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Sample records for pseudo-second-order reaction model

  1. Using of "pseudo-second-order model" in adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2014-01-01

    A research paper's contribution exists not only in its originality and creativity but also in its continuity and development for research that follows. However, the author easily ignores it. Citation error and quotation error occurred very frequently in a scientific paper. Numerous researchers use secondary references without knowing the original idea from authors. Sulaymon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:3011-3023, 2013) and Spiridon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6367-6381, 2013) presented wrong pseudo-second-order models in Environmental Science and Pollution Research, vol. 20. This comment pointed the errors of the kinetic models and offered information for citing original idea of pseudo-second-order kinetic expression. In order to stop the proliferation of the mistake, it is suggested to cite the original paper for the kinetic model which provided greater accuracy and more details about the kinetic expression.

  2. Response to "using of 'pseudo-second-order model' in adsorption", comment letter on "phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" [Bizerea Spiridon et al., Environ Sci Pollut Res (2013) 20:6367-6381].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizerea Spiridon, Otilia; Pitulice, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This letter is a response to the issues put forth by Dr. Y.S. Ho with regard to the article "Phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" as reported by Bizerea Spiridon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6367-6381, 2013). The response proposes to clarify the error slipped in the typewritten linearized equation of the pseudo-second-kinetic model and the reason for using secondary reference regarding this model.

  3. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of phosphate on dolomite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, S; Gürses, A; Ejder, M; Açikyildiz, M

    2004-09-15

    The adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution on dolomite was investigated at 20 and 40 degrees C in terms of pseudo-second-order mechanism for chemical adsorption as well as an intraparticle diffusion mechanism process. Adsorption was changed with increased contact time, initial phosphate concentration, temperature, solution pH. A pseudo-second-order model and intraparticle diffusion model have been developed to predict the rate constants of adsorption and equilibrium capacities. The activation energy of adsorption can be evaluated using the pseudo-second-order rate constants. The adsorption of phosphate onto dolomite are an exothermically activated process. A relatively low activation energy and a model highly fitting to intraparticle diffusion suggest that the adsorption of phosphate by dolomite may involve not only physical but also chemisorption. This was likely due to its combined control of chemisorption and intraparticle diffusion. However, for phosphate/dolomite system chemical reaction is important and significant in the rate-controlling step, and for the adsorption of phosphate onto dolomite the pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetics provides the best correlation of the experimental data.

  4. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Wen; Liu, Junsheng; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    ...., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation...

  5. Application of Kinetic Models to the Sorption of Copper(II) on to Peat

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ho, Y.S; McKay, G

    2002-01-01

    ...) concentrations and peat doses was made. The Elovich model and the pseudo-second order model both provided a high degree of correlation with the experimental data for most of the sorption process...

  6. Adsorption studies of molasse's wastewaters on activated carbon: modelling with a new fractal kinetic equation and evaluation of kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figaro, S; Avril, J P; Brouers, F; Ouensanga, A; Gaspard, S

    2009-01-30

    Adsorption kinetic of molasses wastewaters after anaerobic digestion (MSWD) and melanoidin respectively on activated carbon was studied at different pH. The kinetic parameters could be determined using classical kinetic equations and a recently published fractal kinetic equation. A linear form of this equation can also be used to fit adsorption data. Even with lower correlation coefficients the fractal kinetic equation gives lower normalized standard deviation values than the pseudo-second order model generally used to fit adsorption kinetic data, indicating that the fractal kinetic model is much more accurate for describing the kinetic adsorption data than the pseudo-second order kinetic model.

  7. Modelling Tethered Enzymatic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Goyette, Jesse; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel; Allard, Jun; Maini, Philip; Dushek, Omer

    Enzymatic reactions are key to cell functioning, and whilst much work has been done in protein interaction in cases where diffusion is possible, interactions of tethered proteins are poorly understood. Yet, because of the large role cell membranes play in enzymatic reactions, several reactions may take place where one of the proteins is bound to a fixed point in space. We develop a model to characterize tethered signalling between the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a tethered, phosphorylated protein. We compare our model to experimental data obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We show that a single SPR experiment recovers 5 independent biophysical/biochemical constants. We also compare the results between a three dimensional model and a two dimensional model. The work gives the opportunity to use known techniques to learn more about signalling processes, and new insights into how enzyme tethering alters cellular signalling. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  8. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOME EXISTING KINETIC MODELS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of highest values of R2, first proposed model accounted for 46.7%, Pseudo second-order kinetics model 40% while Elovich, Webber-Morris and second proposed kinetic models accounted for 6.7% respectively of the total results for biosorption of the three heavy metals by five selected microorganisms. But based ...

  9. Pseudo-second-order calcium-mediated Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst attachment to environmental biofilms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luo, Xia; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Jellison, Kristen

    .... The remobilization of biofilm-associated C. parvum oocysts back into the water column by biofilm sloughing or bulk erosion poses a threat to public health and may be responsible for waterborne outbreaks...

  10. comparative analysis of some existing kinetic models with proposed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IGNATIUS NWIDI

    But based on values of ARE%, first proposed kinetic model accounted for 93.3% while pseudo second-order kinetic model accounted for 6.7% of the results for biosorption of the three heavy metals by the five microbes. Keynotes: Heavy metals, Biosorption, Kinetics Models, Comparative analysis, Average Relative Error. 1.

  11. Stochastic Modeling Of Biochemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    STOCHASTIC MODELING OF BIOCHEMICAL REACTIONS Abhyudai Singh and João Pedro Hespanha* Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of...procedure for con- structing approximate stochastic models for chemical reactions used for modeling biochemical processes such as gene regulatory networks... biochemical reactions , the modeling tools developed in this paper can be applied to a very general class of stochastic systems, in particular

  12. Reaction modeling in geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefansson, A.

    2012-12-01

    Natural volcanic geothermal systems are open systems in term of matter and energy. Such systems are complex to model in terms of fluid chemistry, fluid flow and energy budget. Reaction modeling may be used to gain insight and possibly quantify chemical processes occurring within a system, for example fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interaction. Methods have been developed within the WATCH (Bjarnason, 1994; Arnórsson et al., 2007) and PHREEQC (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999) programs to simulate reactions of multicomponent and multiphase systems to 300°C. The models include boiling and phase segregation (open system boiling), fluid-fluid mixing and fluid-rock interaction (gas-water-rock interaction). The models have been applied to quantify processes within the Hellisheidi geothermal system, Iceland. Open system boiling and fluid-rock interaction were simulated as a function of temperature, initial fluid composition and extent of reaction (T-X-ξ). In addition the interactions of magmatic gases with geothermal fluids and rocks were modeled. In this way various component behavior has been traced within the geothermal system and compared with observations of fluid composition and mineralogy. In addition, the reaction models have been used to evaluate the geochemical feasibility and best conditions of gas (CO2 and H2S) and waste water injection into geothermal system.

  13. Modelling Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based notion of "submicro representations of chemical reactions". Based on three structural models of matter (the simple particle model, the atomic model and the free electron model of metals), we suggest there are two major models of reaction in school chemistry curricula: (a) reactions that are simple…

  14. Modeling the enzyme kinetic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atangana, Abdon

    2015-09-01

    The Enzymatic control reactions model was presented within the scope of fractional calculus. In order to accommodate the usual initial conditions, the fractional derivative used is in Caputo sense. The methodologies of the three analytical methods were used to derive approximate solution of the fractional nonlinear system of differential equations. Two methods use integral operator and the other one uses just an integral. Numerical results obtained exhibit biological behavior of real world problem.

  15. Numerical modelling of hydration reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; John, Timm

    2017-04-01

    Mineral reactions are generally accompanied by volume changes. Observations in rocks and thin section indicate that this often occurred by replacement reactions involving a fluid phase. Frequently, the volume of the original rock or mineral seems to be conserved. If the density of the solid reaction products is higher than the reactants, the associated solid volume decrease generates space for a fluid phase. In other words, porosity is created. The opposite is true for an increase in solid volume during reaction, which leads to a porosity reduction. This slows down and may even stop the reaction if it needs fluid as a reactant. Understanding the progress of reactions and their rates is important because reaction generally changes geophysical and rock mechanical properties which will therefore affect geodynamical processes and seismic properties. We studied the case of hydration of eclogite to blueschist in a subduction zone setting. Eclogitized pillow basalt structures from the Tian-Shan orogeny are transformed to blueschist on the rims of the pillow (van der Straaten et al., 2008). Fluid pathways existed between the pillow structures. The preferred hypothesis of blueschist formation is to supply the fluid for hydration from the pillow margins progressing inward. Using numerical modelling we simulate this coupled reaction-diffusion process. Porosity and fluid pressure evolution are coupled to local thermodynamic equilibrium and density changes. The first rim of blueschist that forms around the eclogite pillow increases volume to such a degree that the system is clogged and the reaction stops. Nevertheless, the field evidence suggests the blueschist formation continued. To prevent the system from clogging, a high incoming pore fluid pressure on the pillow boundaries is needed along with removal of mass from the system to accommodate the volume changes. The only other possibility is to form blueschist from any remaining fluid stored in the core of the pillow

  16. Modification of pineapple peel fiber as metal ion adsorbent through reaction with succinic anhydride in pyridine and dimethyl sulfoxide solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiuyi; Zhao, Mouming; Huang, Huihua

    2010-08-01

    Reactions between saponified pineapple peel fiber (SPPF) and succinic anhydride were performed in refluxed pyridine and dimethyl sulfoxide to obtain modified pineapple peel fiber in pyridine (MPPF-PY) and modified pineapple peel fiber in dimethyl sulfoxide at room temperature (MPPF-DMRT) and at 70 degrees C (MPPF-DM70) as novel metal ionic adsorbents. The modified pineapple peel fibers were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The MPPF-PY, MPPF-DMRT, and MPPF-DM70 showed higher Cu2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+ adsorption capacity than raw pineapple peel fiber (RPPF) and SPPF. Dimethyl sulfoxide favored introduction of a carboxylic function group into pineapple peel fiber compared with pyridine. The elevated reaction temperature of dimethyl sulfoxide could increase the adsorption capacity of the modified pineapple fiber. Optimum pH values for Cu2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+ removal by MPPF-DM70 were pH 5.5, 7.5, and 5.5, respectively. The Cu2+, Cd2+, and Pb2+ adsorptions by MPPF-DM70 followed the pseudo second-order kinetics model and Langmuir model.

  17. Progress in microscopic direct reaction modeling of nucleon induced reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, M.; Bauge, E.; Hilaire, S.; Lechaftois, F.; Peru, S.; Pillet, N.; Robin, C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France)

    2015-12-15

    A microscopic nuclear reaction model is applied to neutron elastic and direct inelastic scatterings, and pre-equilibrium reaction. The JLM folding model is used with nuclear structure information calculated within the quasi-particle random phase approximation implemented with the Gogny D1S interaction. The folding model for direct inelastic scattering is extended to include rearrangement corrections stemming from both isoscalar and isovector density variations occurring during a transition. The quality of the predicted (n,n), (n,n{sup '}), (n,xn) and (n,n{sup '}γ) cross sections, as well as the generality of the present microscopic approach, shows that it is a powerful tool that can help improving nuclear reactions data quality. Short- and long-term perspectives are drawn to extend the present approach to more systems, to include missing reactions mechanisms, and to consistently treat both structure and reaction problems. (orig.)

  18. Reaction Time for Trimolecular Reactions in Compartment-based Reaction-Diffusion Models

    OpenAIRE

    Li, F; Chen, M; Erban, R; Cao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Trimolecular reaction models are investigated in the compartment-based (lattice-based) framework for stochastic reaction-diffusion modelling. The formulae for the first collision time and the mean reaction time are derived for the case where three molecules are present in the solution.

  19. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Zhu; Junsheng Liu; Meng Li

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was foun...

  20. Fundamental studies of novel zwitterionic hybrid membranes: kinetic model and mechanism insights into strontium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Liu, Junsheng; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater.

  1. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models. Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater.

  2. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater. PMID:25405224

  3. DSMC Modeling of Flows with Recombination Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-23

    Reactions S. Gimelshein, I. Wysong Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRC 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB, CA 93524-7680 Air Force Research ...dis- sociation and exchange reactions for diatomic , and sometimes for polyatomic, molecules. The recombination reaction was largely avoided in the DSMC...believed to provide adequate accuracy to the VT energy exchange of diatomic molecules. As shown in Fig. 4(a), the use of that model results in good

  4. Kinetics of Model Reactions for Interfacial Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Hall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available To model the rates of interfacial polycondensations, the rates of reaction of benzoyl chloride and methyl chloroformate with various aliphatic monoamines in acetonitrile were determined at 25 °C. Buffering with picric acid slowed these extremely fast reactions so the rate constants could be determined from the rate of disappearance of picrate ion. The rates of the amine reactions correlated linearly with their Swain-Scott nucleophilicities.

  5. Kinetics of Model Reactions for Interfacial Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Hall; Robert Bates (Harvard University); Jeffrey Robertson; Anne Padias; Trevor Centeno-Hall

    2012-01-01

    To model the rates of interfacial polycondensations, the rates of reaction of benzoyl chloride and methyl chloroformate with various aliphatic monoamines in acetonitrile were determined at 25 °C. Buffering with picric acid slowed these extremely fast reactions so the rate constants could be determined from the rate of disappearance of picrate ion. The rates of the amine reactions correlated linearly with their Swain-Scott nucleophilicities.

  6. Multicomponent modelling of Portland cement hydration reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Koenders, E.A.B.; Van Breugel, K.

    2012-01-01

    The prospect of cement and concrete technologies depends on more in depth understanding of cement hydration reactions. Hydration reaction models simulate the development of the microstructures that can finally be used to estimate the cement based material properties that influence performance and

  7. A Full Disturbance Model for Reaction Wheels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, M.P.; Ellenbroek, Marcellinus Hermannus Maria; Seiler, R; van Put, P.; Cottaar, E.J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Reaction wheels are rotating devices used for the attitude control of spacecraft. However, reaction wheels also generate undesired disturbances in the form of vibrations, which may have an adverse effect on the pointing accuracy and stability of spacecraft (optical) payloads. A disturbance model for

  8. Models of spatially restricted biochemical reaction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Susana R; Iyengar, Ravi

    2009-02-27

    Many reactions within the cell occur only in specific intracellular regions. Such local reaction networks give rise to microdomains of activated signaling components. The dynamics of microdomains can be visualized by live cell imaging. Computational models using partial differential equations provide mechanistic insights into the interacting factors that control microdomain dynamics. The mathematical models show that, for membrane-initiated signaling, the ratio of the surface area of the plasma membrane to the volume of the cytoplasm, the topology of the signaling network, the negative regulators, and kinetic properties of key components together define microdomain dynamics. Thus, patterns of locally restricted signaling reaction systems can be considered an emergent property of the cell.

  9. Nonlinear control of the Salnikov model reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Recke, Bodil; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    1999-01-01

    This paper explores different nonlinear control schemes, applied to a simple model reaction. The model is the Salnikov model, consisting of two ordinary differential equations. The control strategies investigated are I/O-linearisation, Exact linearisation, exact linearisation combined with LQR...

  10. Spur Reaction Model of Positronium Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, O. E.

    1974-01-01

    A new model of positronium (Ps) formation is proposed. Positronium is assumed to be formed by a reaction between a positron and an electron in the positron spur. Ps formation must compete with electron‐ion recombination and electron or positron reactions with solvent molecules and scavenger...... impurities. It is also influenced by electron and positron solvation. The model correlates the measured Ps formation probabilities with the spur electron properties determined in radiation chemistry. The predictions of the model are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results for liquids...

  11. Silylation of leached-vermiculites following reaction with imidazole and copper sorption behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Saloana S.G.; Pereira, Mariana B.B. [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Almeida, Ramon K.S. [Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Caixa Postal 6154, 13083-970 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Souza, Antônio G. [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Fonseca, Maria G., E-mail: mgardennia@quimica.ufpb.br [Chemistry Department of Paraíba Federal University, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Jaber, M. [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8220, Laboratoire d' archéologie moléculaire et structurale (LAMS), Boîte courrier 225, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Silylated vermiculites reacted covalently with imidazole. • Modified vermiculites adsorbed copper from aqueous solution. • Copper retention in all solids occurred at rapid time of 80 min. • Higher organic content on the solid improved the copper adsorption. - Abstract: Organically modified vermiculites were synthesized by previous silylation of three leached vermiculites, V0.3Cl, V0.5Cl and V0.8Cl, under anhydrous conditions following reaction with imidazole (Im), which acted as chelating agent for copper retention. Elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, {sup 29}Si and {sup 13}C NMR and nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurements were used to characterize pristine, leached and organofunctionalized solids. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to evaluate the surface after copper sorption. Parameters such as contact time, pH and initial cation concentration for the adsorption of Cu(II) ions were investigated. The adsorption equilibrium data were fitted using the Langmuir isotherm model and the monolayer adsorption capacities were 2.38, 2.52 and 2.69 mmol g{sup −1} for V0.5Cl-Im, V0.3Cl-Im and V0.8Cl-Im, respectively, at pH 6.0 and 298 K for a time reaction of 80 min. The sorption rates were described by pseudo-second-order kinetics. The chloropropyl imidazole vermiculites are promising adsorbents for the rapid removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  12. Modelling the biphasic sorption of simazine, imidacloprid, and boscalid in water/soil systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvestrini, Stefano; Canzano, Silvana; Iovino, Pasquale; Leone, Vincenzo; Capasso, Sante

    2014-01-01

    The sorption kinetics of simazine (6-chloro-N,N'-diethyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine), imidacloprid (1-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-nitroimidazolidin-2-ylideneamine), and boscalid (2-chloro-N-(4'-chlorobiphenyl-2-yl)nicotinamide), three pesticides of wide use in agriculture, was determined in five different water/soil systems over a time interval from the initial few seconds to about 1 month. In all the experiments, sorption kinetics showed a biphasic pattern characterized by an initial, relatively short phase with a high sorption rate and a later phase with much a lower sorption rate. Initial sorption capacity increased with soil organic carbon content and with sorbate hydrophobicity. We postulate that the first phase of the process involves a fast second-order sorption reaction on superficial sites of soil particles, whereas the second phase depends on diffusion-controlled migration to internal binding sites. A kinetic equation based on this hybrid model accurately fitted all data sets. Less satisfactory results were obtained employing the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, two site non-equilibrium, or Weber-Morris equation. The superior performance of the hybrid model for describing boscalid sorption probably reflects the high hydrophobic character and consequent low diffusion rates of this compound. The accuracy of modelling was in any case strongly dependent on the time interval considered.

  13. Propagation models for computing biochemical reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Henzinger, Thomas A; Mateescu, Maria

    2011-01-01

    We introduce propagation models, a formalism designed to support general and efficient data structures for the transient analysis of biochemical reaction networks. We give two use cases for propagation abstract data types: the uniformization method and numerical integration. We also sketch an implementation of a propagation abstract data type, which uses abstraction to approximate states.

  14. Competing reaction model with many absorbing configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, M F; Figueiredo, W

    2010-02-01

    We study a competitive reaction model between two monomers A and B on a linear lattice. We assume that monomer A can react with a nearest-neighbor monomer A or B , but reactions between monomers of type B are prohibited. We include in our model lateral interactions between monomers as well as the effects of temperature of the catalyst. The model is considered in the adsorption controlled limit, where the reaction rate is infinitely larger than the adsorption rate of the monomers. We employ site and pair mean-field approximations as well as static Monte Carlo simulations. We determine the phase diagram of the model in the plane y_{A} versus temperature, where y_{A} is the probability that a monomer of the type A arrives at the surface. This phase diagram shows regions of active and absorbing states separated by a line of continuous phase transitions. Despite the absorbing state of the model to be strongly dependent on temperature, we show that the static critical exponents of the model belong to the same universality class of the directed percolation.

  15. Reaction-diffusion pulses: a combustion model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Daniel [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Llebot, Josep Enric [Grup de FIsica EstadIstica, Dept. de FIsica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterrra (Spain); Fort, Joaquim [Dept. de FIsica, Univ. de Girona, Campus de Montilivi, 17071 Girona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2004-07-02

    We focus on a reaction-diffusion approach proposed recently for experiments on combustion processes, where the heat released by combustion follows first-order reaction kinetics. This case allows us to perform an exhaustive analytical study. Specifically, we obtain the exact expressions for the speed of the thermal pulses, their maximum temperature and the condition of self-sustenance. Finally, we propose two generalizations of the model, namely, the case of several reactants burning together, and that of time-delayed heat conduction. We find an excellent agreement between our analytical results and simulations.

  16. A Reaction-Based River/Stream Water Quality Model: Reaction Network Decomposition and Model Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes details of an automatic matrix decomposition approach for a reaction-based stream water quality model. The method yields a set of equilibrium equations, a set of kinetic-variable transport equations involving kinetic reactions only, and a set of component transport equations involving no reactions. Partial decomposition of the system of water quality constituent transport equations is performed via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network by pivoting on equilibrium reactions to decouple equilibrium and kinetic reactions. This approach minimizes the number of partial differential advective-dispersive transport equations and enables robust numerical integration. Complete matrix decomposition by further pivoting on linearly independent kinetic reactions allows some rate equations to be formulated individually and explicitly enforces conservation of component species when component transport equations are solved. The methodology is demonstrated for a case study involving eutrophication reactions in the Des Moines River in Iowa, USA and for two hypothetical examples to illustrate the ability of the model to simulate sediment and chemical transport with both mobile and immobile water phases and with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  17. Kinetic Modelling of the Removal of Multiple Heavy Metallic Ions from Mine Waste by Natural Zeolite Sorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Ciosek

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the sorption of heavy metallic ions (HMIs, specifically lead (Pb2+, copper (Cu2+, iron (Fe3+, nickel (Ni2+ and zinc (Zn2+, by natural zeolite (clinoptilolite. These HMIs are combined in single-, dual-, triple-, and multi-component systems. The batch mode experiments consist of a total initial concentration of 10 meq/L normality for all systems, acidified to a pH of 2 by concentrated nitric (HNO3 acid. A zeolite dosage of 4 g per 100 mL of synthetic nitrate salt aqueous solution is applied, for a contact period of 5 to 180 min. Existing kinetic models on HMIs sorption are limited for multi-component system combinations. Therefore, this study conducts kinetic analysis by both reaction and diffusion models, to quantify the sorption process. The study concludes that the process correlates best with the pseudo-second-order (PSO kinetic model. In the multi-component system combining all five HMIs, the initial sorption rate and theoretical equilibrium capacity are determined as 0.0033 meq/g·min and 0.1159 meq/g, respectively. This provides significant insight into the mechanisms associated with the sorption process, as well as contributing to the assessment of natural zeolite as a sorbent material in its application in industrial wastewater treatment.

  18. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software - RWDMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The RWDMES is a tool for modeling the disturbances imparted on spacecraft by spinning reaction wheels. Reaction wheels are usually the largest disturbance source on a precision pointing spacecraft, and can be the dominating source of pointing error. Accurate knowledge of the disturbance environment is critical to accurate prediction of the pointing performance. In the past, it has been difficult to extract an accurate wheel disturbance model since the forcing mechanisms are difficult to model physically, and the forcing amplitudes are filtered by the dynamics of the reaction wheel. RWDMES captures the wheel-induced disturbances using a hybrid physical/empirical model that is extracted directly from measured forcing data. The empirical models capture the tonal forces that occur at harmonics of the spin rate, and the broadband forces that arise from random effects. The empirical forcing functions are filtered by a physical model of the wheel structure that includes spin-rate-dependent moments (gyroscopic terms). The resulting hybrid model creates a highly accurate prediction of wheel-induced forces. It accounts for variation in disturbance frequency, as well as the shifts in structural amplification by the whirl modes, as the spin rate changes. This software provides a point-and-click environment for producing accurate models with minimal user effort. Where conventional approaches may take weeks to produce a model of variable quality, RWDMES can create a demonstrably high accuracy model in two hours. The software consists of a graphical user interface (GUI) that enables the user to specify all analysis parameters, to evaluate analysis results and to iteratively refine the model. Underlying algorithms automatically extract disturbance harmonics, initialize and tune harmonic models, and initialize and tune broadband noise models. The component steps are described in the RWDMES user s guide and include: converting time domain data to waterfall PSDs (power spectral

  19. Modeling of biosorption of Cu(II) by alkali-modified spent tea leaves using response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Arpita; Das, Papita; Sinha, Keka

    2015-06-01

    In the present work, spent tea leaves were modified with Ca(OH)2 and used as a new, non-conventional and low-cost biosorbent for the removal of Cu(II) from aqueous solution. Response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network (ANN) were used to develop predictive models for simulation and optimization of the biosorption process. The influence of process parameters (pH, biosorbent dose and reaction time) on the biosorption efficiency was investigated through a two-level three-factor (23) full factorial central composite design with the help of Design Expert. The same design was also used to obtain a training set for ANN. Finally, both modeling methodologies were statistically compared by the root mean square error and absolute average deviation based on the validation data set. Results suggest that RSM has better prediction performance as compared to ANN. The biosorption followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm and it followed pseudo-second-order kinetic. The optimum removal efficiency of the adsorbent was found as 96.12 %.

  20. Synthesis, characterization, and potential application of Mn2+-intercalated bentonite in fluoride removal: adsorption modeling and mechanism evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudzielwana, Rabelani; Gitari, Wilson M.; Akinyemi, Segun A.; Msagati, Titus A. M.

    2017-12-01

    The study synthesizes a low-cost adsorbent made from Mn2+-modified bentonite clay for groundwater defluoridation. The clays were characterized using X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy, and Fourier transform infrared techniques. The fluoride adsorption capacity of the modified clay was evaluated using batch experiments. The adsorption kinetics results showed that the optimum fluoride (F-) uptake was achieved within the 30 min' contact time. The data fitted well to pseudo-second-order of reaction kinetics indicating that adsorption of F- occurred via chemisorption. In addition, the adsorption isotherm data fitted well to Langmuir isotherm model indicating that adsorption occurred on a mono-layered surface. Maximum F- removal of 57% was achieved from groundwater with an initial F- concentration of 5.4 mg L-1 and natural pH of 8.6 using adsorbent dosage of 1 g/100 mL. Fluoride adsorption occurred through ligands and ion exchange mechanisms. The synthesized adsorbent was successfully regenerated for up to five times. The study shows that Mn2+-intercalated bentonite clay has potential for application in defluoridation of groundwater.

  1. Modelling enzyme reaction mechanisms, specificity and catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, Adrian J

    2005-10-15

    Modern modelling methods can now give uniquely detailed understanding of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, including the analysis of mechanisms and the identification of determinants of specificity and catalytic efficiency. A new field of computational enzymology has emerged that has the potential to contribute significantly to structure-based design and to develop predictive models of drug metabolism and, for example, of the effects of genetic polymorphisms. This review outlines important techniques in this area, including quantum-chemical model studies and combined quantum-mechanics and molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Some recent applications to enzymes of pharmacological interest are also covered, showing the types of problems that can be tackled and the insight they can give.

  2. Reaction-diffusion models of decontamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    A contaminant, which also contains a polymer is in the form of droplets on a solid surface. It is to be removed by the action of a decontaminant, which is applied in aqueous solution. The contaminant is only sparingly soluble in water, so the reaction mechanism is that it slowly dissolves...... in the aqueous solution and then is oxidized by the decontaminant. The polymer is insoluble in water, and so builds up near the interface, where its presence can impede the transport of contaminant. In these circumstances, Dstl wish to have mathematical models that give an understanding of the process, and can...

  3. Modeling stochasticity in biochemical reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, P. H.; Vlysidis, M.; Smadbeck, P.; Kaznessis, Y. N.

    2016-03-01

    Small biomolecular systems are inherently stochastic. Indeed, fluctuations of molecular species are substantial in living organisms and may result in significant variation in cellular phenotypes. The chemical master equation (CME) is the most detailed mathematical model that can describe stochastic behaviors. However, because of its complexity the CME has been solved for only few, very small reaction networks. As a result, the contribution of CME-based approaches to biology has been very limited. In this review we discuss the approach of solving CME by a set of differential equations of probability moments, called moment equations. We present different approaches to produce and to solve these equations, emphasizing the use of factorial moments and the zero information entropy closure scheme. We also provide information on the stability analysis of stochastic systems. Finally, we speculate on the utility of CME-based modeling formalisms, especially in the context of synthetic biology efforts.

  4. Comparison of DSMC Reaction Models with QCT Reaction Rates for Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-17

    include area code) N/A Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Comparison of DSMC Reaction Models with QCT Reaction Rates ...controls vibration coupling A is adjusted to match thermal reaction rate Simplest to implement, not tied to any other model Distribution A: Approved for...General trend: reaction rate increases with v • TCE, QK: lack of vibrational favoring results in much lower slope as compared to the benchmark QCT • VFD: φ

  5. Modeling of Reaction Processes Controlled by Diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Revelli, J

    2003-01-01

    Stochastic modeling is quite powerful in science and technology.The technics derived from this process have been used with great success in laser theory, biological systems and chemical reactions.Besides, they provide a theoretical framework for the analysis of experimental results on the field of particle's diffusion in ordered and disordered materials.In this work we analyze transport processes in one-dimensional fluctuating media, which are media that change their state in time.This fact induces changes in the movements of the particles giving rise to different phenomena and dynamics that will be described and analyzed in this work.We present some random walk models to describe these fluctuating media.These models include state transitions governed by different dynamical processes.We also analyze the trapping problem in a lattice by means of a simple model which predicts a resonance-like phenomenon.Also we study effective diffusion processes over surfaces due to random walks in the bulk.We consider differe...

  6. Investigation and Modelling of Diesel Hydrotreating Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Rasmus Risum

    it has received increased attention within the last decade due to tightened legislations regarding the sulfur content, e.g. the demand for Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) with a maximum sulfur content of as low as 10 ppm S has increased. The process is complex, as the performance of a hydrotreating......This project consists of a series of studies, that are related to hydrotreating of diesel. Hy- drotreating is an important refinery process, in which the oil stream is upgraded to meet the required environmental specifications and physical properties. Although hydrotreating is a ma- ture technology...... due to a stronger adsorption on hydrogenation sites. Since feeds used in the hydrotreating process, usually gas-oils, are complex mixtures with a large number of compounds, analysis of the reactions of individual compounds can be difficult. In this work a model-diesel feed consisting of 13 different...

  7. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  8. Model for reaction kinetics in pyrolysis of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, P.; Singh, P.C.; Upadhyay, S.N.; Kumar, S. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)

    1996-12-31

    A reaction model for the pyrolysis of small and large particles of wood Is developed. The chemical reactions that take place when biomass is pyrolyzed are the devolatilization reactions (primary) and due to the vapour-solid interactions (secondary). In the case of small particles, when the volatiles are immediately removed by the purge gas, only primary reactions occur and the reaction model is described by weight loss and char forming reactions. The of heterogeneous secondary reactions occur in the case of large particles due to the interaction between the volatiles and the hot nascent primary char. A chain reaction mechanism of secondary char formation is proposed. The model takes both the volatiles retention time and cracking and repolymerization reactions of the vapours with the decomposing solid as well as autocatalysis into consideration. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Model for reaction kinetics in pyrolysis of wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, P.; Singh, P.C.; Upadhyay, S.N.; Kuma, S. [Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)

    1996-12-31

    A reaction model for the pyrolysis of small and large particles of wood is developed. The chemical reactions that take place when biomass is pyrolyzed are the devolatilization reactions (primary) and due to the vapour-solid interactions (secondary). In the case of small particles, when the volatiles are immediately removed by the purge gas, only primary reactions occur and the reaction model is described by weight loss and char forming reactions. The heterogeneous secondary reactions occur in the case of large particles due to the interaction between the volatiles and the hot nascent primary char. A chain reaction mechanism of secondary char formation is proposed. The model takes both the volatiles retention time and cracking and repolymerization reactions of the vapours with the decomposing solid as well as autocatalysis into consideration. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Kinetic modelling of the Maillard reaction between proteins and sugars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, C.M.J.

    2002-01-01

    Keywords: Maillard reaction, sugar isomerisation, kinetics, multiresponse modelling, brown colour formation, lysine damage, mutagenicity, casein, monosaccharides, disaccharides, aldoses, ketoses

    The aim of this thesis was to determine the kinetics of the Maillard reaction between

  11. Cloreto de n-(2-hidroxil propil-3-trimetil amônio quitosana como adsorvente de corantes reativos em solução aquosa Chitosan-n-2-hydroxypropyl trimethyl ammonium chloride as adsorbent for the removal of the reactive dye from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valfredo T. Fávere

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The quaternary chitosan was synthesized by reaction of chitosan with glycidyl trimethylammonium chloride. it was characterized by infrared spectra and conductometric titration. Adsorption of reactive blue 4 (RB4 and reactive red 120 (RR120 by quaternary chitosan was studied from aqueous medium. Two kinetic adsorption models were tested: pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order. The experimental data best fitted the pseudo second-order model. The Langmuir isotherm model provided the best fit to the equilibrium data in the concentration range investigated and the maximum adsorption capacity determined was 415 mg (RR120 and 637 mg (RB4 of reactive dye per gram of adsorbent.

  12. Disturbances in reaction wheels; from measurement to modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le, M.P.; Ellenbroek, Marcellinus Hermannus Maria; Seiler, R; van Put, P.; Cottaar, E.J.E.

    2014-01-01

    Disturbances in reaction wheels have been long a crucial aspect for many scientific observation missions. An accurate and reliable disturbance model to understand and evaluate the influence of reaction wheel disturbances to the spacecraft is critically needed. Several reaction wheel disturbance

  13. A computational study of pyrolysis reactions of lignin model compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Elder

    2010-01-01

    Enthalpies of reaction for the initial steps in the pyrolysis of lignin have been evaluated at the CBS-4m level of theory using fully substituted b-O-4 dilignols. Values for competing unimolecular decomposition reactions are consistent with results previously published for phenethyl phenyl ether models, but with lowered selectivity. Chain propagating reactions of free...

  14. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three...

  15. Reaction Kinetics Model of Polymerization in the Absence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is on reaction kinetics models for approximating diffuse propagation reaction fronts in one-dimensional gasless combustion type models. This study is carried out in the context of free-radical frontal polymerization (FP) via a propagating, self sustaining reacting front in the absence of material diffusion. The model ...

  16. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reaction wheel mechanical noise is one of the largest sources of disturbance forcing on space-based observatories. Such noise arises from mass imbalance, bearing...

  17. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Reaction wheel disturbances are some of the largest sources of noise on sensitive telescopes. Such wheel-induced mechanical noises are not well characterized....

  18. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict and Invent Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segler, Marwin H S; Waller, Mark P

    2017-05-02

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows organic chemists to solve synthetic problems and invent novel transformations. Herein, we propose a model that mimics chemical reasoning, and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180 000 randomly selected binary reactions. The data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-)discovering novel transformations (even including transition metal-catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph and because each single reaction prediction is typically achieved in a sub-second time frame, the model can be used as a high-throughput generator of reaction hypotheses for reaction discovery. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Effects of reaction-kinetic parameters on modeling reaction pathways in GaN MOVPE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Zuo, Ran; Zhang, Guoyi

    2017-11-01

    In the modeling of the reaction-transport process in GaN MOVPE growth, the selections of kinetic parameters (activation energy Ea and pre-exponential factor A) for gas reactions are quite uncertain, which cause uncertainties in both gas reaction path and growth rate. In this study, numerical modeling of the reaction-transport process for GaN MOVPE growth in a vertical rotating disk reactor is conducted with varying kinetic parameters for main reaction paths. By comparisons of the molar concentrations of major Ga-containing species and the growth rates, the effects of kinetic parameters on gas reaction paths are determined. The results show that, depending on the values of the kinetic parameters, the gas reaction path may be dominated either by adduct/amide formation path, or by TMG pyrolysis path, or by both. Although the reaction path varies with different kinetic parameters, the predicted growth rates change only slightly because the total transport rate of Ga-containing species to the substrate changes slightly with reaction paths. This explains why previous authors using different chemical models predicted growth rates close to the experiment values. By varying the pre-exponential factor for the amide trimerization, it is found that the more trimers are formed, the lower the growth rates are than the experimental value, which indicates that trimers are poor growth precursors, because of thermal diffusion effect caused by high temperature gradient. The effective order for the contribution of major species to growth rate is found as: pyrolysis species > amides > trimers. The study also shows that radical reactions have little effect on gas reaction path because of the generation and depletion of H radicals in the chain reactions when NH2 is considered as the end species.

  20. Multi-criteria comparative evaluation of spallation reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianov, Andrey; Andrianova, Olga; Konobeev, Alexandr; Korovin, Yury; Kuptsov, Ilya

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an approach to a comparative evaluation of the predictive ability of spallation reaction models based on widely used, well-proven multiple-criteria decision analysis methods (MAVT/MAUT, AHP, TOPSIS, PROMETHEE) and the results of such a comparison for 17 spallation reaction models in the presence of the interaction of high-energy protons with natPb.

  1. Nanotransition Materials (NTMs: Photocatalysis, Validated High Effective Sorbent Models Study for Organic Dye Degradation and Precise Mathematical Data’s at Standardized Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farheen Khan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the synthesis of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs via a solution process with the aim of applying the nano-adsorbent for the reduction of methylene blue (MB dye in alkaline media. These NPs were characterized via Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray diffraction, high-resolution Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and ultra violet UV-visible spectroscopy to confirm their morphology and crystalline and optical properties in order to design an adsorption-degradation process. The photocatalytic CuONPs exhibited dynamic properties, great adsorption affinity during the chemisorption process, and operated at various modes with a strong interaction between the adsorbent and the adsorptive species, and equilibrium isotherm, kinetic isotherm, and thermodynamic activities in the presence of UV light. All basic quantities, such as concentration, pH, adsorbent dose, time, and temperature, were determined by an optimization process. The best-fitted adsorption Langmuir model (R2 = 0.9988 and performance, including adsorption capacity (350.87 mg/g, photocatalytic efficiency (90.74%, and degradation rate constant (Ks = 2.23 ×10−2 min−1, illustrate good feasibility with respect to sorption-reduction reactions but followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic on the adsorbent surface, reaching an equilibrium point in 80 min. The thermodynamic analysis suggests that the adsorption reaction is spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (∆H°, entropy (∆S°, and Gibbs free energy (∆G° give effective results to support a chemical reduction reaction at 303 K temperature. The equilibrium isotherm and kinetic and thermodynamic models with error function analysis explore the potential, acceptability, accuracy, access to adsorbents, and novelty of an unrivaled-sorption system.

  2. Effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification with eddy dissipation concept - Sub-grid scale reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juhui; Yin, Weijie; Wang, Shuai; Meng, Cheng; Li, Jiuru; Qin, Bai; Yu, Guangbin

    2016-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) approach is used for gas turbulence, and eddy dissipation concept (EDC)-sub-grid scale (SGS) reaction model is employed for reactions in small eddies. The simulated gas molar fractions are in better agreement with experimental data with EDC-SGS reaction model. The effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification is emphatically analyzed with EDC-SGS reaction model. The distributions of the SGS reaction rates which represent the reactions in small eddies with particles concentration and temperature are analyzed. The distributions of SGS reaction rates have the similar trend with those of total reactions rates and the values account for about 15% of the total reactions rates. The heterogeneous reaction rates with EDC-SGS reaction model are also improved during the biomass gasification process in bubbling fluidized bed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic modeling of the biosorption of Cd2+ ions from aqueous solutions onto Eichhornia crassipes roots using potentiometry: low-cost alternative to conventional methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Martínez-Sánchez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the use of potentiometric measurements for kinetic studies of biosorption of Cd2+ ions from aqueous solutions on Eichhornia crassipes roots. The open circuit potential of the Cd/Cd2+ electrode of the first kind was measured during the bioadsorption process. The amount of Cd2+ ions accumulated was determined in real time. The data were fit to different models, with the pseudo-second-order model proving to be the best in describing the data. The advantages and limitations of the methodology proposed relative to the traditional method are discussed.

  4. Analysis and Simulation of Hybrid Models for Reaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Kreim, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of biochemical reaction networks can be described by a variety of models, like the Reaction Rate equation (RRE), the Chemical Master equation (CME) or the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE). In this thesis, the behaviour of these different models is analysed. It is shown that the FPE can be motivated as an approximation of the CME and convergence is proven. Furthermore, two hybrid models are constructed by combining different approaches and convergence properties are proven and discussed.

  5. Adsorptive removal of direct dyes by low cost rice husk: Effect of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pseudo-second-order and Elovich kinetic models illustrated good fitness to all types of biomasses showing chemisorption nature of biosorption. The amount of dyes sorbed (mg/g) ... reaction was spontaneous at high temperature. Key words: Biosorption, kinetics, thermodynamics, direct dyes, immobilization, pretreatments.

  6. Reading and a diffusion model analysis of reaction time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naples, Adam; Katz, Leonard; Grigorenko, Elena L

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is associated with reading performance. However, the literature is not clear either on the definition of processing speed or on why and how it contributes to reading performance. In this study we demonstrated that processing speed, as measured by reaction time, is not a unitary construct. Using the diffusion model of two-choice reaction time, we assessed processing speed in a series of same-different reaction time tasks for letter and number strings. We demonstrated that the association between reaction time and reading performance is driven by processing speed for reading-related information, but not motor or sensory encoding speed.

  7. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose Ammonia Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2007-04-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate of formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  8. A model reduction method for biochemical reaction networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rao, Shodhan; van der Schaft, Arjan; van Eunen, Karen; Bakker, Barbara; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2014-01-01

    Background: In this paper we propose a model reduction method for biochemical reaction networks governed by a variety of reversible and irreversible enzyme kinetic rate laws, including reversible Michaelis-Menten and Hill kinetics...

  9. Tannic acid promotes ion release of copper oxide nanoparticles: Impacts from solution pH change and complexation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Yang; Pan, Bo; Gao, Guoqian; Liu, Ying; Liu, Siqian; Liang, Ni; Zhou, Dandan; Vijver, Martina G; Peijnenburg, Willie J G M

    2017-10-04

    The increasing number of applications in which copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are used, may lead to potential release of CuO NPs into the environment. However, the impact of natural organic matters on the behavior and fate of CuO NPs in aquatic media is still largely unknown. In this study, the dissolution and aggregation of CuO NPs under the exposure of tannic acid (TA) were monitored over a period of 72 h, with a focus on assessing the contributions of solution pH changes and complexation reactions. Results showed that the total amount of Cu(2+) released from CuO NPs increased in the presence of TA especially at the highest TA concentration of 73.5 μmol/L. Although TA was observed to wrap around the CuO NPs, the aggregation of CuO NPs was not strongly influenced by TA and by the solution pH as investigated in this study. The kinetics of Cu(2+) release were fitted using the modified pseudo second-order model and the rate of dissolution was assessed to be highest at TA = 14.7 μmol/L. At pH = 4, the increased H(+) concentration was responsible for increased Cu(2+) release, whereas the complexation reaction between Cu(2+) and TA dominated at pH = 7. These findings suggested that the effects of TA on the dissolution of CuO NPs were a combination of solution pH change and complexation reaction, the relative fractions of which also depended on the solution pH. Additionally, the percentage of Cu(2+) released from the CuO NPs was found to increase upon decreasing concentrations of CuO NPs. Our work helps to further understand how and to which extent natural organic matters affect the behavior and fate of CuO NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Turing patterns in a reaction-diffusion model with the Degn-Harrison reaction scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanbing; Wu, Jianhua; Dong, Yaying

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a reaction-diffusion model with Degn-Harrison reaction scheme. Some fundamental analytic properties of nonconstant positive solutions are first investigated. We next study the stability of constant steady-state solution to both ODE and PDE models. Our result also indicates that if either the size of the reactor or the effective diffusion rate is large enough, then the system does not admit nonconstant positive solutions. Finally, we establish the global structure of steady-state bifurcations from simple eigenvalues by bifurcation theory and the local structure of the steady-state bifurcations from double eigenvalues by the techniques of space decomposition and implicit function theorem.

  11. Marrying the mussel inspired chemistry and Kabachnik-Fields reaction for preparation of SiO2 polymer composites and enhancement removal of methylene blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiang; Liu, Meiying; Chen, Junyu; Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Huang, Long; Jiang, Ruming; Deng, Fengjie; Wen, Yuanqing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2017-11-01

    The removal of organic dyes using functionalization SiO2 composites (denoted as SiO2-PDA-CSH) were prepared via a facile method that combined with mussel inspired chemistry and Kabachnik-Fields (KF) reaction. The size and surface morphology, chemical structure, thermal stability, surface charging property, and elemental composition were evaluated by means of transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), zeta potential, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The results demonstrated that the organic functional groups can be successfully introduced onto the surface of SiO2 microspheres through the combination of mussel inspired chemistry and KF reaction. The removal of cationic dye methylene blue (MB) by the raw SiO2 and SiO2-PDA-CSH composites was examined and compared using a series of batch adsorption experiments. The results suggested that SiO2-PDA-CSH composites had a 3-fold increase in the adsorption capacity towards MB than that of pure SiO2 microspheres and the adsorption process was dependent on the solution pH. According to the adsorption kinetics, the adsorption of MB onto SiO2-PDA-CSH composites was well described by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The equilibrium data were fitted with Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models with R2 = 0.9981 and R2 = 0.9982, respectively. The maximum adsorption capacity from Langmuir isotherm was found to be 688.85 mg/g. The adsorption thermodynamics was also investigated in detailed. The parameters revealed that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The adsorption mechanism might be the synergistic action of physical adsorption of SiO2-PDA-CSH particles and electrostatic interaction between the MB and functional groups on the surface of SiO2-PDA-CSH composites, including sulfydryl, amino, aromatic moieties, and phosphate groups. Taken together, we developed a novel and facile strategy for the

  12. Kinetic Modeling of Phosphate Adsorption by Preformed and In situ formed Hydrous Ferric Oxides at Circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanpeng; Yue, Qinyan

    2016-10-01

    Kinetics of phosphate removal by Fe(III) was investigated by both preformed and in situ formed hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) at pH 6.0-8.0. A pseudo-second-order empirical model was found to adequately describe phosphate removal in the two cases. The Elovich and intra-particle diffusion models, however, were only capable of describing phosphate adsorption to preformed HFO (PF-HFO). By using surface complexation kinetic models (SCKMs) to describe phosphate adsorption to PF-HFO, the adsorption rate constant (0.0386-0.205 mM-1 min-1 for SCKM-1 and 0.0680-0.274 mM-1 min-1 for SCKM-2) decreased with increasing pH while the protonation reaction rate constant in SCKM-2 (0.0776-0.0947 mM-1 min-1) increased over the pH range 6.0-8.0. Using the rate constants obtained from the process of phosphate adsorption to PF-HFO, the amount of active surface sites on the in situ formed HFO were calculated as 0.955 ± 0.170, 1.46 ± 0.39 and 2.98 ± 0.78 mM for pH = 6.0, 7.0 and 8, respectively. Generally, as the SCKMs incorporate phosphate complexation on HFO surface sites and protons competiting for the surface sites, they could provide a good description of the rate and extent of phosphate removal by both preformed and in-situ formed HFO over a wide range of conditions.

  13. Gene dosage imbalances: action, reaction, and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veitia, Reiner A; Potier, Marie Claude

    2015-06-01

    Single-gene deletions, duplications, and misregulation, as well as aneuploidy, can lead to stoichiometric imbalances within macromolecular complexes and cellular networks, causing their malfunction. Such alterations can be responsible for inherited or somatic genetic disorders including Mendelian diseases, aneuploid syndromes, and cancer. We review the effects of gene dosage alterations at the transcriptomic and proteomic levels, and the various responses of the cell to counteract their effects. Furthermore, we explore several biochemical models and ideas that can provide the rationale for treatments modulating the effects of gene dosage imbalances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei for tests of structure and reaction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchera, A. N.; Bazin, D.; Babo, M.; Baumann, T.; Bowry, M.; Bradt, J.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Elman, B.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jones, M. D.; Lunderberg, E.; Redpath, T.; Rogers, W. F.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2015-10-01

    A series of knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei were studied to extract exclusive cross sections and to investigate the neutron knockout mechanism. The measured cross sections provide stringent tests of shell model and ab initio calculations while measurements of neutron+residual coincidences test the accuracy and validity of reaction models used to predict cross sections. Six different beams ranging from A = 7 to 12 were produced at the NSCL totaling measurements of nine different reaction settings. The reaction settings were determined by the magnetic field of the Sweeper magnet which bends the residues into charged particle detectors. The reaction target was surrounded by the high efficiency CsI array, CAESAR, to tag gamma rays for cross section measurements of low-lying excited states. Additionally, knocked out neutrons were detected with MoNA-LISA in coincidence with the charged residuals. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-02511 and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0000979.

  15. Modelling Of The Kinetic And Equilibrium Sorption Behaviour Of Crude Oil On HDTMAB Modified Nigerian Nanoclays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nwankwere Emeka Thompson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study explores the feasibility of using local nanoclays as starting materials for sorbents with potential to treat crude oil polluted aquatic environment. The nanoclays have been converted into environmentally friendly and hydrophobic sorbents by a hydrothermal method under mild conditions using Hexadecyltrimetylammonium bromide HDTMAB as intercalant. Batch sorption studies were studied for oil concentration 0.5-5.0 g100ml and contact time 1-30 mins. An attempt to describe the crude oil sorptive behaviour of the organoclays b applying popular adsorption models were discussed and the experimental methods adopted for the determination and estimation of the sorption coefficients have also been described. The Langmuir the Freundlich and the Dubinin-Radushkevich adsorption models were applied to experimental equilibrium data. Also the kinetic properties of the sorption procedure were evaluated using the pseudo-second-order Elovich and the intraparticle diffusion of Weber and Morris kinetics models. It was discovered that the sorption process best fitted the Langmuir and the Pseudo-second-order rate models. It was concluded that the organoclays have a good affinity for the crude oil the sorption process was mostly by monolayer coverage the manner of sorption by chemisorption and that diffusion was not only the rate-controlling step.

  16. Model-order reduction of biochemical reaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; Schaft, Arjan van der; Eunen, Karen van; Bakker, Barbara M.; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a model-order reduction method for chemical reaction networks governed by general enzyme kinetics, including the mass-action and Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The model-order reduction method is based on the Kron reduction of the weighted Laplacian matrix which describes the

  17. An Investigation of Model Catalyzed Hydrocarbon Formation Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tysoe, W. T.

    2001-05-02

    Work was focused on two areas aimed at understanding the chemistry of realistic catalytic systems: (1) The synthesis and characterization of model supported olefin metathesis catalysts. (2) Understanding the role of the carbonaceous layer present on Pd(111) single crystal model catalysts during reaction.

  18. Treatment of tannery effluent by passive uptake-parametric studies and kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Rajamohan; Manivasagan, Rajasimman

    2017-06-08

    Galactomyces geotrichum was utilized as a potential biosorbent for the treatment of tannery effluent under controlled environmental conditions. Tannery effluent treatment was studied through parametric experiments to study the effect of effluent pH (3.0-10.0), initial COD (1100-4400 mg/L), and biosorbent dosage (0.3-3.0 g/L).The zeta potential of the biosorbent was determined and found to influence the optimal pH. Increase in effluent COD values resulted in decreased COD removal percentages which attributed to limited availability of surface active sites. The equation relating the COD removal efficiency and biosorbent dose was proposed. Two popular kinetic models, namely pseudo-second order and power function models, were employed to the experimental data. Pseudo-second order model proved to be a good fit with high values of regression coefficient (R (2) > 0.960). Potential application of a fungal biosorption process was explored and the optimal process parameters were identified.

  19. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    for symmetric and asymmetric multi-species electrolytes and is not limited to a range of surface potentials. Numerical simulations are presented, for the case of a CaCO3 electrolyte solution in contact with a surface with rate-controlled protonation/deprotonation reactions. The surface charge and potential...... are determined by the surface reactions, and therefore they depends on the bulk solution composition and concentration......A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  20. A kinetic modeling study of phosphate adsorption onto Phoenix dactylifera L. date palm fibers in batch mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifa Riahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of phosphates from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto date palm fibers (DPF has been studied in batch mode. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms that govern phosphate sorption and find an appropriate model for the kinetics of removal. In order to investigate the mechanism of sorption and potential rate controlling steps, pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, intra-particle diffusion and the Elovich equations have been used to test experimental data. Kinetic analysis of the four models has been carried out for initial phosphate concentration in the range of 30–110 mg/L. The rate constants for the four models have been determined and the correlation coefficients have been calculated in order to assess which model provides the best fit predicted data with experimental results. Seven statistical functions were used to estimate the error deviations between experimental and theoretically predicted kinetic adsorption values, including the average relative error deviation (ARED, Marquardt’s percent standard error deviation (MPSED, the hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID, the sum of the squares of the errors (SSE and three alternative statistical functions, including the Chi-square test, the F-test and Student’s T-test. The results showed that, both Elovich equation and pseudo second-order equation provide the best fit to experimental data for different initial phosphate concentrations.

  1. A natural sorbent, Luffa cylindrica for the removal of a model basic dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altinisik, Aylin; Guer, Emel [Dokuz Eyluel University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Tinaztepe Campus, Buca Izmir (Turkey); Seki, Yoldas, E-mail: yoldas.seki@deu.edu.tr [Dokuz Eyluel University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Chemistry, Tinaztepe Campus, Buca Izmir (Turkey)

    2010-07-15

    In this work, application of Luffa cylindrica in malachite green (MG) removal from aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. The effect of contact time, pH and temperature on removal of malachite green was also investigated. By the time pH was increased from 3 to 5, the amount of sorbed malachite green also increased. Beyond the pH value of 5, the amount of sorbed malachite green remains constant. The fits of equilibrium sorption data to Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations were investigated. Langmuir isotherm exhibited best fit with the experimental data. Monolayer sorption capacity increased with the increasing of temperature. Sorption kinetic was evaluated by pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich rate equations and intraparticle diffusion models. It was inferred that sorption follows pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters for sorption process were also found out. Spontaneous and endothermic nature of sorption was obtained due to negative value of free energy ({Delta}G{sup o}) and positive value of enthalpy ({Delta}H{sup o}) changes. FTIR analyses were also conducted to confirm the sorption of malachite green onto L. cylindrica.

  2. A natural sorbent, Luffa cylindrica for the removal of a model basic dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinişik, Aylin; Gür, Emel; Seki, Yoldaş

    2010-07-15

    In this work, application of Luffa cylindrica in malachite green (MG) removal from aqueous solution was studied in a batch system. The effect of contact time, pH and temperature on removal of malachite green was also investigated. By the time pH was increased from 3 to 5, the amount of sorbed malachite green also increased. Beyond the pH value of 5, the amount of sorbed malachite green remains constant. The fits of equilibrium sorption data to Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations were investigated. Langmuir isotherm exhibited best fit with the experimental data. Monolayer sorption capacity increased with the increasing of temperature. Sorption kinetic was evaluated by pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich rate equations and intraparticle diffusion models. It was inferred that sorption follows pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters for sorption process were also found out. Spontaneous and endothermic nature of sorption was obtained due to negative value of free energy (DeltaG(o)) and positive value of enthalpy (DeltaH(o)) changes. FTIR analyses were also conducted to confirm the sorption of malachite green onto L. cylindrica. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Edge of chaos in reaction diffusion CNN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavova Angela

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the dynamics of a reaction-diffusion Cellular Nonlinear Network (RD-CNN nodel in which the reaction term is represented by Brusselator cell. We investigate the RD-CNN dynamics by means of describing function method. Comparison with classical results for Brusselator equation is provided. Then we introduce a new RD-CNN model with memristor coupling, for which the edge of chaos regime in the parameter space is determined. Numerical simulations are presented for obtaining dynamic patterns in the RD-CNN model with memristor coupling.

  4. Challenges in modelling the reaction chemistry of interstellar dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, S T; Goumans, T P M; Herbst, E; Jones, A P; Slater, B

    2014-09-21

    Studies aiming to understand the physicochemical properties of interstellar dust and the chemical reactions that occur on and in it have traditionally been the preserve of astronomical observation and experimental attempts to mimic astronomically relevant conditions in the laboratory. Increasingly, computational modelling in its various guises is establishing a complementary third pillar of support to this endeavour by providing detailed insights into the complexities of interstellar dust chemistry. Inherently, the basis of computational modelling is to be found in the details (e.g. atomic structure/composition, reaction barriers) that are difficult to probe accurately from observation and experiment. This bottom-up atom-based theoretical approach, often itself based on deeper quantum mechanical principles, although extremely powerful, also has limitations when systems become too large or complex. In this Perspective, after first providing a general background to the current state of observational-based knowledge, we introduce a number of computational modelling methods with reference to recent state-of-the-art studies, in order to highlight the capabilities of such approaches in this field. Specifically, we first outline the use of computational chemistry methods for dust nucleation, structure, and individual reactions on bare and icy dust surfaces. Later, we review kinetic modelling of networks of reactions relevant to dust chemistry and how to take into account quantum tunnelling effects in the low temperature reactions in the interstellar medium. Finally, we point to the future challenges that need to be overcome for computational modelling to provide even more detailed and encompassing perspectives on the nature and reaction chemistry of interstellar dust.

