mPFC remain to be determined. The present study determined synaptic and cellular actions of mGluR5 to test the hypothesis that increasing mGluR5 function can enhance pyramidal cell output. Whole-cell voltage- and current-clamp recordings were made from visually identified pyramidal neurons in layer V of the mPFC in rat brain slices. Both the prototypical mGluR5 agonist CHPG and a positive allosteric modulator (PAM) for mGluR5 (VU0360172) increased synaptically evoked spiking (E-S coupling) in mPFC pyramidal cells. The facilitatory effects of CHPG and VU0360172 were inhibited by an mGluR5 antagonist (MTEP). CHPG, but not VU0360172, increased neuronal excitability (frequency-current [F-I] function). VU0360172, but not CHPG, increased evoked excitatory synaptic currents (EPSCs) and amplitude, but not frequency, of miniature EPSCs, indicating a postsynaptic action. VU0360172, but not CHPG, decreased evoked inhibitory synaptic currents (IPSCs) through an action that involved cannabinoid receptor CB1, because a CB1 receptor antagonist (AM281) blocked the inhibitory effect of VU0360172 on synaptic inhibition. VU0360172 also increased and prolonged CB1-mediated depolarization-induced suppression of synaptic inhibition (DSI). Activation of CB1 with ACEA decreased inhibitory transmission through a presynaptic mechanism. The results show that increasing mGluR5 function enhances mPFC output. This

  2. Regional specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the visual cortex of the galago: an intracellular injection study of striate and extrastriate areas with comparative notes on new world and old world monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Elston, Alejandra; Kaas, Jon H; Casagrande, Vivien

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed marked differences in the basal dendritic structure of layer III pyramidal cells in the cerebral cortex of adult simian primates. In particular, there is a consistent trend for pyramidal cells of increasing complexity with anterior progression through occipitotemporal cortical visual areas. These differences in pyramidal cell structure, and their systematic nature, are believed to be important for specialized aspects of visual processing within, and between, cortical areas. However, it remains unknown whether this regional specialization in the pyramidal cell phenotype is unique to simians, is unique to primates in general or is widespread amongst mammalian species. In the present study we investigated pyramidal cell structure in the prosimian galago (Otolemur garnetti). We found, as in simians, that the basal dendritic arbors of pyramidal cells differed between cortical areas. More specifically, pyramidal cells became progressively more spinous through the primary (V1), second (V2), dorsolateral (DL) and inferotemporal (IT) visual areas. Moreover, pyramidal neurons in V1 of the galago are remarkably similar to those in other primate species, in spite of large differences in the sizes of this area. In contrast, pyramidal cells in inferotemporal cortex are quite variable among primate species. These data suggest that regional specialization in pyramidal cell phenotype was a likely feature of cortex in a common ancestor of simian and prosimian primates, but the degree of specialization varies between species. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  3. Spatial Pyramid Covariance based Compact Video Code for Robust Face Retrieval in TV-series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Ruiping; Cui, Zhen; Shan, Shiguang; Chen, Xilin

    2016-10-10

    We address the problem of face video retrieval in TV-series which searches video clips based on the presence of specific character, given one face track of his/her. This is tremendously challenging because on one hand, faces in TV-series are captured in largely uncontrolled conditions with complex appearance variations, and on the other hand retrieval task typically needs efficient representation with low time and space complexity. To handle this problem, we propose a compact and discriminative representation for the huge body of video data, named Compact Video Code (CVC). Our method first models the face track by its sample (i.e., frame) covariance matrix to capture the video data variations in a statistical manner. To incorporate discriminative information and obtain more compact video signature suitable for retrieval, the high-dimensional covariance representation is further encoded as a much lower-dimensional binary vector, which finally yields the proposed CVC. Specifically, each bit of the code, i.e., each dimension of the binary vector, is produced via supervised learning in a max margin framework, which aims to make a balance between the discriminability and stability of the code. Besides, we further extend the descriptive granularity of covariance matrix from traditional pixel-level to more general patchlevel, and proceed to propose a novel hierarchical video representation named Spatial Pyramid Covariance (SPC) along with a fast calculation method. Face retrieval experiments on two challenging TV-series video databases, i.e., the Big Bang Theory and Prison Break, demonstrate the competitiveness of the proposed CVC over state-of-the-art retrieval methods. In addition, as a general video matching algorithm, CVC is also evaluated in traditional video face recognition task on a standard Internet database, i.e., YouTube Celebrities, showing its quite promising performance by using an extremely compact code with only 128 bits.

  4. Supralinear dendritic Ca2+ signalling in young developing CA1 pyramidal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohle, Jörg; Bischofberger, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Although Ca2+ is critically important in activity-dependent neuronal development, not much is known about the regulation of dendritic Ca2+ signals in developing neurons. Here, we used ratiometric Ca2+ imaging to investigate dendritic Ca2+ signalling in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells during the first 1–4 weeks of postnatal development. We show that active dendritic backpropagation of Nav channel-dependent action potentials (APs) evoked already large dendritic Ca2+ transients in animals aged 1 week with amplitudes of ∼150 nm, similar to the amplitudes of ∼160 nM seen in animals aged 4 weeks. Although the AP-evoked dendritic Ca2+ load increased about four times during the first 4 weeks, the peak amplitude of free Ca2+ concentration was balanced by a four-fold increase in Ca2+ buffer capacity κs (∼70 vs. ∼280). Furthermore, Ca2+ extrusion rates increased with postnatal development, leading to a slower decay time course (∼0.2 s vs. ∼0.1 s) and more effective temporal summation of Ca2+ signals in young cells. Most importantly, during prolonged theta-burst stimulation dendritic Ca2+ signals were up to three times larger in cells at 1 week than at 4 weeks of age and much larger than predicted by linear summation, which is attributable to an activity-dependent slow-down of Ca2+ extrusion. As Ca2+ influx is four-fold smaller in young cells, the larger Ca2+ signals are generated using four times less ATP consumption. Taken together, the data suggest that active backpropagations regulate dendritic Ca2+ signals during early postnatal development. Remarkably, during prolonged AP firing, Ca2+ signals are several times larger in young than in mature cells as a result of activity-dependent regulation of Ca2+ extrusion rates. PMID:25239458

  5. A study of the pyramidality index in tris(2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl)phosphonium perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeré, René T; Zhang, Yuankui

    2013-09-01

    The title compound, C45H70P(+)·ClO4(-) or [Tripp3PH(+)][ClO4(-)], was produced from the perchlorate salt of the corresponding radical cation Tripp3P(·+) through very slow H-atom abstraction reactions in a solution of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (Tripp is 2,4,6-triisopropylphenyl). The H atom on the P atom was located in a difference map and was freely refined with an isotropic displacement consistent with full occupancy [P-H = 1.37 (3) Å]. It is the most sterically congested triarylphosphonium salt yet to be reported and has a `propeller' arrangement of the three Tripp groups around the P atom, with the protonation site located along the molecular threefold axis. There are short contacts between the flanking isopropyl methine H atoms and the P atom [P···H = 1.99 (2)-2.17 (2) Å]. The sum of the angles around the P atom [Σ(C-P-C) = 349.9 (6)°] is a convenient index of pyramidality for tricoordinate centres. This value is significantly larger than in analogous Mes3PH(+) salts (Mes is mesityl or 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl), for which the average of the three reported structures in the literature is Σ(C-P-C) = 345.3 (6)°. For comparison, in the ubiquitous Ph3PH(+) salts, this parameter has a typical average value of only 333.3 (9)°. The value of Σ(C-P-C) in the title compound is midway between that of the neutral phosphane Tripp3P [334.4 (6)°] and the phosphoniumyl radical cation Tripp3P(·+) [359.8 (2)°]. This geometrical feature provides additional support for the assignment as a phosphonium salt.

  6. Genetic drift. The ancient Egyptian dwarfs of the pyramids: the high official and the female worker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozma, Chahira; Sarry El Din, Azza Mohamed; El Shafy El Banna, Rokia Abd; El Samie Kandeel, Wafaa Abd; Lachman, Ralph

    2011-08-01

    The existence of dwarfism is amply documented in ancient Egypt due to the rich biological and artistic legacies. In previous articles published in this journal, I discussed the roles of people with skeletal dysplasia in ancient Egyptian civilization. In this article I, along with my Egyptian and American colleagues, describe two skeletons of dwarfs that date to 2700-2184 BCE and were unearthed from a funerary complex near the Great Pyramids in Giza. The first skeleton belongs to a high official, Per-ni-ankh-w, who died between 45 and 50 years of age. His statue is on display in the Egyptian Museum of Cairo. The second skeleton belongs to a pregnant female worker found with a fetus in situ. Her estimated age at death was 25-30 years. She most likely died during childbirth due to a small pelvic outlet as supported by her narrow sacrum. The fetal bones appear normal. Radiological examination of both skeletons confirmed the clinical diagnosis of achondroplasia. Ancient Egyptians concerned themselves with the search for spiritual fulfillment through the tradition of moral teachings. Amenemope, a wise man who lived during the reign of Amenhotep III (1391-1354 BCE), advocated respect toward individuals with disabilities: Do not jeer at a blind man nor tease a dwarf, Neither interfere with the condition of a cripple. Do not taunt a man who is in the hand of God, Nor scowl at him if he errs. In summary, artistic, biological, and written resources indicate that dwarfs were well integrated in ancient Egyptian society. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. ALS-Plus Syndrome: Non-Pyramidal Features in a Large ALS Cohort

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, Leo; Vandriel, Shannon; Elman, Lauren; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Powers, John; Boller, Ashley; Wood, Elisabeth McCarty; Woo, John; McMillan, Corey T.; Rascovsky, Katya; Grossman, Murray

    2014-01-01

    Objective Autopsy studies show widespread pathology in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), but clinical surveys of multisystem disease in ALS are rare. We investigated ALS-Plus syndrome, an understudied group of patients with clinical features extending beyond pyramidal and neuromuscular systems with or without cognitive/behavioral deficits. Methods In a large, consecutively-ascertained cohort of 550 patients with ALS, we documented atypical clinical manifestations. Genetic screening for C9orf72 hexanucleotide expansions was performed in 343 patients, and SOD1, TARDBP, and VCP were tested in the subgroup of patients with a family history of ALS. Gray matter and white matter imaging was available in a subgroup of 30 patients. Results Seventy-five (13.6%) patients were identified with ALS-Plus syndrome. We found disorders of ocular motility, cerebellar, extrapyramidal and autonomic functioning. Relative to those without ALS-Plus, cognitive impairment (8.0% vs 2.9%, p=0.029), bulbar-onset (49.3% vs 23.2%, pALS-Plus. Survival was significantly shorter in ALS-Plus (29.66 months vs 42.50 months, p=0.02), regardless of bulbar-onset or mutation status. Imaging revealed significantly greater cerebellar and cerebral disease in ALS-Plus compared to those without ALS-Plus. Conclusions ALS-Plus syndrome is not uncommon, and the presence of these atypical features is consistent with neuropathological observations that ALS is a multisystem disorder. ALS-Plus syndrome is associated with increased risk for poor survival and the presence of a pathogenic mutation. PMID:25086858

  8. Conditional bursting enhances resonant firing in neocortical layer 2-3 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Matthew H; Spain, William J

    2009-02-04

    The frequency response properties of neurons are critical for signal transmission and control of network oscillations. At subthreshold membrane potential, some neurons show resonance caused by voltage-gated channels. During action potential firing, resonance of the spike output may arise from subthreshold mechanisms and/or spike-dependent currents that cause afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and afterdepolarizations (ADPs). Layer 2-3 pyramidal neurons (L2-3 PNs) have a fast ADP that can trigger bursts. The present study investigated what stimuli elicit bursting in these cells and whether bursts transmit specific frequency components of the synaptic input, leading to resonance at particular frequencies. We found that two-spike bursts are triggered by step onsets, sine waves in two frequency bands, and noise. Using noise adjusted to elicit firing at approximately 10 Hz, we measured the gain for modulation of the time-varying firing rate as a function of stimulus frequency, finding a primary peak (7-16 Hz) and a high-frequency resonance (250-450 Hz). Gain was also measured separately for single and burst spikes. For a given spike rate, bursts provided higher gain at the primary peak and lower gain at intermediate frequencies, sharpening the high-frequency resonance. Suppression of bursting using automated current feedback weakened the primary and high-frequency resonances. The primary resonance was also influenced by the SK channel-mediated medium AHP (mAHP), because the SK blocker apamin reduced the sharpness of the primary peak. Our results suggest that resonance in L2-3 PNs depends on burst firing and the mAHP. Bursting enhances resonance in two distinct frequency bands.

  9. Morphological development of thick-tufted layer V pyramidal cells in the rat somatosensory cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine eRomand

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The thick-tufted layer V pyramidal (TTL5 neuron is a key neuron providing output from the neocortex. Although it has been extensively studied, principles governing its dendritic and axonal arborization during development are still not fully quantified. Using 3D model neurons reconstructed from biocytin-labeled cells in the rat somatosensory cortex, this study provides a detailed morphological analysis of TTL5 cells at postnatal day (P 7, 14, 21, 36 and 60. Three developmental periods were revealed, which were characterized by distinct growing rates and properties of alterations in different compartments. From P7 to P14, almost all compartments grew fast, and filopodia-like segments along apical dendrite disappeared; From P14 to P21, the growth was localized on specified segments of each compartment, and the densities of spines and boutons were significantly increased; From P21 to P60, the number of basal dendritic segments was significantly increased at specified branch orders, and some basal and oblique dendritic segments were lengthened or thickened. Development changes were therefore seen in two modes: the fast overall growth during the first period and the slow localized growth (thickening mainly on intermediates or lengthening mainly on terminals at the subsequent stages. The lengthening may be accompanied by the retraction on different segments. These results reveal a differential regulation in the arborization of neuronal compartments during development, supporting the notion of functional compartmental development. This quantification provides new insight into the potential value of the TTL5 morphology for information processing, and for other purposes as well.

  10. Pyramidal Neurons in Different Cortical Layers Exhibit Distinct Dynamics and Plasticity of Apical Dendritic Spines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Tjia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian cerebral cortex is typically organized in six layers containing multiple types of neurons, with pyramidal neurons (PNs being the most abundant. PNs in different cortical layers have distinct morphology, physiology and functional roles in neural circuits. Therefore, their development and synaptic plasticity may also differ. Using in vivo transcranial two-photon microscopy, we followed the structural dynamics of dendritic spines on apical dendrites of layer (L 2/3 and L5 PNs at different developmental stages. We show that the density and dynamics of spines are significantly higher in L2/3 PNs than L5 PNs in both adolescent (1 month old and adult (4 months old mice. While spine density of L5 PNs decreases during adolescent development due to a higher rate of spine elimination than formation, there is no net change in the spine density along apical dendrites of L2/3 PNs over this period. In addition, experiences exert differential impact on the dynamics of apical dendritic spines of PNs resided in different cortical layers. While motor skill learning promotes spine turnover on L5 PNs in the motor cortex, it does not change the spine dynamics on L2/3 PNs. In addition, neonatal sensory deprivation decreases the spine density of both L2/3 and L5 PNs, but leads to opposite changes in spine dynamics among these two populations of neurons in adolescence. In summary, our data reveal distinct dynamics and plasticity of apical dendritic spines on PNs in different layers in the living mouse cortex, which may arise from their distinct functional roles in cortical circuits.

  11. Calcium carbonate nucleation in an alkaline lake surface water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.; Hoch, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (Ω) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has Ω values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high Ω, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean Ω at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water Ω. Calcium concentration and Ω regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower Ω than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and Ω at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (Ω) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (Δ mM/Δ min) = -0.0026 Ω + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, Ω at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors.

