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Sample records for pseudo second-order kinetic

  1. Using of "pseudo-second-order model" in adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2014-01-01

    A research paper's contribution exists not only in its originality and creativity but also in its continuity and development for research that follows. However, the author easily ignores it. Citation error and quotation error occurred very frequently in a scientific paper. Numerous researchers use secondary references without knowing the original idea from authors. Sulaymon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:3011-3023, 2013) and Spiridon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6367-6381, 2013) presented wrong pseudo-second-order models in Environmental Science and Pollution Research, vol. 20. This comment pointed the errors of the kinetic models and offered information for citing original idea of pseudo-second-order kinetic expression. In order to stop the proliferation of the mistake, it is suggested to cite the original paper for the kinetic model which provided greater accuracy and more details about the kinetic expression.

  2. Second order dissipative fluid dynamics from kinetic theory

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    Koide T.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We derive the equations of second order dissipative fluid dynamics from the relativistic Boltzmann equation following the method of W. Israel and J. M. Stewart [1]. We present a frame independent calculation of all first- and second-order terms and their coefficients using a linearised collision integral. Therefore, we restore all terms that were previously neglected in the original papers of W. Israel and J. M. Stewart.

  3. P1-17: Pseudo-Haptics Using Motion-in-Depth Stimulus and Second-Order Motion Stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Sato

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Modification of motion of the computer cursor during the manipulation by the observer evokes illusory haptic sensation (Lecuyer et al., 2004 ACM SIGCHI '04 239–246. This study investigates the pseudo-haptics using motion-in-depth and second-order motion. A stereoscopic display and a PHANTOM were used in the first experiment. A subject was asked to move a visual target at a constant speed in horizontal, vertical, or front-back direction. During the manipulation, the speed was reduced to 50% for 500 msec. The haptic sensation was measured using the magnitude estimation method. The result indicates that perceived haptic sensation from motion-in-depth was about 30% of that from horizontal or vertical motion. A 2D display and the PHANTOM were used in the second experiment. The motion cue was second order—in each frame, dots in a square patch reverses in contrast (i.e., all black dots become white and all white dots become black. The patch was moved in a horizontal direction. The result indicates that perceived haptic sensation from second-order motion was about 90% of that from first-order motion.

  4. Contact time optimization of two-stage batch adsorber design using second-order kinetic model for the adsorption of phosphate onto alunite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozacar, Mahmut

    2006-09-01

    The adsorption of phosphate onto alunite in a batch adsorber has been studied. Four kinetic models including pseudo first- and second-order equation, intraparticle diffusion equation and the Elovich equation were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters, rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of phosphate onto alunite could be described by the pseudo second-order equation. Adsorption of phosphate onto alunite followed the Langmuir isotherm. A model has been used for the design of a two-stage batch adsorber based on pseudo second-order adsorption kinetics. The model has been optimized with respect to operating time in order to minimize total operating time to achieve a specified amount of phosphate removal using a fixed mass of adsorbent. The results of two-stage batch adsorber design studies showed that the required times for specified amounts of phosphate removal significantly decreased. It is particularly suitable for low-cost adsorbents/adsorption systems when minimising operating time is a major operational and design criterion, such as, for highly congested industrial sites in which significant volume of effluent need to be treated in the minimum amount of time.

  5. Deconvolution of the thermoluminescent emission curve. Second order kinetics; Deconvolucion de la curva de emision termoluminiscente. Cinetica de segundo orden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno y M, A. [Departamento de Apoyo en Ciencias Aplicadas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Sur 104 Col. Centro, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Moreno B, A. [Facultad de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    In this work it is described the Randall and Wilkins second order kinetics in Microsoft Excel language, which allows its expression as the sum of Gaussian and the correction factors corresponding. These factors are obtained of the differences between the real thermoluminescent curve and the Gaussian proposed. The results obtained justify the Gaussian expression added to the correction factor. (Author)

  6. A kinetic energy fitting metric for resolution of the identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrecht, Daniel S; Brandhorst, Kai; Miller, William H; McCurdy, C William; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2011-04-07

    A kinetic-energy-based fitting metric for application in the context of resolution of the identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory is presented, which is derived from the Poisson equation. Preliminary tests of the applicability include the evaluation of the error in the correlation energy, compared to standard Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, with respect to the auxiliary basis set employed. We comment on the potential merits of this fitting metric, compared to standard resolution of the identity second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, and discuss its scaling behavior in the limit of large molecules.

  7. Roots of the second order equation of neutronic kinetics; Raices de la ecuacion de segundo orden de la cinetica neutronica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polo L, M. A.; Espinosa P, G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)], e-mail: gepe@xanum.uam.mx

    2009-10-15

    In this work is presented the deduction and solution of punctual equation of neutronic kinetics of second order, which is obtained applying the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics. The work hypothesis consisted on considering that the temporary dependence of current vector is not worthless in the constitutive law for the approach of neutronic processes with the diffusion equation. As results of work eight roots of analytical solution of punctual equation of neutronic kinetics of second order are obtained for case of six groups of slowed neutrons, a root more respect the classic pattern of punctual equation of neutronic kinetics. This theory can be used when appear highly heterogeneous configurations in the nuclear reactor. (Author)

  8. Kinetics and Product Selectivity (Yield) of Second Order Competitive Consecutive Reactions in Fed-Batch Reactor and Plug Flow Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Selvamony, Subash Chandra Bose

    2013-01-01

    This literature compares the performance of second order competitive consecutive reaction in Fed-Batch Reactor with that in continuous Plug Flow Reactor. In a kinetic sense, this simulation study aims to develop a case for continuous Plug Flow Reactor in pharmaceutical, fine chemical, and related other chemical industries. MATLAB is used to find solutions for the differential equations. The simulation results show that, for certain cases of nonelementary scenario, product selectivity is highe...

  9. Second-order advantage from kinetic-spectroscopic data matrices in the presence of extreme spectral overlapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Culzoni, Maria J. [Laboratorio de Desarrollo Analitico y Quimiometria (LADAQ), Catedra de Quimica Analitica I, Facultad de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Ciudad Universitaria, Santa Fe S3000ZAA (Argentina); Goicoechea, Hector C. [Laboratorio de Desarrollo Analitico y Quimiometria (LADAQ), Catedra de Quimica Analitica I, Facultad de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Ciudad Universitaria, Santa Fe S3000ZAA (Argentina)], E-mail: hgoico@fbcb.unl.edu.ar; Ibanez, Gabriela A.; Lozano, Valeria A. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario and Instituto de Quimica Rosario (IQUIR-CONICET), Suipacha 531, Rosario S2002LRK (Argentina); Marsili, Nilda R. [Laboratorio de Desarrollo Analitico y Quimiometria (LADAQ), Catedra de Quimica Analitica I, Facultad de Bioquimica y Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Ciudad Universitaria, Santa Fe S3000ZAA (Argentina); Olivieri, Alejandro C. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario and Instituto de Quimica Rosario (IQUIR-CONICET), Suipacha 531, Rosario S2002LRK (Argentina)], E-mail: aolivier@fbioyf.unr.edu.ar; Pagani, Ariana P. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Facultad de Ciencias Bioquimicas y Farmaceuticas, Universidad Nacional de Rosario and Instituto de Quimica Rosario (IQUIR-CONICET), Suipacha 531, Rosario S2002LRK (Argentina)

    2008-04-28

    Multivariate curve resolution coupled to alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS) has been employed to model kinetic-spectroscopic second-order data, with focus on the achievement of the important second-order advantage, under conditions of extreme spectral overlapping among sample components. A series of simulated examples shows that MCR-ALS can conveniently handle the studied analytical problem unlike other second-order multivariate calibration algorithms, provided matrix augmentation is implemented in the spectral mode instead of in the usual kinetic mode. The approach has also been applied to three experimental examples, which involve the determination of: (1) the antiparkinsonian carbidopa (analyte) in the presence of levodopa as a potential interferent, both reacting with cerium (IV) to produce the fluorescent species cerium (III) with different kinetics; (2) Fe(II) (analyte) in the presence of the interferent Zn(II), both catalyzing the oxidation of methyl orange with potassium bromate; and (3) tartrazine (analyte) in the presence of the interferent brilliant blue, both oxidized with potassium bromate, with the interferent leading to a product with an absorption spectrum very similar to tartrazine. The results indicate good analytical performance towards the analytes, despite the intense spectral overlapping and the presence of unexpected constituents in the test samples.

  10. THERMOKINETIC STUDY OF THE ZERO, FIRST AND SECOND ORDER REACTIONS IN A PSEUDO-ADIABATIC CALORIMETER: Numerical approach and experimental dat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Mendoza

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The signal produced by a pseudo-adiabaticcalorimeter is simulated by numericalsolution of the differential equations thatmodel the chemical kinetics [1], the thermalproperties of the calorimetric cell[2], and the response of the thermistorused as a thermometric sensor [3]. These equations show that the calorimetricsignal is related with concentrationin a complex way. Therefore, a comparisonbetween the signals of the threebasic kinetics reactions (zero, first andsecond order was made, as a first stepto obtain a standard procedure to followchemical kinetics using a calorimeter. Inorder to help understanding this relationship,the initial rate method was applied to the simulated data to assess the relationshipbetween the order and the kineticconstants calculated with those usedfor the simulations. As it was expected,the initial rate method for the calorimetricdata, do not give a slope directly relatedwith the order of the reaction, as itwould be produced, for example, in datafrom a spectrophotometer. However, alinear relationship was found betweenwhat we call the “calorimetric order”and the kinetic order. Finally, the developedprocedure was applied to the studyof the H2O2 decomposition catalyzedwith Fe3+ in homogeneous phase andwith activated carbon in heterogeneousphase, finding the order and the kineticsconstants of the global processes, whichwere in close agreement with those inthe literature.

  11. Second Order Kinetic Modeling of Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction of Flavors Released from Selected Food Model Systems

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    Jiyuan Zhang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME has been widely used in various fields as a simple and versatile method, yet challenging in quantification. In order to improve the reproducibility in quantification, a mathematical model with its root in psychological modeling and chemical reactor modeling was developed, describing the kinetic behavior of aroma active compounds extracted by SPME from two different food model systems, i.e., a semi-solid food and a liquid food. The model accounted for both adsorption and release of the analytes from SPME fiber, which occurred simultaneously but were counter-directed. The model had four parameters and their estimated values were found to be more reproducible than the direct measurement of the compounds themselves by instrumental analysis. With the relative standard deviations (RSD of each parameter less than 5% and root mean square error (RMSE less than 0.15, the model was proved to be a robust one in estimating the release of a wide range of low molecular weight acetates at three environmental temperatures i.e., 30, 40 and 60 °C. More insights of SPME behavior regarding the small molecule analytes were also obtained through the kinetic parameters and the model itself.

  12. Response to "using of 'pseudo-second-order model' in adsorption", comment letter on "phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" [Bizerea Spiridon et al., Environ Sci Pollut Res (2013) 20:6367-6381].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizerea Spiridon, Otilia; Pitulice, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This letter is a response to the issues put forth by Dr. Y.S. Ho with regard to the article "Phenol removal from wastewater by adsorption on zeolitic composite" as reported by Bizerea Spiridon et al. (Environ Sci Pollut Res 20:6367-6381, 2013). The response proposes to clarify the error slipped in the typewritten linearized equation of the pseudo-second-kinetic model and the reason for using secondary reference regarding this model.

  13. Quantitative fluorescence kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma using three- and four-way calibration methods capable of providing the second-order advantage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Chao [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Wu, Hai-Long, E-mail: hlwu@hnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Chang; Xiang, Shou-Xia; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin [State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-03-03

    The metabolic coenzymes reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) are the primary electron donor and acceptor respectively, participate in almost all biological metabolic pathways. This study develops a novel method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma containing an uncalibrated interferent, by using three-way calibration based on multi-way fluorescence technique. In the three-way analysis, by using the calibration set in a static manner, we directly predicted the concentrations of both analytes in the mixture at any time after the start of their reactions, even in the presence of an uncalibrated spectral interferent and a varying background interferent. The satisfactory quantitative results indicate that the proposed method allows one to directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the mixture as the function of time in real-time and nondestructively, instead of determining the concentration after the analytical separation. Thereafter, we fitted the first-order rate law to their concentration data throughout their reactions. Additionally, a four-way calibration procedure is developed as an alternative for highly collinear systems. The results of the four-way analysis confirmed the results of the three-way analysis and revealed that both the degradation reaction of NADH and the formation reaction of FAD in human plasma fit the first-order rate law. The proposed methods could be expected to provide promising tools for simultaneous kinetic analysis of multiple reactions in complex systems in real-time and nondestructively. - Highlights: • A novel three-way calibration method for the quantitative kinetic analysis of NADH and FAD in human plasma is proposed. • The method can directly monitor the concentration of each analyte in the reaction in real-time and nondestructively. • The method has the second-order advantage. • A

  14. Second order Standard Model

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    Johnny Espin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known, though not commonly, that one can describe fermions using a second order in derivatives Lagrangian instead of the first order Dirac one. In this description the propagator is scalar, and the complexity is shifted to the vertex, which contains a derivative operator. In this paper we rewrite the Lagrangian of the fermionic sector of the Standard Model in such second order form. The new Lagrangian is extremely compact, and is obtained from the usual first order Lagrangian by integrating out all primed (or dotted 2-component spinors. It thus contains just half of the 2-component spinors that appear in the usual Lagrangian, which suggests a new perspective on unification. We sketch a natural in this framework SU(2×SU(4⊂SO(9 unified theory.

  15. Adsorption kinetics for the removal of chromium (VI) from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A comparison of kinetic models applied to the adsorption of Cr(VI) ions on the adsorbents was evaluated for the pseudo first-order, the pseudo second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models, respectively. Results show that the pseudo second-order kinetic model was found to correlate the experimental data ...

  16. Second-Order Algebraic Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Marcelo; Mahmoud, Ola

    Fiore and Hur [10] recently introduced a conservative extension of universal algebra and equational logic from first to second order. Second-order universal algebra and second-order equational logic respectively provide a model theory and a formal deductive system for languages with variable binding and parameterised metavariables. This work completes the foundations of the subject from the viewpoint of categorical algebra. Specifically, the paper introduces the notion of second-order algebraic theory and develops its basic theory. Two categorical equivalences are established: at the syntactic level, that of second-order equational presentations and second-order algebraic theories; at the semantic level, that of second-order algebras and second-order functorial models. Our development includes a mathematical definition of syntactic translation between second-order equational presentations. This gives the first formalisation of notions such as encodings and transforms in the context of languages with variable binding.

  17. Applications of the pseudo-harmonics to the multidimensional kinetics; Aplicacao do metodo dos pseudo-harmonicos a cinetica multidimensional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Alvim, Antonio C. Marques [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: zelmo@con.ufrj.br; fernando@con.ufrj.br; alvim@con.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    In this work we propose the application of the pseudo-harmonics in modal methods of spatial kinetics. The pseudo-harmonics, or the pseudo-modes, are the eigenfunctions associated to the leakage+removal operator in each group of energy of the steady-state diffusion equation. This operator is self-adjoint and it is not necessary to calculate the adjoints eigenfunctions. In the present work the pseudo-harmonics will be obtained starting from the equation of diffusion discretized by the coarse-mesh finite difference (CMFD). The modal methods approximate the time-dependent flux for an expansion in functions predetermined, that include the spatial dependence, with unknown expansion coefficients, that include the whole dependent part of the time. The obtaining of the system whose solution they are the coefficients of the modal expansion is done with aid of a function weight. Using the pseudomodes obtained in the steady state calculations, in the modal expansion as been the dependent functions of the space, we will show that the function weight can be chosen as being the own adjoint pseudo-modes. This calculation leads to a linear system of ordinary differential equations with the defined dimension for the number of pseudo-harmonics employed. The solution of the equations is built through the analytical integration of the equations of the precursor of delayed neutron. The proposed method was tested and it present good results, when compared with the direct method. (author)

  18. Second-Order Footsteps Illusions

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    Akiyoshi Kitaoka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the “footsteps illusion”, light and dark squares travel at constant speed across black and white stripes. The squares appear to move faster and slower as their contrast against the stripes varies. We now demonstrate some second-order footsteps illusions, in which all edges are defined by colors or textures—even though luminance-based neural motion detectors are blind to such edges.

  19. Cardiorespiratory Kinetics Determined by Pseudo-Random Binary Sequences - Comparisons between Walking and Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschate, J; Drescher, U; Thieschäfer, L; Heine, O; Baum, K; Hoffmann, U

    2016-12-01

    This study aims to compare cardiorespiratory kinetics as a response to a standardised work rate protocol with pseudo-random binary sequences between cycling and walking in young healthy subjects. Muscular and pulmonary oxygen uptake (V̇O2) kinetics as well as heart rate kinetics were expected to be similar for walking and cycling. Cardiac data and V̇O2 of 23 healthy young subjects were measured in response to pseudo-random binary sequences. Kinetics were assessed applying time series analysis. Higher maxima of cross-correlation functions between work rate and the respective parameter indicate faster kinetics responses. Muscular V̇O2 kinetics were estimated from heart rate and pulmonary V̇O2 using a circulatory model. Muscular (walking vs. cycling [mean±SD in arbitrary units]: 0.40±0.08 vs. 0.41±0.08) and pulmonary V̇O2 kinetics (0.35±0.06 vs. 0.35±0.06) were not different, although the time courses of the cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 showed unexpected biphasic responses. Heart rate kinetics (0.50±0.14 vs. 0.40±0.14; P=0.017) was faster for walking. Regarding the biphasic cross-correlation functions of pulmonary V̇O2 during walking, the assessment of muscular V̇O2 kinetics via pseudo-random binary sequences requires a circulatory model to account for cardio-dynamic distortions. Faster heart rate kinetics for walking should be considered by comparing results from cycle and treadmill ergometry. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Adsorption studies of molasse's wastewaters on activated carbon: modelling with a new fractal kinetic equation and evaluation of kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figaro, S; Avril, J P; Brouers, F; Ouensanga, A; Gaspard, S

    2009-01-30

    Adsorption kinetic of molasses wastewaters after anaerobic digestion (MSWD) and melanoidin respectively on activated carbon was studied at different pH. The kinetic parameters could be determined using classical kinetic equations and a recently published fractal kinetic equation. A linear form of this equation can also be used to fit adsorption data. Even with lower correlation coefficients the fractal kinetic equation gives lower normalized standard deviation values than the pseudo-second order model generally used to fit adsorption kinetic data, indicating that the fractal kinetic model is much more accurate for describing the kinetic adsorption data than the pseudo-second order kinetic model.

  1. Second-order optic flow processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaen-Stockdale, Craig; Ledgeway, Tim; Hess, Robert F

    2007-06-01

    Optic flow-large-field rotational and radial motion-is processed as efficiently as translational motion for first-order (luminance-defined) stimuli. However, it has been suggested recently that the same pattern does not hold for second-order (e.g. contrast-defined) stimuli. We used random dot kinematogram (RDK) stimuli to determine whether global processing of optic flow is as efficient as processing of global translational motion for both first- and second-order stimuli. For first-order stimuli, we found that coherence thresholds for radial and rotational motion were equivalent to thresholds for translational motion, supporting previous findings. For second-order stimuli we found, firstly, that given sufficient contrast, second-order optic flow can be processed as efficiently as first-order optic flow and, secondly, that rotational and translational second-order motion are processed with equal efficiency. This contradicts the suggestion that there is a loss of efficiency between integration of second-order global motion and second-order optic flow. The third interesting finding was that the processing of radial second-order motion appears to suffer from a deficit that is dependent upon both the contrast and spatial extent of the stimulus. Further experiments discounted the possibility that the observed deficit is caused by a centrifugal or centripetal bias, but demonstrated that a longer temporal integration period for radial second-order motion is responsible for the observed difference. For durations of approximately 850ms, all three types of motion are processed with equal efficiency.

  2. Analysis of RDX-TAGzT pseudo-propellant combustion with detailed chemical kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhakarna, Neeraj; Thynell, Stefan T.; Chowdhury, Arindrajit; Lin, Ping

    2011-12-01

    A detailed model of steady-state combustion of a pseudo-propellant containing cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX) and triaminoguanidinium azotetrazolate (TAGzT) is presented. The physicochemical processes occurring within the foam layer, comprised of a liquid and gas bubbles, and a gas-phase region above the burning surface are considered. The chemical kinetics is represented by a global thermal decomposition mechanism within the liquid by considering 18 species and eight chemical reactions. The reactions governing decomposition of TAGzT were deduced from separate confined rapid thermolysis experiments using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Within the gas bubbles and gas-phase region, a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism was used by considering up to 93 species and 504 reactions. The pseudo-propellant burn rate was found to be highly sensitive to the global decomposition reactions of TAGzT. The predicted results of burn rate agree well with experimental burn-rate data. The increase in burn rate by inclusion of TAGzT is due in part from exothermic decomposition of the azotetrazolate within the foam layer, and from fast gas-phase reactions between triaminoguanidine decomposition products, such as hydrazine, and oxidiser products from the nitramine decomposition.

  3. Hyperbolicity of second order in space systems of evolution equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gundlach, Carsten [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Martin-GarcIa, Jose M [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Centro de Fisica Miguel A Catalan, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-08-21

    A possible definition of strong/symmetric hyperbolicity for a second-order system of evolution equations is that it admits a reduction to first order which is strongly/symmetric hyperbolic. We investigate the general system that admits a reduction to first order and give necessary and sufficient criteria for strong/symmetric hyperbolicity of the reduction in terms of the principal part of the original second-order system. An alternative definition of strong hyperbolicity is based on the existence of a complete set of characteristic variables, and an alternative definition of symmetric hyperbolicity is based on the existence of a conserved (up to lower-order terms) energy. Both these definitions are made without any explicit reduction. Finally, strong hyperbolicity can be defined through a pseudo-differential reduction to first order. We prove that both definitions of symmetric hyperbolicity are equivalent and that all three definitions of strong hyperbolicity are equivalent (in three space dimensions). We show how to impose maximally dissipative boundary conditions on any symmetric hyperbolic second-order system. We prove that if the second-order system is strongly hyperbolic, any closed constraint evolution system associated with it is also strongly hyperbolic, and that the characteristic variables of the constraint system are derivatives of a subset of the characteristic variables of the main system, with the same speeds.

  4. Describing failure in geomaterials using second-order work approach

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    François Nicot

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Geomaterials are known to be non-associated materials. Granular soils therefore exhibit a variety of failure modes, with diffuse or localized kinematical patterns. In fact, the notion of failure itself can be confusing with regard to granular soils, because it is not associated with an obvious phenomenology. In this study, we built a proper framework, using the second-order work theory, to describe some failure modes in geomaterials based on energy conservation. The occurrence of failure is defined by an abrupt increase in kinetic energy. The increase in kinetic energy from an equilibrium state, under incremental loading, is shown to be equal to the difference between the external second-order work, involving the external loading parameters, and the internal second-order work, involving the constitutive properties of the material. When a stress limit state is reached, a certain stress component passes through a maximum value and then may decrease. Under such a condition, if a certain additional external loading is applied, the system fails, sharply increasing the strain rate. The internal stress is no longer able to balance the external stress, leading to a dynamic response of the specimen. As an illustration, the theoretical framework was applied to the well-known undrained triaxial test for loose soils. The influence of the loading control mode was clearly highlighted. It is shown that the plastic limit theory appears to be a particular case of this more general second-order work theory. When the plastic limit condition is met, the internal second-order work is nil. A class of incremental external loadings causes the kinetic energy to increase dramatically, leading to the sudden collapse of the specimen, as observed in laboratory.

  5. Selfishness as second-order altruism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldakar, Omar Tonsi; Wilson, David Sloan

    2008-01-01

    Selfishness is seldom considered a group-beneficial strategy. In the typical evolutionary formulation, altruism benefits the group, selfishness undermines altruism, and the purpose of the model is to identify mechanisms, such as kinship or reciprocity, that enable altruism to evolve. Recent models have explored punishment as an important mechanism favoring the evolution of altruism, but punishment can be costly to the punisher, making it a form of second-order altruism. This model identifies a strategy called “selfish punisher” that involves behaving selfishly in first-order interactions and altruistically in second-order interactions by punishing other selfish individuals. Selfish punishers cause selfishness to be a self-limiting strategy, enabling altruists to coexist in a stable equilibrium. This polymorphism can be regarded as a division of labor, or mutualism, in which the benefits obtained by first-order selfishness help to “pay” for second-order altruism. PMID:18448681

  6. Systemic Design for Second-Order Effects

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    Evan Barba

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Second-order effects refer to changes within a system that are the result of changes made somewhere else in the system (the first-order effects. Second-order effects can occur at different spatial, temporal, or organizational scales from the original interventions, and are difficult to control. Some organizational theorists suggest that careful management of feedback processes can facilitate controlled change from one organizational configuration to another. Recognizing that skill in managing feedback processes is a core competency of design suggests that design skills are potentially useful tools in achieving organizational change. This paper describes a case study in which a co-design methodology was used to control the second-order effects resulting from a classroom intervention to create organizational change. This approach is then theorized as the Instigator Systems approach.

  7. Pseudo spectral collocation with Maxwell polynomials for kinetic equations with energy diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Vizuet, Tonatiuh; Cerfon, Antoine J.

    2018-02-01

    We study the approximation and stability properties of a recently popularized discretization strategy for the speed variable in kinetic equations, based on pseudo-spectral collocation on a grid defined by the zeros of a non-standard family of orthogonal polynomials called Maxwell polynomials. Taking a one-dimensional equation describing energy diffusion due to Fokker–Planck collisions with a Maxwell–Boltzmann background distribution as the test bench for the performance of the scheme, we find that Maxwell based discretizations outperform other commonly used schemes in most situations, often by orders of magnitude. This provides a strong motivation for their use in high-dimensional gyrokinetic simulations. However, we also show that Maxwell based schemes are subject to a non-modal time stepping instability in their most straightforward implementation, so that special care must be given to the discrete representation of the linear operators in order to benefit from the advantages provided by Maxwell polynomials.

  8. Second Order Mode Selective Phase-Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Mikael Østergaard; Delaubert, Vincent; Bachor, Hans. A-

    2006-01-01

    We exploit second order (χ(2)) nonlinear optical phase matching for the selection of individual high order transverse modes. The ratio between the generated components can be adjusted continuously via changes in the phase-matching condition. ©2007 Optical Society of America......We exploit second order (χ(2)) nonlinear optical phase matching for the selection of individual high order transverse modes. The ratio between the generated components can be adjusted continuously via changes in the phase-matching condition. ©2007 Optical Society of America...

  9. Second-Order Conditioning in "Drosophila"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Christopher J.; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in "Drosophila melanogaster" has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning…

  10. Nine Practices of Second Order Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bill; Tucker, Patrick; Williams, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Many schools are in some stage of implementing differentiated instruction, with some already in what Carol Tomlinson describes in "The Differentiated School" as "second order change," where the entire school practices differentiation. In high-performing schools, differentiation has proved to be an effective instructional strategy; in classroom…

  11. Spacetime Encodings III - Second Order Killing Tensors

    CERN Document Server

    Brink, Jeandrew

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the Petrov type D, stationary axisymmetric vacuum (SAV) spacetimes that were found by Carter to have separable Hamilton-Jacobi equations, and thus admit a second-order Killing tensor. The derivation of the spacetimes presented in this paper borrows from ideas about dynamical systems, and illustrates concepts that can be generalized to higher- order Killing tensors. The relationship between the components of the Killing equations and metric functions are given explicitly. The origin of the four separable coordinate systems found by Carter is explained and classified in terms of the analytic structure associated with the Killing equations. A geometric picture of what the orbital invariants may represent is built. Requiring that a SAV spacetime admits a second-order Killing tensor is very restrictive, selecting very few candidates from the group of all possible SAV spacetimes. This restriction arises due to the fact that the consistency conditions associated with the Killing equations require...

  12. Calculating Second-Order Effects in MOSFET's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benumof, Reuben; Zoutendyk, John A.; Coss, James R.

    1990-01-01

    Collection of mathematical models includes second-order effects in n-channel, enhancement-mode, metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET's). When dimensions of circuit elements relatively large, effects neglected safely. However, as very-large-scale integration of microelectronic circuits leads to MOSFET's shorter or narrower than 2 micrometer, effects become significant in design and operation. Such computer programs as widely-used "Simulation Program With Integrated Circuit Emphasis, Version 2" (SPICE 2) include many of these effects. In second-order models of n-channel, enhancement-mode MOSFET, first-order gate-depletion region diminished by triangular-cross-section deletions on end and augmented by circular-wedge-cross-section bulges on sides.

  13. Second-order conditioning in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in Drosophila melanogaster has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning (SOC) protocol that further demonstrates the flexibility of fly behavior. In SOC, a previously conditioned stimulus (CS1) is used as reinforcement fo...

  14. Second order Horner's syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Risio, Luisa; Fraser McConnell, James

    2009-08-01

    This case report describes the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of a 3.5-year-old, male neutered, domestic shorthair cat with second order Horner's syndrome as the only clinical abnormality. The neuroanatomical pathway of the sympathetic innervation to the eye, differential diagnoses for Horner's syndrome in cats, and the interpretation of pharmacological testing are reviewed. The unusual MRI findings and the value of fat-suppressed MRI sequences are discussed.