  5. Modeling human behaviors and reactions under dangerous environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J; Wright, D K; Qin, S F; Zhao, Y

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the framework of a real-time simulation system to model human behavior and reactions in dangerous environments. The system utilizes the latest 3D computer animation techniques, combined with artificial intelligence, robotics and psychology, to model human behavior, reactions and decision making under expected/unexpected dangers in real-time in virtual environments. The development of the system includes: classification on the conscious/subconscious behaviors and reactions of different people; capturing different motion postures by the Eagle Digital System; establishing 3D character animation models; establishing 3D models for the scene; planning the scenario and the contents; and programming within Virtools Dev. Programming within Virtools Dev is subdivided into modeling dangerous events, modeling character's perceptions, modeling character's decision making, modeling character's movements, modeling character's interaction with environment and setting up the virtual cameras. The real-time simulation of human reactions in hazardous environments is invaluable in military defense, fire escape, rescue operation planning, traffic safety studies, and safety planning in chemical factories, the design of buildings, airplanes, ships and trains. Currently, human motion modeling can be realized through established technology, whereas to integrate perception and intelligence into virtual human's motion is still a huge undertaking. The challenges here are the synchronization of motion and intelligence, the accurate modeling of human's vision, smell, touch and hearing, the diversity and effects of emotion and personality in decision making. There are three types of software platforms which could be employed to realize the motion and intelligence within one system, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  6. Photocatalytic TMO-NMs adsorbent: Temperature-Time dependent Safranine degradation, sorption study validated under optimized effective equilibrium models parameter with standardized statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, chemically synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), were employed for two processes: one is photocatalytic degradation and second one adsorption for the sorption of safranine (SA) dye in an aqueous medium at pH = 12.01. The optimized analytes amount (nano-adsorbent = 0.10 g, conc. range of SA dye 56.13 ppm to 154.37 ppm, pH = 12.01, temperature 303 K) reached to equilibrium point in 80 min, which acquired for chemical adsorption-degradation reactions. The degredated SA dye data’s recorded by UV-visible spectroscopy for the occurrence of TMO-NMs of CuO-NPs at anticipated period of interval. The feasible performance of CuO-NPs was admirable, shows good adsorption capacity qm = 53.676 mg g−1 and most convenient to best fitted results establish by linear regression equation, corresponded for selected kinetic model (pseudo second order (R2 = 0.9981), equilibrium isotherm models (Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich (D-R), Temkin, H-J and Halsey), and thermodynamic parameters (∆H° = 75461.909 J mol−1, ∆S° = 253.761 J mol−1, ∆G° = −1427.93 J mol−1, Ea = 185.142 J mol−1) with error analysis. The statistical study revealed that CuO-NPs was an effective adsorbent certified photocatalytic efficiency (η = 84.88%) for degradation of SA dye, exhibited more feasibility and good affinity toward adsorbate, the sorption capacity increases with increased temperature at equilibrium point. PMID:28195174

  7. Photocatalytic TMO-NMs adsorbent: Temperature-Time dependent Safranine degradation, sorption study validated under optimized effective equilibrium models parameter with standardized statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahab, Rizwan; Khan, Farheen; Kaushik, Nagendra Kumar; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, chemically synthesized copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), were employed for two processes: one is photocatalytic degradation and second one adsorption for the sorption of safranine (SA) dye in an aqueous medium at pH = 12.01. The optimized analytes amount (nano-adsorbent = 0.10 g, conc. range of SA dye 56.13 ppm to 154.37 ppm, pH = 12.01, temperature 303 K) reached to equilibrium point in 80 min, which acquired for chemical adsorption-degradation reactions. The degredated SA dye data’s recorded by UV-visible spectroscopy for the occurrence of TMO-NMs of CuO-NPs at anticipated period of interval. The feasible performance of CuO-NPs was admirable, shows good adsorption capacity qm = 53.676 mg g-1 and most convenient to best fitted results establish by linear regression equation, corresponded for selected kinetic model (pseudo second order (R2 = 0.9981), equilibrium isotherm models (Freundlich, Langmuir, Dubnin-Radushkevich (D-R), Temkin, H-J and Halsey), and thermodynamic parameters (∆H° = 75461.909 J mol-1, ∆S° = 253.761 J mol-1, ∆G° = -1427.93 J mol-1, Ea = 185.142 J mol-1) with error analysis. The statistical study revealed that CuO-NPs was an effective adsorbent certified photocatalytic efficiency (η = 84.88%) for degradation of SA dye, exhibited more feasibility and good affinity toward adsorbate, the sorption capacity increases with increased temperature at equilibrium point.

  8. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  9. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of Congo red dye using guava leaf-based activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojedokun, Adedamola Titi; Bello, Olugbenga Solomon

    2017-07-01

    Guava leaf, a waste material, was treated and activated to prepare adsorbent. The adsorbent was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) and Energy-Dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques. The carbonaceous adsorbent prepared from guava leaf had appreciable carbon content (86.84 %). The adsorption of Congo red dye onto guava leaf-based activated carbon (GLAC) was studied in this research. Experimental data were analyzed by four different model equations: Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms and it was found to fit Freundlich equation most. Adsorption rate constants were determined using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion model equations. The results clearly showed that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC followed pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Intraparticle diffusion was involved in the adsorption process. The mean energy of adsorption calculated from D-R isotherm confirmed the involvement of physical adsorption. Thermodynamic parameters were obtained and it was found that the adsorption of CR dye onto GLAC was an exothermic and spontaneous process at the temperatures under investigation. The maximum adsorption of CR dye by GLAC was found to be 47.62 mg/g. The study shows that GLAC is an effective adsorbent for the adsorption of CR dye from aqueous solution.

  10. Modeling the mechanism involved during the sorption of methylene blue onto fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Vasanth; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2005-04-01

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out to remove methylene blue from its aqueous solutions using fly ash as an adsorbent. Operating variables studied were initial dye concentration, fly ash mass, pH, and contact time. Maximum color removal was observed at a basic pH of 8. Equilibrium data were represented well by a Langmuir isotherm equation with a monolayer sorption capacity of 5.718 mg/g. Sorption data were fitted to both Lagergren first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models and the data were found to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics. Rate constants at different initial concentrations were estimated. The process mechanism was found to be complex, consisting of both surface adsorption and pore diffusion. The effective diffusion parameter D(i) values were estimated at different initial concentrations and the average value was determined to be 2.063 x 10(-9)cm2/s. Analysis of sorption data using a Boyd plot confirms the particle diffusion as the rate-limiting step for the dye concentration ranges studied in the present investigation (20 to 60 mg/L).

  11. Kinetics, equilibrium data and modeling studies for the sorption of chromium by Prosopis juliflora bark carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the activated carbon was prepared from Prosopis juliflora bark as a novel adsorbent. Removal of chromium (Cr was assessed by varying the parameters like metal concentration, temperature, pH, adsorbent dose and contact time. The feasibility of the sorption was studied using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms including linear and non-linear regression methods. In Langmuir, various forms of linearized equations were evaluated. The isotherm parameter of dimensionless separation factor (RL was also studied. The kinetics of adsorption was studied by using Lagergren’s pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations and the results have shown that the adsorption process follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption process depends on both time and concentration. The mechanistic pathway of the adsorption process was evaluated with intraparticle diffusion model. The effect of heat of adsorption of the adsorbate onto the adsorbent material was determined using the thermodynamic parameters and the reusability of the adsorbent materials was ascertained with desorption studies. The adsorbent material characterization was done by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray Diffraction (XRD method and morphology of the surface of adsorbent was identified with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM.

  12. A Numerical Study of Reaction Kinetics Model of Polymerization In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The model which is a system of partial differential equations is analyzed numerically using the finite difference scheme to obtain results for1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 100, 1000 (where p is the order of reaction). Keywords: Frontal polymerization, Material diffusion. Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics, Volume 19 ...

  13. A Multiple Reaction Modelling Framework for Microbial Electrochemical Technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolutola Oyetunde

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for the theoretical evaluation of microbial electrochemical technologies (METs is presented that incorporates a detailed physico-chemical framework, includes multiple reactions (both at the electrodes and in the bulk phase and involves a variety of microbial functional groups. The model is applied to two theoretical case studies: (i A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC for continuous anodic volatile fatty acids (VFA oxidation and cathodic VFA reduction to alcohols, for which the theoretical system response to changes in applied voltage and VFA feed ratio (anode-to-cathode as well as membrane type are investigated. This case involves multiple parallel electrode reactions in both anode and cathode compartments; (ii A microbial fuel cell (MFC for cathodic perchlorate reduction, in which the theoretical impact of feed flow rates and concentrations on the overall system performance are investigated. This case involves multiple electrode reactions in series in the cathode compartment. The model structure captures interactions between important system variables based on first principles and provides a platform for the dynamic description of METs involving electrode reactions both in parallel and in series and in both MFC and MEC configurations. Such a theoretical modelling approach, largely based on first principles, appears promising in the development and testing of MET control and optimization strategies.

  14. A model reduction method for biochemical reaction networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rao, Shodhan; van der Schaft, Arjan; van Eunen, Karen; Bakker, Barbara; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2014-01-01

    Background: In this paper we propose a model reduction method for biochemical reaction networks governed by a variety of reversible and irreversible enzyme kinetic rate laws, including reversible Michaelis-Menten and Hill kinetics. The method proceeds by a stepwise reduction in the number of

  15. Python framework for kinetic modeling of electronically excited reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verboncoeur, John; Parsey, Guy; Guclu, Yaman; Christlieb, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    The use of plasma energy to enhance and control the chemical reactions during combustion, a technology referred to as ``plasma assisted combustion'' (PAC), can result in a variety of beneficial effects: e.g. stable lean operation, pollution reduction, and wider range of p-T operating conditions. While experimental evidence abounds, theoretical understanding of PAC is at best incomplete, and numerical tools still lack in reliable predictive capabilities. In the context of a joint experimental-numerical effort at Michigan State University, we present here an open-source modular Python framework dedicated to the dynamic optimization of non-equilibrium PAC systems. Multiple sources of experimental reaction data, e.g. reaction rates, cross-sections and oscillator strengths, are used in order to quantify the effect of data uncertainty and limiting assumptions. A collisional-radiative model (CRM) is implemented to organize reactions by importance and as a potential means of measuring a non-Maxwellian electron energy distribution function (EEDF), when coupled to optical emission spectroscopy data. Finally, we explore scaling laws in PAC parameter space using a kinetic global model (KGM) accelerated with CRM optimized reaction sequences and sparse stiff integrators.

  16. Contact time optimization of two-stage batch adsorber design using second-order kinetic model for the adsorption of phosphate onto alunite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozacar, Mahmut

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phosphate onto alunite in a batch adsorber has been studied. Four kinetic models including pseudo first- and second-order equation, intraparticle diffusion equation and the Elovich equation were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters, rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of phosphate onto alunite could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. Adsorption of phosphate onto alunite followed the Langmuir isotherm. A model has been used for the design of a two-stage batch adsorber based on pseudo second-order adsorption kinetics. The model has been optimized with respect to operating time in order to minimize total operating time to achieve a specified amount of phosphate removal using a fixed mass of adsorbent. The results of two-stage batch adsorber design studies showed that the required times for specified amounts of phosphate removal significantly decreased. It is particularly suitable for low-cost adsorbents/adsorption systems when minimising operating time is a major operational and design criterion, such as, for highly congested industrial sites in which significant volume of effluent need to be treated in the minimum amount of time.

  17. The balance model for heat transport from hydrolytic reaction mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janacova Dagmar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of the paper is the industrial application of enzyme hydrolysis of tanning solids waste with a view to minimizing the price of enzyme hydrolysate product, which has widely used. On the base of the energy balance of the enzymatic hydrolysis we estimated the critical minimal charge of a tanning drum. We performed of the critical minimal on the basis of a balance model for heat transport from reaction mixture into the environment through reactor wall. Employing a tanning drum for hydrolytic reaction allows to process tanning wastes in the place of their origin. It means thus considerably to enhancing economics of the whole process.

  18. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-07

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. KINETIC MODELS STUDY OF HYDRODESULPHURIZATION VACUUM DISTILLATE REACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AbdulMunem A. Karim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available    This study deals with  kinetics of hydrodesulphurization (HDS reaction of vacuum gas oil (611-833 K which was distillated from Kirkuk crude oil and which was obtained by blending the fractions, light vacuum gas oil (611 - 650 K, medium vacuum gas oil (650-690 K, heavy vacuum gas oil (690-727 K and very heavy vacuum gas oil (727-833 K.   The vacuum gas oil was hydrotreated on a commercial cobalt-molybdenum alumina catalyst presulfied at specified conditions in a laboratory trickle bed reactor. The reaction temperature range (583-643 K,liquid hourly space velocity range (1.5-3.75 h-1 and hydrogen pressure was kept constant at 3.5 MPa with hydrogen to oil ratio about 250 lt/lt.           The conversion results for desulphurization reaction appeared to obey the second order reaction. According to this model, the rate constants for desulphurization reaction were determined. Finally, the apparent activation energy (Ea, enthalpy of activation ( H* and entropy ( S* were calculated based on the values of rate constant (k2 and were equal 80.3792 KJ/mole, 75.2974 KJ/mole and 197.493 J/mole, respectively.

  20. Modelling of structural effects on chemical reactions in turbulent flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammelsaeter, H.R.

    1997-12-31

    Turbulence-chemistry interactions are analysed using algebraic moment closure for the chemical reaction term. The coupling between turbulence and chemical length and time scales generate a complex interaction process. This interaction process is called structural effects in this work. The structural effects are shown to take place on all scales between the largest scale of turbulence and the scales of the molecular motions. The set of equations describing turbulent correlations involved in turbulent reacting flows are derived. Interactions are shown schematically using interaction charts. Algebraic equations for the turbulent correlations in the reaction rate are given using the interaction charts to include the most significant couplings. In the frame of fundamental combustion physics, the structural effects appearing on the small scales of turbulence are proposed modelled using a discrete spectrum of turbulent scales. The well-known problem of averaging the Arrhenius law, the specific reaction rate, is proposed solved using a presumed single variable probability density function and a sub scale model for the reaction volume. Although some uncertainties are expected, the principles are addressed. Fast chemistry modelling is shown to be consistent in the frame of algebraic moment closure when the turbulence-chemistry interaction is accounted for in the turbulent diffusion. The modelling proposed in this thesis is compared with experimental data for an laboratory methane flame and advanced probability density function modelling. The results show promising features. Finally it is shown a comparison with full scale measurements for an industrial burner. All features of the burner are captured with the model. 41 refs., 33 figs.

  1. A model reduction method for biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Shodhan; van der Schaft, Arjan; van Eunen, Karen; Bakker, Barbara M; Jayawardhana, Bayu

    2014-05-03

    In this paper we propose a model reduction method for biochemical reaction networks governed by a variety of reversible and irreversible enzyme kinetic rate laws, including reversible Michaelis-Menten and Hill kinetics. The method proceeds by a stepwise reduction in the number of complexes, defined as the left and right-hand sides of the reactions in the network. It is based on the Kron reduction of the weighted Laplacian matrix, which describes the graph structure of the complexes and reactions in the network. It does not rely on prior knowledge of the dynamic behaviour of the network and hence can be automated, as we demonstrate. The reduced network has fewer complexes, reactions, variables and parameters as compared to the original network, and yet the behaviour of a preselected set of significant metabolites in the reduced network resembles that of the original network. Moreover the reduced network largely retains the structure and kinetics of the original model. We apply our method to a yeast glycolysis model and a rat liver fatty acid beta-oxidation model. When the number of state variables in the yeast model is reduced from 12 to 7, the difference between metabolite concentrations in the reduced and the full model, averaged over time and species, is only 8%. Likewise, when the number of state variables in the rat-liver beta-oxidation model is reduced from 42 to 29, the difference between the reduced model and the full model is 7.5%. The method has improved our understanding of the dynamics of the two networks. We found that, contrary to the general disposition, the first few metabolites which were deleted from the network during our stepwise reduction approach, are not those with the shortest convergence times. It shows that our reduction approach performs differently from other approaches that are based on time-scale separation. The method can be used to facilitate fitting of the parameters or to embed a detailed model of interest in a more coarse

  2. A stochastic modeling of isotope exchange reactions in glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmiruk, N. V.; Boronovskiy, S. E.; Nartsissov, Ya R.

    2017-11-01

    The model presented in this work allows simulation of isotopic exchange reactions at chemical equilibrium catalyzed by a glutamine synthetase. To simulate the functioning of the enzyme the algorithm based on the stochastic approach was applied. The dependence of exchange rates for 14C and 32P on metabolite concentration was estimated. The simulation results confirmed the hypothesis of the ascertained validity for preferred order random binding mechanism. Corresponding values of K0.5 were also obtained.

  3. Diabatic models with transferrable parameters for generalized chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; McKemmish, Laura K.; McKenzie, Ross H.; Hush, Noel S.

    2017-05-01

    Diabatic models applied to adiabatic electron-transfer theory yield many equations involving just a few parameters that connect ground-state geometries and vibration frequencies to excited-state transition energies and vibration frequencies to the rate constants for electron-transfer reactions, utilizing properties of the conical-intersection seam linking the ground and excited states through the Pseudo Jahn-Teller effect. We review how such simplicity in basic understanding can also be obtained for general chemical reactions. The key feature that must be recognized is that electron-transfer (or hole transfer) processes typically involve one electron (hole) moving between two orbitals, whereas general reactions typically involve two electrons or even four electrons for processes in aromatic molecules. Each additional moving electron leads to new high-energy but interrelated conical-intersection seams that distort the shape of the critical lowest-energy seam. Recognizing this feature shows how conical-intersection descriptors can be transferred between systems, and how general chemical reactions can be compared using the same set of simple parameters. Mathematical relationships are presented depicting how different conical-intersection seams relate to each other, showing that complex problems can be reduced into an effective interaction between the ground-state and a critical excited state to provide the first semi-quantitative implementation of Shaik’s “twin state” concept. Applications are made (i) demonstrating why the chemistry of the first-row elements is qualitatively so different to that of the second and later rows, (ii) deducing the bond-length alternation in hypothetical cyclohexatriene from the observed UV spectroscopy of benzene, (iii) demonstrating that commonly used procedures for modelling surface hopping based on inclusion of only the first-derivative correction to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are valid in no region of the chemical

  4. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M. A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davidkova, M.; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Mantero, A.; Nieminem, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H. N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k-d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  5. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamitros, M., E-mail: matkara@gmail.com [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, INCIA, UMR 5287, F-33400 Talence (France); Luan, S. [University of New Mexico, Department of Computer Science, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bernal, M.A. [Instituto de Física Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil); Allison, J. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Baldacchino, G. [CEA Saclay, IRAMIS, LIDYL, Radiation Physical Chemistry Group, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); CNRS, UMR3299, SIS2M, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Davidkova, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Francis, Z. [Saint Joseph University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Mkalles, Beirut (Lebanon); Friedland, W. [Helmholtz Zentrum München, German Research Center for Environmental Health, Institute of Radiation Protection, Ingolstädter Landstr. 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Ivantchenko, V. [Ecoanalytica, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation); Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Ivantchenko, A. [Geant4 Associates International Ltd (United Kingdom); Mantero, A. [SwHaRD s.r.l., via Buccari 9, 16153 Genova (Italy); Nieminem, P.; Santin, G. [ESA-ESTEC, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tran, H.N. [Division of Nuclear Physics and Faculty of Applied Sciences, Ton Duc Thang University, Tan Phong Ward, District 7, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Stepan, V. [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Incerti, S., E-mail: incerti@cenbg.in2p3.fr [CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France)

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  6. Sensitivity of Reaction Rates in X-Ray Burst Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiak, Jessica; Elliott, Jacob; Estrade, Alfredo; Jacobs, Adam; Schatz, Hendrik; Schmidt, Konrad

    2017-09-01

    We present a computational project on the rapid-proton capture process that occurs in accreting neutron stars. Our research involves conducting a sensitivity study of the rp-process to nuclear reaction rates in simulations using various compositions for the accreted material onto the neutron stars. In this research, we analyze the effects these variations of composition have on the resulting X-ray bursts simulated by a single-zone rp-process model. Current work is focused on modifying the initial abundances of accreted hydrogen and helium, including a range of values that correspond to the expected composition of X-ray burst sources with reliable observational data. Our objective is to determine which reaction rates have the largest effect on the modeled bursts. A second goal of the project is to implement a script to run the rp-process code in a distributed mode in a computer cluster. With this, we will be able to extend the sensitivity study to a finer grid of different chemical compositions of the accreted material. By running the sensitivity study and examining how the computational data compares with observational data, we can identify nuclear reactions that would need better experimental constraints to improve the accuracy of the rp-process model.

  7. Mathematical Model of Synthesis Catalyst with Local Reaction Centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Derevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers a catalyst granule with a porous ceramic passive substrate and point active centers on which an exothermic synthesis reaction occurs. A rate of the chemical reaction depends on the temperature according to the Arrhenius law. Heat is removed from the pellet surface in products of synthesis due to heat transfer. In our work we first proposed a model for calculating the steady-state temperature of a catalyst pellet with local reaction centers. Calculation of active centers temperature is based on the idea of self-consistent field (mean-field theory. At first, it is considered that powers of the reaction heat release at the centers are known. On the basis of the found analytical solution, which describes temperature distribution inside the granule, the average temperature of the reaction centers is calculated, which then is inserted in the formula for heat release. The resulting system of transcendental algebraic equations is transformed into a system of ordinary differential equations of relaxation type and solved numerically to achieve a steady-state value. As a practical application, the article considers a Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalyst granule with active cobalt metallic micro-particles. Cobalt micro-particles are the centers of the exothermic reaction of hydrocarbons macromolecular synthesis. Synthesis occurs as a result of absorption of the components of the synthesis gas on metallic cobalt. The temperature distribution inside the granule for a single local center and reaction centers located on the same granule diameter is found. It was found that there is a critical temperature of reactor exceeding of which leads to significant local overheating of the centers - thermal explosion. The temperature distribution with the local reaction centers is qualitatively different from the granule temperature, calculated in the homogeneous approximation. It is shown that, in contrast to the homogeneous approximation, the

  8. Developed Hybrid Model for Propylene Polymerisation at Optimum Reaction Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hossain Khan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A statistical model combined with CFD (computational fluid dynamic method was used to explain the detailed phenomena of the process parameters, and a series of experiments were carried out for propylene polymerisation by varying the feed gas composition, reaction initiation temperature, and system pressure, in a fluidised bed catalytic reactor. The propylene polymerisation rate per pass was considered the response to the analysis. Response surface methodology (RSM, with a full factorial central composite experimental design, was applied to develop the model. In this study, analysis of variance (ANOVA indicated an acceptable value for the coefficient of determination and a suitable estimation of a second-order regression model. For better justification, results were also described through a three-dimensional (3D response surface and a related two-dimensional (2D contour plot. These 3D and 2D response analyses provided significant and easy to understand findings on the effect of all the considered process variables on expected findings. To diagnose the model adequacy, the mathematical relationship between the process variables and the extent of polymer conversion was established through the combination of CFD with statistical tools. All the tests showed that the model is an excellent fit with the experimental validation. The maximum extent of polymer conversion per pass was 5.98% at the set time period and with consistent catalyst and co-catalyst feed rates. The optimum conditions for maximum polymerisation was found at reaction temperature (RT 75 °C, system pressure (SP 25 bar, and 75% monomer concentration (MC. The hydrogen percentage was kept fixed at all times. The coefficient of correlation for reaction temperature, system pressure, and monomer concentration ratio, was found to be 0.932. Thus, the experimental results and model predicted values were a reliable fit at optimum process conditions. Detailed and adaptable CFD results were capable

  9. Forced thermal cycling of catalytic reactions: experiments and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies of catalytic reactions subjected to fast forced temperature oscillations have revealed a rate enhancement increasing with temperature oscillation frequency. We present detailed studies of the rate enhancement up to frequencies of 2.5 Hz. A maximum in the rate enhancement is observed...... at about 1 Hz. A model for the rate enhancement that includes the surface kinetics and the dynamic partial pressure variations in the reactor is introduced. The model predicts a levelling off of the rate enhancement with frequency at about 1 Hz. The experimentally observed decrease above 1 Hz is explained...

  10. Bayesian inference of chemical kinetic models from proposed reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Galagali, Nikhil

    2015-02-01

    © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Bayesian inference provides a natural framework for combining experimental data with prior knowledge to develop chemical kinetic models and quantify the associated uncertainties, not only in parameter values but also in model structure. Most existing applications of Bayesian model selection methods to chemical kinetics have been limited to comparisons among a small set of models, however. The significant computational cost of evaluating posterior model probabilities renders traditional Bayesian methods infeasible when the model space becomes large. We present a new framework for tractable Bayesian model inference and uncertainty quantification using a large number of systematically generated model hypotheses. The approach involves imposing point-mass mixture priors over rate constants and exploring the resulting posterior distribution using an adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo method. The posterior samples are used to identify plausible models, to quantify rate constant uncertainties, and to extract key diagnostic information about model structure-such as the reactions and operating pathways most strongly supported by the data. We provide numerical demonstrations of the proposed framework by inferring kinetic models for catalytic steam and dry reforming of methane using available experimental data.

  11. Measuring individual corrective reaction time using the intermittent illumination model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ray F; Hsu, Chih-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    The corrective reaction time (tcr) is an essential motor property when modelling hand control movements. Many studies designed experiments to estimate tcr, but reported only group means with inconsistent definitions. This study proposes an alternative methodology using Drury's (1994) intermittent illumination model. A total of 24 participants performed circular tracking movements under five levels of visual information delay using a modified monitor in a darkened room. Measured movement speeds and the manipulated delays were used with the model to estimate tcr of individuals and test effects of gender and path width. The results showed excellent model fits and demonstrated individual differences of tcr, which was 273 ms on average and ranged from 87 to 441 ms. The wide range of tcr values was due to significant effects of gender and path width. Male participants required shorter tcr compared to female participants, especially for narrow path widths. This study reports the corrective reaction time (tcr) of individuals using a novel methodology. The estimated tcr ranged from 87 to 441 ms, helping model hand control movements, such as aiming and tracking. The methodology can be continuously applied to study tcr under conditions with various performers and movements.

  12. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  13. A comparative examination of the adsorption mechanism of an anionic textile dye (RBY 3GL) onto the powdered activated carbon (PAC) using various the isotherm models and kinetics equations with linear and non-linear methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Açıkyıldız, Metin; Gürses, Ahmet; Güneş, Kübra; Yalvaç, Duygu

    2015-11-01

    The present study was designed to compare the linear and non-linear methods used to check the compliance of the experimental data corresponding to the isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson) and kinetics equations (pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order). In this context, adsorption experiments were carried out to remove an anionic dye, Remazol Brillant Yellow 3GL (RBY), from its aqueous solutions using a commercial activated carbon as a sorbent. The effects of contact time, initial RBY concentration, and temperature onto adsorbed amount were investigated. The amount of dye adsorbed increased with increased adsorption time and the adsorption equilibrium was attained after 240 min. The amount of dye adsorbed enhanced with increased temperature, suggesting that the adsorption process is endothermic. The experimental data was analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Redlich-Peterson isotherm equations in order to predict adsorption isotherm. It was determined that the isotherm data were fitted to the Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherms. The adsorption process was also found to follow a pseudo second-order kinetic model. According to the kinetic and isotherm data, it was found that the determination coefficients obtained from linear method were higher than those obtained from non-linear method.

  14. Photophysical processes in models of reaction centers of photosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solov`yov, K.N.; Losev, A.P.; Kuz`mitskii, V.A. [Academy of Sciences of Belarus (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-11-01

    Simulation modeling of photosynthesis remains an urgent problem for two reasons. First, the cognitive value of this approach has not been exhausted yet. Second, this should lead to practical use of solar energy with the yield of oxygen, organic products, and nitrogen compounds. At present it has been found that photochemical stages of photosynthesis occur in reaction centers. A greater part of chlorophyll or bacteriochlorophyll molecules function as a light-harvesting antenna. The energy of an absorbed quantum migrates over the antenna and reaches the reaction centers, where the charge is separated and a chemical potential is generated. These are followed by dark stages of photosynthesis. The authors have investigated the photophysical properties of chlorophyll-like molecules and have approached the problem of intramolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET) in studies of nitroporphyrins.

  15. Reactions of Lignin Model Compounds in Ionic Liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holladay, John E.; Binder, Joseph B.; Gray, Michel J.; White, James F.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2009-09-15

    Lignin, a readily available form of biomass, awaits novel chemistry for converting it to valuable aromatic chemicals. Recent work has demonstrated that ionic liquids are excellent solvents for processing woody biomass and lignin. Seeking to exploit ionic liquids as media for depolymerization of lignin, we investigated reactions of lignin model compounds in these solvents. Using Brønsted acid catalysts in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium triflate at moderate temperatures, we obtained up to 11.6% yield of the dealkylation product guaiacol from the model compound eugenol and cleaved phenethyl phenyl ether, a model for lignin ethers. Despite these successes, acid catalysis failed in dealkylation of the unsaturated model compound 4-ethylguaiacol and did not produce monomeric products from organosolv lignin, demonstrating that further work is required to understand the complex chemistry of lignin depolymerization.

  16. Reaction-Diffusion Modeling ERK- and STAT-Interaction Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiev Nikola

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The modeling of the dynamics of interaction between ERK and STAT signaling pathways in the cell needs to establish the biochemical diagram of the corresponding proteins interactions as well as the corresponding reaction-diffusion scheme. Starting from the verbal description available in the literature of the cross talk between the two pathways, a simple diagram of interaction between ERK and STAT5a proteins is chosen to write corresponding kinetic equations. The dynamics of interaction is modeled in a form of two-dimensional nonlinear dynamical system for ERK—and STAT5a —protein concentrations. Then the spatial modeling of the interaction is accomplished by introducing an appropriate diffusion-reaction scheme. The obtained system of partial differential equations is analyzed and it is argued that the possibility of Turing bifurcation is presented by loss of stability of the homogeneous steady state and forms dissipative structures in the ERK and STAT interaction process. In these terms, a possible scaffolding effect in the protein interaction is related to the process of stabilization and destabilization of the dissipative structures (pattern formation inherent to the model of ERK and STAT cross talk.

  17. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  18. Parametric pattern selection in a reaction-diffusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Stich

    Full Text Available We compare spot patterns generated by Turing mechanisms with those generated by replication cascades, in a model one-dimensional reaction-diffusion system. We determine the stability region of spot solutions in parameter space as a function of a natural control parameter (feed-rate where degenerate patterns with different numbers of spots coexist for a fixed feed-rate. While it is possible to generate identical patterns via both mechanisms, we show that replication cascades lead to a wider choice of pattern profiles that can be selected through a tuning of the feed-rate, exploiting hysteresis and directionality effects of the different pattern pathways.

  19. A simplified approach to derive Cleland model for enzymatic reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswathi, Ganesan; Panda, Tapobrata; Basak, Tanmay

    2013-05-01

    Metabolic modeling can suggest which is the key enzyme activity that needs to be controlled or its activity enhanced for the required production of a metabolite in a pathway. It also helps to find possible drug targets (enzymes to be inhibited). In metabolic modeling, knowing the kinetics of the enzymes involved in a pathway is mandatory. Most enzymatic reactions involve multi-substrates and follow an ordered sequential or ping-pong mechanism. The kinetic parameters involved in the model are obtained by fitting experimental data using a model based on the mechanism. The Cleland model has been used for some years. The grouping of parameters, such as dissociation constant and Michaelis-Menten constant, makes the strategy meaningful and hence the Cleland model is still in use. Although other alternate methods, e.g., the King-Altman method, are available, derivation by determinants can be used to derive a rate expression for the sequential or ping-pong mechanism, they are tedious. Hence, a meaningful modification is suggested in this communication for deriving the enzyme mechanism which is based on Thilakavathi et al. (Biotech Lett 28:1889-1894, 2006) to obtain the Cleland model in an easier way.

  20. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-08-16

    Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the literature. They also give better estimates of

  1. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobbs Gary

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Results Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the

  2. In silico strain optimization by adding reactions to metabolic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Sara; Rocha, Miguel

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays, the concerns about the environment and the needs to increase the productivity at low costs, demand for the search of new ways to produce compounds with industrial interest. Based on the increasing knowledge of biological processes, through genome sequencing projects, and high-throughput experimental techniques as well as the available computational tools, the use of microorganisms has been considered as an approach to produce desirable compounds. However, this usually requires to manipulate these organisms by genetic engineering and/ or changing the enviromental conditions to make the production of these compounds possible. In many cases, it is necessary to enrich the genetic material of those microbes with hereologous pathways from other species and consequently adding the potential to produce novel compounds. This paper introduces a new plug-in for the OptFlux Metabolic Engineering platform, aimed at finding suitable sets of reactions to add to the genomes of selected microbes (wild type strain), as well as finding complementary sets of deletions, so that the mutant becomes able to overproduce compounds with industrial interest, while preserving their viability. The necessity of adding reactions to the metabolic model arises from existing gaps in the original model or motivated by the productions of new compounds by the organism. The optimization methods used are metaheuristics such as Evolutionary Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. The usefulness of this plug-in is demonstrated by a case study, regarding the production of vanillin by the bacterium E. coli.

  3. A quantum constrained kinematic model for elementary chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffery, Anthony J.; Truhins, Kaspars; Whiteley, Thomas W. J.

    1998-05-01

    The model we have termed quantum constrained kinematics and found to give an accurate account of atom-diatom inelastic scattering is tested by application to elementary atom-molecule reactive collisions. The approach emphasizes the disposal of initial relative momentum into rotational angular momentum of the product diatomic via vector relations that are constrained by the internal quantum structure of the product diatomic. We introduce the concept of vibrational momentum of the atoms in a diatomic molecule in order to treat vibrational and rotational excitation of the product species. This representation is valuable in providing a realistic picture of the motion in a heteronuclear diatomic and also indicates how the enthalpy of a reaction may be disposed in momentum terms. It may also provide criteria for assessing the likelihood of particular reaction mechanisms. Comparison of results calculated using the quantum constrained kinematic model with experimental data indicates a number of simple, transferable rule-of-thumb guides to the outcome of reactive collisions. Most probable j values and distributions are accurately predicted using readily available data in parameter-free calculations. It is found that in reactive collisions, initial velocity distributions are mapped onto those of product rotational states via an effective impact parameter distribution that is sharply peaked around the half bond length of the product diatomic molecule.

  4. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-01

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R2), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  5. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oboh, I., E-mail: innocentoboh@uniuyo.edu.ng [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Uyo, Uyo (Nigeria); Aluyor, E.; Audu, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Uyo, BeninCity, BeninCity (Nigeria)

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  6. A multi-pathway model for Photosynthetic reaction center

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, M; Yi, X X

    2015-01-01

    Charge separation in light-harvesting complexes occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine (QHE). Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem {\\rm II} reaction center (PS{\\rm II} RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways more than that in the published literature. The two pathways can interfere via cross-couplings and work together to enhance the charge-separation yields. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and voltage of the charge separation and discuss the advantages of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PS{\\rm II} RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension ...

  7. Antioxidative properties of Iberis amara extracts in biochemical model reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schempp, Harald; Toth, Angela; Weiser, Dieter; Elstner, Erich F

    2003-01-01

    Gastro-intestinal disorders such as the non-ulcer dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome expatiate on/with inflammatory processes of the gastro-intestinal mucosa. Iberogast is used in treatment of such disorders. Iberis amara L. extract (IAE) is one of nine components of the drug. There is increasing evidence that mediators of inflammation processes in the stomach and intestine include reactive oxygen species (ROS), arising from several enzymic reactions characteristic for inflammatory events. In this study it was shown that Iberis amara extract (STW 6) has the potential for scavenging ROS, dependent on the individual test system. Biochemical model reactions relevant for the formation of ROS in vivo at inflammatory sites were used. Inhibition of the formation of ROS could be shown to be excellent in test systems known to preferentially produce reactive species (myeloperoxidase-generated HOCl, peroxynitrite) with high affinities to sulfur-containing compounds, e.g. mustard oil glycosides such as glucoiberin. Furthermore ROS, generated during xanthine oxidase (XOD)-catalysed oxidation of xanthine into uric acid, were also efficiently decreased by IAE. However, an inhibition of XOD could be excluded, but chelation of metal ions (Fe, Cu) decreasing their redox-cycling activities seems to play a role. A major activity of IAE proved to represent inhibition of lipid peroxidation processes, shown as delay of the lag phase of the Cu(II)-induced LDL oxidation as well as protection of alpha-linolenic acid from peroxidation by singlet oxygen.

  8. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  9. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999.

  10. Artificial neural network (ANN) approach for modeling Zn(II) adsorption in batch process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildiz, Sayiter [Engineering Faculty, Cumhuriyet University, Sivas (Turkmenistan)

    2017-09-15

    Artificial neural networks (ANN) were applied to predict adsorption efficiency of peanut shells for the removal of Zn(II) ions from aqueous solutions. Effects of initial pH, Zn(II) concentrations, temperature, contact duration and adsorbent dosage were determined in batch experiments. The sorption capacities of the sorbents were predicted with the aid of equilibrium and kinetic models. The Zn(II) ions adsorption onto peanut shell was better defined by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, for both initial pH, and temperature. The highest R{sup 2} value in isotherm studies was obtained from Freundlich isotherm for the inlet concentration and from Temkin isotherm for the sorbent amount. The high R{sup 2} values prove that modeling the adsorption process with ANN is a satisfactory approach. The experimental results and the predicted results by the model with the ANN were found to be highly compatible with each other.

  11. Model reactions and natural occurrence of furans from hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Krause

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Volatile organic compounds like furan and its derivatives are important for atmospheric properties and reactions. In this work the known abiotic formation of furan from catechol under Fenton-like conditions with Fe3+ sulfate was revised by the use of a bispidine Fe2+ complex as a model compound for iron with well-known characteristics. While total yields were comparable to those with the Fe3+ salt, the bispidine Fe2+ complex is a better catalyst as the turnover numbers of the active iron species were higher. Additionally, the role of iron and pH is discussed in relation to furan formation from model compounds and in natural sediment and water samples collected from the Dead Sea and several salt lakes in Western Australia. Various alkylated furans and even traces of halogenated furans (3-chlorofuran and 3-bromofuran were found in some Australian samples. 3-chlorofuran was found in three sediments and four water samples, whereas 3-bromofuran was detected in three water samples. Further, the emission of furans is compared to the abundance of several possible precursors such as isoprene and aromatic hydrocarbons as well as to the related thiophenes. It is deduced that the emissions of volatile organic compounds such as furans contribute to the formation of ultra-fine particles in the vicinity of salt lakes and are important for the local climate.

  12. Modeling reaction noise with a desired accuracy by using the X level approach reaction noise estimator (XARNES) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2012-07-21

    A novel computational method for modeling reaction noise characteristics has been suggested. The method can be classified as a moment closure method. The approach is based on the concept of correlation forms which are used for describing spatially extended many body problems where particle numbers change in space and time. In here, it was shown how the formalism of spatially extended correlation forms can be adapted to study well mixed reaction systems. Stochastic fluctuations in particle numbers are described by selectively capturing correlation effects up to the desired order, ξ. The method is referred to as the ξ-level Approximation Reaction Noise Estimator method (XARNES). For example, the ξ=1 description is equivalent to the mean field theory (first-order effects), the ξ=2 case corresponds to the previously developed PARNES method (pair effects), etc. The main idea is that inclusion of higher order correlation effects should lead to better (more accurate) results. Several models were used to test the method, two versions of a simple complex formation model, the Michaelis-Menten model of enzymatic kinetics, the smallest bistable reaction network, a gene expression network with negative feedback, and a random large network. It was explicitly demonstrated that increase in ξ indeed improves accuracy in all cases investigated. The approach has been implemented as automatic software using the Mathematica programming language. The user only needs to input reaction rates, stoichiometry coefficients, and the desired level of computation ξ. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  14. A reaction diffusion model of pattern formation in clustering of adatoms on silicon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trilochan Bagarti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We study a reaction diffusion model which describes the formation of patterns on surfaces having defects. Through this model, the primary goal is to study the growth process of Ge on Si surface. We consider a two species reaction diffusion process where the reacting species are assumed to diffuse on the two dimensional surface with first order interconversion reaction occuring at various defect sites which we call reaction centers. Two models of defects, namely a ring defect and a point defect are considered separately. As reaction centers are assumed to be strongly localized in space, the proposed reaction-diffusion model is found to be exactly solvable. We use Green's function method to study the dynamics of reaction diffusion processes. Further we explore this model through Monte Carlo (MC simulations to study the growth processes in the presence of a large number of defects. The first passage time statistics has been studied numerically.

  15. A model for primary and heterogeneuos secondary reactions of wood pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahuja, P. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Inst. of Technology, Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India); Kumar, S. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Inst. of Technology, Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India); Singh, P.C. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Inst. of Technology, Banaras Hindu Univ., Varanasi (India)

    1996-06-01

    A chain growth model for heterogeneous secondary reactions is developed for the pyrolysis of large wood particles and the parameters determined by nonlinear optimization. The model takes both the volatile retention time and cracking and repolymerization reactions of the vapours with the decomposing solid as well as autocatalysis into consideration. The extent of the secondary reactions is strongly influenced by the time and the ratio of the autocatalytic (propagation) reaction rate to noncatalytic (initiation) reaction rate. The wood which has a higher value of the autocatalytic/noncatalytic ratio also has a higher exothermic heat of reaction and yields a higher amount of final char residue. This fact confirms that the heterogeneous secondary reactions lead to carbon enrichment of the final residue and are accompanied with an exothermic heat of reaction. The lower activation energies of the initiation and propagation reactions as compared to primary reactions (competitive reaction model consisting of weight loss and char forming reactions) confirm autocatalysis in large particles. The sealed reactor studies of small quantities of fine wood samples show that heterogeneous secondary reactions and not lower heating rates in large particles are the main source of char formed during the thermal decomposition of large wood particles. The model predictions are in agreement with the weight loss and temperature versus time curves over a wide range of particle size and furnace temperatures. (orig.)

  16. Unravelling the Maillard reaction network by multiresponse kinetic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martins, S.I.F.S.

    2003-01-01

    The Maillard reaction is an important reaction in food industry. It is responsible for the formation of colour and aroma, as well as toxic compounds as the recent discovered acrylamide. The knowledge of kinetic parameters, such as rate constants and activation energy, is necessary to predict its

  17. Kinetic modelling of reactions in heated disaccharide-casein systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, C.M.J.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2003-01-01

    The reactions occurring in disaccharide-casein reaction mixtures during heating at 120 degreesC and pH 6.8 were studied. The existence of two main degradation routes were established: (1) Isomerisation of the aldose sugars lactose and maltose in their ketose isomers lactulose and maltulose,

  18. Molecular Modeling of an Electrophilic Addition Reaction with "Unexpected" Regiochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Katherine T.; Li, Diana; Helms, Eric D.

    2017-01-01

    The electrophilic addition of a hydrohalic acid (HX) to an alkene is often one of the first reactions learned in second-year undergraduate organic chemistry classes. During the ensuing discussion of the mechanism, it is shown that this reaction follows Markovnikov's rule, which states that the hydrogen atom will attach to the carbon with fewer…

  19. Stability Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Atherogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Ibragimov, Akif

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a linear, asymptotic stability analysis for a reaction-diffusionconvection system modeling atherogenesis, the initiation of atherosclerosis, as an inflammatory instability. Motivated by the disease paradigm articulated by Ross, atherogenesis is viewed as an inflammatory spiral with a positive feedback loop involving key cellular and chemical species interacting and reacting within the intimal layer of muscular arteries. The inflammatory spiral is initiated as an instability from a healthy state which is defined to be an equilibrium state devoid of certain key inflammatory markers. Disease initiation is studied through a linear, asymptotic stability analysis of a healthy equilibrium state. Various theorems are proved, giving conditions on system parameters guaranteeing stability of the health state, and a general framework is developed for constructing perturbations from a healthy state that exhibit blow-up, which are interpreted as corresponding to disease initiation. The analysis reveals key features that arterial geometry, antioxidant levels, and the source of inflammatory components (through coupled third-kind boundary conditions or through body sources) play in disease initiation. © 2010 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  20. Adsorption kinetics for the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of kinetic models applied to the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions on the adsorbents was evaluated for the pseudo first-order, the pseudo second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models, respectively. Results show that the pseudo second-order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data ...

  1. Constructing and Visualizing Chemical Reaction Networks from Pi-Calculus Models

    OpenAIRE

    John, Mathias; Schulz, Hans-Jörg; Schumann, Heidrun; Uhrmacher, Adelinde; Unger, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The pi-calculus, in particular its stochastic version the stochastic pi-calculus, is a common modeling formalism to concisely describe the chemical reactions occurring in biochemical systems. However, it remains largely unexplored how to transform a biochemical model expressed in the stochastic pi-calculus back into a set of meaningful reactions. To this end, we present a two step approach of first translating model states to reaction sets and then visualizing sequence...

  2. Chemical reaction model for oil and gas generation from type 1 and type 2 kerogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

    1993-06-01

    A global model for the generation of oil and gas from petroleum source rocks is presented. The model consists of 13 chemical species and 10 reactions, including an alternate-pathway mechanism for kerogen pyrolysis. Reaction rate parameters and stoichiometry coefficients determined from a variety of pyrolysis data are given for both type I and type II kerogen. Use of the chemical reaction model is illustrated for typical geologic conditions.

  3. Ares I Reaction Control System Propellant Feedline Decontamination Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to quantify the effects of purge gas temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate on Hydrazine (Hz) decontamination rates of the Ares I Roll Control System and Reaction Control System. A survey of experts in this field revealed the absence of any decontamination rate prediction models. Three basic decontamination methods were identified for analysis and modeling. These include low pressure eduction, high flow rate purge, and pulse purge. For each method, an approach to predict the Hz mass transfer rate, as a function of system pressure, temperature, and purge gas mass flow rate, is developed based on the applicable physics. The models show that low pressure eduction is two orders of magnitude more effective than the high velocity purge, which in turn is two orders of magnitude more effective than the pure diffusion component of pulse purging of deadheads. Eduction subjects the system to low pressure conditions that promote the extraction of Hz vapors. At 120 F, Hz is saturated at approximately 1 psia. At lower pressures and 120 F, Hz will boil, which is an extremely efficient means to remove liquid Hz. The Hz boiling rate is predicted by equating the rate at which energy is added to the saturated liquid Hz through heaters at the tube outer wall with the energy removed from the liquid through evaporation. Boil-off fluxes were predicted by iterating through the range of local pressures with limits set by the minimum allowed pressure of 0.2 psia and maximum allowed wall temperature of 120 F established by the heaters, which gives a saturation pressure of approximately 1.0 psia. Figure 1 shows the resulting boil-off fluxes as a function of local eduction pressure. As depicted in figure 1, the flux is a strong inverse function of eduction pressure, and that minimizing the eduction pressure maximizes the boil-off flux. Also, higher outer wall temperatures lead to higher boil-off fluxes and allow for boil-off over a greater range

  4. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  5. Wide Temperature Range Kinetics of Elementary Combustion Reactions for Army Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fontijn, Arthur

    2002-01-01

    The goals of this program are to provide accurate kinetic data on isolated elementary reactions at temperatures relevant to Army combustion models, particularly for propellant combustion dark zones...

  6. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The JigCell model builder: a spreadsheet interface for creating biochemical reaction network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vass, Marc T; Shaffer, Clifford A; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Watson, Layne T; Tyson, John J

    2006-01-01

    Converting a biochemical reaction network to a set of kinetic rate equations is tedious and error prone. We describe known interface paradigms for inputing models of intracellular regulatory networks: graphical layout (diagrams), wizards, scripting languages, and direct entry of chemical equations. We present the JigCell Model Builder, which allows users to define models as a set of reaction equations using a spreadsheet (an example of direct entry of equations) and outputs model definitions in the Systems Biology Markup Language, Level 2. We present the results of two usability studies. The spreadsheet paradigm demonstrated its effectiveness in reducing the number of errors made by modelers when compared to hand conversion of a wiring diagram to differential equations. A comparison of representatives of the four interface paradigms for a simple model of the cell cycle was conducted which measured time, mouse clicks, and keystrokes to enter the model, and the number of screens needed to view the contents of the model. All four paradigms had similar data entry times. The spreadsheet and scripting language approaches require significantly fewer screens to view the models than do the wizard or graphical layout approaches.

  8. Nanoscale zero-valent iron for metal/metalloid removal from model hydraulic fracturing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuqing; Lei, Cheng; Khan, Eakalak; Chen, Season S; Tsang, Daniel C W; Ok, Yong Sik; Lin, Daohui; Feng, Yujie; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2017-06-01

    Nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) was tested for the removal of Cu(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), and As(V) in model saline wastewaters from hydraulic fracturing. Increasing ionic strength (I) from 0.35 to 4.10 M (Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters) increased Cu(II) removal (25.4-80.0%), inhibited Zn(II) removal (58.7-42.9%), slightly increased and then reduced Cr(VI) removal (65.7-44.1%), and almost unaffected As(V) removal (66.7-75.1%) by 8-h reaction with nZVI at 1-2 g L-1. The removal kinetics conformed to pseudo-second-order model, and increasing I decreased the surface area-normalized rate coefficient (ksa) of Cu(II) and Cr(VI), probably because agglomeration of nZVI in saline wastewaters restricted diffusion of metal(loid)s to active surface sites. Increasing I induced severe Fe dissolution from 0.37 to 0.77% in DIW to 4.87-13.0% in Day-90 wastewater; and Fe dissolution showed a significant positive correlation with Cu(II) removal. With surface stabilization by alginate and polyvinyl alcohol, the performance of entrapped nZVI in Day-90 wastewater was improved for Zn(II) and Cr(VI), and Fe dissolution was restrained (3.20-7.36%). The X-ray spectroscopic analysis and chemical speciation modelling demonstrated that the difference in removal trends from Day-1 to Day-90 wastewaters was attributed to: (i) distinctive removal mechanisms of Cu(II) and Cr(VI) (adsorption, (co-)precipitation, and reduction), compared to Zn(II) (adsorption) and As(V) (bidentate inner-sphere complexation); and (ii) changes in solution speciation (e.g., from Zn2+ to ZnCl3- and ZnCl42-; from CrO42- to CaCrO4 complex). Bare nZVI was susceptible to variations in wastewater chemistry while entrapped nZVI was more stable and environmentally benign, which could be used to remove metals/metalloids before subsequent treatment for reuse/disposal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Palm oil fruit shells as biosorbent for copper removal from water and wastewater: experiments and sorption models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M A; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Nguyen, T V

    2012-06-01

    Palm oil fruit shells were evaluated as a new bioadsorbent to eliminate toxic copper from water and wastewater. Without any chemical treatment, palm oil fruit shells were washed, dried and grounded into powder (copper was significantly high (between 28 and 60 mg/g) at room temperature. Nonlinear regression analyses for isotherm models revealed that three-parameter isotherms had a better fit to the experimental data (R(2)>0.994) than that of two-parameter isotherms. The copper sorption system was heterogeneous as the values of exponents were lying between 0 and 1. The highly correlated pseudo-second-order kinetics model (R(2)>0.998) ascertained the applicability of copper removal by palm oil fruit shells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Biosorption of diazinon by a pre-treated alimentary industrial waste: equilibrium and kinetic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeddou Mezenner, N.; Lagha, H.; Kais, H.; Trari, M.

    2017-11-01

    This study explores the feasibility of pre-treated coffee waste (PCW) as biosorbent for the removal of diazinon. The effect of the pesticide concentration (6-20 mg L-1), contact time, adsorbent dose (0.2-1.2 g L-1), solution pH (3-11.5), temperature (15-40 °C) and co-existing inorganic ions (H2PO4 -, NO3 -) on the diazinon biosorption over PCW is investigated. The experimental results indicate an optimal pH of 7.3 for the diazinon elimination on PCW (1 g L-1). The Langmuir model describes well the isotherm data with a high regression coefficient ( R 2 > 0.990) and a maximum monolayer biosorption capacity of 18.52 mg g-1 at 15 °C. It is also observed that the intra-particle diffusion is not the rate-controlling step. A comparison is evaluated between the pseudo-second-order and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models; the experimental data are well fitted by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The biosorption capacity decreases with increasing temperature for a diazinon concentration of 10 mg L-1. The negative enthalpy Δ H° (-63.57 kJ/mol) indicates that the diazinon biosorption onto PCW is exothermic. Under optimal conditions, the biosorption reaches 95% after 90 min. The removal efficiency decreases from 95 to 65.67 and 48.9% for the diazinon alone and in the presence of NO3 - and H2PO4 - (100 mg L-1), respectively.

  11. Adsorption of phenolic compound by aged-refuse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai Xiaoli [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Enviromental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Siping Road 1239, Shanghai 200092 (China)]. E-mail: xlchai@mail.tongji.edu.cn; Zhao Youcai [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Enviromental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Siping Road 1239, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol by aged-refuse has been studied. Adsorption isotherms have been determined for phenol, 2-chlorophenol, 4-chlorophenol and 2,4-dichlorophenol and the data fits well to the Freundlich equation. The chlorinated phenols are absorbed more strongly than the phenol and the adsorption capacity has an oblivious relationship with the numbers and the position of chlorine subsistent. The experiment data suggests that both the partition function and the chemical adsorption involve in the adsorption process. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model were applied to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption and the results show that it fit the pseudo-second-order model. More than one step involves in the adsorption process and the overall rate of the adsorption process appears to be controlled by the chemical reaction. The thermodynamic analysis indicates that the adsorption is spontaneous and endothermic.

  12. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  13. Study of n-Butyl Acrylate Self-Initiation Reaction Experimentally and via Macroscopic Mechanistic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Arabi Shamsabadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study of the self-initiation reaction of n-butyl acrylate (n-BA in free-radical polymerization. For the first time, the frequency factor and activation energy of the monomer self-initiation reaction are estimated from measurements of n-BA conversion in free-radical homo-polymerization initiated only by the monomer. The estimation was carried out using a macroscopic mechanistic mathematical model of the reactor. In addition to already-known reactions that contribute to the polymerization, the model considers a n-BA self-initiation reaction mechanism that is based on our previous electronic-level first-principles theoretical study of the self-initiation reaction. Reaction rate equations are derived using the method of moments. The reaction-rate parameter estimates obtained from conversion measurements agree well with estimates obtained via our purely-theoretical quantum chemical calculations.

  14. A Joint Modeling Approach for Reaction Time and Accuracy in Psycholinguistic Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeys, T.; Rosseel, Y.; Baten, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the psycholinguistic literature, reaction times and accuracy can be analyzed separately using mixed (logistic) effects models with crossed random effects for item and subject. Given the potential correlation between these two outcomes, a joint model for the reaction time and accuracy may provide further insight. In this paper, a Bayesian…

  15. Competitive reaction- and feedback effects based on VARX models of pooled store data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horvath, C; Leeflang, PSH; Wieringa, JE; Wittink, DR

    2005-01-01

    We apply a model that accommodates dynamic phenomena in demand- and reaction functions. The latter functions capture reactions to actions as well as to consequences of actions. We estimate a fixed effects VARX model with dynamic and interactive effects for multiple brands based on pooled time series

  16. Removal of mixed pesticides from aqueous solutions using organoclays: evaluation of equilibrium and kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Ajoy; Ahammed Shabeer Tp; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Kumar, Rajesh

    2013-07-01

    Removal of mixed pesticides, namely alachlor, metolachlor, chlorpyriphos, fipronil, α-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, p,p'-DDT and two metabolites p,p'-DDE and endosulfan sulphate from aqueous solution by batch adsorption onto three commercial organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M), modified with dimethyl- dialkylamine (DMDA-M) and modified with octadecylamine and aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] were investigated. Effect of process variables, mainly contact time and initial concentration of mixed pesticides, on adsorption phenomenon were evaluated. To understand the adsorption kinetic pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models were tested. The pseudo-second-order model provided the best fit for explaining adsorption kinetics, on the basis of high correlation coefficient (r) and normalized percent deviation values. The adsorption equilibrium was explained by the Freundlich isotherm (r = 0.951-0.992). High values (0.17-0.52 mg g⁻¹) of Freundlich constant (K(f)) indicated higher affinity of pesticides towards all three organoclays, as a result of hydrophobic interaction between the adsorbent/adsorbate systems. Pesticides with high octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and low water solubility showed faster adsorption with higher K(f) values as compared to the pesticides with low K(ow) and high water solubility. The order of organoclays for removal efficiency of mixed pesticide was ODAAPS-M > DMDA-M > ODA-M. These findings may find application to decontaminate or treat mixed pesticide contaminated industrial/agricultural waste waters.