  12. Coexistence of Multiple Types of Synaptic Plasticity in Individual Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Elke; Cepeda-Prado, Efrain; Leßmann, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    Understanding learning and memory mechanisms is an important goal in neuroscience. To gain insights into the underlying cellular mechanisms for memory formation, synaptic plasticity processes are studied with various techniques in different brain regions. A valid model to scrutinize different ways to enhance or decrease synaptic transmission is recording of long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD). At the single cell level, spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) protocols have emerged as a powerful tool to investigate synaptic plasticity with stimulation paradigms that also likely occur during memory formation in vivo . Such kind of plasticity can be induced by different STDP paradigms with multiple repeat numbers and stimulation patterns. They subsequently recruit or activate different molecular pathways and neuromodulators for induction and expression of STDP. Dopamine (DA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been recently shown to be important modulators for hippocampal STDP at Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses and are activated exclusively by distinguishable STDP paradigms. Distinct types of parallel synaptic plasticity in a given neuron depend on specific subcellular molecular prerequisites. Since the basal and apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons are known to be heterogeneous, and distance-dependent dendritic gradients for specific receptors and ion channels are described, the dendrites might provide domain specific locations for multiple types of synaptic plasticity in the same neuron. In addition to the distinct signaling and expression mechanisms of various types of LTP and LTD, activation of these different types of plasticity might depend on background brain activity states. In this article, we will discuss some ideas why multiple forms of synaptic plasticity can simultaneously and independently coexist and can contribute so effectively to increasing the efficacy of memory storage and processing capacity of the

  13. Specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the sensory-motor cortex of the Chacma baboon (Papio ursinus) with comparative notes on macaque and vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; Manger, Paul R; Defelipe, Javier

    2005-09-01

    The systematic study of pyramidal cell structure has revealed new insights into specialization of the phenotype in the primate cerebral cortex. Regional specialization in the neuronal phenotype may influence patterns of connectivity and the computational abilities of the circuits they compose. The comparative study of pyramidal cells in homologous cortical areas is beginning to yield data on the evolution and development of such specialized circuitry in the primate cerebral cortex. Recently, we have focused our efforts on sensory-motor cortex. Based on our intracellular injection methodology, we have demonstrated a progressive increase in the size of, the branching structure in, and the spine density of the basal dendritic trees of pyramidal cells through somatosensory areas 3b, 1, 2, 5, and 7 in the macaque and vervet monkeys. In addition, we have shown that pyramidal cells in premotor area 6 are larger, more branched, and more spinous than those in the primary motor cortex (MI or area 4) in the macaque monkey, vervet monkey, and baboon. Here we expand the basis for comparison by studying the basal dendritic trees of layer III pyramidal cells in these same sensory-motor areas in the chacma baboon. The baboon was selected because it has a larger cerebral cortex than either the macaque or vervet monkeys; motor cortex has expanded disproportionately in these three species; and motor cortex in the baboon reportedly has differentiated to include a new cortical area not present in either the macaque or vervet monkeys. We found, as in monkeys, a progressive increase in the morphological complexity of pyramidal cells through areas 3b, 5, and 7, as well as from area 4 to area 6, suggesting that areal specialization in microcircuitry was likely to be present in a common ancestor of primates. In addition, we found subtle differences in the extent of the interareal differences in pyramidal cell structure between homologous cortical areas in the three species. Copyright 2005

  14. Tonic GABAA conductance decreases membrane time constant and increases EPSP-spike precision in hippocampal pyramidal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka I Wlodarczyk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of a complex dendritic structure, pyramidal neurons have a large membrane surface relative to other cells and so a large electrical capacitance and a large membrane time constant (τm. This results in slow depolarizations in response to excitatory synaptic inputs, and consequently increased and variable action potential latencies, which may be computationally undesirable. Tonic activation of GABAA receptors increases membrane conductance and thus regulates neuronal excitability by shunting inhibition. In addition, tonic increases in membrane conductance decrease the membrane time constant (τm, and improve the temporal fidelity of neuronal firing. Here we performed whole-cell current clamp recordings from hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons and found that bath application of 10 µM GABA indeed decreases τm in these cells. GABA also decreased first spike latency and jitter (standard deviation of the latency produced by current injection of 2 rheobases (500 ms. However, when larger current injections (3-6 rheobases were used, GABA produced no significant effect on spike jitter, which was low. Using mathematical modelling we demonstrate that the tonic GABAA conductance decreases rise time, decay time and half-width of EPSPs in pyramidal neurons. A similar effect was observed on EPSP/IPSP pairs produced by stimulation of Schaffer collaterals: the EPSP part of the response became shorter after application of GABA. Consistent with the current injection data, a significant decrease in spike latency and jitter was obtained in cell attached recordings only at near-threshold stimulation (50% success rate, S50. When stimulation was increased to 2- or 3- times S50, GABA significantly affected neither spike latency nor spike jitter. Our results suggest that a decrease in τm associated with elevations in ambient GABA can improve EPSP-spike precision at near-threshold synaptic inputs.

  15. Pyramiding, alternating or mixing: comparative performances of deployment strategies of nematode resistance genes to promote plant resistance efficiency and durability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djian-Caporalino, Caroline; Palloix, Alain; Fazari, Ariane; Marteu, Nathalie; Barbary, Arnaud; Abad, Pierre; Sage-Palloix, Anne-Marie; Mateille, Thierry; Risso, Sabine; Lanza, Roger; Taussig, Catherine; Castagnone-Sereno, Philippe

    2014-02-22

    Resistant cultivars are key elements for pathogen control and pesticide reduction, but their repeated use may lead to the emergence of virulent pathogen populations, able to overcome the resistance. Increased research efforts, mainly based on theoretical studies, explore spatio-temporal deployment strategies of resistance genes in order to maximize their durability. We evaluated experimentally three of these strategies to control root-knot nematodes: cultivar mixtures, alternating and pyramiding resistance genes, under controlled and field conditions over a 3-years period, assessing the efficiency and the durability of resistance in a protected crop rotation system with pepper as summer crop and lettuce as winter crop. The choice of the resistance gene and the genetic background in which it is introgressed, affected the frequency of resistance breakdown. The pyramiding of two different resistance genes in one genotype suppressed the emergence of virulent isolates. Alternating different resistance genes in rotation was also efficient to decrease virulent populations in fields due to the specificity of the virulence and the trapping effect of resistant plants. Mixing resistant cultivars together appeared as a less efficient strategy to control nematodes. This work provides experimental evidence that, in a cropping system with seasonal sequences of vegetable species, pyramiding or alternating resistance genes benefit yields in the long-term by increasing the durability of resistant cultivars and improving the long-term control of a soil-borne pest. To our knowledge, this result is the first one obtained for a plant-nematode interaction, which helps demonstrate the general applicability of such strategies for breeding and sustainable management of resistant cultivars against pathogens.

  16. [Nutrition in the sport practice: adaptation of the food guide pyramid to the characteristics of athletes diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gross, M; Gutiérrez, A; Mesa, J L; Ruiz-Ruiz, J; Castillo, M J

    2001-12-01

    In spite of all the advances in sport nutrition and the importance of an adequate food intake in order to improve sport performance, both recreational and professional athletes forget frequently to include planning an optimum diet and fluid intake in their global strategy for performance. Physiological and metabolic adaptations produced as a consequence of physical exercise lead to the necessity of increasing caloric (in accordance to energy output) and protein (based on the trophic needs of the organism) intake. Likewise, paying major attention to vitamin and mineral intake, specifically B vitamins and zinc and chromium, is required, in order to optimize carbohydrate metabolism, the ultimate limiting factor for sport performance. During the training phase, 60% of calories should come from carbohydrates, protein intake should be 1.2-2 g/kg/day and athletes should follow the recommendations of the food guide pyramid. During the pre-, per- and post-competition phase the healthy aspect of the diet passes to a second level, in order to obtain good sport performance and to guarantee a fast and effective recovery. Again, carbohydrates with a high or medium glycaemic index and water are the nutrients which have to be calculated more thoroughly. In conclusion, athletes have to follow a diet that is adequate to their higher energy output and to their higher metabolic turnover. The food guide pyramid is a graphic expression which facilitates the comprehension and following of a healthy diet. In the present article, the authors introduce the pyramid adapted to the characteristics of sports nutrition, with easy-to-follow practical recommendations regarding the kind and amounts of foodstuffs that should be consumed in order to cover nutrient needs of people who exercise regularly.

  17. Effect of Boswellia serrata gum resin on the morphology of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells in aged rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini-sharifabad, Mohammad; Esfandiari, Ebrahim

    2015-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that administration of Boswellia resin, known as olibanum or Frankincense, increases memory power. It is reported that beta boswellic acid, the major component of Boswellia serrata gum resin, could enhance neurite outgrowth and branching in hippocampal neurons. We therefore studied whether Boswellia treatment produces morphological changes in the superior region of cornu ammonis (CA1) in aged rats. Sixteen male Wistar rats, 24 months of age, were randomly divided in experimental and control groups. The experimental group was orally administered Boswellia serrata gum resin (100 mg/kg per day for 8 weeks) and the control group received a similar volume of water. The Cavalieri principle was employed to estimate the volumes of CA1 hippocampal field, and a quantitative Golgi study was used to analysis of dendritic arborizations of CA1 pyramidal cells. Comparisons revealed that Boswellia-treated aged rats had greater volumes than control animals in stratum pyramidale and stratum radiatum lacunosum-moleculare. The neurons of CA1 in experimental rats had more dendritic segments (40.25 ± 4.20) than controls (30.9 ± 4.55), P = 0.001. The total dendritic length of CA1 neurons was approximately 20 % larger in the experimental group compared to control. Results also indicated that the aged rats treated with Boswellia resin had more numerical branching density in the apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons. The results of the present study show that long-term administration of Boswellia resin can attenuate age-related dendritic regression in CA1 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampus.

  18. Pyramidal lobe decreases endogenous TSH stimulation without impact on radio-iodine therapy outcome in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawicka-Gutaj, Nadia; Klimowicz, Aleksandra; Sowinski, Jerzy; Oleksa, Robert; Gryczynska, Maria; Wyszomirska, Anna; Czarnywojtek, Agata; Ruchala, Marek

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the frequency of pyramidal lobe (PL) detected in iodine-131 (I-131) scans of thyroid bed in patients after thyroidectomy for differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) and to investigate influence of PL on endogenous thyrotropin (TSH) stimulation as well as on the effects of the radio-iodine ablation in one-year follow-up. This study was designed as a retrospective analysis of 302 radio-iodine neck scans of patients thyroidectomized due to DTC. The study population was selected from patients with PL detected in thyroid bed scintigraphy. Patients without PL were included to the control group. The study and the control groups did not differ in age, sex of patients, histological type and stage of the DTC. Pyramidal lobes were found in 30.5% of all patients. Patients in the study group underwent repeat surgery more often than controls without PL. Preablative TSH level in patients with PL was statistically lower than in the control group, in contrast to free thyroid hormones, which were higher in patients with PL. Preablative and postablative TSH-stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg) and antibodies against thyroglobulin (TgAbs) were measured in both groups, and comparison did not reveal differences. Moreover, for the per-patient analysis, sites of uptake in whole body scintigraphy performed 1 year after radio-iodine remnant ablation (RRA) did not differ between the study and the control groups. Pyramidal lobe decreases endogenous TSH stimulation without impact on radio-iodine therapy outcome in patients with DTC. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Precise and low-cost monitoring of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) pest activity in pyramid traps with cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, R D; Gage, S H; Whalon, M E

    2014-04-01

    Incorporating camera systems into insect traps potentially benefits insect phenology modeling, nonlethal insect monitoring, and research into the automated identification of traps counts. Cameras originally for monitoring mammals were instead adapted to monitor the entrance to pyramid traps designed to capture the plum curculio, Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Using released curculios, two new trap designs (v.I and v.II) were field-tested alongside conventional pyramid traps at one site in autumn 2010 and at four sites in autumn 2012. The traps were evaluated on the basis of battery power, ease-of-maintenance, adaptability, required-user-skills, cost (including labor), and accuracy-of-results. The v.II design fully surpassed expectations, except that some trapped curculios were not photographed. In 2012, 13 of the 24 traps recorded every curculio entering the traps during the 18-d study period, and in traps where some curculios were not photographed, over 90% of the omissions could be explained by component failure or external interference with the motion sensor. Significantly more curculios entered the camera traps between 1800 and 0000 hours. When compared with conventional pyramid traps, the v.I traps collected a similar number of curculios. Two observed but not significant trends were that the v.I traps collected twice as many plum curculios as the v.II traps, while at the same time the v.II traps collected more than twice as many photos per plum curculio as the v.I traps. The research demonstrates that low-cost, precise monitoring of field insect populations is feasible without requiring extensive technical expertise.

  20. The Effect of Booster-Mirror Reflector on the Thermal Performance of a Truncated Pyramid Solar Thermal Cooker

    OpenAIRE

    I. L. Mohammed; Aliyu, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the results and analysis of the performance of a truncated pyramid solar thermal cooker under two conditions are presented: booster-mirror reflector covered with black cloth, and booster-mirror reflector exposed to solar radiation. Results of the thermal performance tests show respective stagnation absorber plate temperatures of 145 oC and 137 oC. First/Second Figures of Merit are 0.120/0.346 and 0.125/0.400 respectively. The total heating times of 5.2 kg of wate...

  1. Brain overgrowth in autism during a critical time in development: implications for frontal pyramidal neuron and interneuron development and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchesne, Eric; Pierce, Karen

    2005-01-01

    While abnormalities in head circumference in autism have been observed for decades, it is only recently that scientists have begun to focus in on the developmental origins of such a phenomenon. In this article we review past and present literature on abnormalities in head circumference, as well as recent developmental MRI studies of brain growth in this disorder. We hypothesize that brain growth abnormalities are greatest in frontal lobes, particularly affecting large neurons such as pyramidal cells, and speculate how this abnormality might affect neurofunctional circuitry in autism. The relationship to clinical characteristics and other disorders of macrencephaly are discussed.