  15. Second-order conditioning in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabone, Christopher J; de Belle, J Steven

    2011-01-01

    Associative conditioning in Drosophila melanogaster has been well documented for several decades. However, most studies report only simple associations of conditioned stimuli (CS, e.g., odor) with unconditioned stimuli (US, e.g., electric shock) to measure learning or establish memory. Here we describe a straightforward second-order conditioning (SOC) protocol that further demonstrates the flexibility of fly behavior. In SOC, a previously conditioned stimulus (CS1) is used as reinforcement for a second conditioned stimulus (CS2) in associative learning. This higher-order context presents an opportunity for reassessing the roles of known learning and memory genes and neuronal networks in a new behavioral paradigm.

  16. Second-Order Science of Interdisciplinary Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2014-01-01

    Context: The problems that are most in need of interdisciplinary collaboration are “wicked problems,” such as food crises, climate change mitigation, and sustainable development, with many relevant aspects, disagreement on what the problem is, and contradicting solutions. Such complex problems bo...... perspectivist approach to science is based on the second-order cybernetics and systems theories of von Foerster, Maruyama, Maturana & Varela, and Luhmann, coupled with embodied theories of cognition and semiotics as a general theory of meaning from von Uexküll and Peirce....

  17. A Mock Theta Function of Second Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Srivastava

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the second-order mock theta function 5 (, which Hikami came across in his work on mathematical physics and quantum invariant of three manifold. We give their bilateral form, and show that it is the same as bilateral third-order mock theta function of Ramanujan. We also show that the mock theta function 5 ( outside the unit circle is a theta function and also write ℎ1( as a coefficient of 0 of a theta series. First writing ℎ1( as a coefficient of a theta function, we prove an identity for ℎ1(.

  18. New Second-Order Optimized Filter Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brzobohaty

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the piecewise-linear (PWL autonomous dynamical systemoptimized from the eigenvalue sensitivities viewpoint the correspondingoptimized non-autonomous linear (single-input single-output system isderived. Such a design procedure gives the possibility to obtainminimum eigenvalue sensitivities with respect to the change of theindividual model parameters also for non-autonomous linear systems. Twoexamples of the system having the complex conjugate poles and zeros,i.e. the optimized second-order band-reject and all-pass filter design,are shown.

  19. Style context with second-order statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramachaneni, Sriharsha; Nagy, George

    2005-01-01

    Patterns often occur as homogeneous groups or fields generated by the same source. In multisource recognition problems, such isogeny induces statistical dependencies between patterns (termed style context). We model these dependencies by second-order statistics and formulate the optimal classifier for normally distributed styles. We show that model parameters estimated only from pairs of classes suffice to train classifiers for any test field length. Although computationally expensive, the style-conscious classifier reduces the field error rate by up to 20 percent on quadruples of handwritten digits from standard NIST data sets.

  20. Second-order impartiality and public sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sládeček Michal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the text the distinction between first- and second-order impartiality, along with Brian Barry’s thorough elaboration of their characteristics and the differences between them, is examined. While the former impartiality is related to non-favoring fellow-persons in everyday occasions, the latter is manifested in the institutional structure of society and its political and public morality. In the second part of the article, the concept of public impartiality is introduced through analysis of two examples. In the first example, a Caledonian Club with its exclusive membership is considered as a form of association which is partial, but nevertheless morally acceptable. In the second example, the so-called Heinz dilemma has been reconsidered and the author points to some flaws in Barry’s interpretation, arguing that Heinz’s right of giving advantage to his wife’s life over property rights can be recognized through mitigating circum-stances, and this partiality can be appreciated in the public sphere. Thus, public impartiality imposes limits to the restrictiveness and rigidity of political impartiality implied in second-order morality. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179049

  1. comparative analysis of some existing kinetic models with proposed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IGNATIUS NWIDI

    But based on values of ARE%, first proposed kinetic model accounted for 93.3% while pseudo second-order kinetic model accounted for 6.7% of the results for biosorption of the three heavy metals by the five microbes. Keynotes: Heavy metals, Biosorption, Kinetics Models, Comparative analysis, Average Relative Error. 1.

  2. Some determinants of second-order conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witnauer, James E; Miller, Ralph R

    2011-03-01

    In a Pavlovian conditioning situation, an initially neutral stimulus may be made excitatory by nonreinforced presentations in compound with an established conditioned excitor [i.e., second-order conditioning (SOC)]. The established excitor may be either a punctate cue or the training context. In four conditioned suppression experiments using rats, we investigated whether SOC phenomena parallel other cue interaction effects. In Experiment 1, we found that the response potential of a target stimulus was directly related to the intertrial interval when SOC was mediated by a punctate cue, and inversely related to the intertrial interval when SOC was mediated by the training context. Experiment 2 demonstrated that punctate- and context-mediated SOC are oppositely affected by posttraining context extinction, and Experiments 3 and 4 demonstrated that context- and punctate-mediated SOC are differentially affected by conditioned stimulus (Experiment 3) and unconditioned stimulus (Experiment 4) preexposure treatments. These findings parallel phenomena in conditioned inhibition and cue competition situations.

  3. Nonlinear elliptic equations of the second order

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear elliptic differential equations are a diverse subject with important applications to the physical and social sciences and engineering. They also arise naturally in geometry. In particular, much of the progress in the area in the twentieth century was driven by geometric applications, from the Bernstein problem to the existence of Kähler-Einstein metrics. This book, designed as a textbook, provides a detailed discussion of the Dirichlet problems for quasilinear and fully nonlinear elliptic differential equations of the second order with an emphasis on mean curvature equations and on Monge-Ampère equations. It gives a user-friendly introduction to the theory of nonlinear elliptic equations with special attention given to basic results and the most important techniques. Rather than presenting the topics in their full generality, the book aims at providing self-contained, clear, and "elementary" proofs for results in important special cases. This book will serve as a valuable resource for graduate stu...

  4. Second order elliptic integro-differential problems

    CERN Document Server

    Garroni, Maria Giovanna

    2002-01-01

    The Green function has played a key role in the analytical approach that in recent years has led to important developments in the study of stochastic processes with jumps. In this Research Note, the authors-both regarded as leading experts in the field- collect several useful results derived from the construction of the Green function and its estimates. The first three chapters form the foundation for the rest of the book, presenting key results and background in integro-differential operators, and integro-differential equations. After a summary of the properties relative to the Green function for second-order parabolic integro-differential operators, the authors explore important applications, paying particular attention to integro-differential problems with oblique boundary conditions. They show the existence and uniqueness of the invariant measure by means of the Green function, which then allows a detailed study of ergodic stopping time and control problems.

  5. Oscillation theory for second order dynamic equations

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ravi P; O''Regan, Donal

    2003-01-01

    The qualitative theory of dynamic equations is a rapidly developing area of research. In the last 50 years, the Oscillation Theory of ordinary, functional, neutral, partial and impulsive differential equations, and their discrete versions, has inspired many scholars. Hundreds of research papers have been published in every major mathematical journal. Many books deal exclusively with the oscillation of solutions of differential equations, but most of these books appeal only to researchers who already know the subject. In an effort to bring Oscillation Theory to a new and broader audience, the authors present a compact, but thorough, understanding of Oscillation Theory for second order differential equations. They include several examples throughout the text not only to illustrate the theory, but also to provide new direction.

  6. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOME EXISTING KINETIC MODELS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In terms of highest values of R2, first proposed model accounted for 46.7%, Pseudo second-order kinetics model 40% while Elovich, Webber-Morris and second proposed kinetic models accounted for 6.7% respectively of the total results for biosorption of the three heavy metals by five selected microorganisms. But based ...

  7. Second-order continuum traffic flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, C.; Hoffmann, C.; Sollacher, R.; Wagenhuber, J.; Schürmann, B.

    1996-11-01

    A second-order traffic flow model is derived from microscopic equations and is compared to existing models. In order to build in different driver characteristics on the microscopic level, we exploit the idea of an additional phase-space variable, called the desired velocity originally introduced by Paveri-Fontana [Trans. Res. 9, 225 (1975)]. By taking the moments of Paveri-Fontana's Boltzmann-like ansatz, a hierachy of evolution equations is found. This hierarchy is closed by neglecting cumulants of third and higher order in the cumulant expansion of the distribution function, thus leading to Euler-like traffic equations. As a consequence of the desired velocity, we find dynamical quantities, which are the mean desired velocity, the variance of the desired velocity, and the covariance of actual and desired velocity. Through these quantities an alternative explanation for the onset of traffic clusters can be given, i.e., a spatial variation of the variance of the desired velocity can cause the formation of a traffic jam. Furthermore, by taking into account the finite car length, Paveri-Fontana's equation is generalized to the high-density regime eventually producing corrections to the macroscopic equations. The relevance of the present dynamic quantities is demonstrated by numerical simulations.

  8. Two-dimensional second-order nonlinear optical spectra: landscape of second-order nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiu; Wang, Ming Qian; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Ling; Li, Wei-Qi; Tian, Wei Quan

    2017-10-26

    The landscape of second-order nonlinear optical (2nd NLO) responses of a system can be depicted as two-dimensional second-order nonlinear optical spectra in a range of external fields, and this is difficult to be realized in experiment for a wide range of external fields. In the present study, an efficient method for application of sum-over-states model to simulate electronic two-dimensional NLO (2DNLO) spectra has been developed, and techniques to analyze NLO response-structure correlation have been proposed. This 2DNLO method has been applied to simulate the 2DNLO spectra of a series of typical electron push-pull chromophores under external fields of up to 5.00 eV. The correlation between the NLO properties and structure has been disclosed, and a further strategy to enhance the NLO properties of push-pull chromophores has been proposed.

  9. Kinetics of the Adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin of White Wine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigates the kinetics of adsorption of bovine serum albumin, BSA, in white wine model solutions onto activated carbon, AC, and alumina, AL. Pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models were applied to determine the rate and mechanism of adsorption of the white wine protein during the haze removal ...

  10. Kinetics of the Adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin of White Wine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    2008-11-07

    Nov 7, 2008 ... This study investigates the kinetics of adsorption of bovine serum albumin, BSA, in white wine model solutions onto activated carbon, AC, and alumina, AL. Pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models were applied to determine the rate and mechanism of adsorption of the white wine protein during ...

  11. Second order logic, set theory and foundations of mathematics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Väänänen, J.A.; Dybjer, P; Lindström, S; Palmgren, E; Sundholm, G

    2012-01-01

    The question, whether second order logic is a better foundation for mathematics than set theory, is addressed. The main difference between second order logic and set theory is that set theory builds up a transfinite cumulative hierarchy while second order logic stays within one application of the

  12. Second-order fractional Fourier transform with incoherent radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yangjian; Zhu, Shi-Yao

    2005-02-15

    Based on the coherent optical theory, we extend the fractional Fourier transform of first-order correlation to a fractional Fourier transform of second-order correlation. An optical system for implementing a second-order fractional Fourier transform was designed. As a numerical example, we investigate the second-order fractional Fourier transform for a single slit.

  13. Analysis of heart rate and oxygen uptake kinetics studied by two different pseudo-random binary sequence work rate amplitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, U; Koschate, J; Schiffer, T; Schneider, S; Hoffmann, U

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the kinetics responses of heart rate (HR), pulmonary (V˙O2pulm) and predicted muscular (V˙O2musc) oxygen uptake between two different pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) work rate (WR) amplitudes both below anaerobic threshold. Eight healthy individuals performed two PRBS WR protocols implying changes between 30W and 80W and between 30W and 110W. HR and V˙O2pulm were measured beat-to-beat and breath-by-breath, respectively. V˙O2musc was estimated applying the approach of Hoffmann et al. (Eur J Appl Physiol 113: 1745-1754, 2013) considering a circulatory model for venous return and cross-correlation functions (CCF) for the kinetics analysis. HR and V˙O2musc kinetics seem to be independent of WR intensity (p>0.05). V˙O2pulm kinetics show prominent differences in the lag of the CCF maximum (39±9s; 31±4s; pkinetics remain unchanged. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Second-order systems approach to recreation provision in lower ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was postulated that by adopting a second-order systems approach rather than perpetuating a first-order systems approach, a positive social impact could be affected. ... It is recommended that a second-order systems approach be implemented that feeds on higher levels of recursion, shared reality that transform interaction ...

  15. Recursive belief manipulation and second-order false-beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Braüner, Torben; Blackburn, Patrick Rowan; Polyanskaya, Irina

    2016-01-01

    The literature on first-order false-belief is extensive, but less is known about the second-order case. The ability to handle second-order false-beliefs correctly seems to mark a cognitively significant step, but what is its status? Is it an example of *complexity only* development, or does it in...

  16. Nontrivial Periodic Solutions for Nonlinear Second-Order Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieshan He

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the existence of nontrivial periodic solutions and positive periodic solutions to a nonlinear second-order difference equation. Under some conditions concerning the first positive eigenvalue of the linear equation corresponding to the nonlinear second-order equation, we establish the existence results by using the topological degree and fixed point index theories.

  17. Solution of IVP of Second Order ODE with Oscillatory Solutions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Numerical method for solution of IVP of second order with oscillatory solutions using VIM is developed. The method is applied to solve some initial value problems of second order ODE with oscillatory solutions. The results are compared with some existing methods and found to compete favourably with existing methods.

  18. Generalised Recurrent Finsler Space of Second Order II | Uppal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sinha and Singh (1971 a, b, 1973) have studied recurrent Finsler spaces of second order and discussed the properties of recurrent curvature tensor and recurrence tensor fields in them. Singh (1981) has defined generalized recurrent Finsler space of second order and denoted it by G(2-Fn). This paper defines G-2 recurrent ...

  19. The second-order decomposition model of nonlinear irregular waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Zhi Wen; Bingham, Harry B.; Li, Jin Xuan

    2013-01-01

    into the first- and the second-order super-harmonic as well as the second-order sub-harmonic components by transferring them into an identical Fourier frequency-space and using a Newton-Raphson iteration method. In order to evaluate the present model, a variety of monochromatic waves and the second......A new method to decompose the nonlinear irregular waves is proposed. The second-order potential flow theory is employed to construct the relation of the second-order items solution by deriving the transfer function between the first- and the second-order components. Target waves are decomposed......-order nonlinear irregular waves over a broad range of frequencies have been analyzed, and the effects on wave nonlinearity are analyzed. The experimental results show that the present method is reasonably effective for the wave decomposition....

  20. Removal of ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine in aqueous solution onto natural clay: equilibrium, kinetics, and thermodynamic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazri, Hassen; Ghorbel-Abid, Ibtissem; Kalfat, Rafik; Trabelsi-Ayadi, Malika

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to describe the adsorption of three pharmaceuticals compounds (ibuprofen, naproxen and carbamazepine) onto natural clay on the basis of equilibrium parameters such as a function of time, effect of pH, varying of the concentration and the temperature. Adsorption kinetic data were modeled using the Lagergren's first-order and the pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The kinetic results of adsorption are described better using the pseudo-second order model. The isotherm results were tested in the Langmuir, Freundlich and Dubinin-Radushkevich models. The thermodynamic parameters obtained indicate that the adsorption of pharmaceuticals on the clay is a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  1. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Wen Zhu; Junsheng Liu; Meng Li

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was foun...

  2. Method to render second order beam optics programs symplectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, D.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-10-01

    We present evidence that second order matrix-based beam optics programs violate the symplectic condition. A simple method to avoid this difficulty, based on a generating function approach to evaluating transfer maps, is described. A simple example illustrating the non-symplectricity of second order matrix methods, and the effectiveness of our solution to the problem, is provided. We conclude that it is in fact possible to bring second order matrix optics methods to a canonical form. The procedure for doing so has been implemented in the program DIMAT, and could be implemented in programs such as TRANSPORT and TURTLE, making them useful in multiturn applications. 15 refs.

  3. Modulation masking produced by second-order modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Füllgrabe, Christian; Moore, Brian C.J.; Demany, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that an auditory nonlinearity converts second-order sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM) (i.e., modulation of SAM depth) into a first-order SAM component, which contributes to the perception of second-order SAM. However, conversion may also occur in other ways...... such as cochlear filtering. The present experiments explored the source of the first-order SAM component by investigating the ability to detect a 5-Hz, first-order SAM probe in the presence of a second-order SAM masker beating at the probe frequency. Detection performance was measured as a function of masker...... and off-frequency listening play a role in second-order SAM perception. The estimated magnitude of the modulation distortion component ranges from 5%–12%. ©2005 Acoustical Society of America....

  4. Positive Solutions for Systems of Second-Order Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnny Henderson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the existence and nonexistence of positive solutions of some systems of nonlinear second-order difference equations subject to multipoint boundary conditions which contain some positive constants.

  5. Abnormal Waves Modelled as Second-order Conditional Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents results for the expected second order short-crested wave conditional of a given wave crest at a specific point in time and space. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean shallow water wave theory. Numerical results showing the importance of the spectral density......, the water depth and the directional spreading on the conditional mean wave profile are presented. Application of conditional waves to model and explain abnormal waves, e.g. the well-known New Year Wave measured at the Draupner platform January 1st 1995, is discussed. Whereas the wave profile can be modelled...... quite well by the second order conditional wave including directional spreading and finite water depth the probability to encounter such a wave is still, however, extremely rare. The use of the second order conditional wave as initial condition to a fully non-linear three-dimensional analysis...

  6. Towards a General Methodology for Second-Order Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl H. Müller

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a new science frontier emerged under the umbrella term of second-order science which creates new and challenging problems through a characteristic re-entry-operation like in pattern of patterns, learning of learning, cybernetics of cybernetics or logic of logic, which works with and on building blocks or elements of traditional or first-order scientific research and which, due to this re-entry configuration, becomes inherently reflexive. In this article I will pursue the ambitious goal to develop a general methodology for second-order science which is needed for second-order analyses from their initial stages up to the final steps. This general methodology will be framed as a sequence of recombination operations which become the central task for a particular step in the design of second-order investigations.

  7. Simulation of transient viscoelastic flow with second order time integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1995-01-01

    The Lagrangian Integral Method (LIM) for the simulation of time-dependent flow of viscoelastic fluids is extended to second order accuracy in the time integration. The method is tested on the established sphere in a cylinder benchmark problem.......The Lagrangian Integral Method (LIM) for the simulation of time-dependent flow of viscoelastic fluids is extended to second order accuracy in the time integration. The method is tested on the established sphere in a cylinder benchmark problem....

  8. Pseudo-second-order calcium-mediated Cryptosporidium parvum oocyst attachment to environmental biofilms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luo, Xia; Jedlicka, Sabrina; Jellison, Kristen

    .... The remobilization of biofilm-associated C. parvum oocysts back into the water column by biofilm sloughing or bulk erosion poses a threat to public health and may be responsible for waterborne outbreaks...

  9. The kinetics and thermodynamics of adsorption of heavy metal ions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pseudo-second order kinetic model was used to characterize the metal ion transport mechanism and the correlation coefficients (r2) were high, confirming the validity of pseudosecond- order. The rate of adsorption was observed to increase with pillaring and does not only depend on the the metal ion concentration, but ...

  10. Kinetic Approach for the Adsorption of Organophosphorous Pesticides from Aqueous Solution Using “Waste” Jute Fiber Carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Senthilkumaar, S.; Krishna, S. K.; Kalaamanic, P.; Subburamaan, C. V.; N. Ganapathy Subramaniam; Kang, T W

    2010-01-01

    Chemically activated “Waste” Jute Fiber carbon has been effectively used for the removal of five organophosphorous pesticides (malathion, monocrotophos, methylparathion, phosphamidon and dimethoate) from aqueous solutions. The prepared activated jute fiber carbon was characterized by using Elemental analyzer and proximate analysis methods. The adsorption equilibrium was examined at 28 ºC. Three different kinetic models, the pseudo first order, pseudo second order and Elovich kinetic models we...

  11. Pursuit eye movements to second-order motion targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawken, M J; Gegenfurtner, K R

    2001-09-01

    We studied smooth-pursuit eye movements elicited by first- and second-order motion stimuli. Stimuli were random dot fields whose contrast was modulated by a Gaussian window with a space constant of 0.5 degrees. For the first-order stimuli, the random dots simply moved across the screen at the same speed as the window; for the second-order stimuli the window moved across stationary or randomly flickering dots. Additional stimuli which combined first- and second-order motion cues were used to determine the degree and type of interaction found between the two types of motion stimuli. Measurements were made at slow (1 degrees/s) and moderate (6 degrees/s) target speeds. At a velocity of 1 degrees/s the initiation, transition, and steady-state phases of smooth pursuit in response to second-order motion targets are severely affected when compared with the smooth pursuit of first-order motion targets. At a velocity of 6 degrees/s there is a small but significant deficit in steady-state pursuit of second-order motion targets but not much effect on pursuit initiation.

  12. Adsorption kinetics of Rhodamine-B on used black tea leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossain Mohammad

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rhodamine B (Rh-B is one of the most common pollutants in the effluents of textile industries effluents in developing countries. This study was carried out to evaluate the applicability of used black tea leaves (UBTL for the adsorptive removal of Rh-B from aqueous system by investigating the adsorption kinetics in batch process. The effects of concentration and temperature on adsorption kinetics were examined. First-, second- and pseudo-second order kinetic equations were used to investigate the adsorption mechanism. The adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL followed pseudo-second order kinetics. The equilibrium amount adsorbed and the equilibrium concentration were calculated from pseudo-second-order kinetic plots for different initial concentrations of Rh-B to construct the adsorption isotherm. The adsorption isotherm was well expressed by Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of UBTL to Rh-B was found to be 53.2 mg/g at pH = 2.0. The equilibrium amount adsorbed, calculated from pseudo-second-order kinetic plots, increased with temperature increase. The positive value of enthalpy of adsorption, ΔHads = 31.22 kJ/mol, suggested that the adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL at pH = 2.0 is an endothermic process.

  13. Second-Order Risk Constraints in Decision Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Love Ekenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, representations and methods aimed at analysing decision problems where probabilities and values (utilities are associated with distributions over them (second-order representations have been suggested. In this paper we present an approach to how imprecise information can be modelled by means of second-order distributions and how a risk evaluation process can be elaborated by integrating procedures for numerically imprecise probabilities and utilities. We discuss some shortcomings of the use of the principle of maximising the expected utility and of utility theory in general, and offer remedies by the introduction of supplementary decision rules based on a concept of risk constraints taking advantage of second-order distributions.

  14. Comment on Cercignani's second-order slip coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjiconstantinou, Nicolas G.

    2003-08-01

    Cercignani's second-order slip model has been neglected over the years, perhaps due to Sreekanth's claim that it cannot fit his experimental data. In this paper we show that Sreekanth's claim was based on an incorrect interpretation of this model. We also show that Cercignani's second-order slip model, when modified and used appropriately, is in good agreement with solutions of the Boltzmann equation for a hard-sphere gas for a wide range of rarefaction. Given its simplicity, we expect this model to be a valuable tool for describing isothermal micro- and nanoscale flows to the extent that the hard-sphere approximation is appropriate.

  15. Controlling flexible structures with second order actuator dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Daniel J.; Umland, Jeffrey W.; Bellos, John

    1989-01-01

    The control of flexible structures for those systems with actuators that are modeled by second order dynamics is examined. Two modeling approaches are investigated. First a stability and performance analysis is performed using a low order finite dimensional model of the structure. Secondly, a continuum model of the flexible structure to be controlled, coupled with lumped parameter second order dynamic models of the actuators performing the control is used. This model is appropriate in the modeling of the control of a flexible panel by proof-mass actuators as well as other beam, plate and shell like structural numbers. The model is verified with experimental measurements.

  16. Linear Phase Second Order Recursive Digital Integrators and Differentiators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, design of linear phase second order recursive digital integrators and differentiators is discussed. New second order integrators have been designed by using Genetic Algorithm (GA optimization method. Thereafter, by modifying the transfer function of these integrators appropriately, new digital differentiators have been obtained. The proposed digital integrators and differentiators accurately approximate the ideal ones and have linear phase response over almost entire Nyquist frequency range. The proposed operators also outperform the existing operators in terms of both magnitude and phase response.

  17. SVD-aided pseudo principal-component analysis: A new method to speed up and improve determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oang, Key Young; Yang, Cheolhee; Muniyappan, Srinivasan; Kim, Jeongho; Ihee, Hyotcherl

    2017-07-01

    Determination of the optimum kinetic model is an essential prerequisite for characterizing dynamics and mechanism of a reaction. Here, we propose a simple method, termed as singular value decomposition-aided pseudo principal-component analysis (SAPPA), to facilitate determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data by bypassing any need to examine candidate kinetic models. We demonstrate the wide applicability of SAPPA by examining three different sets of experimental time-resolved data and show that SAPPA can efficiently determine the optimum kinetic model. In addition, the results of SAPPA for both time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS) and transient absorption (TA) data of the same protein reveal that global structural changes of protein, which is probed by TRXSS, may occur more slowly than local structural changes around the chromophore, which is probed by TA spectroscopy.

  18. SVD-aided pseudo principal-component analysis: A new method to speed up and improve determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Key Young Oang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the optimum kinetic model is an essential prerequisite for characterizing dynamics and mechanism of a reaction. Here, we propose a simple method, termed as singular value decomposition-aided pseudo principal-component analysis (SAPPA, to facilitate determination of the optimum kinetic model from time-resolved data by bypassing any need to examine candidate kinetic models. We demonstrate the wide applicability of SAPPA by examining three different sets of experimental time-resolved data and show that SAPPA can efficiently determine the optimum kinetic model. In addition, the results of SAPPA for both time-resolved X-ray solution scattering (TRXSS and transient absorption (TA data of the same protein reveal that global structural changes of protein, which is probed by TRXSS, may occur more slowly than local structural changes around the chromophore, which is probed by TA spectroscopy.

  19. Forward and Backward Second-Order Pavlovian Conditioning in Honeybees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaini, Syed Abid; Komischke, Bernhard; Menzel, Randolf; Lachnit, Harald

    2007-01-01

    Second-order conditioning (SOC) is the association of a neutral stimulus with another stimulus that had previously been combined with an unconditioned stimulus (US). We used classical conditioning of the proboscis extension response (PER) in honeybees ("Apis mellifera") with odors (CS) and sugar (US). Previous SOC experiments in bees were…

  20. Second-Order Conditioning of Human Causal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Elvia; Vila, Javier; Maldonado, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    This article provides the first demonstration of a reliable second-order conditioning (SOC) effect in human causal learning tasks. It demonstrates the human ability to infer relationships between a cause and an effect that were never paired together during training. Experiments 1a and 1b showed a clear and reliable SOC effect, while Experiments 2a…

  1. Second-Order Conditioning during a Compound Extinction Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineno, Oskar; Zilski, Jessica M.; Schachtman, Todd R.

    2007-01-01

    Two conditioned taste aversion experiments with rats were conducted to establish if a target taste that had received a prior pairing with illness could be subject to second-order conditioning during extinction treatment in compound with a flavor that also received prior conditioning. In these experiments, the occurrence of second-order…

  2. First and second-order derivatives for CP and INDSCAL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendeiro, J.N.; Bennani-Dosse, M.; Ten Berge, J.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide the means to analyse the second-order differential structure of optimization functions concerning CANDECOMP/PARAFAC and INDSCAL. Closed-form formulas are given under two types of constraint: unit-length columns or orthonormality of two of the three component matrices. Some

  3. PID control of second-order systems with hysteresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayawardhana, Bayu; Logemann, Hartmut; Ryan, Eugene P.

    2008-01-01

    The efficacy of proportional, integral and derivative (PID) control for set point regulation and disturbance rejection is investigated in a context of second-order systems with hysteretic components. Two basic structures are studied: in the first, the hysteretic component resides (internally) in the

  4. Solving Second-Order Differential Equations with Variable Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmer, A., III; Costa, G. B.

    2008-01-01

    A method is developed in which an analytical solution is obtained for certain classes of second-order differential equations with variable coefficients. By the use of transformations and by repeated iterated integration, a desired solution is obtained. This alternative method represents a different way to acquire a solution from classic power…

  5. Linear multistep method for solution of second order initial value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Linear multistep method for solution of second order initial value problems of ordinary differential equations: a truncation error approach. M O Udo, G A Olayi, R A Ademiluyi. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Mathematical Sciences Vol. 6 (2) 2007: pp. 119-126. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  6. A New Factorisation of a General Second Order Differential Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A factorisation of a general second order ordinary differential equation is introduced from which the full solution to the equation can be obtained by performing two integrations. The method is compared with traditional methods for solving these type of equations. It is shown how the Green's function can be derived directly from the factorisation…

  7. Reduction of Second-Order Network Systems with Structure Preservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Xiaodong; Kawano, Yu; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a general framework for structure-preserving model reduction of a second-order network system based on graph clustering. In this approach, vertex dynamics are captured by the transfer functions from inputs to individual states, and the dissimilarities of vertices are quantified

  8. Periodic and boundary value problems for second order differential ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In this paper we study second order scalar differential equations with. Sturm–Liouville and periodic boundary conditions. The vector field fًt; x; yق is. Caratheodory and in some instances the continuity condition on x or y is replaced by a monotonicity type hypothesis. Using the method of upper and lower solutions as ...

  9. Second order guiding-center Vlasov–Maxwell equations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Second order gyrogauge invariant guiding-center coordinates with strong E×B-flow are derived using the Lie transformation method. The corresponding Poisson bracket structure and equations of motion are obtained. From a variational principle the explicit Vlasov–Maxwell equations are derived...