  17. Effect of pH on lead removal from water using tree fern as the sorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2005-07-01

    The sorption of lead from water onto an agricultural by-product, tree fern, was examined as a function of pH. The sorption processes were carried out using an agitated and baffled system. Pseudo-second-order kinetic analyses were performed to determine the rate constant of sorption, the equilibrium sorption capacity, and the initial sorption rate. Application of the pseudo-second-order kinetics model produced very high coefficients of determination. Results showed the efficiency of tree fern as a sorbent for lead. The optimum pH for lead removal was between 4 and 7, with pH 4.9 resulting in better lead removal. Ion exchange occurred in the initial reaction period. In addition, a relation between the change in the solution hydrogen ion concentration and equilibrium capacity was developed and is presented.

  18. Adsorption and kinetic studies on the removal of chromium and copper onto Chitosan-g-maliec anhydride-g-ethylene dimethacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Reddi, M R; Gomathi, T; Saranya, M; Sudha, P N

    2017-11-01

    The present work was designed to remove toxic metals chromium and copper using the double grafted copolymer Chitosan-g-Maleic anhydride-g-ethylene dimethacrylate. The graft copolymer was synthesized through chain polymerization reaction using ceric ammonium nitrate as the initiator. Prepared Chitosan-g-Maleic anhydride-g-ethylene dimethacrylate was used in order to remove the heavy metals chromium and copper from aqueous solutions of 200ppm/L concentration proceeding batch adsorption process by varying the parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration of the metal solution. The experimental data were equipped with isotherm models such as Langmuir and Freundlich and pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetics. The calculated results revealed that the adsorption favours Freundlich isotherm and follows pseudo-second order kinetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adsorption Removal of Glycidyl Esters from Palm Oil and Oil Model Solution by Using Acid-Washed Oil Palm Wood-Based Activated Carbon: Kinetic and Mechanism Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Guoqin; Wang, Xuede; Han, Lipeng

    2017-11-08

    Acid-washed oil palm wood-based activated carbon (OPAC) has been investigated for its potential application as a promising adsorbent in the removal of glycidyl esters (GEs) from both palm oil and oil model (hexadecane) solution. It was observed that the removal rate of GEs in palm oil was up to >95%, which was significantly higher than other adsorbents used in this study. In batch adsorption system, the adsorption efficiency and performance of acid-washed OPAC were evaluated as a function of several experimental parameters such as contact time, initial glycidyl palmitate (PGE) concentration, adsorbent dose, and temperature. The Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich models were used to describe the adsorption equilibrium isotherm, and the equilibrium data were fitted best by the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacity of acid-washed OPAC was found to be 36.23 mg/g by using the Langmuir model. The thermodynamic analysis indicated that the adsorption of PGE on acid-washed OPAC was an endothermic and physical process in nature. The experimental data were fitted by using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and intraparticle diffusion models. It was found that the kinetic of PGE adsorption onto acid-washed OPAC followed well the pseudo-second-order model for various initial PGE concentrations and the adsorption process was controlled by both film diffusion and intraparticle diffusion. The desorption test indicated the removal of GEs from palm oil was attributed to not only the adsorption of GEs on acid-washed OPAC, but also the degradation of GEs adsorbed at activated sites with acidic character. Furthermore, no significant difference between before and after PGE adsorption in oil quality was observed.

  20. Zirconium-Doped Fungal Sorbents: Preparation, Characterization, Adsorption Isotherm, and Kinetic and Mathematical Modelling Study for Removal of Fluoride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poornima G. Hiremath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study involves usage of more efficient and eco-friendly zirconium-doped, fluoride-resistant fungal biosorbents for removal of excess fluoride from groundwater. It was observed that >94% fluoride removal was possible at optimal conditions for the four fungal species studied. The adsorption isotherm studies indicated that zirconium-doped Aspergillus ficuum SIT-CH-2, Aspergillus terreus SIT-CH-3, and Aspergillus flavipes SIT-CH-4 were best described by Freundlich isotherm and zirconium-doped Penicillium camemberti SIT-CH-1 fitted well with Langmuir adsorption isotherm equation. The pseudo-second-order kinetics model showed the best fit for all of the four zirconium-doped fungal species for the fluoride biosorption.

  1. Delineating pMDI model reactions with loblolly pine via solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Part 1, Catalyzed reactions with wood models and wood polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    To better understand adhesive interactions with wood, reactions between model compounds of wood and a model compound of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI) were characterized by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, finely ground loblolly pine sapwood, milled-wood lignin and holocellulose from the same wood were isolated and derivatized with...

  2. Evaluation of dynamics and equilibrium models for the sorption of Basic Violet 3 on activated carbon prepared from Moringa Oleifera fruit shell waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Sumithra

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of activated carbon prepared from Moringa oleifera fruit shell waste to remove Basic Violet 3 from aqueous solution was investigated through batch mode contact time studies. The surface chemistry of activated carbon is studied using Boehm titrations and pH of PZC measurements indicates that the surface oxygenated groups are mainly basic in nature. The surface area of the activated carbon is determined using BET method. The kinetics of Basic Violet 3 adsorption are observed to be pH dependent. The experimental data can be explained by Pseudo second order kinetic model. For, Basic Violet 3, the Langmuir model is best suited to stimulate the adsorption isotherms.

  3. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: Experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun; Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Pokorný, Richard [Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Technická 5, 166 28 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel, E-mail: pavelhrma@postech.ac.kr [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: ► We measured enthalpy-based conversion degree of overlapping reactions using DSC. ► We employed the run/rerun technique to obtain heat flow associated with reactions. ► Batch-to-glass conversion advances via multiple overlapping reactions. ► The kinetic model is intended for the source term in the energy transfer equation. ► The results are relevant for industrial glass making and nuclear waste vitrification. - Abstract: Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry–thermogravimetry (DSC–TGA) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both the heat associated with the heat capacity of the feed and experimental artifacts, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by an nth order kinetic model, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

  4. Modeling of Chemical Reactions in Afterburning for the Reduction of N2O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Lennart; Glarborg, Peter; Leckner, Bo

    1996-01-01

    Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions.......Full scale tests in a 12 MW fluidized bed combustor on reduction of N2O by secondary fuel injection are analyzed in terms a model that involves a detailed reaction mechanism for the gas phase chemistry as well as a description of gas-solid reactions....

  5. Reaction Zone Models for Vortex Simulation of Turbulent Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    extinctio n stain-• " ~tlltlon lram 110’ 0 0 0.78 0.8 0.82 0.84 0.86 0.88 0.9 Heat Release parameter (Tb-T_O)/T_b Figure 9 Extinction strain and...flow. Thus, while dynamic effects associated with the presence of an expansion field and the details of the chemical reaction pro - cess are omitted

  6. Modeling the Reactions Catalyzed by Coenzyme B12 Dependent Enzymes: Accuracy and Cost-Quality Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Christian R; Smith, David M

    2018-02-07

    The reactions catalyzed by coenzyme B12 dependent enzymes are formally initiated by the homolytic cleavage of a carbon-cobalt bond and a subsequent or concerted H-atom-transfer reaction. A reasonable model chemistry for describing those reactions should, therefore, account for an accurate description of both reactions. The inherent limitation due to the necessary system size renders the coenzyme B12 system a suitable candidate for DFT or hybrid QM/MM methods; however, the accurate description of both homolytic Co-C cleavage and H-atom-transfer reactions within this framework is challenging and can lead to controversial results with varying accuracy. We present an assessment study of 16 common density functionals applied to prototypical model systems for both reactions. H-abstraction reactions were modeled on the basis of four reference reactions designed to resemble a broad range of coenzyme B12 reactions. The Co-C cleavage reaction is treated by an ONIOM(QM/MM) setup that is in excellent agreement with solution-phase experimental data and is as accurate as full DFT calculations on the complete model system. We find that the meta-GGAs TPSS-D3 and M06L-D3 and the meta-hybrid M06-D3 give the best overall performance with MUEs for both types of reactions below 10 kJ mol-1. Our recommended model chemistry allows for a fast and accurate description of coenzyme B12 chemistry that is readily applicable to study the reactions in an enzymatic framework.

  7. Cold-cap reactions in vitrification of nuclear waste glass: experiments and modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, David A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pokorny, Richard [Inst. of Chemical Technology, Prague (Czech Republic); Hrma, Pavel R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pohang Univ. of Science and Techology (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cold-cap reactions are multiple overlapping reactions that occur in the waste-glass melter during the vitrification process when the melter feed is being converted to molten glass. In this study, we used differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to investigate cold-cap reactions in a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To separate the reaction heat from both sensible heat and experimental instability, we employed the run/rerun method, which enabled us to define the degree of conversion based on the reaction heat and to estimate the heat capacity of the reacting feed. Assuming that the reactions are nearly independent and can be approximated by the nth order kinetics, we obtained the kinetic parameters using the Kissinger method combined with least squares analysis. The resulting mathematical simulation of the cold-cap reactions provides a key element for the development of an advanced cold-cap model.

  8. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Cobbs, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most pote...

  9. A Gibbs Energy Minimization Approach for Modeling of Chemical Reactions in a Basic Oxygen Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskopf, Ari; Visuri, Ville-Valtteri

    2017-12-01

    In modern steelmaking, the decarburization of hot metal is converted into steel primarily in converter processes, such as the basic oxygen furnace. The objective of this work was to develop a new mathematical model for top blown steel converter, which accounts for the complex reaction equilibria in the impact zone, also known as the hot spot, as well as the associated mass and heat transport. An in-house computer code of the model has been developed in Matlab. The main assumption of the model is that all reactions take place in a specified reaction zone. The mass transfer between the reaction volume, bulk slag, and metal determine the reaction rates for the species. The thermodynamic equilibrium is calculated using the partitioning of Gibbs energy (PGE) method. The activity model for the liquid metal is the unified interaction parameter model and for the liquid slag the modified quasichemical model (MQM). The MQM was validated by calculating iso-activity lines for the liquid slag components. The PGE method together with the MQM was validated by calculating liquidus lines for solid components. The results were compared with measurements from literature. The full chemical reaction model was validated by comparing the metal and slag compositions to measurements from industrial scale converter. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model was found to compare favorably with the models proposed in the literature. The real-time capability of the proposed model was confirmed in test calculations.

  10. A Gibbs Energy Minimization Approach for Modeling of Chemical Reactions in a Basic Oxygen Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskopf, Ari; Visuri, Ville-Valtteri

    2017-08-01

    In modern steelmaking, the decarburization of hot metal is converted into steel primarily in converter processes, such as the basic oxygen furnace. The objective of this work was to develop a new mathematical model for top blown steel converter, which accounts for the complex reaction equilibria in the impact zone, also known as the hot spot, as well as the associated mass and heat transport. An in-house computer code of the model has been developed in Matlab. The main assumption of the model is that all reactions take place in a specified reaction zone. The mass transfer between the reaction volume, bulk slag, and metal determine the reaction rates for the species. The thermodynamic equilibrium is calculated using the partitioning of Gibbs energy (PGE) method. The activity model for the liquid metal is the unified interaction parameter model and for the liquid slag the modified quasichemical model (MQM). The MQM was validated by calculating iso-activity lines for the liquid slag components. The PGE method together with the MQM was validated by calculating liquidus lines for solid components. The results were compared with measurements from literature. The full chemical reaction model was validated by comparing the metal and slag compositions to measurements from industrial scale converter. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model was found to compare favorably with the models proposed in the literature. The real-time capability of the proposed model was confirmed in test calculations.

  11. Performance of Frozen Density Embedding for Modeling Hole Transfer Reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ramos, Pablo; Pavanello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out a thorough benchmark of the FDE-ET method for calculating hole transfer couplings. We have considered 10 exchange-correlation functionals, 3 non-additive kinetic energy functionals and 3 basis sets. Overall, we conclude that with a 7% mean relative unsigned error, the PBE functional coupled with the PW91k non-additive Kinetic energy functional and a TZP basis set constitutes the most stable, and accurate level of theory for hole-transfer coupling calculations. The FDE-ET method is found to be an excellent tool for computing diabatic couplings for hole transfer reactions.

  12. Subjective and nystagmus reactions considered in relation to models of vestibular function. [dynamic models for prediction human physiological reactions to angular accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedry, F. E., Jr.; Gilson, R. D.; Stockwell, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Modelling will become increasingly important as more knowledge is accumulated, because it offers advantages in predicting reactions of individuals in a variety of situations, including novel aerospace environments, and in specifying a few parameters which should have considerable clinical significance. However, the need for continuing experimental crosschecks of these models has been illustrated by several sets of results which would not have been predicted by any existing models.

  13. Noise Propagation and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multiphysics Models: Initiation and Reaction Propagation in Energetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-23

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2016-0200 Noise Propagation and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multiphysics Models Daniel Tartakovsky UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA...2016 Title: Noise Propagation and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multi-Physics Models Subtitle: Initiation and Reaction Propagation in...and Uncertainty Quantification in Hybrid Multi-Physics Models Task: Initiation and Reaction Propagation in Energetic Materials AFOSR award: FA9550-12-1

  14. Structure-reactivity modeling using mixture-based representation of chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, Pavel; Madzhidov, Timur; Gimadiev, Timur; Bodrov, Andrey; Nugmanov, Ramil; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-09-01

    We describe a novel approach of reaction representation as a combination of two mixtures: a mixture of reactants and a mixture of products. In turn, each mixture can be encoded using an earlier reported approach involving simplex descriptors (SiRMS). The feature vector representing these two mixtures results from either concatenated product and reactant descriptors or the difference between descriptors of products and reactants. This reaction representation doesn't need an explicit labeling of a reaction center. The rigorous "product-out" cross-validation (CV) strategy has been suggested. Unlike the naïve "reaction-out" CV approach based on a random selection of items, the proposed one provides with more realistic estimation of prediction accuracy for reactions resulting in novel products. The new methodology has been applied to model rate constants of E2 reactions. It has been demonstrated that the use of the fragment control domain applicability approach significantly increases prediction accuracy of the models. The models obtained with new "mixture" approach performed better than those required either explicit (Condensed Graph of Reaction) or implicit (reaction fingerprints) reaction center labeling.

  15. Reaction Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Okubo, Fumiya; Kobayashi, Satoshi; YOKOMORI, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Reaction systems are a formal model that has been introduced to investigate the interactive behaviors of biochemical reactions. Based on the formal framework of reaction systems, we propose new computing models called reaction automata that feature (string) language acceptors with multiset manipulation as a computing mechanism, and show that reaction automata are computationally Turing universal. Further, some subclasses of reaction automata with space complexity are investigated and their la...

  16. PhreeqcRM: A reaction module for transport simulators based on the geochemical model PHREEQC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Wissmeier, Laurin

    2015-01-01

    PhreeqcRM is a geochemical reaction module designed specifically to perform equilibrium and kinetic reaction calculations for reactive transport simulators that use an operator-splitting approach. The basic function of the reaction module is to take component concentrations from the model cells of the transport simulator, run geochemical reactions, and return updated component concentrations to the transport simulator. If multicomponent diffusion is modeled (e.g., Nernst–Planck equation), then aqueous species concentrations can be used instead of component concentrations. The reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of the reaction capabilities of PHREEQC. In each cell, the reaction module maintains the composition of all of the reactants, which may include minerals, exchangers, surface complexers, gas phases, solid solutions, and user-defined kinetic reactants.PhreeqcRM assigns initial and boundary conditions for model cells based on standard PHREEQC input definitions (files or strings) of chemical compositions of solutions and reactants. Additional PhreeqcRM capabilities include methods to eliminate reaction calculations for inactive parts of a model domain, transfer concentrations and other model properties, and retrieve selected results. The module demonstrates good scalability for parallel processing by using multiprocessing with MPI (message passing interface) on distributed memory systems, and limited scalability using multithreading with OpenMP on shared memory systems. PhreeqcRM is written in C++, but interfaces allow methods to be called from C or Fortran. By using the PhreeqcRM reaction module, an existing multicomponent transport simulator can be extended to simulate a wide range of geochemical reactions. Results of the implementation of PhreeqcRM as the reaction engine for transport simulators PHAST and FEFLOW are shown by using an analytical solution and the reactive transport benchmark of MoMaS.

  17. Modelling combustion reactions for gas flaring and its resulting emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Saheed Ismail

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flaring of associated petroleum gas is an age long environmental concern which remains unabated. Flaring of gas maybe a very efficient combustion process especially steam/air assisted flare and more economical than utilization in some oil fields. However, it has serious implications for the environment. This study considered different reaction types and operating conditions for gas flaring. Six combustion equations were generated using the mass balance concept with varying air and combustion efficiency. These equations were coded with a computer program using 12 natural gas samples of different chemical composition and origin to predict the pattern of emission species from gas flaring. The effect of key parameters on the emission output is also shown. CO2, CO, NO, NO2 and SO2 are the anticipated non-hydrocarbon emissions of environmental concern. Results show that the quantity and pattern of these chemical species depended on percentage excess/deficiency of stoichiometric air, natural gas type, reaction type, carbon mass content, impurities, combustion efficiency of the flare system etc. These emissions degrade the environment and human life, so knowing the emission types, pattern and flaring conditions that this study predicts is of paramount importance to governments, environmental agencies and the oil and gas industry.

  18. Modeling of the symmetry factor of electrochemical proton discharge via the Volmer reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björketun, Mårten E.; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Skúlason, Egill

    2013-01-01

    A scheme for evaluating symmetry factors of elementary electrode reactions using a density functional theory (DFT) based model of the electrochemical double layer is presented. As an illustration, the symmetry factor is determined for hydrogen adsorption via the electrochemical Volmer reaction. T...

  19. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling Proton- and Light Ion-Induced Reactions at Low Energies in the MARS15 Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakhno, I. L. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Mokhov, N. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gudima, K. K. [National Academy of Sciences, Cisineu (Moldova)

    2015-04-25

    An implementation of both ALICE code and TENDL evaluated nuclear data library in order to describe nuclear reactions induced by low-energy projectiles in the Monte Carlo code MARS15 is presented. Comparisons between results of modeling and experimental data on reaction cross sections and secondary particle distributions are shown.

  1. A model for void-induced back reaction between radiolytic products in NaCl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkin, A.A.; Dubinko, V.I.; Vainshtein, D.I.; Hartog, H.W. den

    A kinetic model is formulated for the chemical reaction between radiolytic sodium colloids and gas bubbles, which are brought into contact with each other during the exposure to ionising radiation by the growing voids. The reaction starts with the evaporation of Na atoms into the void due to the

  2. New tools in modulating Maillard reaction from model systems to food

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Troise, A.D.

    2015-01-01

    New tools in modulating Maillard reaction from model systems to food
    The Maillard reaction (MR) supervises the final quality of foods and occupies a prominent place in food science. The first stable compounds, the Amadori rearrangement products

  3. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-08-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models.

  4. Testing an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelis, Alessia De; Pancani, Luca; Steca, Patrizia; Colaceci, Sofia; Giusti, Angela; Tibaldi, Laura; Alvaro, Rosaria; Ausili, Davide; Vellone, Ercole

    2017-05-01

    To test an explanatory model of nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions in hospital settings, based on the theory of planned behaviour. Under-reporting of adverse drug reactions is an important problem among nurses. A cross-sectional design was used. Data were collected with the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to test the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire, and structural equation modelling was used to test the explanatory model. The convenience sample comprised 500 Italian hospital nurses (mean age = 43.52). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the factor validity of the adverse drug reporting nurses' questionnaire. The structural equation modelling showed a good fit with the data. Nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions was significantly predicted by attitudes, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control (R² = 0.16). The theory of planned behaviour effectively explained the mechanisms behind nurses' intention to report adverse drug reactions, showing how several factors come into play. In a scenario of organisational empowerment towards adverse drug reaction reporting, the major predictors of the intention to report are support for the decision to report adverse drug reactions from other health care practitioners, perceptions about the value of adverse drug reaction reporting and nurses' favourable self-assessment of their adverse drug reaction reporting skills. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose-Ammonia Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose-ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose-ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  6. Attractor for a Reaction-Diffusion System Modeling Cancer Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyong Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A reaction-diffusion cancer network regulated by microRNA is considered in this paper. We study the asymptotic behavior of solution and show the existence of global uniformly bounded solution to the system in a bounded domain Ω⊂Rn. Some estimates and asymptotic compactness of the solutions are proved. As a result, we establish the existence of the global attractor in L2(Ω×L2(Ω and prove that the solution converges to stable steady states. These results can help to understand the dynamical character of cancer network and propose a new insight to study the mechanism of cancer. In the end, the numerical simulation shows that the analytical results agree with numerical simulation.

  7. Generic Model-Based Tailor-Made Design and Analysis of Biphasic Reaction Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata

    Biphasic reaction systems are composed of immiscible aqueous and organic liquid phases where reactants, products, and catalysts are partitioned. These biphasic conditions point to novel synthesis paths, higher yields, and faster reactions, as well as facilitate product separation. The biphasic...... systems have a broad range of application, such as the manufacture of petroleum based chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and agro-bio products. Major considerations in the design and analysis of biphasic reaction systems are physical and chemical equilibria, kinetic mechanisms, and reaction rates. The primary...... contribution of this thesis is the development of a systematic modelling framework for the biphasic reaction system. The developed framework consists of three modules describing phase equilibria, reactions and mass transfer, and material balances of such processes. Correlative and predictive thermodynamic...

  8. Stochastic modeling and simulation of reaction-diffusion system with Hill function dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghan; Li, Fei; Wang, Shuo; Cao, Young

    2017-03-14

    Stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems presents great challenges for spatiotemporal biological modeling and simulation. One widely used framework for stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems is reaction diffusion master equation (RDME). Previous studies have discovered that for the RDME, when discretization size approaches zero, reaction time for bimolecular reactions in high dimensional domains tends to infinity. In this paper, we demonstrate that in the 1D domain, highly nonlinear reaction dynamics given by Hill function may also have dramatic change when discretization size is smaller than a critical value. Moreover, we discuss methods to avoid this problem: smoothing over space, fixed length smoothing over space and a hybrid method. Our analysis reveals that the switch-like Hill dynamics reduces to a linear function of discretization size when the discretization size is small enough. The three proposed methods could correctly (under certain precision) simulate Hill function dynamics in the microscopic RDME system.

  9. Piecewise linear and Boolean models of chemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Kumar, Ajit; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-12-01

    Models of biochemical networks are frequently complex and high-dimensional. Reduction methods that preserve important dynamical properties are therefore essential for their study. Interactions in biochemical networks are frequently modeled using Hill functions ([Formula: see text]). Reduced ODEs and Boolean approximations of such model networks have been studied extensively when the exponent [Formula: see text] is large. However, while the case of small constant [Formula: see text] appears in practice, it is not well understood. We provide a mathematical analysis of this limit and show that a reduction to a set of piecewise linear ODEs and Boolean networks can be mathematically justified. The piecewise linear systems have closed-form solutions that closely track those of the fully nonlinear model. The simpler, Boolean network can be used to study the qualitative behavior of the original system. We justify the reduction using geometric singular perturbation theory and compact convergence, and illustrate the results in network models of a toggle switch and an oscillator.

  10. Fluorination of an Alumina Surface: Modeling Aluminum-Fluorine Reaction Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhye, Richa; Aquino, Adelia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Pantoya, Michelle L

    2017-07-19

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to examine exothermic surface chemistry between alumina and four fluorinated, fragmented molecules representing species from decomposing fluoropolymers: F(-), HF, CH3F, and CF4. The analysis has strong implications for the reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles passivated by an alumina shell. It was hypothesized that the alumina surface structure could be transformed due to hydrogen bonding effects from the environment that promote surface reactions with fluorinated species. In this study, the alumina surface was analyzed using model clusters as isolated systems embedded in a polar environment (i.e., acetone). The conductor-like screening model (COSMO) was used to mimic environmental effects on the alumina surface. Four defect models for specific active -OH sites were investigated including two terminal hydroxyl groups and two hydroxyl bridge groups. Reactions involving terminal bonds produce more energy than bridge bonds. Also, surface exothermic reactions between terminal -OH bonds and fluorinated species produce energy in decreasing order with the following reactant species: CF4 > HF > CH3F. Additionally, experiments were performed on aluminum powders using thermal equilibrium analysis techniques that complement the calculations. Consistently, the experimental results show a linear relationship between surface exothermic reactions and the main fluorination reaction for Al powders. These results connect molecular level reaction kinetics to macroscopic measurements of surface energy and show that optimizing energy available in surface reactions linearly correlates to maximizing energy in the main reaction.

  11. Modeling reaction front propagation from preferential flow pathways in fractured media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, P. C.; Walsh, S. D.; Carroll, S.; Firoozabadi, A.

    2013-12-01

    We present analytical results and numerical models describing the growth and propagation of reaction fronts around fluid flow pathways in fractured rock, and explore how the front geometry influences both the propagation of the reaction fronts and changes in the solution chemistry. We compare model results to core-flood experiments conducted on mated wellbore cement/caprock half-cores, and demonstrate that the model accurately reproduces the observed solution chemistry. In particular the simulations provide a physical explanation for the apparent 'super-diffusive' reaction zone growth suggested by the brine chemistry. We conclude by discussing the implications of the model for long-term behavior of single and multiple reaction fronts.

  12. Modifications of the optimal velocity traffic model to include delay due to driver reaction time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, L. C.

    2003-03-01

    Straightforward inclusion of a delay time due to driver reaction time in the optimal velocity (OV) model reveals an unphysical sensitivity to driver reaction times. For delay times of nearly 1 s, which are typical for most drivers, oscillations in vehicle velocity induced by encountering a slower vehicle grow until limited by non-linear effects. Simulations demonstrate that unrealistically small delay times are needed for lengthy platoons of vehicles to avoid collisions. This is a serious limitation of the OV model. Other models, such as the inertial car-following model, allow somewhat larger delay times, but also show unphysical effects. Modifications of the OV model to overcome this deficiency are demonstrated. In addition, unphysical short-period oscillations of vehicle velocity are eliminated by introducing partial car-following into the model. Traffic jams are caused primarily by the delay due to driver reaction time in the modified OV model.

  13. Two-phase model of hydrogen transport to optimize nanoparticle catalyst loading for hydrogen evolution reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemppainen, Erno; Halme, Janne; Hansen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    With electrocatalysts it is important to be able to distinguish between the effects of mass transport and reaction kinetics on the performance of the catalyst. When the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is considered, an additional and often neglected detail of mass transport in liquid is the evo......With electrocatalysts it is important to be able to distinguish between the effects of mass transport and reaction kinetics on the performance of the catalyst. When the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is considered, an additional and often neglected detail of mass transport in liquid...... current densities the increase in the gas volume fraction makes the H2 surface concentration nonlinear with respect to the current density. Compared to the typical diffusion layer model, our model is an extension that allows more detailed studies of reaction kinetics and mass transport in the electrolyte...

  14. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction‐Activation Strain Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction energies between the two distorted molecules. The energy required to distort the molecules is called the activation strain or distortion energy. This energy is the principal contributor to the activation barrier. The transition state occurs when this activation strain is overcome by the stabilizing interaction energy. Following the changes in these energies along the reaction coordinate gives insights into the factors controlling reactivity. This model has been applied to reactions of all types in both organic and inorganic chemistry, including substitutions and eliminations, cycloadditions, and several types of organometallic reactions. PMID:28447369

  15. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction-Activation Strain Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Houk, Kendall N

    2017-08-14

    The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction energies between the two distorted molecules. The energy required to distort the molecules is called the activation strain or distortion energy. This energy is the principal contributor to the activation barrier. The transition state occurs when this activation strain is overcome by the stabilizing interaction energy. Following the changes in these energies along the reaction coordinate gives insights into the factors controlling reactivity. This model has been applied to reactions of all types in both organic and inorganic chemistry, including substitutions and eliminations, cycloadditions, and several types of organometallic reactions. © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  16. Removal of Cd{sup 2+} from aqueous solution by adsorption using Fe-montmorillonite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Pingxiao, E-mail: pppxwu@scut.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wu Weimin; Li Shuzhen; Xing Ning; Zhu Nengwu; Li Ping; Wu Jinghua; Yang Chen; Dang Zhi [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2009-09-30

    Fe-montmorillonite (Fe-Mont.) is obtained by exchanging the original interlayer cations of montmorillonite by poly-hydroxyl ferric. In this paper, Fe-Mont. was synthesized by using Ca-montmorillonite (Ca-Mont.) directly under ultrasonic treatment with the aim to enhance the ability of removal of heavy metal ions from wastewater. The modified materials were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR). Batch equilibrium experiments of Cd(II) ions (Cd{sup 2+}) adsorption on the Fe-Mont. were performed. Effects of the initial pH of the solution and contact time on the adsorption of Cd{sup 2+} were studied. Four types of adsorption isotherms were applied to describe the adsorption isotherms of Cd{sup 2+} by Fe-Mont. The relationship between adsorbing capacity (q{sub e}) and equilibrium mass concentration (C{sub e}) is in accordance with the isothermal adsorption equation of Langmuir. Three kinetic models, including pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and the Elovich equation model, were used to analyze the Cd{sup 2+} adsorption process. The pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetics provide the best correlation of the experimental data, therefore the adsorption dynamics follows the laws of pseudo-second-order kinetics.

  17. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  18. New model of chlorine-wall reaction for simulating chlorine concentration in drinking water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ian; Kastl, George; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2017-11-15

    Accurate modelling of chlorine concentrations throughout a drinking water system needs sound mathematical descriptions of decay mechanisms in bulk water and at pipe walls. Wall-reaction rates along pipelines in three different systems were calculated from differences between field chlorine profiles and accurately modelled bulk decay. Lined pipes with sufficiently large diameters (>500 mm) and higher chlorine concentrations (>0.5 mg/L) had negligible wall-decay rates, compared with bulk-decay rates. Further downstream, wall-reaction rate consistently increased (peaking around 0.15 mg/dm 2 /h) as chlorine concentration decreased, until mass-transport to the wall was controlling wall reaction. These results contradict wall-reaction models, including those incorporated in the EPANET software, which assume wall decay is of either zero-order (constant decay rate) or first-order (wall-decay rate reduces with chlorine concentration). Instead, results are consistent with facilitation of the wall reaction by biofilm activity, rather than surficial chemical reactions. A new model of wall reaction combines the effect of biofilm activity moderated by chlorine concentration and mass-transport limitation. This wall reaction model, with an accurate bulk chlorine decay model, is essential for sufficiently accurate prediction of chlorine residuals towards the end of distribution systems and therefore control of microbial contamination. Implementing this model in EPANET-MSX (or similar) software enables the accurate chlorine modelling required for improving disinfection strategies in drinking water networks. New insight into the effect of chlorine on biofilm can also assist in controlling biofilm to maintain chlorine residuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reaction mechanism of WGS and PROX reactions catalyzed by Pt/oxide catalysts revealed by an FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lingshun; Wu, Zongfang; Jin, Yuekang; Ma, Yunsheng; Huang, Weixin

    2013-08-07

    We have employed XPS and TDS to study the adsorption and surface reactions of H2O, CO and HCOOH on an FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst. The FeO(111)-Pt(111) interface of the FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst exposes coordination-unsaturated Fe(II) cations (Fe(II)CUS) and the Fe(II)CUS cations are capable of modifying the reactivity of neighbouring Pt sites. Water facilely dissociates on the Fe(II)CUS cations at the FeO(111)-Pt(111) interface to form hydroxyls that react to form both water and H2 upon heating. Hydroxyls on the Fe(II)CUS cations can react with CO(a) on the neighbouring Pt(111) sites to produce CO2 at low temperatures. Hydroxyls act as the co-catalyst in the CO oxidation by hydroxyls to CO2 (PROX reaction), while they act as one of the reactants in the CO oxidation by hydroxyls to CO2 and H2 (WGS reaction), and the recombinative reaction of hydroxyls to produce H2 is the rate-limiting step in the WGS reaction. A comparison of reaction behaviors between the interfacial CO(a) + OH reaction and the formate decomposition reaction suggest that formate is the likely surface intermediate of the CO(a) + OH reaction. These results provide some solid experimental evidence for the associative reaction mechanism of WGS and PROX reactions catalyzed by Pt/oxide catalysts.

  20. Predicting Complex Organic Mixture Atmospheric Chemistry Using Computer-Generated Reaction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. T.; Broadbelt, L. J.; Mazurek, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    New measurement and chemical characterization technologies now offer unprecedented capabilities for detecting and describing atmospheric organic matter at the molecular level. As a result, very detailed and extensive chemical inventories are produced routinely in atmospheric field measurements of organic compounds found in the vapor and condensed phases (particles, cloud and fog droplets). Hundreds of organic compounds can constitute the complex chemical mixtures observed for these types of samples, exhibiting a wide spectrum of physical properties such as molecular weight, polarity, pH, and chemical reactivity. The central challenge is describing chemically the complex organic aerosol mixture in a useable fashion that can be linked to predictive models. However, the great compositional complexity of organic aerosols engenders a need for the modeling of the reaction chemistry of these compounds in atmospheric chemical models. On a mechanistic level, atmospheric reactions of organic compounds can involve a network of a very large number of chemical species and reactions. Deriving such large molecular kinetic models by hand is a tedious and time-consuming process. However, such models are usually built upon a few basic chemical principles tempered with the model builder's observations, experience, and intuition that can be summarized as a set of rules. This suggests that given an algorithmic framework, computers (information technology) may be used to apply these chemical principles and rules, thereby building a kinetic model. The framework for this model building process has been developed by means of graph theory. A molecule, which is a set of atoms connected by bonds, may be conceptualized as a set of vertices connected by edges, or to be more precise, a graph. The bond breaking and forming for a reaction can be represented compactly in the form of a matrix operator formally called the "reaction matrix". The addition of the reaction matrix operator to the reduced

  1. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  2. A Predictive Model for the Diagnosis of Allergic Drug Reactions According to the Medical History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierro Santurino, Beatriz; Mateos Conde, Javier; Cabero Morán, María Teresa; Mirón Canelo, José Antonio; Armentia Medina, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Quantification of the risk of an allergic drug reaction through the medical history is essential in clinical decision making. However, in normal clinical practice, this evaluation is generally entirely subjective. The objective of this study was to construct a mathematical model to predict the risk of allergic drug reactions using the data collected in the medical history. A total of 696 active principles, corresponding to 466 patients aged more than 14 years attending the Allergy Service of the University Hospital of Salamanca, were included. Simple binary logistic regression was used to determine associations between variables from the medical history and the final diagnosis, to construct a predictive model. Variables useful in predicting a final diagnosis of allergic drug reaction were age, sex, drug class, number of active principles, time to the reaction, number of doses, clinical presentation suggestive of allergic disease, and time to medical consultation. True adverse drug reactions were estimated to occur in 20% of active principles. However, possible allergic reactions could only be ruled out in 52.2%. The use of mathematical models could greatly improve the discriminatory capacity of the medical history. Both the overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis of allergic drug reactions should be considered a public health problem. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. BL-5255. I. Activity in animal models of immediate hypersensitivity reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminoff, P; Reed, F C; Schurig, J E

    1982-01-01

    BL-5255 exhibited potent activity in several models of antigen-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions in rats and guinea pigs. The compound was effective whether administered by oral or parenteral routes and in passively and actively sensitized animals. It appeared to be readily absorbed when given orally. Localized skin and bronchoconstriction reactions in rats were inhibited by the compound by oral doses at 0.014 and 1 mg/kg, respectively. BL-5255 was protective against both IgE- and IgG-mediated reactions in the rat and guinea pig. Its effectiveness versus the systemic anaphylaxis reaction in the guinea pig appears to be due to BL-5255's ability to inhibit both the IgE and IgG1 components of the reaction.

  4. Droplet Reaction and Evaporation of Agents Model (DREAM). Glass model results; Sand model plans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hin, A.R.T.

    2006-01-01

    The Agent Fate Program is generating an extensive set of quality agent fate data which is being used to develop highly accurate secondary evaporation predictive models. Models are being developed that cover a wide range of traditional chemical warfare agents deposited onto surfaces routinely found

  5. Simple dissolution-reaction model for enzymatic conversion of suspension of solid substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, A; Zhu, L; Kielland, V; Straathof, A J; Jongejan, J A; Heijnen, J J

    1997-11-20

    Although reactions in substrate suspension are employed in industry for several bioconversion processes, there appears to be no quantitative model available in the literature to rationalize the optimization of these processes. We present a simple model that incorporates the kinetics of substrate dissolution and a simultaneous enzymatic reaction. The model was tested in the alpha-chymotrypsin-catalyzed hydrolysis of an aqueous suspension of dimethyl benzylmethylmalonate to a homogeneous solution of enantiomerically pure monoester. This reaction occurs in the bulk phase, so catalysis by enzyme absorbed at the solid-liquid interface plays no role. The value of the parameters in the model (i.e., the mass transfer coefficient of substrate dissolution (k(L)), the substrate solubility, and the rate constant for the enzymatic reaction) were determined in separate experiments. Using these parameter values, the model gave a good quantitative prediction of the rate of the overall dissolution-reaction process. When the particle size distribution is known, k(L) may also be calculated instead. The model seems to be applicable also for other poorly soluble substrates, other enzymes, and other solvents. (c) 1997 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Biotechnol Bioeng 56: 433-440, 1997.

  6. A Computational Approach to Increase Time Scales in Brownian Dynamics–Based Reaction-Diffusion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Particle-based Brownian dynamics simulations offer the opportunity to not only simulate diffusion of particles but also the reactions between them. They therefore provide an opportunity to integrate varied biological data into spatially explicit models of biological processes, such as signal transduction or mitosis. However, particle based reaction-diffusion methods often are hampered by the relatively small time step needed for accurate description of the reaction-diffusion framework. Such small time steps often prevent simulation times that are relevant for biological processes. It is therefore of great importance to develop reaction-diffusion methods that tolerate larger time steps while maintaining relatively high accuracy. Here, we provide an algorithm, which detects potential particle collisions prior to a BD-based particle displacement and at the same time rigorously obeys the detailed balance rule of equilibrium reactions. We can show that for reaction-diffusion processes of particles mimicking proteins, the method can increase the typical BD time step by an order of magnitude while maintaining similar accuracy in the reaction diffusion modelling. PMID:22697237

  7. Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

    1999-03-21

    Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

  8. Dynamic Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion Rumor Propagation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyong; Zhu, Linhe

    2016-06-01

    The rapid development of the Internet, especially the emergence of the social networks, leads rumor propagation into a new media era. Rumor propagation in social networks has brought new challenges to network security and social stability. This paper, based on partial differential equations (PDEs), proposes a new SIS rumor propagation model by considering the effect of the communication between the different rumor infected users on rumor propagation. The stabilities of a nonrumor equilibrium point and a rumor-spreading equilibrium point are discussed by linearization technique and the upper and lower solutions method, and the existence of a traveling wave solution is established by the cross-iteration scheme accompanied by the technique of upper and lower solutions and Schauder’s fixed point theorem. Furthermore, we add the time delay to rumor propagation and deduce the conditions of Hopf bifurcation and stability switches for the rumor-spreading equilibrium point by taking the time delay as the bifurcation parameter. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical results.

  9. A robust methodology for kinetic model parameter estimation for biocatalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Haque, Naweed; Andrade Santacoloma, Paloma de Gracia; Lima Afonso Neto, Watson

    2012-01-01

    Effective estimation of parameters in biocatalytic reaction kinetic expressions are very important when building process models to enable evaluation of process technology options and alternative biocatalysts. The kinetic models used to describe enzyme-catalyzed reactions generally include several...... lead to globally optimized parameter values. In this article, a robust methodology to estimate parameters for biocatalytic reaction kinetic expressions is proposed. The methodology determines the parameters in a systematic manner by exploiting the best features of several of the current approaches....... The parameter estimation problem is decomposed into five hierarchical steps, where the solution of each of the steps becomes the input for the subsequent step to achieve the final model with the corresponding regressed parameters. The model is further used for validating its performance and determining...

  10. Optimal Homotopy Asymptotic Solution for Exothermic Reactions Model with Constant Heat Source in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazle Mabood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The heat flow patterns profiles are required for heat transfer simulation in each type of the thermal insulation. The exothermic reaction models in porous medium can prescribe the problems in the form of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. In this research, the driving force model due to the temperature gradients is considered. A governing equation of the model is restricted into an energy balance equation that provides the temperature profile in conduction state with constant heat source on the steady state. The proposed optimal homotopy asymptotic method (OHAM is used to compute the solutions of the exothermic reactions equation.

  11. A simple model for chiral amplification in the aminoalcohol-catalyzed reaction of aldehydes with dialkylzinc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVAN GUTMAN

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple explanation is offered for the recently discovered chiral amplification in the alkylation reaction of benzaldehyde by means of dialkylzinc, catalyzed by (dimethylaminoisoborneol. The model presentd is similar to, yet somewhat simpler than, the model put forward by Noyori et al.

  12. Bifurcation Analysis of Gene Propagation Model Governed by Reaction-Diffusion Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guichen Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical analysis of the attractor bifurcation for gene propagation model governed by reaction-diffusion equations. We investigate the dynamical transition problems of the model under the homogeneous boundary conditions. By using the dynamical transition theory, we give a complete characterization of the bifurcated objects in terms of the biological parameters of the problem.

  13. A discrete solvent reaction field model for calculating frequency-dependent hyperpolarizabilities of molecules in solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, L; van Duijnen, PT; Snijders, JG

    2003-01-01

    We present a discrete solvent reaction field (DRF) model for the calculation of frequency-dependent hyperpolarizabilities of molecules in solution. In this model the solute is described using density functional theory (DFT) and the discrete solvent molecules are described with a classical

  14. The hydration of slag, part 2: reaction models for blended cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2007-01-01

    The hydration of slag-blended cement is studied by considering the interaction between the hydrations of slag and Portland cement clinker. Three reaction models for the slag-blended cement are developed based on stoichiometric calculations. These models correlate the compositions of the unhydrated

  15. Tissue reactions to lead samples in a late infection rat model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VanWachem, PB; VanLuyn, MJA; DeWit, AW; Raatjes, D; Verhoeven, MLPM; Hendriks, M; Cahalan, PT

    Tissue reactions to rat lead samples, model ii ng for clinically used leads, were investigated in a late infection model, in which injection of bacteria was performed after a 3-week encapsulation process. At the site of injection, detachment of the original fibrous capsule, wound fluid infiltration,

  16. Coupled Enzyme Reactions Performed in Heterogeneous Reaction Media: Experiments and Modeling for Glucose Oxidase and Horseradish Peroxidase in a PEG/Citrate Aqueous Two-Phase System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular environment in which biological reactions occur is crowded with macromolecules and subdivided into microenvironments that differ in both physical properties and chemical composition. The work described here combines experimental and computational model systems to help understand the consequences of this heterogeneous reaction media on the outcome of coupled enzyme reactions. Our experimental model system for solution heterogeneity is a biphasic polyethylene glycol (PEG)/sodium citrate aqueous mixture that provides coexisting PEG-rich and citrate-rich phases. Reaction kinetics for the coupled enzyme reaction between glucose oxidase (GOX) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were measured in the PEG/citrate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS). Enzyme kinetics differed between the two phases, particularly for the HRP. Both enzymes, as well as the substrates glucose and H2O2, partitioned to the citrate-rich phase; however, the Amplex Red substrate necessary to complete the sequential reaction partitioned strongly to the PEG-rich phase. Reactions in ATPS were quantitatively described by a mathematical model that incorporated measured partitioning and kinetic parameters. The model was then extended to new reaction conditions, i.e., higher enzyme concentration. Both experimental and computational results suggest mass transfer across the interface is vital to maintain the observed rate of product formation, which may be a means of metabolic regulation in vivo. Although outcomes for a specific system will depend on the particulars of the enzyme reactions and the microenvironments, this work demonstrates how coupled enzymatic reactions in complex, heterogeneous media can be understood in terms of a mathematical model. PMID:24517887

  17. Modelling of chalcopyrite oxidation reactions in the Outokumpu flash smelting process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahokainen, T.; Jokilaakso, A. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    A mathematical model for simulating oxidation reactions of chalcopyrite particles together with momentum, heat and mass transfer between particle and gas phase in a flash smelting furnace reaction shaft is presented. In simulation, the equations governing the gas flow are solved numerically with a commercial fluid flow package, Phoenics. The particle phase is introduced into the gas flow by a Particle Source In Cell (PSIC) - technique, where a number of discrete particles is tracked in a gas flow and the relevant source terms for momentum, mass, and heat transfer are added to the gas phase equations. The gas phase equations used are elliptic in nature and the fluid turbulence is described by the (k-{epsilon}) -model. Thermal gas phase radiation is simulated with a six-flux radiation model. The chemical reactions of concentrate particles are assumed to happen at two sharp interfaces, and a shrinking core model is applied to describe the mass transfer of chemical species through the reaction product layer. In a molten state, the oxygen consumption is controlled by a film penetration concept. The reacting concentrate particles are a mixture of chalcopyrite and silica. Also a certain amount of pure inert silica is fed to the process as flux. In the simulations the calculation domain includes the concentrate burner and a cylindrical reaction shaft of an industrial scale flash smelting furnace. Some examples about the simulations carried out by the combustion model are presented. (author)

  18. Golden rule kinetics of transfer reactions in condensed phase: the microscopic model of electron transfer reactions in disordered solid matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevsky, M V; Odinokov, A V; Titov, S V; Mitina, E A

    2013-12-21

    The algorithm for a theoretical calculation of transfer reaction rates for light quantum particles (i.e., the electron and H-atom transfers) in non-polar solid matrices is formulated and justified. The mechanism postulated involves a local mode (an either intra- or inter-molecular one) serving as a mediator which accomplishes the energy exchange between the reacting high-frequency quantum mode and the phonon modes belonging to the environment. This approach uses as a background the Fermi golden rule beyond the usually applied spin-boson approximation. The dynamical treatment rests on the one-dimensional version of the standard quantum relaxation equation for the reduced density matrix, which describes the frequency fluctuation spectrum for the local mode under consideration. The temperature dependence of a reaction rate is controlled by the dimensionless parameter ξ0 = ℏω0/k(B)T where ω0 is the frequency of the local mode and T is the temperature. The realization of the computational scheme is different for the high/intermediate (ξ0 kinetic regime, the Redfield approximation to the solution of the relaxation equation proved to be sufficient and efficient in practical applications. The study of the essentially quantum-mechanical low-temperature kinetic regime in its asymptotic limit requires the implementation of the exact relaxation equation. The coherent mechanism providing a non-vanishing reaction rate has been revealed when T → 0. An accurate computational methodology for the cross-over kinetic regime needs a further elaboration. The original model of the hopping mechanism for electronic conduction in photosensitive organic materials is considered, based on the above techniques. The electron transfer (ET) in active centers of such systems proceeds via local intra- and intermolecular modes. The active modes, as a rule, operate beyond the kinetic regimes, which are usually postulated in the existing theories of the ET. Our alternative dynamic ET model for

  19. Phase transitions in a holographic s + p model with back-reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Zhang-Yu [Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Cai, Rong-Gen [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Gao, Xin [Virginia Tech, Department of Physics, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Li, Li [University of Crete, Department of Physics, Crete Center for Theoretical Physics, Heraklion (Greece); Zeng, Hui [Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China)

    2015-11-15

    In a previous paper (Nie et al. in JHEP 1311:087, arXiv:1309.2204 [hep-th], 2013), we presented a holographic s + p superconductor model with a scalar triplet charged under an SU(2) gauge field in the bulk. We also study the competition and coexistence of the s-wave and p-wave orders in the probe limit. In this work we continue to study the model by considering the full back-reaction. The model shows a rich phase structure and various condensate behaviors such as the ''n-type'' and ''u-type'' ones, which are also known as reentrant phase transitions in condensed matter physics. The phase transitions to the p-wave phase or s + p coexisting phase become first order in strong back-reaction cases. In these first order phase transitions, the free energy curve always forms a swallow tail shape, in which the unstable s + p solution can also play an important role. The phase diagrams of this model are given in terms of the dimension of the scalar order and the temperature in the cases of eight different values of the back-reaction parameter, which show that the region for the s + p coexisting phase is enlarged with a small or medium back-reaction parameter but is reduced in the strong back-reaction cases. (orig.)

  20. Random incidence absorption coefficients of porous absorbers based on local and extended reaction models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2011-01-01

    resistivity and the absorber thickness on the difference between the two surface reaction models are examined and discussed. For a porous absorber backed by a rigid surface, the local reaction models give errors of less than 10% if the thickness exceeds 120 mm for a flow resistivity of 5000 Nm-4s. As the flow...... resistivity doubles, a decrease in the required thickness by 25 mm is observed to achieve the same amount of error. For an absorber backed by an air gap, the thickness ratio between the material and air cavity is important. If the absorber thickness is approximately 40% of the cavity depth, the local reaction...... models give errors below 10% even for a low flow resistivity case....

  1. Two-phase model of hydrogen transport to optimize nanoparticle catalyst loading for hydrogen evolution reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemppainen, Erno; Halme, Janne; Hansen, Ole

    2016-01-01

    With electrocatalysts it is important to be able to distinguish between the effects of mass transport and reaction kinetics on the performance of the catalyst. When the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is considered, an additional and often neglected detail of mass transport in liquid...... the gas volume fraction is sufficiently high to facilitate H2 transfer to bubbles within a distance shorter than the diffusion layer thickness. At current densities below about 40 mA/cm2 the model reduces to an analytical approximation that has characteristics similar to the diffusion of H2. At higher...... current densities the increase in the gas volume fraction makes the H2 surface concentration nonlinear with respect to the current density. Compared to the typical diffusion layer model, our model is an extension that allows more detailed studies of reaction kinetics and mass transport in the electrolyte...

  2. Study of the Deformation/Interaction Model: How Interactions Increase the Reaction Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiling Liang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The interactions (including weak interactions between dienophiles and dienes play an important role in the Diels-Alder reaction. To elucidate the influence of these interactions on the reactivity, a popular DFT functional and a variational DFT functional corrected with dispersion terms are used to investigate different substituent groups incorporated on the dienophiles and dienes. The bond order is used to track the trajectory of the cycloaddition reaction. The deformation/interaction model is used to obtain the interaction energy from the reactant complex to the inflection point until reaching the saddle point. The interaction energy initially increases with a decrease in the interatomic distance, reaching a maximum value, but then decreases when the dienophiles and dienes come closer. Reduced density gradient and chemical energy component analysis are used to analyse the interaction. Traditional transition state theory and variational transition state theory are used to obtain the reaction rates. The influence of tunneling on the reaction rate is also discussed.

  3. Predicting template-based catalysis rates in a simple catalytic reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Wim; Steel, Mike

    2012-02-21

    We show that in a particular model of catalytic reaction systems, known as the binary polymer model, there is a mathematical concordance between two versions of the model: (1) random catalysis and (2) template-based catalysis. In particular, we derive an analytical calculation that allows us to accurately predict the (observed) required level of catalysis in one version of the model from that in the other version, for a given probability of having self-sustaining autocatalytic sets exist in instances of both model versions. This provides a tractable connection between two models that have been investigated in theoretical origin-of-life studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling of mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column reactor using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas-liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  5. Detailed modeling of hydrodynamics mass transfer and chemical reactions in a bubble column using a discrete bubble model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Darmana, D.; Deen, N.G.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    A 3D discrete bubble model is adopted to investigate complex behavior involving hydrodynamics, mass transfer and chemical reactions in a gas¿liquid bubble column reactor. In this model a continuum description is adopted for the liquid phase and additionally each individual bubble is tracked in a

  6. Nanolithographic Fabrication and Heterogeneous Reaction Studies ofTwo-Dimensional Platinum Model Catalyst Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras, Anthony Marshall [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-05-20

    In order to better understand the fundamental components that govern catalytic activity, two-dimensional model platinum nanocatalyst arrays have been designed and fabricated. These catalysts arrays are meant to model the interplay of the metal and support important to industrial heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Photolithography and sub-lithographic techniques such as electron beam lithography, size reduction lithography and nanoimprint lithography have been employed to create these platinum nanoarrays. Both in-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques and catalytic reaction measurements were used to correlate the structural parameters of the system to catalytic activity.

  7. Modelling and simulation of a transketolase mediated reaction: Sensitivity analysis of kinetic parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sayar, N.A.; Chen, B.H.; Lye, G.J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we have used a proposed mathematical model, describing the carbon-carbon bond format ion reaction between beta-hydroxypyruvate and glycolaldehyde to synthesise L-erythrulose, catalysed by the enzyme transketolase, for the analysis of the sensitivity of the process to its kinetic...... parameters. The model was validated with experimental data. As a conclusion, kinetic parameters with a possible positive impact on reaction performance were identified and assessed in relation to operating conditions. This resulted in the identification of suitable catalyst and process development targets...

  8. Supercritical water oxidation of quinazoline: Reaction kinetics and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yanmeng; Guo, Yang; Wang, Shuzhong; Song, Wenhan; Xu, Donghai

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a first quantitative kinetic model for supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) of quinazoline that describes the formation and interconversion of intermediates and final products at 673-873 K. The set of 11 reaction pathways for phenol, pyrimidine, naphthalene, NH3, etc, involved in the simplified reaction network proved sufficient for fitting the experimental results satisfactorily. We validated the model prediction ability on CO2 yields at initial quinazoline loading not used in the parameter estimation. Reaction rate analysis and sensitivity analysis indicate that nearly all reactions reach their thermodynamic equilibrium within 300 s. The pyrimidine yielding from quinazoline is the dominant ring-opening pathway and provides a significant contribution to CO2 formation. Low sensitivity of NH3 decomposition rate to concentration confirms its refractory nature in SCWO. Nitrogen content in liquid products decreases whereas that in gaseous phase increases as reaction time prolonged. The nitrogen predicted by the model in gaseous phase combined with the experimental nitrogen in liquid products gives an accurate nitrogen balance of conversion process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A numerical evaluation of prediction accuracy of CO2 absorber model for various reaction rate coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shim S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the CO2 absorber column using mono-ethanolamine (MEA solution as chemical solvent are predicted by a One-Dimensional (1-D rate based model in the present study. 1-D Mass and heat balance equations of vapor and liquid phase are coupled with interfacial mass transfer model and vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The two-film theory is used to estimate the mass transfer between the vapor and liquid film. Chemical reactions in MEA-CO2-H2O system are considered to predict the equilibrium pressure of CO2 in the MEA solution. The mathematical and reaction kinetics models used in this work are calculated by using in-house code. The numerical results are validated in the comparison of simulation results with experimental and simulation data given in the literature. The performance of CO2 absorber column is evaluated by the 1-D rate based model using various reaction rate coefficients suggested by various researchers. When the rate of liquid to gas mass flow rate is about 8.3, 6.6, 4.5 and 3.1, the error of CO2 loading and the CO2 removal efficiency using the reaction rate coefficients of Aboudheir et al. is within about 4.9 % and 5.2 %, respectively. Therefore, the reaction rate coefficient suggested by Aboudheir et al. among the various reaction rate coefficients used in this study is appropriate to predict the performance of CO2 absorber column using MEA solution. [Acknowledgement. This research was supported by the Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF, funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011-0017220].