  2. Graphene oxide-Ag nanoparticles-pyramidal silicon hybrid system for homogeneous, long-term stable and sensitive SERS activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jia [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Xu, Shicai [Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Biophysics, College of Physics and Electronic Information, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Liu, Xiaoyun; Li, Zhe; Hu, Litao; Li, Zhen; Chen, Peixi; Ma, Yong [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Jiang, Shouzhen, E-mail: jiang_sz@126.com [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optics and Photonic Device, Jinan 250014 (China); Ning, Tingyin [School of Physics and Electronics, Shandong Normal University, Jinan 250014 (China); Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Optics and Photonic Device, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • We directly grown AgNPs on substrate by annealing method in the quartz tube. Compare with spin-coating Ag nanoparticles solution method, we got more uniform distribution of AgNPs and the AgNPs better adsorption on the substrate. • We use a simple and lost-cost method to obtain the pyramidal silicon (PSi). The PSi possessing well-separated pyramid arrays can make contribution to the homogeneity and sensitivity of the substrate. • In our work, graphene oxide (GO) film is uniformly deposited on AgNPs and PSi by using a spin-coating method. The GO films endow the hybrid system a good stability and enhance the homogeneity and sensitivity of the substrate. - Abstract: In our work, few layers graphene oxide (GO) were directly synthesized on Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs) by spin-coating method to fabricate a GO-AgNPs hybrid structure on a pyramidal silicon (PSi) substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The GO-AgNPs-PSi substrate showed excellent Raman enhancement effect, the minimum detected concentration for Rhodamine 6G (R6G) can reach 10{sup −12} M, which is one order of magnitude lower than the AgNPs-PSi substrate and two order of magnitude lower than the GO-AgNPs-flat-Si substrate. The linear fit calibration curve with error bars is presented and the value of R{sup 2} of 612 and 773 cm{sup −1} can reach 0.986 and 0.980, respectively. The excellent linear response between the Raman intensity and R6G concentrations prove that the prepared GO-AgNPs-PSi substrates can serve as good SERS substrate for molecule detection. The maximum deviations of SERS intensities from 20 positions of the GO-AgNPs-PSi substrate are less than 8%, revealing the high homogeneity of the SERS substrate. The excellent homogeneity of the enhanced Raman signals can be attributed to well-separated pyramid arrays of PSi, the uniform morphology of AgNPs and multi-functions of GO layer. Besides, the uniform GO film can effectively protect AgNPs from oxidation and endow

  3. Coexistence of Multiple Types of Synaptic Plasticity in Individual Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Elke; Cepeda-Prado, Efrain; Leßmann, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    Understanding learning and memory mechanisms is an important goal in neuroscience. To gain insights into the underlying cellular mechanisms for memory formation, synaptic plasticity processes are studied with various techniques in different brain regions. A valid model to scrutinize different ways to enhance or decrease synaptic transmission is recording of long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD). At the single cell level, spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) protocols have emerged as a powerful tool to investigate synaptic plasticity with stimulation paradigms that also likely occur during memory formation in vivo. Such kind of plasticity can be induced by different STDP paradigms with multiple repeat numbers and stimulation patterns. They subsequently recruit or activate different molecular pathways and neuromodulators for induction and expression of STDP. Dopamine (DA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been recently shown to be important modulators for hippocampal STDP at Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses and are activated exclusively by distinguishable STDP paradigms. Distinct types of parallel synaptic plasticity in a given neuron depend on specific subcellular molecular prerequisites. Since the basal and apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons are known to be heterogeneous, and distance-dependent dendritic gradients for specific receptors and ion channels are described, the dendrites might provide domain specific locations for multiple types of synaptic plasticity in the same neuron. In addition to the distinct signaling and expression mechanisms of various types of LTP and LTD, activation of these different types of plasticity might depend on background brain activity states. In this article, we will discuss some ideas why multiple forms of synaptic plasticity can simultaneously and independently coexist and can contribute so effectively to increasing the efficacy of memory storage and processing capacity of the

  4. Extinction of Cocaine Seeking Requires a Window of Infralimbic Pyramidal Neuron Activity after Unreinforced Lever Presses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Andrea L; Nett, Kelle E; Cosme, Caitlin V; Worth, Wensday R; Gupta, Subhash C; Wemmie, John A; LaLumiere, Ryan T

    2017-06-21

    The infralimbic cortex (IL) mediates extinction learning and the active suppression of cocaine-seeking behavior. However, the precise temporal relationship among IL activity, lever pressing, and extinction learning is unclear. To address this issue, we used activity-guided optogenetics in male Sprague Dawley rats to silence IL pyramidal neurons optically for 20 s immediately after unreinforced lever presses during early extinction training after cocaine self-administration. Optical inhibition of the IL increased active lever pressing during shortened extinction sessions, but did not alter the retention of the extinction learning as assessed in ensuing extinction sessions with no optical inhibition. During subsequent cued reinstatement sessions, rats that had previously received optical inhibition during the extinction sessions showed increased cocaine-seeking behavior. These findings appeared to be specific to inhibition during the post-lever press period because IL inhibition given in a noncontingent, pseudorandom manner during extinction sessions did not produce the same effects. Illumination alone (i.e., with no opsin expression) and food-seeking control experiments also failed to produce the same effects. In another experiment, IL inhibition after lever presses during cued reinstatement sessions increased cocaine seeking during those sessions. Finally, inhibition of the prelimbic cortex immediately after unreinforced lever presses during shortened extinction sessions decreased lever pressing during these sessions, but had no effect on subsequent reinstatement. These results indicate that IL activity immediately after unreinforced lever presses is necessary for normal extinction of cocaine seeking, suggesting that critical encoding of the new contingencies between a lever press and a cocaine reward occurs during that period.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The infralimbic cortex (IL) contributes to the extinction of cocaine-seeking behavior, but the precise relationship

  5. Tectonic evolution of the Northern Pyrenees. Results of the PYRAMID project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Mary; Mouthereau, Fredéric; Christophoul, Fredéric; de Saint Blanquat, Michel; Espurt, Nicolas; Labaume, Pierre; Vergés, Jaume; Teixell, Antonio; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Vacharat, Arnaud; Pik, Raphael; Pironon, Jacques; Carpentier, Cédric; Angrand, Paul; Grool, Arjan; Salardon, Roland; Huismans, Ritske; Bader, Anne-Gaëlle; Baudin, Thierry; Aubourg, Charles

    2017-04-01

    The aims of the PYRAMID project funded by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche of France, were to investigate and constrain the 3D structural style and architecture of the North Pyrenean retrowedge and foreland basin, their evolution through time, to define the character and role of inherited crustal geometries, to investigate the interactions between deformation, fluids and thermicity in the different structural units, and to carry out source to sink studies In this talk we present a series of restored cross sections through the central and eastern Pyrenean retrowedge to illustrate structural style, amount and type of deformation and how it was accommodated within the upper crust along the orogen. The total amount of convergence appears to have been constant and the timing of onset of convergence was synchronous. However, in the retrowedge the complexity of the Cretaceous oblique rift system has led to high lateral structural variability. Inherited vertical late Variscan faults trending NE-SW to ENE-WSW segment the European crust and have strongly compartmentalised both retrowedge and foreland basin evolution along the orogen. Crustal scale restorations provide new evolutionary models for the geometry and style of inversion of the pre-orogenic hyper-extended rift system where mantle was exhumed in the most distal domain. Numerical models provide insight into retrowedge inversion. A new stratigraphic scheme has been developed for the eastern and central foreland. Subsidence analyses and foreland basin reconstructions document two pulses of convergence (Late Santonian to Early Paleocene and Eocene to Oligocene) separated by a quiet phase during the Paleocene. These phases can be linked to deformation in the North Pyrenean Zone thrust belt. The first phase was caused mainly by inversion and emplacement of the Metamorphic Internal Zone onto external zones associated with subduction of the exhumed mantle domain. Little or no relief was created during this phase

  6. Specialization of pyramidal cell structure in the visual areas V1, V2 and V3 of the South American rodent, Dasyprocta primnolopha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Elston, Alejandra; Freire, Marco Aurelio M; Gomes Leal, Wallace; Dias, Ivanira Amaral; Pereira, Antonio; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L; Picanço Diniz, Cristovam W

    2006-08-23

    Marked phenotypic variation has been reported in pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. These extent and systematic nature of these specializations suggest that they are important for specialized aspects of cortical processing. However, it remains unknown as to whether regional variations in the pyramidal cell phenotype are unique to primates or if they are widespread amongst mammalian species. In the present study we determined the receptive fields of neurons in striate and extrastriate visual cortex, and quantified pyramidal cell structure in these cortical regions, in the diurnal, large-brained, South American rodent Dasyprocta primnolopha. We found evidence for a first, second and third visual area (V1, V2 and V3, respectively) forming a lateral progression from the occipital pole to the temporal pole. Pyramidal cell structure became increasingly more complex through these areas, suggesting that regional specialization in pyramidal cell phenotype is not restricted to primates. However, cells in V1, V2 and V3 of the agouti were considerably more spinous than their counterparts in primates, suggesting different evolutionary and developmental influences may act on cortical microcircuitry in rodents and primates.

  7. A comparison of food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: USDA's MyPyramid, NHLBI's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard's Healthy Eating Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, Jill; Krebs-Smith, Susan M

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: the US Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard University's Healthy Eating Pyramid. Estimates of nutrient values associated with following each of the food guides at the 2,000-calorie level were made using a composite approach. This approach calculates population-weighted nutrient composites for each food group and subgroup, assuming average choices within food groups. Nutrient estimates were compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes and other goals and limits. Recommendations were similar regarding almost all food groups for both the type and amount of foods. Primary differences were seen in the types of vegetables and protein sources recommended and the amount of dairy products and total oil recommended. Overall nutrient values were also similar for most nutrients, except vitamin A, vitamin E, and calcium. These food guides were derived from different types of nutrition research, yet they share consistent messages: eat more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains; eat less added sugar and saturated fat; and emphasize plant oils.

  8. The Prevalence of STIV c92-Like Proteins in Acidic Thermal Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie C. Snyder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new type of viral-induced lysis system has recently been discovered for two unrelated archaeal viruses, STIV and SIRV2. Prior to the lysis of the infected host cell, unique pyramid-like lysis structures are formed on the cell surface by the protrusion of the underlying cell membrane through the overlying external S-layer. It is through these pyramid structures that assembled virions are released during lysis. The STIV viral protein c92 is responsible for the formation of these lysis structures. We searched for c92-like proteins in viral sequences present in multiple viral and cellular metagenomic libraries from Yellowstone National Park acidic hot spring environments. Phylogenetic analysis of these proteins demonstrates that, although c92-like proteins are detected in these environments, some are quite divergent and may represent new viral families. We hypothesize that this new viral lysis system is common within diverse archaeal viral populations found within acidic hot springs.

  9. Expression of GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs by layer V pyramidal cells of the rat primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano, D; Perrais, D; Rossier, J; Ropert, N

    1997-04-01

    The expression of the GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs by layer V pyramidal neurons of the primary visual cortex and cerebellar Purkinje cells was analysed by single-cell reverse transcription of the mRNAs and amplification of the resulting cDNAs by the polymerase chain reaction. Neurons were identified by infrared videomicroscopy, and GABA(A)-mediated miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents were recorded. In Purkinje cells, alpha1, beta2, beta3, gamma2S and gamma2L subunit mRNAs were detected within a single cell. In layer V pyramidal cells, a total of ten GABA(A) receptor subunit mRNAs could be detected, with a mean of seven subunit mRNAs per cell, suggesting GABA(A) receptor heterogeneity within a single pyramidal cell.

  10. Were Viking Dry-dock methods in the Americas used earlier to Build Pyramids, with Outflow Eroding the Sphinx, and were Stonehenge, the Obelisks, and Moas Similarly Erected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Edward; McLeod, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Chisel-quarried recycled granite in MA is datable by runes to 1069 CE; it could corroborate dating by a LIDAR. Associated sites, possibly used by Vikings to dry-dock their ships, could have exploited lock-like controls, possibly a continued technology. Site-leveling at the Giza Pyramids proves water was used. `Locks' and body-immersion worked for building, moving, erecting, or watering, at sites like Stonehenge, The Hanging Gardens at Babylon, the Moas of Easter Island, or The Pyramids, where the eroding water discharge was deliberately flushed over the Sphinx complex. It enhance the electromagnetically excited blue light signals we can detect, especially at sites frequented by Molocket of ME. Information, as at America's Stonehenge, in NH, and constructions at Acton MA, at Giza or at Rumford ME proves that the Pyramids and Sphinx were engineered and built about 4500 BP.

  11. The protective role of ascorbic acid on hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in a rat model of maternal lead exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehri, Hamid; Ganji, Farzaneh

    2016-07-01

    Oxidative stress is a major pathogenic mechanism of lead neurotoxicity. The antioxidant ascorbic acid protects hippocampal pyramidal neurons against cell death during congenital lead exposure; however, critical functions like synaptic transmission, integration, and plasticity depend on preservation of dendritic and somal morphology. This study was designed to examine if ascorbic acid also protects neuronal morphology during developmental lead exposure. Timed pregnant rats were divided into four treatment groups: (1) control, (2) 100mg/kg ascorbic acid once a day via gavage, (3) 0.05% lead acetate in drinking water, and (4) 0.05% lead+100mg/kg oral ascorbic acid. Brains of eight male pups (P25) per treatment group were processed for Golgi staining. Changes in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons' somal size were estimated by cross-sectional area and changes in dendritic arborization by Sholl's analysis. One-way ANOVA was used to compare results among treatment groups. Lead-exposed pups exhibited a significant decrease in somal size compared to controls (Plead exposure. Oxidative stress thus contributes to lead neurotoxicity but other pathogenic mechanisms are also involved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. RNA interference of Marlin-1/Jakmip1 results in abnormal morphogenesis and migration of cortical pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, René L; Fuentes, Patricio; Valenzuela, José Ignacio; Alvarado-Diaz, Carlos P; Ramírez, Omar A; Kukuljan, Manuel; Couve, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The formation of the nervous systems requires processes that coordinate proliferation, differentiation and migration of neuronal cells, which extend axons, generate dendritic branching and establish synaptic connections during development. The structural organization and dynamic remodeling of the cytoskeleton and its association to the secretory pathway are critical determinants of cell morphogenesis and migration. Marlin-1 (Jakmip1) is a microtubule-associated protein predominantly expressed in neurons and lymphoid cells. Marlin-1 participates in polarized secretion in lymphocytes, but its functional association with the neuronal cytoskeleton and its contribution to brain development have not been explored. Combining in vitro and in vivo approaches we show that Marlin-1 contributes to the establishment of neuronal morphology. Marlin-1 associates to the cytoskeleton in neurites, is required for the maintenance of an intact Golgi apparatus and its depletion produces the down-regulation of kinesin-1, a plus-end directed molecular motor with a central function in morphogenesis and migration. RNA interference of Marlin-1 in vivo results in abnormal migration of newborn pyramidal neurons during the formation of the cortex. Our results support the involvement of Marlin-1 in the acquisition of the complex architecture and migration of pyramidal neurons, two fundamental processes for the laminar layering of the cortex. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Concurrent improvement in optical and electrical characteristics by using inverted pyramidal array structures toward efficient Si heterojunction solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hsin Ping

    2016-03-02

    The Si heterojunction (SHJ) solar cell is presently the most popular design in the crystalline Si (c-Si) photovoltaics due to the high open-circuit voltages (V). Photon management by surface structuring techniques to control the light entering the devices is critical for boosting cell efficiency although it usually comes with the V loss caused by severe surface recombination. For the first time, the periodic inverted pyramid (IP) structure fabricated by photolithography and anisotropic etching processes was employed for SHJ solar cells, demonstrating concurrent improvement in optical and electrical characteristics (i.e., short-circuit current density (J) and V). Periodic IP structures show superior light-harvesting properties as most of the incident rays bounce three times on the walls of the IPs but only twice between conventional random upright pyramids (UPs). The high minority carrier lifetime of the IP structures after a-Si:H passivation results in an enhanced V by 28 mV, showing improved carrier collection efficiency due to the superior passivation of the IP structure over the random UP structures. The superior antireflective (AR) ability and passivation results demonstrate that the IP structure has the potential to replace conventional UP structures to further boost the efficiency in solar cell applications.