  10. Periodic and subharmonic solutions for second order p-Laplacian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of periodic and subharmonic solutions to second order p-Laplacian difference equa- tions are obtained by using the critical point theory. The proof is based on the Linking theorem in combination with variational technique. Keywords. Periodic and subharmonic solutions; p-Laplacian; difference equations; discrete variational ...

  11. Continuous implicit method for the solution of general second order ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods of collocation and interpolation were adopted to generate a continuous implicit scheme for the solution of second order ordinary differential equation. Newton polynomial approximation method was used to generate the unknown parameter in the corrector. This enables us to solve both initial and boundary value ...

  12. Oscillation of second order neutral dynamic equations with distributed delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoshun Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we establish new oscillation criteria for second order neutral dynamic equations with distributed delay by employing the generalized Riccati transformation. The obtained theorems essentially improve the oscillation results in the literature. And two examples are provided to illustrate to the versatility of our main results.

  13. Oscillation criteria for second order nonlinear perturbed differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussadek Remili

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sufficient conditions for the oscillation of the nonlinear second order differential equation $(a(tx^{\\prime }^{\\prime }+Q(t,x^{\\prime}=P(t,x,x^{\\prime }$ are established where the coefficients are continuous and $a(t$ is nonnegative.

  14. Existence of positive solutions for systems of second order multi ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we establish the existence of positive solutions for systems of second order multi-point boundary value problems on time scales by applying Guo– Krasnosel'skii fixed point theorem. Author Affiliations. K R Prasad1 N Sreedhar2 M A S Srinivas3. Department of Applied Mathematics, Andhra University, ...

  15. Nonlinear second-order multivalued boundary value problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. In this paper we study nonlinear second-order differential inclusions involv- ing the ordinary vector p-Laplacian, a multivalued maximal monotone operator and nonlinear multivalued boundary conditions. Our framework is general and unifying and incorporates gradient systems, evolutionary variational inequalities ...

  16. Improved system blind identification based on second-order ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Improved system blind identification based on second-order cyclostationary statistics: A group delay approach. P V S GIRIDHAR1 and S V NARASIMHAN2. 1Dept. of Electronics & Communication Engineering, Karnataka Regional. Engineering College, Surathkal 574 157, India. Present address: Centre for Development of ...

  17. Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies up to Second Order

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Riotto, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    These lecture notes present the computation of the full system of Boltzmann equations describing the evolution of the photon, baryon and cold dark matter fluids up to second order in perturbation theory, as recently studied in (Bartolo, Matarrese & Riotto 2006, 2007). These equations allow to follow the time evolution of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies at all angular scales from the early epoch, when the cosmological perturbations were generated, to the present, through the recombination era. The inclusion of second-order contributions is mandatory when one is interested in studying possible deviations from Gaussianity of cosmological perturbations, either of primordial (e.g. inflationary) origin or due to their subsequent evolution. Most of the emphasis in these lectures notes will be given to the derivation of the relevant equations for the study of cosmic microwave background anisotropies and to their analytical solutions.

  18. Phase transitions, inhomogeneous horizons and second-order hydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attems, Maximilian; Bea, Yago; Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; Triana, Miquel; Zilhão, Miguel

    2017-06-01

    We use holography to study the spinodal instability of a four-dimensional, strongly-coupled gauge theory with a first-order thermal phase transition. We place the theory on a cylinder in a set of homogeneous, unstable initial states. The dual gravity configurations are black branes afflicted by a Gregory-Laflamme instability. We numerically evolve Einstein's equations to follow the instability until the system settles down to a stationary, inhomogeneous black brane. The dual gauge theory states have constant temperature but non-constant energy density. We show that the time evolution of the instability and the final states are accurately described by second-order hydrodynamics. In the static limit, the latter reduces to a single, second-order, non-linear differential equation from which the inhomogeneous final states can be derived.

  19. First and second order convex approximation strategies in structural optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, C.

    1989-01-01

    In this paper, various methods based on convex approximation schemes are discussed that have demonstrated strong potential for efficient solution of structural optimization problems. First, the convex linearization method (Conlin) is briefly described, as well as one of its recent generalizations, the method of moving asymptotes (MMA). Both Conlin and MMA can be interpreted as first-order convex approximation methods that attempt to estimate the curvature of the problem functions on the basis of semiempirical rules. Attention is next directed toward methods that use diagonal second derivatives in order to provide a sound basis for building up high-quality explicit approximations of the behavior constraints. In particular, it is shown how second-order information can be effectively used without demanding a prohibitive computational cost. Various first-order and second-order approaches are compared by applying them to simple problems that have a closed form solution.

  20. Second order elastic metrics on the shape space of curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Martin; Bruveris, Martins; Harms, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Second order Sobolev metrics on the space of regular unparametrized planar curves have several desirable completeness properties not present in lower order metrics, but numerics are still largely missing. In this paper, we present algorithms to numerically solve the initial and boundary value...... problems for geodesics. The combination of these algorithms allows to compute Karcher means in a Riemannian gradient-based optimization scheme. Our framework has the advantage that the constants determining the weights of the zero, first, and second order terms of the metric can be chosen freely. Moreover......, due to its generality, it could be applied to more general spaces of mapping. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach by analyzing a collection of shapes representing physical objects....

  1. First- and second-order charged particle optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.L.; Servranckx, R.V.

    1984-07-01

    Since the invention of the alternating gradient principle there has been a rapid evolution of the mathematics and physics techniques applicable to charged particle optics. In this publication we derive a differential equation and a matrix algebra formalism valid to second-order to present the basic principles governing the design of charged particle beam transport systems. A notation first introduced by John Streib is used to convey the essential principles dictating the design of such beam transport systems. For example the momentum dispersion, the momentum resolution, and all second-order aberrations are expressed as simple integrals of the first-order trajectories (matrix elements) and of the magnetic field parameters (multipole components) characterizing the system. 16 references, 30 figures.

  2. Oscillatory conditions of the nonlinear second order differential equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrzatayeva, Kalbibi R.; Ramazanova, Khanym S.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we consider the nonlinear second order differential equation (ρ(t)|y'(t)|p-2y'(t))'+ϑ(t)|y(t)|p-2y(t) = 0,t∈I. Here, I = (0,∞), 1 < p < ∞, p(ṡ) be positive continuous function and ν(ṡ) be continuous function on I. We investigate the question of conjugacy, oscilatory of this equation when the function ν(ṡ) changes sign.

  3. Estimation in second order dependency model for multivariate binary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, E.H.S.

    1995-04-01

    This paper proposes a normal model for multivariate binary data. The normal model is an extension to the bivariate normal model for 2{times}2 contingency table proposed by Pearson. A stochastic algorithm using Gibbs sampler is developed to estimate the parameters for high dimensional binary data. The method is compared to the second order dependency Bahadur-Lazarsfeld representation of binary density. Two examples, one from psychological testing and one from medical science, are used to substantiate the above ideas.

  4. Free-Form Region Description with Second-Order Pooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, João; Caseiro, Rui; Batista, Jorge; Sminchisescu, Cristian

    2015-06-01

    Semantic segmentation and object detection are nowadays dominated by methods operating on regions obtained as a result of a bottom-up grouping process (segmentation) but use feature extractors developed for recognition on fixed-form (e.g. rectangular) patches, with full images as a special case. This is most likely suboptimal. In this paper we focus on feature extraction and description over free-form regions and study the relationship with their fixed-form counterparts. Our main contributions are novel pooling techniques that capture the second-order statistics of local descriptors inside such free-form regions. We introduce second-order generalizations of average and max-pooling that together with appropriate non-linearities, derived from the mathematical structure of their embedding space, lead to state-of-the-art recognition performance in semantic segmentation experiments without any type of local feature coding. In contrast, we show that codebook-based local feature coding is more important when feature extraction is constrained to operate over regions that include both foreground and large portions of the background, as typical in image classification settings, whereas for high-accuracy localization setups, second-order pooling over free-form regions produces results superior to those of the winning systems in the contemporary semantic segmentation challenges, with models that are much faster in both training and testing.

  5. KINETIC AND EQUILIBRIUM STUDIES OF Pb(II) AND Cd(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    equilibrium adsorption capacity for lead and cadmium ions were obtained from Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and DRK isotherms and the experimental data were found to fit best the Langmuir isotherm with values of 21.28 and 40.00 mg/g for Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions, respectively. The Pseudo-second order kinetics model had ...

  6. Periodic boundary value problems of second order random differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bapurao Dhage

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an existence and the existence of extremal random solutions are proved for a periodic boundary value problem of second order ordinary random differential equations. Our investigations have been placed in the space of real-valued functions defined and continuous on closed and bounded intervals of real line together with the applications of the random version of a nonlinear alternative of Leray-Schauder type and an algebraic random fixed point theorem of Dhage. An example is also indicated for demonstrating the realizations of the abstract theory developed in this paper.

  7. A second order derivative scheme based on Bregman algorithm class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagna, Rosanna; Crisci, Serena; Cuomo, Salvatore; Galletti, Ardelio; Marcellino, Livia

    2016-10-01

    The algorithms based on the Bregman iterative regularization are known for efficiently solving convex constraint optimization problems. In this paper, we introduce a second order derivative scheme for the class of Bregman algorithms. Its properties of convergence and stability are investigated by means of numerical evidences. Moreover, we apply the proposed scheme to an isotropic Total Variation (TV) problem arising out of the Magnetic Resonance Image (MRI) denoising. Experimental results confirm that our algorithm has good performance in terms of denoising quality, effectiveness and robustness.

  8. Second-order TGV model for Poisson noise image restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hou-Biao; Wang, Jun-Yan; Dou, Hong-Xia

    2016-01-01

    Restoring Poissonian noise images have drawn a lot of attention in recent years. There are many regularization methods to solve this problem and one of the most famous methods is the total variation model. In this paper, by adding a quadratic regularization on TGV regularization part, a new image restoration model is proposed based on second-order total generalized variation regularization. Then the split Bregman iteration algorithm was used to solve this new model. The experimental results show that the proposed model and algorithm can deal with Poisson image restoration problem well. What's more, the restoration model performance is significantly improved both in visual effect and objective evaluation indexes.

  9. Monadic Second Order Logic on Tree-like Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walukiewicz, Igor

    2002-01-01

    An operation M* which constructs from a given structure M a tree-like structure whose domain consists of the finite sequences of elements of M is considered. A notion of automata running on such tree-like structures is defined. It is shown that automata of this kind characterise expressive power...... of monadic second-order logic (MSOL) over tree-like structures. Using this characterisation it is proved that MSOL theory of a tree-like structure is effectively reducible to that of the original structure. As another application of the characterisation it is shown that MSOL on trees of arbitrary degree...

  10. Combined first and second order Fermi acceleration at comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Lorencz, K.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional, time-dependent model calculations indicate that an interplay between velocity and spatial diffusion may be responsible for the acceleration of implanted heavy ions in the cometary preshock region. Velocity diffusion (second order Fermi acceleration) accelerates the pickup ions to moderate energies thus creating a seed population for the more efficient diffusive-compressive shock acceleration. Solar wind convection limits the time available for diffusive-compressive acceleration, therefore the resulting energy spectrum above 100 keV is a power law with a spectral index of 5 - 6, a value which is in reasonably good agreement with observations.

  11. Kinetics and Isotherm of Sunset Yellow Dye Adsorption on Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticle Loaded on Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Mosallanejad, A. Arami

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium sulfide nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdSN-AC for the removal of sunset yellow (SY dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdSN-AC dose. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdSN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdSN-AC is followed by these results. 

  12. Sorption Kinetics for the Removal of Cadmium and Zinc onto Palm Kernel Shell Based Activated Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Muhammad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics and mechanism of cadmium and zinc adsorption on palm kernel shell based activated carbons (PKSAC have been studied. A series of batch laboratory studies were conducted in order to investigate the suitability of palm kernel shell based activated carbon (PKSAC for the removal of cadmium (cadmium ions and zinc (zinc ions from their aqueous solutions. All batch experiments were carried out at pH 7.0 and a constant temperature of 30+-1°C using an incubator shaker that operated at 150 rpm. The kinetics investigated includes the pseudo first order, the pseudo-second order and the intraparticle diffusion models. The pseudo-second order model correlate excellently the experimental data, suggesting that chemisorption processes could be the rate-limiting step. Keywords: adsorption, cadmium, kinetics, palm kernel shell, zinc

  13. Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of dibenzothiophene from n-octane on bamboo charcoal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dishun; Zhang, Juan; Duan, Erhong; Wang, Jinlong

    2008-03-01

    The adsorption of the model sulfur compound dibenzothiophene (DBT) from n-octane solution on to bamboo charcoal (BC) was investigated. The equilibrium and kinetics of DBT adsorption on BC were examined. Adsorption isotherm of DBT on BC was determined and correlated with two well-known isotherm equations (Langmuir and Freundlich). The equilibrium data for DBT adsorption fitted the Freundlich model well. Two simplified kinetic models including pseudo first-order and pseudo second-order equations were selected to follow the adsorption processes. The adsorption of DBT on BC can be best described by a pseudo second-order equation. The parameters of this best-fit kinetic model were calculated and discussed.

  14. Kinetics adsorption study of the ethidium bromide by graphene oxide as adsorbent from aqueous matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, M.; Moradi, O.; Zare, K.

    2017-01-01

    In this study of ethidium bromide, adsorption from aqueous matrices by graphene oxide as adsorbent was investigated. Influencing parameters in the adsorption study included contact time, temperature, and pH. The optimum time was selected 17 min, and the best value of pH was determined at 8. All adsorption experiments were performed at 298 K temperature. The maximum wavelength of ethidium bromide was 475 nm. The Elovich, four types of the pseudo-second-order, the pseudo-first-order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic adsorption models were used for kinetic study, and the results show that adsorption of ethidium bromide on graphene oxide surface best complied with type (I) of the pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  15. Adsorption of methyl orange from aqueous solution onto PMMA nanofiber: Kinetics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulfikar, Muhammad Ali; Bahri, Afdal; Setiyanto, Henry; Nasir, Muhammad

    2017-07-01

    The potential of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) nanofiber prepared by the electrospinning technique for the methyl orange (MO) adsorption from aqueous solution was investigated. In this study, the adsorption experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of temperatures in a batch system. From experiment it can be seen that the MO adsorption using PMMA nanofiber increased with increasing temperature. The kinetic data of MO were analyzed by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. It was found that the amount of MO adsorbed increase with increasing temperature. Kinetics parameters data indicated that the MO adsorption onto PMMA nanofiber was found to follow both pseudo first and second-order rate equations.

  16. An application of second-order UV-derivative spectrophotometry for study of solvolysis of a novel fluocinolone acetonide ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Bojan; Vladimirov, Sote; Cudina, Olivera; Savic, Vladimir; Karljikovic-Rajic, Katarina

    2010-02-01

    A novel topical corticosteroid FA-21-PhP, 2-phenoxypropionate ester of fluocinolone acetonide, has been synthesized in order to investigate the possibility of decreasing systemic side effects. In this study model system for in vitro solvolytic reaction of FA-21-PhP has been analyzed in ethanol/water (90:10, v/v) with excess of sodium hydrogen carbonate. The selected conditions have been used as in vitro model for activation of corticosteroid C-21 ester prodrug. The second-order derivative spectrophotometric method (DS) using zero-crossing technique was developed for monitoring ternary mixture of solvolysis. Fluocinolone acetonide (FA) as a solvolyte was determined in the mixture in the concentration range 0.062-0.312 mM using amplitude (2)D(274.96). Experimentally determined LOD value was 0.0295 mM. The accuracy of proposed DS method was confirmed with HPLC referent method. Peak area of parent ester FA-21-PhP was used for solvolysis monitoring to ensure the initial stage of changes. Linear relationship in HPLC assay for parent ester was obtained in the concentration range 0.054-0.54 mM, with experimentally determined LOD value of 0.0041 mM. Investigated solvolytic reaction in the presence of excess of NaHCO(3) proceeded via a pseudo-first-order kinetic with significant correlation coefficients 0.9891 and 0.9997 for DS and HPLC, respectively. The values of solvolysis rate constant calculated according to DS and HPLC methods are in good accordance 0.038 and 0.043 h(-1), respectively. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Second-order analytic solutions for re-entry trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Kyou

    1993-01-01

    With the development of aeroassist technology, either for near-earth orbital transfer with or without a plane change or for planetary aerocapture, it is of interest to have accurate analytic solutions for reentry trajectories in an explicit form. Starting with the equations of motion of a non-thrusting aerodynamic vehicle entering a non-rotating spherical planetary atmosphere, a normalization technique is used to transform the equations into a form suitable for an analytic integration. Then, depending on the type of planar entry modes with a constant angle-of-attack, namely, ballistic fly-through, lifting skip, and equilibrium glide trajectories, the first-order solutions are obtained with the appropriate simplification. By analytic continuation, the second-order solutions for the altitude, speed, and flight path angle are derived. The closed form solutions lead to explicit forms for the physical quantities of interest, such as the deceleration and aerodynamic heating rates. The analytic solutions for the planar case are extended to three-dimensional skip trajectories with a constant bank angle. The approximate solutions for the heading and latitude are developed to the second order. In each type of trajectory examined, explicit relations among the principal variables are in a form suitable for guidance and navigation purposes. The analytic solutions have excellent agreement with the numerical integrations. They also provide some new results which were not reported in the existing classical theory.

  18. On the universal identity in second order hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grozdanov, S. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Instituut-Lorentz for Theoretical Physics, Leiden University,Niels Bohrweg 2, Leiden 2333 CA (Netherlands); Starinets, A.O. [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Oxford,1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-02

    We compute the ’t Hooft coupling correction to the infinite coupling expression for the second order transport coefficient λ{sub 2} in N=4SU(N{sub c}) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at finite temperature in the limit of infinite N{sub c}, which originates from the R{sup 4} terms in the low energy effective action of the dual type IIB string theory. Using this result, we show that the identity involving the three second order transport coefficients, 2ητ{sub Π}−4λ{sub 1}−λ{sub 2}=0, previously shown by Haack and Yarom to hold universally in relativistic conformal field theories with string dual descriptions to leading order in supergravity approximation, holds also at next to leading order in this theory. We also compute corrections to transport coefficients in a (hypothetical) strongly interacting conformal fluid arising from the generic curvature squared terms in the corresponding dual gravity action (in particular, Gauss-Bonnet action), and show that the identity holds to linear order in the higher-derivative couplings. We discuss potential implications of these results for the near-equilibrium entropy production rate at strong coupling.

  19. Adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode control for microgrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incremona, Gian Paolo; Cucuzzella, Michele; Ferrara, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    This paper deals with the design of adaptive suboptimal second-order sliding mode (ASSOSM) control laws for grid-connected microgrids. Due to the presence of the inverter, of unpredicted load changes, of switching among different renewable energy sources, and of electrical parameters variations, the microgrid model is usually affected by uncertain terms which are bounded, but with unknown upper bounds. To theoretically frame the control problem, the class of second-order systems in Brunovsky canonical form, characterised by the presence of matched uncertain terms with unknown bounds, is first considered. Four adaptive strategies are designed, analysed and compared to select the most effective ones to be applied to the microgrid case study. In the first two strategies, the control amplitude is continuously adjusted, so as to arrive at dominating the effect of the uncertainty on the controlled system. When a suitable control amplitude is attained, the origin of the state space of the auxiliary system becomes attractive. In the other two strategies, a suitable blend between two components, one mainly working during the reaching phase, the other being the predominant one in a vicinity of the sliding manifold, is generated, so as to reduce the control amplitude in steady state. The microgrid system in a grid-connected operation mode, controlled via the selected ASSOSM control strategies, exhibits appreciable stability properties, as proved theoretically and shown in simulation.

  20. Adsorption kinetics of Rhodamine-B on Used Black Tea Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Abul Hossain

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Rhodamine B (Rh-B is one of the most common pollutants in the effluents of textile industries effluents in developing countries. This study was carried out to evaluate the applicability of used black tea leaves (UBTL for the adsorptive removal of Rh-B fromaqueous system by investigating the adsorption kinetics in batch process. The effects of concentration and temperature on adsorption kinetics were examined. First-, second- and pseudo-second order kinetic equations were used to investigate the adsorption mechanism.The adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL followed pseudo-second order kinetics. The equilibrium amount adsorbed and the equilibrium concentration were calculated from pseudo-secondorder kinetic plots for different initial concentrations of Rh-B to construct the adsorption isotherm. The adsorption isotherm was well expressed by Langmuir equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of UBTL to Rh-B was found to be 53.2 mg/g at pH = 2.0. The equilibrium amount adsorbed, calculated from pseudo-second-order kinetic plots, increased with temperature increase. The positive value of enthalpy of adsorption, ΔHads = 31.22 kJ/mol, suggested that the adsorption of Rh-B on UBTL at pH = 2.0 is an endothermic process.

  1. Kinetic Approach for the Adsorption of Organophosphorous Pesticides from Aqueous Solution Using “Waste” Jute Fiber Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Senthilkumaar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemically activated “Waste” Jute Fiber carbon has been effectively used for the removal of five organophosphorous pesticides (malathion, monocrotophos, methylparathion, phosphamidon and dimethoate from aqueous solutions. The prepared activated jute fiber carbon was characterized by using Elemental analyzer and proximate analysis methods. The adsorption equilibrium was examined at 28 ºC. Three different kinetic models, the pseudo first order, pseudo second order and Elovich kinetic models were selected to analyses the adsorption process. To compare the fitness of pseudo first order and pseudo second order, sum of the squares of the errors and correlation coefficient, r2 values were calculated. The Elovich model was used to confirm the chemisorptions.

  2. SECOND-ORDER CYBERNETICS, SEMIOTICS AND THE ART

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niculae V. Mihaita

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We take into consideration the concept of second order cybernetics and Pierce‘s approach of semiotics fundamentals. I am also an observer, experimenter and mental interpreter of metasigns given to the audience by Eugene Ionesco‘s absurd theatre. The interpreting of signs meaning is determinate by the context. From Semiotics ‗point of view, the objects I‘m studying (The Love Poem Lucifer or Evening Star, the short play Foursome and the most known, The Chairs gives me a lot of information about differences or NOT between actors, positive and negative interactions and become knowledge when I see them as signs. Second order cybernetics brings to the semiotics the idea of closure of structural coupling, interpretation and language [Soren, Cybersemiotics, 2008]. Them, the objects chosen are, for EXPERIMENTER, the YOYO in figure 1, and signifies the OBJECT of recursion. Boje [Boje, David, 2005] redefines antenarrative communication more holistically as an enactive phenomenon, and makes connections between varieties of disciplines in order to find out how antenarratives help us understand communication in the world. Instead of the finite event of producing an artifact, betting is a process and an end in itself, through which the practitioners might gain self-awareness. By synthesizing enactive-thinking in virtual space and the practice of communicating we appeal for valuable insights into the creative mind, challenging scholars and practitioners alike. Drawing contributions as above ideograms are useful for practicing cyberneticians, statisticians, researchers and academics, Informational Statistics applications [Mihaita, 2010] explores the ways in which liberal arts writers seek to involve, create and engage with new and diverse audiences from beginners encountering and participating in the work unexpectedly, to professionals from other disciplines and members of particular communities. Taking into consideration the Second-order Cybernetics

  3. Numerical treatment of interfaces for second-order wave equations

    CERN Document Server

    Cécere, Mariana; Reula, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    In this article we develop a numerical scheme to deal with interfaces between touching numerical grids when solving the second-order wave equation. In the spirit of the Simultaneous Approximation Term (SAT) schemes introduced in \\cite{Carpenter1999341}, information is passed among grids using the values of the fields only at the contact points between them (actually, in our case, just the values of the field corresponding to the time derivative of the field). The scheme seems to be as accurate as the space and time discretizations used for the corresponding derivatives. The semi-discrete approximation preserves the norm and uses standard finite-difference operators satisfying summation by parts. For the time integrator we use a semi-implicit IMEX Runge-Kutta method. This is crucial for, otherwise, the methods will be impractical given the severe restrictions its stiff parts would put on totally explicit integrators.

  4. Invariant classification of second-order conformally flat superintegrable systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, J. J.; Kress, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we continue the work of Kalnins et al in classifying all second-order conformally-superintegrable (Laplace-type) systems over conformally flat spaces, using tools from algebraic geometry and classical invariant theory. The results obtained show, through Stäckel equivalence, that the list of known nondegenerate superintegrable systems over three-dimensional conformally flat spaces is complete. In particular, a seven-dimensional manifold is determined such that each point corresponds to a conformal class of superintegrable systems. This manifold is foliated by the nonlinear action of the conformal group in three dimensions. Two systems lie in the same conformal class if and only if they lie in the same leaf of the foliation. This foliation is explicitly described using algebraic varieties formed from representations of the conformal group. The proof of these results rely heavily on Gröbner basis calculations using the computer algebra software packages Maple and Singular.

  5. Feature Scaling via Second-Order Cone Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizheng Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Feature scaling has attracted considerable attention during the past several decades because of its important role in feature selection. In this paper, a novel algorithm for learning scaling factors of features is proposed. It first assigns a nonnegative scaling factor to each feature of data and then adopts a generalized performance measure to learn the optimal scaling factors. It is of interest to note that the proposed model can be transformed into a convex optimization problem: second-order cone programming (SOCP. Thus the scaling factors of features in our method are globally optimal in some sense. Several experiments on simulated data, UCI data sets, and the gene data set are conducted to demonstrate that the proposed method is more effective than previous methods.

  6. Quasilinear second order elliptic systems and topological degree

    OpenAIRE

    Gebran, Hicham Georges; Stuart, Charles Alexander

    2007-01-01

    We consider a large class of quasilinear second order elliptic systems of the form       - ∑α,β=1N aαβ(x,u(x)),∇u(x))∂2αβu(x) + b(x,u(x),∇u(x)) = 0, where x varies in an unbounded domain Ω of the Euclidean space RN and u = (u1,...,um) is a vector of functions. These systems generate operators acting between the Sobolev spaces W2,p(Ω, Rm) and Lp(Ω, Rm) for p > N. We investigate then the Fredholm and properness properties of these operators and the connections between them. These functional pro...

  7. Cosmologies in Horndeski's second-order vector-tensor theory

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, John D; Yamamoto, Kei

    2012-01-01

    Horndeski derived a most general vector-tensor theory in which the vector field respects the gauge symmetry and the resulting dynamical equations are of second order. The action contains only one free parameter, $\\lambda$, that determines the strength of the non-minimal coupling between the gauge field and gravity. We investigate the cosmological consequences of this action and discuss observational constraints. For $\\lambda<0$ we identify singularities where the deceleration parameter diverges within a finite proper time. This effectively rules out any sensible cosmological application of the theory for a negative non-minimal coupling. We also find a range of parameter that gives a viable cosmology and study the phenomenology for this case. Observational constraints on the value of the coupling are rather weak since the interaction is higher-order in space-time curvature.

  8. Magnetic relaxation in a spin-1 Ising model near the second-order phase transition point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, Riza [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tasliciftlik Campus, Tokat 60250 (Turkey)], E-mail: rerdem29@hotmail.com

    2008-09-15

    The magnetic relaxation of a spin-1 Ising model with bilinear and biquadratic interactions is formulated within the framework of statistical equilibrium theory and the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Using a molecular-field expression for the magnetic Gibbs energy, the magnetic Gibbs energy produced in the irreversible process is calculated and time derivatives of the dipolar and quadrupolar order parameters are treated as fluxes conjugate to their appropriate generalized forces in the sense of Onsager theory. The kinetic equations are obtained by introducing kinetic coefficients that satisfy the Onsager relation. By solving these equations an expression is derived for the dynamic or complex magnetic susceptibility. From the real and imaginary parts of this expression, magnetic dispersion and absorption factor are calculated and analyzed near the second-order phase transition.

  9. Magnetic relaxation in a spin-1 Ising model near the second-order phase transition point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Rıza

    The magnetic relaxation of a spin-1 Ising model with bilinear and biquadratic interactions is formulated within the framework of statistical equilibrium theory and the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Using a molecular-field expression for the magnetic Gibbs energy, the magnetic Gibbs energy produced in the irreversible process is calculated and time derivatives of the dipolar and quadrupolar order parameters are treated as fluxes conjugate to their appropriate generalized forces in the sense of Onsager theory. The kinetic equations are obtained by introducing kinetic coefficients that satisfy the Onsager relation. By solving these equations an expression is derived for the dynamic or complex magnetic susceptibility. From the real and imaginary parts of this expression, magnetic dispersion and absorption factor are calculated and analyzed near the second-order phase transition.