  10. Reactions of aqueous chlorine and chlorine dioxide with model food compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukayama, M Y; Tan, H; Wheeler, W B; Wei, C I

    1986-01-01

    Chlorine and chlorine dioxide (ClO2), common disinfecting and bleaching chemicals used in the food industry, are potent oxidizing and chlorinating agents. Unfortunately, little is known about the nature of the reactions of chlorine with organic food constituents. This presentation reviews published information concerning the reactions of chlorine gas (Cl2[g]), aqueous chlorine, and ClO2 with model food compounds, the fate of chlorine during the chlorination of specific food products, and the potential toxicity of the reaction products. Fatty acids and their methyl esters react with chlorine with the degree of incorporation corresponding to their degree of unsaturation. Aqueous chlorine oxidizes and chlorinates lipids and amino acids much more readily than ClO2. Several amino acids are highly susceptible to oxidation and chlorination by chlorine compounds. Reactions of chlorine and ClO2 with several food products, including flour and shrimp, have also been characterized. In one model system, 99% of Cl2(g) either reacted with components of flour or was consumed by oxidation/chlorination reactions. The lipids extracted from the chlorinated flour contained significant amounts of chlorine. Exposure of shrimp to hypochlorous acid (HOCl) solution resulted in significant incorporation of chlorine into the edible portion. Although significant quantities of chlorine can be incorporated into specific model compounds and food products, the health risks associated with exposure to chlorinated organic products are unknown. Preliminary studies using the Ames Salmonella/microsome mutagenicity assay indicate that the reaction products from mixtures of aqueous chlorine and various lipids or tryptophan are nonmutagenic. Nevertheless, additional studies are warranted, so that the toxicological significance of these reaction products can be understood more fully. PMID:3545804

  11. Development and application of a numerical model of kinetic and equilibrium microbiological and geochemical reactions (BIOKEMOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvage, Karen M.; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    1998-08-01

    This paper presents the conceptual and mathematical development of the numerical model titled BIOKEMOD, and verification simulations performed using the model. BIOKEMOD is a general computer model for simulation of geochemical and microbiological reactions in batch aqueous solutions. BIOKEMOD may be coupled with hydrologic transport codes for simulation of chemically and biologically reactive transport. The chemical systems simulated may include any mixture of kinetic and equilibrium reactions. The pH, pe, and ionic strength may be specified or simulated. Chemical processes included are aqueous complexation, adsorption, ion-exchange and precipitation/dissolution. Microbiological reactions address growth of biomass and degradation of chemicals by microbial metabolism of substrates, nutrients, and electron acceptors. Inhibition or facilitation of growth due to the presence of specific chemicals and a lag period for microbial acclimation to new substrates may be simulated if significant in the system of interest. Chemical reactions controlled by equilibrium are solved using the law of mass action relating the thermodynamic equilibrium constant to the activities of the products and reactants. Kinetic chemical reactions are solved using reaction rate equations based on collision theory. Microbiologically mediated reactions for substrate removal and biomass growth are assumed to follow Monod kinetics modified for the potentially limiting effects of substrate, nutrient, and electron acceptor availability. BIOKEMOD solves the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed geochemical and biogeochemical reactions using the Newton-Raphson method with full matrix pivoting. Simulations may be either steady state or transient. Input to the program includes the stoichiometry and parameters describing the relevant chemical and microbiological reactions, initial conditions, and sources/sinks for each chemical species. Output includes the chemical and biomass concentrations

  12. A Series Solution of the Cauchy Problem for Turing Reaction-diffusion Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Päivärinta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the series pattern solution of the Cauchy problem for Turing reaction-diffusion model is obtained by using the homotopy analysis method (HAM. Turing reaction-diffusion model is nonlinear reaction-diffusion system which usually has power-law nonlinearities or may be rewritten in the form of power-law nonlinearities. Using the HAM, it is possible to find the exact solution or an approximate solution of the problem. This technique provides a series of functions which converges rapidly to the exact solution of the problem. The efficiency of the approach will be shown by applying the procedure on two problems. Furthermore, the so-called homotopy-Pade technique (HPT is applied to enlarge the convergence region and rate of solution series given by the HAM.

  13. Multiresponse kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation in a heated glucose/wheat flour system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocadağlı, Tolgahan; Gökmen, Vural

    2016-11-15

    The study describes the kinetics of the formation and degradation of α-dicarbonyl compounds in glucose/wheat flour system heated under low moisture conditions. Changes in the concentrations of glucose, fructose, individual free amino acids, lysine and arginine residues, glucosone, 1-deoxyglucosone, 3-deoxyglucosone, 3,4-dideoxyglucosone, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and diacetyl concentrations were determined to form a multiresponse kinetic model for isomerisation and degradation reactions of glucose. Degradation of Amadori product mainly produced 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 3-deoxyglucosone proceeded directly from glucose and also Amadori product degradation. Glyoxal formation was predominant from glucosone while methylglyoxal and diacetyl originated from 1-deoxyglucosone. Formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural from fructose was found to be a key step. Multi-response kinetic modelling of Maillard reaction and caramelisation simultaneously indicated quantitatively predominant parallel and consecutive pathways and rate limiting steps by estimating the reaction rate constants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling of Sheath Ion-Molecule Reactions in Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hash, David B.; Govindan, T. R.; Meyyappan, M.

    2004-01-01

    In many plasma simulations, ion-molecule reactions are modeled using ion energy independent reaction rate coefficients that are taken from low temperature selected-ion flow tube experiments. Only exothermic or nearly thermoneutral reactions are considered. This is appropriate for plasma applications such as high-density plasma sources in which sheaths are collisionless and ion temperatures 111 the bulk p!asma do not deviate significantly from the gas temperature. However, for applications at high pressure and large sheath voltages, this assumption does not hold as the sheaths are collisional and ions gain significant energy in the sheaths from Joule heating. Ion temperatures and thus reaction rates vary significantly across the discharge, and endothermic reactions become important in the sheaths. One such application is plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes in which dc discharges are struck at pressures between 1-20 Torr with applied voltages in the range of 500-700 V. The present work investigates The importance of the inclusion of ion energy dependent ion-molecule reaction rates and the role of collision induced dissociation in generating radicals from the feedstock used in carbon nanotube growth.

  15. Multiphasic Reaction Modeling for Polypropylene Production in a Pilot-Scale Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jakir Hossain Khan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a novel multiphasic model for the calculation of the polypropylene production in a complicated hydrodynamic and the physiochemical environments has been formulated, confirmed and validated. This is a first research attempt that describes the development of the dual-phasic phenomena, the impact of the optimal process conditions on the production rate of polypropylene and the fluidized bed dynamic details which could be concurrently obtained after solving the model coupled with the CFD (computational fluid dynamics model, the basic mathematical model and the moment equations. Furthermore, we have established the quantitative relationship between the operational condition and the dynamic gas–solid behavior in actual reaction environments. Our results state that the proposed model could be applied for generalizing the production rate of the polymer from a chemical procedure to pilot-scale chemical reaction engineering. However, it was assumed that the solids present in the bubble phase and the reactant gas present in the emulsion phase improved the multiphasic model, thus taking into account that the polymerization took place mutually in the emulsion besides the bubble phase. It was observed that with respect to the experimental extent of the superficial gas velocity and the Ziegler-Natta feed rate, the ratio of the polymer produced as compared to the overall rate of production was approximately in the range of 9%–11%. This is a significant amount and it should not be ignored. We also carried out the simulation studies for comparing the data of the CFD-dependent dual-phasic model, the emulsion phase model, the dynamic bubble model and the experimental results. It was noted that the improved dual-phasic model and the CFD model were able to predict more constricted and safer windows at similar conditions as compared to the experimental results. Our work is unique, as the integrated developed model is able to offer clearer ideas

  16. Towards a unified model of neutrino-nucleus reactions for neutrino oscillation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, S. X.; Kamano, H.; Hayato, Y.; Hirai, M.; Horiuchi, W.; Kumano, S.; Murata, T.; Saito, K.; Sakuda, M.; Sato, T.; Suzuki, Y.

    2017-05-01

    A precise description of neutrino-nucleus reactions will play a key role in addressing fundamental questions such as the leptonic CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy through analyzing data from next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments. The neutrino energy relevant to the neutrino-nucleus reactions spans a broad range and, accordingly, the dominant reaction mechanism varies across the energy region from quasi-elastic scattering through nucleon resonance excitations to deep inelastic scattering. This corresponds to transitions of the effective degree of freedom for theoretical description from nucleons through meson-baryon to quarks. The main purpose of this review is to report our recent efforts towards a unified description of the neutrino-nucleus reactions over the wide energy range; recent overall progress in the field is also sketched. Starting with an overview of the current status of neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments, we formulate the cross section to be commonly used for the reactions over all the energy regions. A description of the neutrino-nucleon reactions follows and, in particular, a dynamical coupled-channels model for meson productions in and beyond the Δ (1232) region is discussed in detail. We then discuss the neutrino-nucleus reactions, putting emphasis on our theoretical approaches. We start the discussion with electroweak processes in few-nucleon systems studied with the correlated Gaussian method. Then we describe quasi-elastic scattering with nuclear spectral functions, and meson productions with a Δ -hole model. Nuclear modifications of the parton distribution functions determined through a global analysis are also discussed. Finally, we discuss issues to be addressed for future developments.

  17. Influence of heat and chemical reactions on the Sisko fluid model for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present article studies the effects of heat and chemical reactions on the blood flow through tapered artery with a stenosis. The model incorporates Sisko fluid representation for the blood flow through an axially non-symmetrical but radially symmetric stenosis. Symmetry of the distribution of the wall shearing stress and ...

  18. Molecular Modeling as a Self-Taught Component of a Conventional Undergraduate Chemical Reaction Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Erhard W.; Zygmunt, William E.

    2016-01-01

    We inserted a self-taught molecular modeling project into an otherwise conventional undergraduate chemical-reaction-engineering course. Our objectives were that students should (a) learn with minimal instructor intervention, (b) gain an appreciation for the relationship between molecular structure and, first, macroscopic state functions in…

  19. The hydration of slag, part 1: reaction models for blended cement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Wei; Brouwers, Jos

    2007-01-01

    Reaction models are proposed to quantify the hydration products and to determine the composition of C–S–H from alkali-activated slags (AAS). Products of the slag hydration are first summarized from observations in literature. The main hydration products include C–S–H, hydrotalcite, hydrogarnet, AFm

  20. Toward a Kinetic Model for Acrylamide Formation in a Glucose-Asparagine Reaction System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Loon, W.A.M.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Ruck, A.L.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2005-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a glucose-asparagine reaction system is pro-posed. Equimolar solutions (0.2 M) of glucose and asparagine were heated at different tempera-tures (120-200 C) at pH 6.8. Besides the reactants, acrylamide, fructose, and melanoidins were quantified after

  1. Deeper Insight into the Diels-Alder Reaction through the Activation Strain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez, I.; Bickelhaupt, F.M.

    2016-01-01

    The Diels–Alder (DA) cycloaddition reaction has the ability to significantly increase molecular complexity regioselectively and stereospecifically in a single synthetic step. In this review it is discussed how the activation strain model of chemical reactivity reveals the physical factors that

  2. satl model lesson for teaching effect of temperature on rate of reaction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    SATL MODEL LESSON FOR TEACHING EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE. ON RATE OF REACTION. Shazia Summer, Anam Shafi and Iftikhar Imam Naqvi*. Department of Chemistry, Jinnah University for women, 5C Nazimabad, 74600, Karachi. Pakistan. *Corresponding author email: shaziasamar@hotmail.com. ABSTRACT.

  3. Estimating Reaction Rate Coefficients Within a Travel-Time Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, R [Georgia Institute of Technology; Lu, C [Georgia Institute of Technology; Luo, Jian [Georgia Institute of Technology; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Cheng, H. [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    A generalized, efficient, and practical approach based on the travel-time modeling framework is developed to estimate in situ reaction rate coefficients for groundwater remediation in heterogeneous aquifers. The required information for this approach can be obtained by conducting tracer tests with injection of a mixture of conservative and reactive tracers and measurements of both breakthrough curves (BTCs). The conservative BTC is used to infer the travel-time distribution from the injection point to the observation point. For advection-dominant reactive transport with well-mixed reactive species and a constant travel-time distribution, the reactive BTC is obtained by integrating the solutions to advective-reactive transport over the entire travel-time distribution, and then is used in optimization to determine the in situ reaction rate coefficients. By directly working on the conservative and reactive BTCs, this approach avoids costly aquifer characterization and improves the estimation for transport in heterogeneous aquifers which may not be sufficiently described by traditional mechanistic transport models with constant transport parameters. Simplified schemes are proposed for reactive transport with zero-, first-, nth-order, and Michaelis-Menten reactions. The proposed approach is validated by a reactive transport case in a two-dimensional synthetic heterogeneous aquifer and a field-scale bioremediation experiment conducted at Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field application indicates that ethanol degradation for U(VI)-bioremediation is better approximated by zero-order reaction kinetics than first-order reaction kinetics.

  4. Reaction reversibility in α-pinene thermal isomerization: improving the kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibiryaev, A. M.; Ermakova, A.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.

    2011-08-01

    Revision of the experimental data on α-pinene thermal isomerization attained in supercritical ethanol allowed us to expand the reaction scheme, which includes now six main products and eleven reversible reactions. The equilibrium constants of every reaction ( K T, j and K Φ, j) were calculated to allow for reversibility of reactions. The thermochemical data of the pure compounds required to calculate constants K T, j and K Φ, j (standard enthalpy and entropy of formation Δf H° (298.15 K), Δf S° (298.15 K), heat capacity C p ( T), critical parameters T cr and p cr, boiling point T b, and the acentric factor ω) were preliminary estimated using the empirical Joback and Benson methods. A kinetic model based on the new expanded scheme of reversible reactions was successfully identified and its kinetic parameters k j (600 K) and E j were determined. Detailed examination of the new kinetic model allowed us to refine the generally accepted mechanism of α-pinene thermal isomerization and to distinguish additional features of the multistep process.

  5. Reaction rates of ozone and terpenes adsorbed to model indoor surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springs, M; Wells, J R; Morrison, G C

    2011-08-01

    Reaction rates and reaction probabilities have been quantified on model indoor surfaces for the reaction of ozone with two monoterpenes (Δ(3) -carene and d-limonene). Molar surface loadings were obtained by performing breakthrough experiments in a plug-flow reactor (PFR) packed with beads of glass, polyvinylchloride or zirconium silicate. Reaction rates and probabilities were determined by equilibrating the PFR with both the terpene and the ozone and measuring the ozone consumption rate. To mimic typical indoor conditions, temperatures of 20, 25, and 30°C were used in both types of experiments along with a relative humidity ranging from 10% to 80%. The molar surface loading decreased with increased relative humidity, especially on glass, suggesting that water competed with the terpenes for adsorption sites. The ozone reactivity experiments indicate that higher surface loadings correspond with higher ozone uptake. The reaction probability for Δ(3) -carene with ozone ranged from 2.9 × 10(-6) to 3.0 × 10(-5) while reaction probabilities for d-limonene ranged from 2.8 × 10(-5) to 3.0 × 10(-4) . These surface reaction probabilities are roughly 10-100 times greater than the corresponding gas-phase values. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially for lower volatility terpenoids. At present, it is unclear how important heterogeneous reactions will be in influencing indoor concentrations of terpenes, ozone and their reaction products. We observe that surface reaction probabilities were 10 to 100 times greater than their corresponding gas-phase values. Thus indoor surfaces do enhance effective reaction rates and adsorption of terpenes will increase ozone flux to otherwise low-reactivity surfaces. Extrapolation of these results to typical indoor conditions suggests that surface conversion rates may be substantial relative to gas-phase rates, especially

  6. The Effects of Mixing, Reaction Rates, and Stoichiometry on Yield for Mixing Sensitive Reactions—Part I: Model Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Imran A. Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two classes of mixing sensitive reactions: competitive-consecutive and competitive-parallel. The yield of desired product from these coupled reactions depends on how fast the reactants are brought together. Recent experimental results have suggested that the mixing effect may depend strongly on the stoichiometry of the reactions. To investigate this, a 1D, dimensionless, reaction-diffusion model at the micromixing scale was developed. Assuming constant mass concentration and mass diffusivities, systems of PDE's were derived on a mass fraction basis for both types of reactions. Two dimensionless reaction rate ratios and a single general Damköhler number emerged from the analysis. The resulting dimensionless equations were used to investigate the effects of mixing, reaction rate ratio, and reaction stoichiometry. As expected, decreasing either the striation thickness or the dimensionless rate ratio maximizes yield, the reaction stoichiometry has a considerable effect on yield, and all three variables interact strongly.

  7. Traveling Wave Solutions of Reaction-Diffusion Equations Arising in Atherosclerosis Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcisa Apreutesei

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this short review article, two atherosclerosis models are presented, one as a scalar equation and the other one as a system of two equations. They are given in terms of reaction-diffusion equations in an infinite strip with nonlinear boundary conditions. The existence of traveling wave solutions is studied for these models. The monostable and bistable cases are introduced and analyzed.

  8. Modeling of the interplay between single-file diffusion and conversion reaction in mesoporous systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-11

    We analyze the spatiotemporal behavior of species concentrations in a diffusion-mediated conversion reaction which occurs at catalytic sites within linear pores of nanometer diameter. A strict single-file (no passing) constraint occurs in the diffusion within such narrow pores. Both transient and steady-state behavior is precisely characterized by kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of a spatially discrete lattice–gas model for this reaction–diffusion process considering various distributions of catalytic sites. Exact hierarchical master equations can also be developed for this model. Their analysis, after application of mean-field type truncation approximations, produces discrete reaction–diffusion type equations (mf-RDE). For slowly varying concentrations, we further develop coarse-grained continuum hydrodynamic reaction–diffusion equations (h-RDE) incorporating a precise treatment of single-file diffusion (SFD) in this multispecies system. Noting the shortcomings of mf-RDE and h-RDE, we then develop a generalized hydrodynamic (GH) formulation of appropriate gh-RDE which incorporates an unconventional description of chemical diffusion in mixed-component quasi-single-file systems based on a refined picture of tracer diffusion for finite-length pores. The gh-RDE elucidate the non-exponential decay of the steady-state reactant concentration into the pore and the non-mean-field scaling of the reactant penetration depth. Then an extended model of a catalytic conversion reaction within a functionalized nanoporous material is developed to assess the effect of varying the reaction product – pore interior interaction from attractive to repulsive. The analysis is performed utilizing the generalized hydrodynamic formulation of the reaction-diffusion equations which can reliably capture the complex interplay between reaction and restricted transport for both irreversible and reversible reactions.

  9. A parametric duration model of the reaction times of drivers distracted by mobile phone conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Md Mazharul; Washington, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The use of mobile phones while driving is more prevalent among young drivers-a less experienced cohort with elevated crash risk. The objective of this study was to examine and better understand the reaction times of young drivers to a traffic event originating in their peripheral vision whilst engaged in a mobile phone conversation. The CARRS-Q advanced driving simulator was used to test a sample of young drivers on various simulated driving tasks, including an event that originated within the driver's peripheral vision, whereby a pedestrian enters a zebra crossing from a sidewalk. Thirty-two licensed drivers drove the simulator in three phone conditions: baseline (no phone conversation), hands-free and handheld. In addition to driving the simulator each participant completed questionnaires related to driver demographics, driving history, usage of mobile phones while driving, and general mobile phone usage history. The participants were 21-26 years old and split evenly by gender. Drivers' reaction times to a pedestrian in the zebra crossing were modelled using a parametric accelerated failure time (AFT) duration model with a Weibull distribution. Also tested where two different model specifications to account for the structured heterogeneity arising from the repeated measures experimental design. The Weibull AFT model with gamma heterogeneity was found to be the best fitting model and identified four significant variables influencing the reaction times, including phone condition, driver's age, license type (provisional license holder or not), and self-reported frequency of usage of handheld phones while driving. The reaction times of drivers were more than 40% longer in the distracted condition compared to baseline (not distracted). Moreover, the impairment of reaction times due to mobile phone conversations was almost double for provisional compared to open license holders. A reduction in the ability to detect traffic events in the periphery whilst distracted

  10. STEPS: efficient simulation of stochastic reaction-diffusion models in realistic morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepburn, Iain; Chen, Weiliang; Wils, Stefan; De Schutter, Erik

    2012-05-10

    Models of cellular molecular systems are built from components such as biochemical reactions (including interactions between ligands and membrane-bound proteins), conformational changes and active and passive transport. A discrete, stochastic description of the kinetics is often essential to capture the behavior of the system accurately. Where spatial effects play a prominent role the complex morphology of cells may have to be represented, along with aspects such as chemical localization and diffusion. This high level of detail makes efficiency a particularly important consideration for software that is designed to simulate such systems. We describe STEPS, a stochastic reaction-diffusion simulator developed with an emphasis on simulating biochemical signaling pathways accurately and efficiently. STEPS supports all the above-mentioned features, and well-validated support for SBML allows many existing biochemical models to be imported reliably. Complex boundaries can be represented accurately in externally generated 3D tetrahedral meshes imported by STEPS. The powerful Python interface facilitates model construction and simulation control. STEPS implements the composition and rejection method, a variation of the Gillespie SSA, supporting diffusion between tetrahedral elements within an efficient search and update engine. Additional support for well-mixed conditions and for deterministic model solution is implemented. Solver accuracy is confirmed with an original and extensive validation set consisting of isolated reaction, diffusion and reaction-diffusion systems. Accuracy imposes upper and lower limits on tetrahedron sizes, which are described in detail. By comparing to Smoldyn, we show how the voxel-based approach in STEPS is often faster than particle-based methods, with increasing advantage in larger systems, and by comparing to MesoRD we show the efficiency of the STEPS implementation. STEPS simulates models of cellular reaction-diffusion systems with complex

  11. Noise-and delay-induced phase transitions of the dimer-monomer surface reaction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Chunhua, E-mail: zchh2009@126.com [Faculty of Science, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China) and Center of Metallurgical Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction, Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Wang Hua, E-mail: wanghuaheat@hotmail.com [Center of Metallurgical Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction, Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2012-06-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We study the dimer-monomer surface reaction model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that noise induces first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination of noise and time-delayed feedback induce first- and second-order IPT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First- and second-order IPT is viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions. - Abstract: The effects of noise and time-delayed feedback in the dimer-monomer (DM) surface reaction model are investigated. Applying small delay approximation, we construct a stochastic delayed differential equation and its Fokker-Planck equation to describe the state evolution of the DM reaction model. We show that the noise can only induce first-order irreversible phase transition (IPT) characteristic of the DM model, however the combination of the noise and time-delayed feedback can simultaneously induce first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model. Therefore, it is shown that the well-known first- and second-order IPT characteristics of the DM model may be viewed as noise-and delay-induced phase transitions.

  12. Reentry blackout prediction for atmospheric reentry demonstrator mission considering uncertainty in chemical reaction rate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minseok; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2018-01-01

    A numerical simulation model of plasma flows and electromagnetic waves around a vehicle was developed to predict a radio frequency blackout. Plasma flows in the shock layer and the wake region were calculated using a computational fluid dynamics technique with a three-dimensional model. A finite-catalytic wall condition known to affect plasma properties, such as the number density of electrons, was considered for accurate prediction. A parametric study was performed to investigate the effect of uncertainty in the chemical reaction rate model on evaluating a radio frequency blackout. The behavior of electromagnetic waves in plasma was investigated using a frequency-dependent finite-difference time-domain method. Numerical simulations of reentry blackout were performed for the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator mission at various altitudes. The plasma flows and the complex movement of electromagnetic waves around the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator vehicle were clarified. The predicted signal loss profile was then directly compared with the experimental flight data to validate the present models. The numerical results generally reproduced the trends over altitudes of the measured data. It is suggested that the present simulation model can be used to investigate the radio frequency blackout and signal loss of electromagnetic waves in the communication of a reentry vehicle. It was confirmed that high associative ionization reaction rates contribute to reducing the electron density in the wake region and radio frequency blackout. It is suggested that the accuracy of predicting the signal loss improved when considering the uncertainty in the chemical reaction model for associative ionizations.

  13. Practical enhancement factor model based on GM for multiple parallel reactions: Piperazine (PZ) CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    industrially relevant reaction regimes must be developed and validated against experimental measurements.In a previous work, we presented the general model (GM) enhancement factor model for (m+n)-th order reversible reactions and validated it against the numerical solution of the two-film model for absorption.......23 and 0.41 mol CO2/2 mol PZ. We show that overall second order kinetics describes well the reaction between CO2 and PZ accounting for the carbamate and bicarbamate reactions. Here we prove the GM model for piperazine and MEA but we expect that this practical approach is applicable for various amines...

  14. Stochastic binary modeling of cells in continuous time as an alternative to biochemical reaction equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Kumagai, Yutaro; Vandenbon, Alexis; Akira, Shizuo; Standley, Daron M

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a coarse-grained formulation for modeling the dynamic behavior of cells quantitatively, based on stochasticity and heterogeneity, rather than on biochemical reactions. We treat each reaction as a continuous-time stochastic process, while reducing each biochemical quantity to a binary value at the level of individual cells. The system can be analytically represented by a finite set of ordinary linear differential equations, which provides a continuous time course prediction of each molecular state. Here we introduce our formalism and demonstrate it with several examples.

  15. Pre-equilibrium (exciton) model and the heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission

    CERN Document Server

    Betak, E

    2015-01-01

    We bring the possibility to include the cluster emission into the statistical pre-equilibrium (exciton) model enlarged for considering also the heavy ion collisions. At this moment, the calculations have been done without treatment of angular momentum variables, but all the approach can be straightforwardly applied to heavy-ion reactions with cluster emission including the angular momentum variables. The direct motivation of this paper is a possibility of producing the superdeformed nuclei, which are easier to be detected in heavy-ion reactions than in those induced by light projectiles (nucleons, deuterons, $\\alpha$-particles).

  16. Gamma emission in precompound reactions: 1, Statistical model and collective gamma decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoering, A. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany) Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Weidenmueller, H.A. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany))

    1992-01-01

    We extend the theory of particle-induced precompound reactions by including gamma decay. We use the Brink-Axel hypothesis and consider the gamma emission of giant dipole resonances built on the ground state and on the excited states of the composite system. The latter are modeled as multiparticle multi-hole excitations. In this way, we combine the statistical ansatz and the chaining hypothesis typical for precompound reaction theories, with the collective aspects of gamma decay. Formulas for average S-matrix and average cross section are derived in this framework.

  17. Gamma emission in precompound reactions: 1, Statistical model and collective gamma decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoering, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)]|[Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory; Weidenmueller, H.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    1992-09-01

    We extend the theory of particle-induced precompound reactions by including gamma decay. We use the Brink-Axel hypothesis and consider the gamma emission of giant dipole resonances built on the ground state and on the excited states of the composite system. The latter are modeled as multiparticle multi-hole excitations. In this way, we combine the statistical ansatz and the chaining hypothesis typical for precompound reaction theories, with the collective aspects of gamma decay. Formulas for average S-matrix and average cross section are derived in this framework.

  18. Modeling radical edge-site reactions of biochar in CO2/water solution under ultrasonic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubatiuk, Tetiana; Sajjadi, Baharak; Hill, Glake; Leszczynska, Danuta; Chen, Wei-Yin; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2017-12-01

    We report results of theoretical evaluation of the mechanisms of possible radical reactions on the edge-site of biochar with CO2,SUP>·-, OH ˙ , and H ˙ in irradiated aqueous solution. The computational studies were performed for model poly aromatic systems. Obtained mechanisms reflect one of the routes of the oxygen loss accompanied by increase of hydrogen content, as observed in photochemical experiment. The reaction of CO2·- with the edge site of biochar mainly leads to reduced rather than oxidized products. The mechanism of CO2 capturing is mapped by different routes of one-electron reduction and radical addition to the aromatic ring.

  19. Deeper Insight into the Diels-Alder Reaction through the Activation Strain Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Israel; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2016-12-06

    In this Focus Review, we present the application of the so-called Activation Strain Model of chemical reactivity to the Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. To this end, representative recent examples have been selected to illustrate the power of this new computational approach to gain a deeper quantitative understanding of this fundamental process in chemistry. We cover a wide range of issues, such as, the "endo-rule", reactivity trends emerging from systematic variation in the reactants' strain, and cycloaddition reactions involving relevant species in material science, that is, fullerenes, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and nanotubes. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Layered decomposition for the model order reduction of timescale separated biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Thomas P; Papachristodoulou, Antonis

    2014-09-07

    Biochemical reaction networks tend to exhibit behaviour on more than one timescale and they are inevitably modelled by stiff systems of ordinary differential equations. Singular perturbation is a well-established method for approximating stiff systems at a given timescale. Standard applications of singular perturbation partition the state variable into fast and slow modules and assume a quasi-steady state behaviour in the fast module. In biochemical reaction networks, many reactants may take part in both fast and slow reactions; it is not necessarily the case that the reactants themselves are fast or slow. Transformations of the state space are often required in order to create fast and slow modules, which thus no longer model the original species concentrations. This paper introduces a layered decomposition, which is a natural choice when reaction speeds are separated in scale. The new framework ensures that model reduction can be carried out without seeking state space transformations, and that the effect of the fast dynamics on the slow timescale can be described directly in terms of the original species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Stefan model for mass transfer in a rotating disk reaction vessel

    KAUST Repository

    BOHUN, C. S.

    2015-05-04

    Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2015. In this paper, we focus on the process of mass transfer in the rotating disk apparatus formulated as a Stefan problem with consideration given to both the hydrodynamics of the process and the specific chemical reactions occurring in the bulk. The wide range in the reaction rates of the underlying chemistry allows for a natural decoupling of the problem into a simplified set of weakly coupled convective-reaction-diffusion equations for the slowly reacting chemical species and a set of algebraic relations for the species that react rapidly. An analysis of the chemical equilibrium conditions identifies an expansion parameter and a reduced model that remains valid for arbitrarily large times. Numerical solutions of the model are compared to an asymptotic analysis revealing three distinct time scales and chemical diffusion boundary layer that lies completely inside the hydrodynamic layer. Formulated as a Stefan problem, the model generalizes the work of Levich (Levich and Spalding (1962) Physicochemical hydrodynamics, vol. 689, Prentice-Hall Englewood Cliffs, NJ) and will help better understand the natural limitations of the rotating disk reaction vessel when consideration is made for the reacting chemical species.

  2. Electrophilic properties of patulin. Adduct structures and reaction pathways with 4-bromothiophenol and other model nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliege, R; Metzler, M

    2000-05-01

    The mycotoxin patulin (PAT) is believed to exert its cytotoxic and chromosome-damaging effects by forming covalent adducts with essential cellular thiols. Since the chemical structures of such adducts are unknown to date, we have studied the reaction of PAT and its O-acetylated derivative with the monofunctional thiol model compound 4-bromothiophenol (BTP), which was chosen due to analytical advantages. By means of analytical and preparative high-performance liquid chromatography, 16 adducts of PAT and 3 adducts of acetyl-PAT were isolated and their chemical structures elucidated by (1)H and (13)C NMR, IR, and UV spectroscopy. Time course studies and analysis of daughter product formation from isolated intermediate adducts led to a detailed scheme for the reaction of PAT with BTP. The structures of adducts of PAT formed with other model nucleophiles, e. g., the aliphatic thiol 2-mercaptoethanol and the aromatic amine 4-bromoaniline, were also elucidated and found to corroborate the reaction scheme. In addition, one further reaction pathway was observed with 2-mercaptoethanol, which appears to be independent from those found for BTP. Our study with model nucleophiles provides insights into the electrophilic reactivity of PAT and proved to be useful for the structure elucidation of PAT adducts with biological nucleophiles of toxicological relevance, as will be reported by Fliege and Metzler [(2000) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 13, 373-381].

  3. A mathematical model for the adenylosuccinate synthetase reaction involved in purine biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likhoshvai Vitalii A

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of the mathematical models that adequately describe biochemical reactions and molecular-genetic mechanisms is one of the most important tasks in modern bioinformatics. Because the enzyme adenylosuccinate synthetase (AdSS has long been extensively studied, a wealth of kinetic data has been accumulated. Results We describe a mathematical model for the reaction catalyzed by AdSS. The model's parameters were fitted to experimental data obtained from published literature. The advantage of our model is that it includes relationships between the reaction rate, the concentrations of three substrates (GTP, IMP and ASP, the effects of five inhibitors (GMP, GDP, AMP, ASUC and SUCC, and the influence of Mg2+ ions. Conclusion Our model describes the reaction catalyzed by AdSS as a fully random process. The model structure implies that each of the inhibitors included in it is only competitive to one of the substrates. The model was tested for adequacy using experimental data published elsewhere. The values obtained for the parameters are as follows: Vmax = 1.35·10-3 mM/min, KmGTP = 0.023 mM, KmIMP = 0.02 mM, KmASP = 0.3 mM, KiGMP = 0.024 mM, KiGDP = 8·10-3 mM, KiAMP = 0.01 mM, KiASUC = 7.5·10-3 mM, KiSUCC = 8 mM, KmMg = 0.08 mM.

  4. Rigorous Multicomponent Reactive Separations Modelling: Complete Consideration of Reaction-Diffusion Phenomena; Modelisation rigoureuse de la separation reactive multiconstituant: prise en compte des phenomenes de diffusion-reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmadi, A.; Meyer, M.; Rouzineau, D.; Prevost, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, ENSIACET, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, UMR 5503, 31 - Toulouse (France); Alix, P.; Laloue, N. [IFP Energies nouvelles-Lyon, 69 - Solaize (France)

    2010-09-15

    This paper gives the first step of the development of a rigorous multicomponent reactive separation model. Such a model is highly essential to further the optimization of acid gases removal plants (CO{sub 2} capture, gas treating, etc.) in terms of size and energy consumption, since chemical solvents are conventionally used. Firstly, two main modelling approaches are presented: the equilibrium-based and the rate-based approaches. Secondly, an extended rate-based model with rigorous modelling methodology for diffusion-reaction phenomena is proposed. The film theory and the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations are used in order to characterize multicomponent interactions. The complete chain of chemical reactions is taken into account. The reactions can be kinetically controlled or at chemical equilibrium, and they are considered for both liquid film and liquid bulk. Thirdly, the method of numerical resolution is described. Coupling the generalized Maxwell-Stefan equations with chemical equilibrium equations leads to a highly non-linear Differential-Algebraic Equations system known as DAE index 3. The set of equations is discretized with finite-differences as its integration by Gear method is complex. The resulting algebraic system is resolved by the Newton- Raphson method. Finally, the present model and the associated methods of numerical resolution are validated for the example of esterification of methanol. This archetype non-electrolytic system permits an interesting analysis of reaction impact on mass transfer, especially near the phase interface. The numerical resolution of the model by Newton-Raphson method gives good results in terms of calculation time and convergence. The simulations show that the impact of reactions at chemical equilibrium and that of kinetically controlled reactions with high kinetics on mass transfer is relatively similar. Moreover, the Fick's law is less adapted for multicomponent mixtures where some abnormalities such as counter

  5. A reaction-diffusion model of CO2 influx into an oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somersalo, Erkki; Occhipinti, Rossana; Boron, Walter F; Calvetti, Daniela

    2012-09-21

    We have developed and implemented a novel mathematical model for simulating transients in surface pH (pH(S)) and intracellular pH (pH(i)) caused by the influx of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) into a Xenopus oocyte. These transients are important tools for studying gas channels. We assume that the oocyte is a sphere surrounded by a thin layer of unstirred fluid, the extracellular unconvected fluid (EUF), which is in turn surrounded by the well-stirred bulk extracellular fluid (BECF) that represents an infinite reservoir for all solutes. Here, we assume that the oocyte plasma membrane is permeable only to CO(2). In both the EUF and intracellular space, solute concentrations can change because of diffusion and reactions. The reactions are the slow equilibration of the CO(2) hydration-dehydration reactions and competing equilibria among carbonic acid (H(2)CO(3))/bicarbonate (HCO(3)(-)) and a multitude of non-CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) buffers. Mathematically, the model is described by a coupled system of reaction-diffusion equations that-assuming spherical radial symmetry-we solved using the method of lines with appropriate stiff solvers. In agreement with experimental data [Musa-Aziz et al. 2009, PNAS 106 5406-5411], the model predicts that exposing the cell to extracellular 1.5% CO(2)/10 mM HCO(3)(-) (pH 7.50) causes pH(i) to fall and pH(S) to rise rapidly to a peak and then decay. Moreover, the model provides insights into the competition between diffusion and reaction processes when we change the width of the EUF, membrane permeability to CO(2), native extra- and intracellular carbonic anhydrase-like activities, the non-CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) (intrinsic) intracellular buffering power, or mobility of intrinsic intracellular buffers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  7. Modeling Adsorption Kinetics of Magnesium and Phosphate Ions on Goethite by Empirical Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malihe Talebi Atouei

    2017-06-01

    determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AA-670Shimadzu AA/FE. The amounts of adsorbed ions were calculated from the difference of the initial and the equilibrium concentrations. The experimental data were described by using the several widely-used kinetic models. Models performance was evaluated based on their ability to describe experimental data and obtained values for coefficient of determination (R2 and standard error of the estimate (SE. Results and Discussion: The results demonstrate that phosphate and magnesium adsorption on goethite reached equilibrium within the 24 h equilibration time. The equilibration time is, however, pH-dependent. No systematic differences are observed among time-dependent adsorption isotherms for phosphate at pHpHPZC. It seems that the effect of pH on kinetics of phosphate and magnesium adsorption is related to the mineral surface charge, which influences electrostatic interactions between the ions and the surface charges.thus electrostatic attractive and repulsive forces dominantly control the reaction. The equilibration time for phosphate and magnesium adsorption on goethite was calculated to be ≤1 h when electrostatic forces are attractive and approximately 24 h when electrostatic forces are repulsive. In binary ion systems, phosphate and magnesium enhanced the amount and accelerated the adsorption rate of each other. Adsorption of phosphate could reverse electrostatic forces from repulsive to attractive for the adsorption of magnesium and vice versa. Also, because of the smaller ionic radius of magnesium (0.065 nm in comparison with phosphate (0.22 nm, reduction in equilibration time of magnesium adsorption in the presence of phosphate could be partly diffusion-controlled. Fitting different kinetic models on experimental data showed that pseudo-second order model can successfully describe phosphate and magnesium adsorption data in both single and binary ion systems with highest determination coefficient (R2~0.99 and lowest

  8. Nonlinear electromechanical modelling and dynamical behavior analysis of a satellite reaction wheel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghalari, Alireza; Shahravi, Morteza

    2017-12-01

    The present research addresses the satellite reaction wheel (RW) nonlinear electromechanical coupling dynamics including dynamic eccentricity of brushless dc (BLDC) motor and gyroscopic effects, as well as dry friction of shaft-bearing joints (relative small slip) and bearing friction. In contrast to other studies, the rotational velocity of the flywheel is considered to be controllable, so it is possible to study the reaction wheel dynamical behavior in acceleration stages. The RW is modeled as a three-phases BLDC motor as well as flywheel with unbalances on a rigid shaft and flexible bearings. Improved Lagrangian dynamics for electromechanical systems is used to obtain the mathematical model of the system. The developed model can properly describe electromechanical nonlinear coupled dynamical behavior of the satellite RW. Numerical simulations show the effectiveness of the presented approach.

  9. Extended Parker-Sochacki method for Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelrazik, Ismail M; Elkaranshawy, Hesham A

    2016-03-01

    In this article, a new approach--namely, the extended Parker-Sochacki method (EPSM)--is presented for solving the Michaelis-Menten nonlinear enzymatic reaction model. The Parker-Sochacki method (PSM) is combined with a new resummation method called the Sumudu-Padé resummation method to obtain approximate analytical solutions for the model. The obtained solutions by the proposed approach are compared with the solutions of PSM and the Runge-Kutta numerical method (RKM). The comparison proves the practicality, efficiency, and correctness of the presented approach. It serves as a basis for solving other nonlinear biochemical reaction models in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Transport-reaction model for defect and carrier behavior within displacement cascades in gallium arsenide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wampler, William R.; Myers, Samuel Maxwell,

    2014-02-01

    A model is presented for recombination of charge carriers at displacement damage in gallium arsenide, which includes clustering of the defects in atomic displacement cascades produced by neutron or ion irradiation. The carrier recombination model is based on an atomistic description of capture and emission of carriers by the defects with time evolution resulting from the migration and reaction of the defects. The physics and equations on which the model is based are presented, along with details of the numerical methods used for their solution. The model uses a continuum description of diffusion, field-drift and reaction of carriers and defects within a representative spherically symmetric cluster. The initial radial defect profiles within the cluster were chosen through pair-correlation-function analysis of the spatial distribution of defects obtained from the binary-collision code MARLOWE, using recoil energies for fission neutrons. Charging of the defects can produce high electric fields within the cluster which may influence transport and reaction of carriers and defects, and which may enhance carrier recombination through band-to-trap tunneling. Properties of the defects are discussed and values for their parameters are given, many of which were obtained from density functional theory. The model provides a basis for predicting the transient response of III-V heterojunction bipolar transistors to pulsed neutron irradiation.

  11. Research on the model reactions of ClONO 2 with HCl on water clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Si Chuan; Guo, Rui; Wang, Sheng Long

    1999-11-01

    The reaction of ClONO 2 with HCl on ice or on PSC surfaces occurs readily. However, the rate of ClONO 2 reacting with HCl in pure gas phase is small. In order to understand the reaction conditions of ClONO 2 with HCl, several model reactions of ClONO 2 with the (H 2O) n·HCl clusters for n=0,1,2,3,4 have been theoretically studied at the MP2//HF/6-31G(d) level and for n=0,1 at the MP2/6-31G(d) level. One of the reactions for n=3 has been further calculated at the MP2//HF/6-31G(d,p), MP2//HF/6-311G(d,p), and MP2//HF/6-311+G(d,p) levels. Numerical results show that the reaction of ClONO 2 with HCl on a three- or four-water cluster proceeds faster with a low-energy barrier. The implication for ozone holes in the Antartic and Artic stratosphere is discussed.

  12. Proton capture reaction cross section measurements on 162Er as a probe of statistical model calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, N.; Güray, R. T.; Yalçın, C.; Tan, W. P.; Aprahamian, A.; Beard, M.; deBoer, R. J.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Falahat, S.; Görres, J.; Li, Q.; Sauerwein, A.; Sonnabend, K.; Wiescher, M.; Fülöp, Zs.; Gyürky, Gy.; Somorjai, E.; Greene, J.

    2017-10-01

    It is crucial to measure reaction cross sections relevant to the astrophysical γ process so that theoretical reaction rates can be tested and validated with experimental data. The total cross sections for the 162Er(p ,γ )163Tm and the 162Er(p ,n )162Tm reactions have been measured by the activation method in center-of-mass energies from 3.973 to 8.944 MeV and from 5.962 to 8.944 MeV, respectively. The nucleus 162Er is the heaviest p nuclide to be measured by the activation method using γ -ray spectroscopy, so far. It is important to note that the energy range for the (p ,γ ) reaction measurement covers a large fraction of the astrophysically relevant energy region between 2.71 and 5.34 MeV. The targets were prepared by evaporating 28.2 % isotopically enriched Er1622O3 powder onto carbon backing foils, and bombarded with proton beams provided by the FN Tandem Accelerator at the University of Notre Dame. The reaction yields have been determined by the observed activity of produced radioactive isotopes, which was detected offline by a high-purity germanium detector. The results are presented and compared with calculations from two statistical model codes: non-smoker and talys.

  13. Reaction-Multi Diffusion Model for Nutrient Release and Autocatalytic Degradation of PLA-Coated Controlled-Release Fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Ameenuddin Irfan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for the reaction-diffusion equation is developed to describe the nutrient release profiles and degradation of poly(lactic acid (PLA-coated controlled-release fertilizer. A multi-diffusion model that consists of coupled partial differential equations is used to study the diffusion and chemical reaction (autocatalytic degradation simultaneously. The model is solved using an analytical-numerical method. Firstly, the model equation is transformed using the Laplace transformation as the Laplace transform cannot be inverted analytically. Numerical inversion of the Laplace transform is used by employing the Zakian method. The solution is useful in predicting the nutrient release profiles at various diffusivity, concentration of extraction medium, and reaction rates. It also helps in explaining the transformation of autocatalytic concentration in the coating material for various reaction rates, times of reaction, and reaction-multi diffusion. The solution is also applicable to the other biodegradable polymer-coated controlled-release fertilizers.

  14. A Semi-Empirical Two Step Carbon Corrosion Reaction Model in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Alan; Colbow, Vesna; Harvey, David; Rogers, Erin; Wessel, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The cathode CL of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was exposed to high potentials, 1.0 to 1.4 V versus a reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE), that are typically encountered during start up/shut down operation. While both platinum dissolution and carbon corrosion occurred, the carbon corrosion effects were isolated and modeled. The presented model separates the carbon corrosion process into two reaction steps; (1) oxidation of the carbon surface to carbon-oxygen groups, and (2) further corrosion of the oxidized surface to carbon dioxide/monoxide. To oxidize and corrode the cathode catalyst carbon support, the CL was subjected to an accelerated stress test cycled the potential from 0.6 VRHE to an upper potential limit (UPL) ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 VRHE at varying dwell times. The reaction rate constants and specific capacitances of carbon and platinum were fitted by evaluating the double layer capacitance (Cdl) trends. Carbon surface oxidation increased the Cdl due to increased specific capacitance for carbon surfaces with carbon-oxygen groups, while the second corrosion reaction decreased the Cdl due to loss of the overall carbon surface area. The first oxidation step differed between carbon types, while both reaction rate constants were found to have a dependency on UPL, temperature, and gas relative humidity.

  15. Integrated Approach to Mathematical Modelling of Atrazine Degradation in Different Reaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijan Bošnjak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the known approaches and published mathematical models, as well as on theoretical consideration using our experimental data, the integrated approach to mathematical modelling of atrazine biodegradation processes has been employed and sophisticated mathematical models for different reaction systems have been developed. The applicability of these models which take into account physical, chemical, biochemical and biological complexity of atrazine biodegradation was further analyzed in comparison with mathematical models describing simple consecutive reaction systems using first-order kinetics. Kinetics of atrazine degradation in liquid media and soil contaminated with atrazine at the temperatures of 10 and 30 °C was assessed and compared. Biodegradation experiments in liquid media were conducted at atrazine concentrations ranging from 0.14 to 25 mmol/L, while the experiments in soil were conducted at atrazine concentration of approx. 0.44 μmol/g. Computer simulations were applied to explain experimental results and test the adequacy of mathematical models. Detailed analysis of computer simulation data showed that the developed integrated mathematical models could be considered as the most convenient for describing kinetics of atrazine biotransformation in both liquid media and contaminated soil, although even simple mathematical models are suitable for explaining some experimental results, especially when evaluating the temperature effects on biodegradation efficacy of the applied mixed bacterial culture.

  16. Multiscale Modeling of Poly(lactic acid) Production: From Reaction Conditions to Rheology of Polymer Melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zubov, Alexandr; Sin, Gürkan

    2018-01-01

    process based on hybrid Monte Carlo approach, and (iii) mesoscopic public domain model of polymer chain reptation dynamics. Based on the input reaction conditions, the macro-scale model predicts L,L-lactide conversion and averaged molar mass of PLLA, while the micro-scale and meso-scale simulations allow......Abstract Poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) is a fully biodegradable bioplastic with promising market potential. The paper deals with systematic development and analysis of the modeling framework allowing direct mapping between PLLA production process conditions and rheological properties of the polymer...

  17. The effect of learning models and emotional intelligence toward students learning outcomes on reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutiani, Ani; Silitonga, Mei Y.

    2017-08-01

    This research focused on the effect of learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes on reaction rate teaching topic. In order to achieve the objectives of the research, with 2x2 factorial research design was used. There were two factors tested, namely: the learning models (factor A), and emotional intelligence (factor B) factors. Then, two learning models were used; problem-based learning/PBL (A1), and project-based learning/PjBL (A2). While, the emotional intelligence was divided into higher and lower types. The number of population was six classes containing 243 grade X students of SMAN 10 Medan, Indonesia. There were 15 students of each class were chosen as the sample of the research by applying purposive sampling technique. The data were analyzed by applying two-ways analysis of variance (2X2) at the level of significant α = 0.05. Based on hypothesis testing, there was the interaction between learning models and emotional intelligence in students' chemistry learning outcomes. Then, the finding of the research showed that students' learning outcomes in reaction rate taught by using PBL with higher emotional intelligence is higher than those who were taught by using PjBL. There was no significant effect between students with lower emotional intelligence taught by using both PBL and PjBL in reaction rate topic. Based on the finding, the students with lower emotional intelligence were quite hard to get in touch with other students in group discussion.

  18. Mathematical Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Metabolic Reaction Systems Using Metabolome Time Series Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kansuporn eSriyudthsak

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The high-throughput acquisition of metabolome data is greatly anticipated for the complete understanding of cellular metabolism in living organisms. A variety of analytical technologies have been developed to acquire large-scale metabolic profiles under different biological or environmental conditions. Time series data are useful for predicting the most likely metabolic pathways because they provide important information regarding the accumulation of metabolites, which implies causal relationships in the metabolic reaction network. Considerable effort has been undertaken to utilize these data for constructing a mathematical model merging system properties and quantitatively characterizing a whole metabolic system in toto. However, there are technical difficulties between benchmarking the provision and utilization of data. Although hundreds of metabolites can be measured, which provide information on the metabolic reaction system, simultaneous measurement of thousands of metabolites is still challenging. In addition, it is nontrivial to logically predict the dynamic behaviors of unmeasurable metabolite concentrations without sufficient information on the metabolic reaction network. Yet, consolidating the advantages of advancements in both metabolomics and mathematical modeling remain to be accomplished. This review outlines the conceptual basis of and recent advances in technologies in both the research fields. It also highlights the potential for constructing a large-scale mathematical model by estimating model parameters from time series metabolome data in order to comprehensively understand metabolism at the systems level.

  19. Mathematical Modeling and Dynamic Simulation of Metabolic Reaction Systems Using Metabolome Time Series Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Shiraishi, Fumihide; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    The high-throughput acquisition of metabolome data is greatly anticipated for the complete understanding of cellular metabolism in living organisms. A variety of analytical technologies have been developed to acquire large-scale metabolic profiles under different biological or environmental conditions. Time series data are useful for predicting the most likely metabolic pathways because they provide important information regarding the accumulation of metabolites, which implies causal relationships in the metabolic reaction network. Considerable effort has been undertaken to utilize these data for constructing a mathematical model merging system properties and quantitatively characterizing a whole metabolic system in toto. However, there are technical difficulties between benchmarking the provision and utilization of data. Although, hundreds of metabolites can be measured, which provide information on the metabolic reaction system, simultaneous measurement of thousands of metabolites is still challenging. In addition, it is nontrivial to logically predict the dynamic behaviors of unmeasurable metabolite concentrations without sufficient information on the metabolic reaction network. Yet, consolidating the advantages of advancements in both metabolomics and mathematical modeling remain to be accomplished. This review outlines the conceptual basis of and recent advances in technologies in both the research fields. It also highlights the potential for constructing a large-scale mathematical model by estimating model parameters from time series metabolome data in order to comprehensively understand metabolism at the systems level.

  20. Scaling analysis in modeling transport and reaction processes a systematic approach to model building and the art of approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, William B

    2007-01-01

    This book is unique as the first effort to expound on the subject of systematic scaling analysis. Not written for a specific discipline, the book targets any reader interested in transport phenomena and reaction processes. The book is logically divided into chapters on the use of systematic scaling analysis in fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and reaction processes. An integrating chapter is included that considers more complex problems involving combined transport phenomena. Each chapter includes several problems that are explained in considerable detail. These are followed by several worked examples for which the general outline for the scaling is given. Each chapter also includes many practice problems. This book is based on recognizing the value of systematic scaling analysis as a pedagogical method for teaching transport and reaction processes and as a research tool for developing and solving models and in designing experiments. Thus, the book can serve as both a textbook and a reference boo...

  1. Contribution to the modelling of gas-solid reactions and reactors; Contribution a la modelisation des reactions et des reacteurs gaz-solide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patisson, F

    2005-09-15

    Gas-solid reactions control a great number of major industrial processes involving matter transformation. This dissertation aims at showing that mathematical modelling is a useful tool for both understanding phenomena and optimising processes. First, the physical processes associated with a gas-solid reaction are presented in detail for a single particle, together with the corresponding available kinetic grain models. A second part is devoted to the modelling of multiparticle reactors. Different approaches, notably for coupling grain models and reactor models, are illustrated through various case studies: coal pyrolysis in a rotary kiln, production of uranium tetrafluoride in a moving bed furnace, on-grate incineration of municipal solid wastes, thermogravimetric apparatus, nuclear fuel making, steel-making electric arc furnace. (author)

  2. Synthesis, characterization and optimization of poly(p-phenylenediamine)-based organoclay composite for Cr(VI) remediation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mdlalose, L

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available to pristine organoclay. Adsorption was better described by the pseudo second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model, suggesting that chemisorption was the main mechanism of the adsorption process. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacity for Cr...

  3. Adsorption of methyl violet from aqueous solution using gum xanthan/Fe3O4 based nanocomposite hydrogel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mittal, H

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available isotherm model (q(sube) = 642 mg/g) and pseudo-second-order kinetics model. Thermodynamic studies suggested that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous. Moreover, the adsorbent was successfully utilized for successive five cycles...

  4. The use of the dusty-gas model for the description of mass transport with chemical reaction in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Veldsink, J.W.; van Damme, Rudolf M.J.; Versteeg, Geert; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1995-01-01

    In the present study, mass transport accompanied by chemical reactions in porous media is studied according to the Fick model and the dusty-gas model. For mass transport accompanied by a chemical reaction in catalyst structures showing a plane, line, or point of symmetry, the approximate analytical

  5. Required Levels of Catalysis for Emergence of Autocatalytic Sets in Models of Chemical Reaction Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim Hordijk

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The formation of a self-sustaining autocatalytic chemical network is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the origin of life. The question of whether such a network could form “by chance” within a sufficiently complex suite of molecules and reactions is one that we have investigated for a simple chemical reaction model based on polymer ligation and cleavage. In this paper, we extend this work in several further directions. In particular, we investigate in more detail the levels of catalysis required for a self-sustaining autocatalytic network to form. We study the size of chemical networks within which we might expect to find such an autocatalytic subset, and we extend the theoretical and computational analyses to models in which catalysis requires template matching.

  6. Cross-section measurements and nuclear model calculation for proton induced nuclear reaction on zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abyad, M., E-mail: alabyad_m@yahoo.com [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Postal Code 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Abdel-Hamid, A.S. [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Postal Code 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Tarkanyi, F.; Ditroi, F.; Takacs, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Seddik, U. [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Nuclear Research Center, AEA, Postal Code 13759, Cairo (Egypt); Bashter, I.I. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Zagazig University, Zagazig (Egypt)

    2012-01-15

    Proton induced nuclear reactions were measured with stacked-foil technique on natural zirconium targets up to 16.7 MeV. Excitation functions were measured for the production of {sup 90,92m,95m,95g,96}Nb and {sup 88}Y. Cumulative cross-section, thick target yields and activation functions were deduced and compared with the available experimental data, as well as with the nuclear models codes; ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS. The integral yields for thick targets were deduced from the measured excitation function of the produced radionuclides. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We measured the excitation functions for proton induced reactions on Zr for the production of {sup 90.92m,95m,95g,96}Nb and {sup 88}Y. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results compared with the experimental data, as well as with nuclear models codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integral yields for thick targets were deduced .

  7. Conditions for the critical phenomena in a dynamic model of an electrocatalytic reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firstova, Natalia; Shchepakina, Elena

    2017-02-01

    In the paper, a detailed study of the critical phenomena mechanism in a model of an electrocatalytic reaction is carried out. The use of the geometric theory of integral manifolds allows us to show the relationship between the critical regime and the stability loss delay of the slow integral manifold of the corresponding differential system. The asymptotic formula for the critical value of the control parameter is obtained.

  8. DL-ADR: a novel deep learning model for classifying genomic variants into adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhaohui; Huang, Jimmy Xiangji; Zeng, Xing; Zhang, Gang

    2016-08-10

    Genomic variations are associated with the metabolism and the occurrence of adverse reactions of many therapeutic agents. The polymorphisms on over 2000 locations of cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP) due to many factors such as ethnicity, mutations, and inheritance attribute to the diversity of response and side effects of various drugs. The associations of the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the internal pharmacokinetic patterns and the vulnerability of specific adverse reactions become one of the research interests of pharmacogenomics. The conventional genomewide association studies (GWAS) mainly focuses on the relation of single or multiple SNPs to a specific risk factors which are a one-to-many relation. However, there are no robust methods to establish a many-to-many network which can combine the direct and indirect associations between multiple SNPs and a serial of events (e.g. adverse reactions, metabolic patterns, prognostic factors etc.). In this paper, we present a novel deep learning model based on generative stochastic networks and hidden Markov chain to classify the observed samples with SNPs on five loci of two genes (CYP2D6 and CYP1A2) respectively to the vulnerable population of 14 types of adverse reactions. A supervised deep learning model is proposed in this study. The revised generative stochastic networks (GSN) model with transited by the hidden Markov chain is used. The data of the training set are collected from clinical observation. The training set is composed of 83 observations of blood samples with the genotypes respectively on CYP2D6*2, *10, *14 and CYP1A2*1C, *1 F. The samples are genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. A hidden Markov chain is used as the transition operator to simulate the probabilistic distribution. The model can perform learning at lower cost compared to the conventional maximal likelihood method because the transition distribution is conditional on the previous state of the hidden Markov

  9. Atmospheric reaction systems as null-models to identify structural traces of evolution in metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Petter; Huss, Mikael; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2011-05-06

    The metabolism is the motor behind the biological complexity of an organism. One problem of characterizing its large-scale structure is that it is hard to know what to compare it to. All chemical reaction systems are shaped by the same physics that gives molecules their stability and affinity to react. These fundamental factors cannot be captured by standard null-models based on randomization. The unique property of organismal metabolism is that it is controlled, to some extent, by an enzymatic machinery that is subject to evolution. In this paper, we explore the possibility that reaction systems of planetary atmospheres can serve as a null-model against which we can define metabolic structure and trace the influence of evolution. We find that the two types of data can be distinguished by their respective degree distributions. This is especially clear when looking at the degree distribution of the reaction network (of reaction connected to each other if they involve the same molecular species). For the Earth's atmospheric network and the human metabolic network, we look into more detail for an underlying explanation of this deviation. However, we cannot pinpoint a single cause of the difference, rather there are several concurrent factors. By examining quantities relating to the modular-functional organization of the metabolism, we confirm that metabolic networks have a more complex modular organization than the atmospheric networks, but not much more. We interpret the more variegated modular arrangement of metabolism as a trace of evolved functionality. On the other hand, it is quite remarkable how similar the structures of these two types of networks are, which emphasizes that the constraints from the chemical properties of the molecules has a larger influence in shaping the reaction system than does natural selection.