  14. Discontinuous Galerkin finite element method for solving population density functions of cortical pyramidal and thalamic neuronal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Hsu; Lin, Chou-Ching K; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2015-02-01

    Compared with the Monte Carlo method, the population density method is efficient for modeling collective dynamics of neuronal populations in human brain. In this method, a population density function describes the probabilistic distribution of states of all neurons in the population and it is governed by a hyperbolic partial differential equation. In the past, the problem was mainly solved by using the finite difference method. In a previous study, a continuous Galerkin finite element method was found better than the finite difference method for solving the hyperbolic partial differential equation; however, the population density function often has discontinuity and both methods suffer from a numerical stability problem. The goal of this study is to improve the numerical stability of the solution using discontinuous Galerkin finite element method. To test the performance of the new approach, interaction of a population of cortical pyramidal neurons and a population of thalamic neurons was simulated. The numerical results showed good agreement between results of discontinuous Galerkin finite element and Monte Carlo methods. The convergence and accuracy of the solutions are excellent. The numerical stability problem could be resolved using the discontinuous Galerkin finite element method which has total-variation-diminishing property. The efficient approach will be employed to simulate the electroencephalogram or dynamics of thalamocortical network which involves three populations, namely, thalamic reticular neurons, thalamocortical neurons and cortical pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Simultaneous Improvement and Genetic Dissection of Salt Tolerance of Rice (Oryza sativa L. by Designed QTL Pyramiding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunlong Pang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Breeding of multi-stress tolerant rice varieties with higher grain yields is the best option to enhance the rice productivity of abiotic stresses prone areas. It also poses the greatest challenge to plant breeders to breed rice varieties for such stress prone conditions. Here, we carried out a designed QTL pyramiding experiment to develop high yielding “Green Super Rice” varieties with significantly improved tolerance to salt stress and grain yield. Using the F4 population derived from a cross between two selected introgression lines, we were able to develop six mostly homozygous promising high yielding lines with significantly improved salt tolerance and grain yield under optimal and/or saline conditions in 3 years. Simultaneous mapping using the same breeding population and tunable genotyping-by-sequencing technology, we identified three QTL affecting salt injury score and leaf chlorophyll content. By analyzing 32M SNP data of the grandparents and graphical genotypes of the parents, we discovered 87 positional candidate genes for salt tolerant QTL. According to their functional annotation, we inferred the most likely candidate genes. We demonstrated that designed QTL pyramiding is a powerful strategy for simultaneous improvement and genetic dissection of complex traits in rice.

  16. The ebola virus interferon antagonist VP24 directly binds STAT1 and has a novel, pyramidal fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Adrianna P P; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Liu, Tong; Abelson, Dafna M; Lee, David E; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2012-02-01

    Ebolaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality and in fatal cases, are characterized by early suppression of the host innate immune system. One of the proteins likely responsible for this effect is VP24. VP24 is known to antagonize interferon signaling by binding host karyopherin α proteins, thereby preventing them from transporting the tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor STAT1 to the nucleus. Here, we report that VP24 binds STAT1 directly, suggesting that VP24 can suppress at least two distinct branches of the interferon pathway. Here, we also report the first crystal structures of VP24, derived from different species of ebolavirus that are pathogenic (Sudan) and nonpathogenic to humans (Reston). These structures reveal that VP24 has a novel, pyramidal fold. A site on a particular face of the pyramid exhibits reduced solvent exchange when in complex with STAT1. This site is above two highly conserved pockets in VP24 that contain key residues previously implicated in virulence. These crystal structures and accompanying biochemical analysis map differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic viruses, offer templates for drug design, and provide the three-dimensional framework necessary for biological dissection of the many functions of VP24 in the virus life cycle.

  17. Autosomal dominant juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and distal hereditary motor neuronopathy with pyramidal tract signs: synonyms for the same disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jonghe, P; Auer-Grumbach, M; Irobi, J; Wagner, K; Plecko, B; Kennerson, M; Zhu, D; De Vriendt, E; Van Gerwen, V; Nicholson, G; Hartung, H-P; Timmerman, V

    2002-06-01

    Autosomal dominant juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rare disorder and so far only one family has been reported. Genetic linkage studies mapped the disease locus to chromosome 9q34 (ALS4). The diagnosis of ALS in this family is based on the clinical signs with almost exclusively lower motor neurone pathology in combination with less prominent pyramidal tract signs. Atypical features include normal life expectancy, the absence of bulbar involvement and the symmetrical distal distribution of atrophy and weakness. We performed a molecular genetic study in three families that we had diagnosed as having distal hereditary motor neuronopathy, i.e. distal spinal muscular atrophy or spinal Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome, and found linkage to the ALS4 locus. The clinical phenotype in these three families, of different geographic origin (Austria, Belgium and England), is strikingly similar to the autosomal dominant juvenile ALS family except for a younger onset age in two of the distal hereditary motor neuronopathy families. These data suggest that ALS4 and distal hereditary motor neuronopathy with pyramidal tract signs may be one and the same disorder.

  18. Dietary intakes at child-care centers in central Texas fail to meet Food Guide Pyramid recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padget, Alison; Briley, Margaret E

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the dietary intakes of children who attend child-care centers with the recommendations of the Food Guide Pyramid for Young Children. Three-day dietary records were obtained for 50 children ages 3 to 5 years old who attended nine child-care centers in central Texas. Dietary intakes during child care were measured by a researcher, and dietary intakes at home were recorded by a parent. During child care, the 3-year-old children consumed sufficient fruits and meat/alternates, but not sufficient grains, vegetables, or dairy to meet two thirds of Food Guide Pyramid for Young Children recommendations. The 4- and 5-year-old children only consumed sufficient dairy. Ninety-one percent (20 of 22) of the 3-year-old children met two thirds of their estimated energy requirements during child care, compared with 5% (1 of 20) of 4-year-old children and 25% (2 of 8) of 5-year-old children. Intakes at home did not compensate for lack of grain and vegetable consumption during child care.

  19. U.S. Food Guide Pyramid food group intake by Asian Indian immigrants in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, S S; Diwan, S; Cohen, D L

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the food group intake and the dietary quality of middle-aged and older Gujarati Asian Indian immigrants (45 years or older) living in two urban metropolitan areas in the U.S. Participants (90 men, 99 females) completed a 24-hour dietary recall, which was used to determine if they met the daily food group intake guidelines of the U.S. Food Guide Pyramid. The overall quality of their reported dietary intake was determined using the Healthy Eating Index based on their nutrient and food group intake. Both men and women met the daily number of servings recommendations for the grains (men: 9.3 servings/day; women: 6.9 servings/day) and vegetables (men: 4.5 servings/day; women: 3.6 servings/day) groups, but did not meet the recommendations for fruits, dairy and meats groups. The total score on the Healthy Eating Index of the diets of these participants was 73, indicative of a dietary intake that does not meet the established U.S. dietary guidelines. These immigrants should be educated about appropriate food choices (ethnic and non-ethnic) within each of the U.S. Food Guide Pyramid food groups to improve the overall quality of their dietary intakes.

  20. Layer- and column-specific knockout of NMDA receptors in pyramidal neurons of the mouse barrel cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Aronoff

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Viral vectors injected into the mouse brain offer the possibility for localized genetic modifications in a highly controlled manner. Lentivector injection into mouse neocortex transduces cells within a diameter of approximately 200µm, which closely matches the lateral scale of a column in barrel cortex. The depth and volume of the injection determines which cortical layer is transduced. Furthermore, transduced gene expression from the lentivector can be limited to predominantly pyramidal neurons by using a 1.3kb fragment of the αCaMKII promoter. This technique therefore allows genetic manipulation of a specific cell type in defined columns and layers of the neocortex. By expressing Cre recombinase from such a lentivector in gene-targeted mice carrying a floxed gene, highly specific genetic lesions can be induced. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by specifically knocking out NMDA receptors (NMDARs in pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory barrel cortex of gene-targeted mice carrying floxed NMDAR 1 genes. Neurons transduced with lentivector encoding GFP and Cre recombinase exhibit not only reductions in NMDAR 1 mRNA levels, but reduced NMDAR-dependent currents and pairing-induced synaptic potentiation. This technique for knockout of NMDARs in a cell type, column- and layer-specific manner in the mouse somatosensory cortex may help further our understanding of the functional roles of NMDARs in vivo during sensory perception and learning.

  1. Development of pyramidal lines with two major QTLs conferring resistance to sheath blight in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Kamal; Jena, Kshirod; Bhuiyan, Md Atiqur Rahman; Ratnam, Wickneswari

    2014-09-01

    Sheath blight is an emerging threat in rice cultivation. It is animportant disease caused by the soil-borne necrotrophic pathogenic fungus, Rhizoctonia solani Kühn. However, to date neither known major genes for quantitative resistance, nor any rice lines immune to this disease has been identified. The disease resistance is quantitative in nature. Numerous genes are involved in this resistance process. There are few quantitative trait loci (QTLs) detected conferring improved resistance against the disease. Teqing and Tetepshowimproved resistance having QTLs, qSB-9 and qSBR11-1, respectively. Since, these QTLs demonstrates additive effects, pyramiding of these QTLs might be an option to increase the sheath blight resistance in rice. Nine rice cultivars were screened at greenhouse conditions. Results showed that Tetep and Teqing had the lowest disease ratings. UKMRC2a new high yielding cultivar was as recipient parent. Crosses between UKMRC2 and Teqing, and UKMRC2 and Tetep were made and confirmed. Subsequently 4-way crosses between the two F1s were performed to develop pyramidal lines.

  2. The ebola virus interferon antagonist VP24 directly binds STAT1 and has a novel, pyramidal fold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrianna P P Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ebolaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever with up to 90% lethality and in fatal cases, are characterized by early suppression of the host innate immune system. One of the proteins likely responsible for this effect is VP24. VP24 is known to antagonize interferon signaling by binding host karyopherin α proteins, thereby preventing them from transporting the tyrosine-phosphorylated transcription factor STAT1 to the nucleus. Here, we report that VP24 binds STAT1 directly, suggesting that VP24 can suppress at least two distinct branches of the interferon pathway. Here, we also report the first crystal structures of VP24, derived from different species of ebolavirus that are pathogenic (Sudan and nonpathogenic to humans (Reston. These structures reveal that VP24 has a novel, pyramidal fold. A site on a particular face of the pyramid exhibits reduced solvent exchange when in complex with STAT1. This site is above two highly conserved pockets in VP24 that contain key residues previously implicated in virulence. These crystal structures and accompanying biochemical analysis map differences between pathogenic and nonpathogenic viruses, offer templates for drug design, and provide the three-dimensional framework necessary for biological dissection of the many functions of VP24 in the virus life cycle.

  3. Pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex in post-stroke, vascular and other ageing-related dementias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E; Slade, Janet Y; Hall, Roslyn; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Burke, Matthew; Thomas, Alan J; Khundakar, Ahmad; Allan, Louise M; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Dementia associated with cerebrovascular disease is common. It has been reported that ∼30% of elderly patients who survive stroke develop delayed dementia (post-stroke dementia), with most cases being diagnosed as vascular dementia. The pathological substrates associated with post-stroke or vascular dementia are poorly understood, particularly those associated with executive dysfunction. Three separate yet interconnecting circuits control executive function within the frontal lobe involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. We used stereological methods, along with immunohistological and related cell morphometric analysis, to examine densities and volumes of pyramidal neurons of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex in the frontal lobe from a total of 90 elderly subjects (age range 71-98 years). Post-mortem brain tissues from post-stroke dementia and post-stroke patients with no dementia were derived from our prospective Cognitive Function After Stroke study. We also examined, in parallel, samples from ageing controls and similar age subjects pathologically diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, mixed Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, and vascular dementia. We found pyramidal cell volumes in layers III and V in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of post-stroke and vascular dementia and, of mixed and Alzheimer's disease subjects to be reduced by 30-40% compared to post-stroke patients with no dementia and controls. There were no significant changes in neuronal volumes in either the anterior cingulate or orbitofrontal cortices. Remarkably, pyramidal neurons within the orbitofrontal cortex were also found to be smaller in size when compared to those in the other two neocortical regions. To relate the cell changes to cognitive function, we noted significant correlations between neuronal volumes and total CAMCOG, orientation and memory scores and clinical

  4. Improvement of light output power of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode by lateral epitaxial overgrowth using pyramidal-shaped SiO(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chu-Young; Lee, Jin-Bock; Lee, Sang-Jun; Han, Sang-Heon; Park, Tae-Young; Kim, Je Won; Kim, Yong Chun; Park, Seong-Ju

    2010-01-18

    We report on the improvement of light output power of InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by lateral epitaxial overgrowth (LEO) of GaN using a pyramidal-shaped SiO(2) mask. The light output power was increased by 80% at 20 mA of injection current compared with that of conventional LEDs without LEO structures. This improvement is attributed to an increased internal quantum efficiency by a significant reduction in threading dislocation and by an enhancement of light extraction efficiency by pyramidal-shaped SiO(2) LEO mask.

  5. Muscarinic receptor control of pyramidal neuron membrane potential in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, P; Gawlak, M; Szulczyk, P

    2015-09-10

    Damage to the cholinergic input to the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. Cholinergic endings release acetylcholine, which activates nicotinic and/or G-protein-coupled muscarinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors activate transduction systems, which control cellular effectors that regulate the membrane potential in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) neurons. The mechanisms responsible for the cholinergic-dependent depolarization of mPFC layer V pyramidal neurons in slices obtained from young rats were elucidated in this study. Glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission as well as tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive Na(+) and voltage-dependent Ca(++) currents were eliminated. Cholinergic receptor stimulation by carbamoylcholine chloride (CCh; 100 μM) evoked depolarization (10.0 ± 1.3 mV), which was blocked by M1/M4 (pirenzepine dihydrochloride, 2 μM) and M1 (VU 0255035, 5 μM) muscarinic receptor antagonists and was not affected by a nicotinic receptor antagonist (mecamylamine hydrochloride, 10 μM). CCh-dependent depolarization was attenuated by extra- (20 μM) or intracellular (50 μM) application of an inhibitor of the βγ-subunit-dependent transduction system (gallein). It was also inhibited by intracellular application of a βγ-subunit-binding peptide (GRK2i, 10μM). mPFC pyramidal neurons express Nav1.9 channels. CCh-dependent depolarization was abolished in the presence of antibodies against Nav1.9 channels in the intracellular solution and augmented by the presence of ProTx-I toxin (100 nM) in the extracellular solution. CCh-induced depolarization was not affected by the following reagents: intracellular transduction system blockers, including U-73122 (10 μM), chelerythrine chloride (5 μM), SQ 22536 (100 μM) and H-89 (2 μM); channel blockers, including Ba(++) ions (200 μM), apamin (100 nM), flufenamic acid (200 μM), 2-APB (200 μM), SKF 96365 (50 μM), and ZD 7288 (50 μM); and a Na(+)/Ca(++) exchanger blocker, benzamil (20

  6. Pyramids of QTLs enhance host-plant resistance and Bt-mediated resistance to leaf-chewing insects in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, María A; All, John N; Boerma, H Roger; Parrott, Wayne A