  10. Understanding operational risk capital approximations: First and second orders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth W. Peters

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We set the context for capital approximation within the framework of the Basel II / III regulatory capital accords. This is particularly topical as the Basel III accord is shortly due to take effect. In this regard, we provide a summary of the role of capital adequacy in the new accord, highlighting along the way the significant loss events that have been attributed to the Operational Risk class that was introduced in the Basel II and III accords. Then we provide a semi-tutorial discussion on the modelling aspects of capital estimation under a Loss Distributional Approach (LDA. Our emphasis is to focuss on the important loss processes with regard to those that contribute most to capital, the so called “high consequence, low frequency" loss processes. This leads us to provide a tutorial overview of heavy tailed loss process modelling in OpRisk under Basel III, with discussion on the implications of such tail assumptions for the severity model in an LDA structure. This provides practitioners with a clear understanding of the features that they may wish to consider when developing OpRisk severity models in practice. From this discussion on heavy tailed severity models, we then develop an understanding of the impact such models have on the right tail asymptotics of the compound loss process and we provide detailed presentation of what are known as first and second order tail approximations for the resulting heavy tailed loss process. From this we develop a tutorial on three key families of risk measures and their equivalent second order asymptotic approximations: Value-at-Risk (Basel III industry standard; Expected Shortfall (ES and the Spectral Risk Measure. These then form the capital approximations. We then provide a few example case studies to illustrate the accuracy of these asymptotic captial approximations, the rate of the convergence of the assymptotic result as a function of the LDA frequency and severity model parameters, the sensitivity

  11. Second-order correlations in single-particle interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembold, A.; Röpke, R.; Schütz, G.; Fortágh, J.; Stibor, A.; Günther, A.

    2017-10-01

    Interferometers with single particles are susceptible for dephasing perturbations from the environment, such as electromagnetic oscillations or mechanical vibrations. On the one hand, this limits sensitive quantum phase measurements as it reduces the interference contrast in the signal. On the other hand, it enables single-particle interferometers to be used as sensitive sensors for electromagnetic and mechanical perturbations. Recently, it was demonstrated experimentally, that a second-order correlation analysis of the spatial and temporal detection signal can decrease the electromagnetic shielding and vibrational damping requirements significantly. Thereby, the relevant matter-wave characteristics and the perturbation parameters could be extracted from the correlation analysis of a spatially ‘washed-out’ interference pattern and the original undisturbed interferogram could be reconstructed. This method can be applied to all interferometers that produce a spatial fringe pattern on a detector with high spatial and temporal single-particle resolution. In this article, we present and discuss in detail the used two-dimensional second-order correlation theory for multifrequency perturbations. The derivations of an explicit and approximate solution of the correlation function and corresponding amplitude spectra are provided. It is explained, how the numerical correlation function is extracted from the measurement data. Thereby, the influence of the temporal and spatial discretization step size on the extracted parameters, as contrast and perturbation amplitude, is analyzed. The influence of noise on the correlation function and corresponding amplitude spectrum is calculated and numerically cross-checked by a comparison of our theory with numerical single-particle simulations of a perturbed interference pattern. Thereby, an optimum spatial discretization step size is determined to achieve a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, which was used in former experiments to

  12. Second-order mappings in grapheme-color synesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Marcus R; Akins, Kathleen A; Enns, James T

    2012-04-01

    Typically, the search for order in grapheme-color synesthesia has been conducted by looking at the frequency of certain letter-color associations. Here, we report stronger associations when second-order similarity mappings are examined--specifically, mappings between the synesthetic colors of letters and letter shape, frequency, and position in the alphabet. The analyses demonstrate that these relations are independent of one other. More strikingly, our analyses show that each of the letter-color mappings is restricted to one dimension of color, with letter shape and ordinality linked to hue, and letter frequency linked to luminance. These results imply that synesthetic associations are acquired as the alphabet is learned, with associations involving letter shape, ordinality, and frequency being made independently and idiosyncratically. Because these mappings of similarity structure between domains (letters and colors) are similar to those found in numerous other cognitive and perceptual domains, they imply that synesthetic associations operate on principles common to many aspects of human cognition.

  13. On computing first and second order derivative spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Indrajit G.

    2015-08-01

    Enhancing resolution in spectral response and an ability to differentiate spectral mixing in delineating the endmembers from the spectral response are central to the spectral data analysis. First and higher order derivatives analysis of absorbance and reflectance spectral data is commonly used techniques in differentiating the spectral mixing. But high sensitivity of derivative to the noise in data is a major problem in the robust estimation of derivative of spectral data. An algorithm of robust estimation of first and second order derivative spectra from evenly spaced noisy normal spectral data is proposed. The algorithm is formalized in the framework of an inverse problem, where based on the fundamental theorem of calculus a matrix equation is formed using a Volterra type integral equation of first kind. A regularization technique, where the balancing principle is used in selecting a posteriori optimal regularization parameter is designed to solve the inverse problem for robust estimation of first order derivative spectra. The higher order derivative spectra are obtained while using the algorithm in sequel. The algorithm is tested successfully with synthetically generated spectral data contaminated with additive white Gaussian noise, and also with real absorbance and reflectance spectral data for fresh and sea water respectively.

  14. Second order gyrokinetic theory for particle-in-cell codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronko, Natalia; Bottino, Alberto; Sonnendrücker, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The main idea of the gyrokinetic dynamical reduction consists in a systematical removal of the fast scale motion (the gyromotion) from the dynamics of the plasma, resulting in a considerable simplification and a significant gain of computational time. The gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations are nowadays implemented in for modeling (both laboratory and astrophysical) strongly magnetized plasmas. Different versions of the reduced set of equations exist, depending on the construction of the gyrokinetic reduction procedure and the approximations performed in the derivation. The purpose of this article is to explicitly show the connection between the general second order gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov system issued from the modern gyrokinetic theory and the model currently implemented in the global electromagnetic Particle-in-Cell code ORB5. Necessary information about the modern gyrokinetic formalism is given together with the consistent derivation of the gyrokinetic Maxwell-Vlasov equations from first principles. The variational formulation of the dynamics is used to obtain the corresponding energy conservation law, which in turn is used for the verification of energy conservation diagnostics currently implemented in ORB5. This work fits within the context of the code verification project VeriGyro currently run at IPP Max-Planck Institut in collaboration with others European institutions.

  15. Second order sliding mode control for a quadrotor UAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, En-Hui; Xiong, Jing-Jing; Luo, Ji-Liang

    2014-07-01

    A method based on second order sliding mode control (2-SMC) is proposed to design controllers for a small quadrotor UAV. For the switching sliding manifold design, the selection of the coefficients of the switching sliding manifold is in general a sophisticated issue because the coefficients are nonlinear. In this work, in order to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the quadrotor perfectly, the dynamical model of the quadrotor is divided into two subsystems, i.e., a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. For the former, a sliding manifold is defined by combining the position and velocity tracking errors of one state variable, i.e., the sliding manifold has two coefficients. For the latter, a sliding manifold is constructed via a linear combination of position and velocity tracking errors of two state variables, i.e., the sliding manifold has four coefficients. In order to further obtain the nonlinear coefficients of the sliding manifold, Hurwitz stability analysis is used to the solving process. In addition, the flight controllers are derived by using Lyapunov theory, which guarantees that all system state trajectories reach and stay on the sliding surfaces. Extensive simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Fundamental studies of novel zwitterionic hybrid membranes: kinetic model and mechanism insights into strontium removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Liu, Junsheng; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater.

  17. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models. Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater.

  18. 8-Hydroxyqunoline adsorption from aqueous solution using powdered orange peel: kinetic and isotherm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siraj Khalid

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ on powdered orange peel (POP, a locally available adsorbent, has been studied. Experiment was performed on different 8HQ concentration, particle size, and adsorbent dosage. The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm model has been tested. The obtained results best fitted the Langmuir model, suggesting monolayer adsorption of 8HQ on POP. The kinetic studies for the adsorption process were also carried out using pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order models, and the data obtained is best fitted to the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters were calculated for the adsorption process and the result showed that the values of ΔGads, ΔHads, and ΔSads are −1171.4J/mol, −140J/mol and −40.5 J/K at 303 K. Thus, it can be summarized that the adsorption of 8HQ is spontaneous, chemisorbed, monolayer, and exothermic

  19. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    A series of zwitterionic hybrid membranes were prepared via the ring opening of 1,3-propanesultone with the amine groups in the chains of TMSPEDA and a subsequent sol-gel process. Their kinetic models for strontium removal were investigated using three two-parameter kinetic equations (i.e., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation. It was found that the adsorption of strontium ions on these zwitterionic hybrid membranes fitted well with the Lagergren pseudo-second order model. Mechanism insights suggested that diffusion-chemisorption was one of the main adsorption mechanisms. Boyd equation exhibited that film-diffusion mechanism might be the control process during the starting period. These findings are very useful in strontium removal from the stimulated radioactive wastewater. PMID:25405224

  20. Removal of Congo Red from Aqueous Solution by Anion Exchange Membrane (EBTAC): Adsorption Kinetics and Themodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Akhtar, Shahbaz; Zafar, Shagufta; Shaheen, Aqeela; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Luque, Rafael; Rehman, Aziz Ur

    2015-07-08

    The adsorption behavior of anionic dye congo red (CR) from aqueous solutions using an anion exchange membrane (EBTAC) has been investigated at room temperature. The effect of several factors including contact time, membrane dosage, ionic strength and temperature were studied. Kinetic models, namely pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order, liquid film diffusion and Elovich models as well as Bangham and modified freundlich Equations, were employed to evaluate the experimental results. Parameters such as adsorption capacities, rate constant and related correlation coefficients for every model were calculated and discussed. The adsorption of CR on anion exchange membranes followed pseudo-second-order Kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters, namely changes in Gibbs free energy (∆G°), enthalpy (∆H°) and entropy (∆S°) were calculated for the adsorption of congo red, indicating an exothermic process.

  1. Removal of Congo Red from Aqueous Solution by Anion Exchange Membrane (EBTAC: Adsorption Kinetics and Themodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Imran Khan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption behavior of anionic dye congo red (CR from aqueous solutions using an anion exchange membrane (EBTAC has been investigated at room temperature. The effect of several factors including contact time, membrane dosage, ionic strength and temperature were studied. Kinetic models, namely pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order, liquid film diffusion and Elovich models as well as Bangham and modified freundlich Equations, were employed to evaluate the experimental results. Parameters such as adsorption capacities, rate constant and related correlation coefficients for every model were calculated and discussed. The adsorption of CR on anion exchange membranes followed pseudo-second-order Kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters, namely changes in Gibbs free energy (∆G°, enthalpy (∆H° and entropy (∆S° were calculated for the adsorption of congo red, indicating an exothermic process.

  2. Kinetics of soybean oil epoxidation with peracetic acid formed in situ in the presence of an ion exchange resin: Pseudo-homogeneous model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Milovan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A kinetic model was proposed for the epoxidation of vegetable oils with peracetic acid formed in situ from acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an acidic ion exchange resin as a catalyst. The model is pseudo-homogeneous with respect to the catalyst. Besides the main reactions of peracetic acid and epoxy ring formation, the model takes into account the side reaction of epoxy ring opening with acetic acid. The partitioning of acetic acid and peracetic acid between the aqueous and organic phases and the change in the phases’ volumes during the process were considered. The temperature dependency of the apparent reaction rate coefficients is described by a reparameterized Arrhenius equation. The constants in the proposed model were estimated by fitting the experimental data obtained for the epoxidations of soybean oil conducted under defined reaction conditions. The highest epoxy yield of 87.73% was obtained at 338 K when the mole ratio of oil unsaturation:acetic acid:hydrogen peroxide was 1:0.5:1.35 and when the amount of the catalyst Amberlite IR-120H was 4.04 wt.% of oil. Compared to the other reported pseudo-homogeneous models, the model proposed in this study better correlates the change of double bond and epoxy group contents during the epoxidation process. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III45022

  3. Associative structure of second-order conditioning in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Paul; Wasserman, Jessica S; Polack, Cody W; Kosinski, Thierry; Renaux, Charlotte; Miller, Ralph R

    2017-11-03

    Second-order conditioning (SOC; i.e., conditioned responding to S2 as a result of S1-US pairings followed by S2-S1 pairings) is generally explained by either a direct S2→US association or by an associative chain (i.e., S2→S1→US). Previous research found that differences in responses to S2 after S1 was extinguished often depended on the nature of the S2-S1 pairings (i.e., sequential or simultaneous). In two experiments with human participants, we examined the possibility that such differences result from S1 evoking S2 during extinction of S1 following simultaneous but not sequential S2-S1 pairings. This evocation of S2 by S1 following simultaneous pairings may have paired the evoked representation of S2 with absence of the outcome, thereby facilitating mediated extinction of S2. Using sequential S2-S1 pairings, both Experiments 1 and 2 failed to support this account of how extinction of S1 reduced responding to S2. Experiment 1 found that extinguishing S1 reduced responding to S2, while extinguishing S2 had little effect on responses to S1, although forward evocation of S1 during extinction of S2 paired the evoked representation of S1 with absence of the outcome. In Experiment 2, evocation of S2 during S1 nonreinforced trials was prevented because S2-S1 pairings followed (rather than proceeded) S1-alone exposures. Nevertheless, responding to S2 at test mimicked S1 responding. Responding to S2 was high in the context in which S1 had been reinforced and low in the context in which S1 had been nonreinforced. Collectively, these experiments provide additional support for the associative-chain account of SOC.

  4. Adsorption Kinetics of Cd(ll and Pb(ll Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Bamboo-Based Activated Charcoal and Bamboo Dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevens Azubuike Odoemelam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of bamboo dust (BD and bamboo-based activated charcoal for adsorption of Pb(ll and Cd(ll ions from aqueous solutions were assessed in this work. The effect of contact time on the uptake of these metal ions was studied in batch process. The adsorption data were correlated with pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order and diffusivity kinetic models. Results show that pseudo second-order kinetic model gave the best description for the adsorption process. Kinetic studies further showed that the adsorption transport mechanism was particle-diffusion controlled for the adsorption process. Results obtained generally showed that lead(ll ions were better adsorbed onto both adsorbents as compared to cadmium(ll. Comparison of sorption capacity for the two adsorbents shows that bamboo-based activated charcoal exhibited better removal for the metal ions than the bamboo dust.

  5. Kinetic characteristics of gas-liquid ozone reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levanov, A. V.; Isaikina, O. Ya.; Lunin, V. V.

    2017-10-01

    An experimental chemical method for determining the kinetic characteristics (volumetric mass transfer coefficient and rate constant of a second-order reaction) of gas-liquid ozone reactions in a bubble column reactor is described. The calculation formulas are substantiated, and the ranges of values of the experimental factors that determine the method's limits of applicability are found. The conditions under which the boundary-value problem of a gas-liquid ozone reaction of the second order can be reduced to a problem of a pseudo-first order reaction allowing an analytical solution are revealed.

  6. Fundamental Studies of Novel Zwitterionic Hybrid Membranes: Kinetic Model and Mechanism Insights into Strontium Removal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhu, Wen; Liu, Junsheng; Li, Meng

    2014-01-01

    ...., Lagergren pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and Elovich models). Adsorption mechanism was evaluated using intraparticle diffusion model, diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd equation...

  7. Equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics studies of textile dyes adsorption on modified Tunisian clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    naghmouchi nahed

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption capacity of two anionic textile dyes (RR120 and BB150 on DMSO intercalated Tunisian raw clay was investigated with respect to contact time, initial dye concentration, pH and Temperature. The equilibrium data were fitted into Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin–Radushkevich isotherms. The kinetic parameters were calculated using pseudo-first order, pseudo second-order, intra-particle diffusion and Elovich kinetic models. The thermodynamic parameters (DH°, DS° and DG° of the adsorption process were also evaluated.

  8. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raji, Foad; Pakizeh, Majid, E-mail: pakizeh@um.ac.ir

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 introduced itself as a high performance sorbent for Hg(II) removal. • Kinetics data were analyzed by pseudo-first and second order and diffusion models. • The adsorption kinetic data were described very well by pseudo-second-order model. • Sorption of Hg(II) by ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 was an exothermic chemical process. • Hg(II) sorption was a spontaneous process since of minus free energy change. - Abstract: Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20–55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl{sub 2}-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = −49.4 kJ mol{sup −1}). The negative ΔS° value (−148.9 J mol{sup −1} K{sup −1}) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites.

  9. Thermodynamics and kinetics of glyphosate adsorption on resin D301

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-xiong Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics are investigated in batch experiments. The adsorption isotherms and kinetics in the range of 303.15–318.15 K are determined. Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherms are employed to describe the adsorption process, indicating that the Langmuir isotherm fits the data better. By thermodynamic functions, ΔHθ, ΔGθ and ΔSθ are calculated. The kinetics of the adsorption follows a pseudo-second order model. The apparent activation energy is calculated to be 83.11 kJ mol−1 by Arrhenius equation.

  10. Adsorption Kinetics for the Removal of Fluoride from Aqueous Solution by Activated Carbon Adsorbents Derived from the Peels of Selected Citrus Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chakrapani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons (ACs were prepared from the peels of Citrus documana, Citrus medica and Citrus aurantifolia fruits. Adsorption of fluoride onto these activated carbons was investigated. Effect of contact time in the removal of fluoride from aqueous solution at neutral pH was studied. Five kinetic models; the pseudo first- and second-order equations, intraparticle diffusion, pore diffusion and the Elovich equation, were selected to follow adsorption process. Adsorption of fluoride onto adsorbents could be described by pseudo second-order equation. Kinetic parameters; rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and correlation coefficients, for each kinetic equation were calculated and discussed. The good fitting of kinetic data to pore diffusion and Elovich equations indicate that pore diffusion plays a vital role in controlling the rate of the reaction.

  11. SECOND-ORDER SOLUTIONS OF COSMOLOGICAL PERTURBATION IN THE MATTER-DOMINATED ERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Jai-chan [Department of Astronomy and Atmospheric Sciences, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, Hyerim [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Gong, Jinn-Ouk [Theory Division, CERN, CH-1211 Geneve 23 (Switzerland)

    2012-06-10

    We present the growing mode solutions of cosmological perturbations to the second order in the matter-dominated era. We also present several gauge-invariant combinations of perturbation variables to the second order in the most general fluid context. Based on these solutions, we study the Newtonian correspondence of relativistic perturbations to the second order. In addition to the previously known exact relativistic/Newtonian correspondence of density and velocity perturbations to the second order in the comoving gauge, here we show that in the sub-horizon limit we have the correspondences for density, velocity, and potential perturbations in the zero-shear gauge and in the uniform-expansion gauge to the second order. Density perturbation in the uniform-curvature gauge also shows the correspondence to the second order in the sub-horizon scale. We also identify the relativistic gravitational potential that shows exact correspondence to the Newtonian one to the second order.

  12. Second order solutions of cosmological perturbation in the matter dominated era

    CERN Document Server

    Hwang, Jai-chan; Gong, Jinn-Ouk

    2012-01-01

    We present the growing mode solutions of cosmological perturbations to the second order in the matter dominated era. We also present several gauge-invariant combinations of perturbation variables to the second order in most general fluid context. Based on the solutions we study the Newtonian correspondence of relativistic perturbations to the second order. In addition to the previously known exact relativistic/Newtonian correspondence of density and velocity perturbations to the second order in the comoving gauge, here we show that in the sub-horizon limit we have the correspondences for density, velocity and potential perturbations in the zero-shear gauge and in the uniform-expansion gauge to the second order. Density perturbation in the uniform curvature gauge also shows the correspondence to the second order in the sub-horizon scale. We also identify the relativistic gravitational potential which shows exact correspondence to the Newtonian one to the second order.

  13. Adsorption kinetic and desorption studies of Cd2+ on Multi-Carboxylic-Functionalized Silica Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Wei, Jian; Meng, Xiaojing; Wu, Zhuqiang; Liang, Xiuke

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, the adsorption behavior of cadmium (II) ion from aqueous solution onto multi-carboxylic-functionalized silica gel (SG-MCF) has been investigated in detail by means of batch and column experiments. Batch experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of contact time on adsorption capacity of cadmium (II) ion. The kinetic data were analyzed on the basis of the pseudo-first-order kinetic and the pseudo-second-order kinetic models and consequently, the pseudo-second-order kinetic can better describe the adsorption process than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. And the adsorption mechanism of the process was studied by intra-particle and film diffusion, it was found out that the adsorption rate was governed primarily by film diffusion to the adsorption onto the SG-MCF. In addition, column experiments were conducted to assess the effects initial inlet concentration and the flow rate on breakthrough time and adsorption capacity ascertaining the practical applicability of the adsorbent. The results suggest that the total amount of adsorbed cadmium (II) ion increased with declined flow rate and increased the inlet concentration. The adsorption-desorption experiment confirmed that adsorption capacity of cadmium (II) ion didn’t present an obvious decrease after five cycles.

  14. Adsorption kinetic and desorption studies of Cu2+ on Multi-Carboxylic-Functionalized Silica Gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Meng, Xiaojing; Liu, Yushuang; Hu, Xinju; Liang, Xiuke

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, the adsorption behavior of copper (II) ion from aqueous solution onto multi-carboxylic-functionalized silica gel (SG-MCF) has been investigated in detail by means of batch and column experiments. Batch experiments were performed to evaluate the effects of contact time on adsorption capacity of copper (II) ion. The kinetic data were analyzed on the basis of the pseudo-first-order kinetic and the pseudo-second-order kinetic models and consequently, the pseudo-second-order kinetic can better describe the adsorption process than the pseudo-first-order kinetic model. And the adsorption mechanism of the process was studied by intra-particle and film diffusion, it was found out that the adsorption rate was governed primarily by film diffusion to the adsorption onto the SG-MCF. In addition, column experiments were conducted to assess the effects initial inlet concentration and the flow rate on breakthrough time and adsorption capacity ascertaining the practical applicability of the adsorbent. The results suggest that the total amount of adsorbed copper (II) ion increased with declined flow rate and increased the inlet concentration. The adsorption-desorption experiment confirmed that adsorption capacity of copper (II) ion didn’t present an obvious decrease after five cycles.

  15. Adsorption and kinetic studies on the removal of chromium and copper onto Chitosan-g-maliec anhydride-g-ethylene dimethacrylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal Reddi, M R; Gomathi, T; Saranya, M; Sudha, P N

    2017-11-01

    The present work was designed to remove toxic metals chromium and copper using the double grafted copolymer Chitosan-g-Maleic anhydride-g-ethylene dimethacrylate. The graft copolymer was synthesized through chain polymerization reaction using ceric ammonium nitrate as the initiator. Prepared Chitosan-g-Maleic anhydride-g-ethylene dimethacrylate was used in order to remove the heavy metals chromium and copper from aqueous solutions of 200ppm/L concentration proceeding batch adsorption process by varying the parameters such as adsorbent dose, contact time, pH and initial concentration of the metal solution. The experimental data were equipped with isotherm models such as Langmuir and Freundlich and pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetics. The calculated results revealed that the adsorption favours Freundlich isotherm and follows pseudo-second order kinetics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Kinetics of nitrate adsorption and reduction by nano-scale zero valent iron (NZVI): Effect of ionic strength and initial pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Do-Gun; Hwang, Yuhoon; Shin, Hang-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models for pollutants reduction by Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron (NZVI) were tested in this study to gain a better understanding and description of the reaction. Adsorption kinetic models and a heterogeneous catalytic reaction kinetic equation were proposed for nitrate removal and for ammonia...... generation, respectively. A widely used pseudo-first-order reaction model was a poor fit for nitrate removal in an iron-limiting condition and for ammonia generation in an excess iron condition. However, in this study, pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order adsorption kinetic equations were a good fit...... for nitrate removal; in addition, a Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic equation was able to successfully describe ammonia generation, regardless of the NZVI dose, the ionic strength, and the initial pH. These results strongly indicate that nitrate reduction by NZVI is a heterogeneous catalytic reaction...

  17. Kinetic modeling of liquid-phase adsorption of phosphate on dolomite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, S; Gürses, A; Ejder, M; Açikyildiz, M

    2004-09-15

    The adsorption of phosphate from aqueous solution on dolomite was investigated at 20 and 40 degrees C in terms of pseudo-second-order mechanism for chemical adsorption as well as an intraparticle diffusion mechanism process. Adsorption was changed with increased contact time, initial phosphate concentration, temperature, solution pH. A pseudo-second-order model and intraparticle diffusion model have been developed to predict the rate constants of adsorption and equilibrium capacities. The activation energy of adsorption can be evaluated using the pseudo-second-order rate constants. The adsorption of phosphate onto dolomite are an exothermically activated process. A relatively low activation energy and a model highly fitting to intraparticle diffusion suggest that the adsorption of phosphate by dolomite may involve not only physical but also chemisorption. This was likely due to its combined control of chemisorption and intraparticle diffusion. However, for phosphate/dolomite system chemical reaction is important and significant in the rate-controlling step, and for the adsorption of phosphate onto dolomite the pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetics provides the best correlation of the experimental data.

  18. Sorption kinetics of diuron on volcanic ash derived soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres-Jensen, Lizethly; Rodríguez-Becerra, Jorge; Parra-Rivero, Joselyn; Escudey, Mauricio; Barrientos, Lorena; Castro-Castillo, Vicente

    2013-10-15

    Diuron sorption kinetic was studied in Andisols, Inceptisol and Ultisols soils in view of their distinctive physical and chemical properties: acidic pH and variable surface charge. Two types of kinetic models were used to fit the experimental dates: those that allow to establish principal kinetic parameters and modeling of sorption process (pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order), and some ones frequently used to describe solute transport mechanisms of organic compounds on different sorbents intended for remediation purposes (Elovich equation, intraparticle diffusion, Boyd, and two-site nonequilibrium models). The best fit was obtained with the pseudo-second-order model. The rate constant and the initial rate constant values obtained through this model demonstrated the behavior of Diuron in each soil, in Andisols were observed the highest values for both parameters. The application of the models to describe solute transport mechanisms allowed establishing that in all soils the mass transfer controls the sorption kinetic across the boundary layer and intraparticle diffusion into macropores and micropores. The slowest sorption rate was observed on Ultisols, behavior which must be taken into account when the leaching potential of Diuron is considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Kinetic and isotherm studies of Cu(II) biosorption onto valonia tannin resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengil, I. Ayhan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Sakarya University, 54100 Sakarya (Turkey)], E-mail: asengil@sakarya.edu.tr; Ozacar, Mahmut [Department of Chemistry, Science and Arts Faculty, Sakarya University, 54100 Sakarya (Turkey); Tuerkmenler, Harun [Institute of Sciences and Technology, Sakarya University, 54040 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2009-03-15

    The biosorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions by valonia tannin resin was investigated as a function of particle size, initial pH, contact time and initial metal ion concentration. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms that govern copper removal and find a suitable equilibrium isotherm and kinetic model for the copper removal in a batch reactor. The experimental isotherm data were analysed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. The equilibrium data fit well in the Langmuir isotherm. The experimental data were analysed using four sorption kinetic models - the pseudo-first- and second-order equations, the Elovich and the intraparticle diffusion model equation - to determine the best fit equation for the biosorption of copper ions onto valonia tannin resin. Results show that the pseudo-second-order equation provides the best correlation for the biosorption process, whereas the Elovich equation also fits the experimental data well.

  20. Concurrent Co2+ and Sr2+ sorption from binary mixtures using aluminum industry waste: Kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenković, A.; Smičiklas, I.; Šljivić-Ivanović, M.; Vukelić, N.

    2015-12-01

    Multi-component sorption studies are essential to identify the applicability of red mud as a lowcost sorbent for the simultaneous removal of metal ions from wastewaters. Sorption kinetics of Co2+ and Sr2+ ions was investigated, at different total concentrations of mixtures and different molar ratios of two cations. Kinetics of metal sorption from binary systems was found to be well described by pseudo-second order rate model. Equilibrium sorbed amounts and equilibrium times for Co2+ sorption increased with the increase of its total concentration in the mixture, whereas pseudo-second order rate constants exhibited the opposite trend. Sr2+ sorption was strongly suppressed in the presence of Co2+ ions, and the removal efficiency decreased with increasing concentration and mole fraction of Co2+. Red mud can be used for simultaneous Co2+ and Sr2+ removal from mixtures of lower initial concentration, otherwise Co2+ sorption is dominant.