  10. Reaction-diffusion model of TGA gasification experiments for estimating diffusional effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Gomez-Barea; P. Ollero; R. Arjona [Escuela Superior de Ingenieros (University of Seville), Seville (Spain). Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    2005-09-01

    A 2D non-isothermal and non-equimolar reaction-diffusion model is developed in order to assess the diffusional effects that may take place during the CO{sub 2} gasification of a biomass char contained in the cylindrical crucible of a horizontal-arm thermogravimetric apparatus (TGA). The model takes into account the chemical reaction rate and the effective transport properties as a function of the local conversion and therefore as a function of time and position within the char bed. Intraparticle diffusion and structural changes of the char bed during the gasification are also included. The model results showed good agreement with the experimental ones obtained at different temperatures and CO{sub 2} partial pressures, and points out the relevant role of diffusional effects in TGA experiments. The effectiveness factor defined as the ratio of the measured to the intrinsic reaction rates at the same gas conditions strongly depends on temperature and CO{sub 2} partial pressure and may be as low as 0.2 at 950{sup o}C and 50% char conversion. The marked variation found for the effectiveness factor at different conversions suggests the necessity of a complementary analysis of the variation of the diffusional effects with conversion when TGA experiments for kinetic determination are carried out. 36 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. ezBioNet: A modeling and simulation system for analyzing biological reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Tung, Thai Quang; Park, Junho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2012-10-01

    To achieve robustness against living environments, a living organism is composed of complicated regulatory mechanisms ranging from gene regulations to signal transduction. If such life phenomena are to be understand, an integrated analysis tool that should have modeling and simulation functions for biological reactions, as well as new experimental methods for measuring biological phenomena, is fundamentally required. We have designed and implemented modeling and simulation software (ezBioNet) for analyzing biological reaction networks. The software can simultaneously perform an integrated modeling of various responses occurring in cells, ranging from gene expressions to signaling processes. To support massive analysis of biological networks, we have constructed a server-side simulation system (VCellSim) that can perform ordinary differential equations (ODE) analysis, sensitivity analysis, and parameter estimates. ezBioNet integrates the BioModel database by connecting the european bioinformatics institute (EBI) servers through Web services APIs and supports the handling of systems biology markup language (SBML) files. In addition, we employed eclipse RCP (rich client platform) which is a powerful modularity framework allowing various functional expansions. ezBioNet is intended to be an easy-to-use modeling tool, as well as a simulation system, to understand the control mechanism by monitoring the change of each component in a biological network. A researcher may perform the kinetic modeling and execute the simulation. The simulation result can be managed and visualized on ezBioNet, which is freely available at http://ezbionet.cbnu.ac.kr.

  12. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models

    CERN Document Server

    Spill, Fabian; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K; Byrne, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains ...

  13. Theoretical studies on thermal degradation reaction mechanism of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinbao; He, Chao; Li, Xinsheng; Pan, Guiying; Tong, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Density functional theory methods (DFT) M062X have been used to investigate the thermal degradation processes of model compound of bisphenol A polycarbonate (MPC) and to identify the optimal reaction paths in the thermal decomposition of bisphenol A polycarbonate (PC). The bond dissociation energies of main bonds in MPC were calculated, and it is found that the weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between the methylic carbon and carbon atom and the second weakest bond in MPC is the single bond between oxygen atom and the carbonyl carbon. On the basis of computational results of kinetic parameters, a mechanism is proposed where the hydrolysis (or alcoholysis) reaction is the main degradation pathways for the formation of the evolved products, and the homolytic cleavage and rearrangement reactions are the competitive reaction pathways in the thermal degradation of PC. The proposed mechanism is consistent with experimental observations of CO2, bisphenol A and 1,1-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-ethane as the main degradation products, together with a small amount of CO, alkyl phenol and diphenyl carbonate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling and Experimental Investigations of Mixing-Controlled Geochemical and Biological Reactions at the Pore Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valocchi, A. J.; Werth, C. J.; Yoon, H.; Tang, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the important role played by mixing-controlled reactions in porous media. For example, transverse mixing of nutrients along the fringes of a contaminant plume is often the limiting step that controls overall degradation rate during natural or engineered in situ bioremediation. Similar mixing processes can promote precipitation/dissolution reactions during geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. Field and laboratory investigations have demonstrated that the length scale of transverse mixing zones can be very small, often on the order of centimeters or less. To study dispersion, mixing and reaction at this scale, we use pore-scale numerical simulation models and micro-fluidics laboratory experiments. An overview of our methods and findings, including comparisons between direct numerical simulations and laboratory experiments will be presented. The presentation will emphasize recent results including: (a) coupling of precipitation/dissolution with porosity reduction under different geochemical conditions, and (b) impact of pore structure on biodegradation and biofilm growth patterns. Our work has improved understanding of coupled flow, transport and reaction processes; however, there remain significant challenges in extending the results to larger field scales.

  15. Grief reaction model of families who experienced acute bereavement in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, Junko; Yamase, Hiroaki; Yamase, Yoshie

    2012-06-01

    The present study clarified the structure of factors that affect grief reactions of families who experienced acute bereavement in critical care settings in Japan. Sixty-four families who experienced acute bereavement answered a questionnaire. The questionnaire included the Miyabayashi Grief Measurement, recognition of bereavement, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, and the Tri-Axial Coping Scale. We analyzed the causal structure regarding the relationship of stress recognition, coping, and grief reactions using structural equation modeling. The greatest influence on grief reactions of bereaved families was stress recognition. Factors that influenced stress recognition were subjective degree of sadness, acceptance of bereavement, regret for bereavement, and recognition of a peaceful death. These results show that the quality of end-of-life care in critical care settings is an important factor that affects bereaved families' stress recognition and grief reactions. Nurses and medical staff must provide end-of-life care to help family members accept the death of their loved one and reduce regrets as much as possible. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Catalytic Reactions on Model Gold Surfaces: Effect of Surface Steps and of Surface Doping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Natália D. S. Cordeiro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption energies and the activation energy barriers for a series of reactions catalyzed by gold surfaces and obtained theoretically through density functional theory (DFT based calculations were considered to clarify the role of the low coordinated gold atoms and the role of doping in the catalytic activity of gold. The effect of the surface steps was introduced by comparison of the activation energy barriers and of the adsorption energies on flat gold surfaces such as the Au(111 surface with those on stepped surfaces such as the Au(321 or the Au(110 surfaces. It is concluded that the presence of low coordinated atoms on the latter surfaces increases the adsorption energies of the reactants and decreases the activation energy barriers. Furthermore, the increasing of the adsorption energy of the reaction products can lead to lower overall reaction rates in the presence of low gold coordinated atoms due to desorption limitations. On the other hand, the effect of doping gold surfaces with other transition metal atoms was analyzed using the dissociation reaction of molecular oxygen as a test case. The calculations showed that increasing the silver content in some gold surfaces was related to a considerable increment of the reactivity of bimetallic systems toward the oxygen dissociation. Importantly, that increment in the reactivity was enhanced by the presence of low coordinated atoms in the catalytic surface models considered.

  17. Kinetic Modeling of the Reaction Rate for Quartz and Carbon Pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Tangstad, Merete

    2018-01-01

    Kinetic modeling of quartz and carbon pellet at temperatures of 1898 K, 1923 K, and 1948 K (1625 °C, 1650 °C, and 1675 °C) was investigated in this study. The carbon materials used were charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal. The overall SiC producing reaction can be described by the reaction SiO2 + 3C = SiC + 2CO. In the SiC-producing step, the reaction rate of quartz and carbon pellet can be expressed as {d{ pct}}/dt = ( {1 - 0.40 × X_{fix - C}^{ - 0.86} × FC × {pct}} ) × A × \\exp ( { - E/{{RT}}} ) The carbon factor F C was used to describe the influence of different carbon materials that effect the gas-solid interface reaction. For charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal, the F C values were 0.83, 0.80, 0.94, and 0.83, respectively. The pre-exponential factor A values for the preceding four carbon materials were 1.06 × 1016 min-1, 4.21 × 1015 min-1, 3.85 × 109 min-1, and 1.00 × 1025 min-1, respectively. The activation energies E for the SiC-producing step were 570, 563, 336, and 913 kJ/mole for charcoal, coke, coal, and preheated coal pellets, respectively.

  18. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    of the mixture was varied from oxidizing to reducing conditions. Moreover, a series of experiments in an oxygen atmosphere instead of a nitrogen atmosphere has been done. A reaction mechanism based on a recent work by Burke et al. has been developed. In addition to modeling of the present experiments......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  19. Atomic-Scale Modeling of Particle Size Effects for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction of Pt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tritsaris, Georgios; Greeley, Jeffrey Philip; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We estimate the activity of the oxygen reduction reaction on platinum nanoparticles of sizes of practical importance. The proposed model explicitly accounts for surface irregularities and their effect on the activity of neighboring sites. The model reproduces the experimentally observed trends...... in both the specific and mass activities for particle sizes in the range between 2 and 30 nm. The mass activity is calculated to be maximized for particles of a diameter between 2 and 4 nm. Our study demonstrates how an atomic-scale description of the surface microstructure is a key component...

  20. Modeling languages for biochemical network simulation: reaction vs equation based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechert, Wolfgang; Noack, Stephan; Elsheikh, Atya

    2010-01-01

    Biochemical network modeling and simulation is an essential task in any systems biology project. The systems biology markup language (SBML) was established as a standardized model exchange language for mechanistic models. A specific strength of SBML is that numerous tools for formulating, processing, simulation and analysis of models are freely available. Interestingly, in the field of multidisciplinary simulation, the problem of model exchange between different simulation tools occurred much earlier. Several general modeling languages like Modelica have been developed in the 1990s. Modelica enables an equation based modular specification of arbitrary hierarchical differential algebraic equation models. Moreover, libraries for special application domains can be rapidly developed. This contribution compares the reaction based approach of SBML with the equation based approach of Modelica and explains the specific strengths of both tools. Several biological examples illustrating essential SBML and Modelica concepts are given. The chosen criteria for tool comparison are flexibility for constraint specification, different modeling flavors, hierarchical, modular and multidisciplinary modeling. Additionally, support for spatially distributed systems, event handling and network analysis features is discussed. As a major result it is shown that the choice of the modeling tool has a strong impact on the expressivity of the specified models but also strongly depends on the requirements of the application context.

  1. Body-Fitted Detonation Shock Dynamics and the Pseudo-Reaction-Zone Energy Release Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Chad; Quirk, James; Short, Mark; Chqiuete, Carlos

    2016-11-01

    Programmed-burn methods are a class of models used to propagate a detonation wave, without the high resolution cost associated with a direct numerical simulation. They separate the detonation evolution calculation into two components: timing and energy release. The timing component is usually calculated with a Detonation Shock Dynamics model, a surface evolution representation that relates the normal velocity of the surface (Dn) to its local curvature. The energy release component must appropriately capture the degree of energy change associated with chemical reaction while simultaneously remaining synchronized with the timing component. The Pseudo-Reaction-Zone (PRZ) model is a reactive burn like energy release model, converting reactants into products, but with a conversion rate that is a function of the DSD surface Dn field. As such, it requires the DSD calculation produce smooth Dn fields, a challenge in complex geometries. We describe a new body-fitted approach to the Detonation Shock Dynamics calculation which produces the required smooth Dn fields, and a method for calibrating the PRZ model such that the rate of energy release remains as synced as possible with the timing component. We show results for slab, rate-stick and arc geometries.

  2. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of vanadium with melamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Liu, Zuohua; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-05-01

    Melamine, possessing three free amino groups and three aromatic nitrogen atoms in its molecule, has great potential as an adsorbent for metal ions. We investigated three impact factors of the adsorption process: the initial pH of the vanadium solution, contact time and reaction temperature. The adsorption kinetics could be accurately described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Langmuir and Freundlich models fitted well with the experimental equilibrium data, and the maximal adsorption capacity was found to be 1,428.57 mg vanadium/g melamine, and the Freundlich model showed the adsorption is privilege type.

  3. Reactions of exotic nuclei with the quark-meson coupling model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, E.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.; Thomas, A. W.

    2017-11-01

    The nucleon-nucleon interaction is an important requirement for investigations of nuclear structure and reactions, as well as for astrophysical models such as r-process nucleosynthesis and neutron stars. The traditional approach to low-energy nuclear physics is to treat nucleons as immutable objects interacting via phenomenological forces. The use of phenomenological interactions, rather than one derived from a microscopic theory, raises questions as to the reliability of predictions for exotic regions of the nuclear chart. The quark-meson coupling (QMC) model uses a relativistic mean-field approach to provide a microscopically derived nucleon-nucleon interaction, which takes into account the quark structure of the nucleon. The Skyrme energy density functional is a popular phenomenological tool in studies of nuclear structure and reactions. In this work, the QMC density functional was used to produce a set of Skyrme parameterisations, in the hopes that they will give more reliable predictions for exotic nuclei. In conjunction with Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations, the Skyrme-QMC (SQMC) parameterisations have been used to model the ground-state properties of individual nuclei and nucleus-nucleus potentials for Ca + Sn reactions. The SQMC parameterisation performs with an accuracy comparable to modern phenomenological functionals. From this, one can investigate the importance of the isovector terms of the nucleon-nucleon interaction, which are particularly significant for exotic, neutron-rich regions of the nuclear chart. One of the notable successes of the QMC model is its derivation of nuclear spin-orbit coupling. The isovector dependence of the spin-orbit equation of state is remarkably similar to that of the modern UNEDF1 phenomenological density functional. HFB calculations along the Sn isotopic chain reveal that the isovector properties of the spin-orbit term impact binding energies to a level that will be significant for astrophysical r

  4. A reaction-diffusion model of ROS-induced ROS release in a mitochondrial network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lufang Zhou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of mitochondrial function is a fundamental determinant of cell injury and death. In heart cells under metabolic stress, we have previously described how the abrupt collapse or oscillation of the mitochondrial energy state is synchronized across the mitochondrial network by local interactions dependent upon reactive oxygen species (ROS. Here, we develop a mathematical model of ROS-induced ROS release (RIRR based on reaction-diffusion (RD-RIRR in one- and two-dimensional mitochondrial networks. The nodes of the RD-RIRR network are comprised of models of individual mitochondria that include a mechanism of ROS-dependent oscillation based on the interplay between ROS production, transport, and scavenging; and incorporating the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and Ca(2+ handling. Local mitochondrial interaction is mediated by superoxide (O2.- diffusion and the O2.(--dependent activation of an inner membrane anion channel (IMAC. In a 2D network composed of 500 mitochondria, model simulations reveal DeltaPsi(m depolarization waves similar to those observed when isolated guinea pig cardiomyocytes are subjected to a localized laser-flash or antioxidant depletion. The sensitivity of the propagation rate of the depolarization wave to O(2.- diffusion, production, and scavenging in the reaction-diffusion model is similar to that observed experimentally. In addition, we present novel experimental evidence, obtained in permeabilized cardiomyocytes, confirming that DeltaPsi(m depolarization is mediated specifically by O2.-. The present work demonstrates that the observed emergent macroscopic properties of the mitochondrial network can be reproduced in a reaction-diffusion model of RIRR. Moreover, the findings have uncovered a novel aspect of the synchronization mechanism, which is that clusters of mitochondria that are oscillating can entrain mitochondria that would otherwise display stable dynamics. The work identifies the

  5. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  6. Multivesicular droplets: a cell model system to study compartmentalised biochemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuti, N; Verboket, P E; Dittrich, P S

    2017-09-12

    Multivesicular vesicles (MVVs) are artificial liposomal structures widely used as a platform to study the compartmentalisation of cells and as a scaffold for artificial cell/protocell models. Current preparation techniques for MVVs, however, offer poor control on the size, lamellarity, and loading of inner lipid vesicles. Here, we introduce a microfluidic device for the production of multivesicular droplets (MVDs): a novel model system combining the ease of use and control of droplet microfluidics with the biological relevance of MVVs. We use a perfluorinated carrier phase with a biocompatible surfactant to generate monodisperse droplets of an aqueous giant unilamellar lipid vesicle suspension. The successful on-chip formation and stability of MVDs is verified through high-speed microscopy. For bright field or fluorescence microscopy inspection, the MVDs are trapped in an array where the integrity of both lipid vesicles and droplets is preserved for up to 15 minutes. Finally, we show a two-step enzymatic reaction that takes place across the lipid vesicle membranes; the second reaction step occurs in the vesicle's interior, where the enzyme is encapsulated, while both the substrate and fluorescent product permeate across the membrane. Our approach opens the possibility to mimic artificial organelles with optimised reaction parameters (pH, ions, etc.) in each compartment.

  7. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: geochemical modeling and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  8. Retrograde reactions in coal processing: The behavior of ether and sulfide model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Skeen, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1997-04-01

    Retrograde reactions that produce more refractory molecular structures are undesirable in coal liquefaction. The authors previously found that restricted mass transport, induced by immobilization on a silica support, promotes retrograde reactions for 1,2-diphenylethane (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) by both skeletal rearrangement and ring growth (cyclization-dehydrogenation) pathways involving free-radical intermediates. They are now examining the influence of heteroatoms on the retrograde pathways for the corresponding surface-immobilized ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) and sulfide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}SCH{sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 5}) model compounds at 275--350 C. Cyclization-dehydrogenation pathways are not detected for either model compound. However, retrograde skeletal rearrangements involving 1,2-phenyl shifts in C{sub 6}H{sub 5}XCH{center_dot}C{sub 6}H{sub 5} (X = O,S) are found to be significant under restricted diffusion, and for X = O, radical coupling at ring carbons to form benzylphenols is also observed as a major pathway. For surface-immobilized benzyl phenyl ether, the two retrograde processes account for ca. 50% of the thermolysis products, and also generate reactive hydroxyl and keto functionalities that can be involved in additional retrograde reactions.

  9. Thermodynamic properties and adsorption behaviour of hydrogel nanocomposites for cadmium removal from mine effluents

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fosso-Kankeu, E

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available followed the pseudo-second-order rate equation, whereas, the adsorption isotherm followed both the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm models. The thermodynamics studies revealed that the adsorption processes were spontaneous and endothermic in nature...

  10. Microbial respiration and dissolution precipitation reactions of minerals: thermo-kinetics and reactive transport modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azaroual, M. M.; Parmentier, M.; Andre, L.; Croiset, N.; Pettenati, M.; Kremer, S.

    2010-12-01

    Microbial processes interact closely with abiotic geochemical reactions and mineralogical transformations in several hydrogeochemical systems. Reactive transport models are aimed to analyze these complex mechanisms integrating as well as the degradation of organic matter as the redox reactions involving successive terminal electron acceptors (TEAPs) mediated by microbes through the continuum of unsaturated zone (soil) - saturated zone (aquifer). The involvement of microbial processes in reactive transport in soil and subsurface geologic greatly complicates the mastery of the major mechanisms and the numerical modelling of these systems. The introduction of kinetic constraints of redox reactions in aqueous phase requires the decoupling of equilibrium reactions and the redefinition of mass balance of chemical elements including the concept of basis species and secondary species of thermodynamic databases used in geochemical modelling tools. An integrated methodology for modelling the reactive transport has been developed and implemented to simulate the transfer of arsenic, denitrification processes and the role of metastable aqueous sulfur species with pyrite and organic matter as electron donors entities. A mechanistic rate law of microbial respiration in various geochemical environments was used to simulate reactive transport of arsenic, nitrate and organic matter combined to the generalized rate law of mineral dissolution - precipitation reactions derived from the transition state theory was used for dissolution - precipitation of silica, aluminosilicate, carbonate, oxyhydroxide, and sulphide minerals. The kinetic parameters are compiled from the literature measurements based on laboratory constrained experiments and field observations. Numerical simulations, using the geochemical software PHREEQC, were performed aiming to identify the key reactions mediated by microbes in the framework of in the first hand the concept of the unsaturated - saturated zones of an

  11. Electrocatalysis of hydrogen peroxide reactions on perovskite oxides: experiment versus kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poux, T; Bonnefont, A; Ryabova, A; Kéranguéven, G; Tsirlina, G A; Savinova, E R

    2014-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as a stable intermediate of the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction on various electrodes including metal, metal oxide and carbon materials. In this article we study the hydrogen peroxide oxidation and reduction reactions in alkaline medium using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) method on oxides of the perovskite family (LaCoO3, LaMnO3 and La0.8Sr0.2MnO3) which are considered as promising electrocatalytic materials for the cathode of liquid and solid alkaline fuel cells. The experimental findings, such as the higher activity of Mn-compared to that of Co-perovskites, the shape of RDE curves, and the influence of the H2O2 concentration, are rationalized with the help of a microkinetic model.

  12. Reaction pathways of model compounds of biomass-derived oxygenates on Fe/Ni bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Weiting; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2015-10-01

    Controlling the activity and selectivity of converting biomass-derivatives to fuels and valuable chemicals is critical for the utilization of biomass feedstocks. There are primarily three classes of non-food competing biomass, cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. In the current work, glycolaldehyde, furfural and acetaldehyde are studied as model compounds of the three classes of biomass-derivatives. Monometallic Ni(111) and monolayer (ML) Fe/Ni(111) bimetallic surfaces are studied for the reaction pathways of the three biomass surrogates. The ML Fe/Ni(111) surface is identified as an efficient surface for the conversion of biomass-derivatives from the combined results of density functional theory (DFT) calculations and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments. A correlation is also established between the optimized adsorption geometry and experimental reaction pathways. These results should provide helpful insights in catalyst design for the upgrading and conversion of biomass.

  13. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations of {sup 3}He-induced nuclear reactions on zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abyad, M.; Mohamed, Gehan Y. [Nuclear Research Centre, Atomic Energy Authority, Physics Department (Cyclotron Facility), Cairo (Egypt); Ditroi, F.; Takacs, S.; Tarkanyi, F. [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), Institute for Nuclear Research, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2017-05-15

    Excitation functions of {sup 3}He-induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc were measured using the standard stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. From their threshold energies up to 27 MeV, the cross-sections for {sup nat}Zn ({sup 3}He,xn) {sup 69}Ge, {sup nat}Zn({sup 3}He,xnp) {sup 66,67,68}Ga, and {sup nat}Zn({sup 3}He,x){sup 62,65}Zn reactions were measured. The nuclear model codes TALYS-1.6, EMPIRE-3.2 and ALICE-IPPE were used to describe the formation of these products. The present data were compared with the theoretical results and with the available experimental data. Integral yields for some important radioisotopes were determined. (orig.)

  14. Experimental study and nuclear model calculations of 3He-induced nuclear reactions on zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abyad, M.; Mohamed, Gehan Y.; Ditrói, F.; Takács, S.; Tárkányi, F.

    2017-05-01

    Excitation functions of 3He -induced nuclear reactions on natural zinc were measured using the standard stacked-foil technique and high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. From their threshold energies up to 27MeV, the cross-sections for natZn (3He, xn) 69Ge, natZn(3He, xnp) 66,67,68Ga, and natZn(3He, x)62,65Zn reactions were measured. The nuclear model codes TALYS-1.6, EMPIRE-3.2 and ALICE-IPPE were used to describe the formation of these products. The present data were compared with the theoretical results and with the available experimental data. Integral yields for some important radioisotopes were determined.

  15. Modeling-gas phase reactions in indoor environments using computational fluid dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dan Nørtoft; Weschler, Charles J.

    2002-01-01

    This CFD modeling study examines the concentrations of two gaseous compounds that react in an indoor setting to produce a hypothetical product. The reactants are ozone and either d-limonene or alpha-terpinene (which reacts with ozone about 40 times faster than d-limonene). In addition to two...... surfaces while the terpenes do not. The results show that for all four scenarios, under steady-state conditions, there are large concentration gradients within the room for both reactants and product. To some extent this is due to imperfect mixing. However. it also reflects that reactions occur...... at different rates across the room (because of varying reactant concentrations) and that the time available for reactions to occur varies with the room location (because the "age of the air" varies from point to point). Locally, within the room, the concentrations calculated by the CFID method differ...

  16. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformation through different reaction pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic......The degradation of organic micropollutants occurs via different reaction pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. We propose a mechanism-based modeling approach that provides a quantitative framework...... description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. To demonstrate specific features of the modeling approach, we simulated the degradation of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model accurately reproduces...

  17. A reaction-diffusion model for market fluctuations - A relation between price change and traded volumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuvan, Steven; Bier, Martin

    2018-02-01

    Two decades ago Bak et al. (1997) [3] proposed a reaction-diffusion model to describe market fluctuations. In the model buyers and sellers diffuse from opposite ends of a 1D interval that represents a price range. Trades occur when buyers and sellers meet. We show analytically and numerically that the model well reproduces the square-root relation between traded volumes and price changes that is observed in real-life markets. The result is remarkable as this relation has commonly been explained in terms of more elaborate trader strategies. We furthermore explain why the square-root relation is robust under model modifications and we show how real-life bond market data exhibit the square-root relation.

  18. Acid-base chemical reaction model for nucleation rates in the polluted atmospheric boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Modi; Titcombe, Mari; Jiang, Jingkun; Jen, Coty; Kuang, Chongai; Fischer, Marc L; Eisele, Fred L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Hanson, David R; Zhao, Jun; McMurry, Peter H

    2012-11-13

    Climate models show that particles formed by nucleation can affect cloud cover and, therefore, the earth's radiation budget. Measurements worldwide show that nucleation rates in the atmospheric boundary layer are positively correlated with concentrations of sulfuric acid vapor. However, current nucleation theories do not correctly predict either the observed nucleation rates or their functional dependence on sulfuric acid concentrations. This paper develops an alternative approach for modeling nucleation rates, based on a sequence of acid-base reactions. The model uses empirical estimates of sulfuric acid evaporation rates obtained from new measurements of neutral molecular clusters. The model predicts that nucleation rates equal the sulfuric acid vapor collision rate times a prefactor that is less than unity and that depends on the concentrations of basic gaseous compounds and preexisting particles. Predicted nucleation rates and their dependence on sulfuric acid vapor concentrations are in reasonable agreement with measurements from Mexico City and Atlanta.

  19. Simulation and Statistical Inference of Stochastic Reaction Networks with Applications to Epidemic Models

    KAUST Repository

    Moraes, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    Epidemics have shaped, sometimes more than wars and natural disasters, demo- graphic aspects of human populations around the world, their health habits and their economies. Ebola and the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) are clear and current examples of potential hazards at planetary scale. During the spread of an epidemic disease, there are phenomena, like the sudden extinction of the epidemic, that can not be captured by deterministic models. As a consequence, stochastic models have been proposed during the last decades. A typical forward problem in the stochastic setting could be the approximation of the expected number of infected individuals found in one month from now. On the other hand, a typical inverse problem could be, given a discretely observed set of epidemiological data, infer the transmission rate of the epidemic or its basic reproduction number. Markovian epidemic models are stochastic models belonging to a wide class of pure jump processes known as Stochastic Reaction Networks (SRNs), that are intended to describe the time evolution of interacting particle systems where one particle interacts with the others through a finite set of reaction channels. SRNs have been mainly developed to model biochemical reactions but they also have applications in neural networks, virus kinetics, and dynamics of social networks, among others. 4 This PhD thesis is focused on novel fast simulation algorithms and statistical inference methods for SRNs. Our novel Multi-level Monte Carlo (MLMC) hybrid simulation algorithms provide accurate estimates of expected values of a given observable of SRNs at a prescribed final time. They are designed to control the global approximation error up to a user-selected accuracy and up to a certain confidence level, and with near optimal computational work. We also present novel dual-weighted residual expansions for fast estimation of weak and strong errors arising from the MLMC methodology. Regarding the statistical inference

  20. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, Kenneth M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, Kirk J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McGrail, B. Peter [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ΔfG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than

  1. Modelling the effect of temperature on the range expansion of species by reaction-diffusion equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Otto; Moenickes, Sylvia; Suhling, Frank

    2012-02-01

    The spatial dynamics of range expansion is studied in dependence of temperature. The main elements population dynamics, competition and dispersal are combined in a coherent approach based on a system of coupled partial differential equations of the reaction-diffusion type. The nonlinear reaction terms comprise population dynamic models with temperature dependent reproduction rates subject to an Allee effect and mutual competition. The effect of temperature on travelling wave solutions is investigated for a one dimensional model version. One main result is the importance of the Allee effect for the crossing of regions with unsuitable habitats. The nonlinearities of the interaction terms give rise to a richness of spatio-temporal dynamic patterns. In two dimensions, the resulting non-linear initial boundary value problems are solved over geometries of heterogeneous landscapes. Geo referenced model parameters such as mean temperature and elevation are imported into the finite element tool COMSOL Multiphysics from a geographical information system. The model is applied to the range expansion of species at the scale of middle Europe. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Impact of organic-mineral matter interactions on thermal reaction pathways for coal model compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Struss, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1995-07-01

    Coal is a complex, heterogeneous solid that includes interdispersed mineral matter. However, knowledge of organic-mineral matter interactions is embryonic, and the impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction is incomplete. Clay minerals, for example, are known to be effective catalysts for organic reactions. Furthermore, clays such as montmorillonite have been proposed to be key catalysts in the thermal alteration of lignin into vitrinite during the coalification process. Recent studies by Hatcher and coworkers on the evolution of coalified woods using microscopy and NMR have led them to propose selective, acid-catalyzed, solid state reaction chemistry to account for retained structural integrity in the wood. However, the chemical feasibility of such reactions in relevant solids is difficult to demonstrate. The authors have begun a model compound study to gain a better molecular level understanding of the effects in the solid state of organic-mineral matter interactions relevant to both coal formation and processing. To satisfy the need for model compounds that remain nonvolatile solids at temperatures ranging to 450 C, model compounds are employed that are chemically bound to the surface of a fumed silica (Si-O-C{sub aryl}linkage). The organic structures currently under investigation are phenethyl phenyl ether (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OC{sub 6}H{sub 5}) derivatives, which serve as models for {beta}-alkyl aryl ether units that are present in lignin and lignitic coals. The solid-state chemistry of these materials at 200--450 C in the presence of interdispersed acid catalysts such as small particle size silica-aluminas and montmorillonite clay will be reported. Initial focus will be on defining the potential impact of these interactions on coal pyrolysis and liquefaction.

  3. Reaction modeling of drainage quality in the Duluth Complex, northern Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Robert; Lapakko, Kim; Piatak, Nadine; Woodruff, Laurel G.

    2015-01-01

    Reaction modeling can be a valuable tool in predicting the long-term behavior of waste material if representative rate constants can be derived from long-term leaching tests or other approaches. Reaction modeling using the REACT program of the Geochemist’s Workbench was conducted to evaluate long-term drainage quality affected by disseminated Cu-Ni-(Co-)-PGM sulfide mineralization in the basal zone of the Duluth Complex where significant resources have been identified. Disseminated sulfide minerals, mostly pyrrhotite and Cu-Fe sulfides, are hosted by clinopyroxene-bearing troctolites. Carbonate minerals are scarce to non-existent. Long-term simulations of up to 20 years of weathering of tailings used two different sets of rate constants: one based on published laboratory single-mineral dissolution experiments, and one based on leaching experiments using bulk material from the Duluth Complex conducted by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (MNDNR). The simulations included only plagioclase, olivine, clinopyroxene, pyrrhotite, and water as starting phases. Dissolved oxygen concentrations were assumed to be in equilibrium with atmospheric oxygen. The simulations based on the published single-mineral rate constants predicted that pyrrhotite would be effectively exhausted in less than two years and pH would rise accordingly. In contrast, only 20 percent of the pyrrhotite was depleted after two years using the MNDNR rate constants. Predicted pyrrhotite depletion by the simulation based on the MNDNR rate constant matched well with published results of laboratory tests on tailings. Modeling long-term weathering of mine wastes also can provide important insights into secondary reactions that may influence the permeability of tailings and thereby affect weathering behavior. Both models predicted the precipitation of a variety of secondary phases including goethite, gibbsite, and clay (nontronite).

  4. Reaction mechanism of sterol hydroxylation by steroid C25 dehydrogenase - Homology model, reactivity and isoenzymatic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugor, Agnieszka; Wójcik-Augustyn, Anna; Niedzialkowska, Ewa; Mordalski, Stefan; Staroń, Jakub; Bojarski, Andrzej; Szaleniec, Maciej

    2017-08-01

    Steroid C25 dehydrogenase (S25DH) is a molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase isolated from the anaerobic Sterolibacterium denitrificans Chol-1S. S25DH is classified as 'EBDH-like' enzyme (EBDH, ethylbenzene dehydrogenase) and catalyzes the introduction of an OH group to the C25 atom of a sterol aliphatic side-chain. Due to its regioselectivity, S25DH is proposed as a catalyst in production of pharmaceuticals: calcifediol or 25-hydroxycholesterol. The aim of presented research was to obtain structural model of catalytic subunit α and investigate the reaction mechanism of the O2-independent tertiary carbon atom activation. Based on homology modeling and theoretical calculations, a S25DH α subunit model was for the first time characterized and compared to other S25DH-like isoforms. The molecular dynamics simulations of the enzyme-substrate complexes revealed two stable binding modes of a substrate, which are stabilized predominantly by van der Waals forces in the hydrophobic substrate channel. However, H-bond interactions involving polar residues with C3=O/C3-OH in the steroid ring appear to be responsible for positioning the substrate. These results may explain the experimental kinetic results which showed that 3-ketosterols are hydroxylated 5-10-fold faster than 3-hydroxysterols. The reaction mechanism was studied using QM:MM and QM-only cluster models. The postulated mechanism involves homolytic CH cleavage by the MoO ligand, giving rise to a radical intermediate with product obtained in an OH rebound process. The hypothesis was supported by kinetic isotopic effect (KIE) experiments involving 25,26,26,26-[2H]-cholesterol (4.5) and the theoretically predicted intrinsic KIE (7.0-7.2). Finally, we have demonstrated that the recombinant S25DH-like isoform catalyzes the same reaction as S25DH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, E.; Ronan, G.; Chinitz, W.

    1982-01-01

    A principal element to be derived from modeling turbulent reacting flows is an expression for the reaction rates of the various species involved in any particular combustion process under consideration. A temperature-derived most-likely probability density function (pdf) was used to describe the effects of temperature fluctuations on the Arrhenius reaction rate constant. A most-likely bivariate pdf described the effects of temperature and species concentrations fluctuations on the reaction rate. A criterion is developed for the use of an "appropriate" temperature pdf. The formulation of models to calculate the mean turbulent Arrhenius reaction rate constant and the mean turbulent reaction rate is considered and the results of calculations using these models are presented.

  6. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spill, Fabian; Guerrero, Pilar; Alarcon, Tomas; Maini, Philip K.; Byrne, Helen

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  7. Hybrid approaches for multiple-species stochastic reaction-diffusion models.

    KAUST Repository

    Spill, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion models are used to describe systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, ecology and biology. The fundamental quantities in such models are individual entities such as atoms and molecules, bacteria, cells or animals, which move and/or react in a stochastic manner. If the number of entities is large, accounting for each individual is inefficient, and often partial differential equation (PDE) models are used in which the stochastic behaviour of individuals is replaced by a description of the averaged, or mean behaviour of the system. In some situations the number of individuals is large in certain regions and small in others. In such cases, a stochastic model may be inefficient in one region, and a PDE model inaccurate in another. To overcome this problem, we develop a scheme which couples a stochastic reaction-diffusion system in one part of the domain with its mean field analogue, i.e. a discretised PDE model, in the other part of the domain. The interface in between the two domains occupies exactly one lattice site and is chosen such that the mean field description is still accurate there. In this way errors due to the flux between the domains are small. Our scheme can account for multiple dynamic interfaces separating multiple stochastic and deterministic domains, and the coupling between the domains conserves the total number of particles. The method preserves stochastic features such as extinction not observable in the mean field description, and is significantly faster to simulate on a computer than the pure stochastic model.

  8. Charge-dependent non-bonded interaction methods for use in quantum mechanical modeling of condensed phase reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuechler, Erich R.

    Molecular modeling and computer simulation techniques can provide detailed insight into biochemical phenomena. This dissertation describes the development, implementation and parameterization of two methods for the accurate modeling of chemical reactions in aqueous environments, with a concerted scientific effort towards the inclusion of charge-dependent non-bonded non-electrostatic interactions into currently used computational frameworks. The first of these models, QXD, modifies interactions in a hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular (QM/MM) mechanical framework to overcome the current limitations of 'atom typing' QM atoms; an inaccurate and non-intuitive practice for chemically active species as these static atom types are dictated by the local bonding and electrostatic environment of the atoms they represent, which will change over the course of the simulation. The efficacy QXD model is demonstrated using a specific reaction parameterization (SRP) of the Austin Model 1 (AM1) Hamiltonian by simultaneously capturing the reaction barrier for chloride ion attack on methylchloride in solution and the solvation free energies of a series of compounds including the reagents of the reaction. The second, VRSCOSMO, is an implicit solvation model for use with the DFTB3/3OB Hamiltonian for biochemical reactions; allowing for accurate modeling of ionic compound solvation properties while overcoming the discontinuous nature of conventional PCM models when chemical reaction coordinates. The VRSCOSMO model is shown to accurately model the solvation properties of over 200 chemical compounds while also providing smooth, continuous reaction surfaces for a series of biologically motivated phosphoryl transesterification reactions. Both of these methods incorporate charge-dependent behavior into the non-bonded interactions variationally, allowing the 'size' of atoms to change in meaningful ways with respect to changes in local charge state, as to provide an accurate, predictive and

  9. Methionine and Choline Deficient (MCD) Model in Predicting Adverse Drug Reactions in Human NASH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Toth, Erica; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2017-11-14

    In the past few decades, great conceptual and technological advances have been made in the field of toxicology, but animal model-based research still remains one of the most widely-used and readily available tools for furthering our current knowledge. However, animal models are not perfect in predicting all systemic toxicity in humans. Extrapolating animal data to accurately predict human toxicities remains a challenge, and researchers are obligated to question the appropriateness of their chosen animal model. This paper provides an assessment of the utility of the methionine choline deficient (MCD) diet fed animal model in reflecting human nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and the potential risks of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) and toxicities that are associated with the disease. As a commonly used NASH model, the MCD model fails to exhibit most metabolic abnormalities in a similar manner to the human disease. The MCD model, on the other hand, closely resembles human NASH histology, and reflects signatures of drug transporter alterations in humans. Due to the nature of the MCD model, it should be avoided in studies of NASH pathogenesis, metabolic parameter evaluation and biomarker identification. but it can be used to accurately predict altered drug disposition due to NASH-associated transporter alterations. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Neural networks for modelling of chemical reaction systems with complex kinetics: oxidation of 2-octanol with nitric acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molga, E.J.; van Woezik, B.A.A.; Westerterp, K.R.

    2000-01-01

    Application of neural networks to model the conversion rates of a heterogeneous oxidation reaction has been investigated — oxidation of 2-octanol with nitric acid has been considered as a case study. Due to a more complex and unknown kinetics of the investigated reaction the proposed approach based

  11. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, W.

    1986-01-01

    A computationally-viable model describing the interaction between fluid-mechanical turbulence and finite-rate combustion reactions, principally in high-speed flows was developed. Chemical kinetic mechanisms, complete and global, were developed describing the finite rate reaction of fuels of interest to NASA. These fuels included principally hydrogen and silane, although a limited amount of work involved hydrocarbon fuels as well.

  12. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  13. Modeling porous scaffold microstructure by a reaction-diffusion system and its degradation by hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón-Alvarado, Diego A; Velasco, Marco A; Narváez-Tovar, Carlos A

    2012-02-01

    One of the most important areas of Tissue Engineering is the research about bone regeneration and the replacement of its function. To meet this requirement, scaffolds have been developed to allow the cell migration, the growth of bone tissue, the transport of growth factors and nutrients and the renovation of the mechanical properties of bone. Scaffolds are made of different biomaterials and manufactured using various techniques that, in some cases, do not allow full control over the size and orientation of the pores that characterize the scaffold microstructure. From this perspective, we propose a novel hypothesis that a reaction-diffusion system can be used to design the geometrical specifications of the bone matrix. The validation of this hypothesis is performed by simulations of the reaction-diffusion system in a representative tridimensional unit cell, coupled with a model of scaffold degradation by hydrolysis. The results show the possibility that a Reaction-Diffusion system can control features such as the percentage of porosity, trabecular size, orientation, and interconnectivity of pores. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evolution of the Maillard Reaction in Glutamine or Arginine-Dextrinomaltose Model Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pastoriza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteral formulas are foods designed for medical uses to feed patients who are unable to eat normally. They are prepared by mixing proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates and fats and submitted to sterilization. During thermal treatment, the Maillard reaction takes place through the reaction of animo acids with reducing sugars. Thus, although glutamine and arginine are usually added to improve the nutritional value of enteral formulas, their final concentration may vary. Thus, in the present paper the early, intermediate, and advanced states of the Maillard reaction were studied in model systems by measuring loss of free amino acids through the decrease of fluorescence intensity with o-phtaldialdehyde (OPA, 5-Hydroximethylfurfural (HMF, furfural, glucosylisomaltol, fluorescence, and absorbance at 420 nm. The systems were prepared by mixing glutamine or arginine with dextrinomaltose (similar ingredients to those used in special enteral formula, and heated at 100 °C, 120 °C and 140 °C for 0 to 30 min. The recorded changes in the concentration of furanic compounds was only useful for longer heating times of high temperatures, while absorbance and fluorescence measurements were useful in all the assayed conditions. In addition, easiness and sensitivity of absorbance and fluorescence make them useful techniques that could be implemented as indicators for monitoring the manufacture of special enteral formulas. Glucosylisomaltol is a useful indicator to monitor the manufacture of glutamine-enriched enteral formulas.

  15. Convective instability and boundary driven oscillations in a reaction-diffusion-advection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Henriquez, Estefania; Zykov, Vladimir; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Gholami, Azam

    2017-10-01

    In a reaction-diffusion-advection system, with a convectively unstable regime, a perturbation creates a wave train that is advected downstream and eventually leaves the system. We show that the convective instability coexists with a local absolute instability when a fixed boundary condition upstream is imposed. This boundary induced instability acts as a continuous wave source, creating a local periodic excitation near the boundary, which initiates waves travelling both up and downstream. To confirm this, we performed analytical analysis and numerical simulations of a modified Martiel-Goldbeter reaction-diffusion model with the addition of an advection term. We provide a quantitative description of the wave packet appearing in the convectively unstable regime, which we found to be in excellent agreement with the numerical simulations. We characterize this new instability and show that in the limit of high advection speed, it is suppressed. This type of instability can be expected for reaction-diffusion systems that present both a convective instability and an excitable regime. In particular, it can be relevant to understand the signaling mechanism of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum that may experience fluid flows in its natural habitat.

  16. Use of model peptide reactions for the characterization of kinetically controlled ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joongoo; Kwon, Yoonjin; Pentelute, Brad L; Bang, Duhee

    2011-08-17

    Since the introduction of kinetically controlled ligation (KCL), a chemoselective reaction between a peptide-(α)thioarylester and a Cys-peptide-(α)thioalkylester, KCL has been utilized for the total chemical synthesis of large proteins (i.e., lysozyme and HIV-protease) by providing fully convergent synthetic routes. Although KCL has the potential to become an important chemistry for protein synthesis, the principle of KCL is not fully characterized. In particular, prior work on KCL has focused on the reactivity difference of the two different -(α)thioester forms-alkyl vs aryl. Another equally important feature of KCL, Xaa-Cys ligation sites, has not been investigated. The work reported here describes combinatorial KCL reactions using model peptides to dissect the interplay of the Xaa(1), Xaa(2), -(α)thioarylester, and -(α)thioalkylester. Results from these studies provide fundamental insights into the KCL reaction, and will lead to the optimal synthetic route for the routine chemical synthesis of large target protein molecules.

  17. Kinetic modelling of hydro-treatment reactions by study of different chemical groups; Modelisation cinetique des reactions d`hydrotraitement par regroupement en familles chimiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnardot, J.

    1998-11-19

    Hydro-treatment of petroleum shortcuts permits elimination of unwanted components in order to increase combustion in engine and to decrease atmospheric pollution. Hydro-desulfurization (HDS), Hydro-denitrogenation (HDN) and Hydrogenation of aromatics (HDA) of a LCO (Light Cycle Oil)-Type gas oil have been studied using a new pilot at a fixed temperature with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst. A hydrodynamic study showed that reactions occurring in the up-flow fixed bed reactor that has been used during the experiments, were governed exclusively by chemical reaction rates and not by diffusion. Through detailed chemical analysis, height chemical groups have been considered: three aromatics groups, one sulfided group, one nitrogenized and NH{sub 3}, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}. Two Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type kinetic models with either one or two types of sites have been established. The model with two types of site - one site of hydrogenation and one site of hydrogenolysis - showed a better fit in the modeling of the experimental results. This model enables to forecast the influence of partial pressure of H{sub 2}S and partial pressure of H{sub 2} on hydro-treatment reactions of a LCO-type gas oil. (author) 119 refs.

  18. Prediction of bakery products nutritive value based on mathematical modeling of biochemical reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Ponomareva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Researches are devoted to identifying changes in the chemical composition of whole-grain wheat bread during baking and to forecasting of food value of bakery products by mathematical modeling of biochemical transformations. The received model represents the invariant composition, considering speed of biochemical reactions at a batch of bakery products, and allowing conduct virtual experiments to develop new types of bread for various categories of the population, including athletes. The offered way of modeling of biochemical transformations at a stage of heat treatment allows to predict food value of bakery products, without spending funds for raw materials and large volume of experiment that will provide possibility of economy of material resources at a stage of development of new types of bakery products and possibility of production efficiency increase.

  19. STEPS: modeling and simulating complex reaction-diffusion systems with Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Wils

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe how the use of the Python language improved the user interface of the program STEPS. STEPS is a simulation platform for modeling and stochastic simulation of coupled reaction-diffusion systems with complex 3-dimensional boundary conditions. Setting up such models is a complicated process that consists of many phases. Initial versions of STEPS relied on a static input format that did not cleanly separate these phases, limiting modelers in how they could control the simulation and becoming increasingly complex as new features and new simulation algorithms were added. We solved all of these problems by tightly integrating STEPS with Python, using SWIG to expose our existing simulation code.

  20. A Non-Isothermal Chemical Lattice Boltzmann Model Incorporating Thermal Reaction Kinetics and Enthalpy Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Bartlett

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The lattice Boltzmann method is an efficient computational fluid dynamics technique that can accurately model a broad range of complex systems. As well as single-phase fluids, it can simulate thermohydrodynamic systems and passive scalar advection. In recent years, it also gained attention as a means of simulating chemical phenomena, as interest in self-organization processes increased. This paper will present a widely-used and versatile lattice Boltzmann model that can simultaneously incorporate fluid dynamics, heat transfer, buoyancy-driven convection, passive scalar advection, chemical reactions and enthalpy changes. All of these effects interact in a physically accurate framework that is simple to code and readily parallelizable. As well as a complete description of the model equations, several example systems will be presented in order to demonstrate the accuracy and versatility of the method. New simulations, which analyzed the effect of a reversible reaction on the transport properties of a convecting fluid, will also be described in detail. This extra chemical degree of freedom was utilized by the system to augment its net heat flux. The numerical method outlined in this paper can be readily deployed for a vast range of complex flow problems, spanning a variety of scientific disciplines.

  1. A novel approach to modeling the reaction kinetics of tetracycline antibiotics with aqueous ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Zachary R; Blaney, Lee

    2014-01-15

    Tetracycline antibiotics represent one of the most successful classes of pharmaceuticals and are extensively used around the world for human and veterinary health. Ozone-based processes have emerged as a selective water treatment process for many pharmaceuticals. The primary objective of this study was to determine the reaction kinetics for transformation of five tetracycline antibiotics (i.e., chlortetracycline, doxycycline, oxytetracycline, rolitetracycline, and tetracycline) by ozone across the pH2 to 9 range. The apparent second-order rate constant for tetracycline was on the order of 1-6 × 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) at low pH, and 0.6-2.0 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at near neutral pH. The apparent second-order rate constants did not fit a conventional pKa-based model, presumably due to the complex acid/base speciation of tetracycline antibiotics. A model that considers the net charge on tetracycline molecules in solution provided a nice fit to experimental data for all five tetracyclines. The five tetracycline antibiotics demonstrated similar reaction kinetics with ozone, and a cumulative analysis of all kinetics data provides a baseline model for other tetracycline compounds. The ozone exposure required for complete transformation of tetracycline antibiotics (10(-5) M-s) is well below that achieved during ozone disinfection processes (10(-3) M-s), indicating that ozone is an effective treatment for tetracycline antibiotics. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Waterhammer Modeling for the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System Cold Flow Development Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    The Upper Stage Reaction Control System provides three-axis attitude control for the Ares I launch vehicle during active Upper Stage flight. The system design must accommodate rapid thruster firing to maintain the proper launch trajectory and thus allow for the possibility to pulse multiple thrusters simultaneously. Rapid thruster valve closure creates an increase in static pressure, known as waterhammer, which propagates throughout the propellant system at pressures exceeding nominal design values. A series of development tests conducted in the fall of 2009 at Marshall Space Flight Center were performed using a water-flow test article to better understand fluid performance characteristics of the Upper Stage Reaction Control System. A subset of the tests examined waterhammer along with the subsequent pressure and frequency response in the flight-representative system and provided data to anchor numerical models. This thesis presents a comparison of waterhammer test results with numerical model and analytical results. An overview of the flight system, test article, modeling and analysis are also provided.

  3. Bioelectric gene and reaction networks: computational modelling of genetic, biochemical and bioelectrical dynamics in pattern regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietak, Alexis; Levin, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) describe interactions between gene products and transcription factors that control gene expression. In combination with reaction-diffusion models, GRNs have enhanced comprehension of biological pattern formation. However, although it is well known that biological systems exploit an interplay of genetic and physical mechanisms, instructive factors such as transmembrane potential (Vmem) have not been integrated into full GRN models. Here we extend regulatory networks to include bioelectric signalling, developing a novel synthesis: the bioelectricity-integrated gene and reaction (BIGR) network. Using in silico simulations, we highlight the capacity for Vmem to alter steady-state concentrations of key signalling molecules inside and out of cells. We characterize fundamental feedbacks where Vmem both controls, and is in turn regulated by, biochemical signals and thereby demonstrate Vmem homeostatic control, Vmem memory and Vmem controlled state switching. BIGR networks demonstrating hysteresis are identified as a mechanisms through which more complex patterns of stable Vmem spots and stripes, along with correlated concentration patterns, can spontaneously emerge. As further proof of principle, we present and analyse a BIGR network model that mechanistically explains key aspects of the remarkable regenerative powers of creatures such as planarian flatworms. The functional properties of BIGR networks generate the first testable, quantitative hypotheses for biophysical mechanisms underlying the stability and adaptive regulation of anatomical bioelectric pattern. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Monitoring, Modeling, and Diagnosis of Alkali-Silica Reaction in Small Concrete Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cai, Guowei [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gribok, Andrei V. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mahadevan, Sankaran [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Assessment and management of aging concrete structures in nuclear power plants require a more systematic approach than simple reliance on existing code margins of safety. Structural health monitoring of concrete structures aims to understand the current health condition of a structure based on heterogeneous measurements to produce high-confidence actionable information regarding structural integrity that supports operational and maintenance decisions. This report describes alkali-silica reaction (ASR) degradation mechanisms and factors influencing the ASR. A fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical model developed by Saouma and Perotti by taking into consideration the effects of stress on the reaction kinetics and anisotropic volumetric expansion is presented in this report. This model is implemented in the GRIZZLY code based on the Multiphysics Object Oriented Simulation Environment. The implemented model in the GRIZZLY code is randomly used to initiate ASR in a 2D and 3D lattice to study the percolation aspects of concrete. The percolation aspects help determine the transport properties of the material and therefore the durability and service life of concrete. This report summarizes the effort to develop small-size concrete samples with embedded glass to mimic ASR. The concrete samples were treated in water and sodium hydroxide solution at elevated temperature to study how ingress of sodium ions and hydroxide ions at elevated temperature impacts concrete samples embedded with glass. Thermal camera was used to monitor the changes in the concrete sample and results are summarized.

  5. Extended sudden approximation model for high-energy nucleon removal reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carstoiu, F.; Sauvan, E.; Orr, N.A. [Caen Univ., Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Institut des Sciences de la Matiere et du Rayonnement, IN2P3-CNRS ISMRA, 14 (France); Carstoiu, F. [IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Bonaccorso, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Pisa (Italy)

    2004-04-01

    A model based on the sudden approximation has been developed to describe high energy single nucleon removal reactions. Within this approach, which takes as its starting point the formalism of Hansen, the nucleon-removal cross section and the full 3-dimensional momentum distributions of the core fragments including absorption, diffraction, Coulomb and nuclear-Coulomb interference amplitudes, have been calculated. The Coulomb breakup has been treated to all orders for the dipole interaction. The model has been compared to experimental data for a range of light, neutron-rich psd-shell nuclei. Good agreement was found for both the inclusive cross sections and momentum distributions. In the case of {sup 17}C, comparison is also made with the results of calculations using the transfer-to-the-continuum model. The calculated 3-dimensional momentum distributions exhibit longitudinal and transverse momentum components that are strongly coupled by the reaction for s-wave states, whilst no such effect is apparent for d-waves. Incomplete detection of transverse momenta arising from limited experimental acceptances thus leads to a narrowing of the longitudinal distributions for nuclei with significant s-wave valence neutron configurations, as confirmed by the data. Asymmetries in the longitudinal momentum distributions attributed to diffractive dissociation are also explored. (authors)

  6. A cellular automata model for traffic flow based on kinetics theory, vehicles capabilities and driver reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán, H. A.; Lárraga, M. E.; Alvarez-Icaza, L.; Carvajal, J.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a reliable cellular automata model oriented to faithfully reproduce deceleration and acceleration according to realistic reactions of drivers, when vehicles with different deceleration capabilities are considered is presented. The model focuses on describing complex traffic phenomena by coding in its rules the basic mechanisms of drivers behavior, vehicles capabilities and kinetics, while preserving simplicity. In particular, vehiclés kinetics is based on uniform accelerated motion, rather than in impulsive accelerated motion as in most existing CA models. Thus, the proposed model calculates in an analytic way three safe preserving distances to determine the best action a follower vehicle can take under a worst case scenario. Besides, the prediction analysis guarantees that under the proper assumptions, collision between vehicles may not happen at any future time. Simulations results indicate that all interactions of heterogeneous vehicles (i.e., car-truck, truck-car, car-car and truck-truck) are properly reproduced by the model. In addition, the model overcomes one of the major limitations of CA models for traffic modeling: the inability to perform smooth approach to slower or stopped vehicles. Moreover, the model is also capable of reproducing most empirical findings including the backward speed of the downstream front of the traffic jam, and different congested traffic patterns induced by a system with open boundary conditions with an on-ramp. Like most CA models, integer values are used to make the model run faster, which makes the proposed model suitable for real time traffic simulation of large networks.

  7. Modeling the Electrochemical Hydrogen Oxidation and Evolution Reactions on the Basis of Density Functional Theory Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skulason, Egill; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Björketun, Mårten

    2010-01-01

    , W, Mo, and Nb, different facets, and step of surfaces. We compare the results for different facets of the Pt electrode to experimental data. Our results suggest that the most important parameter for describing the HOR or the HER activity of an electrode is its binding free energy of H. We present...... a detailed kinetic model based entirely on the DFT reactions and show that the exchange current follows a volcano curve when plotted against the H adsorption free energy in excellent agreement with experimental data....

  8. On one model problem for the reaction-diffusion-advection equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, M. A.; Zakharova, S. A.; Levashova, N. T.

    2017-09-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the solution with boundary layers in the time-independent mathematical model of reaction-diffusion-advection arising when describing the distribution of greenhouse gases in the surface atmospheric layer is studied. On the basis of the asymptotic method of differential inequalities, the existence of a boundary-layer solution and its asymptotic Lyapunov stability as a steady-state solution of the corresponding parabolic problem is proven. One of the results of this work is the determination of the local domain of the attraction of a boundary-layer solution.

  9. Design and analysis of ADER-type schemes for model advection-diffusion-reaction equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busto, S.; Toro, E. F.; Vázquez-Cendón, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    We construct, analyze and assess various schemes of second order of accuracy in space and time for model advection-diffusion-reaction differential equations. The constructed schemes are meant to be of practical use in solving industrial problems and are derived following two related approaches, namely ADER and MUSCL-Hancock. Detailed analysis of linear stability and local truncation error are carried out. In addition, the schemes are implemented and assessed for various test problems. Empirical convergence rate studies confirm the theoretically expected accuracy in both space and time.