    2016-04-01

    QTL-M and QTL-E enhance soybean resistance to insects. Pyramiding these QTLs with cry1Ac increases protection against Bt-tolerant pests, presenting an opportunity to effectively deploy Bt with host-plant resistance genes. Plant resistance to leaf-chewing insects minimizes the need for insecticide applications, reducing crop production costs and pesticide concerns. In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], resistance to a broad range of leaf-chewing insects is found in PI 229358 and PI 227687. PI 229358's resistance is conferred by three quantitative trait loci (QTLs): M, G, and H. PI 227687's resistance is conferred by QTL-E. The letters indicate the soybean Linkage groups (LGs) on which the QTLs are located. This study aimed to determine if pyramiding PI 229358 and PI 227687 QTLs would enhance soybean resistance to leaf-chewing insects, and if pyramiding these QTLs with Bt (cry1Ac) enhances resistance against Bt-tolerant pests. The near-isogenic lines (NILs): Benning(ME), Benning(MGHE), and Benning(ME+cry1Ac) were developed. Benning(ME) and Benning(MGHE) were evaluated in detached-leaf and greenhouse assays with soybean looper [SBL, Chrysodeixis includens (Walker)], corn earworm [CEW, Helicoverpa zea (Boddie)], fall armyworm [FAW, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith)], and velvetbean caterpillar [VBC, Anticarsia gemmatalis (Hübner)]; and in field-cage assays with SBL. Benning(ME+cry1Ac) was tested in detached-leaf assays against SBL, VBC, and Southern armyworm [SAW, Spodoptera eridania (Cramer)]. In the detached-leaf assay, Benning(ME) showed the strongest antibiosis against CEW, FAW, and VBC. In field-cage conditions, Benning(ME) and Benning(MGHE) suffered 61 % less defoliation than Benning. Benning(ME+cry1Ac) was more resistant than Benning(ME) and Benning (cry1Ac) against SBL and SAW. Agriculturally relevant levels of resistance in soybean can be achieved with just two loci, QTL-M and QTL-E. ME+cry1Ac could present an opportunity to protect the durability of Bt

  7. Flat-on ambipolar triphenylamine/C60 nano-stacks formed from the self-organization of a pyramid-sphere-shaped amphiphile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Wei-Wei; Huang, Chi-Feng; Wu, Kuan-Yi; Wu, San-Lien; Chang, Shu-Ting; Cheng, Yen-Ju; Wang, Chien-Lung

    2016-04-21

    A giant amphiphile, which is constructed with an amorphous nano-pyramid (triphenylamine, TPA) and a crystalline nano-sphere (C60), was synthesized. Structural characterization indicates that this pyramid-sphere-shaped amphiphile (TPA-C60 ) forms a solvent-induced ordered phase, in which the two constituent units self-assemble into alternating stacks of two-dimensional (2D) TPA and C60 nano-sheets. Due to the complexity of the molecular structure and the amorphous nature of the nano-pyramid, phase formation was driven by intermolecular C60-C60 interactions and the ordered phase could not be reformed from the TPA-C60 melt. Oriented crystal arrays of TPA-C60 , which contain flat-on TPA/C60 nano-stacks, can be obtained via a PDMS-assisted crystallization (PAC) technique. The flat-on dual-channel supramolecular structure of TPA-C60 delivered ambipolar and balanced charge-transport characteristics with an average μe of 2.11 × 10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1 and μh of 3.37 × 10-4 cm2 V-1 s-1. The anisotropic charge-transport ability of the pyramid-sphere-shaped amphiphile was further understood based on the lattice structure and the lattice orientation of TPA-C60 revealed from electron diffraction analyses.

  8. Experimental investigation on the large-area fabrication of micro-pyramid arrays by roll-to-roll hot embossing on PVC film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yujun; Yi, Peiyun; Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin; Lin, Zhongqin

    2014-04-01

    Large-area polymeric components with micro-pyramids have been widely applied in the fields of optics, optoelectronics, biology and chemistry, etc. Roll-to-roll (R2R) hot embossing is regarded as a promising approach to fulfil high throughput fabrication of patterned polymeric films. In this study, an R2R hot embossing system has been developed in-house and effective and continuous production of the polymeric component with micro-pyramids is demonstrated by R2R hot embossing. The influence of processing parameters has been firstly investigated by using the one-variable-at-a-time method. Afterwards, a series of experiments based on the central composite design approach have been conducted for the analysis of variance and the establishment of empirical models of the R2R hot embossing process. As a result, a 90 mm × 90 mm PVC sample with a feature height of 65 µm was successfully fabricated and the height consistency reached 94.5%. Additionally, a process window with a mold temperature of 150-160 °C, an applied force of 18-25 kgf and a feeding speed of 0.3-0.5 m min-1, was established to achieve 100% passable micro-pyramid arrays. The processing rules and the concrete ranges of parameter values can guide the process production of large-area micro-pyramids.

  9. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon solar cells passivated by an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-09-01

    Inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon (BS) solar cells with an Al2O3 passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been demonstrated. A multi-scale textured BS surface combining silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and inverted pyramids was obtained for the first time by lithography and metal catalyzed wet etching. The reflectance of the as-prepared BS surface was about 2% lower than that of the more commonly reported upright pyramid-based SiNW BS surface over the whole of the visible light spectrum, which led to a 1.7 mA cm-2 increase in short circuit current density. Moreover, the as-prepared solar cells were further passivated by an ALD-Al2O3 layer. The effect of annealing temperature on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells was investigated. It was found that the values of all solar cell parameters including short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and fill factor exhibit a further increase under an optimized annealing temperature. Minority carrier lifetime measurements indicate that the enhanced cell performance is due to the improved passivation quality of the Al2O3 layer after thermal annealing treatments. By combining these two refinements, the optimized SiNW BS solar cells achieved a maximum conversion efficiency enhancement of 7.6% compared to the cells with an upright pyramid-based SiNWs surface and conventional SiNx passivation.

  10. Spinogenesis and pruning in the anterior ventral inferotemporal cortex of the macaque monkey: an intracellular injection study of layer III pyramidal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy N. Elston

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Cortical pyramidal cells grow and mature at different rates in visual, auditory and prefrontal cortex of the macaque monkey. In particular, differences across the areas have been reported in both the timing and magnitude of growth, branching, spinogenesis and pruning in the basal dendritic trees of cells in layer III. Presently available data suggest that these different growth profiles reflect the type of functions performed by these cells in the adult brain. However, to date, studies have focussed on only a relatively few cortical areas. In the present investigation we quantified the growth of the dendritic trees of layer III pyramidal cells in the anterior ventral portion of cytoarchitectonic area TE (TEav to better comprehend developmental trends in the cerebral cortex. We quantified the growth and branching of the dendrities, and spinogenesis and pruning of spines, from post-natal day 2 (PND2 to four and a half years of age. We found that the dendritic trees increase in size from PND2 to 7 months of age and thereafter become smaller. The dendritic trees became increasingly more branched from PND2 into adulthood. There was a 2-fold increase in the number of spines in the basal dendritic trees of pyramidal cells from PND2 to 3½ months of age and then a 10% net decrease in spine number into adulthood. Thus, the growth profile of layer III pyramidal cells in the anterior ventral portion of the inferotemporal cortex differs to that in other cortical areas associated with visual processing.

  11. Scaling the Pyramid Model across Complex Systems Providing Early Care for Preschoolers: Exploring How Models for Decision Making May Enhance Implementation Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, LeAnne D.

    2017-01-01

    Bringing effective practices to scale across large systems requires attending to how information and belief systems come together in decisions to adopt, implement, and sustain those practices. Statewide scaling of the Pyramid Model, a framework for positive behavior intervention and support, across different types of early childhood programs…

  12. Altered dendritic complexity affects firing properties of cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in mice lacking the 5-HT3A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Velden, Luuk; van Hooft, Johannes A; Chameau, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    We have previously shown that the serotonergic input on Cajal-Retzius cells, mediated by 5-HT(3) receptors, plays an important role in the early postnatal maturation of the apical dendritic trees of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We reported that knockout mice lacking the 5-HT(3A) receptor showed exuberant apical dendrites of these cortical pyramidal neurons. Because model studies have shown the role of dendritic morphology on neuronal firing pattern, we used the 5-HT(3A) knockout mouse to explore the impact of dendritic hypercomplexity on the electrophysiological properties of this specific class of neurons. Our experimental results show that hypercomplexity of the apical dendritic tuft of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons affects neuronal excitability by reducing the amount of spike frequency adaptation. This difference in firing pattern, related to a higher dendritic complexity, was accompanied by an altered development of the afterhyperpolarization slope with successive action potentials. Our abstract and realistic neuronal models, which allowed manipulation of the dendritic complexity, showed similar effects on neuronal excitability and confirmed the impact of apical dendritic complexity. Alterations of dendritic complexity, as observed in several pathological conditions such as neurodegenerative diseases or neurodevelopmental disorders, may thus not only affect the input to layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons but also shape their firing pattern and consequently alter the information processing in the cortex.

  13. Altered dendritic complexity affects firing properties of cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons in mice lacking the 5-HT3A receptor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velden, L.; van Hooft, J.A.; Chameau, P.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously shown that the serotonergic input on Cajal-Retzius cells, mediated by 5-HT3 receptors, plays an important role in the early postnatal maturation of the apical dendritic trees of layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. We reported that knockout mice lacking the 5-HT(3A) receptor showed

  14. Exostoses of the Bony Pyramid of the Nose : A Review About an Adaptive Response to Mechanical Stimuli Exerted by In-Flight Oxygen Masks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreinemakers, J. Rieneke C; Klein-Nulend, J.; van Lotten, M. L.; Nolte, P. A.; Kon, M.

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses thickening of the bony pyramid of the nose, a condition that is caused by in-flight oxygen masks in otherwise healthy Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF) F-16 pilots. The overlying skin may show temporary or permanent reddening, irritation, thickening and may become painful.

  15. Oregon's Food Pyramid Choice Menus: Do Lunches as Offered to, and Selected, and Consumed by Third Graders Meet Current USDA Nutrition Standards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    Oregon's Food Pyramid Choice Menus (FPCM) require that participating elementary schools offer three to seven entrees, at least two types of milk, and six to ten fruits and vegetables, as well as three or more types of grain products in a variety bar daily. The study discussed in this report was designed to answer two questions: (1) do the menus,…

  16. Indoor {sup 22}Rn and {sup 222}Rn concentration measurements inside the Teotihuacan pyramids using NTD and E-PERM methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinosa, G. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: espinosa@fisica.unam.mx; Golzarri, J.I. [Instituto de Fisica, UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, T. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Edificio D, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Navarrete, M. [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM, Edificio D, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Bogard, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6480 (United States); Martinez, G. [Coordinacion Nacional de Conservacion del Patrimonio Cultural, Xicotencatl y General Anaya s/n, 04120 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Juarez, F. [Instituto de Geofisica, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-11-15

    Measurements of {sup 22}Rn (Thoron) and {sup 222}Rn (Radon) concentrations, inside the Sun and Moon pyramids of Teotihuacan's archeological zone in Mexico, are reported in this work. Two well-established methods, nuclear track detectors (NTDs), using open-close end cups with internal and external detectors of CR-39 polymer, and electret-passive environmental radon monitoring (E-PERM) were used for the measurements. This experiment had two objectives: to obtain better confidence in the {sup 22}Rn and {sup 222}Rn measurements inside the archeological tunnels, and to compare the data obtained in each one of the two methods. This experiment is specially interesting because of the very peculiar conditions where the measurements are made: high humidity, labyrinths with air currents, but almost constant temperature inside of the pyramid tunnels and galleries, notwithstanding of the temperature changes between the day and the night outside of the pyramid body. The {sup 222}Rn concentrations found in both the pyramids were lower than the action level proposed by the ICRP-65. These tunnels are not open to the public, but researchers from the Anthropology Institutions spend part of their time working there, in periods varying from 3 to 5 months.

  17. Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisses, A.; Kell, A.; Kent, G. [UNR; Driscoll, N. [UCSD; Karlin, R.; Baskin, R. [USGS; Louie, J. [UNR; Pullammanappallil, S. [Optim

    2016-08-01

    Amy Eisses, Annie Kell, Graham Kent, Neal Driscoll, Robert Karlin, Rob Baskin, John Louie, and Satish Pullammanappallil, 2011, Marine and land active-source seismic imaging of mid-Miocene to Holocene-aged faulting near geothermal prospects at Pyramid Lake, Nevada: presented at Geothermal Resources Council Annual Meeting, San Diego, Oct. 23-26.

  18. Promoting Sanitation Markets at the Bottom of the Pyramid in Peru : A Win-Win Scenario for Government, the Private Sector, and Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Baskovich, Malva Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Launched in 2007, the Creating Sanitation Markets (CSM) initiative is a multi stakeholder effort led by the World Bank's water and sanitation program to explore new alternatives for increasing access to quality household sanitation in Peru. The approach is premised on a market-based system for sanitation at the bottom of the pyramid, introducing a new paradigm for local sustainable develop...

  19. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon solar cells passivated by an atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Ding, Shi-Jin; Zhang, David Wei

    2015-10-07

    Inverted pyramid-based nanostructured black-silicon (BS) solar cells with an Al2O3 passivation layer grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) have been demonstrated. A multi-scale textured BS surface combining silicon nanowires (SiNWs) and inverted pyramids was obtained for the first time by lithography and metal catalyzed wet etching. The reflectance of the as-prepared BS surface was about 2% lower than that of the more commonly reported upright pyramid-based SiNW BS surface over the whole of the visible light spectrum, which led to a 1.7 mA cm(-2) increase in short circuit current density. Moreover, the as-prepared solar cells were further passivated by an ALD-Al2O3 layer. The effect of annealing temperature on the photovoltaic performance of the solar cells was investigated. It was found that the values of all solar cell parameters including short circuit current, open circuit voltage, and fill factor exhibit a further increase under an optimized annealing temperature. Minority carrier lifetime measurements indicate that the enhanced cell performance is due to the improved passivation quality of the Al2O3 layer after thermal annealing treatments. By combining these two refinements, the optimized SiNW BS solar cells achieved a maximum conversion efficiency enhancement of 7.6% compared to the cells with an upright pyramid-based SiNWs surface and conventional SiNx passivation.

  20. Detection and Classification of Multiple Objects using an RGB-D Sensor and Linear Spatial Pyramid Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitriou, Michalis; Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Vidakis, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a complete system for multiple object detection and classification in a 3D scene using an RGB-D sensor such as the Microsoft Kinect sensor. Successful multiple object detection and classification are crucial features in many 3D computer vision applications. The main goal......, connected components detection and filtering approaches, in order to design a complete image processing algorithm for efficient object detection of multiple individual objects in a single scene, even in complex scenes with many objects. Besides, we apply the Linear Spatial Pyramid Matching (LSPM) [1] method...... proposed by Jianchao Yang et al for the efficient classification of the detected objects. Experimental results are presented for both detection and classification, showing the efficiency of the proposed design....

  1. Note: Nanomechanical characterization of soft materials using a micro-machined nanoforce transducer with an FIB-made pyramidal tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Gao, S.; Brand, U.; Hiller, K.; Wollschläger, N.; Pohlenz, F.

    2017-03-01

    The quantitative nanomechanical characterization of soft materials using the nanoindentation tech-nique requires further improvements in the performances of instruments, including their force resolution in particular. A micro-machined silicon nanoforce transducer based upon electrostatic comb drives featuring the force and depth resolutions down to ˜1 nN and 0.2 nm, respectively, is described. At the end of the MEMS transducer's main shaft, a pyramidal tip is fabricated using a focused ion beam facility. A proof-of-principle setup with this MEMS nanoindenter has been established to measure the mechanical properties of soft polydimethylsiloxane. First measurement results demonstrate that the prototype measurement system is able to quantitatively characterize soft materials with elastic moduli down to a few MPa.

  2. A Method Based on Active Appearance Model and Gradient Orientation Pyramid of Face Verification as People Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Xiang Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Face verification in the presence of age progression is an important problem that has not been widely addressed. In this paper, we propose to use the active appearance model (AAM and gradient orientation pyramid (GOP feature representation for this problem. First, we use the AAM on the dataset and generate the AAM images; we then get the representation of gradient orientation on a hierarchical model, which is the appearance of GOP. When combined with a support vector machine (SVM, experimental results show that our approach has excellent performance on two public domain face aging datasets: FGNET and MORPH. Second, we compare the performance of the proposed methods with a number of related face verification methods; the results show that the new approach is more robust and performs better.