  1. Differential effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on second-order texture contrast sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbot, Antoine; Landy, Michael S.; Carrasco, Marisa

    2012-01-01

    The visual system can use a rich variety of contours to segment visual scenes into distinct perceptually coherent regions. However, successfully segmenting an image is a computationally expensive process. Previously we have shown that exogenous attention—the more automatic, stimulus-driven component of spatial attention—helps extract contours by enhancing contrast sensitivity for second-order, texture-defined patterns at the attended location, while reducing sensitivity at unattended locations, relative to a neutral condition. Interestingly, the effects of exogenous attention depended on the second-order spatial frequency of the stimulus. At parafoveal locations, attention enhanced second-order contrast sensitivity to relatively high, but not to low second-order spatial frequencies. In the present study we investigated whether endogenous attention—the more voluntary, conceptually-driven component of spatial attention—affects second-order contrast sensitivity, and if so, whether its effects are similar to those of exogenous attention. To that end, we compared the effects of exogenous and endogenous attention on the sensitivity to second-order, orientation-defined, texture patterns of either high or low second-order spatial frequencies. The results show that, like exogenous attention, endogenous attention enhances second-order contrast sensitivity at the attended location and reduces it at unattended locations. However, whereas the effects of exogenous attention are a function of the second-order spatial frequency content, endogenous attention affected second-order contrast sensitivity independent of the second-order spatial frequency content. This finding supports the notion that both exogenous and endogenous attention can affect second-order contrast sensitivity, but that endogenous attention is more flexible, benefitting performance under different conditions. PMID:22895879

  2. Evaluation of the kinetic oxidation of aqueous volatile organic compounds by permanganate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodlu, Mojtaba G; Hassanizadeh, S Majid; Hartog, Niels

    2014-07-01

    The use of permanganate solutions for in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) is a well-established groundwater remediation technology, particularly for targeting chlorinated ethenes. The kinetics of oxidation reactions is an important ISCO remediation design aspect that affects the efficiency and oxidant persistence. The overall rate of the ISCO reaction between oxidant and contaminant is typically described using a second-order kinetic model while the second-order rate constant is determined experimentally by means of a pseudo first order approach. However, earlier studies of chlorinated hydrocarbons have yielded a wide range of values for the second-order rate constants. Also, there is limited insight in the kinetics of permanganate reactions with fuel-derived groundwater contaminants such as toluene and ethanol. In this study, batch experiments were carried out to investigate and compare the oxidation kinetics of aqueous trichloroethylene (TCE), ethanol, and toluene in an aqueous potassium permanganate solution. The overall second-order rate constants were determined directly by fitting a second-order model to the data, instead of typically using the pseudo-first-order approach. The second-order reaction rate constants (M(-1) s(-1)) for TCE, toluene, and ethanol were 8.0×10(-1), 2.5×10(-4), and 6.5×10(-4), respectively. Results showed that the inappropriate use of the pseudo-first-order approach in several previous studies produced biased estimates of the second-order rate constants. In our study, this error was expressed as a function of the extent (P/N) in which the reactant concentrations deviated from the stoichiometric ratio of each oxidation reaction. The error associated with the inappropriate use of the pseudo-first-order approach is negatively correlated with the P/N ratio and reached up to 25% of the estimated second-order rate constant in some previous studies of TCE oxidation. Based on our results, a similar relation is valid for the other volatile

  3. The effects of satiation after first- and second-order appetitive conditioning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, P C

    1981-01-01

    Rats received first- and second-order conditioning based on a food unconditional stimulus (US). The effects of postconditioning satiation on the performance of detailed behavioral components of general activity evoked by first- and second-order conditional stimuli (CSs) were then assessed in extinction tests. Satiation reduced the frequency of all components of general activity evoked by first-order CSs but had little or no effects on behaviors evoked by second-order CSs. These results are consistent with earlier suggestions that first- but not second-order conditional responding is mediated by a representation of the US and that a major effect of satiation is to devalue that representation.

  4. Adsorption of methyl tert-butyl ether using granular activated carbon : equilibrium and kinetic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.Z.; Chen, J.M. [Zhejiang Univ. of Technology, Hangzhou (China). College of Biological and Environmental Engineering; Zhang, J.X. [Yuhuan County Environmental Protection Bureau, Yuhuan (China)

    2010-04-01

    Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is used in gasoline as a replacement for lead in order to promote combustion efficiency. However, MTBE is one of the most frequently detected underground water pollutants caused by leaks in underground fuel storage tanks, and has been classified as a potential human carcinogen. This study investigated that adsorption of MTBE through a granular activated carbon filter. Pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order equation and intraparticle diffusion equation kinetic models were used to predict the constant rate of adsorption. The study showed that the pseudo-second order model accurately described the adsorption kinetics for the removal of MTBE from an aqueous solution onto granular activated carbon. The Lagergren first-order rate constant k{sub 1} and the pseudo-second order rate constant k{sub 2} decreased with initial increases of MTBE. A Boyd plot was used to demonstrate that external mass transfer is the principal rate-limiting step during the initial stages of adsorption. Results of the study indicated that granular activated carbon is an effective adsorbent for MTBE. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  5. Kinetic and equilibrium studies of urea adsorption onto activated carbon: Adsorption mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Kameda, Tomohito; Ito, Saya; Yoshioka, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    We found that activated carbon effectively removed urea from solution and that urea adsorption onto activated carbon followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. We classified the urea adsorption on activated carbon as physical adsorption and found that it was best described by the Halsey adsorption isotherm, suggesting that the multilayer adsorption of urea molecules on the adsorption sites of activated carbon best characterized the adsorption system. The mechanism of adsorption of urea by ...

  6. Growth and PhysioChemical Properties of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical L-Threonine Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ramesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present aim of the paper is to grow and to study the various properties of L-threonine amino acid single crystal in various aspects. Crystal growth of L-threonine single crystals has been carried out with the help of crystallization kinetics. pH and deuteration effects on the properties of the grown crystals have been studied and the results presented in a lucid manner. The various second-order NLO parameters were evaluated using anharmonic oscillator model. Particle and ion irradiation effects on structural, optical, and surface properties of the crystals have also been studied in detail.

  7. Kinetic study of brilliant green adsorption from aqueous solution onto white rice husk ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavlieva, Mariana P; Genieva, Svetlana D; Georgieva, Velyana G; Vlaev, Lyubomir T

    2013-11-01

    The present research was focused on the study of adsorption kinetics of brilliant green (BG) onto white rice husk ash from aqueous solutions. The research was performed in the temperature interval 290-320 K in 10° steps and in the concentration range of 3-100 mg L(-1). Batch studies were conducted in order to determine the optimal adsorbent dose, and the time required to reach the adsorption equilibrium at each temperature. The effect of the initial concentration of brilliant green was studied (pH not adjusted), as well as the effect of temperature. The maximum adsorption capacity of the WRHA for BG at 320 K was determined to be 85.56 mg g(-1). The adsorption kinetic data were analyzed employing several kinetic models: pseudo-first-order equation, pseudo-second-order equation, Elovichequation, Banghman's equation, Diffusion-chemisorption model, and Boyd kinetic expression. It was established that the adsorption process obeyed the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Based on the rate constants obtained by this kinetic model using Arrhenius and Eyring equations, the activation parameters were determined, namely the activation energy (50.04 kJ mol(-1)), the change of entropy (-318.31 J mol(-1) K(-1)), enthalpy (-47.50 kJ mol(-1)), and Gibbs free energy (range 44.81-54.36 kJ mol(-1)) for the formation of activated complex from the reagents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Adsorption kinetics and isotherm of vanadium with melamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Liu, Zuohua; Tao, Changyuan

    2017-05-01

    Melamine, possessing three free amino groups and three aromatic nitrogen atoms in its molecule, has great potential as an adsorbent for metal ions. We investigated three impact factors of the adsorption process: the initial pH of the vanadium solution, contact time and reaction temperature. The adsorption kinetics could be accurately described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Langmuir and Freundlich models fitted well with the experimental equilibrium data, and the maximal adsorption capacity was found to be 1,428.57 mg vanadium/g melamine, and the Freundlich model showed the adsorption is privilege type.

  9. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, I.; Aluyor, E.; Audu, T.

    2015-03-01

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R2), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  10. Kinetic modelling for zinc (II) ions biosorption onto Luffa cylindrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oboh, I., E-mail: innocentoboh@uniuyo.edu.ng [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Uyo, Uyo (Nigeria); Aluyor, E.; Audu, T. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Uyo, BeninCity, BeninCity (Nigeria)

    2015-03-30

    The biosorption of Zinc (II) ions onto a biomaterial - Luffa cylindrica has been studied. This biomaterial was characterized by elemental analysis, surface area, pore size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and the biomaterial before and after sorption, was characterized by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectrometer. The kinetic nonlinear models fitted were Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and Intra-particle diffusion. A comparison of non-linear regression method in selecting the kinetic model was made. Four error functions, namely coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}), hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID), average relative error (ARE), and sum of the errors squared (ERRSQ), were used to predict the parameters of the kinetic models. The strength of this study is that a biomaterial with wide distribution particularly in the tropical world and which occurs as waste material could be put into effective utilization as a biosorbent to address a crucial environmental problem.

  11. Kinetics and isotherm studies of Cd(II) adsorption from aqueous solution utilizing seeds of bottlebrush plant ( Callistemon chisholmii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Rifaqat Ali Khan; Kashifuddin, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Seeds of bottlebrush, a novel plant material, were found to exhibit excellent adsorption capacity over a wide range of Cd(II) concentration. It was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy to support the adsorption of Cd(II) ions. Effect of various parameters like pH, contact time, initial concentration and different electrolytes was investigated using batch process to optimize conditions for maximum adsorption. The adsorbent data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Redushkeuich isotherm equations at 30°, 40° and 50 °C. Thermodynamic parameters such as standard enthalpy change (Δ H°), free energy change (Δ G°) and entropy change (Δ S°) were also evaluated and the results indicated that adsorption of Cd(II) are spontaneous and endothermic. Various kinetics models including the Pseudo-first-order kinetics, Pseudo-second-order kinetics and Intraparticle diffusion models have been applied to the experimental data to predict the adsorption kinetics. Kinetic study was carried out by varying initial concentration of Cd(II) at constant temperature and it was found that pseudo-second-order rate equation was better obeyed than pseudo-first-order equation supporting that chemisorption process was involved.

  12. Second-order polarization-mode dispersion in photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard; Peterson, A

    2003-01-01

    We report the first experimental measurements of second-order polarization-mode dispersion in two successive 900 meter pulls of a silica photonic crystal fiber.......We report the first experimental measurements of second-order polarization-mode dispersion in two successive 900 meter pulls of a silica photonic crystal fiber....

  13. Combined First and Second Order Total Variation Inpainting using Split Bregman

    KAUST Repository

    Papafitsoros, Konstantinos

    2013-07-12

    In this article we discuss the implementation of the combined first and second order total variation inpainting that was introduced by Papafitsoros and Schdönlieb. We describe the algorithm we use (split Bregman) in detail, and we give some examples that indicate the difference between pure first and pure second order total variation inpainting.

  14. Optimization of an intracavity Q-switched solid-state second order Raman laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiong; Fu, Xihong; Peng, Hangyu; Zhang, Jun; Qin, Li; Ning, Yongqiang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the model of an intracavity Q-switched second order Raman laser is established, the characteristics of the output 2nd Stokes are simulated. The dynamic balance mechanism among intracavity conversion rates of stimulated emission, first order Raman and second order Raman is obtained. Finally, optimization solutions for increasing output 2nd Stokes pulse energy are proposed.

  15. Neural Processing of Second-Order Motion in the Suprasylvian Cortex of the Cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussières, L; Casanova, C

    2017-02-01

    Neuronal responses to second-order motion, that is, to spatiotemporal variations of texture or contrast, have been reported in several cortical areas of mammals, including the middle-temporal (MT) area in primates. In this study, we investigated whether second-order responses are present in the cat posteromedial lateral suprasylvian (PMLS) cortex, a possible homolog of the primate area MT. The stimuli used were luminance-based sine-wave gratings (first-order) and contrast-modulated carrier stimuli (second-order), which consisted of a high-spatial-frequency static grating (carrier) whose contrast was modulated by a low-spatial-frequency drifting grating (envelope). Results indicate that most PMLS neurons responded to second-order motion and for the vast majority of cells, first- and second-order preferred directions were conserved. However, responses to second-order stimuli were significantly reduced when compared to those evoked by first-order gratings. Circular variance was increased for second-order stimuli, indicating that PMLS direction selectivity was weaker for this type of stimulus. Finally, carrier orientation selectivity was either absent or very broad and had no influence on the envelope's orientation selectivity. In conclusion, our data show that PMLS neurons exhibit similar first- and second-order response profiles and that, akin primate area MT cells, they perform a form-cue invariant analysis of motion signals. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Having a Second-Order Mind while Doing First-Order Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, George M.

    1992-01-01

    Contends that overemphasis in literature on distinguishing first- and second-order therapeutic perspectives has produced schism within field of family therapy. Attempts to bridge that schism, using view of language that informs dialectical psychology to construct both-order, and framing of first- and second-order, perspectives. Such framing…

  17. Explanation of Second-Order Asymptotic Theory Via Information Spectrum Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Masahito

    We explain second-order asymptotic theory via the information spectrum method. From a unified viewpoint based on the generality of the information spectrum method, we consider second-order asymptotic theory for use in fixed-length data compression, uniform random number generation, and channel coding. Additionally, we discuss its application to quantum cryptography, folklore in source coding, and security analysis.

  18. Poly(3-alkylthiophene)s show unexpected second-order nonlinear optical response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, S; Vandendriessche, S; Cornelis, D; Monnaie, F; Koeckelberghs, G; Asselberghs, I; Verbiest, T; van der Veen, M A

    2014-03-14

    Regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)s with chain lengths varying from 5 to 100 monomers are synthesized. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)s show in solution an unexpectedly significant second-order nonlinear optical response. The increase in transition dipole moment upon oligomerisation causes the significant second-order nonlinear optical response.

  19. A comparison of second order derivative based models for time domain reflectometry wave form analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adaptive waveform interpretation with Gaussian filtering (AWIGF) and second order bounded mean oscillation operator Z square 2(u,t,r) are TDR analysis methods based on second order differentiation. AWIGF was originally designed for relatively long probe (greater than 150 mm) TDR waveforms, while Z s...

  20. Conditional Second Order Short-crested Water Waves Applied to Extreme Wave Episodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2005-01-01

    A derivation of the mean second order short-crested wave pattern and associated wave kinematics, conditional on a given magnitude of the wave crest, is presented. The analysis is based on the second order Sharma and Dean finite water wave theory. A comparison with a measured extreme wave profile...

  1. Combined First and Second Order Total Variation Inpainting using Split Bregman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Papafitsoros

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this article we discuss the implementation of the combined first and second order total variation inpainting that was introduced by Papafitsoros and Schdönlieb. We describe the algorithm we use (split Bregman in detail, and we give some examples that indicate the difference between pure first and pure second order total variation inpainting.

  2. Assessing Stability and Change in a Second-Order Confirmatory Factor Model of Meaning in Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Neal; Hayward, R David

    2014-04-01

    Research indicates that meaning in life is an important correlate of health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about the way a sense of meaning may change over time. The purpose of this study is to explore two ways of assessing change in meaning within a second-order confirmatory factor analysis framework. First, tests are conducted to see if the first and second-order factor loadings and measurement error terms are invariant over time. Second, a largely overlooked technique is used to assess change and stability in meaning at the second-order level. Findings from a nationwide survey reveal that the first and second-order factor loadings are invariant of time. Moreover, the second-order measurement error terms, but not the first-order measurement error terms, are invariant, as well. The results further reveal that standard ways of assessing stability mask significant change in meaning that is due largely to regression to the mean.

  3. Loads on a 3D body due to second order waves and a current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skourup, Jesper; Cheung, K. F.; Bingham, Harry B.

    2000-01-01

    are expanded about the still-water level by Taylor series so that the solution is evaluated on a time-invariant geometry. A formulation correct to second order in the wave steepness and to first order in the current speed is used. Numerical results are obtained for the first-order and the second-order...... oscillatory forces and for the second-order mean force on a fixed vertical circular cylinder in waves and a current. The second-order oscillatory forces on the body in waves and current are new results, while the remaining force components are verified by comparison with established numerical and analytical...... models. It is shown that the current can have a significant influence on the forces, and especially on the amplitude of the second-order oscillatory component....

  4. The effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayati, I.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the second-order hydrodynamic effects on a semisubmersible floating offshore wind turbine. Second-order hydrodynamics induce loads and motions at the sum- and difference-frequencies of the incident waves. These effects have often been ignored in offshore wind analysis, under the assumption that they are significantly smaller than first-order effects. The sum- and difference-frequency loads can, however, excite eigenfrequencies of a floating system, leading to large oscillations that strain the mooring system or vibrations that cause fatigue damage to the structure. Observations of supposed second-order responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands (MARIN) offshore basin suggest that these effects might be more important than originally expected. These observations inspired interest in investigating how second-order excitation affects floating offshore wind turbines and whether second-order hydrodynamics should be included in offshore wind simulation tools like FAST. In this work, the effects of second-order hydrodynamics on a floating semisubmersible offshore wind turbine are investigated. Because FAST is currently unable to account for second-order effects, a method to assess these effects was applied in which linearized properties of the floating wind system derived from FAST (including the 6x6 mass and stiffness matrices) are used by WAMIT to solve the first- and second-order hydrodynamics problems in the frequency domain. The method was applied to the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation OC4-DeepCwind semisubmersible platform, supporting the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's 5-MW baseline wind turbine. In this paper, the loads and response of the system caused by the second-order hydrodynamics are analysed and compared to the first-order hydrodynamic loads and induced motions in the frequency domain. Further, the second-order loads

  5. First- and second-order metal-insulator phase transitions and topological aspects of a Hubbard-Rashba system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelino, Edgar

    2017-05-01

    This paper considers a model consisting of a kinetic term, Rashba spin-orbit coupling and short-range Coulomb interaction at zero temperature. The Coulomb interaction is decoupled by a mean-field approximation in the spin channel using field theory methods. The results feature a first-order phase transition for any finite value of the chemical potential and quantum criticality for vanishing chemical potential. The Hall conductivity is also computed using the Kubo formula in a mean-field effective Hamiltonian. In the limit of infinite mass the kinetic term vanishes and all the phase transitions are of second order; in this case the spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism adds a ferromagnetic metallic phase to the system and features a zero-temperature quantization of the Hall conductivity in the insulating one.

  6. ZnS:Cu nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as novel adsorbent for kinetic, thermodynamic and isotherm studies of Reactive Orange 12 and Direct yellow 12 adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Mehrorang; Ansari, Amin; Sahraei, Reza

    2013-10-01

    The objective of this work is the study of adsorption of Reactive Orange 12 (RO-12) and Direct yellow 12 (DY 12) by zinc sulfide:copper (ZnS-Cu-NP-AC) nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon. This new material with high efficiency in a routine manner was synthesized in our laboratory and its surface properties viz surface area, pore volume and functional groups was characterized with different techniques such FT-IR, SEM, and BET analysis. Generally, in batch adsorption procedure variables including amount of adsorbent, initial dyes concentration, contact time, temperature on dyes removal percentage has great effect on removal percentage that their influence was optimized. The kinetic of proposed adsorption processes efficiently followed, pseudo-second-order, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models. The equilibrium data the removal strongly follow Langmuir monolayer adsorption with high adsorption capacity in short time. This novel adsorbent by small amount (0.08 g) really is applicable for removal of high amount of both dyes (RO 12 and DY 12) in short time (model such as pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intra-particle diffusion was assessed and it was found that the removal processes follow pseudo second order kinetics and interparticle diffusion mechanism.

  7. Form and motion processing of second-order stimuli in color vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Suarez, Luis; Mullen, Kathy T

    2013-06-13

    We investigate whether there are second-order form and motion mechanisms in human color vision. Second-order stimuli are contrast modulations of a noise carrier. The contrast envelopes are static Gabors of different spatial frequencies (0.125-1 cycles/°) or drifting Gabors of different temporal frequencies (0.25 cycles/°, 0.5-4 Hz). Stimuli are isoluminant red-green or achromatic. Second-order form processing is measured using a simultaneous 2IFC (two-interval forced-choice) detection and orientation identification task, and direction identification is used for second-order motion processing. We find that for simple detection thresholds, chromatic performance is as good or better than achromatic performance, whereas for both motion and form tasks, chromatic performance is poorer than achromatic. Chromatic second-order form perception is very poor across all spatial and temporal frequencies measured and has a lowpass contrast modulation sensitivity function with a spatial cutoff of 1 cycle/° and temporal cutoff of 4 Hz. Chromatic second-order motion sensitivity is even poorer than for form and typically is limited to 1-2 Hz. To determine whether this residual motion processing might be based on feature tracking, we used the pedestal paradigm of Lu and Sperling (1995). We find that adding a static pedestal of the same spatial frequency as the drifting Gabor envelope, with its contrast set to 1-2 times its detection threshold, impairs motion direction performance for the chromatic stimuli but not the achromatic. This suggests that the motion of second-order chromatic stimuli is not processed by a second-order system but by a third-order, feature-tracking system, although a genuine second-order motion system exists for achromatic stimuli.

  8. Second-order optimality conditions for nonlinear programs and mathematical programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daidai, Ikram

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that second-order information is a basic tool notably in optimality conditions and numerical algorithms. In this work, we present a generalization of optimality conditions to strongly convex functions of order γ with the help of first- and second-order approximations derived from (Optimization 40(3):229-246, 2011) and we study their characterization. Further, we give an example of such a function that arises quite naturally in nonlinear analysis and optimization. An extension of Newton's method is also given and proved to solve Euler equation with second-order approximation data.

  9. Second-order optimality conditions for nonlinear programs and mathematical programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikram Daidai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is well known that second-order information is a basic tool notably in optimality conditions and numerical algorithms. In this work, we present a generalization of optimality conditions to strongly convex functions of order γ with the help of first- and second-order approximations derived from (Optimization 40(3:229-246, 2011 and we study their characterization. Further, we give an example of such a function that arises quite naturally in nonlinear analysis and optimization. An extension of Newton’s method is also given and proved to solve Euler equation with second-order approximation data.

  10. On the Linearization of Second-Order Differential and Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Dorodnitsyn

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This article complements recent results of the papers [J. Math. Phys. 41 (2000, 480; 45 (2004, 336] on the symmetry classification of second-order ordinary difference equations and meshes, as well as the Lagrangian formalism and Noether-type integration technique. It turned out that there exist nonlinear superposition principles for solutions of special second-order ordinary difference equations which possess Lie group symmetries. This superposition springs from the linearization of second-order ordinary difference equations by means of non-point transformations which act simultaneously on equations and meshes. These transformations become some sort of contact transformations in the continuous limit.

  11. Linear Matrix Inequalities for Analysis and Control of Linear Vector Second-Order Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegas, Fabiano Daher; Stoustrup, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    the Lyapunov matrix and the system matrices by introducing matrix multipliers, which potentially reduce conservativeness in hard control problems. Multipliers facilitate the usage of parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions as certificates of stability of uncertain and time-varying vector second-order systems......SUMMARY Many dynamical systems are modeled as vector second-order differential equations. This paper presents analysis and synthesis conditions in terms of LMI with explicit dependence in the coefficient matrices of vector second-order systems. These conditions benefit from the separation between...

  12. Chromium Biosorption from Cr(VI) Aqueous Solutions by Cupressus lusitanica Bark: Kinetics, Equilibrium and Thermodynamic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Alma Rosa Netzahuatl-Muñoz; María del Carmen Cristiani-Urbina; Eliseo Cristiani-Urbina

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of chromium (Cr) ion biosorption from Cr(VI) aqueous solutions by Cupressus lusitanica bark (CLB). CLB total Cr biosorption capacity strongly depended on operating variables such as initial Cr(VI) concentration and contact time: as these variables rose, total Cr biosorption capacity increased significantly. Total Cr biosorption rate also increased with rising solution temperature. The pseudo-second-order model describ...

  13. Second order analysis of two-stage rank tests for the one-sample problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim

    1991-01-01

    In this paper we present a rank analogue to Stein's two-stage procedure. We analyze its behavior to second order using existing asymptotic expansions for fixed sample size rank tests and recent results on combinations of independent rank statistics.

  14. Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Nonlinear Functional Dynamic Equations with Damping on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Tuğla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study oscillatory behavior of second-order dynamic equations with damping under some assumptions on time scales. New theorems extend and improve the results in the literature. Illustrative examples are given.

  15. Second-Order Feed-Forward Renderingfor Specular and Glossy Reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Xie, Naiwen; Ke, Wei; Popescu, Voicu

    2014-09-01

    The feed-forward pipeline based on projection followed by rasterization handles the rays that leave the eye efficiently: these first-order rays are modeled with a simple camera that projects geometry to screen. Second-order rays however, as, for example, those resulting from specular reflections, are challenging for the feed-forward approach. We propose an extension of the feed-forward pipeline to handle second-order rays resulting from specular and glossy reflections. The coherence of second-order rays is leveraged through clustering, the geometry reflected by a cluster is approximated with a depth image, and the color samples captured by the second-order rays of a cluster are computed by intersection with the depth image. We achieve quality specular and glossy reflections at interactive rates in fully dynamic scenes.

  16. Existence of infinitely many periodic solutions for second-order nonautonomous Hamiltonian systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Guan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available By using minimax methods and critical point theory, we obtain infinitely many periodic solutions for a second-order nonautonomous Hamiltonian systems, when the gradient of potential energy does not exceed linear growth.

  17. Antiperiodic Boundary Value Problems for Second-Order Impulsive Ordinary Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider a second-order ordinary differential equation with antiperiodic boundary conditions and impulses. By using Schaefer's fixed-point theorem, some existence results are obtained.

  18. Health Parameter Estimation with Second-Order Sliding Mode Observer for a Turbofan Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiaodong Chang; Jinquan Huang; Feng Lu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the problem of health parameter estimation in an aero-engine is investigated by using an unknown input observer-based methodology, implemented by a second-order sliding mode observer (SOSMO...

  19. Second-order nonlinear optical properties of the four tetranitrotetrapropoxycalix[4]arene conformers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenis, Paul J.A.; Kenis, P.J.A.; Noordman, Oscar F.J.; Noordman, O.F.J.; Houbrechts, Stephan; van Hummel, G.J.; Harkema, Sybolt; van Veggel, F.C.J.M.; Clays, Koen; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Persoons, Andre; van Hulst, N.F.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports a systematic experimental and theoretical study of the second-order nonlinear optical properties of multichromophoric molecules that range from dipolar symmetry to three-dimensional octupolar symmetry. The four possible conformers of tetranitrotetrapropoxycalix[4]arene (cone,

  20. Homoclinic orbits at infinity for second-order Hamiltonian systems with fixed energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Lun Wu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We obtain the existence of homoclinic orbits at infinity for a class of second-order Hamiltonian systems with fixed energy. We use the limit for a sequence of approximate solutions which are obtained by variational methods.

  1. Comparison of Second-Order Loads on a Tension-Leg Platform for Wind Turbines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueydon, S.; Wuillaume, P.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Platt, A.

    2015-03-01

    The first objective of this work is to compare the two floating offshore wind turbine simulation packages {DIFFRAC+aNySIM} and {WAMIT+FAST}. The focus is on second-order wave loads, and so first- and second-order wave loads are applied to a structure sequentially for a detailed comparison and a more precise analysis of the effects of the second-order loads. aNySIM does not have the capability to model flexible bodies, and so the simulations performed in this tool are done assuming a rigid body. FAST also assumes that the platform is rigid, but can account for the flexibility of the tower. The second objective is to study the effects of the second-order loads on the response of a TLP floating wind turbine. The flexibility of the tower must be considered for this investigation, and therefore only FAST is used.

  2. Initial boundary value problems for second order parabolic systems in cylinders with polyhedral base

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luong, Vu Trong; Loi, Do Van

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to establish the well posedness and the regularity of the solution of the initial boundary value problem with Dirichlet boundary conditions for second-order parabolic...

  3. Second order conservative languages with a Maltsev polymorphism also have a majority polymorphism

    OpenAIRE

    Vodolazskiy, Evgeniy

    2017-01-01

    The paper proves that for any second order conservative constraint language with a Maltsev polymorphism there is a majority polymorphism. Moreover, the majority polymorphism can be defined by the Maltsev polymorphism.

  4. Effects of ventral striatal lesions on first- and second-order appetitive conditioning

    OpenAIRE

    McDannald, Michael A.; Setlow, Barry; Holland, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    Rats with bilateral lesions of the ventral striatal nucleus accumbens failed to acquire Pavlovian second-order conditioning to auditory stimuli paired with visual stimuli that had previously received first-order pairings with food. This deficit in second-order conditioning was specific to learning driven by incentive properties of the first-order cues, and was observed whether the first-order training had occurred prior to or after lesion surgery. Lesions also produced deficits in the display...

  5. A second order model of noise in saturated semiconductor optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Tromborg, Bjarne; Mørk, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a second order model of spontaneous emission noise in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). The resulting noise distributions agree well with statistical simulations and explain the measured redistribution of noise in saturated SOAs.......We have developed a second order model of spontaneous emission noise in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs). The resulting noise distributions agree well with statistical simulations and explain the measured redistribution of noise in saturated SOAs....

  6. Second-order Lagrangian description of tri-dimensional gravity wave interactions

    OpenAIRE

    NOUGUIER, Frederic; Chapron, Bertrand; GUERIN, Charles-Antoine

    2015-01-01

    We revisit and supplement the description of gravity waves based on perturbation expansions in Lagrangian coordinates. A general analytical framework is developed to derive a second-order Lagrangian solution to the motion of arbitrary surface gravity wave fields in a compact and vectorial form. The result is shown to be consistent with the classical second-order Eulerian expansion by Longuet-Higgins (J. Fluid Mech., vol. 17, 1963, pp. 459-480) and is used to improve the original derivation by...

  7. An alternative assessment of second-order closure models in turbulent shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speziale, Charles G.; Gatski, Thomas B.

    1994-01-01

    The performance of three recently proposed second-order closure models is tested in benchmark turbulent shear flows. Both homogeneous shear flow and the log-layer of an equilibrium turbulent boundary layer are considered for this purpose. An objective analysis of the results leads to an assessment of these models that stands in contrast to that recently published by other authors. A variety of pitfalls in the formulation and testing of second-order closure models are uncovered by this analysis.

  8. A New Grünwald-Letnikov Derivative Derived from a Second-Order Scheme

    OpenAIRE

    B. A. Jacobs

    2015-01-01

    A novel derivation of a second-order accurate Grünwald-Letnikov-type approximation to the fractional derivative of a function is presented. This scheme is shown to be second-order accurate under certain modifications to account for poor accuracy in approximating the asymptotic behavior near the lower limit of differentiation. Some example functions are chosen and numerical results are presented to illustrate the efficacy of this new method over some other popular choices ...