  10. Onsager reaction-field theory for magnetic models on diamond and hcp lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysin, G. M.

    2000-08-01

    The Onsager reaction-field (ORF) theory is extended to apply to three-dimensional Bravais lattices with a basis. The ORF calculation is used to predict the critical temperature for classical Ising, XY, and Heisenberg magnetic models, in particular, on diamond and hexagonal close-packed lattices. Results are compared with series extrapolations and other theoretical approaches where available. For the hcp lattice the ORF calculation is seen to be equivalent to a Green's-function approach by Adler [Physica B&C 107B, 207 (1981)].

  11. Cross-section measurements and nuclear model calculation for proton induced nuclear reaction on zirconium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abyad, M; Abdel-Hamid, A S; Tárkányi, F; Ditrói, F; Takács, S; Seddik, U; Bashter, I I

    2012-01-01

    Proton induced nuclear reactions were measured with stacked-foil technique on natural zirconium targets up to 16.7MeV. Excitation functions were measured for the production of (90,92m,95m,95g,96)Nb and (88)Y. Cumulative cross-section, thick target yields and activation functions were deduced and compared with the available experimental data, as well as with the nuclear models codes; ALICE-IPPE, EMPIRE and TALYS. The integral yields for thick targets were deduced from the measured excitation function of the produced radionuclides. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Continuous Dependence in Front Propagation for Convective Reaction-Diffusion Models with Aggregative Movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Malaguti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a degenerate reaction-diffusion equation, including aggregative movements and convective terms. The model also incorporates a real parameter causing the change from a purely diffusive to a diffusive-aggregative and to a purely aggregative regime. Existence and qualitative properties of traveling wave solutions are investigated, and estimates of their threshold speeds are furnished. Further, the continuous dependence of the threshold wave speed and of the wave profiles on a real parameter is studied, both when the process maintains its diffusion-aggregation nature and when it switches from it to another regime.

  13. An Immunosensing System Using Stilbene Glycoside as a Fluorogenic Substrate for an Enzymatic Reaction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Fei Tan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A natural product, stilbene glycoside (2,3,5,4’-tetrahydroxydiphenylethylene-2-O-glucoside, TBG, has been evaluated for the first time as a potential substrate for horseradish peroxidase (HRP-catalyzed fluorogenic reactions. The properties of TBG as a fluorogenic substrate for HRP and its application in a fluorometric enzyme-linked immunosensing system were compared with commercially available substrates such as p-hydroxyphenylpropionic acid (pHPPA, chavicol and Amplex red using Brucella melitensis antibody (BrAb as a model analyte. The immunosensing body based on HRP-BrAb was constructed by dispersing graphite, BrAg and paraffin wax at room temperature. In a competitive immunoassay procedure, the BrAb competed with HRP-BrAb to react with the immobilized BrAg. In the enzymatic reaction, the binding HRP-BrAb on the sensing body surface can catalyze the polymerization reaction of TBG by H2O2 forming fluorescent dimers and causing an increase in fluorescence intensity. TBG showed comparable ability for HRP detection and its enzyme-linked immunosensing reaction system, in a linear detection ranging of 3.5´10-8~7.6´10-6g/L and with a detection limit of 1.7´10-9 g/L. The immobilized biocomposite surface could be regenerated with excellent reproducibility (RSD=3.8% by simply polishing with an alumina paper. The proposed immunosensing system has been used to determine the BrAb in rabbit serum samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Dynamical Cluster-decay Model (DCM) applied to 9Li+208Pb reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Arshdeep; Hemdeep; Kaushal, Pooja; Behera, Bivash R.; Gupta, Raj K.

    2017-10-01

    The decay mechanism of 217At* formed in 9Li+208Pb reaction is studied within the dynamical cluster-decay model (DCM) at various center-of-mass energies. The aim is to see the behavior of a light neutron-rich radioactive beam on a doubly-magic target nucleus for the (total) fusion cross section σfus and the individual decay channel cross sections. Experimentally, only the isotopic yield of heavy mass residues 211-214At * [equivalently, the light-particles (LPs) evaporation residue cross sections σxn for x = 3- 6 neutrons emission] are measured, with the fusion-fission (ff) component σff taken zero. For a fixed neck-length parameter ΔR, the only parameter in the DCM, we are able to fit σfus =∑x=16σxn almost exactly for 9Li on 208Pb at all E c . m .'s. However, the observed individual decay channels (3n-6n) are very poorly fitted, with unobserved channels (1n, 2n) and σff strongly over-estimated. Different ΔR values, meaning thereby different reaction time scales, are required to fit individually both the observed and unobserved evaporation residue channels (1n-6n) and σff, but then the compound nucleus (CN) contribution σCN is very small (< 1%), and the non-compound nucleus (nCN) decay cross section σnCN contributes the most towards total σfus (=σCN +σnCN). Thus, the 9Li induced reaction on doubly-magic 208Pb is more of a quasi-fission-like nCN decay, which is further analyzed in terms of the statistical CN formation probability PCN and CN survival probability Psurv. For the reaction under study, PCN < < 1 and Psurv → 1, in particular at above barrier energies.

  15. Refractory-Slag-Metal-Inclusion Multiphase Reactions Modeling Using Computational Thermodynamics: Kinetic Model for Prediction of Inclusion Evolution in Molten Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jae Hong; Chung, Yongsug; Park, Joo Hyun

    2017-02-01

    The refractory-slag-metal-inclusion multiphase reaction model was developed by integrating the refractory-slag, slag-metal, and metal-inclusion elementary reactions in order to predict the evolution of inclusions during the secondary refining processes. The mass transfer coefficient in the metal and slag phase, and the mass transfer coefficient of MgO in the slag were employed in the present multiphase reactions modeling. The "Effective Equilibrium Reaction Zone (EERZ) Model" was basically employed. In this model, the reaction zone volume per unit step for metal and slag phase, which is dependent on the `effective reaction zone depth' in each phase, should be defined. Thus, we evaluated the effective reaction zone depth from the mass transfer coefficient in metal and slag phase at 1873 K (1600 °C) for the desulfurization reaction which was measured in the present study. Because the dissolution rate of MgO from the refractory to slag phase is one of the key factors affecting the slag composition, the mass transfer coefficient of MgO in the ladle slag was also experimentally determined. The calculated results for the variation of the composition of slag and molten steel as a function of reaction time were in good agreement with the experimental results. The MgAl2O4 spinel inclusion was observed at the early to middle stage of the reaction, whereas the liquid oxide inclusion was mainly observed at the final stage of the refining reaction. The content of CaO sharply increased, and the SiO2 content increased mildly with the increasing reaction time, while the content of Al2O3 in the inclusion drastically decreased. Even though there is slight difference between the calculated and measured results, the refractory-slag-metal multiphase reaction model constructed in the present study exhibited a good predictability of the inclusion evolution during ladle refining process.

  16. Volatile components formed from reaction of sugar and beta-alanine as a model system of cookie processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishibori, S; Berhnard, R A; Osawa, T; Kawakishi, S

    1998-01-01

    Volatile components formed from the reaction of monosaccharides or disaccharides with beta-alanine were investigated in a dry condition as a model system of cookie processing. Maltol is a common compound formed in the Maillard reaction, but it was very difficult to detect it in previous experiments using actual cookie materials. In this work, we investigated the principal compounds and maltol formation from the reaction of monosaccharides or disaccharides with beta-alanine at 150 degrees C for 10 min. Neither the reaction of monosaccharides nor the disaccharides with beta-alanine resulted in the formation of maltol. 2,3-Dihydro-3,5-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4(H)-pyran-4-one (DDMP) was detected as a principal product from the reaction of monosaccharides with beta-alanine. 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furfural was also confirmed as being a major product in both reactions.

  17. A Multiscale, Mortar-Coupled Advection-Diffusion-Reaction Model for Biofilm Growth in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valocchi, A. J.; Laleian, A.; Werth, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Multiscale models of reactive transport and biofilm growth in porous media are capable of capturing complex pore-scale processes while leveraging the efficiency of continuum-scale models. In particular, porosity and permeability changes caused by biofilm development result in complex feedbacks between transport and reaction that are difficult to quantify at the continuum scale. Pore-scale models are needed to accurately resolve these dynamics but are often impractical for applications due to their high computational cost. To address this challenge, we develop a multiscale model of biofilm growth in which non-overlapping regions at pore and continuum spatial scales are coupled with a mortar method that ensures continuity of flux across the interface. Thus, regions of high reactivity are resolved at the pore scale for accuracy while regions of low reactivity are resolved at the continuum scale for efficiency. By benchmarking the multiscale model against a fully pore-scale model, we find the multiscale model has a reduced run time while producing a consistent result in terms of biofilm growth, distribution, and solute utilization. We effectively extend a previous model by incorporating a multiscale flow solver and parallelizing solution of the computationally-intensive pore-scale component for increased scalability. We find that mortar coupling is a flexible and effective technique able to join differing computational grids and differing physics in adjacent regions for both fluid flow and solute transport. These results demonstrate the practicality of multiscale mortar-coupled models in studying the complexity of subsurface systems while considering computational limitations in their numerical solution. While recent work has demonstrated growing interest in the development of general multiscale models, more work is needed for their use in real-world applications. Our contribution is a step on the path toward accurate, efficient, and practical reactive transport

  18. Kinetic modeling of lipase-catalyzed esterification reaction between oleic acid and trimethylolpropane: a simplified model for multi-substrate multi-product ping-pong mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornadel, Amin; Akerman, Cecilia Orellana; Adlercreutz, Patrick; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Borg, Niklas

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic models are among the tools that can be used for optimization of biocatalytic reactions as well as for facilitating process design and upscaling in order to improve productivity and economy of these processes. Mechanism pathways for multi-substrate multi-product enzyme-catalyzed reactions can become very complex and lead to kinetic models comprising several tens of terms. Hence the models comprise too many parameters, which are in general highly correlated and their estimations are often prone to huge errors. In this study, Novozym(®) 435 catalyzed esterification reaction between oleic acid (OA) and trimethylolpropane (TMP) with continuous removal of side-product (water) was carried out as an example for reactions that follow multi-substrate multi-product ping-pong mechanisms. A kinetic model was developed based on a simplified ping-pong mechanism proposed for the reaction. The model considered both enzymatic and spontaneous reactions involved and also the effect of product removal during the reaction. The kinetic model parameters were estimated using nonlinear curve fitting through unconstrained optimization methodology and the model was verified by using empirical data from different experiments and showed good predictability of the reaction under different conditions. This approach can be applied to similar biocatalytic processes to facilitate their optimization and design. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Modelling the adsorption of mercury onto natural and aluminium pillared clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloussaief, Mabrouk; Sdiri, Ali; Benzina, Mourad

    2013-01-01

    The removal of heavy metals by natural adsorbent has become one of the most attractive solutions for environmental remediation. Natural clay collected from the Late Cretaceous Aleg formation, Tunisia was used as a natural adsorbent for the removal of Hg(II) in aqueous system. Physicochemical characterization of the adsorbent was carried out with the aid of various techniques, including chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared and scanning electron micrograph. Batch sorption technique was selected as an appropriate technique in the current study. Method parameters, including pH, temperature, initial metal concentration and contact time, were varied in order to quantitatively evaluate their effects on Hg(II) adsorption onto the original and pillared clay samples. Adsorption kinetic was studied by fitting the experimental results to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The adsorption data were also simulated with Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherms. Results showed that the natural clay samples are mainly composed of silica, alumina, iron, calcium and magnesium oxides. The sorbents are mainly mesoporous materials with specific surface area of adsorption of Hg(II) studies, experimental data demonstrated a high degree of fitness to the pseudo-second-order kinetics with an equilibration time of 240 min. The equilibrium data showed the best model fit to Langmuir model with the maximum adsorption capacities of 9.70 and 49.75 mg g(-1) for the original and aluminium pillared clays, respectively. The maximum adsorption of Hg(II) on the aluminium pillared clay was observed to occur at pH 3.2. The calculated thermodynamic parameters (∆G°, ∆H° and ∆S°) showed an exothermic adsorption process. The entropy values varied between 60.77 and 117.59 J mol(-1) K(-1), and those of enthalpy ranged from 16.31 to 30.77 kJ mol(-1). The equilibrium parameter (R (L)) indicated that the adsorption of Hg(II) on Tunisian smectitic

  20. Implicit coupling of turbulent diffusion with chemical reaction mechanisms for prognostic atmospheric dispersion models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berlowitz, D.R.

    1996-11-01

    In the last few decades the negative impact by humans on the thin atmospheric layer enveloping the earth, the basis for life on this planet, has increased steadily. In order to halt, or at least slow down this development, the knowledge and study of these anthropogenic influence has to be increased and possible remedies have to be suggested. An important tool for these studies are computer models. With their help the atmospheric system can be approximated and the various processes, which have led to the current situation can be quantified. They also serve as an instrument to assess short or medium term strategies to reduce this human impact. However, to assure efficiency as well as accuracy, a careful analysis of the numerous processes involved in the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere is called for. This should help to concentrate on the essentials and also prevent excessive usage of sometimes scarce computing resources. The basis of the presented work is the EUMAC Zooming Model (ETM), and particularly the component calculating the dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, the model MARS. The model has two main parts: an explicit solver, where the advection and the horizontal diffusion of pollutants are calculated, and an implicit solution mechanism, allowing the joint computation of the change of concentration due to chemical reactions, coupled with the respective influence of the vertical diffusion of the species. The aim of this thesis is to determine particularly the influence of the horizontal components of the turbulent diffusion on the existing implicit solver of the model. Suggestions for a more comprehensive inclusion of the full three dimensional diffusion operator in the implicit solver are made. This is achieved by an appropriate operator splitting. A selection of numerical approaches to tighten the coupling of the diffusion processes with the calculation of the applied chemical reaction mechanisms are examined. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  1. Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) in marine sediments from the Skagerrak (Denmark): II. Reaction-transport modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dale, A.W.; Regnier, P.; Knab, N.J.

    2008-01-01

    A steady-state reaction-transport model is applied to sediments retrieved by gravity core from two stations (S10 and S13) in the Skagerrak to determine the main kinetic and thermodynamic controls on anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). The model considers an extended biomass-implicit reaction...... network for organic carbon degradation, which includes extracellular hydrolysis of macromolecular organic matter, fermentation, sulfate reduction, methanogenesis, AOM, acetogenesis and acetotrophy. Catabolic reaction rates are determined using a modified Monod rate expression that explicitly accounts...... at both sites because of high hydrogen concentrations ( 3-6 nM). The model results imply there is no straightforward relationship between pore water concentrations and the minimum catabolic energy needed to support life because of the highly coupled nature of the reaction network. Best model fits...

  2. Turing pattern formation on the sphere for a morphochemical reaction-diffusion model for electrodeposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Bozzini, Benedetto; Frittelli, Massimo; Sgura, Ivonne

    2017-07-01

    The present paper deals with the pattern formation properties of a specific morpho-electrochemical reaction-diffusion model on a sphere. The physico-chemical background to this study is the morphological control of material electrodeposited onto spherical particles. The particular experimental case of interest refers to the optimization of novel metal-air flow batteries and addresses the electrodeposition of zinc onto inert spherical supports. Morphological control in this step of the high-energy battery operation is crucial to the energetic efficiency of the recharge process and to the durability of the whole energy-storage device. To rationalise this technological challenge within a mathematical modeling perspective, we consider the reaction-diffusion system for metal electrodeposition introduced in [Bozzini et al., J. Solid State Electr.17, 467-479 (2013)] and extend its study to spherical domains. Conditions are derived for the occurrence of the Turing instability phenomenon and the steady patterns emerging at the onset of Turing instability are investigated. The reaction-diffusion system on spherical domains is solved numerically by means of the Lumped Surface Finite Element Method (LSFEM) in space combined with the IMEX Euler method in time. The effect on pattern formation of variations in the domain size is investigated both qualitatively, by means of systematic numerical simulations, and quantitatively by introducing suitable indicators that allow to assign each pattern to a given morphological class. An experimental validation of the obtained results is finally presented for the case of zinc electrodeposition from alkaline zincate solutions onto copper spheres.

  3. Spatiotemporal Patterns in a Ratio-Dependent Food Chain Model with Reaction-Diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Predator-prey models describe biological phenomena of pursuit-evasion interaction. And this interaction exists widely in the world for the necessary energy supplement of species. In this paper, we have investigated a ratio-dependent spatially extended food chain model. Based on the bifurcation analysis (Hopf and Turing, we give the spatial pattern formation via numerical simulation, that is, the evolution process of the system near the coexistence equilibrium point (u2*,v2*,w2*, and find that the model dynamics exhibits complex pattern replication. For fixed parameters, on increasing the control parameter c1, the sequence “holes → holes-stripe mixtures → stripes → spots-stripe mixtures → spots” pattern is observed. And in the case of pure Hopf instability, the model exhibits chaotic wave pattern replication. Furthermore, we consider the pattern formation in the case of which the top predator is extinct, that is, the evolution process of the system near the equilibrium point (u1*,v1*,0, and find that the model dynamics exhibits stripes-spots pattern replication. Our results show that reaction-diffusion model is an appropriate tool for investigating fundamental mechanism of complex spatiotemporal dynamics. It will be useful for studying the dynamic complexity of ecosystems.

  4. Set-base dynamical parameter estimation and model invalidation for biochemical reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumschinski, Philipp; Borchers, Steffen; Bosio, Sandro; Weismantel, Robert; Findeisen, Rolf

    2010-05-25

    Mathematical modeling and analysis have become, for the study of biological and cellular processes, an important complement to experimental research. However, the structural and quantitative knowledge available for such processes is frequently limited, and measurements are often subject to inherent and possibly large uncertainties. This results in competing model hypotheses, whose kinetic parameters may not be experimentally determinable. Discriminating among these alternatives and estimating their kinetic parameters is crucial to improve the understanding of the considered process, and to benefit from the analytical tools at hand. In this work we present a set-based framework that allows to discriminate between competing model hypotheses and to provide guaranteed outer estimates on the model parameters that are consistent with the (possibly sparse and uncertain) experimental measurements. This is obtained by means of exact proofs of model invalidity that exploit the polynomial/rational structure of biochemical reaction networks, and by making use of an efficient strategy to balance solution accuracy and computational effort. The practicability of our approach is illustrated with two case studies. The first study shows that our approach allows to conclusively rule out wrong model hypotheses. The second study focuses on parameter estimation, and shows that the proposed method allows to evaluate the global influence of measurement sparsity, uncertainty, and prior knowledge on the parameter estimates. This can help in designing further experiments leading to improved parameter estimates.

  5. On the mathematical modeling of wound healing angiogenesis in skin as a reaction-transport process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegg, Jennifer A; Menon, Shakti N; Maini, Philip K; McElwain, D L Sean

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, numerous research groups have attempted to provide mathematical descriptions of the skin wound healing process. The development of theoretical models of the interlinked processes that underlie the healing mechanism has yielded considerable insight into aspects of this critical phenomenon that remain difficult to investigate empirically. In particular, the mathematical modeling of angiogenesis, i.e., capillary sprout growth, has offered new paradigms for the understanding of this highly complex and crucial step in the healing pathway. With the recent advances in imaging and cell tracking, the time is now ripe for an appraisal of the utility and importance of mathematical modeling in wound healing angiogenesis research. The purpose of this review is to pedagogically elucidate the conceptual principles that have underpinned the development of mathematical descriptions of wound healing angiogenesis, specifically those that have utilized a continuum reaction-transport framework, and highlight the contribution that such models have made toward the advancement of research in this field. We aim to draw attention to the common assumptions made when developing models of this nature, thereby bringing into focus the advantages and limitations of this approach. A deeper integration of mathematical modeling techniques into the practice of wound healing angiogenesis research promises new perspectives for advancing our knowledge in this area. To this end we detail several open problems related to the understanding of wound healing angiogenesis, and outline how these issues could be addressed through closer cross-disciplinary collaboration.

  6. Reaction-diffusion finite element model of lateral line primordium migration to explore cell leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allena, R; Maini, P K

    2014-12-01

    Collective cell migration plays a fundamental role in many biological phenomena such as immune response, embryogenesis and tumorigenesis. In the present work, we propose a reaction-diffusion finite element model of the lateral line primordium migration in zebrafish. The population is modelled as a continuum with embedded discrete motile cells, which are assumed to be viscoelastic and able to undergo large deformations. The Wnt/ß-catenin-FGF and cxcr4b-cxcr7b signalling pathways inside the cohort regulating the migration are described through coupled reaction-diffusion equations. The coupling between mechanics and the molecular scenario occurs in two ways. Firstly, the intensity of the protrusion-contraction movement of the cells depends on the cxcr4b concentration. Secondly, the intra-synchronization between the active deformations and the adhesion forces inside each cell is triggered by the cxcr4b-cxcr7b polarity. This influences the inter-synchronization between the cells and results in two main modes of migration: uncoordinated and coordinated. The main objectives of the work were (i) to validate our assumptions with respect to the experimental observations and (ii) to decipher the mechanical conditions leading to efficient migration of the primordium. To achieve the second goal, we will specifically focus on the role of the leader cells and their position inside the population.

  7. Study and modelling of a reactional tube bundle heated by a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collantes Hernandez, M.A.

    1993-07-01

    Fluidized beds exhibit two important characteristics for the heating of a reactional tube bundle: homogeneous temperature within all the fluidized bed and high heat transfer coefficient with the immersed surfaces. One of the key points for their modeling is the knowledge of the vertical and horizontal thermal conductivities and the heat transfer coefficient at the wall or with the tubes of the reactor. As thermal diffusivity data about large fluidized beds are not available in the literature, we have built a large size pilot unit (0.6 m x 1.1 m x 2.8 m) to determine these values under the conditions of a catalytic treatment of petroleum products. The measure of local temperatures and the use of a two-dimensional diffusion model have permitted us to determine thermal conductivities as a function of several parameters: fluidization velocity, height of the bed, nature and granulometry of solids and geometry of the tube bundle. On the basis of the collected experimental data, the case of a petrochemical unit has been studied. A mathematical code was developed, which permitted us to acquire the data concerning the progress of the reaction in the tubes and it also allowed us to analyse the influence of size and density of the tube bundles on the conversion. (author). 72 refs., 90 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. Detection of Adverse Reaction to Drugs in Elderly Patients through Predictive Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael San-Miguel Carrasco

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Geriatrics Medicine constitutes a clinical research field in which data analytics, particularly predictive modeling, can deliver compelling, reliable and long-lasting benefits, as well as non-intuitive clinical insights and net new knowledge. The research work described in this paper leverages predictive modeling to uncover new insights related to adverse reaction to drugs in elderly patients. The differentiation factor that sets this research exercise apart from traditional clinical research is the fact that it was not designed by formulating a particular hypothesis to be validated. Instead, it was data-centric, with data being mined to discover relationships or correlations among variables. Regression techniques were systematically applied to data through multiple iterations and under different configurations. The obtained results after the process was completed are explained and discussed next.

  9. Reactive nanolaminate pulsed-laser ignition mechanism: Modeling and experimental evidence of diffusion limited reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarrington, C. D.; Abere, M. J.; Adams, D. P.; Hobbs, M. L.

    2017-04-01

    Al/Pt nanolaminates with a bilayer thickness (tb, width of an Al/Pt pair-layer) of 164 nm were irradiated with single laser pulses with durations of 10 ms and 0.5 ms at 189 W/cm2 and 1189 W/cm2, respectively. The time to ignition was measured for each pulse, and shorter ignition times were observed for the higher power/shorter pulse width. Videographic images of the irradiated area shortly after ignition show a non-uniform radial brightness for the longer pulse, while the shorter pulse shows uniform brightness. A diffusion-limited single step reaction mechanism was implemented in a finite element package to model the progress from reactants to products at both pulse widths. The model captures well both the observed ignition delay and qualitative observations regarding the non-uniform radial temperature.

  10. A computational study of ultrafast acid dissociation and acid-base neutralization reactions. I. The model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Patrick; Thomas, Vibin; Rivard, Ugo; Iftimie, Radu

    2010-07-28

    Ultrafast, time-resolved investigations of acid-base neutralization reactions have recently been performed using systems containing the photoacid 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid trisodium salt (HPTS) and various Bronsted bases. Two conflicting neutralization mechanisms have been formulated by Mohammed et al. [Science 310, 83 (2005)] and Siwick et al. [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 13412 (2007)] for the same acid-base system. Herein an ab initio molecular dynamics based computational model is formulated, which is able to investigate the validity of the proposed mechanisms in the general context of ground-state acid-base neutralization reactions. Our approach consists of using 2,4,6-tricyanophenol (exp. pKa congruent with 1) as a model for excited-state HPTS( *) (pKa congruent with 1.4) and carboxylate ions for the accepting base. We employ our recently proposed dipole-field/quantum mechanics (QM) treatment [P. Maurer and R. Iftimie, J. Chem. Phys. 132, 074112 (2010)] of the proton donor and acceptor molecules. This approach allows one to tune the free energy of neutralization to any desired value as well as model initial nonequilibrium hydration effects caused by a sudden increase in acidity, making it possible to achieve a more realistic comparison with experimental data than could be obtained via a full-QM treatment of the entire system. It is demonstrated that the dipole-field/QM model reproduces correctly key properties of the 2,4,6-tricyanophenol acid molecule including gas-phase proton dissociation energies and dipole moments, and condensed-phase hydration structure and pKa values.

  11. Coupled Transport/Reaction Modelling of Copper Canister Corrosion Aided by Microbial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinsong Liu [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-04-15

    Copper canister corrosion is an important issue in the concept of a nuclear fuel repository. Previous studies indicate that the oxygen-free copper canister could hold its integrity for more than 100,000 years in the repository environment. Microbial processes may reduce sulphate to sulphide and considerably increase the amount of sulphides available for corrosion. In this paper, a coupled transport/reaction model is developed to account for the transport of chemical species produced by microbial processes. The corroding agents like sulphide would come not only from the groundwater flowing in a fracture that intersects the canister, but also from the reduction of sulphate near the canister. The reaction of sulphate-reducing bacteria and the transport of sulphide in the bentonite buffer are included in the model. The depth of copper canister corrosion is calculated by the model. With representative 'central values' of the concentrations of sulphate and methane at repository depth at different sites in Fennoscandian Shield the corrosion depth predicted by the model is a few millimetres during 10{sup 5} years. As the concentrations of sulphate and methane are extremely site-specific and future climate changes may significantly influence the groundwater compositions at potential repository sites, sensitivity analyses have been conducted. With a broad perspective of the measured concentrations at different sites in Sweden and in Finland, and some possible mechanisms (like the glacial meltwater intrusion and interglacial seawater intrusion) that may introduce more sulphate into the groundwater at intermediate depths during future climate changes, higher concentrations of either/both sulphate and methane than what is used as the representative 'central' values would be possible. In worst cases. locally, half of the canister thickness could possibly be corroded within 10{sup 5} years.

  12. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raji, Foad; Pakizeh, Majid, E-mail: pakizeh@um.ac.ir

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 introduced itself as a high performance sorbent for Hg(II) removal. • Kinetics data were analyzed by pseudo-first and second order and diffusion models. • The adsorption kinetic data were described very well by pseudo-second-order model. • Sorption of Hg(II) by ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 was an exothermic chemical process. • Hg(II) sorption was a spontaneous process since of minus free energy change. - Abstract: Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20–55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = −49.4 kJ mol{sup −1}). The negative ΔS° value (−148.9 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites.

  13. Iron Reduction and Radionuclide Immobilization: Kinetic, Thermodynamic and Hydrologic controls & Reaction-Based Modeling - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William D. Burgos

    2004-06-18

    Our research focused on (1) microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) individually, and concomitantly in natural sediments, (2) Fe(III) oxide surface chemistry, specifically with respect to reactions with Fe(II)and U(VI), (3) the influence of humic substances on Fe(III) and U(VI) bioreduction, and on U(VI) complexation, and (4) the development of reaction-based reactive transport biogeochemical models to numerically simulate our experimental results. We have continued our investigations on microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Modeling our earlier experimental results required assumption of a hydrated surface for hematite, more reactive than predicted based on theoretical solubility (Burgos et al.2002). Subsequent studies with Shewanella putrefaciens and Geobacter sulfurreducens confirmed the rates of Fe(III) bioreduction depend on oxide surface area rather than oxide thermodynamic properties (Roden,2003a,b;2004; Burgos et al,2003). We examined the potential for bioreduction of U(VI) by Geobacter sulfurreducens in the presence of synthetic Fe(III) oxides and natural Fe(III) oxide-containing solids (Jeon et al,2004a,b) in which more than 95% of added U(VI) was sorbed to mineral surfaces. The results showed a significant portion of solid-associated U(VI) was resistant to both enzymatic and abiotic (Fe(II)-driven) reduction, but the rate and extent of bioreduction of U(VI) was increased due to the addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). We conducted long-term semicontinuous culture and column experiments on coupled Fe(III) oxide/U(VI) reduction. These experiments were conducted with natural subsurface sediment from the Oyster site in Virginia, whose Fe content and microbial reducibility are comparable to ORNL FRC sediments (Jeon et al, 2004b). The results conclusively demonstrated the potential for sustained removal of U(VI) from solution via DMRB activity in excess of the U(VI) sorption capacity of the natural mineral assemblages. Jang (2004) demonstrated

  14. The effect of inquiry-flipped classroom model toward students' achievement on chemical reaction rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paristiowati, Maria; Fitriani, Ella; Aldi, Nurul Hanifah

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this research is to find out the effect of Inquiry-Flipped Classroom Models toward Students' Achievement on Chemical Reaction Rate topic. This study was conducted at SMA Negeri 3 Tangerang in Eleventh Graders. The Quasi Experimental Method with Non-equivalent Control Group design was implemented in this study. 72 students as the sample was selected by purposive sampling. Students in experimental group were learned through inquiry-flipped classroom model. Meanwhile, in control group, students were learned through guided inquiry learning model. Based on the data analysis, it can be seen that there is significant difference in the result of the average achievement of the students. The average achievement of the students in inquiry-flipped classroom model was 83,44 and the average achievement of the students in guided inquiry learning model was 74,06. It can be concluded that the students' achievement with inquiry-flipped classroom better than guided inquiry. The difference of students' achievement were significant through t-test which is tobs 3.056 > ttable 1.994 (α = 0.005).

  15. Test of gamma-ray strength functions in nuclear reaction model calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopecky, J. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten, (The Netherlands)); Uhl, M. (Institut fuer Radiumforschung und Kernphysik, Universitaet Wien, A1090 Wien, Boltzmanngasse 3, (Austria))

    1990-05-01

    The impact of models for {ital E}1 and {ital M}1 gamma-ray strength functions on the results of nuclear model calculations of total average radiation widths, radiative capture cross sections, and gamma-ray spectra has been studied. We considered strength functions that reproduce photoabsorption and/or average resonance data but significantly differ from each other at low gamma-ray energies. As the calculated quantities critically depend on the strength functions in this energy region, model calculations can be used to test the low-energy behavior of strength functions. By analyzing the {sup 197}Au, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 105}Pd, and {sup 93}Nd neutron capture reactions we found strong evidence for a model of the {ital E}1 strength function, which is characterized by the following properties: (i) an energy dependent spreading width of the underlying Lorentzian for the photoabsorption cross section and (ii) a nonzero, temperature dependent, limit as the transition energy tends to zero. This model is founded in theoretical work by Zaretskij, Sirotkin, and Kadmenskij and represents a partial breakdown of Brink's hypothesis.

  16. Modeling Time-Dependent Behavior of Concrete Affected by Alkali Silica Reaction in Variable Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnaggar, Mohammed; Di Luzio, Giovanni; Cusatis, Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Alkali Silica Reaction (ASR) is known to be a serious problem for concrete worldwide, especially in high humidity and high temperature regions. ASR is a slow process that develops over years to decades and it is influenced by changes in environmental and loading conditions of the structure. The problem becomes even more complicated if one recognizes that other phenomena like creep and shrinkage are coupled with ASR. This results in synergistic mechanisms that can not be easily understood without a comprehensive computational model. In this paper, coupling between creep, shrinkage and ASR is modeled within the Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM) framework. In order to achieve this, a multi-physics formulation is used to compute the evolution of temperature, humidity, cement hydration, and ASR in both space and time, which is then used within physics-based formulations of cracking, creep and shrinkage. The overall model is calibrated and validated on the basis of experimental data available in the literature. Results show that even during free expansions (zero macroscopic stress), a significant degree of coupling exists because ASR induced expansions are relaxed by meso-scale creep driven by self-equilibriated stresses at the meso-scale. This explains and highlights the importance of considering ASR and other time dependent aging and deterioration phenomena at an appropriate length scale in coupled modeling approaches. PMID:28772829

  17. A systematic investigation of computation models for predicting Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifan Kuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early and accurate identification of adverse drug reactions (ADRs is critically important for drug development and clinical safety. Computer-aided prediction of ADRs has attracted increasing attention in recent years, and many computational models have been proposed. However, because of the lack of systematic analysis and comparison of the different computational models, there remain limitations in designing more effective algorithms and selecting more useful features. There is therefore an urgent need to review and analyze previous computation models to obtain general conclusions that can provide useful guidance to construct more effective computational models to predict ADRs. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the current study, the main work is to compare and analyze the performance of existing computational methods to predict ADRs, by implementing and evaluating additional algorithms that have been earlier used for predicting drug targets. Our results indicated that topological and intrinsic features were complementary to an extent and the Jaccard coefficient had an important and general effect on the prediction of drug-ADR associations. By comparing the structure of each algorithm, final formulas of these algorithms were all converted to linear model in form, based on this finding we propose a new algorithm called the general weighted profile method and it yielded the best overall performance among the algorithms investigated in this paper. CONCLUSION: Several meaningful conclusions and useful findings regarding the prediction of ADRs are provided for selecting optimal features and algorithms.

  18. Hybrid models for chemical reaction networks: Multiscale theory and application to gene regulatory systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Stefanie; Schütte, Christof

    2017-09-21

    Well-mixed stochastic chemical kinetics are properly modeled by the chemical master equation (CME) and associated Markov jump processes in molecule number space. If the reactants are present in large amounts, however, corresponding simulations of the stochastic dynamics become computationally expensive and model reductions are demanded. The classical model reduction approach uniformly rescales the overall dynamics to obtain deterministic systems characterized by ordinary differential equations, the well-known mass action reaction rate equations. For systems with multiple scales, there exist hybrid approaches that keep parts of the system discrete while another part is approximated either using Langevin dynamics or deterministically. This paper aims at giving a coherent overview of the different hybrid approaches, focusing on their basic concepts and the relation between them. We derive a novel general description of such hybrid models that allows expressing various forms by one type of equation. We also check in how far the approaches apply to model extensions of the CME for dynamics which do not comply with the central well-mixed condition and require some spatial resolution. A simple but meaningful gene expression system with negative self-regulation is analysed to illustrate the different approximation qualities of some of the hybrid approaches discussed. Especially, we reveal the cause of error in the case of small volume approximations.

  19. Human Gait Modeling and Analysis Using a Semi-Markov Process With Ground Reaction Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hao; Liao, Wei-Hsin

    2017-06-01

    Modeling and evaluation of patients' gait patterns is the basis for both gait assessment and gait rehabilitation. This paper presents a convenient and real-time gait modeling, analysis, and evaluation method based on ground reaction forces (GRFs) measured by a pair of smart insoles. Gait states are defined based on the foot-ground contact forms of both legs. From the obtained gait state sequence and the duration of each state, the human gait is modeled as a semi-Markov process (SMP). Four groups of gait features derived from the SMP gait model are used for characterizing individual gait patterns. With this model, both the normal gaits of healthy people and the abnormal gaits of patients with impaired mobility are analyzed. Abnormal evaluation indices (AEI) are further proposed for gait abnormality assessment. Gait analysis experiments are conducted on 23 subjects with different ages and health conditions. The results show that gait patterns are successfully obtained and evaluated for normal, age-related, and pathological gaits. The effectiveness of the proposed AEI for gait assessment is verified through comparison with a video-based gait abnormality rating scale.

  20. Hybrid models for chemical reaction networks: Multiscale theory and application to gene regulatory systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Stefanie; Schütte, Christof

    2017-09-01

    Well-mixed stochastic chemical kinetics are properly modeled by the chemical master equation (CME) and associated Markov jump processes in molecule number space. If the reactants are present in large amounts, however, corresponding simulations of the stochastic dynamics become computationally expensive and model reductions are demanded. The classical model reduction approach uniformly rescales the overall dynamics to obtain deterministic systems characterized by ordinary differential equations, the well-known mass action reaction rate equations. For systems with multiple scales, there exist hybrid approaches that keep parts of the system discrete while another part is approximated either using Langevin dynamics or deterministically. This paper aims at giving a coherent overview of the different hybrid approaches, focusing on their basic concepts and the relation between them. We derive a novel general description of such hybrid models that allows expressing various forms by one type of equation. We also check in how far the approaches apply to model extensions of the CME for dynamics which do not comply with the central well-mixed condition and require some spatial resolution. A simple but meaningful gene expression system with negative self-regulation is analysed to illustrate the different approximation qualities of some of the hybrid approaches discussed. Especially, we reveal the cause of error in the case of small volume approximations.

  1. Pre-Service Science Teachers' Mental Models Regarding Dissolution and Precipitation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBroom, Rachel Ann

    This study described pre-service secondary science teachers' mental models of dissolution and precipitation reactions. The study took place at a mid-sized master's granting public institution located in southeastern United States. The twelve participants were either juniors or seniors in the Bachelor of Science in Science Education program or first year students in the Master's of Arts in Teaching Science Education program. All had completed two semesters of general chemistry with final grades of C or better. Participants were shown six videos---four showing ionic solids dissolving in water and two of precipitates forming from the combination of the previous four ionic solutions. After each video, participants completed a questionnaire consisting of multiple choice questions and tasks involving the writing of chemical equations and providing particulate level drawings of the observed chemical phenomenon. Each participant was interviewed individually to explain his/her answers and to allow the researcher to probe the individual's understanding of the dissolution process. Although the study used a population not previously reported in the literature, results from this study matched previously reported findings for populations of high school students, college students, and pre-service elementary teachers. Participants demonstrated several common misconceptions related to the topics of dissolution and precipitation reactions. These misconceptions included dissolving is the same as melting, ionic solids react with the solvent (water) to form new compounds, and precipitation reactions result in the production of two chemical compounds. The study also discussed the level of consistency exhibited by individuals in their multiple representations and explanations of the same chemical phenomenon.

  2. A comprehensive adsorption study and modeling of antibiotics as a pharmaceutical waste by graphene oxide nanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostamian, Rahele; Behnejad, Hassan

    2018-01-01

    The adsorption behavior of tetracycline (TCN), doxycycline (DCN) as the most common antibiotics in veterinary and ciprofloxacin (CPN) onto graphene oxide nanosheets (GOS) in aqueous solution was evaluated. The four factors influencing the adsorption of antibiotics (initial concentration, pH, temperature and contact time) were studied. The results showed that initial pH ∼ 6 to 7 and contact time ∼ 100 - 200min are optimum for each drug. The monolayer adsorption capacity was reduced with the increasing temperature from 25°C to 45°C. Non-linear regressions were carried out in order to define the best fit model for every system. To do this, eight error functions were applied to predict the optimum model. Among various models, Hill and Toth isotherm models represented the equilibrium adsorption data of antibiotics while the kinetic data were well fitted by pseudo second-order (PSO) kinetic model (DCN and TCN) and Elovich (CPN) models. The maximum adsorption capacity (qmax) is found to be in the following order: CPN > DCN > TCN, obtained from sips equation at the same temperature. The GOS shows highest adsorption capacity towards CPN up to 173.4mgg-1. The study showed that GOS can be removed more efficiently from water solution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Spectra for the A = 6 reactions calculated from a three-body resonance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Mark W.; Hale, Gerald M.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a resonance model of the transition matrix for three-body breakup reactions of the A = 6 system and present calculations for the nucleon observed spectra, which are important for inertial confinement fusion and Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The model is motivated by the Faddeev approach where the form of the T matrix is written as a sum of the distinct Jacobi coordinate systems corresponding to particle configurations (α, n-n) and (n; n-α) to describe the final state. The structure in the spectra comes from the resonances of the two-body subsystems of the three-body final state, namely the singlet (T = 1) nucleon-nucleon (NN) anti-bound resonance, and the Nα resonances designated the ground state (Jπ = {{{3^ - }} over 2}) and first excited state (Jπ = {{{1^ - }} over 2}) of the A = 5 systems 5He and 5Li. These resonances are described in terms of single-level, single-channel R-matrix parameters that are taken from analyses of NN and Nα scattering data. While the resonance parameters are approximately charge symmetric, external charge-dependent effects are included in the penetrabilities, shifts, and hard-sphere phases, and in the level energies to account for internal Coulomb differences. The shapes of the resonance contributions to the spectrum are fixed by other, two-body data and the only adjustable parameters in the model are the combinatorial amplitudes for the compound system. These are adjusted to reproduce the observed nucleon spectra from measurements at the Omega and NIF facilities. We perform a simultaneous, least-squares fit of the tt neutron spectra and the 3He3He proton spectra. Using these amplitudes we make a prediction of the α spectra for both reactions at low energies. Significant differences in the tt and 3He3He spectra are due to Coulomb effects.

  4. Spectra for the A = 6 reactions calculated from a three-body resonance model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paris Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a resonance model of the transition matrix for three-body breakup reactions of the A = 6 system and present calculations for the nucleon observed spectra, which are important for inertial confinement fusion and Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN. The model is motivated by the Faddeev approach where the form of the T matrix is written as a sum of the distinct Jacobi coordinate systems corresponding to particle configurations (α, n-n and (n; n-α to describe the final state. The structure in the spectra comes from the resonances of the two-body subsystems of the three-body final state, namely the singlet (T = 1 nucleon-nucleon (NN anti-bound resonance, and the Nα resonances designated the ground state (Jπ = 3−2${{{3^ - }} \\over 2}$ and first excited state (Jπ = 1−2${{{1^ - }} \\over 2}$ of the A = 5 systems 5He and 5Li. These resonances are described in terms of single-level, single-channel R-matrix parameters that are taken from analyses of NN and Nα scattering data. While the resonance parameters are approximately charge symmetric, external charge-dependent effects are included in the penetrabilities, shifts, and hard-sphere phases, and in the level energies to account for internal Coulomb differences. The shapes of the resonance contributions to the spectrum are fixed by other, two-body data and the only adjustable parameters in the model are the combinatorial amplitudes for the compound system. These are adjusted to reproduce the observed nucleon spectra from measurements at the Omega and NIF facilities. We perform a simultaneous, least-squares fit of the tt neutron spectra and the 3He3He proton spectra. Using these amplitudes we make a prediction of the α spectra for both reactions at low energies. Significant differences in the tt and 3He3He spectra are due to Coulomb effects.

  5. Modeling of reaction kinetics in bubbling fluidized bed biomass gasification reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thapa, R.K.; Halvorsen, B.M. [Telemark University College, Kjolnes ring 56, P.O. Box 203, 3901 Porsgrunn (Norway); Pfeifer, C. [University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    Bubbling fluidized beds are widely used as biomass gasification reactors as at the biomass gasification plant in Gussing, Austria. The reactor in the plant is a dual circulating bubbling fluidized bed gasification reactor. The plant produces 2MW electricity and 4.5MW heat from the gasification of biomass. Wood chips as biomass and olivine particles as hot bed materials are fluidized with high temperature steam in the reactor. As a result, biomass undergoes endothermic chemical reaction to produce a mixture of combustible gases in addition to some carbon-dioxide (CO2). The combustible gases are mainly hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4). The gas is used to produce electricity and heat via utilization in a gas engine. Alternatively, the gas is further processed for gaseous or liquid fuels, but still on the process of development level. Composition and quality of the gas determine the efficiency of the reactor. A computational model has been developed for the study of reaction kinetics in the gasification rector. The simulation is performed using commercial software Barracuda virtual reactor, VR15. Eulerian-Lagrangian approach in coupling of gas-solid flow has been implemented. Fluid phase is treated with an Eulerian formulation. Discrete phase is treated with a Lagrangian formulation. Particle-particle and particle-wall interactions and inter-phase heat and mass transfer have been taken into account. Series of simulations have been performed to study model prediction of the gas composition. The composition is compared with data from the gasifier at the CHP plant in Güssing, Austria. The model prediction of the composition of gases has good agreements with the result of the operating plant.

  6. Development of a reduced model of formation reactions in Zr-Al nanolaminates

    KAUST Repository

    Vohra, Manav

    2014-12-15

    A computational model of anaerobic reactions in metallic multilayered systems with an equimolar composition of zirconium and aluminum is developed. The reduced reaction formalism of M. Salloum and O. M. Knio, Combust. Flame 157(2): 288–295 (2010) is adopted. Attention is focused on quantifying intermixing rates based on experimental measurements of uniform ignition as well as measurements of self-propagating front velocities. Estimates of atomic diffusivity are first obtained based on a regression analysis. A more elaborate Bayesian inference formalism is then applied in order to assess the impact of uncertainties in the measurements, potential discrepancies between predictions and observations, as well as the sensitivity of predictions to inferred parameters. Intermixing rates are correlated in terms of a composite Arrhenius law, which exhibits a discontinuity around the Al melting temperature. Analysis of the predictions indicates that Arrhenius parameters inferred for the low-temperature branch lie within a tight range, whereas the parameters of the high-temperature branch are characterized by higher uncertainty. The latter is affected by scatter in the experimental measurements, and the limited range of bilayers where observations are available. For both branches, the predictions exhibit higher sensitivity to the activation energy than the pre-exponent, whose posteriors are highly correlated.

  7. Modelling of Turbulent Scalar Fluxes in the Broken Reaction Zones Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hong G.; Chakraborty, Nilanjan; Klein, Markus; Kasten, Christian; Arias, Paul

    2016-11-01

    The LES filtered species transport equation in turbulent reacting flow simulations contains the unclosed turbulent scalar flux that needs to be modelled. It is well known that the statistical behavior of this term and its alignment characteristics with resolved scalar gradient depend on the relative importance of heat release and turbulent velocity fluctuations. Counter-gradient transport has been reported in several earlier studies where the flames under investigation were located either in the corrugated flamelets or thin reaction zones regime of premixed turbulent combustion. Therefore it is useful to understand the statistical behavior of turbulent scalar fluxes if the flame represents the broken reaction zones regime (BRZR). The present analysis aims to provide improved understanding on this subject through an a-priori analysis of a detailed chemistry database consisting of three freely-propagating statistically planar turbulent H2-air premixed flames representing three different regimes of combustion. Results indicate that heat release effects weaken with increasing Karlovitz number, but that counter-gradient transport can still occur for large LES filter size in the BRZR. Furthermore the behaviour of the flux and in particular its sign are different for reactant and product species. KAUST, EPSRC, KAUST Supercomputing Lab, N8, Archer.

  8. Propagation of neutron-reaction uncertainties through multi-physics models of novel LWR's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Solis, Augusto; Sjöstrand, Henrik; Helgesson, Petter

    2017-09-01

    The novel design of the renewable boiling water reactor (RBWR) allows a breeding ratio greater than unity and thus, it aims at providing for a self-sustained fuel cycle. The neutron reactions that compose the different microscopic cross-sections and angular distributions are uncertain, so when they are employed in the determination of the spatial distribution of the neutron flux in a nuclear reactor, a methodology should be employed to account for these associated uncertainties. In this work, the Total Monte Carlo (TMC) method is used to propagate the different neutron-reactions (as well as angular distributions) covariances that are part of the TENDL-2014 nuclear data (ND) library. The main objective is to propagate them through coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic models in order to assess the uncertainty of important safety parameters related to multi-physics, such as peak cladding temperature along the axial direction of an RBWR fuel assembly. The objective of this study is to quantify the impact that ND covariances of important nuclides such as U-235, U-238, Pu-239 and the thermal scattering of hydrogen in H2O have in the deterministic safety analysis of novel nuclear reactors designs.

  9. Propagation of neutron-reaction uncertainties through multi-physics models of novel LWR's

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernandez-Solis Augusto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The novel design of the renewable boiling water reactor (RBWR allows a breeding ratio greater than unity and thus, it aims at providing for a self-sustained fuel cycle. The neutron reactions that compose the different microscopic cross-sections and angular distributions are uncertain, so when they are employed in the determination of the spatial distribution of the neutron flux in a nuclear reactor, a methodology should be employed to account for these associated uncertainties. In this work, the Total Monte Carlo (TMC method is used to propagate the different neutron-reactions (as well as angular distributions covariances that are part of the TENDL-2014 nuclear data (ND library. The main objective is to propagate them through coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic models in order to assess the uncertainty of important safety parameters related to multi-physics, such as peak cladding temperature along the axial direction of an RBWR fuel assembly. The objective of this study is to quantify the impact that ND covariances of important nuclides such as U-235, U-238, Pu-239 and the thermal scattering of hydrogen in H2O have in the deterministic safety analysis of novel nuclear reactors designs.

  10. A nonlocal and periodic reaction-diffusion-advection model of a single phytoplankton species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    In this article, we are concerned with a nonlocal reaction-diffusion-advection model which describes the evolution of a single phytoplankton species in a eutrophic vertical water column where the species relies solely on light for its metabolism. The new feature of our modeling equation lies in that the incident light intensity and the death rate are assumed to be time periodic with a common period. We first establish a threshold type result on the global dynamics of this model in terms of the basic reproduction number R0. Then we derive various characterizations of R0 with respect to the vertical turbulent diffusion rate, the sinking or buoyant rate and the water column depth, respectively, which in turn give rather precise conditions to determine whether the phytoplankton persist or become extinct. Our theoretical results not only extend the existing ones for the time-independent case, but also reveal new interesting effects of the modeling parameters and the time-periodic heterogeneous environment on persistence and extinction of the phytoplankton species, and thereby suggest important implications for phytoplankton growth control.

  11. Neutrino-Nucleus Reactions - Shell Model vs R.P.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shadow; Mekjian, Aram; Zamick, Larry; Auerbach, Naftali

    2001-10-01

    We discuss the virtues and limitations of various approaches to neutrino-nucleus reactions using as an example ν +^12C arrow ^12N+e^-. In the spherical R.P.A., which has often been used, the exclusive reaction rate to the J=1^+ T=1 ground state of ^12N is overestimated by at least a factor of four. This can be explained by deformation effects by using a Nilsson model, or by configuration mixing in the shell model. For the operator rY^1t+ (dipole), r[Y^1s]^λt+ (spin-dipole), and r[Y^1l]^λt+ (orbital-dipole) the summed strength is independent of deformation in a Δ N =0 approximation. This can be explained by using energy weighted sum rules(EWS), plus the fact that for the \\underlinedipole case, the excitation crosses over only one major shell. Thus one can get a good estimate of the non-energy weighted sum strength by dividing EWS by hbar ω. The sum rule for the dipole due to Lipparini and Stingari is 1/2 [EWS(+)+EWS(-)]=9/16 π frachbar^2M A which for N=Z nuclei gives EWS(+)=EWS(-)=9/16 π frachbar^2M A. The spin-dipole strength is 3/4 of the above dipole strength. The above expressions will be modified by exchange current effects which have yet to be calculated. The Primakoff sum rule approach to muon capture can be extended to neutrino interactions and these results can be compared with the shell model and RPA results. In the shell model one has to truncate at a certain level so it is not clear if all the strength has been included. Another problem is self consistency. In the Hartee Fock (HF) theory there will be no admixture of the giant monopole state into the ground state, but in many shell model calculations such admixtures are often very large. One of us (N.A.) has shown that one gets better results in the shell model calculations when H.F. wave functions are used.

  12. Comparison of a deterministic reaction model with an INC model for the production of nucleon in nucleon induced rection on light nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, H

    2015-01-01

    Among many reaction models, the intranuclear cascade (INC) calculates par- ticle production in continuum and other physical quantities for nucleon induced reaction on target nuclei. Since it is based on Monte-Carlo method, the time of computation of the INC model is rather large to get reasonable statistical error on double differential cross sections of outgoing particles in continuum for reaction on very light target nuclei. We propose a deterministic approach to calculate double differential cross sections much faster than INC model does. We present some preliminary results and compare them with the results of our INC code.

  13. Adsorption kinetics of NO on ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) and cerium-containing OMC (Ce-OMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jinghuan; Cao, Feifei; Chen, Songze; Ni, Mingjiang; Gao, Xiang, E-mail: xgao1@zju.edu.cn; Cen, Kefa

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) and Ce-OMC were used for NO adsorption. • The NO adsorption capacity of OMC was two times larger than that of activated carbon. • With the addition of cerium both adsorption capacity and adsorption rate increased. • The pseudo-second-order model was the most suitable model for NO adsorption on OMC. • Intraparticle diffusion was the rate controlling step for NO adsorption. - Abstract: Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) and cerium-containing OMC (Ce-OMC) were prepared using evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) method and used to adsorb NO. N{sub 2} sorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to confirm their structures. The results showed that the ordered and uniform structures were successfully synthesized and with the introduction of cerium pore properties were not significantly changed. The NO adsorption capacity of OMC was two times larger than that of activated carbon (AC). With the introduction of cerium both the adsorption capacity and the adsorption rate were improved. The effects of residence time and oxygen concentration on NO adsorption were also investigated. Oxygen played an important role in the NO adsorption (especially in the form of chemisorption) and residence time had small influence on the NO adsorption capacity. The NO adsorption kinetics was analyzed using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich equation and intraparticle diffusion models. The results indicated that the NO adsorption process can be divided into rapid adsorption period, slow adsorption period, and equilibrium adsorption period. The pseudo-second-order model was the most suitable model for NO adsorption on OMC and Ce-OMC. The rate controlling step was the intraparticle diffusion together with the adsorption reaction.

  14. Biosorption and Diffusion Modeling of Pb(II by Malt Bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaiani B. Fontana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of Pb(II from water by biosorption processes onto malt bagasse was investigated and the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters were obtained; additionally a diffusion modeling was proposed. The characterization of malt bagasse was performed by FTIR and SEM/EDS. The experiments were conducted in batch system and an experimental design based response surface methodology was applied for agitation speed and pH optimization. The kinetics of biosorption followed pseudo-second-order model and the temperature of the process affected the biosorption capacity. Isotherm models of Langmuir, Freundlich, and Elovich were applied and the Langmuir model showed better fit and the estimated biosorption capacity was 29.1 mg g−1. The negative values obtained for ΔG° and positive values of ΔH° confirm, respectively, the spontaneous and endothermic nature of the process. The diffusion modeling was performed based on experiments in the absence of agitation to investigate the influence of the biosorbent on the sorption process of Pb(II ions.

  15. Neural Network Control of CSTR for Reversible Reaction Using Reverence Model Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan ALOKO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, non-linear control of CSTR for reversible reaction is carried out using Neural Network as design tool. The Model Reverence approach in used to design ANN controller. The idea is to have a control system that will be able to achieve improvement in the level of conversion and to be able to track set point change and reject load disturbance. We use PID control scheme as benchmark to study the performance of the controller. The comparison shows that ANN controller out perform PID in the extreme range of non-linearity.This paper represents a preliminary effort to design a simplified neutral network control scheme for a class of non-linear process. Future works will involve further investigation of the effectiveness of thin approach for the real industrial chemical process

  16. Modelling of geochemical reactions and experimental cation exchange in MX 80 bentonite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes-H, G; Fritz, B; Clement, A; Michau, N

    2005-10-01

    Bentonites are widely used for waste repository systems because of their hydrodynamic, surface and chemical-retention properties. MX 80 bentonite (bentonite of Wyoming) contains approximately 85% Na/Ca-montmorillonite and 15% accessory minerals. The dominant presence of Na/Ca-montmorillonite in this clay mineral could cause it to perform exceptionally well as an engineered barrier for a radioactive waste repository because this buffer material is expected to fill up by swelling the void between canisters containing waste and the surrounding ground. However, the Na/Ca-montmorillonite could be transformed to other clay minerals as a function of time under repository conditions. Previous modelling studies based on the hydrolysis reactions have shown that the Na/Ca-montmorillonite-to-Ca-montmorillonite conversion is the most significant chemical transformation. In fact, this chemical process appears to be a simple cation exchange into the engineered barrier. The purpose of the present study was two-fold. Firstly, it was hoped to predict the newly formed products of bentonite-fluid reactions under repository conditions by applying a thermokinetic hydrochemical code (KIRMAT: Kinetic Reactions and Mass Transport). The system modelled herein was considered to consist of a 1-m thick zone of water-saturated engineered barrier. This non-equilibrated system was placed in contact with a geological fluid on one side, which was then allowed to diffuse into the barrier, while the other side was kept in contact with iron-charged water. Reducing initial conditions ( [P(O)2 approximately equals 0] ; Eh=-200 mV) and a constant reaction temperature (100 degrees C) were considered. Secondly, it was hoped to estimate the influence of inter-layer cations (Ca and Na) on the swelling behaviour of the MX 80 bentonite by using an isothermal system of water vapour adsorption and an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) coupled with a digital image analysis (DIA) program. Here, the

  17. Statistical and dynamical modeling of heavy-ion fusion-fission reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamizadeh, H.; Razazzadeh, H.