  3. Adherence to the food guide pyramid recommendations among African Americans and Latinos: results from the Multiethnic Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sangita; Murphy, Suzanne P; Wilkens, Lynne R; Shen, Lucy; Hankin, Jean H; Monroe, Kristine R; Henderson, Brian; Kolonel, Laurence N

    2004-12-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the degree of adherence to the Food Guide Pyramid recommendations among African Americans, Latinos born in the United States, and Latinos born in Mexico. Subjects were from the Multiethnic Cohort Study in Hawaii and Los Angeles, and completed a self-administered quantitative food frequency questionnaire at baseline in 1993-1996. Dairy recommendations were the least likely of all the food group recommendations to be followed, with 61% to 99% of individuals in the three ethnic groups not consuming the recommended number of servings. African Americans were less likely to adhere to all of the food group recommendations compared to the two Latino groups. A greater percentage of Latinos born in the United States did not adhere to the food group recommendations compared to Latinos born in Mexico. All three groups would benefit from interventions designed to promote healthy food choices.

  4. Highly antireflective AlGaN/GaN ultraviolet photodetectors using ZnO nanorod arrays on inverted pyramidal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hongyun; Lim, Jongwoo; Suria, Ateeq J.; Senesky, Debbie G.

    2017-07-01

    Highly antireflective heterostructured aluminum gallium nitride (AlGaN)/GaN ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors were demonstrated using a combination of inverted pyramidal surfaces and zinc oxide nanorod arrays (i.e., antireflective surface modification) to enhance the optical sensitivity. The microfabricated hierarchical surfaces significantly reduced the average surface reflectance to less than 0.3% in the UV region and less than 1% in the visible light region, allowing near-perfect absorption of incident light regardless of the angle of incidence (5-80°). As a result, the photodetectors fabricated on highly antireflective AlGaN/GaN surfaces showed higher sensitivity and responsivity over a broad range of incidence angles compared to photodetectors on planar AlGaN/GaN surfaces, supporting the use of a hierarchically modified sensing surface for omnidirectional UV monitoring with higher sensitivity.

  5. A full simulation of the Quetzal echo at the Mayan pyramid of Kukulkan at Chichen Itza in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, Nico F.; Degrieck, Joris; Briers, Rudy; Leroy, Oswald

    2003-04-01

    It is well known that a handclap in front of the staircase of the pyramid produces an echo that sounds similar to the chirp of the Quetzal bird. This phenomenon occurs due to diffraction. There exist some publications concerning this phenomenon and even some first attempts are reported to simulate it. However, no full simulation (amplitude, frequency, time) has ever been reported before. The present work presents a simulation which is based on the theory of the diffraction of plane waves and which takes into account continuity conditions. The latter theory is the building block for an extended theory that tackles the diffraction of a spherical sound pulse. By means of these principles it is possible to entirely simulate the echo following a handclap in front of the staircase. [Work supported by The Flemish Institute for the Encouragement of the Scientific and Technological Research in Industry (I.W.T.)

  6. The evolution of ultrahigh carbon steels - from the Great Pyramids, to Alexander the Great, to Y2K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, J

    1999-10-01

    Hypereutectoid steels containing between about 1 and 2.1 wt%C, and now known as ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCS), have both a rich history (dating back to the time of Alexander the Great, i.e. {approximately} 300 BC) and an interesting, recent, technological period of development (from 1975 to the present). The connections between the modern UHCS and their ancient counterparts, and in particular Damascus steels, have received considerable attention. In addition to monolithic products, UHCS have also been used in both ancient and modern times in laminated composites. In the present paper, a summary of the modern development of UHCS and UHCS-containing laminates is given, and parallels are drawn with ancient materials. Also, ancient laminated composites containing other steels are described; controversial issues and a possible solution related to the age of such a laminate found in the Great Pyramid of Gizeh are discussed.

  7. Sodium Dynamics in Pyramidal Neuron Dendritic Spines: Synaptically Evoked Entry Predominantly through AMPA Receptors and Removal by Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kenichi; Ross, William N

    2017-10-11

    Dendritic spines are key elements underlying synaptic integration and cellular plasticity, but many features of these important structures are not known or are controversial. We examined these properties using newly developed simultaneous sodium and calcium imaging with single-spine resolution in pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices from either sex. Indicators for both ions were loaded through the somatic patch pipette, which also recorded electrical responses. Fluorescence changes were detected with a high-speed, low-noise CCD camera. Following subthreshold electrical stimulation, postsynaptic sodium entry is almost entirely through AMPA receptors with little contribution from entry through NMDA receptors or voltage-gated sodium channels. Sodium removal from the spine head is through rapid diffusion out to the dendrite through the spine neck with a half-removal time of ∼16 ms, which suggests the neck has low resistance. Peak [Na(+)]i changes during single EPSPs are ∼5 mm Stronger electrical stimulation evoked small plateau potentials that had significant longer-lasting localized [Na(+)]i increases mediated through NMDA receptors.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dendritic spines, small structures that are difficult to investigate, are important elements in the fundamental processes of synaptic integration and plasticity. The main tool for examining these structures has been calcium imaging. However, the kinds of information that calcium imaging reveals is limited. We used newly developed, high-speed, simultaneous sodium and calcium imaging to examine ion dynamics in spines in hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We found that following single subthreshold synaptic activation most sodium entry was through AMPA receptors and not through NMDA receptors or through voltage-gated sodium channels and that the spine neck is not a significant resistance barrier. Most spine mechanisms are linear. However, regenerative NMDA conductances can be activated with stronger stimulation

  8. Expression profile analysis of vulnerable CA1 pyramidal neurons in young-middle aged Ts65Dn mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alldred, Melissa J.; Lee, Sang Han; Petkova, Eva; Ginsberg, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent cause of intellectual disability (ID). Individuals with DS show a variety of cognitive deficits, most notably in hippocampal learning and memory, and display pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD), with neurodegeneration of cholinergic basal forebrain (CBF) neurons. Elucidation of the molecular and cellular underpinnings of neuropathology has been assessed via gene expression analysis in a relevant animal model, termed the Ts65Dn mouse. The Ts65Dn mouse is a segmental trisomy model of DS which mimics DS/AD pathology, notably age-related cognitive dysfunction and degeneration of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons (BFCNs). To determine expression level changes, molecular fingerprinting of Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) pyramidal neurons was performed in adult (4-9 month old) Ts65Dn mice, at the initiation of BFCN degeneration. To quantitate transcriptomic changes during this early time period, laser capture microdissection (LCM), terminal continuation (TC) RNA amplification, custom-designed microarray analysis, and subsequent validation of individual transcripts by qPCR and protein analysis via immunoblotting was performed. Results indicate significant alterations within CA1 pyramidal neurons of Ts65Dn mice compared to normal disomic (2N) littermates, notably in the downregulation of neurotrophins and their cognate neurotrophin receptors among other classes of transcripts relevant to neurodegeneration. These results of this single population gene expression analysis at the time of septohippocampal deficits in a trisomic mouse model shed light on a vulnerable circuit that may cause the AD-like pathology invariably seen in DS that could help to identify mechanisms of degeneration, and provide novel gene targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:25131634

  9. Syngap1 haploinsufficiency damages a postnatal critical period of pyramidal cell structural maturation linked to cortical circuit assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceti, Massimiliano; Creson, Thomas K; Vaissiere, Thomas; Rojas, Camilo; Huang, Wen-Chin; Wang, Ya-Xian; Petralia, Ronald S; Page, Damon T; Miller, Courtney A; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2015-05-01

    Genetic haploinsufficiency of SYNGAP1/Syngap1 commonly occurs in developmental brain disorders, such as intellectual disability, epilepsy, schizophrenia, and autism spectrum disorder. Thus, studying mouse models of Syngap1 haploinsufficiency may uncover pathologic developmental processes common among distinct brain disorders. A Syngap1 haploinsufficiency model was used to explore the relationship between critical period dendritic spine abnormalities, cortical circuit assembly, and the window for genetic rescue to understand how damaging mutations disrupt key substrates of mouse brain development. Syngap1 mutations broadly disrupted a developmentally sensitive period that corresponded to the period of heightened postnatal cortical synaptogenesis. Pathogenic Syngap1 mutations caused a coordinated acceleration of dendrite elongation and spine morphogenesis and pruning of these structures in neonatal cortical pyramidal neurons. These mutations also prevented a form of developmental structural plasticity associated with experience-dependent reorganization of brain circuits. Consistent with these findings, Syngap1 mutant mice displayed an altered pattern of long-distance synaptic inputs into a cortical area important for cognition. Interestingly, the ability to genetically improve the behavioral endophenotype of Syngap1 mice decreased slowly over postnatal development and mapped onto the developmental period of coordinated dendritic insults. Pathogenic Syngap1 mutations have a profound impact on the dynamics and structural integrity of pyramidal cell postsynaptic structures known to guide the de novo wiring of nascent cortical circuits. These findings support the idea that disrupted critical periods of dendritic growth and spine plasticity may be a common pathologic process in developmental brain disorders. Copyright © 2015 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  10. Geology and geothermal waters of Lightning Dock region, Animas Valley and Pyramid Mountains, Hidalgo County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elston, W.E.; Deal, E.G.; Logsdon, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    This circular covers the geology of the Pyramid Peak, Swallow Fork Peak, Table Top Mountain, and South Pyramid Peak 7-1/2-min quadrangles, which include the Lightning Dock KGRA. Hot wells (70 to 115.5/sup 0/C) seem to be structurally controlled by intersections of the ring-fracture zone of an Oligocene ash-flow tuff cauldron (Muir cauldron), a Miocene-to-Holocene north-trending basin-and-range fault (Animas Valley fault), and a northeast-trending lineament that appears to control anomalously heated underground waters and Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt cones in the San Bernardino, San Simon, and Animas Valleys. The Muir cauldron, approximately 20 km in diameter, collapsed in two stages, each associated with the eruption of a rhyolite ash-flow-tuff sheet and of ring-fracture domes. Most of the hydrothermal alteration of the Lightning Dock KGRA is related to the first stage of eruption and collapse, not to the modern geothermal system. Contrary to previous reports, no silicic volcanic rocks younger than basin-and-range faulting are known; unconformities beneath rhyolite ring-fracture domes are caused by Oligocene caldera collapse, not by basin-and-range faulting. The Animas Valley is the site of widespread post-20 My travertine deposits and near-surface veins of calcite, fluorite, and/or psilomelane, controlled by north- or northwest-trending basin-and-range faults. The fluoride-bearing waters of the Lightning Dock KGRA may be a late stage of this hydrothermal activity. Distribution of Pliocene-Pleistocene basalt suggests that deep-seated basalt near the solids may be the ultimate heat source.

  11. Specialization in pyramidal cell structure in the cingulate cortex of the Chacma baboon (Papio ursinus): an intracellular injection study of the posterior and anterior cingulate gyrus with comparative notes on the macaque and vervet monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elston, Guy N; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Elston, Alejandra; DeFelipe, Javier; Manger, Paul

    2005-10-28

    This study forms part of an ongoing investigation of pyramidal cell structure in the cingulate cortex of primates. Recently we have demonstrated that layer III pyramidal cells in the anterior cingulate gyrus are considerably larger, more branched and more spinous than those in the posterior cingulate gyrus (areas 24 and 23, respectively) in the macaque and vervet monkeys. Moreover, the extent of the interareal difference in specialization in pyramidal cell structure differed between the two species. These data suggest that pyramidal cell circuitry may have evolved differently in these closely related species. Presently there are too few data to speculate on what is selecting for this specialization in structure. Here we extend the basis for comparison by studying pyramidal cell structure in cingulate gyrus of the Chacma baboon (Papio ursinus). Methodology used here is the same as that for our previous studies: intracellular injection of Lucifer Yellow in flat-mounted cortical slices. We found that pyramidal cells in anterior cingulate gyrus (area 24) were more branched and more spinous than those in posterior cingulate gyrus (area 23). Moreover, the complexity in pyramidal cell structure in both the anterior and posterior cingulate gyrus of the baboon differed to that in the corresponding regions in either the macaque or vervet monkeys.

  12. Encapsulated Environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, T.M.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Cheung, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  13. Encapsulated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLellan, Tom M.; Daanen, Hein A M; Cheung, Stephen S.

    2013-01-01

    In many occupational settings, clothing must be worn to protect individuals from hazards in their work environment. However, personal protective clothing (PPC) restricts heat exchange with the environment due to high thermal resistance and low water vapor permeability. As a consequence, individuals

  14. Changes in neuronal excitability by activated microglia: Differential Na+ current up-regulation in pyramid-shaped and bipolar neurons by TNF-α and IL-18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eKlapal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are activated during pathological events in the brain and are capable of releasing various types of inflammatory cytokines. Here we demonstrate that the addition of 5% microglia activated by 1 µg/ml lipopolysaccharides (LPS to hippocampal cultures up-regulates Na+ current densities (INavD of bipolar as well as pyramid-shaped neurons, thereby increasing their excitability. Deactivation of microglia by the addition of 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β decreases INavD below control levels suggesting that the residual activated microglial cells influence neuronal excitability in control cultures. Preincubation of hippocampal cultures with 10 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a major cytokine released by activated microglia, up-regulated INavD significantly by ~30% in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells the up-regulation only reached an increase of ~14%. Incubation of the cultures with antibodies against either TNF-receptor 1 or 2 blocked the up-regulation of INavD in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells increases in INavD were exclusively blocked by antibodies against TNF-receptor 2, suggesting that both cell types respond differently to TNF-α exposure. Since additional cytokines, such as interleukin-18 (IL-18, are released from activated microglia we tested potential effects of IL-18 on INavD in both cell types. Exposure to 5-10 ng/ml IL-18 for 4 days increased INavD in both pyramid-shaped as well as bipolar neurons, albeit the dose-response curves were shifted to lower concentrations in bipolar cells. Our results suggest that by secretion of cytokines microglial cells up-regulate Na+ current densities in bipolar and pyramid-shaped neurons to some extent differentially. Depending on the exact cytokine composition and concentration released this could change the balance between the activity of inhibitory bipolar and excitatory pyramid-shaped cells. Since bipolar cells show a larger up-regulation of

  15. [PI 3 K/Akt signaling pathway contributed to the protective effect of acupuncture intervention on epileptic seizure-induced injury of hippocampal pyramidal cells in epilepsy rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Ang, Wen-Ping; Shen, De-Kai; Liu, Xiang-Guo; Yang, Yong-Qing; Ma, Yun

    2013-02-01

    To observe the protective effect of acupuncture stimulation on pyramidal cells in hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions and to analyze the involvement of phosphatidy linositol-3-kinase (PI 3 K)/protein kinase B(PKB or Akt) signaling pathway in the acupuncture effect in epilepsy rats. A total of 120 SD rats were randomly divided into normal control group, model group, LY 294002 (a specific antagonist for PI 3 K/Akt signaling) group, acupuncture+ LY 294002 group and acupuncture group (n = 24 in each group, 12 for H. E. staining, and 12 for electron microscope observation). Epilepsy model was established by intraperitoneal injection of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 5 microL). Manual acupuncture stimulation was applied to "Baihui" (GV 20) and "Dazhui" (GV 14) once daily for 5 days. Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO, 5 microL, a control solvent) was given to rats of the normal, model and acupuncture groups, and LY294002 (5 microL, dissolved in DMSO) given to rats of the LY 294002 and acupuncture+ LY 294002 groups by lateral ventricular injection. Four hours and 24 h after modeling, the hippocampus tissues were sampled for observing pathological changes of CA 1 and CA 3 regions after H. E. staining under light microscope and for checkin ultrastructural changes of the pyramidal cells under transmission electron microscope. In comparison with the normal control group, the numbers of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 3 region in the model group were decreased significantly 4 h and 24 h after epileptic seizure (P acupuncture group were increased considerably in the number at both 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P acupuncture+ LY 294002 and model groups in the numbers of pyramidal cells at 4 h and 24 h after seizure (P > 0.05). Findings of the light microscope and electron microscope showed that the injury severity of pyramidal cells of hippocampal CA 1 and CA 3 regions was moderate 4 h after epileptic seizure and even worse 24 h after seizure in the model group, LY 294002 group and acupuncture+ LY