  9. Oscillation Theorems for Second-Order Half-Linear Advanced Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuhong Tang

    2011-01-01

    (((Δ(Δ+(((=0 on an arbitrary time scale with sup =∞, where (≥ and ∫∞(Δ/(1/(<∞. Some sufficient conditions for oscillation of the studied equation are established. Our results not only improve and complement those results in the literature but also unify the oscillation of the second-order half-linear advanced differential equation and the second-order half-linear advanced difference equation. Three examples are included to illustrate the main results.

  10. Stability analysis for neutral stochastic differential equation of second order driven by Poisson jumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Alka; Bora, Swaroop Nandan

    2017-11-01

    This paper studies the existence, uniqueness, and exponential stability in mean square for the mild solution of neutral second order stochastic partial differential equations with infinite delay and Poisson jumps. By utilizing the Banach fixed point theorem, first the existence and uniqueness of the mild solution of neutral second order stochastic differential equations is established. Then, the mean square exponential stability for the mild solution of the stochastic system with Poisson jumps is obtained with the help of an established integral inequality.

  11. Second-order Dirac equation of graphene electrons in an electromagnetic field and their novel spin

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Ji

    2013-01-01

    The second-order Dirac equation (DE) and its velocity operator of graphene electrons in an electromagnetic field are obtained according to tight-binding k.p method. With extra terms included, they demonstrate the motion of graphene electrons more completely through a more complete Ehrenfest theorem and present finer properties of graphene electrons. Eigen-energy given by the second-order DE for field-free graphene indicates that extra terms may affect the trembling motion of graphene electron...

  12. Visual deficits in amblyopia constrain normal models of second-order motion processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmers, A J; Ledgeway, T; Hutchinson, C V; Knox, P J

    2011-09-15

    It is well established that amblyopes exhibit deficits in processing first-order (luminance-defined) patterns. This is readily manifest by measuring spatiotemporal sensitivity (i.e. the "window of visibility") to moving luminance gratings. However the window of visibility to moving second-order (texture-defined) patterns has not been systematically studied in amblyopia. To address this issue monocular modulation sensitivity (1/threshold) to first-order motion and four different varieties of second-order motion (modulations of either the contrast, flicker, size or orientation of visual noise) was measured over a five-octave range of spatial and temporal frequencies. Compared to normals amblyopes are not only impaired in the processing of first-order motion, but overall they exhibit both higher thresholds and a much narrower window of visibility to second-order images. However amblyopia can differentially impair the perception of some types of second-order motion much more than others and crucially the precise pattern of deficits varies markedly between individuals (even for those with the same conventional visual acuity measures). For the most severely impaired amblyopes certain second-order (texture) cues to movement in the environment are effectively invisible. These results place important constraints on the possible architecture of models of second-order motion perception in human vision. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The Photocatalytic Kinetics of the Methyl Orange Degradation in the Aqueous Suspension of Irradiated TiO2

    OpenAIRE

    Mazyar Peyda; Nahid Nabavi; Gholam Reza Sadeghi

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the present study, the photocatalytic (TiO2/UV) batch process has been used for the methyl orange (MO) degradation. Methods: In the catalyst range from 0.25 to 1.5 g/L, the optimum concentration of TiO2 was found to be 0.5 g/L. The kinetic behavior of MO degradation has been evaluated using the non-linear form of pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order models. Results: The goodness of the fit was evaluated using the correlation coefficient R2 value and the mean square ...

  14. Theory of relaxation phenomena in a spin-3/2 Ising system near the second-order phase transition temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keskin, Mustafa [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)]. E-mail: keskin@erciyes.edu.tr; Canko, Osman [Department of Physics, Erciyes University, 38039 Kayseri (Turkey)

    2005-12-19

    The relaxation behavior of the spin-3/2 Ising model Hamiltonian with bilinear and biquadratic interactions near the second-order phase transition temperature or critical temperature is studied by means of the Onsager's theory of irreversible thermodynamics or the Onsager reciprocity theorem (ORT). First, we give the equilibrium case briefly within the molecular-field approximation in order to study the relaxation behavior by using the ORT. Then, the ORT is applied to the model and the kinetic equations are obtained. By solving these equations, three relaxation times are calculated and examined for temperatures near the second-order phase transition temperature. It is found that one of the relaxation times goes to infinity near the critical temperature on either side, the second relaxation time makes a cusp at the critical temperature and third one behaves very differently in which it terminates at the critical temperature while approaching it, then showing a 'flatness' property and then decreases. We also study the influences of the Onsager rate coefficients on the relaxation times. The behavior of these relaxation times is discussed and compared with the spin-1/2 and spin-1 Ising systems.

  15. Theory of relaxation phenomena in a spin-3/2 Ising system near the second-order phase transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Mustafa; Canko, Osman

    2005-12-01

    The relaxation behavior of the spin-3/2 Ising model Hamiltonian with bilinear and biquadratic interactions near the second-order phase transition temperature or critical temperature is studied by means of the Onsager's theory of irreversible thermodynamics or the Onsager reciprocity theorem (ORT). First, we give the equilibrium case briefly within the molecular-field approximation in order to study the relaxation behavior by using the ORT. Then, the ORT is applied to the model and the kinetic equations are obtained. By solving these equations, three relaxation times are calculated and examined for temperatures near the second-order phase transition temperature. It is found that one of the relaxation times goes to infinity near the critical temperature on either side, the second relaxation time makes a cusp at the critical temperature and third one behaves very differently in which it terminates at the critical temperature while approaching it, then showing a “flatness” property and then decreases. We also study the influences of the Onsager rate coefficients on the relaxation times. The behavior of these relaxation times is discussed and compared with the spin-1/2 and spin-1 Ising systems.

  16. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of cadmium adsorption from aqueous solution onto rice husk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Senthil Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption behavior of rice husk for cadmium ions from aqueous solutions has been investigated as a function of appropriate equilibrium time, adsorbent dose, temperature, adsorbate concentrations and pH in a batch system. Studies showed that the pH of aqueous solutions affected cadmium removal with the result that removal efficiency increased with increasing solution pH. The maximum adsorption was 98.65% at solution pH 6, contact time 60 min and initial concentration of 25 mg/L. The experimental data were analysed by the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin models of adsorption. The characteristic parameters for each isotherm and related correlation coefficients have been determined.  Thermodynamic parameters such as,  and have also been evaluated and it has been found that the sorption process was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. The kinetics of the sorption were analysed using the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. Kinetic parameters, rate constants, equilibrium sorption capacities and related correlation coefficients for each kinetic model were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of cadmium could be described by the pseudo-second order equation, suggesting that the adsorption process is presumably a chemisorption. The rice husk investigated in this study showed good potential for the removal of cadmium from aqueous solutions. The goal for this work is to develop inexpensive, highly available, effective metal ion adsorbents from natural waste as alternative to existing commercial adsorbents.

  17. Development of adsorbent from Teflon waste by radiation induced grafting: equilibrium and kinetic adsorption of dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, N K; Kumar, Virendra; Pahan, S; Bhardwaj, Y K; Sabharwal, S

    2011-10-15

    Mutual radiation grafting technique was employed to graft polyacrylic acid (PAA) onto Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) scrap using high energy gamma radiation. Polyacrylic acid-g-Teflon (PAA-g-Teflon) adsorbent was characterized by grafting extent measurement, FTIR spectroscopy, SEM and wet ability & surface energy analysis. The PAA-g-Teflon adsorbent was studied for dye adsorption from aqueous solution of basic dyes, namely, Basic red 29 (BR29) and Basic yellow 11 (BY11). The equilibrium adsorption data were analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models, whereas, adsorption kinetics was analyzed using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models. Equilibrium adsorption of BR29 was better explained by Langmuir adsorption model, while that of BY11 by Freundlich adsorption model. The adsorption capacity for BY11 was more than for BR29. Separation factor (R(L)) was found to be in the range 0 0.99) and better agreement between the q(e,cal) and q(e,exp) values suggested that pseudo-second order kinetic model better represents the kinetic adsorption data. The non-linearity obtained for intra-particle diffusion plot indicated, more than one process is involved in the adsorption of basic dyes. The desorption studies showed that ~95% of the adsorbed dye could be eluted in suitable eluent. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies on the Phosphate Adsorption Removal by Dolomite Mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of dolomite to remove phosphate from aqueous solutions was investigated. The experimental results showed that the removal of phosphate by dolomite was rapid (the removal rate over 95% in 60 min when the initial phosphate concentration is at the range of 10–50 mg/L. Several kinetic models including intraparticle diffusion model, pseudo-first-order model, Elovich model, and pseudo-second-order model were employed to evaluate the kinetics data of phosphate adsorption onto dolomite and pseudo-second-order model was recommended to describe the adsorption kinetics characteristics. Further analysis of the adsorption kinetics indicated that the phosphate removal process was mainly controlled by chemical bonding or chemisorption. Moreover, both Freundlich and Langmuir adsorption isotherms were used to evaluate the experimental data. The results indicated that Langmuir isotherm was more suitable to describe the adsorption characteristics of dolomite. Maximum adsorption capacity of phosphate by dolomite was found to be 4.76 mg phosphorous/g dolomite. Thermodynamic studies showed that phosphate adsorption was exothermic. The study implies that dolomite is an excellent low cost material for phosphate removal in wastewater treatment process.

  19. Biosorption kinetics of Cd (II, Cr (III and Pb (II in aqueous solutions by olive stone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Calero

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A by-product from olive oil production, olive stone, was investigated for the removal of Cd (II, Cr (III and Pb (II from aqueous solutions. The kinetics of biosorption are studied, analyzing the effect of the initial concentration of metal and temperature. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and intraparticle diffusion models have been used to represent the kinetics of the process and obtain the main kinetic parameters. The results show that the pseudo-second order model is the one that best describes the biosorption of the three metal ions for all the range of experimental conditions investigated. For the three metal ions, the maximum biosoption capacity and the initial biosorption rate increase when the initial metal concentration rises. However, the kinetic constant decreases when the initial metal concentration increases. The temperature effect on biosorption capacity for Cd (II and Cr (III is less significant; however, for Pb (II the effect of temperature is more important, especially when temperature rises from 25 to 40ºC. The biosorption capacity at mmol/g of olive stone changes in the following order: Cr>Cd>Pb. Thus, for an initial concentration of 220 mg/ℓ, a maximum sorption capacity of 0.079 mmol/g for Cr (III, 0.065 mmol/g for Cd (II and 0.028 mmol/g for Pb (II has been obtained.

  20. Equilibrium, hysteresis and kinetics of cadmium desorption from sodium-feldspar using rhamnolipid biosurfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşçi, Yeliz; Açikel, Unsal; Açikel, Yeşim Sağ

    2012-09-01

    In this study, the sorption/desorption equilibruim and the desorption kinetics of Cd by rhamnolipid biosurfactant from Na-feldspar as a soil component were investigated. The linear, Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms adequately fitted the equilibrium sorption data with regression coefficients ranging from 0.9836 - 0.9879. However, both the sorption/desorption equilibria were well characterized by the Freundlich model. The extent of hysteresis was quantified based on the differences obtained from sorption and desorption isotherms regarding the quantity of Cd(II) sorbed, the Freundlich exponent, concentration-dependent metal distribution coefficients, and the irreversibility index based on the metal distribution coefficient. The kinetics of desorption of Cd from Na-feldspar was investigated using 77 mM rhamnolipid and at pH 6.8. The first-order, an empirical first-order desorption model (two-coefficient), Lagergren-pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich and modified Freundlich models were used to describe the kinetic data to estimate the rate constants. To determine the rate-controlling step, the intra-particle diffusion model was also applied to the desorption process. The desorption kinetics of Cd(II) on Na-feldspar was represented better by the pseudo-second-order, Elovich and modified Freundlich equations with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9941- 0.9982 than by first-order equations. The rate-controlling stage was suggested to be mainly the surface reaction mechanism.

  1. Biosorption of lead contaminated wastewater using cattails (Typha angustifolia leaves: kinetic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YEN LING SHARAIN-LIEW

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, dried leaves of Typha angustifolia (TA, also known as the common cattail, were used as an adsorbent in kinetic studies of Pb(II adsorption from synthetic aqueous solutions. Batch adsorption studies with dried TA leaves were conducted and they were able to adsorb Pb(II from 100 mL of a 25 mg L-1 Pb(II solution effectively with the optimized dosage of 0.6 g. Adsorption equilibrium was achieved within 8 h with an effective removal of 86.04 %. Adsorption kinetics was further evaluated using four kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich model. Fitting of the data was performed based on linear regression analysis. The sorption kinetic data fitted best to the pseudo-second order model with an R2 of 0.9979, followed closely by the Elovich model with an R2 of 0.9952. The obtained results showed the adsorption of Pb(II by TA leaves, which is an abundant biological material, is feasible, cheap and environmentally friendly.

  2. Democratic decisions establish stable authorities that overcome the paradox of second-order punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbe, Christian; Traulsen, Arne; Röhl, Torsten; Milinski, Manfred

    2014-01-14

    Individuals usually punish free riders but refuse to sanction those who cooperate but do not punish. This missing second-order peer punishment is a fundamental problem for the stabilization of cooperation. To solve this problem, most societies today have implemented central authorities that punish free riders and tax evaders alike, such that second-order punishment is fully established. The emergence of such stable authorities from individual decisions, however, creates a new paradox: it seems absurd to expect individuals who do not engage in second-order punishment to strive for an authority that does. Herein, we provide a mathematical model and experimental results from a public goods game where subjects can choose between a community with and without second-order punishment in two different ways. When subjects can migrate continuously to either community, we identify a bias toward institutions that do not punish tax evaders. When subjects have to vote once for all rounds of the game and have to accept the decision of the majority, they prefer a society with second-order punishment. These findings uncover the existence of a democracy premium. The majority-voting rule allows subjects to commit themselves and to implement institutions that eventually lead to a higher welfare for all.

  3. Assessing Stability and Change in a Second-Order Confirmatory Factor Model of Meaning in Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayward, R. David

    2013-01-01

    Research indicates that meaning in life is an important correlate of health and well-being. However, relatively little is known about the way a sense of meaning may change over time. The purpose of this study is to explore two ways of assessing change in meaning within a second-order confirmatory factor analysis framework. First, tests are conducted to see if the first and second-order factor loadings and measurement error terms are invariant over time. Second, a largely overlooked technique is used to assess change and stability in meaning at the second-order level. Findings from a nationwide survey reveal that the first and second-order factor loadings are invariant of time. Moreover, the second-order measurement error terms, but not the first-order measurement error terms, are invariant, as well. The results further reveal that standard ways of assessing stability mask significant change in meaning that is due largely to regression to the mean. PMID:24778574

  4. Equilibrium, kinetics, mechanism, and process design for the sorption of methylene blue onto rice husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadivelan, V; Kumar, K Vasanth

    2005-06-01

    Batch experiments were carried out for the sorption of methylene blue onto rice husk particles. The operating variables studied were initial solution pH, initial dye concentration, adsorbent concentration, and contact time. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherm equations and the equilibrium data were found to be well represented by the Langmuir isotherm equation. The monolayer sorption capacity of rice husks for methylene blue sorption was found to be 40.5833 mg/g at room temperature (32 degrees C). The sorption was analyzed using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models and the sorption kinetics was found to follow a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Also the applicability of pseudo second order in modeling the kinetic data was also discussed. The sorption process was found to be controlled by both surface and pore diffusion with surface diffusion at the earlier stages followed by pore diffusion at the later stages. The average external mass transfer coefficient and intraparticle diffusion coefficient was found to be 0.01133 min(-1) and 0.695358 mg/g min0.5. Analysis of sorption data using a Boyd plot confirms that external mass transfer is the rate limiting step in the sorption process. The effective diffusion coefficient, Di was calculated using the Boyd constant and was found to be 5.05 x 10(-04) cm2/s for an initial dye concentration of 50 mg/L. A single-stage batch-adsorber design of the adsorption of methylene blue onto rice husk has been studied based on the Langmuir isotherm equation.

  5. Equilibrium and kinetics studies for the adsorption of Ni2+ and Fe3+ ions from aqueous solution by graphene oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konicki Wojciech

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adsorption of Ni2+ and Fe3+ metal ions from aqueous solutions onto graphene oxide (GO have been explored. The effects of various experimental factors such as pH of the solution, initial metal ion concentration and temperature were evaluated. The kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies were also investigated. The adsorption rate data were analyzed using the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. Kinetic studies indicate that the adsorption of both ions follows the pseudo-second-order kinetics. The isotherms of adsorption data were analyzed by adsorption isotherm models such as Langmuir and Freundlich. Equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model. The maximum adsorption capacities of Ni2+ and Fe3+ onto GO were 35.6 and 27.3 mg g−1, respectively. In addition, various thermodynamic parameters, such as enthalpy (ΔHO, entropy (ΔSO and Gibbs free energy (ΔGO, were calculated.

  6. Adsorption of anionic azo-dyes from aqueous solutions onto graphene oxide: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konicki, Wojciech; Aleksandrzak, Małgorzata; Moszyński, Dariusz; Mijowska, Ewa

    2017-06-15

    In the present study, graphene oxide (GO) was used for the adsorption of anionic azo-dyes such as Acid Orange 8 (AO8) and Direct Red 23 (DR23) from aqueous solutions. GO was characterized by Fourier Transform-Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and zeta potential measurements. The influence of dye initial concentration, temperature and pH on AO8 and DR23 adsorption onto GO was investigated. Equilibrium data were analyzed by model equations such as Langmuir Freundlich, Temkin, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Redlich-Peterson isotherms and were best represented by Langmuir and Redlich-Peterson isotherm model. Kinetic adsorption data were analyzed using the pseudo-first-order kinetic model, the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the intraparticle diffusion model. The adsorption kinetics well fitted using a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamics parameters, ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°, were calculated, indicating that the adsorption of AO8 and DR23 onto GO was spontaneous process. The adsorption process of AO8 onto GO was exothermic, while the adsorption of DR23 onto GO was endothermic in nature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Elucidation of the naproxen sodium adsorption onto activated carbon prepared from waste apricot: Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Y. [Inonu University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)], E-mail: yonal@inonu.edu.tr; Akmil-Basar, C.; Sarici-Ozdemir, C. [Inonu University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)

    2007-09-30

    In this study, activated carbon (WA11Zn5) was prepared from waste apricot, which is waste in apricot plants in Malatya, by chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2}. BET surface area of activated carbon is determined as 1060 m{sup 2}/g. The ability of WA11Zn5, to remove naproxen sodium from effluent solutions by adsorption has been studied. Equilibrium isotherms for the adsorption of naproxen sodium on activated carbon were measured experimentally. Results were analyzed by the Langmiur, Freundlich equation using linearized correlation coefficient at 298 K. The characteristic parameters for each isotherm have been determined. Langmiur equation is found to best represent the equilibrium data for naproxen sodium-WA11Zn5 systems. The monolayer adsorption capacity of WA11Zn5 for naproxen sodium was found to be 106.38 mg/g at 298 K. The process was favorable and spontaneous. The kinetics of adsorption of naproxen sodium have been discussed using three kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo first-order model, the pseudo second-order model, the intraparticle diffusion model. Kinetic parameters and correlation coefficients were determined. It was shown that the pseudo second-order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption kinetics for naproxen sodium onto WA11Zn5. The thermodynamic parameters, such as {delta}G{sup o}, {delta}S{sup o} and {delta}H{sup o}, were calculated. The thermodynamics of naproxen sodium-WA11Zn5 system indicates endothermic process.

  8. Stabilization and PID tuning algorithms for second-order unstable processes with time-delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seer, Qiu Han; Nandong, Jobrun

    2017-03-01

    Open-loop unstable systems with time-delays are often encountered in process industry, which are often more difficult to control than stable processes. In this paper, the stabilization by PID controller of second-order unstable processes, which can be represented as second-order deadtime with an unstable pole (SODUP) and second-order deadtime with two unstable poles (SODTUP), is performed via the necessary and sufficient criteria of Routh-Hurwitz stability analysis. The stability analysis provides improved understanding on the existence of a stabilizing range of each PID parameter. Three simple PID tuning algorithms are proposed to provide desired closed-loop performance-robustness within the stable regions of controller parameters obtained via the stability analysis. The proposed PID controllers show improved performance over those derived via some existing methods. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Effects of ventral striatal lesions on first- and second-order appetitive conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDannald, Michael A; Setlow, Barry; Holland, Peter C

    2013-08-01

    Rats with bilateral lesions of the ventral striatal nucleus accumbens failed to acquire Pavlovian second-order conditioning to auditory stimuli paired with visual stimuli that had previously received first-order pairings with food. This deficit in second-order conditioning was specific to learning driven by incentive properties of the first-order cues, and was observed whether the first-order training had occurred prior to or after lesion surgery. Lesions also produced deficits in the display of conditioned responses to the first-order conditioned stimulus, but only when they were made after first-order training. These results suggest a specific role for the ventral striatum in acquiring and expressing incentive properties of conditioned stimuli through second-order conditioning, as well as a more general role in expressing previously acquired Pavlovian conditioned responses. © 2013 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Low Dimensional Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie Algebras of Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutwig Campoamor-Stursberg

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A direct approach to non-linear second-order ordinary differential equations admitting a superposition principle is developed by means of Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebras of a dimension not exceeding three. This procedure allows us to describe generic types of second-order ordinary differential equations subjected to some constraints and admitting a given Lie algebra as Vessiot-Guldberg-Lie algebra. In particular, well-known types, such as the Milne-Pinney or Kummer-Schwarz equations, are recovered as special cases of this classification. The analogous problem for systems of second-order differential equations in the real plane is considered for a special case that enlarges the generalized Ermakov systems.

  11. Second-Order Temporal Interference with Thermal Light: Interference beyond the Coherence Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihn, Yong Sup; Kim, Yosep; Tamma, Vincenzo; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2017-12-01

    We report the observation of a counterintuitive phenomenon in multipath correlation interferometry with thermal light. The intensity correlation between the outputs of two unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometers (UMZIs) with two classically correlated beams of thermal light at the input exhibits genuine second-order interference with the visibility of 1 /3 . Surprisingly, the second-order interference does not degrade at all no matter how much the path length difference in each UMZI is increased beyond the coherence length of the thermal light. Moreover, the second-order interference is dependent on the difference of the UMZI phases. These results differ substantially from those of the entangled-photon Franson interferometer, which exhibits two-photon interference dependent on the sum of the UMZI phases and the interference vanishes as the path length difference in each UMZI exceeds the coherence length of the pump laser. Our work offers deeper insight into the interplay between interference and coherence in multiphoton interferometry.

  12. Constructing set-valued fundamental diagrams from jamiton solutions in second order traffic models

    KAUST Repository

    Seibold, Benjamin

    2013-09-01

    Fundamental diagrams of vehicular traiic ow are generally multivalued in the congested ow regime. We show that such set-valued fundamental diagrams can be constructed systematically from simple second order macroscopic traiic models, such as the classical Payne-Whitham model or the inhomogeneous Aw-Rascle-Zhang model. These second order models possess nonlinear traveling wave solutions, called jamitons, and the multi-valued parts in the fundamental diagram correspond precisely to jamiton-dominated solutions. This study shows that transitions from function-valued to set-valued parts in a fundamental diagram arise naturally in well-known second order models. As a particular consequence, these models intrinsically reproduce traiic phases. © American Institute of Mathematical Sciences.

  13. Hybrid Second-Order Iterative Algorithm for Orthogonal Projection onto a Parametric Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowu Li

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available To compute the minimum distance between a point and a parametric surface, three well-known first-order algorithms have been proposed by Hartmann (1999, Hoschek, et al. (1993 and Hu, et al. (2000 (hereafter, the First-Order method. In this paper, we prove the method’s first-order convergence and its independence of the initial value. We also give some numerical examples to illustrate its faster convergence than the existing methods. For some special cases where the First-Order method does not converge, we combine it with Newton’s second-order iterative method to present the hybrid second-order algorithm. Our method essentially exploits hybrid iteration, thus it performs very well with a second-order convergence, it is faster than the existing methods and it is independent of the initial value. Some numerical examples confirm our conclusion.

  14. Second-order conditioning of LiCl-induced gaping with flavor and contextual cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sticht, Martin A; Leach, Zoe K; Wilson, James C; Parker, Linda A

    2015-03-01

    Conditioned gaping occurs through a classically conditioned association between a flavor or a context (CS) and an unconditioned stimulus (US) that produces nausea, such as lithium chloride (LiCl; US). Rats display conditioned gaping to a flavor or context previously associated with nausea; thus, our aim was to investigate whether rats acquire second-order conditioning to a flavor experienced in a nausea-paired context. In Experiment 1, rats were assigned to one of three groups, based upon the contingency of the first order pairing (CS1 context and LiCl) and the contingency of the second-order pairing (CS2 saccharin CS1 context) including: Group Paired/Paired (P/P), Group Paired/Unpaired (P/U) and Group Unpaired/Paired (U/P). In the initial context conditioning, rats were injected with LiCl (Paired) or Saline (Unpaired) prior to a 30 min confinement in a distinctive context (CS1). Drug-free second-order conditioning training among Groups P/P and U/P then consisted of a 5 min intraoral infusion of 0.1 % saccharin (CS2) in the context (CS1), while Group P/U received saccharin in the home cage 24 hr prior to the CS1 exposure. Twenty four hr later, the rats were tested for second-order conditioning during a 2 min taste reactivity (TR) test. Saccharin (CS2) elicited gaping in Group P/P, but not Groups P/U or U/P. Experiment 2 revealed that second-order conditioning was produced in rats given 4 or 8 first-order conditioning trials, but not 2 trials. These results demonstrate that an excitatory contextual CS+ has the potential to confer second-order conditioning to a novel flavor in the absence of any direct pairing with LiCl.

  15. First- and Second-Order Methodological Developments from the Coleman Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel R. Lucas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Equality of Educational Opportunity was a watershed for sociological engagement with public policy, yet the questions the project addressed drew attention to several challenging methodological issues. Statistical advances, such as the multilevel model, were important first-order developments from the Coleman Report. Second-order developments, however, may be far less visible but perhaps even more important. Second-order developments of the Coleman Report stem from two sources: (1 social scientists’ reactions to proposed resolutions of the statistical challenges that the report navigated, and (2 Coleman’s own (perhaps implicit theoretical response to criticisms of such works as Equality of Educational Opportunity. Heightened interest in the challenge of identification serves as an example of the former type of second-order effect, whereas “Coleman’s boat” (Coleman 1990—and the social analytics that adopt, among other approaches, simulation strategies of inquiry consistent with Coleman’s typology of causal pathways—serves as an example of the latter. First-order developments take the questions as given and see the challenge as a practical, technical issue; second-order developments explicitly or implicitly reassess the question, treating the challenge as epistemological or social-theoretic. Second-order developments therefore may change the game, upsetting or rejecting routine practice at a fundamental level. I contend that as knowledge of second-order developments and their means of practical implementation in analyses diffuses among social analysts, they will prove of far more value than first-order developments to social understanding, sociology, and social policy.

  16. Accuracy Enhanced Stability and Structure Preserving Model Reduction Technique for Dynamical Systems with Second Order Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    A method for model reduction of dynamical systems with the second order structure is proposed in this paper. The proposed technique preserves the second order structure of the system, and also preserves the stability of the original systems. The method uses the controllability and observability...... gramians within the time interval to build the appropriate Petrov-Galerkin projection for dynamical systems within the time interval of interest. The bound on approximation error is also derived. The numerical results are compared with the counterparts from other techniques. The results confirm...

  17. Observed galaxy number counts on the light cone up to second order: III. Magnification bias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertacca, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    We study up to second order the galaxy number over-density that depends on magnification in redshift space on cosmological scales for a concordance model. The result contains all general relativistic effects up to second order which arise from observations of the past light cone, including all redshift and lensing distortions, contributions from velocities, Sachs-Wolfe, integrated SW, and time-delay terms. We find several new terms and contributions that could be potentially important for an accurate calculation of the bias on estimates of non-Gaussianity and on precision parameter estimates.

  18. Second-order infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabitov, I Kh [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Mechanics and Mathematics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We study infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles. We begin by considering the minimal possible smoothness class C{sup 1} both for surfaces and for deformation fields. Conditions are formulated for a given harmonic of a first-order infinitesimal bending to be extendable into a second order infinitesimal bending. We finish by stating a criterion for nonrigidity of second order for closed surfaces of revolution in the analytic class. We also give the first concrete example of such a nonrigid surface. Bibliography: 15 entries.

  19. Test of the second order asymptotic theory with low degree solar gravity modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, C.T.; Rosenwald, R.D.; Gu, Y.; Hill, H.A

    1988-01-01

    Further testing of first and second order asymptotic theory predictions for solar gravity modes is possible with the work of gu and Hill in which the number of classified low-degree gravity mode multiplets was increased from 31 to 53. In an extension of the work where the properties of 31 multiplets were analyzed in the framework of first order asymptotic theory, a new analysis has been performed using the properties of the 53 classified multiplets. The result of this analysis again shows the inadequacy of first order asymptotic theory for describing the eigenfrequency spectrum and clearly demonstrates the necessity of using second order asymptotic theory. 30 refs.

  20. A New Grünwald-Letnikov Derivative Derived from a Second-Order Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Jacobs

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel derivation of a second-order accurate Grünwald-Letnikov-type approximation to the fractional derivative of a function is presented. This scheme is shown to be second-order accurate under certain modifications to account for poor accuracy in approximating the asymptotic behavior near the lower limit of differentiation. Some example functions are chosen and numerical results are presented to illustrate the efficacy of this new method over some other popular choices for discretizing fractional derivatives.