    2018-02-01

    A modified statistical model and a four dimensional dynamical model based on Langevin equations have been used to simulate the fission process of the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra produced in the fusion 19F + 188Os and 19F + 197Au reactions. The evaporation residue cross section, the fission cross section, the pre-scission neutron, proton and alpha multiplicities and the anisotropy of fission fragments angular distribution have been calculated for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra. In the modified statistical model the effects of spin K about the symmetry axis and temperature have been considered in calculations of the fission widths and the potential energy surfaces. It was shown that the modified statistical model can reproduce the above mentioned experimental data by using appropriate values of the temperature coefficient of the effective potential equal to λ = 0.0180 ± 0.0055, 0.0080 ± 0.0030 MeV-2 and the scaling factor of the fission barrier height equal to rs = 1.0015 ± 0.0025, 1.0040 ± 0.0020 for the compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra, respectively. Three collective shape coordinates plus the projection of total spin of the compound nucleus on the symmetry axis, K, were considered in the four dimensional dynamical model. In the dynamical calculations, dissipation was generated through the chaos weighted wall and window friction formula. Comparison of the theoretical results with the experimental data showed that two models make it possible to reproduce satisfactorily the above mentioned experimental data for the excited compound nuclei 207At and 216Ra.

  18. Position-specific isotope modeling of organic micropollutants transformations through different reaction pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Biao; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Organic compounds are produced in vast quantities for industrial and agricultural use, as well as for human and animal healthcare [1]. These chemicals and their metabolites are frequently detected at trace levels in fresh water environments where they undergo degradation via different reaction pathways. Compound specific stable isotope analysis (CSIA) is a valuable tool to identify such degradation pathways in different environmental systems. Recent advances in analytical techniques have promoted the fast development and implementation of multi-element CSIA. However, quantitative frameworks to evaluate multi-element stable isotope data and incorporating mechanistic information on the degradation processes [2,3] are still lacking. In this study we propose a mechanism-based modeling approach to simultaneously evaluate concentration as well as bulk and position-specific multi-element isotope evolution during the transformation of organic micropollutants. The model explicitly simulates position-specific isotopologues for those atoms that experience isotope effects and, thereby, provides a mechanistic description of isotope fractionation occurring at different molecular positions. We validate the proposed approach with the concentration and multi-element isotope data of three selected organic micropollutants: dichlorobenzamide (BAM), isoproturon (IPU) and diclofenac (DCF). The model precisely captures the dual element isotope trends characteristic of different reaction pathways and their range of variation consistent with observed multi-element (C, N) bulk isotope fractionation. The proposed approach can also be used as a tool to explore transformation pathways in scenarios for which position-specific isotope data are not yet available. [1] Schwarzenbach, R.P., Egli, T., Hofstetter, T.B., von Gunten, U., Wehrli, B., 2010. Global Water Pollution and Human Health. Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. doi:10.1146/annurev-environ-100809-125342. [2] Jin, B., Haderlein, S.B., Rolle, M

  19. Reaction path modelling in the As-S system: a case study for geothermal As transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cleverley, James S.; Benning, Liane G.; Mountain, Bruce W

    2003-09-01

    Geochemical speciation and reaction path modelling with the Geochemists Workbench (GWB) software was used to investigate zonal As sulphide mineral precipitation and As transport in an active geothermal field, the Uzon Caldera, Kamchatka. A new compilation and critical review of published experimental and theoretical thermodynamic data for As phases was used to modify and update a SUPCRT92 database with important missing phases. The equilibrium constants for these As phases were then added or modified in the current GWB database. Speciation calculations predict that the sampled fluids are undersaturated with respect to As phases and aqueous As is dominantly transported as the complex H{sub 3}AsO{sub 3(aq)} and to a lesser extent the As sulphide complexes As{sub 2}S{sub 3(aq)}, HAs{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup -} and As{sub 2}S{sub 4}{sup 2-}. Modelling the changes in concentration of dissolved As between the samples (0.2-8.6 mg/kg) indicates a strong dependence on redox (log O{sub 2(g)} from -53 to -60) and temperature (95-65 deg. C), and illustrates the importance of mixing between the hydrothermal fluid and an oxygenated fluid. Reaction path models that follow the cooling of a H{sub 2}S{sub (aq)} dominated, As enriched (15 mg/kg) fluids from 125 to 25 deg. C, with sliding redox from log O{sub 2(g)} -55 to -60, predict the mineral paragenesis: (native As+pyrite)-(realgar+pyrite)-(orpiment+pyrite)-(pyrite). This mineral sequence closely resembles the natural layering observed in the Uzon Caldera. Although field measurements contain a lower reduced S concentration than the model, the error margin in the measured sulphide inherent from in situ oxidation during sampling is enough to account for the discrepancy. Despite assumptions in fluid parameters and modelling approaches, as well as deficiencies in the thermodynamic data and an equilibrium approach, this study has shown that acceptable and useful analogues for natural As-rich systems can be developed.

  20. Multiscale Modelling of the Calcium Naphthenate Precipitation Reaction in Petroleum Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Mehandzhiyski, Aleksandar Yordanov

    2016-01-01

    The formation of calcium naphthenate precipitates occurring in the petroleum industry is both an undesirable side reaction and can introduce costly shutdowns and cleaning processes. Although the reaction has been studied by experimental techniques, the exact mechanism of reaction and precipitation is still under debate. In the present work, we apply a multiscale approach to study the formation of calcium naphthenate precipitates. To systematically study this otherwise complex reaction influen...

  1. Evidence for the Active Phase of Heterogeneous Catalysts through In Situ Reaction Product Imaging and Multiscale Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matera, S.; Blomberg, S.; Hoffmann, M. J.; Zetterberg, J.; Gustafson, J.; Lundgren, E.; Reuter, K.

    2015-06-17

    We use multiscale modeling to analyze laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements of the CO oxidation reaction over Pd(100) at near-ambient reaction conditions. Integrating density functional theory-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of the active catalyst into fluid-dynamical simulations of the mass transport inside the reactor chamber, we calculate the reaction product concentration directly above the catalyst surface. Comparing corresponding data calculated for different surface models against the measured LIF signals, we can discriminate the one that predominantly actuates the experimentally measured catalytic activity. For the probed CO oxidation reaction conditions, the experimental activity is due to pristine Pd(100) possibly coexisting with other (oxidic) domains on the surface.

  2. Therapeutic efficacy and immunological response of CCL5 antagonists in models of contact skin reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Canavese

    Full Text Available Skin-infiltrating T-cells play a predominant role in allergic and inflammatory skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and allergic contact dermatitis. These T-cells are attracted by several chemotactic factors including the chemokine CCL5/RANTES, a CC chemokine inducing both the migration and activation of specific leukocyte subsets. CCL5 has been found to be associated with various cell-mediated hypersensitive disorders such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis and irritant contact dermatitis. We have used two antagonists, the first, Met-CCL5, a dual CCR1/CCR5 antagonist and the second, a variant in which GAG binding is abrogated, (44AANA(47-CCL5, which acts as a dominant negative inhibitor of CCL5. The antagonists were tested in two models of contact skin reaction. The first, irritant contact dermatitis (ICD is a pathological non-specific inflammatory skin condition arising from the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by keratinocytes in response to haptens, usually chemicals. The second, contact hypersensitivity (CHS is a T-cell dependent model, mimicking in part the T-cell-mediated skin diseases such as psoriasis. In both models, the CCL5 antagonists showed therapeutic efficacy by reducing swelling by 50% as well as the reduction of soluble mediators in homogenates derived from challenged ears. These results demonstrate that blocking the receptor or the ligand are both effective strategies to inhibit skin inflammation.

  3. Material Balance And Reaction Kinetics Modeling For Penex Isomerization Process In Daura Refinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamadi Adel Sharif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Penex Deisohexanizer isomerization of light straight run naphtha is a significant process for petroleum refining and proved to be effective technology to produce gasoline components with a high octane number. Modeling of the chemical kinetic reactions is an important tool because it is a better tool for optimization of the experimental data into parameters used for industrial reactors. The present study deals on the isomerization process in Daura refinery. Material balance calculations were done mathematically on the unit for the kinetics prediction purpose. A kinetic mathematical model was derived for the prediction rate constants K1 and K2 and activation energy Ea at operating temperatures range 120-180°C. According to the model, the results show that with increasing of temperature leads to increased K1 directly, where the K2 values proportional inversely. The activation energy results show that Ea1(nC6

  4. New time-scale criteria for model simplification of bio-reaction systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quasi-steady state approximation (QSSA based on time-scale analysis is known to be an effective method for simplifying metabolic reaction system, but the conventional analysis becomes time-consuming and tedious when the system is large. Although there are automatic methods, they are based on eigenvalue calculations of the Jacobian matrix and on linear transformations, which have a high computation cost. A more efficient estimation approach is necessary for complex systems. Results This work derived new time-scale factor by focusing on the problem structure. By mathematically reasoning the balancing behavior of fast species, new time-scale criteria were derived with a simple expression that uses the Jacobian matrix directly. The algorithm requires no linear transformation or decomposition of the Jacobian matrix, which has been an essential part for previous automatic time-scaling methods. Furthermore, the proposed scale factor is estimated locally. Therefore, an iterative procedure was also developed to find the possible multiple boundary layers and to derive an appropriate reduced model. Conclusion By successive calculation of the newly derived time-scale criteria, it was possible to detect multiple boundary layers of full ordinary differential equation (ODE models. Besides, the iterative procedure could derive the appropriate reduced differential algebraic equation (DAE model with consistent initial values, which was tested with simple examples and a practical example.

  5. Peak Vertical Ground Reaction Force during Two-Leg Landing: A Systematic Review and Mathematical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxin Niu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. (1 To systematically review peak vertical ground reaction force (PvGRF during two-leg drop landing from specific drop height (DH, (2 to construct a mathematical model describing correlations between PvGRF and DH, and (3 to analyze the effects of some factors on the pooled PvGRF regardless of DH. Methods. A computerized bibliographical search was conducted to extract PvGRF data on a single foot when participants landed with both feet from various DHs. An innovative mathematical model was constructed to analyze effects of gender, landing type, shoes, ankle stabilizers, surface stiffness and sample frequency on PvGRF based on the pooled data. Results. Pooled PvGRF and DH data of 26 articles showed that the square root function fits their relationship well. An experimental validation was also done on the regression equation for the medicum frequency. The PvGRF was not significantly affected by surface stiffness, but was significantly higher in men than women, the platform than suspended landing, the barefoot than shod condition, and ankle stabilizer than control condition, and higher than lower frequencies. Conclusions. The PvGRF and root DH showed a linear relationship. The mathematical modeling method with systematic review is helpful to analyze the influence factors during landing movement without considering DH.

  6. Solving the non-isothermal reaction-diffusion model equations in a spherical catalyst by the variational iteration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazwaz, Abdul-Majid

    2017-07-01

    In this work we address the Lane-Emden boundary value problems which appear in chemical applications, biochemical applications, and scientific disciplines. We apply the variational iteration method to solve two specific models. The first problem models reaction-diffusion equation in a spherical catalyst, while the second problem models the reaction-diffusion process in a spherical biocatalyst. We obtain reliable analytical expressions of the concentrations and the effectiveness factors. Proper graphs will be used to illustrate the obtained results. The proposed analysis demonstrates reliability and efficiency applicability of the employed method.

  7. A quark model calculation for the short-range contribution in the pion double charge exchange reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou Bingsong; Jiang Huanqing (Institute of Theoretical Physics and Institute of High Energy Physcis, Academia Sinica, Beijing (CN))

    1989-10-01

    A quark model calculation for the short-range contribution in the pion double charge exchange (DCX) reaction is presented. In the framework of this new model the angular distributions of {sup 18}O({pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup {minus}}){sup 18}Ne(g.s.) at low energies are calculated and compared with the experimental data. It is found that this model can explain the anomalous'' increasing behavior for the DCX reaction around 50 MeV quite well.

  8. The application of selective reaction monitoring confirms dysregulation of glycolysis in a preclinical model of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins-de-Souza Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing preclinical models is essential for novel drug discovery in schizophrenia. Most existing models are characterized by abnormalities in behavioral readouts, which are informative, but do not necessarily translate to the symptoms of the human disease. Therefore, there is a necessity of characterizing the preclinical models from a molecular point of view. Selective reaction monitoring (SRM has already shown promise in preclinical and clinical studies for multiplex measurement of diagnostic, prognostic and treatment-related biomarkers. Methods We have established an SRM assay for multiplex analysis of 7 enzymes of the glycolysis pathway which is already known to be affected in human schizophrenia and in the widely-used acute PCP rat model of schizophrenia. The selected enzymes were hexokinase 1 (Hk1, aldolase C (Aldoc, triosephosphate isomerase (Tpi1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Gapdh, phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (Pgam1, phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (Pgk1 and enolase 2 (Eno2. The levels of these enzymes were analyzed using SRM in frontal cortex from brain tissue of PCP treated rats. Results Univariate analyses showed statistically significant altered levels of Tpi1 and alteration of Hk1, Aldoc, Pgam1 and Gapdh with borderline significance in PCP rats compared to controls. Most interestingly, multivariate analysis which considered the levels of all 7 enzymes simultaneously resulted in generation of a bi-dimensional chart that can distinguish the PCP rats from the controls. Conclusions This study not only supports PCP treated rats as a useful preclinical model of schizophrenia, but it also establishes that SRM mass spectrometry could be used in the development of multiplex classification tools for complex psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia.

  9. Models of direct reactions and quantum pre-equilibrium for nucleon scattering on spherical nuclei; Modeles de reactions directes et de pre-equilibre quantique pour la diffusion de nucleons sur des noyaux spheriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, M.

    2006-01-15

    When a nucleon collides with a target nucleus, several reactions may occur: elastic and inelastic scatterings, charge exchange... In order to describe these reactions, different models are involved: the direct reactions, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus models. Our goal is to study, within a quantum framework and without any adjustable parameter, the direct and pre-equilibrium reactions for nucleons scatterings off double closed-shell nuclei. We first consider direct reactions: we are studying nucleon scattering with the Melbourne G-matrix, which represents the interaction between the projectile and one target nucleon, and with random phase approximation (RPA) wave functions which describe all target states. This is a fully microscopic approach since no adjustable parameters are involved. A second part is dedicated to the study of nucleon inelastic scattering for large energy transfer which necessarily involves the pre-equilibrium mechanism. Several models have been developed in the past to deal with pre-equilibrium. They start from the Born expansion of the transition amplitude which is associated to the inelastic process and they use several approximations which have not yet been tested. We have achieved some comparisons between second order cross sections which have been calculated with and without these approximations. Our results allow us to criticize some of these approximations and give several directions to improve the quantum pre-equilibrium models. (author)

  10. Unravelling the kinetics of the formation of acrylamide in the Maillard reaction of fructose and asparagine by multiresponse modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, J.J.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic model for the formation of acrylamide in a fructose–asparagine reaction system at initial pH 5.5 is proposed, based on an approach called multiresponse kinetic modelling. The formation of acetic acid and formic acid from the degradation of fructose and its isomer glucose was included in

  11. Computer Simulations of Corporation's Reaction to an Environment on the Basis of Corporate Entrepreneurship Model in British Petroleum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on mean field theory and corporate entrepreneurship (CE concept a mathematical model of complex organization has been derived. The model was applied to computer simulations of corporation's reaction to hostile environment in corporations similar to British Petroleum.

  12. Mechanism of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions sorption from aqueous solutions by macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastasović, Aleksandra B., E-mail: anastaso@chem.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Chemistry, Department of Microelectronic Technologies, Njegoševa 12, Belgrade (Serbia); Ekmeščić, Bojana M. [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Chemistry, Department of Microelectronic Technologies, Njegoševa 12, Belgrade (Serbia); and others

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Macroporous PGME-deta sorption potential for Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) was studied. • Sorption kinetics obeyed pseudo-second order model. • Maximal Pb(II), Cd(II) and Cu(II) sorption capacities were 164, 152 and 120 mg g{sup −1}. • AFM indicates that metal sorption changes the size and morphology of PGME-deta. • XPS suggests complexation through the formation of Me−O and Me−N bonds in PGME-deta. - Abstract: The mechanism of Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions sorption from aqueous solutions by macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene glycol dimethacrylate) (PGME) functionalized by reaction of the pendant epoxy groups with diethylene triamine (PGME-deta) was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX) were used for the determination of surface morphology of the copolymer particles. The sorption behavior of heavy metals Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions sorption was investigated in batch static experiments under non-competitive conditions at room temperature (298 K). The obtained results were fitted to pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic model. The kinetics studies showed that Cu(II), Cd(II) and Pb(II) sorption obeys the pseudo-second-order model under all investigated operating conditions with evident influence of pore diffusion.

  13. Model reduction for stochastic CaMKII reaction kinetics in synapses by graph-constrained correlation dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Todd; Bartol, Tom; Sejnowski, Terrence; Mjolsness, Eric

    2015-06-18

    A stochastic reaction network model of Ca(2+) dynamics in synapses (Pepke et al PLoS Comput. Biol. 6 e1000675) is expressed and simulated using rule-based reaction modeling notation in dynamical grammars and in MCell. The model tracks the response of calmodulin and CaMKII to calcium influx in synapses. Data from numerically intensive simulations is used to train a reduced model that, out of sample, correctly predicts the evolution of interaction parameters characterizing the instantaneous probability distribution over molecular states in the much larger fine-scale models. The novel model reduction method, 'graph-constrained correlation dynamics', requires a graph of plausible state variables and interactions as input. It parametrically optimizes a set of constant coefficients appearing in differential equations governing the time-varying interaction parameters that determine all correlations between variables in the reduced model at any time slice.

  14. Macrophage reaction against biomaterials in the mouse model - Phenotypes, functions and markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopfleisch, R

    2016-10-01

    The foreign body reaction (FBR) is a response of the host tissue against more or less degradation-resistant foreign macromolecular material. The reaction is divided into five different phases which involve most aspects of the innate and the adaptive immune system: protein adsorption, acute and chronic inflammation, foreign body giant cell formation and fibrosis. It is long known, that macrophages play a central role in all of these phases except for protein adsorption. Initially it was believed that the macrophage driven FBR has a complete negative effect on biocompatibility. Recent progress in biomaterial and macrophage research however describe macrophages as more than pure antigen phagocytosing and presenting cells and thus pro-inflammatory cells involved in biomaterial encapsulation and failure. Quite contrary, both, pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages, the diverse regulatory M2 macrophage subtypes and even foreign body giant cells (FBGC) are after necessary for integration of non-degradable biomaterials and degradation and replacement of degradable biomaterials. This review gives a comprehensive overview on the taxonomy of the currently known macrophage subtypes. Their diverging functions, metabolism and markers are summarized and the relevance of this more diverse macrophage picture for the design of biomaterials is shortly discussed. The view on role of macrophages in the foreign body reaction against biomaterials is rapidly changing. Despite the initial idea that macrophage are mainly involved in undesired degradation and biomaterial rejection it becomes now clear that they are nevertheless necessary for proper integration of non-degradable biomaterials and degradation of placeholder, degradable biomaterials. As a pathologist I experienced a lack on a good summary on the current taxonomy, functions and phenotypes of macrophages in my recent projects on the biocompatibility of biomaterials in the mouse model. The submitted review therefore intends to gives a

  15. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO₂, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C₁₂{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO₂, allene, C₂–C₆ olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water

  16. Modeling of multiphase flow with solidification and chemical reaction in materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jiuan

    Understanding of multiphase flow and related heat transfer and chemical reactions are the keys to increase the productivity and efficiency in industrial processes. The objective of this thesis is to utilize the computational approaches to investigate the multiphase flow and its application in the materials processes, especially in the following two areas: directional solidification, and pyrolysis and synthesis. In this thesis, numerical simulations will be performed for crystal growth of several III-V and II-VI compounds. The effects of Prandtl and Grashof numbers on the axial temperature profile, the solidification interface shape, and melt flow are investigated. For the material with high Prandtl and Grashof numbers, temperature field and growth interface will be significantly influenced by melt flow, resulting in the complicated temperature distribution and curved interface shape, so it will encounter tremendous difficulty using a traditional Bridgman growth system. A new design is proposed to reduce the melt convection. The geometric configuration of top cold and bottom hot in the melt will dramatically reduce the melt convection. The new design has been employed to simulate the melt flow and heat transfer in crystal growth with large Prandtl and Grashof numbers and the design parameters have been adjusted. Over 90% of commercial solar cells are made from silicon and directional solidification system is the one of the most important method to produce multi-crystalline silicon ingots due to its tolerance to feedstock impurities and lower manufacturing cost. A numerical model is developed to simulate the silicon ingot directional solidification process. Temperature distribution and solidification interface location are presented. Heat transfer and solidification analysis are performed to determine the energy efficiency of the silicon production furnace. Possible improvements are identified. The silicon growth process is controlled by adjusting heating power and

  17. Ozonation of benzotriazole and methylindole: Kinetic modeling, identification of intermediates and reaction mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldán, Gloria; Rodríguez, Elena

    2015-01-23

    The ozonation of 1H-benzotriazole (BZ) and 3-methylindole (ML), two emerging contaminants that are frequently present in aquatic environments, was investigated. The experiments were performed with the contaminants (1μM) dissolved in ultrapure water. The kinetic study led to the determination of the apparent rate constants for the ozonation reactions. In the case of 1H-benzotriazole, these rate constants varied from 20.1 ± 0.4M(-1)s(-1) at pH=3 to 2143 ± 23 M(-1)s(-1) at pH=10. Due to its acidic nature (pKa=8.2), the degree of dissociation of this pollutant was determined at every pH of work, and the specific rate constants of the un-dissociated and dissociated species were evaluated, being the values of these rate constants 20.1 ± 2.0 and 2.0 ± 0.3 × 10(3)M(-1)s(-1), respectively. On the contrary, 3-methylindole does not present acidic nature, and therefore, it can be proposed an average value for its rate constant of 4.90 ± 0.7 × 10(5)M(-1)s(-1) in the whole pH range 3-10. Further experiments were performed to identify the main degradation byproducts (10 mg L(-1) of contaminants, 0.023 gh(-1) of ozone). Up to 8 intermediates formed in the ozonation of 3-methylindole were identified by LC-TOFMS, while 6 intermediates were identified in the ozonation of 1H-benzotriazole. By considering these intermediate compounds, the reaction mechanisms were proposed and discussed. Finally, evaluated rate constants allowed to predict and modeling the oxidation of these micropollutants in general aquatic systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A reaction-diffusion model to capture disparity selectivity in primary visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Sultan Mohiuddin Siddiqui

    Full Text Available Decades of experimental studies are available on disparity selective cells in visual cortex of macaque and cat. Recently, local disparity map for iso-orientation sites for near-vertical edge preference is reported in area 18 of cat visual cortex. No experiment is yet reported on complete disparity map in V1. Disparity map for layer IV in V1 can provide insight into how disparity selective complex cell receptive field is organized from simple cell subunits. Though substantial amounts of experimental data on disparity selective cells is available, no model on receptive field development of such cells or disparity map development exists in literature. We model disparity selectivity in layer IV of cat V1 using a reaction-diffusion two-eye paradigm. In this model, the wiring between LGN and cortical layer IV is determined by resource an LGN cell has for supporting connections to cortical cells and competition for target space in layer IV. While competing for target space, the same type of LGN cells, irrespective of whether it belongs to left-eye-specific or right-eye-specific LGN layer, cooperate with each other while trying to push off the other type. Our model captures realistic 2D disparity selective simple cell receptive fields, their response properties and disparity map along with orientation and ocular dominance maps. There is lack of correlation between ocular dominance and disparity selectivity at the cell population level. At the map level, disparity selectivity topography is not random but weakly clustered for similar preferred disparities. This is similar to the experimental result reported for macaque. The details of weakly clustered disparity selectivity map in V1 indicate two types of complex cell receptive field organization.

  19. Minimal moment equations for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks with partially finite state space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob

    2015-12-28

    Many stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks contain some chemical species for which the number of molecules that are present in the system can only be finite (for instance due to conservation laws), but also other species that can be present in arbitrarily large amounts. The prime example of such networks are models of gene expression, which typically contain a small and finite number of possible states for the promoter but an infinite number of possible states for the amount of mRNA and protein. One of the main approaches to analyze such models is through the use of equations for the time evolution of moments of the chemical species. Recently, a new approach based on conditional moments of the species with infinite state space given all the different possible states of the finite species has been proposed. It was argued that this approach allows one to capture more details about the full underlying probability distribution with a smaller number of equations. Here, I show that the result that less moments provide more information can only stem from an unnecessarily complicated description of the system in the classical formulation. The foundation of this argument will be the derivation of moment equations that describe the complete probability distribution over the finite state space but only low-order moments over the infinite state space. I will show that the number of equations that is needed is always less than what was previously claimed and always less than the number of conditional moment equations up to the same order. To support these arguments, a symbolic algorithm is provided that can be used to derive minimal systems of unconditional moment equations for models with partially finite state space.

  20. Minimal moment equations for stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks with partially finite state space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruess, Jakob

    2015-12-01

    Many stochastic models of biochemical reaction networks contain some chemical species for which the number of molecules that are present in the system can only be finite (for instance due to conservation laws), but also other species that can be present in arbitrarily large amounts. The prime example of such networks are models of gene expression, which typically contain a small and finite number of possible states for the promoter but an infinite number of possible states for the amount of mRNA and protein. One of the main approaches to analyze such models is through the use of equations for the time evolution of moments of the chemical species. Recently, a new approach based on conditional moments of the species with infinite state space given all the different possible states of the finite species has been proposed. It was argued that this approach allows one to capture more details about the full underlying probability distribution with a smaller number of equations. Here, I show that the result that less moments provide more information can only stem from an unnecessarily complicated description of the system in the classical formulation. The foundation of this argument will be the derivation of moment equations that describe the complete probability distribution over the finite state space but only low-order moments over the infinite state space. I will show that the number of equations that is needed is always less than what was previously claimed and always less than the number of conditional moment equations up to the same order. To support these arguments, a symbolic algorithm is provided that can be used to derive minimal systems of unconditional moment equations for models with partially finite state space.

  1. Seemingly irrational driving behavior model: The effect of habit strength and anticipated affective reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yi-Shih

    2015-09-01

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that aberrant driving behaviors are not entirely rational. On the basis of the dual-process theory, this study postulates that drivers may learn to perform irrational aberrant driving behaviors, and these behaviors could be derived either from a deliberate or an intuitive decision-making approach. Accordingly, a seemingly irrational driving behavior model is proposed; in this model, the theory of planned behavior (TPB) was adopted to represent the deliberate decision-making mechanism, and habit strength was incorporated to reflect the intuitive decision process. A multiple trivariate mediation structure was designed to reflect the process through which driving behaviors are learned. Anticipated affective reactions (AARs) were further included to examine the effect of affect on aberrant driving behaviors. Considering the example of speeding behaviors, this study developed scales and conducted a two-wave survey of students in two departments at a university in Northern Taiwan. The analysis results show that habit strength consists of multiple aspects, and frequency of past behavior cannot be a complete repository for accumulating habit strength. Habit strength appeared to be a crucial mediator between intention antecedents (e.g., attitude) and the intention itself. Including habit strength in the TPB model enhanced the explained variance of speeding intention by 26.7%. In addition, AARs were different from attitudes; particularly, young drivers tended to perform speeding behaviors to reduce negative feelings such as regret. The proposed model provides an effective alternative approach for investigating aberrant driving behaviors; corresponding countermeasures are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Bifurcation analysis of a delay reaction-diffusion malware propagation model with feedback control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linhe; Zhao, Hongyong; Wang, Xiaoming

    2015-05-01

    With the rapid development of network information technology, information networks security has become a very critical issue in our work and daily life. This paper attempts to develop a delay reaction-diffusion model with a state feedback controller to describe the process of malware propagation in mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSNs). By analyzing the stability and Hopf bifurcation, we show that the state feedback method can successfully be used to control unstable steady states or periodic oscillations. Moreover, formulas for determining the properties of the bifurcating periodic oscillations are derived by applying the normal form method and center manifold theorem. Finally, we conduct extensive simulations on large-scale MWSNs to evaluate the proposed model. Numerical evidences show that the linear term of the controller is enough to delay the onset of the Hopf bifurcation and the properties of the bifurcation can be regulated to achieve some desirable behaviors by choosing the appropriate higher terms of the controller. Furthermore, we obtain that the spatial-temporal dynamic characteristics of malware propagation are closely related to the rate constant for nodes leaving the infective class for recovered class and the mobile behavior of nodes.

  3. Traveling waves in a coupled reaction-diffusion and difference model of hematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adimy, M.; Chekroun, A.; Kazmierczak, B.

    2017-04-01

    The formation and development of blood cells is a very complex process, called hematopoiesis. This process involves a small population of cells called hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The HSCs are undifferentiated cells, located in the bone marrow before they become mature blood cells and enter the blood stream. They have a unique ability to produce either similar cells (self-renewal), or cells engaged in one of different lineages of blood cells: red blood cells, white cells and platelets (differentiation). The HSCs can be either in a proliferating or in a quiescent phase. In this paper, we distinguish between dividing cells that enter directly to the quiescent phase and dividing cells that return to the proliferating phase to divide again. We propose a mathematical model describing the dynamics of HSC population, taking into account their spatial distribution. The resulting model is a coupled reaction-diffusion equation and difference equation with delay. We study the existence of monotone traveling wave fronts and the asymptotic speed of spread.

  4. A simplified kinetic model for the side reactions occurring during the enzymatic synthesis of ampicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L.O. Ferreira

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a kinetic study of the side reactions of the ampicillin enzymatic synthesis, from phenylglycine methyl ester and 6-aminopenicillanic acid using penicillin G acylase immobilized on agarose. A Michaelis-Menten model with competitive inhibition was fitted to initial rates of ester and antibiotic hydrolysis, at pH 6.5 and 25ºC. Inherent kinetic parameters were estimated for low enzymatic loads, to assure that diffusional resistance was not important. It was observed that ampicillin inhibits the hydrolysis of PGME, but the inhibitory effect of the ester on ampicillin hydrolysis was almost negligible. The obtained parameters were: k cat1= 0.025 mM/UI min, Km1 = 155.4mM, K AE = 16.18mM, k cat2= 4.67x10-3 mM/UI min, Km2 = 11.47, K EA = 0.68 mM. Parameter values are in the range reported in the literature, except for Km1, which is much higher. The large confidence interval for this parameter denotes that the model presents low sensitivity with respect to it.

  5. A reaction-diffusion model of the Darien Gap Sterile Insect Release Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, John G.

    2015-05-01

    The Sterile Insect Release Method (SIRM) is used as a biological control for invasive insect species. SIRM involves introducing large quantities of sterilized male insects into a wild population of invading insects. A fertile/sterile mating produces offspring that are not viable and the wild insect population will eventually be eradicated. A U.S. government program maintains a permanent sterile fly barrier zone in the Darien Gap between Panama and Columbia to control the screwworm fly (Cochliomyia Hominivorax), an insect that feeds off of living tissue in mammals and has devastating effects on livestock. This barrier zone is maintained by regular releases of massive quantities of sterilized male screwworm flies from aircraft. We analyze a reaction-diffusion model of the Darien Gap barrier zone. Simulations of the model equations yield two types of spatially inhomogeneous steady-state solutions representing a sterile fly barrier that does not prevent invasion and a barrier that does prevent invasion. We investigate steady-state solutions using both phase plane methods and monotone iteration methods and describe how barrier width and the sterile fly release rate affects steady-state behavior.

  6. A Reaction-Diffusion Model for Synapse Growth and Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kang; Lisman, John; Hagan, Michael

    Memory storage involves strengthening of synaptic transmission known as long-term potentiation (LTP). The late phase of LTP is associated with structural processes that enlarge the synapse. Yet, synapses must be stable, despite continual subunit turnover, over the lifetime of an encoded memory. These considerations suggest that synapses are variable-size stable structure (VSSS), meaning they can switch between multiple metastable structures with different sizes. The mechanisms underlying VSSS are poorly understood. While experiments and theory have suggested that the interplay between diffusion and receptor-scaffold interactions can lead to a preferred stable size for synaptic domains, such a mechanism cannot explain how synapses adopt widely different sizes. Here we develop a minimal reaction-diffusion model of VSSS for synapse growth, incorporating the recent observation from super-resolution microscopy that neural activity can build compositional heterogeneities within synaptic domains. We find that introducing such heterogeneities can change the stable domain size in a controlled manner. We discuss a potential connection between this model and experimental data on synapse sizes, and how it provides a possible mechanism to structurally encode graded long-term memory. We acknowledge the support from NSF INSPIRE Award number IOS-1526941 (KL, MFH, JL) and the Brandeis Center for Bioinspired Soft Materials, an NSF MRSEC, DMR- 1420382 (MFH).

  7. EXTENSION OF THE NUCLEAR REACTION MODEL CODE EMPIRE TO ACTINIDES NUCLEAR DATA EVALUATION.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAPOTE,R.; SIN, M.; TRKOV, A.; HERMAN, M.; CARLSON, B.V.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2007-04-22

    Recent extensions and improvements of the EMPIRE code system are outlined. They add new capabilities to the code, such as prompt fission neutron spectra calculations using Hauser-Feshbach plus pre-equilibrium pre-fission spectra, cross section covariance matrix calculations by Monte Carlo method, fitting of optical model parameters, extended set of optical model potentials including new dispersive coupled channel potentials, parity-dependent level densities and transmission through numerically defined fission barriers. These features, along with improved and validated ENDF formatting, exclusive/inclusive spectra, and recoils make the current EMPIRE release a complete and well validated tool for evaluation of nuclear data at incident energies above the resonance region. The current EMPIRE release has been used in evaluations of neutron induced reaction files for {sup 232}Th and {sup 231,233}Pa nuclei in the fast neutron region at IAEA. Triple-humped fission barriers and exclusive pre-fission neutron spectra were considered for the fission data evaluation. Total, fission, capture and neutron emission cross section, average resonance parameters and angular distributions of neutron scattering are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data.

  8. A reaction-diffusion model for radiation-induced bystander effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olobatuyi, Oluwole; de Vries, Gerda; Hillen, Thomas

    2017-08-01

    We develop and analyze a reaction-diffusion model to investigate the dynamics of the lifespan of a bystander signal emitted when cells are exposed to radiation. Experimental studies by Mothersill and Seymour 1997, using malignant epithelial cell lines, found that an emitted bystander signal can still cause bystander effects in cells even 60 h after its emission. Several other experiments have also shown that the signal can persist for months and even years. Also, bystander effects have been hypothesized as one of the factors responsible for the phenomenon of low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity and increased radioresistance (HRS/IRR). Here, we confirm this hypothesis with a mathematical model, which we fit to Joiner's data on HRS/IRR in a T98G glioma cell line. Furthermore, we use phase plane analysis to understand the full dynamics of the signal's lifespan. We find that both single and multiple radiation exposure can lead to bystander signals that either persist temporarily or permanently. We also found that, in an heterogeneous environment, the size of the domain exposed to radiation and the number of radiation exposures can determine whether a signal will persist temporarily or permanently. Finally, we use sensitivity analysis to identify those cell parameters that affect the signal's lifespan and the signal-induced cell death the most.

  9. A Thermodynamically-consistent FBA-based Approach to Biogeochemical Reaction Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial rates are critical to understanding biogeochemical processes in natural environments. Recently, flux balance analysis (FBA) has been applied to predict microbial rates in aquifers and other settings. FBA is a genome-scale constraint-based modeling approach that computes metabolic rates and other phenotypes of microorganisms. This approach requires a prior knowledge of substrate uptake rates, which is not available for most natural microbes. Here we propose to constrain substrate uptake rates on the basis of microbial kinetics. Specifically, we calculate rates of respiration (and fermentation) using a revised Monod equation; this equation accounts for both the kinetics and thermodynamics of microbial catabolism. Substrate uptake rates are then computed from the rates of respiration, and applied to FBA to predict rates of microbial growth. We implemented this method by linking two software tools, PHREEQC and COBRA Toolbox. We applied this method to acetotrophic methanogenesis by Methanosarcina barkeri, and compared the simulation results to previous laboratory observations. The new method constrains acetate uptake by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of methanogenesis, and predicted well the observations of previous experiments. In comparison, traditional methods of dynamic-FBA constrain acetate uptake on the basis of enzyme kinetics, and failed to reproduce the experimental results. These results show that microbial rate laws may provide a better constraint than enzyme kinetics for applying FBA to biogeochemical reaction modeling.

  10. Alteration of the Martian Surface Through Time: A Reaction Path Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, W. I.; Plumlee, G. S.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1995-09-01

    We have performed preliminary geochemical reaction path calculations [1] that attempt to model reasonable martian geologic processes under various climatic conditions postulated for Mars during its planetary evolution [2]. Weathering and fluid evaporation and freezing are discussed here. Under current Earth conditions, 25 degrees C rainwater in equilibrium with the atmosphere has a calculated pH=5.66, dissolved O2=2.5x10^-4 mole/kg, and dissolved CO2=1.3x10^-5 mole/kg. In contrast, martian rainwater in a postulated early, warm and wet climate would have lower pH,, higher dissolved CO2, and lower dissolved oxygen. For instance, in a martian atmosphere with pCO2=2.2 bar [3] and pO2=10^-5 bar, rainwater is calculated to have pH=3.96, dissolved CO2 of 7.5x10^-2 mole/kg, and dissolved O2=1.3x10^-8 mole/kg. If, under these climatic conditions, there was also extensive basaltic volcanism, then rainwater would be further modified chemically by solution of volcanic gases to form acid rain. For example, we can model this process using a Kilauea gas composition, in mole percent (H2O=57.8; HCl=0.9; SO2=17.4; CO2=21.6; H2S=0.2; H2=1.0), and assume the resultant fluid is buffered by atmospheric CO2. Addition of only 0.1 gram of gas to 1 kgram of ancient rainwater reduces the pH to 3.07 and dramatically increases dissolved SO4- (3.8x10^-4 mole/kg), H2S[aq] (1.3x10^-4 mole/kg) and Cl- (4.4x10^-5 mole/kg). Weathering minerals formed by reaction of the above fluid types with martian basalts can vary significantly depending upon initial fluid acidity and solute content. Acid rain and "normal" rain (buffered under high pCO2 conditions) initially alter martian basalt (modeled as the Chassigny parent composition [4]) to, in order of decreasing abundance: Fe-smectite (+/- ferrihydrite), Mn hydroxide, kaolinite, apatite, chalcedony at pH 5 then dolomite, calcite, K-feldspar, and dawsonite also precipitate. An important aspect of this modeling is that acid rain can produce larger volumes

  11. Kinetic Adsorption Study of Silver Nanoparticles on Natural Zeolite: Experimental and Theoretical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Ruíz-Baltazar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the adsorption capacity of Ag nanoparticles on natural zeolite from Oaxaca is presented. In order to describe the adsorption mechanism of silver nanoparticles on zeolite, experimental adsorption models for Ag ions and Ag nanoparticles were carried out. These experimental data obtained by the atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique were compared with theoretical models such as Lagergren first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion. Correlation factors R2 of the order of 0.99 were observed. Analysis by transmission electron microscopy describes the distribution of the silver nanoparticles on the zeolite outer surface. Additionally, a chemical characterization of the material was carried out through a dilution process with lithium metaborate. An average value of 9.3 in the Si/Al ratio was observed. Factors such as the adsorption behavior of the silver ions and the Si/Al ratio of the zeolite are very important to support the theoretical models and establish the adsorption mechanism of Ag nanoparticles on natural zeolite.

  12. Activated carbon adsorption of quinolone antibiotics in water: Performance, mechanism, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hao; Li, Xuebing; Wang, Jun; Lin, Pengfei; Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojian; Suffet, I H Mel

    2017-06-01

    The extensive use of antibiotics has led to their presence in the aquatic environment, and introduces potential impacts on human and ecological health. The capability of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to remove six frequently used quinolone (QN) antibiotics during water treatment was evaluated to improve drinking water safety. The kinetics of QN adsorption by PAC was best described by a pseudo second-order equation, and the adsorption capacity was well described by the Freundlich isotherm equation. Isotherms measured at different pH showed that hydrophobic interaction, electrostatic interaction, and π-π dispersion force were the main mechanisms for adsorption of QNs by PAC. A pH-dependent isotherm model based on the Freundlich equation was developed to predict the adsorption capacity of QNs by PAC at different pH values. This model had excellent prediction capabilities under different laboratory scenarios. Small relative standard derivations (RSDs), i.e., 0.59%-0.92% for ciprofloxacin and 0.09%-3.89% for enrofloxacin, were observed for equilibrium concentrations above the 0.3mg/L level. The RSDs increased to 11.9% for ciprofloxacin and 32.1% for enrofloxacin at μg/L equilibrium levels, which is still acceptable. This model could be applied to predict the adsorption of other chemicals having different ionized forms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Adsorptive desulfurization of model oil using untreated, acid activated and magnetite nanoparticle loaded bentonite as adsorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ishaq

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present research work focuses on a novel ultraclean desulfurization process of model oil by the adsorption method using untreated, acid activated and magnetite nanoparticle loaded bentonite as adsorbent. The parameters investigated are effect of contact time, adsorbent dose, initial dibenzothiophene (DBT concentration and temperature. Experimental tests were conducted in batch process. Pseudo first and second order kinetic equations were used to examine the experimental data. It was found that pseudo second order kinetic equation described the data of the DBT adsorption onto all types of adsorbents very well. The isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The Langmuir isotherm model fits the data very well for the adsorption of DBT onto all three forms of adsorbents. The adsorption of DBT was also investigated at different adsorbent doses and was found that the percentage adsorption of DBT was increased with increasing the adsorbent dose, while the adsorption in mg/g was decreased with increasing the adsorbent dose. The prepared adsorbents were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX and X-ray diffraction (XRD.

  14. Waterhammer Testing and Modeling of the Ares I Upper Stage Reaction Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. Hunter; Holt, Kimberly A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Ares I rocket is the agency's first step in completing the goals of the Constellation Program, which plans to deliver a new generation of space explorers into low earth orbit for future missions to the International Space Station, the moon, and other destinations within the solar system. Ares I is a two-stage rocket topped by the Orion crew capsule and its service module. The launch vehicle's First Stage is a single, five-segment reusable solid rocket booster (RSRB), derived from the Space Shuttle Program's four segment RSRB. The vehicle's Upper Stage, being designed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), is propelled by a single J-2X Main Engine fueled with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. During active Upper Stage flight of the Ares I launch vehicle, the Upper Stage Reaction Control System (US ReCS) will perform attitude control operations for the vehicle. The US ReCS will provide three-axis attitude control capability (roll, pitch, and yaw) for the Upper Stage while the J-2X is not firing and roll control capability while the engine is firing. Because of the requirements imposed upon the system, the design must accommodate rapid pulsing of multiple thrusters simultaneously to maintain attitude control. In support of these design activities and in preparation for Critical Design Review, analytical models of the US ReCS propellant feed system have been developed using the Thermal Hydraulic Library of MSC.EASY5 v.2008, herein referred to as EASY5. EASY5 is a commercially available fluid system modeling package with significant history of modeling space propulsion systems. In Fall 2009, a series of development tests were conducted at MSFC on a cold-flow test article for the US ReCS, herein referred to as System Development Test Article (SDTA). A subset of those tests performed were aimed at examining the effects of waterhammer on a flight-representative system and to ensure that those effects could be quantified with analytical models and incorporated into

  15. Investigation of heat induced reactions between lipid oxidation products and amino acids in lipid rich model systems and hazelnuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir, Yeşim; Göncüoğlu, Neslihan; Gökmen, Vural

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the contribution of lipid oxidation to non-enzymatic browning reactions in lipid rich model and actual food systems. Hazelnut oil and model reaction mixtures consisting of different amino acids were heated under certain conditions to determine possible lipid oxidation and non-enzymatic browning reaction products. In model systems, the Schiff base of 2,4-decadienal, its decarboxylated form, and reaction products formed after hydrolytic cleavage of the Schiff base or decarboxylated form were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry. No furosine was detected in hazelnuts after roasting at 160 °C while the concentration of free amino acids significantly decreased. 2,4-Decadienal reacted effectively with all amino acids studied through a Maillard type carbonyl-amine condensation pathway. (2E,4E)-Deca-2,4-dien-1-amine was identified as a typical reaction product in model systems and roasted hazelnuts. In lipid-rich foods like hazelnuts, lipid-derived carbonyls might be responsible for potential modifications of free and protein bound amino acids during heating.

  16. Kinetic study on pyrolytic process of oil-palm solid waste using two-step consecutive reaction model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, J.; Lua, A.C. [Nanyang Technological University (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Production Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Pyrolysis of oil-palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) shell, a cheap and abundantly available solid waste from palm oil producing process, was carried out using thermogravimetric analysis. The effects of raw material particle size and heating rate on the pyrolytic properties and kinetic parameters (activation energy, frequency factor and reaction order) were investigated. A one-step global model and a two-step consecutive reaction model were used to simulate the pyrolytic process and predict the weight loss during pyrolysis. The two-step model fitted the experimental data much better than the one-step model as the softening effect and formation of an intermediate during the pyrolytic process were taken into account. This two-stage reaction characteristic was confirmed by two obvious maxima in the derivative thermogram for pyrolysis of palm shells under different heating rates. The pyrolytic reactions at the low- and high-temperature regimes were found to be based on a first-order reaction mechanism and a contracting volume mechanism, respectively. (author)

  17. Derivation of an Analytical Solution to a Reaction-Diffusion Model for Autocatalytic Degradation and Erosion in Polymer Microspheres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlee N Ford Versypt

    Full Text Available A mathematical reaction-diffusion model is defined to describe the gradual decomposition of polymer microspheres composed of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA that are used for pharmaceutical drug delivery over extended periods of time. The partial differential equation (PDE model treats simultaneous first-order generation due to chemical reaction and diffusion of reaction products in spherical geometry to capture the microsphere-size-dependent effects of autocatalysis on PLGA erosion that occurs when the microspheres are exposed to aqueous media such as biological fluids. The model is solved analytically for the concentration of the autocatalytic carboxylic acid end groups of the polymer chains that comprise the microspheres as a function of radial position and time. The analytical solution for the reaction and transport of the autocatalytic chemical species is useful for predicting the conditions under which drug release from PLGA microspheres transitions from diffusion-controlled to erosion-controlled release, for understanding the dynamic coupling between the PLGA degradation and erosion mechanisms, and for designing drug release particles. The model is the first to provide an analytical prediction for the dynamics and spatial heterogeneities of PLGA degradation and erosion within a spherical particle. The analytical solution is applicable to other spherical systems with simultaneous diffusive transport and first-order generation by reaction.

  18. Adsorptive features of acid-treated olive stones for drin pesticides: equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic modeling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakouri, Hicham; Usero, José; Morillo, José; Ouassini, Abdelhamid

    2009-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of drin pesticides from aqueous solution onto acid treated olive stones (ATOS) was investigated using stir bar sorptive extraction and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectroscopy. The effects of sorbent particle size, adsorbent dose, contact time, concentration of pesticide solution and temperature on the adsorption processes were systematically studied in batch shaking sorption experiments. Maximum removal efficiency (94.8%) was reached for aldrin (0.5 mg L(-1)) using the fraction 63-100 microm of ATOS (solid/liquid ratio: 1 g L(-1)). Experimental data were modeled by Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. The Freundlich isotherm model (R(2)=0.98-0.99) fitted the equilibrium data better than the Langmuir and D-R isotherm models, with low sum of error values (SE=1.4-9.2%). The mean adsorption free energy derived from the D-R isotherm model (R(2)=0.95-0.99) showed that the adsorption of drin pesticides was taken place by weak physical forces, such as van der Waals forces and hydrogen bonding. The calculated thermodynamic parameters, DeltaH, DeltaS and DeltaG prove that drin pesticides adsorption on ATOS was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic under examined conditions. The pseudo first order, pseudo second order kinetic and the intra-particle diffusion models were used to describe the kinetic data and rate constants were evaluated.

  19. Application of a heterogeneous adsorbent (HA for the removal of hexavalent chromium from aqueous solutions: Kinetic and equilibrium modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Srivastava

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, a heterogeneous adsorbent material (HA was used as an adsorbent for the removal of Cr(VI from aqueous solutions at laboratory scale. Cr(VI containing water was treated with heterogeneous adsorbent(HA.Chromium solutions of various initial concentrations were treated with adsorbent in batch mode experiments to investigate the adsorption characteristics of heterogeneous adsorbent (HA. Kinetics of adsorption of Cr(VI ions on adsorbent was investigated by using pseudo first order and second order kinetic models. Removal processes were found to be governed by pseudo second order model. Intraparticle diffusion model was also analyzed for this system. Removal was found to be increased by increasing the temperature from 298 to 318 K which indicates the endothermic nature of the process. Various two parameter isotherm models viz. Langmuir, Freundlich, Elovich, Tempkin, Dubnin–Raduskevich (D–R, Harkin–Jura and BET isotherm were applied on resultant data for equilibrium modeling. It was observed that heterogeneous adsorbent (HA particles were highly efficient for the removal of Cr(VI.

  20. A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  1. Reprint of: A numerical modelling of gas exchange mechanisms between air and turbulent water with an aquarium chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Ryuichi S.

    2014-08-01

    This paper proposes a new numerical modelling to examine environmental chemodynamics of a gaseous material exchanged between the air and turbulent water phases across a gas-liquid interface, followed by an aquarium chemical reaction. This study uses an extended concept of a two-compartment model, and assumes two physicochemical substeps to approximate the gas exchange processes. The first substep is the gas-liquid equilibrium between the air and water phases, A(g)⇌A(aq), with Henry's law constant H. The second is a first-order irreversible chemical reaction in turbulent water, A(aq)+H2O→B(aq)+H+ with a chemical reaction rate κA. A direct numerical simulation (DNS) technique has been employed to obtain details of the gas exchange mechanisms and the chemical reaction in the water compartment, while zero velocity and uniform concentration of A is considered in the air compartment. The study uses the different Schmidt numbers between 1 and 8, and six nondimensional chemical reaction rates between 10(≈0) to 101 at a fixed Reynolds number. It focuses on the effects of the Schmidt number and the chemical reaction rate on fundamental mechanisms of the gas exchange processes across the interface.

  2. A Simple Model to Access Equilibrium Constants of Reactions Type A ⇋ B Using Monte Carlo Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Farias, L. A. M. Cardoso, N. M. Oliveira Neto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple theoretical model to describe equilibrium properties of homogeneous re-versible chemical reactions is proposed and applied to an A ⇋ B type reaction. Forthis purpose the equilibrium properties are analyzed by usual Monte Carlo simula-tion. It is shown that the equilibrium constant (Ke for this kind of reaction exhibitsdistinct characteristics for Eba 1, where Eba is the ratio be-tween the reverse and forward activation energies. For Eba 1 and increase(decrease the temperature our results recover the principle of Le Chˆtelier applied ato temperature effects. The special and interesting case is obtained for Eba = 1 sinceKe = 1 for all range of temperature. Another important parameter in our analysisis θA , defined as temperature measured with relation the activation energy of theforward reaction. For fixed values of Eba and for θA ≫ 1 the equilibrium constantapproaches 1, showing that all transitions are equally likely, no matter the differencein the energy barriers. The data obtained in our simulations show the well knownrelationship between Ke , Eb , Ea and kB T . Finally we argue that this theoreticalmodel can be applied to a family of homogeneous chemical reactions characterizedby the same Eba and θA showing the broad application of this stochastic model tostudy chemical reactions. Some of these results will be discussed in terms of collisiontheory.

  3. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  4. Optimal control of an invasive species using a reaction-diffusion model and linear programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneau, Mathieu; Johnson, Fred A.; Smith, Brian J.; Romagosa, Christina M.; Martin, Julien; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2017-01-01

    Managing an invasive species is particularly challenging as little is generally known about the species’ biological characteristics in its new habitat. In practice, removal of individuals often starts before the species is studied to provide the information that will later improve control. Therefore, the locations and the amount of control have to be determined in the face of great uncertainty about the species characteristics and with a limited amount of resources. We propose framing spatial control as a linear programming optimization problem. This formulation, paired with a discrete reaction-diffusion model, permits calculation of an optimal control strategy that minimizes the remaining number of invaders for a fixed cost or that minimizes the control cost for containment or protecting specific areas from invasion. We propose computing the optimal strategy for a range of possible model parameters, representing current uncertainty on the possible invasion scenarios. Then, a best strategy can be identified depending on the risk attitude of the decision-maker. We use this framework to study the spatial control of the Argentine black and white tegus (Salvator merianae) in South Florida. There is uncertainty about tegu demography and we considered several combinations of model parameters, exhibiting various dynamics of invasion. For a fixed one-year budget, we show that the risk-averse strategy, which optimizes the worst-case scenario of tegus’ dynamics, and the risk-neutral strategy, which optimizes the expected scenario, both concentrated control close to the point of introduction. A risk-seeking strategy, which optimizes the best-case scenario, focuses more on models where eradication of the species in a cell is possible and consists of spreading control as much as possible. For the establishment of a containment area, assuming an exponential growth we show that with current control methods it might not be possible to implement such a strategy for some of the

  5. Adsorption kinetic parameters of Fe3+ and Ni2+ ions by gyrolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kestutis Baltakys

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work the adsorption kinetic parameters for Fe3+ and Ni2+ ions by gyrolite are presented. Additionally, the adsoption mechanism was described by using pseudo first order and pseudo second order  equations. It was determined that the adsorption capacity of gyrolite and intrusion of heavy metals ions in its structure depends on reaction time and the pH value of adsorptive. It was observed that the incorporation of Fe3+ ions occurs more intensive than Ni2+ ions. It was found that in the acidic solution the intrusion of Fe3+ ions into gyrolite structure proceeds by two types of chemical reaction mechanisms: substitution and addition. Meanwhile, nickel ions were participated only in substitution reaction: gyrolite-Ca0 + Mex+ ↔ gyrolite-Me0 + Ca2+. It was observed that the pseudo second order model fit well for iron and nickel ions adsorption mechanism. It was estimated that the adsorption reactions are not reversible process and the crystal structure of gyrolite is stable. Moreover, synthetic adsorbent and the products of sorption were characterized by XRD, STA and FT-IR methods.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.1.5735

  6. Use of chemistry software to teach and assess model-based reaction and equation knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Pyatt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the challenges students face when learning chemical reactions in a first-year chemistry course and the effectiveness of a curriculum and software implementation that was used to teach and assess student understanding of chemical reactions and equations. This study took place over a two year period in a public suburban high-school, in southwestern USA. Two advanced placement (AP chemistry classes participated, referred to here as study group A (year 1, N = 14; and study group B (year 2, N = 21. The curriculum for a first-year chemistry course (group A was revised to include instruction on reaction-types. The second year of the study involved the creation and implementation of a software solution which promoted mastery learning of reaction-types. Students in both groups benefited from the reaction-type curriculum and achieved proficiency in chemical reactions and equations.  The findings suggest there was an added learning benefit to using the reaction-type software solution. This study also found that reaction knowledge was a moderate to strong predictor of chemistry achievement. Based on regression analysis, reaction knowledge significantly predicted chemistry achievement for both groups.

  7. 2D Model for Diffusion of Oxygen with Biochemical Reaction During Biofilm Formation Process in Static Aqueous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyate, Y. T.; Rim-Rukeh, A.

    A 2D model that describes diffusion of oxygen with biochemical reaction during biofilm formation process in static aqueous medium is presented. The analysis is based on X60 steel placed at the bottom of a container containing produced water inoculated with Leptothrix discophora (iron-oxidizing bacteria). These bacteria form biofilms on the exposed surfaces of the metal. The biofilm-microorganisms absorb oxygen from the produced water through biochemical reaction, resulting in transfer of oxygen from the bulk liquid phase to the biofilm. Predictions of the model are compared with experimental data and good agreement is obtained.