  16. Dopamine D2 Receptors Modulate Pyramidal Neurons in Mouse Medial Prefrontal Cortex through a Stimulatory G-Protein Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Sarah E; Sohal, Vikaas S

    2017-10-18

    Dopaminergic modulation of prefrontal cortex (PFC) is thought to play key roles in many cognitive functions and to be disrupted in pathological conditions, such as schizophrenia. We have previously described a phenomenon whereby dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) activation elicits afterdepolarizations (ADPs) in subcortically projecting (SC) pyramidal neurons within L5 of the PFC. These D2R-induced ADPs only occur following synaptic input, which activates NMDARs, even when the delay between the synaptic input and ADPs is relatively long (e.g., several hundred milliseconds). Here, we use a combination of electrophysiological, optogenetic, pharmacological, transgenic, and chemogenetic approaches to elucidate cellular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon in male and female mice. We find that knocking out D2Rs eliminates the ADP in a cell-autonomous fashion, confirming that this ADP depends on D2Rs. Hyperpolarizing current injection, but not AMPA receptor blockade, prevents synaptic stimulation from facilitating D2R-induced ADPs, suggesting that this phenomenon depends on the recruitment of voltage-dependent currents (e.g., NMDAR-mediated Ca 2+ influx) by synaptic input. Finally, the D2R-induced ADP is blocked by inhibitors of cAMP/PKA signaling, insensitive to pertussis toxin or β-arrestin knock-out, and mimicked by G s -DREADD stimulation, suggesting that D2R activation elicits the ADP by stimulating cAMP/PKA signaling. These results show that this unusual physiological phenomenon, in which D2Rs enhance cellular excitability in a manner that depends on synaptic input, is mediated at the cellular level through the recruitment of signaling pathways associated with G s , rather than the G i/o -associated mechanisms that have classically been ascribed to D2Rs. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are thought to play important roles in behaviors, including working memory and cognitive flexibility. Variation in D2Rs has also been

  17. Pyramiding of drought yield QTLs into a high quality Malaysian rice cultivar MRQ74 improves yield under reproductive stage drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsudin, Noraziyah Abd Aziz; Swamy, B P Mallikarjuna; Ratnam, Wickneswari; Sta Cruz, Ma Teressa; Sandhu, Nitika; Raman, Anitha K; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-12-01

    With the objective of improving the grain yield (GY) of the Malaysian high quality rice cultivar MRQ74 under reproductive stage drought stress (RS), three drought yield QTLs, viz. qDTY 2.2, qDTY 3.1 , and qDTY 12.1 were pyramided by marker assisted breeding (MAB). Foreground selection using QTL specific markers, recombinant selection using flanking markers, and background selections were performed in every generation. BC1F3 derived pyramided lines (PLs) with different combinations of qDTY 2.2, qDTY 3.1 , and qDTY 12.1 were evaluated under both RS and non-stress (NS) during the dry season (DS) of 2013 and 2014 at IRRI. The GY reductions in RS trials compared to NS trials ranged from 79 to 99 %. Plant height (PH) was reduced and days to flowering (DTF) was delayed under RS. Eleven BC1F5 MRQ74 PLs with yield advantages of 1009 to 3473 kg ha(-1) under RS and with yields equivalent to MRQ74 under NS trials were identified as promising drought tolerance PLs. Five best PLs, IR 98010-126-708-1-4, IR 98010-126-708-1-3, IR 98010-126-708-1-5, IR 99616-44-94-1-1, and IR 99616-44-94-1-2 with a yield advantage of more than 1000 kg ha(-1) under RS and with yield potential equivalent to that of MRQ74 under NS were selected. The effect of three drought grain yield QTLs under RS in MRQ74 was validated. Under NS, PLs with two qDTY combinations (qDTY 2.2 + qDTY 12.1 ) performed better than PLs with other qDTY combinations, indicating the presence of a positive interaction between qDTY 2.2 and qDTY 12.1 in the MRQ74 background. Drought tolerant MRQ74 PLs with a yield advantage of more than 1000 kg ha(-1) under RS were developed. Differential yield advantages of different combinations of the qDTYs indicate a differential synergistic relationship among qDTYs.

  18. The Tip of the Iceberg: The Quest for Innovation at the Base of the Pyramid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, M. D.; Awad, N. F.

    Much of the world in Asia, Latin America, and Africa is at an early stage of economic development similar to what the United States and other developed countries experienced many decades ago. Yet, much as their needs for hard and soft infrastructure, effective business practices, and an educated workforce parallel similar needs that underlay earlier development in the West, replicating Western development would overlook the hallmarks of the current century: widely available information and communications technology; a set of electronic linkages among the world; and a global business environment, to name just a few. Consequently, it should be possible to allow developing countries to use "leapfrog" technologies that were inconceivable decades ago to support their development. One means of identifying these opportunities is by matching traditional development needs with novel support by connecting previously unrelated literatures.

  19. The environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pannozzo, Linda

    2016-01-01

    "In About Canada: The Environment, award-winning author Linda Pannozzo takes us on a whirlwind tour of the philosophical, economic, and ideological landscape forming the backdrop for our current environmental worldview...

  20. Enacting Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    Enacting Environments is an ethnography of the midst of the encounter between corporations, sustainable development and climate change. At this intersection 'environmental management' and 'carbon accounting' are put into practice. Purportedly, these practices green capitalism. Drawing on fieldwork...

  1. Robotic environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, H.H.

    2011-01-01

    Technological and conceptual advances in fields such as artificial intelligence, robotics, and material science have enabled robotic architectural environments to be implemented and tested in the last decade in virtual and physical prototypes. These prototypes are incorporating sensing-actuating

  2. Flexoelectric Induced Caloric Effect in Truncated Pyramid Shaped Ba0.67Sr0.33TiO3 Ferroelectric Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Satyanarayan; Chauhan, Aditya; Madhar, Niyaz Ahamad; Ilahi, Bouraoui; Vaish, Rahul

    2017-07-01

    Solid state refrigeration based on ferroelectric materials can potentially be competing in not-in-kind refrigeration technology. However, their functionality is currently limited to Curie temperatures. Through this article, authors have attempted to describe an unexplored component of the stress-driven caloric effect, obtainable beyond the Curie point. The phenomenon, termed as the flexocaloric effect (FCE), relies on inhomogeneous straining of the crystal lattice to induce polarization in centrosymmetric crystals (flexoelectricity). For this study, a truncated pyramid geometry was selected, and the dependence of sample height on caloric capacity was studied. A peak temperature change of 1.75 K (313 K) was estimated for Ba0.67Sr0.33TiO3 (BST) ceramics employing a truncated pyramid configuration.

  3. Effects of 15 Hz square wave magnetic fields on the voltage-gated sodium and potassium channels in prefrontal cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Dou, Jun-Rong; Gao, Yang; Dong, Lei; Li, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Although magnetic fields have significant effects on neurons, little is known about the mechanisms behind their effects. The present study aimed to measure the effects of magnetic fields on ion channels in cortical pyramidal neurons. Cortical pyramidal neurons of Kunming mice were isolated and then subjected to 15 Hz, 1 mT square wave (duty ratio 50%) magnetic fields stimulation. Sodium currents (INa), transient potassium currents (IA) and delayed rectifier potassium currents (IK) were recorded by whole-cell patch clamp method. We found that magnetic field exposure depressed channel current densities, and altered the activation kinetics of sodium and potassium channels. The inactivation properties of INa and IA were also altered. Magnetic field exposure alters ion channel function in neurons. It is likely that the structures of sodium and potassium channels were influenced by the applied field. Sialic acid, which is an important component of the channels, could be the molecule responsible for the reported results.

  4. Ischemic preconditioning protects hippocampal pyramidal neurons from transient ischemic injury via the attenuation of oxidative damage through upregulating heme oxygenase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, In Hye; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Cho, Geum-Sil; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Chen, Bai Hui; Yan, Bing Chun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Choi, Jung Hoon; Lee, Choong Hyun; Hwang, In Koo; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kwon, Young-Guen; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho

    2015-02-01

    Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) provides neuroprotection against subsequent severe ischemic injury by activating specific mechanisms. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IPC attenuates postischemic neuronal death via heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Animals used in this study were randomly assigned to 4 groups; sham-operated group, ischemia-operated group, IPC plus (+) sham-operated group and IPC+ischemia-operated group. IPC was induced by subjecting gerbils to 2min of ischemia followed by 1 day of recovery. A significant loss of neurons was observed in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) in the ischemia-operated groups at 5 days postischemia. In the IPC+ischemia-operated groups, CA1 pyramidal neurons were well protected. The level of HO-1 protein and its activity increased significantly in the CA1 of the IPC+sham-operated group, and the level and activity was maintained in all the time after ischemia-reperfusion compared with the ischemia-operated groups. HO-1 immunoreactivity was induced in the CA1 pyramidal neurons in both IPC+sham-operated- and IPC+ischemia-operated groups. We also found that levels or immunoreactivities of superoxide anion, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal were significantly decreased in the CA1 of both IPC+sham-operated- and IPC+ischemia-operated groups. Whereas, treatment with zinc protoporphyrin IX (a HO-1 inhibitor) into the IPC+ischemia-operated groups did not preserve the IPC-mediated increase of HO-1 and lost beneficial effects of IPC by inhibiting ischemia-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation. In brief, IPC protects CA1 pyramidal neurons from ischemic injury by upregulating HO-1, and we suggest that the enhancement of HO-1 expression by IPC may be a legitimate strategy for a therapeutic intervention of cerebral ischemic damage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Micro RNA detection in long-term fixed tissue of cortical glutamatergic pyramidal neurons after targeted laser-capture neuroanatomical microdissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herai, Roberto R; Stefanacci, Lisa; Hrvoj-Mihic, Branka; Chailangkarn, Thanathom; Hanson, Kari; Semendeferi, Katerina; Muotri, Alysson R

    2014-09-30

    Formalin fixation (FF) is the standard and most common method for preserving postmortem brain tissue. FF stabilizes cellular morphology and tissue architecture, and can be used to study the distinct morphologic and genetic signatures of different cell types. Although the procedure involved in FF degrades messenger RNA over time, an alternative approach is to use small RNAs (sRNAs) for genetic analysis associated with cell morphology. Although genetic analysis is carried out on fresh or frozen tissue, there is limited availability or impossibility on targeting specific cell populations, respectively. The goal of this study is to detect miRNA and other classes of sRNA stored in formalin or in paraffin embedded for over decades. Two brain samples, one formed by a mixed population of cortical and subcortical cells, and one formed by pyramidal shaped cells collected by laser-capture microdissection, were subjected to sRNA sequencing. Performing bioinformatics analysis over the sequenced sRNA from brain tissue, we detected several classes of sRNA, such as miRNAs that play key roles in brain neurodevelopmental and maintenance pathways, and hsa-mir-155 expression in neurons. Comparison with existing method: Our method is the first to combine the approaches for: laser-capture of pyramidal neurons from long-term formalin-fixed brain; extract sRNA from laser-captured pyramidal neurons; apply a suite of bioinformatics tools to detect miRNA and other classes of sRNAs on sequenced samples having high levels of RNA degradation. This is the first study to show that sRNA can be rescued from laser-captured FF pyramidal neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Deleterious impacts of a 900-MHz electromagnetic field on hippocampal pyramidal neurons of 8-week-old Sprague Dawley male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şahin, Arzu; Aslan, Ali; Baş, Orhan; İkinci, Ayşe; Özyılmaz, Cansu; Sönmez, Osman Fikret; Çolakoğlu, Serdar; Odacı, Ersan

    2015-10-22

    Children are at potential risk due to their intense use of mobile phones. We examined 8-week-old rats because this age of the rats is comparable with the preadolescent period in humans. The number of pyramidal neurons in the cornu ammonis of the Sprague Dawley male rat (8-weeks old, weighing 180-250 g) hippocampus following exposure to a 900 MHz (MHz) electromagnetic field (EMF) were examined. The study consisted of control (CN-G), sham exposed (SHM-EG) and EMF exposed (EMF-EG) groups with 6 rats in each. The EMF-EG rats were exposed to 900 MHz EMF (1h/day for 30 days) in an EMF jar. The SHM-EG rats were placed in the EMF jar but not exposed to the EMF (1h/day for 30 days). The CN-G rats were not placed into the exposure jar and were not exposed to the EMF during the study period. All animals were sacrificed at the end of the experiment, and their brains were removed for histopathological and stereological analysis. The number of pyramidal neurons in the cornu ammonis of the hippocampus was estimated on Cresyl violet stained sections of the brain using the optical dissector counting technique. Histopathological evaluations were also performed on these sections. Histopathological observation showed abundant cells with abnormal, black or dark blue cytoplasm and shrunken morphology among the normal pyramidal neurons. The largest lateral ventricles were observed in the EMF-EG sections compared to those from the other groups. Stereological analyses showed that the total number of pyramidal neurons in the cornu ammonis of the EMF-EG rats was significantly lower than those in the CN-G (pEMF exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Intrathecal delivery of IL-6 reactivates the intrinsic growth capacity of pyramidal cells in the sensorimotor cortex after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Qin, Yu; Bian, Chen; Zhao, Yandong; Zhang, Wen

    2015-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the growth-promoting effect of intrathecal delivery of recombinant rat IL-6 immediately after corticospinal tract (CST) injury. Our present study aims to further clarify whether intrathecal delivery of IL-6 after CST injury could reactivate the intrinsic growth capacity of pyramidal cells in the sensorimotor cortex which project long axons to the spinal cord. We examined, by ELISA, levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), adenylyl cyclase (AC, which synthesizes cAMP), phosphodiesterases (PDE, which degrades cAMP), and, by RT-PCR, the expression of regeneration-associated genes in the rat sensorimotor cortex after intrathecal delivery of IL-6 for 7 days, started immediately after CST injury. Furthermore, we injected retrograde neuronal tracer Fluorogold (FG) to the spinal cord to label pyramidal cells in the sensorimotor cortex, layers V and VI, combined with βIII-tubulin immunostaining, then we analyzed by immunohistochemisty and western blot the expression of the co-receptor gp-130 of IL-6 family, and pSTAT3 and mTOR, downstream IL-6/JAK/STAT3 and PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathways respectively. We showed that intrathecal delivery of IL-6 elevated cAMP level and upregulated the expression of regeneration-associated genes including GAP-43, SPRR1A, CAP-23 and JUN-B, and the expression of pSTAT3 and mTOR in pyramidal cells of the sensorimotor cortex. In contrast, AG490, an inhibitor of JAK, partially blocked these effects of IL-6. All these results indicate that intrathecal delivery of IL-6 immediately after spinal cord injury can reactivate the intrinsic growth capacity of pyramidal cells in the sensorimotor cortex and these effects of IL-6 were partially JAK/STAT3-dependent.