  1. A Novel Second-Order All-Pass Filter Using Square-Root Domain Blocks

    OpenAIRE

    Surav Yilmaz, S.; Tola, A. T.; Arslanalp, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a new second order all-pass filter is synthesized in the square-root domain by using the state-space method. The proposed second order all-pass filter is constituted by current mirrors, current sources, current-mode square-root circuits and capacitors. The pole frequency of the filter can be tuned electronically by varying the values of the current sources of this circuit. The filter is simulated in PSpice using 0.35um CMOS technology parameters. Quality factor of the circuit i...

  2. Second-order analysis of structured inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Ghorbani, Mohammad

    Statistical methodology for spatio-temporal point processes is in its infancy. We consider second-order analysis based on pair correlation functions and K-functions for first general inhomogeneous spatio-temporal point processes and second inhomogeneous spatio-temporal Cox processes. Assuming......-temporal Gaussian process. Another concerns shot-noise Cox processes with a separable spatio-temporal covariance density. We propose diagnostic procedures for checking hypotheses of second-order spatio-temporal separability, which we apply on simulated and real data (the UK 2001 epidemic foot and mouth disease data)....

  3. Anti-Stokes luminescence in the light of second order perturbation theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Rupak, E-mail: rupak@iiserkol.ac.in; Pal, Bipul, E-mail: bipul@iiserkol.ac.in; Bansal, Bhavtosh, E-mail: bhavtosh@iiserkol.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur, Nadia, West Bengal 741246 (India)

    2014-11-10

    Anti-Stokes photoluminescence is measured in high-quality GaAs quantum wells. The primary pathway for interband optical absorption and hence emission under subbandgap photoexcitation is the optical phonon-mediated second-order electric dipole transition. This conclusion is drawn from the remarkable agreement between predictions of second-order perturbation calculation and the measured intensity of anti-Stokes photoluminescence, both as function of the detuning wavelength and temperature. The results are of direct relevance to laser cooling of solids where phonon-assisted upconversion is a necessary condition.

  4. Integrable dissipative nonlinear second order differential equations via factorizations and Abel equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancas, Stefan C. [Department of Mathematics, Embry–Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, FL 32114-3900 (United States); Rosu, Haret C., E-mail: hcr@ipicyt.edu.mx [IPICYT, Instituto Potosino de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica, Apdo Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosí, SLP (Mexico)

    2013-09-02

    We emphasize two connections, one well known and another less known, between the dissipative nonlinear second order differential equations and the Abel equations which in their first-kind form have only cubic and quadratic terms. Then, employing an old integrability criterion due to Chiellini, we introduce the corresponding integrable dissipative equations. For illustration, we present the cases of some integrable dissipative Fisher, nonlinear pendulum, and Burgers–Huxley type equations which are obtained in this way and can be of interest in applications. We also show how to obtain Abel solutions directly from the factorization of second order nonlinear equations.

  5. Modal phase matching in nanostructured zinc-blende semiconductors for second-order nonlinear optical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Eleonora; Sanatinia, Reza; Mensi, Mounir; Anand, Srinivasan; Swillo, Marcin

    2017-08-01

    We demonstrate enhanced second-harmonic generation in arrays of nanowaveguides satisfying modal-phase-matching condition, both theoretically and experimentally. The overlap of interacting fields defined by the fundamental mode of the pump and the second-order mode of the second-harmonic wave is enhanced by the longitudinal component of the nonlinear polarization density. For guided modes with significant longitudinal electric field components, the overlap of fields is comparable to that obtained in the quasi-phase-matching technique leading to higher conversion efficiencies. Thus, the presented method is preferable to achieve higher conversion efficiency in second-order nonlinear processes in nanowaveguides.

  6. Hybrid approximations via second order combined dynamic derivatives on time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Sheng

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the approximation of conventional second order derivative via the combined (diamond-$\\alpha$ dynamic derivative on time scales with necessary smoothness conditions embedded. We will show the constraints under which the second order dynamic derivative provides a consistent approximation to the conventional second derivative; the cases where the dynamic derivative approximates the derivative only via a proper modification of the existing formula; and the situations in which the dynamic derivative can never approximate consistently even with the help of available structure correction methods. Constructive error analysis will be given via asymptotic expansions for practical hybrid modeling and computational applications.

  7. How to Convexify the Intersection of a Second Order Cone and a Nonconvex Quadratic

    OpenAIRE

    Burer, Sam; Kilinc-Karzan, Fatma

    2014-01-01

    A recent series of papers has examined the extension of disjunctive-programming techniques to mixed-integer second-order-cone programming. For example, it has been shown---by several authors using different techniques---that the convex hull of the intersection of an ellipsoid, $E$, and a split disjunction, $(l - x_j)(x_j - u) \\le 0$ with $l < u$, equals the intersection of $E$ with an additional second-order-cone representable (SOCr) set. In this paper, we study more general intersections of ...

  8. A Second-Order Maximum Principle Preserving Lagrange Finite Element Technique for Nonlinear Scalar Conservation Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Guermond, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. This paper proposes an explicit, (at least) second-order, maximum principle satisfying, Lagrange finite element method for solving nonlinear scalar conservation equations. The technique is based on a new viscous bilinear form introduced in Guermond and Nazarov [Comput. Methods Appl. Mech. Engrg., 272 (2014), pp. 198-213], a high-order entropy viscosity method, and the Boris-Book-Zalesak flux correction technique. The algorithm works for arbitrary meshes in any space dimension and for all Lipschitz fluxes. The formal second-order accuracy of the method and its convergence properties are tested on a series of linear and nonlinear benchmark problems.

  9. Second-order Cosmological Perturbations Engendered by Point-like Masses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brilenkov, Ruslan; Eingorn, Maxim

    2017-08-01

    In the ΛCDM framework, presenting nonrelativistic matter inhomogeneities as discrete massive particles, we develop the second-order cosmological perturbation theory. Our approach relies on the weak gravitational field limit. The derived equations for the second-order scalar, vector, and tensor metric corrections are suitable at arbitrary distances, including regions with nonlinear contrasts of the matter density. We thoroughly verify fulfillment of all Einstein equations, as well as self-consistency of order assignments. In addition, we achieve logical positive results in the Minkowski background limit. Feasible investigations of the cosmological back-reaction manifestations by means of relativistic simulations are also outlined.

  10. Adsorption Behaviour of La(III) and Eu(III) Ions from Aqueous Solutions by Hydroxyapatite: Kinetic, Isotherm, and Thermodynamic Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Granados-Correa, F.; Vilchis-Granados, J.; Jiménez-Reyes, M.; Quiroz-Granados, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    The hydroxyapatite was successfully synthesized, characterized, and used as an alternative low-cost adsorbent material to study the adsorption behavior of La(III) and Eu(III) ions from nitrate aqueous solutions as a function of contact time, initial metal ion concentration, pH, and temperature by using a bath technique. The kinetic data correspond very well to the pseudo-second-order equation, and in both cases the uptake was affected by intraparticle diffusion. Isotherm adsorption data were ...

  11. REMOVAL OF METHYLENE BLUE BY ADSORPTION ONTO RETAMA RAETAM PLANT: KINETICS AND EQUILIBRIUM STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Badis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The feasibility of using medicinal plants species Retama raetam as a low cost and an eco-friendly adsorbent for the adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue from simulated aqueous solution has been investigated. Adsorption kinetics of methylene blue onto Retama raetam plants was studied in a batch system. The effects of pH and contact time were examined. The methylene blue maximum adsorption occurred at pH 8 and the lowest adsorption occurred at pH 2. The apparent equilibrium was reached after 120 min. Optimal experimental conditions were determined. Adsorption modelling parameters for Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms were determined and, based on R2, various error distribution functions were evaluated as well. Adsorption isotherm was best described by non linear Freundlich isotherm model. Thermodynamic studies show that adsorption was spontaneous and exothermic. For determining the best-fit-kinetic adsorption model, the experimental data were analyzed by using pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, pseudo-third-order, Esquivel, and Elovich models. Linear regressive and non-linear regressive method was used to obtain the relative parameters. The statistical functions were estimated to find the suitable method that fit better the experimental data. Both methods were appropriate for obtaining the parameters. The linear pseudo-second-order (type 9 and type 10 models were the best to fit the equilibrium data. The present work showed that plant Retama raetam can be used as a low cost adsorbent for the removal of methylene blue from water.

  12. Existence of solutions for nonlinear mixed type integrodifferential equation of second order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haribhau Laxman Tidke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we investigate the existence of solutions for nonlinear mixed Volterra-Fredholm integrodifferential equation of second order with nonlocal conditions in Banach spaces. Our analysis is based on Leray-Schauder alternative, rely on a priori bounds of solutions and the inequality established by B. G. Pachpatte.

  13. Asymptotic and oscillatory behavior of second order neutral quantum equations with maxima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Anderson

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the behavior of solutions to certain second order quantum ($q$-difference equations with maxima are considered. In particular, the asymptotic behavior of non-oscillatory solutions is described, and sufficient conditions for oscillation of all solutions are obtained.

  14. Control by Contextual Stimuli in Novel Second-Order Conditional Discriminations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gonzalez, Luis Antonio; Martinez, Hector

    2007-01-01

    Eighteen undergraduates participated in studies designed to examine the factors that produce transfer of contextual functions to novel stimuli in second-order conditional discriminations. In Study 1, participants selected comparison B1 given sample A1 and comparison B2 given sample A2 in a matching-to-sample procedure. Contextual stimuli X1 or X2…

  15. Second Order Nonlinear Hydroelastic Analyses of Floating Bodies - the Primary Consideration of Nonlinear Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, X.; Cui, W.; Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    2003-01-01

    The theory and typical numerical results of a second order nonlinear hydroelastic analysis of floating bodies are presented in a series of papers in which only nonlinearity in fluids is considered. Under the assumption of linear fluid, the hydroelastic analysis methods of nonlinear structure...

  16. Four New Applications of Second-Order Generalized Integrator Quadrature Signal Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Zhen; Zhao, Rende; Wang, Xiongfei

    2016-01-01

    The Second-Order Generalized Integrator (SOGI) was used as a building block for the SOGI-Quadrature-Signal Generator (SOGI-QSG) which has been widely used for grid synchronization, frequency estimation, and harmonic extraction over the past decade. This paper further investigates its integration ...

  17. Super Twisting Second Order Sliding Mode Control for Position Tracking Control of Hydraulic Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a control strategy based on second order sliding modes, generally applicable for position tracking control of electro-hydraulic valve-cylinder drives (VCD), is proposed. The main target is to overcome problems with linear controllers deteriorating performance due to the strong...

  18. Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Nonlinear Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order nonlinear dynamic equations of the form on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  19. Extreme Response Predictions for Jack-up Units in Second Order Stochastic Waves by FORM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Capul, Julien

    2006-01-01

    simpler and makes efficient use of the optimisation procedures implemented in standard FORM software codes. Due to the fast calculation procedure the analysis can be carried out taking into account all relevant non-linear effects. Specifically, the present analysis accounts for second order stochas...

  20. Oscillation theory for a pair of second order dynamic equations with a singular interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallav Kumar Baruah

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we consider a pair of second order dynamic equations defined on the time scale $I = [a,c]cup [sigma(c,b]$. We impose matching interface conditions at the singular interface $c$. We prove a theorem regarding the relationship between the number of eigenvalues and zeros of the corresponding eigenfunctions.

  1. Modeling of second order space charge driven coherent sum and difference instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Shuo Yuan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Second order coherent oscillation modes in intense particle beams play an important role for beam stability in linear or circular accelerators. In addition to the well-known second order even envelope modes and their instability, coupled even envelope modes and odd (skew modes have recently been shown in [Phys. Plasmas 23, 090705 (2016PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.4963851] to lead to parametric instabilities in periodic focusing lattices with sufficiently different tunes. While this work was partly using the usual envelope equations, partly also particle-in-cell (PIC simulation, we revisit these modes here and show that the complete set of second order even and odd mode phenomena can be obtained in a unifying approach by using a single set of linearized rms moment equations based on “Chernin’s equations.” This has the advantage that accurate information on growth rates can be obtained and gathered in a “tune diagram.” In periodic focusing we retrieve the parametric sum instabilities of coupled even and of odd modes. The stop bands obtained from these equations are compared with results from PIC simulations for waterbag beams and found to show very good agreement. The “tilting instability” obtained in constant focusing confirms the equivalence of this method with the linearized Vlasov-Poisson system evaluated in second order.

  2. Existence and Uniqueness of Periodic Solutions for Second Order Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanhong Wei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study some second order ordinary differential equations. We establish the existence and uniqueness in some appropriate function space. By using Schauder’s fixed-point theorem, new results on the existence and uniqueness of periodic solutions are obtained.

  3. A 5-step maximal order method for direct solution of second order ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this work, we propose a direct solution of second order ordinary differential equations without reduction to systems of first order equations. The method is based on collocating the differential system arising from a polynomial basis function at selected grid points xn+i, i = 0(1)5, which yields a five-step continuous method.

  4. Multiplicity of solutions for Dirichlet boundary conditions of second-order quasilinear equations with impulsive effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tengfei Shen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the multiplicity of solutions for Dirichlet boundary conditions of second-order quasilinear equations with impulsive effects. By using critical point theory, a new result is obtained. An example is given to illustrate the main result.

  5. Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Vyacheslav M.; Popovych, Roman O.; Shapoval, Nataliya M.

    2013-01-01

    Lie symmetries of systems of second-order linear ordinary differential equations with constant coefficients are exhaustively described over both the complex and real fields. The exact lower and upper bounds for the dimensions of the maximal Lie invariance algebras possessed by such systems are obtained using an effective algebraic approach. PMID:23564972

  6. Model reduction of second-order network systems using graph clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Xiaodong; Scherpen, Jacquelien M.A.; Kawano, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A general framework is proposed for structure-preserving model reduction of a second-order network system. The method is based on graph clustering, and a recursive algorithm is proposed to find an appropriate clustering. Behaviors of nodes are interpreted by transfer functions, and the similarities

  7. Oscillation results on meromorphic solutions of second order differential equations in the complex plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Bin Cao

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to consider the oscillation theory on meromorphic solutions of second order linear differential equations of the form $f^{''}+A(zf=0$ where $A$ is meromorphic in the complex plane. We improve and extend some oscillation results due to Bank and Laine, Kinnunen, Liang and Liu, and others.

  8. Second Order Washout filter based Power Sharing Strategy for Uninterruptible Power Supply

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jinghang; Savaghebi, Mehdi; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, first, the existing frequency and voltage amplitude restoration control strategies are reviewed. Moreover, the proposed second order washout filter control strategy is proposed to enhance the dynamic response under load disturbance. The physical parameter of the proposed method is ...

  9. Exponential ratio-product type estimators under second order approximation in stratified random sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rajesh; Sharma, Prayas; Smarandache, Florentin

    2014-01-01

    Singh et al (20009) introduced a family of exponential ratio and product type estimators in stratified random sampling. Under stratified random sampling without replacement scheme, the expressions of bias and mean square error (MSE) of Singh et al (2009) and some other estimators, up to the first- and second-order approximations are derived. Also, the theoretical findings are supported by a numerical example.

  10. Second-order asymptotics in level crossing for differences of renewal processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroese, Dirk; Kallenberg, W.C.M.

    1992-01-01

    We consider level crossing for the difference of independent renewal processes. Second-order expansions for the distribution function of the crossing time of level n are found, as n - oo. As a by-product several other results on the difference process are found. The expected minimum of the

  11. On Application of Second Order Sliding Mode Control to Electro-Hydraulic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of second order mode controls to hydraulic valve-cylinder drives with a special focus on the limitations resulting from nonlinear dynamic effects in flow control valves. Second order sliding mode algorithms appear highly attractive in the successive implementa......This paper discusses the application of second order mode controls to hydraulic valve-cylinder drives with a special focus on the limitations resulting from nonlinear dynamic effects in flow control valves. Second order sliding mode algorithms appear highly attractive in the successive...... implementation of sliding mode control, achieving continuous control inputs, while maintaining the main properties of sliding modes. Under certain model assumptions, some of these controllers may even be applied as output feedback controllers. However, intrinsic nonlinear dynamic effects of hydraulic valves...... sliding algorithm known as the super twisting controller is considered for output feedback control and compared with conventional first order sliding mode control. The controllers under consideration are applied for position tracking control of a hydraulic valve-cylinder drive exhibiting strong variations...

  12. Second-order relational face processing is applied to faces of different race and photographic contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, H E; Bilsbury, T G; McMullen, P A

    2012-03-01

    A large body of research suggests that faces are processed by a specialized mechanism within the human visual system. This specialized mechanism is made up of subprocesses (Maurer, LeGrand, & Mondloch, 2002). One subprocess, called second- order relational processing, analyzes the metric distances between face parts. Importantly, it is well established that other-race faces and contrast-reversed faces are associated with impaired performance on numerous face processing tasks. Here, we investigated the specificity of second-order relational processing by testing how this process is applied to faces of different race and photographic contrast. Participants completed a feature displacement discrimination task, directly measuring the sensitivity to second-order relations between face parts. Across three experiments we show that, despite absolute differences in sensitivity in some conditions, inversion impaired performance in all conditions. The presence of robust inversion effects for all faces suggests that second-order relational processing can be applied to faces of different race and photographic contrast.

  13. Temporal Frequency Modulates Reaction Time Responses to First-Order and Second-Order Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Claire V.; Ledgeway, Tim

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of temporal frequency and modulation depth on reaction times for discriminating the direction of first-order (luminance-defined) and second-order (contrast-defined) motion, equated for visibility using equal multiples of direction-discrimination threshold. Results showed that reaction times were heavily…

  14. Existence of Positive Solutions of Nonlinear Second-Order Periodic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Ruyun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper is devoted to study the existence of periodic solutions of the second-order equation , where is a Carathéodory function, by combining a new expression of Green's function together with Dancer's global bifurcation theorem. Our main results are sharp and improve the main results by Torres (2003.

  15. On the Solvability of Second-Order Impulsive Differential Equations with Antiperiodic Boundary Value Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery Romanovski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We prove existence results for second-order impulsive differential equations with antiperiodic boundary value conditions in the presence of classical fixed point theorems. We also obtain the expression of Green's function of related linear operator in the space of piecewise continuous functions.

  16. Existence of One-Signed Solutions of Discrete Second-Order Periodic Boundary Value Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruyun Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence of one-signed periodic solutions of second-order nonlinear difference equation on a finite discrete segment with periodic boundary conditions by combining some properties of Green's function with the fixed-point theorem in cones.

  17. Positive solutions for second-order boundary-value problems with sign changing Green's functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cabada

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this article we analyze some possibilities of finding positive solutions for second-order boundary-value problems with the Dirichlet and periodic boundary conditions, for which the corresponding Green's functions change sign. The obtained results can also be adapted to Neumann and mixed boundary conditions.

  18. Second-order wave kinematics conditional on a given wave crest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher

    1996-01-01

    -Gaussian contributions. As an application, the mean wave elevation and the associated wave kinematics are determined for a Stokes second-order wave theory. The results are compared to the linear (Gaussian) predictions and the effect of the non-linearities is quantified both for the wave profile and the horizontal wave...

  19. Oscillation criteria of second order neutral delay dynamic equations with distributed deviating arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethiraju Thandapani

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we establish some oscillation theorems for second order neutral dynamic equations with distributed deviating arguments. We use the Riccati transformation technique to obtain sufficient conditions for the oscillation of all solutions. Further, some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  20. A smart nonstandard finite difference scheme for second order nonlinear boundary value problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erdogan, Utku; Ozis, Turgut

    2011-01-01

    A new kind of finite difference scheme is presented for special second order nonlinear two point boundary value problems. An artificial parameter is introduced in the scheme. Symbolic computation is proposed for the construction of the scheme. Local truncation error of the method is discussed.

  1. Computer Simulation for Calculating the Second-Order Correlation Function of Classical and Quantum Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facao, M.; Lopes, A.; Silva, A. L.; Silva, P.

    2011-01-01

    We propose an undergraduate numerical project for simulating the results of the second-order correlation function as obtained by an intensity interference experiment for two kinds of light, namely bunched light with Gaussian or Lorentzian power density spectrum and antibunched light obtained from single-photon sources. While the algorithm for…

  2. On the Solvability of Second-Order Impulsive Differential Equations with Antiperiodic Boundary Value Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanovski Valery

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove existence results for second-order impulsive differential equations with antiperiodic boundary value conditions in the presence of classical fixed point theorems. We also obtain the expression of Green's function of related linear operator in the space of piecewise continuous functions.

  3. Solving Second-Order Ordinary Differential Equations without Using Complex Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kougias, Ioannis E.

    2009-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is a subject with a wide range of applications and the need of introducing it to students often arises in the last year of high school, as well as in the early stages of tertiary education. The usual methods of solving second-order ODEs with constant coefficients, among others, rely upon the use of complex…

  4. Solution Matching for a Second Order Boundary Value Problem on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprillya Lanz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Let be a time scale such that <;,∈. We will show the existence and uniqueness of solutions for the second-order boundary value problem ΔΔ(=(,(,Δ(,∈[,],(=,(=, by matching a solution of the first equation satisfying boundary conditions on [,] with a solution of the first equation satisfying boundary conditions on [,], where ∈(,.

  5. The role of first- and second-order stimulus features for human overt attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Hans-Peter; König, Peter; Einhäuser, Wolfgang

    2007-02-01

    When processing complex visual input, human observers sequentially allocate their attention to different subsets of the stimulus. What are the mechanisms and strategies that guide this selection process? We investigated the influence of various stimulus features on human overt attention--that is, attention related to shifts of gaze with natural color images and modified versions thereof. Our experimental modifications, systematic changes of hue across the entire image, influenced only the global appearance of the stimuli, leaving the local features under investigation unaffected. We demonstrated that these modifications consistently reduce the subjective interpretation of a stimulus as "natural" across observers. By analyzing fixations, we found that first-order features, such as luminance contrast, saturation, and color contrast along either of the cardinal axes, correlated to overt attention in the modified images. In contrast, no such correlation was found in unmodified outdoor images. Second-order luminance contrast ("texture contrast") correlated to overt attention in all conditions. However, although none of the second-order color contrasts were correlated to overt attention in unmodified images, one of the second-order color contrasts did exhibit a significant correlation in the modified images. These findings imply, on the one hand, that higher-order bottom-up effects--namely, those of second-order luminance contrast--may partially account for human overt attention. On the other hand, these results also demonstrate that global image properties, which correlate to the subjective impression of a scene being "natural," affect the guidance of human overt attention.

  6. A family of block methods for special second order initial value ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, efforts are directed towards generating a 2-block 2-point numerical method for solving the special second order initial value problems of the form Y\\'\\' = F(X, Y), Y(0) = YO, Y\\'(0) = YOO .. The scheme so developed, is in the same line of thought as Shampine and Watts (1969, 1972) [9]; Chu and Hamltion (1987) ...

  7. Factorization of a class of almost linear second-order differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez, P G [Departamento de FIsica Fundamental, Area de FIsica Teorica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Kuru, S [Departamento de FIsica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47071 Valladolid (Spain); Negro, J [Departamento de FIsica Fundamental, Area de FIsica Teorica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008 Salamanca (Spain); Nieto, L M [Departamento de FIsica Teorica, Atomica y Optica, Universidad de Valladolid, 47071 Valladolid (Spain)

    2007-08-10

    A general type of almost linear second-order differential equations, which are directly related to several interesting physical problems, is characterized. The solutions of these equations are obtained using the factorization technique, and their non-autonomous invariants are also found by means of scale transformations.

  8. Non-linear second-order periodic systems with non-smooth potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    Abstract. In this paper we study second order non-linear periodic systems driven by the ordinary vector p-Laplacian with a non-smooth, locally Lipschitz potential function. Our approach is variational and it is based on the non-smooth critical point theory. We prove existence and multiplicity results under general growth ...

  9. Non-linear second-order periodic systems with non-smooth potential

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper we study second order non-linear periodic systems driven by the ordinary vector -Laplacian with a non-smooth, locally Lipschitz potential function. Our approach is variational and it is based on the non-smooth critical point theory. We prove existence and multiplicity results under general growth conditions on ...

  10. Detection of tremor bursts by a running second order moment function and analysis using interburst histograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Journee, Henricus Louis; Postma, Alida Annechien; Sun, Mingui; Staal, Michiel J.

    Introduction: Conventional linear signal processing techniques are not always suitable for the detection of tremor bursts in clinical practice due to inevitable noise from electromyographic (EMG) bursts. This study introduces (1) a non-linear analysis technique based on a running second order moment

  11. Poly(3-alkylthiophene)s show unexpected second-order nonlinear optical response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deckers, S.; Vandendriessche, S.; Cornelis, D.; Monnaie, F.; Koeckelberghs, G.; Asselberghs, I.; Verbiest, T.; Van der Veen, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene)s with chain lengths varying from 5 to 100 monomers are synthesized. Poly(3-hexylthiophene)s show in solution an unexpectedly significant second-order nonlinear optical response. The increase in transition dipole moment upon oligomerisation causes the significant

  12. Optimized Second-Order Dynamical Systems and Their RLC Circuit Models with PWL Controlled Sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brzobohaty

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Complementary active RLC circuit models with a voltage-controlledvoltage source (VCVS and a current-controlled current source (CCCSfor the second-order autonomous dynamical system realization areproposed. The main advantage of these equivalent circuits is the simplerelation between the state model parameters and their correspondingcircuit parameters, which leads also to simple design formulas.

  13. Continuability and boundedness of solutions to nonlinear second-order differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianwen Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Continuability, boundedness, and monotonicity of solutions for a class of second-order nonlinear differential equations are discussed. It is proved that all solutions are eventually monotonic and can be extended to infinity under some natural assumptions. Moreover, necessary and sufficient conditions for boundedness of all solutions are established. The results obtained have extended and improved some analogous existing ones.

  14. Multiple periodic solutions for a class of second-order nonlinear neutral delay equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of a variational structure and Z 2 -group index theory, we obtain multiple periodic solutions to a class of second-order nonlinear neutral delay equations of the form0, au>0$"> x ″ ( t − τ + λ ( t f ( t , x ( t , x ( t − τ , x ( t − 2 τ = x ( t , λ ( t > 0 , τ > 0 .

  15. Independence of First- and Second-Order Memories in Newborn Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coureaud, Gerard; Languille, Solene; Joly, Virginie; Schaal, Benoist; Hars, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    The mammary pheromone promotes the acquisition of novel odorants (CS1) in newborn rabbits. Here, experiments pinpoint that CS1 becomes able to support neonatal learning of other odorants (CS2). We therefore evaluated whether these first- and second-order memories remained dependent after reactivation. Amnesia induced after CS2 recall selectively…

  16. Boundary-value problems for first and second order functional differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihuang Hong

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents sufficient conditions for the existence of solutions to boundary-value problems of first and second order multi-valued differential equations in Banach spaces. Our results obtained using fixed point theorems, and lead to new existence principles.

  17. Newton's method for stochastic differential equations and its probabilistic second-order error estimate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Amano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Kawabata and Yamada [5] proposed an implicit Newton's method for nonlinear stochastic differential equations and proved its convergence. Later Amano [2] gave an explicit formulation of method and showed its direct error estimate. In this article, we prove a probabilistic second-order error estimate which has been an open problem since 1991.

  18. Algebraic properties of first integrals for systems of second-order ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symmetries of the rst integrals for scalar linear or linearizable second- order ordinary differential equations (ODEs) have already been derived and shown to exhibit interesting properties. One of these is that the symmetry algebra sl(3; R ) is generated by the three triplets of symmetries of the functionally independent first ...