  8. Estimation and Modeling of Enceladus Plume Jet Density Using Reaction Wheel Control Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.; Pilinski, Emily B.; Macala, Glenn A.; Feldman, Antonette

    2010-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft was launched on October 15, 1997 by a Titan 4B launch vehicle. After an interplanetary cruise of almost seven years, it arrived at Saturn on June 30, 2004. In 2005, Cassini completed three flybys of Enceladus, a small, icy satellite of Saturn. Observations made during these flybys confirmed the existence of a water vapor plume in the south polar region of Enceladus. Five additional low-altitude flybys of Enceladus were successfully executed in 2008-9 to better characterize these watery plumes. The first of these flybys was the 50-km Enceladus-3 (E3) flyby executed on March 12, 2008. During the E3 flyby, the spacecraft attitude was controlled by a set of three reaction wheels. During the flyby, multiple plume jets imparted disturbance torque on the spacecraft resulting in small but visible attitude control errors. Using the known and unique transfer function between the disturbance torque and the attitude control error, the collected attitude control error telemetry could be used to estimate the disturbance torque. The effectiveness of this methodology is confirmed using the E3 telemetry data. Given good estimates of spacecraft's projected area, center of pressure location, and spacecraft velocity, the time history of the Enceladus plume density is reconstructed accordingly. The 1-sigma uncertainty of the estimated density is 7.7%. Next, we modeled the density due to each plume jet as a function of both the radial and angular distances of the spacecraft from the plume source. We also conjecture that the total plume density experienced by the spacecraft is the sum of the component plume densities. By comparing the time history of the reconstructed E3 plume density with that predicted by the plume model, values of the plume model parameters are determined. Results obtained are compared with those determined by other Cassini science instruments.

  9. Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling Reactions of Highly Fluorinated Arylboronic Esters: Catalytic Studies and Stoichiometric Model Reactions on the Transmetallation Step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, Johannes; Braun, Thomas; Laubenstein, Reik; Herrmann, Roy

    2017-09-07

    Fluorinated 4-aryl phenylalanine amino acid derivatives (aryl=2-C5 NF4 , 4-C6 H4 SF5 , 2-C6 H4 SCF3 , C6 F5 ) were obtained in Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of phenylalanine precursors with highly fluorinated aryl boronic acid and esters in the presence of CsF. Pd(II) complexes that possessed phenyl alanine derived ligands, such as trans-[PdBr{4-C6 H4 CH2 CH{NHC(O)CH3 }CO2 Et}(PiPr3 )2 ], were used as catalysts. Stoichiometric model reactions indicate the intermediate generation of the boronate Cs[BF(2-C5 NF4 )(pin)] (pin=pinacolato=O2 C2 Me4 ). The transmetallation step with Cs[BF(4-C6 H4 SF5 )(pin)], [NMe4 ][BF(2-C5 NF4 )(pin)] and/or the fluorido complex trans-[PdF{4-C6 H4 CH2 C{NHC(O)CH3 }(CO2 Et)2 }(PiPr3 )2 ] was investigated. A comparison of the reactions of trans-[PdX{4-C6 H4 CH2 C{NHC(O)CH3 }(CO2 Et)2 }(PiPr3 )2 ] (X=Br, F) with 2-Bpin-C5 NF4 or [NMe4 ][BF(2-C5 NF4 )(pin)] revealed the remarkable high reactivity of the fluorido complex towards 2-BpinC5 NF4 . Low-temperature NMR studies indicated the ionic species trans-[Pd{4-C6 H4 CH2 C{NHC(O)CH3 }(CO2 Et)2 }(PiPr3 )2 ][BF(2-C5 NF4 )(pin)] to be a highly reactive intermediate. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Neural network model and isotherm study for removal of phenol from aqueous solution by orange peel ash

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Naba Kumar; Bhaumik, Ria; Das, Biswajit; Roy, Palas; Datta, Jayanta Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Bhattacharjee, Siddhartha

    2015-09-01

    Artificial Neural Network model and isotherm study were done to predict the removal efficiency of phenol. An inexpensive adsorbent was developed from orange peel ash (OPA) for effective uptake of phenol from aqueous solution. The influence of different experimental parameters (initial concentration, pH, adsorbents dose, contact time, stirring rate and temperature) on phenol uptake efficiency was evaluated. Phenol was adsorbed by the OPA up to maximum of 97.34 %. Adsorption of phenol on OPA correlated well with the Langmuir isotherm model, implying monolayer coverage of phenol onto the surface of the adsorbent. The maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 3.55 mg g-1 at 303 K. Pseudo-second-order kinetic model provided a better correlation for the experimental data. Moreover, the activation energy of the adsorption process ( E a) was found to be -18.001 kJ mol-1 indicating physorption nature of phenol onto OPA. A negative enthalpy (∆ H°) value indicated that the adsorption process was exothermic. Again multi-layer Neural Network model was in very good agreement with the experimental results.

  11. Defluoridation of water by Tea-bag model using La(3+) modified synthetic resin@chitosan biocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Subbaiah Muthu; Elanchezhiyan, S Sd; Lee, Giehyeon; Meenakshi, Sankaran

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work is to gain a better understanding of the formation of lanthanum complex onto iminodiacetic acid and chitosan (CS@La-IDAMP) composite for effective removal of fluoride from aqueous solution using a tea-bag model for the first time. The surface textural and chemical properties of the synthesized composites were characterized by FTIR, SEM with EDAX and mapping images. The experimental data revealed that the fluoride adsorption was rapid, maximum fluoride removal could be removed within 12min contact time at neutral pH in room temperature under batch equilibrium model. The equilibrium data for adsorption of fluoride on the synthesized blends were well represented by the Freundlich isotherm, giving a maximum adsorption capacity of 17.50mg/g. The adsorption kinetic models were also examined and it was found that all the sorption processes were better described by the pseudo-second-order model. This results suggested that the efficiency of the fluoride removal process was mainly controlled by electrostatic attraction and ion-exchange mechanism. Furthermore, the CS@La-IDAMP material was tested for the regeneration ability with the suitable regenerant to make this process as cost-effective. Finally, it can be concluded that the composite material is the potential adsorbent for the treatment of fluoride from water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Competitive Adsorption of Cd(II), Cr(VI), and Pb(II) onto Nanomaghemite: A Spectroscopic and Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komárek, Michael; Koretsky, Carla M; Stephen, Krishna J; Alessi, Daniel S; Chrastný, Vladislav

    2015-11-03

    A combined modeling and spectroscopic approach is used to describe Cd(II), Cr(VI), and Pb(II) adsorption onto nanomaghemite and nanomaghemite coated quartz. A pseudo-second order kinetic model fitted the adsorption data well. The sorption capacity of nanomaghemite was evaluated using a Langmuir isotherm model, and a diffuse double layer surface complexation model (DLM) was developed to describe metal adsorption. Adsorption mechanisms were assessed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Pb(II) adsorption occurs mainly via formation of inner-sphere complexes, whereas Cr(VI) likely adsorbs mainly as outer-sphere complexes and Cd(II) as a mixture of inner- and outer-sphere complexes. The simple DLM describes well the pH-dependence of single adsorption edges. However, it fails to adequately capture metal adsorption behavior over broad ranges of ionic strength or metal-loading on the sorbents. For systems with equimolar concentrations of Pb(II), Cd(II), and Cr(VI). Pb(II) adsorption was reasonably well predicted by the DLM, but predictions were poorer for Cr(VI) and Cd(II). This study demonstrates that a simple DLM can describe well the adsorption of the studied metals in mixed sorbate-sorbent systems, but only under narrow ranges of ionic strength or metal loading. The results also highlight the sorption potential of nanomaghemite for metals in complex systems.

  13. Evaluation of different isotherm models, kinetic, thermodynamic, and copper biosorption efficiency of Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Zeynep; Atakol, Orhan; Aras, Sümer; Cansaran-Duman, Demet; Celikkol, Pelin; Emregul, Emel

    2014-01-01

    The biosorption characteristics of Cu(II) ions from aqueous solution using Lobaria pulmonaria (L.) Hoffm. biomass were investigated. The biosorption efficiency of Cu(II) onto biomass was significantly influenced by the operating parameters. The maximum biosorption efficiency of L. pulmonaria was 65.3% at 10 mg/L initial metal concentration for 5 g/L lichen biomass dosage. The biosorption of Cu(II) ions onto biomass fits the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model well. The thermodynamic parameters indicate the feasibility and exothermic and spontaneous nature of the biosorption. The effective desorption achieved with HCl was 96%. Information on the nature of possible interactions between the functional groups of the L. pulmonaria biomass and Cu(II) ions was obtained via Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results indicated that the carboxyl (-COOH) and hydroxyl (-OH) groups of the biomass were mainly involved in the biosorption of Cu(II) onto L. pulmonaria biomass. The L. pulmonaria is a promising biosorbent for Cu(lI) ions because of its availability, low cost, and high metal biosorption and desorption capacities. Lobaria pulmonaria is a promising biosorbent for Cu(II) ions because of its availability, low cost, and high metal biosorption and desorption capacities. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper on the biosorption Cu by L. pulmonaria.

  14. Equilibrium and kinetic modelling of cadmium (II) biosorption by Dried Biomass Aphanothece sp. from aqueous phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awalina; Harimawan, A.; Haryani, G. S.; Setiadi, T.

    2017-05-01

    The Biosorption of cadmium (II) ions on dried biomass of Aphanothece sp.which previously grown in a photobioreactor system with atmospheric carbon dioxide fed input, was studied in a batch system with respect to initial pH, biomass concentration, contact time, and temperature. The biomass exhibited the highest cadmium (II) uptake capacity at 30ºC, initial pH of 8.0±0.2 in 60 minute and initial cadmium (II) ion concentration of 7.76 mg/L. Maximum biosorption capacities were 16.47 mg/g, 54.95 mg/g and 119.05 mg/g at range of initial cadmium (II) 0.96-3.63 mg/L, 1.99-8.10 mg/L and 6.48-54.38 mg/L, respectively. Uptake kinetics follows the pseudo-second order model while equilibrium is best described by Langmuir isotherm model. Isotherms have been used to determine thermodynamic parameter process (free energy change, enthalpy change and entropy change). FTIR analysis of microalgae biomass revealed the presence of amino acids, carboxyl, hydroxyl, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups, which are responsible for biosorption of metal ions. During repeated sorption/desorption cycles, the ratio of Cd (II) desorption to biosorption decreased from 81% (at first cycle) to only 27% (at the third cycle). Nevertheless, due to its higher biosorption capability than other adsorbent, Aphanothece sp appears to be a good biosorbent for removing metal Cd (II) ions from aqueous phase.

  15. Modeling of Malachite Green Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Nanoscale Zerovalent Zinc Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqian Ruan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The commercially available nanoscale zerovalent zinc (nZVZ was used as an adsorbent for the removal of malachite green (MG from aqueous solutions. This material was characterized by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The advanced experimental design tools were adopted to study the effect of process parameters (viz. initial pH, temperature, contact time and initial concentration and to reduce number of trials and cost. Response surface methodology and rapidly developing artificial intelligence technologies, i.e., artificial neural network coupled with particle swarm optimization (ANN-PSO and artificial neural network coupled with genetic algorithm (ANN-GA were employed for predicting the optimum process variables and obtaining the maximum removal efficiency of MG. The results showed that the removal efficiency predicted by ANN-GA (94.12% was compatible with the experimental value (90.72%. Furthermore, the Langmuir isotherm was found to be the best model to describe the adsorption of MG onto nZVZ, while the maximum adsorption capacity was calculated to be 1000.00 mg/g. The kinetics for adsorption of MG onto nZVZ was found to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG0, ΔH0 and ΔS0 were calculated from the Van’t Hoff plot of lnKc vs. 1/T in order to discuss the removal mechanism of MG.

  16. Kinetic modeling and determination of reaction constants of Alzheimer's beta-amyloid fibril extension and dissociation using surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Ono, Kenjiro; Yamada, Masahito; Naiki, Hironobu

    2002-11-19

    To establish the kinetic model of the extension and dissociation of beta-amyloid fibrils (f(A)beta) in vitro, we analyzed these reactions using a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor. Sonicated f(A)beta were immobilized on the surface of the SPR sensor chip as seeds. The SPR signal increased linearly as a function of time after amyloid beta-peptides (Abeta) were injected into the f(A)beta-immobilized chips. The extension of f(A)beta was confirmed by atomic force microscopy. When flow cells were washed with running buffer, the SPR signal decreased with time after the extension reaction. The curve fitting resolved the dissociation reaction into the fast exponential and slow linear decay phases. Kinetic analysis of the effect of Abeta/f(A)beta concentrations on the reaction rate indicated that both the extension reaction and the slow linear phase of the dissociation were consistent with a first-order kinetic model; i.e., the extension/dissociation reactions proceed via consecutive association/dissociation of Abeta onto/from the end of existing fibrils. On the basis of this model, the critical monomer concentration ([M](e)) and the equilibrium association constant (K) were calculated, for the first time, to be 20 nM and 5 x 10(7) M(-1), respectively. Alternatively, [M](e) was directly measured as 200 nM, which may represent the equilibrium between the extension reaction and the fast phase of the dissociation. The SPR biosensor is a useful quantitative tool for the kinetic and thermodynamic study of the molecular mechanisms of f9A)beta formation in vitro.

  17. A Mathematical Model for the Multiphase Transport and Reaction Kinetics in a Ladle with Bottom Powder Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-08-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-population balance model-simultaneous reaction model (CFD-PBM-SRM) coupled model has been proposed to study the multiphase flow behavior and refining reaction kinetics in a ladle with bottom powder injection, and some new and important phenomena and mechanisms are presented. For the multiphase flow behavior, the effects of bubbly plume flow, powder particle motion, particle-particle collision and growth, particle-bubble collision and adhesion, and powder particle removal into top slag are considered. For the reaction kinetics, the mechanisms of multicomponent simultaneous reactions, including Al, S, Si, Mn, Fe, and O, at the multi-interface, including top slag-liquid steel interface, air-liquid steel interface, powder droplet-liquid steel interface, and bubble-liquid steel interface, are presented, and the effect of sulfur solubility in the powder droplet on the desulfurization is also taken into account. Model validation is carried out using hot tests in a 2-t induction furnace with bottom powder injection. The result shows that the powder particles gradually disperse in the entire furnace; in the vicinity of the bottom slot plugs, the desulfurization product CaS is liquid phase, while in the upper region of the furnace, the desulfurization product CaS is solid phase. The predicted sulfur contents by the present model agree well with the measured data in the 2-t furnace with bottom powder injection.

  18. A Mathematical Model for the Multiphase Transport and Reaction Kinetics in a Ladle with Bottom Powder Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Wentao; Zhu, Miaoyong

    2017-12-01

    A computation fluid dynamics-population balance model-simultaneous reaction model (CFD-PBM-SRM) coupled model has been proposed to study the multiphase flow behavior and refining reaction kinetics in a ladle with bottom powder injection, and some new and important phenomena and mechanisms are presented. For the multiphase flow behavior, the effects of bubbly plume flow, powder particle motion, particle-particle collision and growth, particle-bubble collision and adhesion, and powder particle removal into top slag are considered. For the reaction kinetics, the mechanisms of multicomponent simultaneous reactions, including Al, S, Si, Mn, Fe, and O, at the multi-interface, including top slag-liquid steel interface, air-liquid steel interface, powder droplet-liquid steel interface, and bubble-liquid steel interface, are presented, and the effect of sulfur solubility in the powder droplet on the desulfurization is also taken into account. Model validation is carried out using hot tests in a 2-t induction furnace with bottom powder injection. The result shows that the powder particles gradually disperse in the entire furnace; in the vicinity of the bottom slot plugs, the desulfurization product CaS is liquid phase, while in the upper region of the furnace, the desulfurization product CaS is solid phase. The predicted sulfur contents by the present model agree well with the measured data in the 2-t furnace with bottom powder injection.

  19. Modeling of mass transfer in combination with a homogeneously catalyzed reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, J.A.A.; Versteeg, G. F.

    The mass transfer rates of a gaseous reactant into a liquid where the reactions are catalyzed by homogeneous catalysts have been evaluated by the numerical solution of the diffusion-reaction equations according to Higbie's penetration theory. The concentration profiles as well as enhancement factors

  20. Catecholamines reduce dose-dependent oedema formation and inflammatory reaction in an isolated rat lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacho, Christine; Dacho, Andreas; Geissler, Antje; Hauser, Charlotte; Nowak, Kai; Beck, Grietje

    2013-01-01

    Since we detected that donor dopamine pre-treatment ameliorates lung function after hypothermia and ischaemia/reperfusion in an isolated rat lung model we studied, whether other catecholamines have beneficial effects on lungs. Rats were treated with noradrenaline, adrenaline or dobutamine in different doses. Thereafter lungs were explanted, flushed with Perfadex® solution and stored at 4°C for different time periods. Oedema production was measured and inflammatory mediators were analysed after reperfusion and ventilation. Low-dose noradrenaline or dobutamine did not reduce tissue oedema after eight hours of hypothermia, whereas higher doses significantly reduced oedema formation. Low-dose catecholamines did not prevent the inflammatory response, whereas higher doses of beta-receptor-stimulating catecholamines significantly blunted inflammatory reaction. This study demonstrates that adrenergic-receptor-stimulating catecholamines have a protective dose-dependent effect on lungs after hypothermia and ischaemia/reperfusion. Although noradrenaline and dobutamine have similar dose-dependent organ-protective effects to dopamine, they have more side-effects.

  1. Adsorption of Amido Black 10B from aqueous solution using polyaniline/SiO2 nanocomposite: Experimental investigation and artificial neural network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzifi, Marjan; Yaraki, Mohammad Tavakkoli; Kiadehi, Asieh Dehghani; Hosseini, Seyyed Hossein; Olazar, Martin; Bharti, Arvind Kumar; Agarwal, Shilpi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Kazemi, Atefeh

    2018-01-15

    The present work focused on the performance of Polyaniline/SiO2 nanocomposite for removing Amido Black 10B dye from aqueous solution. The effect of different variables, such as adsorption time, the mass of adsorbent, solution pH and initial dye concentration was studied and also was optimized by an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) method. Lagergren, pseudo-second order, Intra-particle Diffusion, Elovich and Boyd models were tested to track the kinetics of the adsorption process. The experimental data were fitted to different two-parameter, and three-parameter isotherm models, namely, Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, D-R, Hill, Sips and Redlich-Peterson models, and their validity was examined. The results showed that the dye adsorption process was well described by Redlich-Peterson isotherm model. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the adsorption of Amido Black 10B onto Polyaniline/SiO2 nanocomposite was endothermic. The comparison of the adsorption efficiencies obtained by the ANN model and the experimental data evidenced that the ANN model could estimate the behavior of the Amido Black 10B dye adsorption process under various conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modeling the sorption kinetic of metsulfuron-methyl on Andisols and Ultisols volcanic ash-derived soils: kinetics parameters and solute transport mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Lizethly; Escudey, Mauricio; Fuentes, Edwar; Báez, María E

    2010-07-15

    Metsulfuron-methyl sorption kinetic was studied in Andisol and Ultisol soils in view of their distinctive physical and chemical properties: acidic pH and variable surface charge. Different kinetic models were applied to the experimental results. The pseudo-second-order model fitted sorption kinetics data better than the pseudo-first-order model. The rate constant and the initial rate constant values obtained through this model demonstrated the different behavior of metsulfuron-methyl in both kinds of soils, both parameters being the highest for Andisol. The application of Elovich equation, intraparticle diffusion model and a two-site nonequilibrium model (TSNE) allowed to conclude that: (i) the high organic matter content is the governing factor for Andisols where mass transfer across the boundary layer, and in a lesser degree, intraparticle diffusion were the two processes controlling sorption kinetic and (ii) the mineral composition was more relevant in Ultisols where rate was controlled almost exclusively by intraparticle diffusion into macropores and micropores. The slower sorption rate on Ultisols, the mechanism involved and the lower sorption capacity of this kind of soils must be taken into account to assess leaching behavior of this herbicide. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Efficient computation of electrograms and ECGs in human whole heart simulations using a reaction-eikonal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neic, Aurel; Campos, Fernando O.; Prassl, Anton J.; Niederer, Steven A.; Bishop, Martin J.; Vigmond, Edward J.; Plank, Gernot

    2017-10-01

    Anatomically accurate and biophysically detailed bidomain models of the human heart have proven a powerful tool for gaining quantitative insight into the links between electrical sources in the myocardium and the concomitant current flow in the surrounding medium as they represent their relationship mechanistically based on first principles. Such models are increasingly considered as a clinical research tool with the perspective of being used, ultimately, as a complementary diagnostic modality. An important prerequisite in many clinical modeling applications is the ability of models to faithfully replicate potential maps and electrograms recorded from a given patient. However, while the personalization of electrophysiology models based on the gold standard bidomain formulation is in principle feasible, the associated computational expenses are significant, rendering their use incompatible with clinical time frames. In this study we report on the development of a novel computationally efficient reaction-eikonal (R-E) model for modeling extracellular potential maps and electrograms. Using a biventricular human electrophysiology model, which incorporates a topologically realistic His-Purkinje system (HPS), we demonstrate by comparing against a high-resolution reaction-diffusion (R-D) bidomain model that the R-E model predicts extracellular potential fields, electrograms as well as ECGs at the body surface with high fidelity and offers vast computational savings greater than three orders of magnitude. Due to their efficiency R-E models are ideally suitable for forward simulations in clinical modeling studies which attempt to personalize electrophysiological model features.

  4. The effect of a number of selective points in modeling of polymerization reacting Monte Carlo method: studying the initiation reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Sadi, M; Dabir, B

    2003-01-01

    Monte Carlo Method is one of the most powerful techniques to model different processes, such as polymerization reactions. By this method, without any need to solve moment equations, a very detailed information on the structure and properties of polymers are obtained. The number of algorithm repetitions (selected volumes of reactor for modelling which represent the number of initial molecules) is very important in this method. In Monte Carlo method calculations are based on the random number of generations and reaction probability determinations. so the number of algorithm repetition is very important. In this paper, the initiation reaction was considered alone and the importance of number of initiator molecules on the result were studied. It can be concluded that Monte Carlo method will not give accurate results if the number of molecules is not satisfied to be big enough, because in that case , selected volume would not be representative of the whole system.

  5. Static diode pumped alkali lasers: Model calculations of the effects of heating, ionization, high electronic excitation and chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barmashenko, B. D.; Rosenwaks, S.; Heaven, M. C.

    2013-04-01

    The effects of heating, ionization, high electronic excitation and chemical reactions on the operation of diode pumped alkali lasers (DPALs) with a static, non-flowing gain medium are calculated using a semi-analytical model. Unlike other models, assuming a three-level scheme of the laser and neglecting influence of the temperature on the lasing power, it takes into account the temperature rise and losses of neutral alkali atoms due to ionization and chemical reactions, resulting in decrease of the pump absorption and slope efficiency. Good agreement with measurements in a static DPAL [B.V. Zhdanov, J. Sell, R.J. Knize, Electron. Lett. 44 (2008) 582] is obtained. It is found that the ionization processes have a small effect on the laser operation, whereas the chemical reactions of alkali atoms with hydrocarbons strongly affect the lasing power.

  6. Aromatic C-Nitroso Compounds and Their Dimers: A Model for Probing the Reaction Mechanisms in Crystalline Molecular Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Biljan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on the dimerization and dissociation of aromatic C-nitroso compounds and their dimers, the reactions that could be used as a convenient model for studying the thermal organic solid-state reaction mechanisms. This molecular model is simple because it includes formation or breaking of only one covalent bond between two nitrogen atoms. The crystalline molecular solids of nitroso dimers (azodioxides dissociate by photolysis under the cryogenic conditions, and re-dimerize by slow warming. The thermal re-dimerization reaction is examined under the different topotactic conditions in crystals: disordering, surface defects, and phase transformations. Depending on the conditions, and on the molecular structure, aromatic C-nitroso compounds can associate to form one-dimensional polymeric structures and are able to self-assemble on gold surfaces.

  7. Shell model based reaction rates for rp-process nuclei in the mass range A=44-63

    CERN Document Server

    Fisker, J L; Görres, J; Langanke, K; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Wiescher, M C

    2001-01-01

    We have used large-scale shell-model diagonalization calculations to determine the level spectra, proton spectroscopic factors, and electromagnetic transition probabilities for proton rich nuclei in the mass range A=44-63. Based on these results and the available experimental data, we calculated the resonances for proton capture reactions on neutron deficient nuclei in this mass range. We also calculated the direct capture processes on these nuclei in the framework of a Woods-Saxon potential model. Taking into account both resonant and direct contributions, we determined the ground-state proton capture reaction rates for these nuclei under hot hydrogen burning conditions for temperatures between 10 sup 8 and 10 sup 1 sup 0 K. The calculated compound-nucleus level properties and the reaction rates are presented here; the rates are also available in computer-readable format from the authors.

  8. Silica Aerogel-supported Hydrozincite and Carbonate-intercalated Hydrotalcite for High-efficiency Removal of Pb(II) Ions by Precipitation Transformation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Xiaoxia; Li, Jianfa; Feng, Xiaolan; Wang, Yusen

    2017-09-01

    In this work, hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite supported on silica aerogel were prepared via a simple and economical process and used as adsorbents for Pb(II) removal. The supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite possess ultra-thin thickness, high surface area, and weak crystallinity. In the batch Pb(II) adsorption experiments, the adsorbents with higher Zn(II) contents showed higher Pb(II) adsorption capacities, and the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating a mechanism of surface chemisorption. The adsorption capacities calculated based Langmuir isotherm model are 684.9 mg/g and 555.6 mg/g for the supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite, respectively, higher than the adsorption capacities of other hydrotalcite-based adsorbents and most of other inorganic adsorbents reported previously. The XRD diffraction peaks of hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite disappeared after the adsorption, and the Pb(II) species were uniformly dispersed in the adsorbents in form of Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 proven by TEM, EDS mapping and XRD analysis, demonstrating the nature of the adsorption is the precipitation conversion of hydrozincite or Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite into Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2. These results demonstrate the synergic Pb(II) removal effect of the CO3 2- and OH- derived from hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3 2- hydrotalcite together with their ultra-thin thickness and high surface area contribute the excellent properties of the adsorbents.

  9. Silica Aerogel-supported Hydrozincite and Carbonate-intercalated Hydrotalcite for High-efficiency Removal of Pb(II) Ions by Precipitation Transformation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Wang, Xiaoxia; Li, Jianfa; Feng, Xiaolan; Wang, Yusen

    2017-09-25

    In this work, hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite supported on silica aerogel were prepared via a simple and economical process and used as adsorbents for Pb(II) removal. The supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite possess ultra-thin thickness, high surface area, and weak crystallinity. In the batch Pb(II) adsorption experiments, the adsorbents with higher Zn(II) contents showed higher Pb(II) adsorption capacities, and the adsorption data fitted well with the Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo-second-order kinetic model, indicating a mechanism of surface chemisorption. The adsorption capacities calculated based Langmuir isotherm model are 684.9 mg/g and 555.6 mg/g for the supported hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite, respectively, higher than the adsorption capacities of other hydrotalcite-based adsorbents and most of other inorganic adsorbents reported previously. The XRD diffraction peaks of hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite disappeared after the adsorption, and the Pb(II) species were uniformly dispersed in the adsorbents in form of Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2 proven by TEM, EDS mapping and XRD analysis, demonstrating the nature of the adsorption is the precipitation conversion of hydrozincite or Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite into Pb3(CO3)2(OH)2. These results demonstrate the synergic Pb(II) removal effect of the CO3(2-) and OH(-) derived from hydrozincite and Zn/Al-CO3(2-) hydrotalcite together with their ultra-thin thickness and high surface area contribute the excellent properties of the adsorbents.

  10. Kinetics of adsorption of bovine serum albumin on magnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhouli; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen; Guo, Caixia

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles (MNPs-CMC) were developed as effective magnetic affinity adsorbent for Bovine serum albumin and the adsorption reactions were investigated. The obtained experimental data were compared with the adsorption kinetics models and equilibrium isotherms. The experimental kinetic data were modeled using Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order, Bangham's equation, Intra-particle diffusion model and Elovich equations. It was found that the adsorption reactions followed the Pseudo-second order kinetics equation. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin equations. By comparing the correlation coefficients determined for each linear transformation of isotherm analysis, it was found that the Langmuir equation was the best fit equilibrium model for the adsorption of BSA. Error functions have been used to determine the alternative single component parameters by nonlinear regression due to the inherent bias in using the correlation coefficient resulting from linearization. It showed that the Langmuir equation resulted in the lowest values for the error function and thus fitted the data better than the other isotherm. Various thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH°), entropy (ΔS°) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) were evaluated. MNPs-CMC nanoaprticles were shown to be a promising material for adsorption of BSA from aqueous solutions. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Isometric graphing and multidimensional scaling for reaction-diffusion modeling on regular and fractal surfaces with spatiotemporal pattern recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuriakose, Jainy; Ghosh, Anandamohan; Ravi Kumar, V; Kulkarni, B D

    2004-03-15

    Heterogeneous surface reactions exhibiting complex spatiotemporal dynamics and patterns can be studied as processes involving reaction-diffusion mechanisms. In many realistic situations, the surface has fractal characteristics. This situation is studied by isometric graphing and multidimensional scaling (IGMDS) of fractal surfaces for extracting geodesic distances (i.e., shortest scaled distances that obtain edges of neighboring surface nodes and their interconnections) and the results obtained used to model effects of surface diffusion with nonlinear reactions. Further analysis of evolved spatiotemporal patterns may be carried out by IGMDS because high-dimensional snapshot data can be efficiently projected to a transformed subspace with reduced dimensions. Validation of the IGMDS methodology is carried out by comparing results with reduction capabilities of conventional principal component analysis for simple situations of reaction and diffusion on surfaces. The usefulness of the IGMDS methodology is shown for analysis of complex patterns formed on both regular and fractal surfaces, and using generic nonlinear reaction-diffusion systems following FitzHugh Nagumo and cubic reaction kinetics. The studies of these systems with nonlinear kinetics and noise show that effects of surface disorder due to fractality can become very relevant. The relevance is shown by studying properties of dynamical invariants in IGMDS component space, viz., the Lyapunov exponents and the KS entropy for interesting situations of spiral formation and turbulent patterns. (c) 2004 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Equilibrium modeling of mono and binary sorption of Cu(II and Zn(II onto chitosan gel beads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaj Józef

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the work are in-depth experimental studies of Cu(II and Zn(II ion removal on chitosan gel beads from both one- and two-component water solutions at the temperature of 303 K. The optimal process conditions such as: pH value, dose of sorbent and contact time were determined. Based on the optimal process conditions, equilibrium and kinetic studies were carried out. The maximum sorption capacities equaled: 191.25 mg/g and 142.88 mg/g for Cu(II and Zn(II ions respectively, when the sorbent dose was 10 g/L and the pH of a solution was 5.0 for both heavy metal ions. One-component sorption equilibrium data were successfully presented for six of the most useful three-parameter equilibrium models: Langmuir-Freundlich, Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Koble-Corrigan, Hill and Toth. Extended forms of Langmuir-Freundlich, Koble-Corrigan and Sips models were also well fitted to the two-component equilibrium data obtained for different ratios of concentrations of Cu(II and Zn(II ions (1:1, 1:2, 2:1. Experimental sorption data were described by two kinetic models of the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order. Furthermore, an attempt to explain the mechanisms of the divalent metal ion sorption process on chitosan gel beads was undertaken.

  13. A model for a countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium reactions. The methanol synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Kuczynski, M.

    1987-01-01

    The theoretical background for a novel, countercurrent gas—solid—solid trickle flow reactor for equilibrium gas reactions is presented. A one-dimensional, steady-state reactor model is developed. The influence of the various process parameters on the reactor performance is discussed. The physical

  14. Radiative capture reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B in the continuum shell model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennaceur, K.; Ploszajczak, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France); Nowacki, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France)]|[Lab. de Physique Theorique Strasbourg, Strasbourg (France); Okolowicz, J. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), Caen (France)]|[Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland)

    1998-06-01

    We present here the first application of realistic shell model (SM) including coupling between many-particle (quasi-)bound states and the continuum of one-particle scattering states to the calculation of the total capture cross section and the astrophysical factor in the reaction {sup 7}Be(p,{gamma}){sup 8}B. (orig.)

  15. Refined transition-state models for proline-catalyzed asymmetric Michael reactions under basic and base-free conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Akhilesh K; Sunoj, Raghavan B

    2012-12-07

    The stereocontrolling transition state (TS) models for C-C bond formation relying on hydrogen bonding have generally been successful in proline-catalyzed aldol, Mannich, α-amination, and α-aminoxylation reactions. However, the suitability of the hydrogen-bonding model in protic and aprotic conditions as well as under basic and base-free conditions has not been well established for Michael reactions. Through a comprehensive density functional theory investigation, we herein analyze different TS models for the stereocontrolling C-C bond formation, both in the presence and absence of a base in an aprotic solvent (THF). A refined stereocontrolling TS for the Michael reaction between cyclohexanone and nitrostyrene is proposed. The new TS devoid of hydrogen bonding between the nitro group of nitrostyrene and carboxylic acid of proline, under base-free conditions, is found to be more preferred over the conventional hydrogen-bonding model besides being able to reproduce the experimentally observed stereochemical outcome. A DBU-bound TS is identified as more suitable for rationalizing the origin of asymmetric induction under basic reaction conditions. In both cases, the most preferred approach of nitrostyrene is identified as occurring from the face anti to the carboxylic acid of proline-enamine. The predicted enantio- and diastereoselectivities are in very good agreement with the experimental observations.

  16. Traveling wave solutions of a biological reaction-convection-diffusion equation model by using $(G'/G$ expansion method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahnam Javadi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the $(G'/G$-expansion method is applied to solve a biological reaction-convection-diffusion model arising in mathematical biology. Exact traveling wave solutions are obtained by this method. This scheme can be applied to a wide class of nonlinear partial differential equations.

  17. Using Different Conceptual Change Methods Embedded within 5E Model: A Sample Teaching of Endothermic-Exothermic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Fatma; Calik, Muammer

    2008-01-01

    Since Widodo, Duit and Muller (2002) addressed that there is a gap between teacher's theoretical knowledge and their practical classroom constructivist behavior, we presented a sample teaching activity about Endothermic-Exothermic Reactions for teacher usage. Therein, the aim of this study is to design a 5E model to include students' alternative…

  18. Heavy Metal Adsorption onto Kappaphycus sp. from Aqueous Solutions: The Use of Error Functions for Validation of Isotherm and Kinetics Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Sayedur Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption process is a promising technology for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastes and effluents using low-cost and effective biosorbents. In the present study, adsorption of Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ onto dried biomass of red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by four isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich and four kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models. The adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. Functional groups in the biomass involved in metal adsorption process were revealed as carboxylic and sulfonic acids and sulfonate by Fourier transform infrared analysis. A total of nine error functions were applied to validate the models. We strongly suggest the analysis of error functions for validating adsorption isotherm and kinetic models using linear methods. The present work shows that the red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. can be used as a potentially low-cost biosorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Further study is warranted to evaluate its feasibility for the removal of heavy metals from the real environment.

  19. Heavy Metal Adsorption onto Kappaphycus sp. from Aqueous Solutions: The Use of Error Functions for Validation of Isotherm and Kinetics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md. Sayedur; Sathasivam, Kathiresan V.

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption process is a promising technology for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastes and effluents using low-cost and effective biosorbents. In the present study, adsorption of Pb2+, Cu2+, Fe2+, and Zn2+ onto dried biomass of red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by four isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich) and four kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models). The adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. Functional groups in the biomass involved in metal adsorption process were revealed as carboxylic and sulfonic acids and sulfonate by Fourier transform infrared analysis. A total of nine error functions were applied to validate the models. We strongly suggest the analysis of error functions for validating adsorption isotherm and kinetic models using linear methods. The present work shows that the red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. can be used as a potentially low-cost biosorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Further study is warranted to evaluate its feasibility for the removal of heavy metals from the real environment. PMID:26295032

  20. Heavy Metal Adsorption onto Kappaphycus sp. from Aqueous Solutions: The Use of Error Functions for Validation of Isotherm and Kinetics Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Sayedur; Sathasivam, Kathiresan V

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption process is a promising technology for the removal of heavy metals from industrial wastes and effluents using low-cost and effective biosorbents. In the present study, adsorption of Pb(2+), Cu(2+), Fe(2+), and Zn(2+) onto dried biomass of red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. was investigated as a function of pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration, and temperature. The experimental data were evaluated by four isotherm models (Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich) and four kinetic models (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intraparticle diffusion models). The adsorption process was feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic in nature. Functional groups in the biomass involved in metal adsorption process were revealed as carboxylic and sulfonic acids and sulfonate by Fourier transform infrared analysis. A total of nine error functions were applied to validate the models. We strongly suggest the analysis of error functions for validating adsorption isotherm and kinetic models using linear methods. The present work shows that the red seaweed Kappaphycus sp. can be used as a potentially low-cost biosorbent for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions. Further study is warranted to evaluate its feasibility for the removal of heavy metals from the real environment.

  1. A hybrid model of support vector regression with genetic algorithm for forecasting adsorption of malachite green onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes: central composite design optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Dashtian, K; Ghaedi, A M; Dehghanian, N

    2016-05-11

    The aim of this work is the study of the predictive ability of a hybrid model of support vector regression with genetic algorithm optimization (GA-SVR) for the adsorption of malachite green (MG) onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). Various factors were investigated by central composite design and optimum conditions was set as: pH 8, 0.018 g MWCNTs, 8 mg L(-1) dye mixed with 50 mL solution thoroughly for 10 min. The Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and D-R isothermal models are applied to fitting the experimental data, and the data was well explained by the Langmuir model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 62.11-80.64 mg g(-1) in a short time at 25 °C. Kinetic studies at various adsorbent dosages and the initial MG concentration show that maximum MG removal was achieved within 10 min of the start of every experiment under most conditions. The adsorption obeys the pseudo-second-order rate equation in addition to the intraparticle diffusion model. The optimal parameters (C of 0.2509, σ(2) of 0.1288 and ε of 0.2018) for the SVR model were obtained based on the GA. For the testing data set, MSE values of 0.0034 and the coefficient of determination (R(2)) values of 0.9195 were achieved.

  2. The temperature dependence of the symmetry factor for a model Fe3+(aq)/Fe2+(aq) redox half reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2015-09-01

    The symmetry factor for the activation of an elementary electrode reaction is, in principle, potential dependent and temperature dependent. The variation with temperature is usually rationalised by an Arrhenius-type separation in an enthalpic and entropic contribution. This empirical scheme is investigated for a model aqueous ferrous-ferric oxidation half reaction, using Marcus theory based molecular dynamics simulations. These calculations are extended with umbrella integration and classical transition path sampling methods to verify the validity of the Marcus theory for our model reaction. We show that, in the framework of the Marcus theory, the empirical Arrhenius-type analysis of the symmetry factor is justified provided the activation entropy is evaluated from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy with the potential kept constant. Under these conditions the temperature derivative of the symmetry factor is directly equal to the potential derivative of the activation entropy. Both quantities in turn are proportional to the equilibrium reaction entropy which is the expected behaviour for asymmetric electron transfer of which the half reaction studied here is an example. The numerical simulation results are in good agreement with these theoretical relations confirming that the Marcus theory can be used to analyse the temperature dependence of electron transfer rates.

  3. Modelling of simultaneous mass and heat transfer with chemical reaction using the Maxwell-Stefan theory—I. Model development and isothermal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    A general applicable model has been developed which can predict mass and heat transfer fluxes through a vapour/gas-liquid interface in case a reversible chemical reaction with associated heat effect takes place in the liquid phase. In this model the Maxwell-Stefan theory has been used to describe

  4. Flow of a mixture of reactive gases: H{sub 2}-air detonation with a model of 8 reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouboa, A. [Univ. of Evry val d`Essonne (France); Poissant, G. [I.U.T. d`Evry (France); Forestier, A. [L.T.M.E., St. Paul-lez-Durance (France); Gibert, R.J. [C.E.A. Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-11-01

    This report deals with the modeling of a flow in the case of a reactive gas mixture submitted to a detonation wave. The system of Euler multispecies equations is coupled with a reactional model of eight reactions. In order to solve this system numerically, a finite volume formulation is used, based on the Van Leer method. In spite of the fact that the studied tests present some difficulties due to non regular structures and severe shock waves, the authors obtain satisfying results. In this paper, they present a monodimensional example. This paper is divided into four sections: in the first one, the authors have given Euler`s multispecies equations, in a second, they have proposed a kinetic model of the hydrogen-oxygen mixtures, in a third one, they have presented a resolution method and the results of a common numeric test (impact tube). Finally, they have explained the future prospects for the evolution of a more efficient model.

  5. Modeling and analysis for three-dimensional flow with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawar Hayat

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the steady three-dimensional boundary layer flow of Maxwell fluid over a bidirectional stretching surface with homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions. A system of ordinary differential equations is obtained by using suitable transformations. Convergent series solutions are derived by homotopic procedure. Impact of various pertinent parameters on the velocity and concentration is discussed. It is noted that an increase in the Deborah number decreases both the velocity components. Also concentration distribution decreases for larger values of strength of homogeneous reaction parameter while it increases for strength of heterogeneous reaction parameter.

  6. Modelling of the spallation reaction: analysis and testing of nuclear models; Simulation de la spallation: analyse et test des modeles nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toccoli, C

    2000-04-03

    The spallation reaction is considered as a 2-step process. First a very quick stage (10{sup -22}, 10{sup -29} s) which corresponds to the individual interaction between the incident projectile and nucleons, this interaction is followed by a series of nucleon-nucleon collisions (intranuclear cascade) during which fast particles are emitted, the nucleus is left in a strongly excited level. Secondly a slower stage (10{sup -18}, 10{sup -19} s) during which the nucleus is expected to de-excite completely. This de-excitation is performed by evaporation of light particles (n, p, d, t, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He) or/and fission or/and fragmentation. The HETC code has been designed to simulate spallation reactions, this simulation is based on the 2-steps process and on several models of intranuclear cascades (Bertini model, Cugnon model, Helder Duarte model), the evaporation model relies on the statistical theory of Weiskopf-Ewing. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the ability of the HETC code to predict experimental results. A methodology about the comparison of relevant experimental data with results of calculation is presented and a preliminary estimation of the systematic error of the HETC code is proposed. The main problem of cascade models originates in the difficulty of simulating inelastic nucleon-nucleon collisions, the emission of pions is over-estimated and corresponding differential spectra are badly reproduced. The inaccuracy of cascade models has a great impact to determine the excited level of the nucleus at the end of the first step and indirectly on the distribution of final residual nuclei. The test of the evaporation model has shown that the emission of high energy light particles is under-estimated. (A.C.)

  7. On the behaviour, mechanistic modelling and interaction of biochar and crop fertilizers in aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prithvi Simha

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the benefits of applying biochar for the purposes of soil conditioning and crop productivity enhancement have been demonstrated, relatively few studies have elaborated on its causal mechanisms, especially on the biochar–fertilizer interaction. Thus, in the present study, the ex-situ adsorptive potential of base activated biochar (BAB towards plant nutrient immobilization and removal from aqueous solutions was investigated. Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum was utilized as the precursor to prepare slow vacuum pyrolysed char and its affinity towards adsorption of urea was examined at various process conditions. Low sorption temperatures, moderate agitation speeds and high initial concentration were seen to favour greater urea uptake by BAB. The sorption was exothermic, physical, spontaneous and had a pseudo-second order kinetic fit. Both surface and intra-particle diffusion governed the removal and immobilization of urea. Furthermore, process mass transfer was limited by film diffusion of urea to the external surface of the BAB. Equilibrium studies suggested that Dubinin–Radushkevich is the most appropriate model to describe the urea-BAB behaviour with maximum uptake, estimated to be 1115 mg⋅g−1. Through such ex-situ analysis, it could be possible to have prior knowledge, quantification and differentiation of the potential of chars manufactured from various feedstocks. This could then be used as an effective screening step in designing appropriate biochar–fertilizer systems for soil conditioning and help reduce the time and effort spent otherwise in long-term field studies.

  8. Existence of global solutions for reaction diffusion systems modeling the electrodeposition of alloys with initial data measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nour Eddine Alaa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we are interested in the mathematical model of reaction diffusion systems. The originality of our study is to work with concentrations appearing in reactors together with measure initial data. To validate this model, we prove the existence of global weak solutions. The "j" technique introduced by Pierre and Martin [18] is suitable for this type of solutions. However, its adaptation has some new technical difficulties that we have to overcome.

  9. The dark side of working online : towards a definition and an emotion reaction model of workplace cyberbullying

    OpenAIRE

    Vranjes, Ivana; Baillien, Elfi; Vandebosch, Heidi; Erreygers, Sara; Witte, de, W.E.A.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: The introduction of new technologies created avenues for new forms of bullying. Despite an impressive body of research on cyberbullying amongst youngsters, studies in the work context have largely neglected its electronic counterpart. In this study, we define workplace cyberbullying and propose an Emotion Reaction Model of its occurrence. Our model aligns with the main proposition of the Affective Events Theory (Weiss & Cropanzano, 1996), that emotions evoked by certain work events ...

  10. Artificial Neural Network Modeling and Genetic Algorithm Optimization for Cadmium Removal from Aqueous Solutions by Reduced Graphene Oxide-Supported Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron (nZVI/rGO) Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Mingyi; Li, Tongjun; Hu, Jiwei; Cao, Rensheng; Wei, Xionghui; Shi, Xuedan; Ruan, Wenqian

    2017-05-17

    Reduced graphene oxide-supported nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI/rGO) composites were synthesized in the present study by chemical deposition method and were then characterized by various methods, such as Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nZVI/rGO composites prepared were utilized for Cd(II) removal from aqueous solutions in batch mode at different initial Cd(II) concentrations, initial pH values, contact times, and operating temperatures. Response surface methodology (RSM) and artificial neural network hybridized with genetic algorithm (ANN-GA) were used for modeling the removal efficiency of Cd(II) and optimizing the four removal process variables. The average values of prediction errors for the RSM and ANN-GA models were 6.47% and 1.08%. Although both models were proven to be reliable in terms of predicting the removal efficiency of Cd(II), the ANN-GA model was found to be more accurate than the RSM model. In addition, experimental data were fitted to the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherms. It was found that the Cd(II) adsorption was best fitted to the Langmuir isotherm. Examination on thermodynamic parameters revealed that the removal process was spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Furthermore, the pseudo-second-order model can better describe the kinetics of Cd(II) removal with a good R² value than the pseudo-first-order model.

  11. Predictions of dynamic changes in reaction rates as a consequence of incomplete mixing using pore scale reactive transport modeling on images of porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhashmi, Z; Blunt, M J; Bijeljic, B

    2015-08-01

    We present a pore scale model capable of simulating fluid/fluid reactive transport on images of porous media from first principles. We use a streamline-based particle tracking method for simulating flow and transport, while for reaction to occur, both reactants must be within a diffusive distance of each other during a time-step. We assign a probability of reaction (Pr), as a function of the reaction rate constant (kr) and the diffusion length. Firstly, we validate our model for reaction against analytical solutions for the bimolecular reaction (A+B→C) in a free fluid. Then, we simulate transport and reaction in a beadpack to validate the model through predicting the fluid/fluid reaction experimental results provided by Gramling et al. (2002). Our model accurately predicts the experimental data, as it takes into account the degree of incomplete mixing present at the sub-pore (image voxel) level, in contrast to advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) model that over-predicts pore scale mixing. Finally, we show how our model can predict dynamic changes in the reaction rate accurately accounting for the local geometry, topology and flow field at the pore scale. We demonstrate the substantial difference between the predicted early-time reaction rate in comparison to the ADRE model. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. cycloaddition reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    models of regioselectivity in pericyclic reactions. In addition, local hard and soft acid base (HSAB) princi- ples have been also employed to predict the observed regioselectivity.2 In recent years, the conceptual density functional theory has been remarkably successful in explaining the reactivity and site selectivity.3 The.

  13. Principal component analysis- adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system modeling and genetic algorithm optimization of adsorption of methylene blue by activated carbon derived from Pistacia khinjuk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M; Ghaedi, A M; Abdi, F; Roosta, M; Vafaei, A; Asghari, A

    2013-10-01

    In the present study, activated carbon (AC) simply derived from Pistacia khinjuk and characterized using different techniques such as SEM and BET analysis. This new adsorbent was used for methylene blue (MB) adsorption. Fitting the experimental equilibrium data to various isotherm models shows the suitability and applicability of the Langmuir model. The adsorption mechanism and rate of processes was investigated by analyzing time dependency data to conventional kinetic models and it was found that adsorption follow the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Principle component analysis (PCA) has been used for preprocessing of input data and genetic algorithm optimization have been used for prediction of adsorption of methylene blue using activated carbon derived from P. khinjuk. In our laboratory various activated carbon as sole adsorbent or loaded with various nanoparticles was used for removal of many pollutants (Ghaedi et al., 2012). These results indicate that the small amount of proposed adsorbent (1.0g) is applicable for successful removal of MB (RE>98%) in short time (45min) with high adsorption capacity (48-185mgg(-1)). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. (n,p) and (n,alpha) measurements using LENZ instrument to improve reaction model prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Young; Devlin, Matthew; Haight, Robert; Manning, Brett; Mosby, Shea

    2015-10-01

    Understanding neutron-induced charged particle reactions is of interest for nuclear astrophysics and applied nuclear energy. Often, direct measurements of these reactions are not feasible at neutron beam facilities due to the short half-lives of the targets and the reduced cross sections at astrophysically relevant energies given the large Coulomb barriers. Instead, the Hauser-Feshbach formalism is used to study this reaction mechanism for predicting cross sections. We have developed the LENZ (Low Energy n,z) instrument to measure the (n,p) and (n, α) reactions using a time-of-flight method for incident neutron energies from thermal to several tens of MeV at LANSCE. The LENZ has improved capabilities including a large solid angle, a low detection threshold, and good signal-to-background ratios using waveform digitizers. We have performed an in-beam commissioning measurement on 59Co(n, α/p) at En = 0.7 - 12 MeV. In this paper, we will discuss the results of the 59Co(n, α/p) measurements and present the status of the reaction studies on 16O(n, α) for nuclear energy applications and 77Se(n,p) for reaction mechanism studies. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy-Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. Enhanced removal of cationic dye by calcium alginate/organobentonite beads: Modeling, kinetics, equilibriums, thermodynamic and reusability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebri, Nassima; Boutahala, Mokhtar; Chelali, Nacer-Eddine; Boukhalfa, Nadia; Zeroual, Larbi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, acid-activated organobentonite (OAB), calcium alginate (A) and calcium alginate/acid-activated organobentonite composite beads (A-OAB) were prepared and applied for the removal of methylene blue from solutions in batch system. The zero point charge of pH (pHpzc), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis were carried out. The effects of pH solution (2-11), temperature (15, 25, 35 and 45°C), initial concentration (20-500mg/L), and contact time were investigated. The adsorption processes fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and both models Langmuir and Chapman isotherms. Results showed that the maximum adsorption capacities of (OAB), (A) and (A-OAB) for the adsorption of MB were 263.80, 483.6 and 799.43mg/g at 25°C, respectively. Thermodynamic studies showed spontaneous and endothermic nature of the overall adsorption process. Desorption tests showed that the removal efficiency of MB decreased from 95 to 89.7% after six regeneration cycles for (A-OAB). From this, (A-OAB) can be utilized as an economical adsorbent for the removal of basic dyes from the contaminated waste water. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Modeling studies: Adsorption of aniline blue by using Prosopis Juliflora carbon/Ca/alginate polymer composite beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M; Tamilarasan, R

    2013-02-15

    The research article describes the experimental and modeling study for the adsorptive removal of aniline blue dye (AB dye) from aqueous matrices using a Prosopis Juliflora modified carbon/Ca/alginate polymer bead as a low cost and eco-friendly adsorbent. The rate of adsorption was investigated under various experimental parameters such as contact time, adsorbent dose, dye concentration, pH and temperature. The kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies were assessed to find out the efficiency of the adsorption process. The equilibrium uptake capacity of the adsorption process was found with Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherm equations and it was evaluated by dimensionless separation factor (R(L)). The dynamics of adsorption was predicted by pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order Lagergren's equation and intra particle diffusion model. Adsorption feasibility was assessed with thermodynamic parameters such as isosteric heat of adsorption (ΔH°), standard entropy (ΔS°) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) using VantHoff plot. The alginate bead was characterized with FTIR spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. U(VI) biosorption by bi-functionalized Pseudomonas putida @ chitosan bead: Modeling and optimization using RSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohbatzadeh, Hozhabr; Keshtkar, Ali Reza; Safdari, Jaber; Fatemi, Faezeh

    2016-08-01

    In this work, Pseudomonas putida cells immobilized into chitosan beads (PICB) were synthesized to investigate the impact of microorganism entrapment on biosorption capacity of prepared biosorbent for U(VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions. Response Surface Methodology (RSM) based on Central Composite Design (CCD) was utilized to evaluate the performance of the PICB in comparison with chitosan beads (CB) under batch mode. Performing experiments under optimal condition sets viz. pH 5, initial U(VI) concentration 500mg/L, biosorbent dosage 0.4g/L and 20wt.% bacterial cells showed that the observed biosorption capacity enhanced by 1.27 times from 398mg/g (CB) to 504mg/g (PICB) that confirmed the effectiveness of cells immobilization process. FTIR and potentiometric titration were then utilized to characterize the prepared biosorbents. While the dominant functional group in the binding process was NH3(+) (4.78meq/g) in the CB, the functional groups of NH3(+), NH2, OH, COOH (6.00meq/g) were responsible for the PICB. The equilibrium and kinetic studies revealed that the Langmuir isotherm model and the pseudo-second-order kinetic model were in better fitness with the CB and PICB experimental data. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the PICB could be a suitable biosorbent for uranium (VI) biosorption from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biosorption of Strontium from Simulated Nuclear Wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus under Culture Conditions: Adsorption and Bioaccumulation Processes and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingxue; Dong, Faqin; Kang, Wu; Sun, Shiyong; Wei, Hongfu; Zhang, Wei; Nie, Xiaoqin; Guo, Yuting; Huang, Ting; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Algae biosorption is an ideal wastewater treatment method when coupled with algae growth and biosorption. The adsorption and bioaccumulation of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus were investigated in this research. One hundred mL of cultured S. spinosus cells with a dry weight of 1.0 mg in simulated nuclear wastewater were used to analyze the effects on S. spinosus cell growth as well as the adsorption and bioaccumulation characters under conditions of 25 ± 1 °C with approximately 3,000 lux illumination. The results showed that S. spinosus had a highly selective biosorption capacity for strontium, with a maximum bioremoval ratio of 76%. The adsorbed strontium ion on cell walls was approximately 90% of the total adsorbed amount; the bioaccumulation in the cytoplasm varied by approximately10%. The adsorption quantity could be described with an equilibrium isotherm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model suggested that adsorption was the rate-limiting step of the biosorption process. A new bioaccumulation model with three parameters was proposed and could give a good fit with the experiment data. The results suggested that S. spinosus may be a potential biosorbent for the treatment of nuclear wastewater in culture conditions. PMID:24919131

  19. Biosorption of Strontium from Simulated Nuclear Wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus under Culture Conditions: Adsorption and Bioaccumulation Processes and Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxue Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Algae biosorption is an ideal wastewater treatment method when coupled with algae growth and biosorption. The adsorption and bioaccumulation of strontium from simulated nuclear wastewater by Scenedesmus spinosus were investigated in this research. One hundred mL of cultured S. spinosus cells with a dry weight of 1.0 mg in simulated nuclear wastewater were used to analyze the effects on S. spinosus cell growth as well as the adsorption and bioaccumulation characters under conditions of 25 ± 1 °C with approximately 3,000 lux illumination. The results showed that S. spinosus had a highly selective biosorption capacity for strontium, with a maximum bioremoval ratio of 76%. The adsorbed strontium ion on cell walls was approximately 90% of the total adsorbed amount; the bioaccumulation in the cytoplasm varied by approximately10%. The adsorption quantity could be described with an equilibrium isotherm. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model suggested that adsorption was the rate-limiting step of the biosorption process. A new bioaccumulation model with three parameters was proposed and could give a good fit with the experiment data. The results suggested that S. spinosus may be a potential biosorbent for the treatment of nuclear wastewater in culture conditions.

  20. Kinetics and isothermal modeling of liquid phase adsorption of rhodamine B onto urea modified Raphia hookerie epicarp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyinbor, A. A.; Adekola, F. A.; Olatunji, G. A.

    2017-10-01

    Epicarp of Raphia hookerie, a bioresource material, was modified with urea (UMRH) to adsorb Rhodamine B (RhB) from aqueous solution. Adsorbent morphology and surface chemistry were established by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area determination, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR) analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as the pH point of zero charge (pHpzc) determination. Prepared material was subsequently utilized for the uptake of Rhodamine B (RhB). Operational parameters, such as adsorbent dosage, concentration, time, and temperature, were investigated. Evidence of effective urea modification was confirmed by vivid absorption bands at 1670 and 1472 cm-1 corresponding to C=O and C-N stretching vibrations, respectively. Optimum adsorption was obtained at pH 3. Freundlich adsorption isotherm best fits the equilibrium adsorption data, while evidence of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction was revealed by Temkin isotherm model. The maximum monolayer adsorption capacity ( q max) was 434.78 mg/g. Kinetics of the adsorption process was best described by the pseudo-second-order kinetics model. Desorption efficiency was less than or equal to 25 % for all the eluents, and it follows the order HCl > H2O > CH3COOH.