  8. Optical, electrical and structural properties of nano-pyramidal ZnO films grown on glass substrate by spray pyrolysis technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedia, A.; Bedia, F. Z.; Aillerie, M.; Maloufi, N.; Ould Saad Hamady, S.; Perroud, O.; Benyoucef, B.

    2014-05-01

    Optical, electrical and structural properties of ZnO nano-pyramidal films, synthesized by chemical spray pyrolysis technique on glass substrates were investigated. A complete set of structural, optical and electrical parameters is proposed in this contribution. ZnO films possess polycrystalline wurtzite structure showing a preferential orientation along the c-axis as confirmed by XRD measurements. The structure has been investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, at 532 nm excitation source and the morphology is characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Link to the specific growing parameters, the morphology of the so-obtained films is rarely observed in nanostructures family with a diameter of ZnO hexagonal nano-pyramids in the range of 50-150 nm smaller than this usually obtained by spray pyrolysis. The strong peaks of the E2 Raman mode at 99.3 cm-1 (low) and 439.4 cm-1 (high), indicate a good crystal quality of the ZnO nano-pyramids. The existence of a compressive stress in the ZnO structure was pointed out by Raman scattering and estimated by XRD measurements. High optical transmittance value of the film above 90% in the visible region was observed and the optical band gap was found to be 3.273 eV at room temperature. The photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of ZnO hexagonal pyramid shows an intensity ratio of the UV emission to the visible band more than 20. By electrical characterizations of the ZnO films, we obtained the values of the resistivity and Hall mobility equal to 17 Ω cm and 8.49 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively.

  9. From the EBM pyramid to the Greek temple: a new conceptual approach to Guidelines as implementation tools in mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador-Carulla, L; Lukersmith, S; Sullivan, W

    2017-04-01

    Guideline methods to develop recommendations dedicate most effort around organising discovery and corroboration knowledge following the evidence-based medicine (EBM) framework. Guidelines typically use a single dimension of information, and generally discard contextual evidence and formal expert knowledge and consumer's experiences in the process. In recognition of the limitations of guidelines in complex cases, complex interventions and systems research, there has been significant effort to develop new tools, guides, resources and structures to use alongside EBM methods of guideline development. In addition to these advances, a new framework based on the philosophy of science is required. Guidelines should be defined as implementation decision support tools for improving the decision-making process in real-world practice and not only as a procedure to optimise the knowledge base of scientific discovery and corroboration. A shift from the model of the EBM pyramid of corroboration of evidence to the use of broader multi-domain perspective graphically depicted as 'Greek temple' could be considered. This model takes into account the different stages of scientific knowledge (discovery, corroboration and implementation), the sources of knowledge relevant to guideline development (experimental, observational, contextual, expert-based and experiential); their underlying inference mechanisms (deduction, induction, abduction, means-end inferences) and a more precise definition of evidence and related terms. The applicability of this broader approach is presented for the development of the Canadian Consensus Guidelines for the Primary Care of People with Developmental Disabilities.

  10. High-performance SERS substrate based on hybrid structure of graphene oxide/AgNPs/Cu film@pyramid Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Xu, Shi Cai; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Xiao Yun; Gao, Sai Sai; Hu, Li Tao; Guo, Jia; Ma, Yong; Jiang, Shou Zhen; Si, Hai Peng

    2016-12-01

    We present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/copper film covered silicon pyramid arrays (GO/AgNPs/PCu@Si) by a low-cost and simple method. The GO/AgNPs/PCu@Si substrate presents high sensitivity, good homogeneity and well stability with R6G molecules as a probe. The detected concentration of Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) is as low as 10-15 M. These sensitive SERS behaviors are also confirmed in theory via a commercial COMSOL software, the electric field enhancement is not only formed between the AgNPs, but also formed between the AgNPs and Cu film. And the GO/AgNPs/PCu@Si substrates also present good property on practical application for the detection of methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). This work may offer a novel and practical method to facilitate the SERS applications in areas of medicine, food safety and biotechnology.

  11. Muscarinic Long-Term Enhancement of Tonic and Phasic GABAA Inhibition in Rat CA1 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Soledad; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Buño, Washington

    2016-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) regulates network operation in the hippocampus by controlling excitation and inhibition in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons (PCs), the latter through gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs). Although, the enhancing effects of ACh on GABAARs have been reported (Dominguez et al., 2014, 2015), its role in regulating tonic GABAA inhibition has not been explored in depth. Therefore, we aimed at determining the effects of the activation of ACh receptors on responses mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAARs. Here, we show that under blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors ACh, acting through muscarinic type 1 receptors, paired with post-synaptic depolarization induced a long-term enhancement of tonic GABAA currents (tGABAA) and puff-evoked GABAA currents (pGABAA). ACh combined with depolarization also potentiated IPSCs (i.e., phasic inhibition) in the same PCs, without signs of interactions of synaptic responses with pGABAA and tGABAA, suggesting the contribution of two different GABAA receptor pools. The long-term enhancement of GABAA currents and IPSCs reduced the excitability of PCs, possibly regulating plasticity and learning in behaving animals. PMID:27833531

  12. MUSCARINIC LONG-TERM ENHANCEMENT OF TONIC AND PHASIC GABAA INHIBITION IN RAT CA1 PYRAMIDAL NEURONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soledad Dominguez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAcetylcholine (ACh regulates network operation in the hippocampus by controlling excitation and inhibition in rat CA1 pyramidal neurons (PCs, the latter through gamma-aminobutyric acid type-A receptors (GABAARs. Although, the enhancing effects of ACh on GABAARs have been reported (Dominguez et al., 2014; 2015, its role in regulating tonic GABAA inhibition has not been explored in depth. Therefore, we aimed at determining the effects of the activation of ACh receptors on responses mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic GABAARs. Here, we show that under blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors ACh, acting through muscarinic type 1 receptors, paired with postsynaptic depolarization induced a long-term enhancement of tonic GABAA currents (tGABAA and puff-evoked GABAA currents (pGABAA. ACh combined with depolarization also potentiated IPSCs (i.e., phasic inhibition in the same PCs, without signs of interactions of synaptic responses with pGABAA and tGABAA, suggesting the contribution of two different GABAA receptor pools. The long-term enhancement of GABAA currents and IPSCs reduced the excitability of PCs, possibly regulating plasticity and learning in behaving animals.

  13. Local diameter fully constrains dendritic size in basal but not apical trees of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Duncan E; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2005-10-01

    Computational modeling of dendritic morphology is a powerful tool for quantitatively describing complex geometrical relationships, uncovering principles of dendritic development, and synthesizing virtual neurons to systematically investigate cellular biophysics and network dynamics. A feature common to many morphological models is a dependence of the branching probability on local diameter. Previous models of this type have been able to recreate a wide variety of dendritic morphologies. However, these diameter-dependent models have so far failed to properly constrain branching when applied to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, leading to explosive growth. Here we present a simple modification of this basic approach, in which all parameter sampling, not just bifurcation probability, depends on branch diameter. This added constraint prevents explosive growth in both apical and basal trees of simulated CA1 neurons, yielding arborizations with average numbers and patterns of bifurcations extremely close to those observed in real cells. However, simulated apical trees are much more varied in size than the corresponding real dendrites. We show that, in this model, the excessive variability of simulated trees is a direct consequence of the natural variability of diameter changes at and between bifurcations observed in apical, but not basal, dendrites. Conversely, some aspects of branch distribution were better matched by virtual apical trees than by virtual basal trees. Dendritic morphometrics related to spatial position, such as path distance from the soma or branch order, may be necessary to fully constrain CA1 apical tree size and basal branching pattern.

  14. The associations between blood lipids and the Food Guide Pyramid: findings from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Desiree L; Hotchkiss, Larry; Cotugna, Nancy

    2004-04-01

    Dietary recommendations are based on nutrients, foods, and food groups, but the relationship between the Food Guide Pyramid (FGP) food groups and serum lipids has not been studied. NHANES III data were obtained for US adults who met the following criteria: aged 20-59 years, reliable participant, and typical 24-h recall. We examined whether serum lipids (serum total cholesterol (STC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triacylglycerol) were related to FGP food group intake (dairy, fruit, grain, meat, and vegetable). A sample of 9111 participants qualified for this analysis. Fruit intakes were inversely related to STC, HDL-C, and LDL-C (P = 0.012, P = 0.001, and P = 0.014, respectively) and directly related to triacylglycerol levels (P = 0.003). Grain intake was inversely associated with both STC and HDL-C (P = 0.020 and P = 0.000). Dairy and meat intakes were directly related to LDL-C (P = 0.026 and P = 0.020). Food groups are related to serum lipids. Universal definitions for food groups are needed in research and nutrition education. Studying the relationships between food groups and serum lipids is important for future dietary recommendations related to serum lipids.

  15. Bidirectional Hebbian Plasticity Induced by Low-Frequency Stimulation in Basal Dendrites of Rat Barrel Cortex Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-García, Andrea; Barros-Zulaica, Natali; Núñez, Ángel; Buño, Washington; Fernández de Sevilla, David

    2017-01-01

    According to Hebb's original hypothesis (Hebb, 1949), synapses are reinforced when presynaptic activity triggers postsynaptic firing, resulting in long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic efficacy. Long-term depression (LTD) is a use-dependent decrease in synaptic strength that is thought to be due to synaptic input causing a weak postsynaptic effect. Although the mechanisms that mediate long-term synaptic plasticity have been investigated for at least three decades not all question have as yet been answered. Therefore, we aimed at determining the mechanisms that generate LTP or LTD with the simplest possible protocol. Low-frequency stimulation of basal dendrite inputs in Layer 5 pyramidal neurons of the rat barrel cortex induces LTP. This stimulation triggered an EPSP, an action potential (AP) burst, and a Ca2+ spike. The same stimulation induced LTD following manipulations that reduced the Ca2+ spike and Ca2+ signal or the AP burst. Low-frequency whisker deflections induced similar bidirectional plasticity of action potential evoked responses in anesthetized rats. These results suggest that both in vitro and in vivo similar mechanisms regulate the balance between LTP and LTD. This simple induction form of bidirectional hebbian plasticity could be present in the natural conditions to regulate the detection, flow, and storage of sensorimotor information. PMID:28203145

  16. The rural bite in population pyramids: what are the implications for responsiveness of health systems in middle income countries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahan, Nowrozy; Allotey, Pascale; Arunachalam, Dharma; Yasin, Shajahan; Soyiri, Ireneous N; Davey, Tamzyn M; Reidpath, Daniel D

    2014-01-01

    Health services can only be responsive if they are designed to service the needs of the population at hand. In many low and middle income countries, the rate of urbanisation can leave the profile of the rural population quite different from the urban population. As a consequence, the kinds of services required for an urban population may be quite different from that required for a rural population. This is examined using data from the South East Asia Community Observatory in rural Malaysia and contrasting it with the national Malaysia population profile. Census data were collected from 10,373 household and the sex and age of household members was recorded. Approximate Malaysian national age and sex profiles were downloaded from the US Census Bureau. The population pyramids, and the dependency and support ratios for the whole population and the SEACO sub-district population are compared. Based on the population profiles and the dependency ratios, the rural sub-district shows need for health services in the under 14 age group similar to that required nationally. In the older age group, however, the rural sub-district shows twice the need for services as the national data indicate. The health services needs of an older population will tend towards chronic conditions, rather than the typically acute conditions of childhood. The relatively greater number of older people in the rural population suggest a very different health services mix need. Community based population monitoring provides critical information to inform health systems.

  17. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of excitatory postsynapses on proximal dendrites of cultured mouse CA1 pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Maximilian; Platschek, Steffen; Priesemann, Viola; Becker, Denise; Willems, Laurent M; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Jedlicka, Peter; Vlachos, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the human brain can lead to long-lasting changes in cortical excitability. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms which underlie rTMS-induced plasticity remain incompletely understood. Here, we used repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) of mouse entorhino-hippocampal slice cultures to study rMS-induced plasticity of excitatory postsynapses. By employing whole-cell patch-clamp recordings of CA1 pyramidal neurons, local electrical stimulations, immunostainings for the glutamate receptor subunit GluA1 and compartmental modeling, we found evidence for a preferential potentiation of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites of CA1 neurons (2-4 h after stimulation). This rMS-induced synaptic potentiation required the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels, L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptors. In view of these findings we propose a cellular model for the preferential strengthening of excitatory synapses on proximal dendrites following rMS in vitro, which is based on a cooperative effect of synaptic glutamatergic transmission and postsynaptic depolarization.

  18. Evaluation of sinking-in and cracking behavior of soda-lime glass under varying angle of trigonal pyramid indenter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Yoshida

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that glass undergoes elastic and inelastic deformation under a sharp diamond indenter. Although brittle or less-brittle behavior of glass must be connected with such mechanical responses of glass under the indenter, there has been limited research on in-situ deformation behavior of glass during the loading and unloading indentation cycle. This is because most indentation tests were conducted using a commercial hardness tester for which this information is not available. In this study, the in-situ sinking-in region of glass during indentation test is determined using a custom-designed indentation microscope with trigonal pyramid indenters having different tip angles. It is found that both the shape of contact region and the amount of sinking-in are affected by indenter geometries, and that the projected contact region of the glass sample under Berkovich indenter is not a regular triangle, but a concave triangle with bowed-in edges. This is due to the larger amount of sinking-in under the face than under the ridge of indenter. It is also found that these deformation behaviors of glass are inseparably linked with contact damage or cracking in glass.

  19. Pyramid approach for the reduction of parallax-related artefacts in optical recordings of moving translucent volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotho, Philipp; Romero-Santiago, Alejandro; Schwerdtfeger, Karsten; Hulser, Matthias; Haab, Lars; Strauss, Daniel J

    2017-07-01

    Functional optical imaging (OI) of intrinsic signals (like blood oxygenation coupled reflection changes) and of extrinsic properties of voltage sensitive probes (like voltage-sensitive dyes (VSD)) forms a group of invasive neuroimaging techniques, that possess up to date the highest temporal and spatial resolution on a meso- to macroscopic scale. There are different sources that contribute to the OI signal of which many are noise. In our previous works, we have used dense optical flow for the reduction of movement artefacts. The translucent surface of the cortex allows contributions from multiple depths. Due to the depth offield (DOF) effect, we get an implicit relation of depth and 2D frequency components. In this work, we introduce registration on the levels of a Laplacian pyramid to remove movement artefacts which have different motion components in different spatial frequency bands. This aims to resolve artefacts that remain after normal registration and are caused e.g. by parallax motion, dead pixels or dust on the sensor and other high frequent, moving particles on the cortex surface without the compromise of using high smoothness weights.

  20. Effects of low frequency electric fields on synaptic integration in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons: implications for power line emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco eCavarretta

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The possible cognitive effects of low frequency external electric fields, such as those generated by power lines, are poorly understood. Their functional consequences for mechanisms at the single neuron level are very difficult to study and identify experimentally, especially in vivo. The major open problem is that experimental investigations on humans have given inconsistent or contradictory results, making it difficult to estimate the possible effects of external low frequency electric fields on cognitive functions. Here we investigate this issue with a realistic model of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. The model suggests how and why external electric fields, with environmentally observed frequencies and intensities far lower than what is required for direct neural activation, can perturb dendritic signal processing and somatic firing of neurons that are crucially involved in cognitive tasks such as learning and memory. These results show that individual neuronal morphology, ion channel dendritic distribution, and alignment with the electric field are major determinants of overall effects, and provide a physiologically plausible explanation of why experimental findings can appear to be small and difficult to reproduce, yet deserve serious consideration.