  19. On the Robustness of Hysteretic Second-Order Systems with PID : iISS approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, Ruiyue; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Andrieu, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study the robustness property of a second-order linear plant controlled by a proportional, integral and derivative (PID) controller with a hysteretic actuator. The hysteretic actuator is modeled by a Duhem model that exhibits clockwise (CW) input-output (I/O) dynamics (such as the

  20. Design and development of second order MEMS sound pressure gradient sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albahri, Shehab

    The design and development of a second order MEMS sound pressure gradient sensor is presented in this dissertation. Inspired by the directional hearing ability of the parasitoid fly, Ormia ochracea, a novel first order directional microphone that mimics the mechanical structure of the fly's ears and detects the sound pressure gradient has been developed. While the first order directional microphones can be very beneficial in a large number of applications, there is great potential for remarkable improvements in performance through the use of second order systems. The second order directional microphone is able to provide a theoretical improvement in Sound to Noise ratio (SNR) of 9.5dB, compared to the first-order system that has its maximum SNR of 6dB. Although second order microphone is more sensitive to sound angle of incidence, the nature of the design and fabrication process imposes different factors that could lead to deterioration in its performance. The first Ormia ochracea second order directional microphone was designed in 2004 and fabricated in 2006 at Binghamton University. The results of the tested parts indicate that the Ormia ochracea second order directional microphone performs mostly as an Omni directional microphone. In this work, the previous design is reexamined and analyzed to explain the unexpected results. A more sophisticated tool implementing a finite element package ANSYS is used to examine the previous design response. This new tool is used to study different factors that used to be ignored in the previous design, mainly; response mismatch and fabrication uncertainty. A continuous model using Hamilton's principle is introduced to verify the results using the new method. Both models agree well, and propose a new way for optimizing the second order directional microphone using geometrical manipulation. In this work we also introduce a new fabrication process flow to increase the fabrication yield. The newly suggested method uses the shell

  1. Serpentine: Finite Difference Methods for Wave Propagation in Second Order Formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2012-03-26

    Wave propagation phenomena are important in many DOE applications such as nuclear explosion monitoring, geophysical exploration, estimating ground motion hazards and damage due to earthquakes, non-destructive testing, underground facilities detection, and acoustic noise propagation. There are also future applications that would benefit from simulating wave propagation, such as geothermal energy applications and monitoring sites for carbon storage via seismic reflection techniques. In acoustics and seismology, it is of great interest to increase the frequency bandwidth in simulations. In seismic exploration, greater frequency resolution enables shorter wave lengths to be included in the simulations, allowing for better resolution in the seismic imaging. In nuclear explosion monitoring, higher frequency seismic waves are essential for accurate discrimination between explosions and earthquakes. When simulating earthquake induced motion of large structures, such as nuclear power plants or dams, increased frequency resolution is essential for realistic damage predictions. Another example is simulations of micro-seismic activity near geothermal energy plants. Here, hydro-fracturing induces many small earthquakes and the time scale of each event is proportional to the square root of the moment magnitude. As a result, the motion is dominated by higher frequencies for smaller seismic events. The above wave propagation problems are all governed by systems of hyperbolic partial differential equations in second order differential form, i.e., they contain second order partial derivatives of the dependent variables. Our general research theme in this project has been to develop numerical methods that directly discretize the wave equations in second order differential form. The obvious advantage of working with hyperbolic systems in second order differential form, as opposed to rewriting them as first order hyperbolic systems, is that the number of differential equations in the

  2. Superior effect of Ni-substitution on the hydrogenation kinetics of Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 1−x}TM{sub x} (TM = Ag, Cu, Ni) pseudo-binary compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponthieu, M. [MIRE-Group, Laboratorio de Física de Materiales de Interés Energético, Dpto Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); ICMPE/CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Fernández, J.F., E-mail: josefrancisco.fernandez@uam.es [MIRE-Group, Laboratorio de Física de Materiales de Interés Energético, Dpto Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Cuevas, F. [ICMPE/CNRS-UPEC, UMR 7182, 2-8 rue Henri Dunant, 94320 Thiais (France); Laversenne, L. [Institut Néel, CNRS, Grenoble (France); Bodega, J.; Ares, J.R.; Sánchez, C. [MIRE-Group, Laboratorio de Física de Materiales de Interés Energético, Dpto Física de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Kinetics of (de)hydrogenation of Mg{sub 6}(Pd,TM) TM = Ag, Cu and Ni compared. • Faster hydrogenation kinetics for the Ni compound. • Faster H-desorption for the Ni compound due to MgH{sub 2}/Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} synergy. - Abstract: In this investigation, the H-sorption kinetics of Mg{sub 6}Pd and Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 1−x}TM{sub x} (TM = Ag, Cu, Ni) pseudo-binary compounds at the TM solubility limit have been studied by isothermal hydrogen absorption, thermal desorption spectroscopy and in situ neutron diffraction. Among all studied compounds, the fastest absorption kinetics takes place for the Ni-substituted one. The fit of the absorption curves to established model equations for solid–gas reaction shows that hydrogenation is controlled by diffusion. As for desorption, the peak temperature for the Ni-substituted compound is 90 K below that of MgH{sub 2}/Mg system and is characterised by a low activation energy of 68 kJ/molH{sub 2}. To better understand these results, neutron diffraction experiments during in situ thermal desorption of deuterated Mg{sub 6}Pd and Mg{sub 6}Pd{sub 0.25}Ni{sub 0.75} compounds were carried out. These experiments demonstrate a synergetic effect between MgH{sub 2} and Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} hydrides as responsible for the remarkable kinetics of the Ni-containing compound.

  3. Equilibrium and Kinetic Studies on the Adsorption of Acid Yellow 36 Dye by Pinecone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Sheikh Mohammadi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Dyes have significant role in environmental problems, due to their toxic effects on the food chain and sources of water. The purpose of this research was to study the adsorption of acid yellow 36 dye onto pinecone using batch system. Materials & Methods: This research was performed at laboratory scale and batch system. Equilibrium isotherms were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich, and D-R models. Also kinetic studies were done by three models of pseudo first order, pseudo second order, and intra-particle diffusion. Results: The maximum adsorption was achieved at pH 5.0, adsorbent dose 0.7 g/l and contact time 20 min. The equilibrium adsorption capacity (mg/g increased with increasing initial dye concentration. The Langmuir model (R2=0.99 provided the best fit for the experimental data. The adsorption kinetics were studied and best fit was achieved by pseudo- second order model (R2= 0.96. Conclusions: According to the results obtained of equilibrium and kinetic studies on the adsorption of acid yellow 36, pinecone can be a suitable and efficient adsorbent in the removal of yellow acid 36 dye from industrial wastewater.

  4. Interaction of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) with bacterial extracellular proteins (ECPs) and its adsorption isotherms and kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, S Sudheer; Srivatsan, P; Vaishnavi, N; Mukherjee, Amitava; Chandrasekaran, N

    2011-08-15

    Indiscriminate and increased use of silver nanoparticles (SNPs) in consumer products leads to the release of it into the environment. The fate and transport of SNPs in environment remains unknown. We have studied the interaction of SNPs with extracellular protein (ECP) produced by two environmental bacterial species and the adsorption behavior in aqueous solutions. The effect of pH and salt concentrations on the adsorption was also investigated. The adsorption process was found to be dependent on surface charge (zeta potential). The capping of SNPs by ECP was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adsorption of ECP on SNPs was analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich models, suggesting that the equilibrium adsorption data fitted well with Freundlich model. The equilibrium adsorption data were modeled using the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic equations. The results indicated that pseudo-second-order kinetic equation would better describe the adsorption kinetics. The capping was stable at environmental pH and salt concentration. The destabilization of nanoparticles was observed at alkaline pH. The study suggests that the stabilization of nanoparticles in the environment might lead to the accumulation and transport of nanomaterials in the environment, and ultimately destabilizes the functioning of the ecosystem. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinetics of adsorption of bovine serum albumin on magnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhouli; Yue, Tianli; Yuan, Yahong; Cai, Rui; Niu, Chen; Guo, Caixia

    2013-07-01

    The magnetic carboxymethyl chitosan nanoparticles (MNPs-CMC) were developed as effective magnetic affinity adsorbent for Bovine serum albumin and the adsorption reactions were investigated. The obtained experimental data were compared with the adsorption kinetics models and equilibrium isotherms. The experimental kinetic data were modeled using Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order, Bangham's equation, Intra-particle diffusion model and Elovich equations. It was found that the adsorption reactions followed the Pseudo-second order kinetics equation. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich and Temkin equations. By comparing the correlation coefficients determined for each linear transformation of isotherm analysis, it was found that the Langmuir equation was the best fit equilibrium model for the adsorption of BSA. Error functions have been used to determine the alternative single component parameters by nonlinear regression due to the inherent bias in using the correlation coefficient resulting from linearization. It showed that the Langmuir equation resulted in the lowest values for the error function and thus fitted the data better than the other isotherm. Various thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH°), entropy (ΔS°) and Gibbs free energy (ΔG°) were evaluated. MNPs-CMC nanoaprticles were shown to be a promising material for adsorption of BSA from aqueous solutions. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Kinetic study for copper adsorption onto soil minerals in the absence and presence of humic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komy, Zanaty R; Shaker, Ali M; Heggy, Said E M; El-Sayed, Mohamed E A

    2014-03-01

    Equilibrium and kinetics of Cu(2+) adsorption onto soil minerals (kaolinite and hematite) in the absence and presence of humic acid have been investigated under various conditions. The influences of ionic strength, pH and solution cations on the rate of the adsorption have been studied. The rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals in the absence or the presence of humic acid increased with decreasing ionic strength, increasing pH and in the presence of the background electrolyte K(+) rather than Ca(2+). Humic acid enhanced the rate and the amount of adsorbed Cu(2+) onto soil minerals. The adsorption equilibrium data showed that adsorption behavior of Cu(2+) could be described more reasonably by Langmiur adsorption isotherm than Freundlich isotherm in the absence or presence of humic acid. Pseudo first and pseudo second order models were used to evaluate the kinetic data and the rate constants. The results indicated that the adsorption of Cu(2+) onto hematite and kaolinite in the absence and presence of humic acid is more conforming to pseudo second order kinetics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies of Hg(II) adsorption onto MCM-41 modified by ZnCl2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Foad; Pakizeh, Majid

    2014-05-01

    Kinetics and thermodynamics of mercury ions sorption onto ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent were studied. Several rate models in the form of two main classes of mathematic kinetic models (adsorption reaction models and adsorption diffusion models) were investigated. Pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, film and intraparticle diffusion models were used to analyze the kinetic data. Results showed that the pseudo-second order model can well describe the adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters, such as Gibb's free energy change (ΔG°), standard enthalpy change (ΔH°) and standard entropy change (ΔS°) were also evaluated. Negative value of free energy at temperature range of 20-55 °C, indicates the spontaneous nature of Hg(II) sorption by ZnCl2-MCM-41 sorbent. The adsorption capacity which was found to decrease with temperature showed the exothermic nature of the mercury sorption process (ΔH° = -49.4 kJ mol-1). The negative ΔS° value (-148.9 J mol-1 K-1) revealed a decrease in the randomness at the solid/solution interface and also indicated the fast adsorption of the Hg(II) onto active sites.

  8. Kinetics of adsorption of dyes from aqueous solution using activated carbon prepared from waste apricot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onal, Yunus [Inonu University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, 44280 Malatya (Turkey)]. E-mail: yonal@inonu.edu.tr

    2006-10-11

    Adsorbent (WA11Zn5) has been prepared from waste apricot by chemical activation with ZnCl{sub 2}. Pore properties of the activated carbon such as BET surface area, pore volume, pore size distribution, and pore diameter were characterized by N{sub 2} adsorption and DFT plus software. Adsorption of three dyes, namely, Methylene Blue (MB), Malachite Green (MG), Crystal Violet (CV), onto activated carbon in aqueous solution was studied in a batch system with respect to contact time, temperature. The kinetics of adsorption of MB, MG and CV have been discussed using six kinetic models, i.e., the pseudo-first-order model, the pseudo-second-order model, the Elovich equation, the intraparticle diffusion model, the Bangham equation, the modified Freundlich equation. Kinetic parameters and correlation coefficients were determined. It was shown that the second-order kinetic equation could describe the adsorption kinetics for three dyes. The dyes uptake process was found to be controlled by external mass transfer at earlier stages (before 5 min) and by intraparticle diffusion at later stages (after 5 min). Thermodynamic parameters, such as {delta}G, {delta}H and {delta}S, have been calculated by using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficient obtained at different temperatures and concentrations. The thermodynamics of dyes-WA11Zn5 system indicates endothermic process.

  9. A Novel Second-Order All-Pass Filter Using Square-Root Domain Blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Surav Yilmaz

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a new second order all-pass filter is synthesized in the square-root domain by using the state-space method. The proposed second order all-pass filter is constituted by current mirrors, current sources, current-mode square-root circuits and capacitors. The pole frequency of the filter can be tuned electronically by varying the values of the current sources of this circuit. The filter is simulated in PSpice using 0.35um CMOS technology parameters. Quality factor of the circuit is selected as 5 and supply voltage is set to 2.7V. The simulation results show that the proposed circuit has the merits of electronic tunability. We also performed noise, THD and Monte-Carlo analyses. Various simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed circuit.

  10. Application of graphene second-order nonlinearity in THz plasmons excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalpoor, Kamal; Zarifkar, Abbas; Miri, Mehdi

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, the phase-matching condition, the excited electric field formula, and the nonlinear susceptibility tensor elements conditions required for excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on flat graphene are derived. The second-order nonlinearity is utilized for compensation of the free-space and SPPs wave vectors mismatch. In order to excite SPPs on graphene, the phase matching condition is investigated for the second-order effects including the difference frequency generation (DFG), the second harmonic generation (SHG), and the sum-frequency generation (SFG). In addition, since the incident waves polarizations play an important role in the excitation of the SPPs, the realization of the susceptibility tensor elements conditions, the effect of TE, TM, not polarized and perpendicularly polarized incident waves are investigated using the Green's function theory.

  11. Second-order equation of motion for electromagnetic radiation back-reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matolcsi, T.; Fülöp, T.; Weiner, M.

    2017-09-01

    We take the viewpoint that the physically acceptable solutions of the Lorentz-Dirac equation for radiation back-reaction are actually determined by a second-order equation of motion, the self-force being given as a function of spacetime location and velocity. We propose three different methods to obtain this self-force function. For two example systems, we determine the second-order equation of motion exactly in the non-relativistic regime via each of these three methods, leading to the same result. We reveal that, for both systems considered, back-reaction induces a damping proportional to velocity and, in addition, it decreases the effect of the external force.

  12. Directly Solving Special Second Order Delay Differential Equations Using Runge-Kutta-Nyström Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mechee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Runge-Kutta-Nyström (RKN method is adapted for solving the special second order delay differential equations (DDEs. The stability polynomial is obtained when this method is used for solving linear second order delay differential equation. A standard set of test problems is solved using the method together with a cubic interpolation for evaluating the delay terms. The same set of problems is reduced to a system of first order delay differential equations and then solved using the existing Runge-Kutta (RK method. Numerical results show that the RKN method is more efficient in terms of accuracy and computational time when compared to RK method. The methods are applied to a well-known problem involving delay differential equations, that is, the Mathieu problem. The numerical comparison shows that both methods are in a good agreement.

  13. The second-order luminosity-redshift relation in a generic inhomogeneous cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Dayan, Ido [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St George, Toronto ON, M5S 3H8 (Canada); Marozzi, Giovanni; Veneziano, Gabriele [Collège de France, 11 Place M. Berthelot, 75005 Paris (France); Nugier, Fabien, E-mail: ido.bendayan@gmail.com, E-mail: giovanni.marozzi@unige.ch, E-mail: fabien.nugier@lpt.ens.fr, E-mail: gabriele.veneziano@cern.ch [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de l' École Normale Supérieure, CNRS UMR 8549, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France)

    2012-11-01

    After recalling a general non-perturbative expression for the luminosity-redshift relation holding in a recently proposed 'geodesic light-cone' gauge, we show how it can be transformed to phenomenologically more convenient gauges in which cosmological perturbation theory is better understood. We present, in particular, the complete result on the luminosity-redshift relation in the Poisson gauge up to second order for a fairly generic perturbed cosmology, assuming that appreciable vector and tensor perturbations are only generated at second order. This relation provides a basic ingredient for the computation of the effects of stochastic inhomogeneities on precision dark-energy cosmology whose results we have anticipated in a recent letter. More generally, it can be used in connection with any physical information carried by light-like signals traveling along our past light-cone.

  14. Beyond the G W approximation: A second-order screened exchange correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinguo; Marom, Noa; Caruso, Fabio; Scheffler, Matthias; Rinke, Patrick

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the recently developed renormalized second-order perturbation theory for ground-state energy calculations, we propose a second-order screened exchange correction (SOSEX) to the G W self-energy. This correction follows the spirit of the SOSEX correction to the random-phase approximation for the electron correlation energy and can be clearly represented in terms of Feynman diagrams. We benchmark the performance of the perturbative G0W0 +SOSEX scheme for a set of molecular systems, including the G2 test set from quantum chemistry as well as benzene and tetracyanoethylene. We find that G0W0 +SOSEX improves over G0W0 for the energy levels of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals. In addition, it can resolve some of the difficulties encountered by the G W method for relative energy positions as exemplified by benzene where the energy spacing between certain valence orbitals is severely underestimated.

  15. Emergence of Lévy Walks from Second-Order Stochastic Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuśmierz, Łukasz; Toyoizumi, Taro

    2017-12-01

    In natural foraging, many organisms seem to perform two different types of motile search: directed search (taxis) and random search. The former is observed when the environment provides cues to guide motion towards a target. The latter involves no apparent memory or information processing and can be mathematically modeled by random walks. We show that both types of search can be generated by a common mechanism in which Lévy flights or Lévy walks emerge from a second-order gradient-based search with noisy observations. No explicit switching mechanism is required—instead, continuous transitions between the directed and random motions emerge depending on the Hessian matrix of the cost function. For a wide range of scenarios, the Lévy tail index is α =1 , consistent with previous observations in foraging organisms. These results suggest that adopting a second-order optimization method can be a useful strategy to combine efficient features of directed and random search.

  16. Second order Statistical Texture Features from a New CSLBPGLCM for Ultrasound Kidney Images Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelladurai CALLINS CHRISTIYANA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a new method called Center Symmetric Local Binary Pattern Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (CSLBPGLCM for the purpose of extracting second order statistical texture features in ultrasound kidney images. These features are then feed into ultrasound kidney images retrieval system for the point of medical applications. This new GLCM matrix combines the benefit of CSLBP and conventional GLCM. The main intention of this CSLBPGLCM is to reduce the number of grey levels in an image by not simply accumulating the grey levels but incorporating another statistical texture feature in it. The proposed approach is cautiously evaluated in ultrasound kidney images retrieval system and has been compared with conventional GLCM. It is experimentally proved that the proposed method increases the retrieval efficiency, accuracy and reduces the time complexity of ultrasound kidney images retrieval system by means of second order statistical texture features.

  17. A second order thermodynamic perturbation theory for hydrogen bond cooperativity in water

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, Bennett D.

    2017-01-01

    It has been extensively demonstrated through first principles quantum mechanics calculations that water exhibits strong hydrogen bond cooperativity. Classical molecular simulation and statistical mechanics methods typically assume pairwise additivity, meaning they cannot account for these 3-body and higher cooperative effects. In this document, we extend second order thermodynamic perturbation theory to correct for hydrogen bond cooperativity in 4 site water. We show that the association theo...

  18. Karhunen-Loève Expansion for the Second Order Detrended Brownian Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchun Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the norm in the Hilbert Space L2[0,1], the second order detrended Brownian motion is defined as the orthogonal component of projection of the standard Brownian motion into the space spanned by nonlinear function subspace. Karhunen-Loève expansion for this process is obtained together with the relationship of that of a generalized Brownian bridge. As applications, Laplace transform, large deviation, and small deviation are given.

  19. Transmission performance improvement using random DFB laser based Raman amplification and bidirectional second-order pumping

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, M.; Rosa, P; Le, S.T.; Iqbal, Md A.; Phillips, I.D.; Harper, P.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that a distributed Raman amplification scheme based on random distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser enables bidirectional second-order Raman pumping without increasing relative intensity noise (RIN) of the signal. This extends the reach of 10 × 116 Gb/s DP-QPSK WDM transmission up to 7915 km, compared with conventional Raman amplification schemes. Moreover, this scheme gives the longest maximum transmission distance among all the Raman amplification schemes presented in this p...

  20. Solution of second order linear fuzzy difference equation by Lagrange's multiplier method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankar Prasad Mondal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we execute the solution procedure for second order linear fuzzy difference equation by Lagrange's multiplier method. In crisp sense the difference equation are easy to solve, but when we take in fuzzy sense it forms a system of difference equation which is not so easy to solve. By the help of Lagrange's multiplier we can solved it easily. The results are illustrated by two different numerical examples and followed by two applications.

  1. Performance of First- and Second-Order Methods for L1-Regularized Least Squares Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Fountoulakis, Kimon; Gondzio, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    We study the performance of first- and second-order optimization methods for l1-regularized sparse least-squares problems as the conditioning of the problem changes and the dimensions of the problem increase up to one trillion. A rigorously defined generator is presented which allows control of the dimensions, the conditioning and the sparsity of the problem. The generator has very low memory requirements and scales well with the dimensions of the problem.

  2. A finite difference method for nonlinear parabolic-elliptic systems of second order partial differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Marian Malec; Lucjan Sapa

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with a finite difference method for a wide class of weakly coupled nonlinear second-order partial differential systems with initial condition and weakly coupled nonlinear implicit boundary conditions. One part of each system is of the parabolic type (degenerated parabolic equations) and the other of the elliptic type (equations with a parameter) in a cube in \\(\\mathbf{R}^{1+n}\\). A suitable finite difference scheme is constructed. It is proved that the scheme has a unique sol...

  3. Interval Oscillation Criteria for Second-Order Forced Functional Dynamic Equations on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Yan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with oscillation of second-order forced functional dynamic equations of the form (r(t(xΔ(tγΔ+∑i=0n‍qi(t|x(δi(t|αisgn  x(δi(t=e(t on time scales. By using a generalized Riccati technique and integral averaging techniques, we establish new oscillation criteria which handle some cases not covered by known criteria.

  4. Static multipole polarisabilities and second-order Stark shift in francium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.; Wilson, J. W.

    1988-01-01

    The multipole polarizability of the ground state of francium is calculated by utilizing both the variational technique of Davison and the quantum defect theory underlying the Bates-Damgaard method. This approach is also shown to yield reasonable results for other alkali atoms. Second-order Stark shift for the ground state of francium is presented as a function of field strength for possible future experimental comparison.

  5. Experimental Determination of System Outage Probability Due to First-Order and Second-Order PMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaffe, Henry H.; Peterson, Daniel L., Jr.

    2006-11-01

    In this paper, a polarization-mode dispersion (PMD) tolerance testing procedure for transponders and transmission systems is described. This method exploits programmable PMD sources for testing the first- and second-order joint probability density function to estimate the total PMD network outage. Experimental data show that first-order-only PMD testing is insufficient to quantify the tolerance of a transponder and may falsely underestimate network outage.

  6. The second order phase transition in Sn2P2S6 crystals: anharmonic oscillator model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.M. Vysochanskii

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Statistical theory for ferroelectrics based on triple well anharmonic potential was used for the case of structural second order phase transition in Sn2P2S6 crystals. Parameters of effective Hamiltonian of the model were estimated using available experimental data. These findings confirm the assumption that the phase transition in these crystals is located in crossover region between order-disorder and displacive type, and very closely to tricritical point.

  7. Robust Synchronization of Incommensurate Fractional-Order Chaotic Systems via Second-Order Sliding Mode Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A second-order sliding mode (SOSM controller is proposed to synchronize a class of incommensurate fractional-order chaotic systems with model uncertainties and external disturbances. Based on the chattering free SOSM control scheme, it can be rigorously proved that the dynamics of the synchronization error is globally asymptotically stable by using the Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, numerical examples are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed controller design approach.

  8. Second-order virial expansion for an atomic gas in a harmonic waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Tom; Leyronas, Xavier; Pricoupenko, Ludovic

    2016-06-01

    The virial expansion for cold two-component Fermi and Bose atomic gases is considered in the presence of a waveguide and in the vicinity of a Feshbach resonance. The interaction between atoms and the coupling with the Feshbach molecules is modeled using a quantitative separable two-channel model. The scattering phase shift in an atomic waveguide is defined. This permits us to extend the Beth-Uhlenbeck formula for the second-order virial coefficient to this inhomogeneous case.

  9. On oscillations of solutions to second-order linear delay differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opluštil, Z.; Šremr, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2013), s. 65-94 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : linear second-order delay differential equation * oscillatory solution Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.340, year: 2013 http://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2013.20.issue-1/gmj-2013-0001/gmj-2013-0001. xml ?format=INT

  10. Remark on zeros of solutions of second-order linear ordinary differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dosoudilová, M.; Lomtatidze, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2016), s. 571-577 ISSN 1072-947X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : second-order linear equation * zeros of solutions * periodic boundary value problem Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.290, year: 2016 https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/gmj.2016.23.issue-4/gmj-2016-0052/gmj-2016-0052. xml

  11. Second Order Sliding Mode Control with Prescribed Convergence Law for Electro-Hydraulic Drives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lasse; Andersen, Torben Ole; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of second order sliding modes for position tracking control of electro-hydraulic valve-cylinder drives (VCD’s). The target is to introduce increased tracking- and transient performance compared to conventional linear approaches, without extending the number...... approach, and that control chattering is eliminated without introducing a boundary layer, normally seen in first order sliding mode controlled systems....

  12. Texture processing of synthetic aperture radar data using second-order spatial statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filho, Otto C. Rotunno; Treitz, Paul M.; Soulis, Eric D.; Howarth, Philip J.; Kouwen, Nicholas

    1996-02-01

    A method is presented for generating second-order spatial statistics (texture) from digital image data using the neighboring gray-level dependence matrix (NGLDM). Texture processing of a high-resolution airborne synthetic aperture radar image in an agricultural environment improved crop classification over the raw data. Classification of the large-number emphasis feature, based on the NGLDM (window size = 11 × 11, α = 24 and β = 1), showed a 30.5% improvement in validation accuracy over the tonal data.

  13. Monotone methods for solving a boundary value problem of second order discrete system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuan-Ming

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of a pair of upper and lower solutions is introduced for a boundary value problem of second order discrete system. A comparison result is given. An existence theorem for a solution is established in terms of upper and lower solutions. A monotone iterative scheme is proposed, and the monotone convergence rate of the iteration is compared and analyzed. The numerical results are given.

  14. Solution of Second-Order IVP and BVP of Matrix Differential Models Using Matrix DTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Abazari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a matrix form of differential transformation method (DTM and apply for nonlinear second-order initial value problems (IVPs and boundary value problems (BVPs of matrix models which are given by (=(,(,( and subject to initial conditions (=0,(=1 and boundary conditions (=0,(=1, where 0,1∈×. Also the convergence of present method is established. Several illustrative examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the present method.

  15. Positive solutions of second order boundary value problems with changing signs Carathéodory nonlinearities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkader Boucherif

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the existence of positive solutions of two-point boundary value problems for nonlinear second order differential equations of the form $(py^{\\prime}^{\\prime}(t+q(ty(t=f(t,y(t,y^{\\prime}(t$, where $f$ is a Carathéodory function, which may change sign, with respect to its second argument, infinitely many times.

  16. Second-order Percus Yevick theory for mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Douglas; Sokolowski, Stefan

    The second-order integral equation formalism of Attard, applied recently, with good results, to one-component hard spheres and Lennard-Jones fluids, is applied to some binary mixtures of Lennard-Jones fluids. Comparison with molecular dynamic simulations of the pair correlation functions shows that this method is also quite accurate for mixtures. This is true not only when the Lorentz Berthelot mixing rules are obeyed but also when there are substantial deviations from these rules.

  17. Synthesis of Optimized Piecewise-Linear Systems Using Similarity Transformation, Part II: Second-Order Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Horska

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available State models of dynamical systems can be used as prototypes inpractical realization of electronic chaotic oscillators. Experimentalverification shows that namely eigenvalue sensitivities of theseprototypes are very important for such a purpose. In the paper theoptimization design procedure for the second-order linear andpiecewise-linear (PWL autonomous dynamical systems is suggested. Thisgives the possibility to obtain minimum eigenvalue sensitivities withrespect to the change of the individual state model parameters.

  18. Existence of periodic solutions for second-order neutral differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjin Li

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of variational structure and critical point theory, we study the existence of periodic solutions for a second-order neutral differential equation $$displaylines{ (p(t x' (t - au ' + f(t, x(t, x(t-au , x(t-2au = g(t,cr x(0 = x(2kau, x'(0 = x'(2kau. }$$ where $k$ is a given positive integer and $au$ is a positive number.

  19. Reanalyzing the 16PF-5 Second Order Structure: Exploratory versus Confirmatory Factorial Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Anton; Blanch, Angel; Garcia, Luis F.

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, the second order structures of the 16PF-5 for 3, 4, 5 and 6 factors are analysed in a sample of 636 undergraduate students and their friends and relatives, with a mean age of 25.09 years (sd: 9.20). A two-stage analysis with Exploratory and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (EFA and CFA) was performed assigning subjects either to…

  20. Variational method for second-order properties in atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendazzoli, G.L. (Bologna Univ. (Italy)); Evangelisti, S. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica); Fano, G.; Ortolani, F. (Bologna Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna (Italy))

    1980-02-11

    Second-order properties are computed by diagonalizing a perturbed Hamiltonian in a three-dimensional linear space L. The choice of the basis vectors generating L is suggested by the coupled perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF) method. A test numerical computation on the dipole polarizability of the H/sub 2/ molecule is presented. The method can be considered as an improvement of the CPHF method.

  1. Second-order fear conditioning prevented by blocking NMDA receptors in amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gewirtz, J C; Davis, M

    1997-07-31

    Antagonists of NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate)-type glutamate receptors disrupt several forms of learning. Although this might indicate that NMDA-receptor-mediated processes are critical for synaptic plasticity, there may be other mechanisms by which NMDA-receptor antagonism could interfere with learning. For instance, fear conditioning would be blocked by microinfusion of the NMDA-receptor antagonist AP5 (D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate) into the basolateral amygdala if AP5 inhibited routine synaptic transmission, thereby reducing the ability of stimuli to activate amygdala neurons. In second-order fear conditioning, the reinforcer is a fear-eliciting conditioned stimulus rather than an unconditioned stimulus. Expression of conditioned fear is amygdala-dependent and so provides a behavioural assessment of the ability of the reinforcer to activate amygdala neurons in the presence of AP5. We report here that intra-amygdala AP5 actually enhances expression of conditioned fear to the conditioned stimulus that provides the reinforcement signal for second-order conditioning. Nevertheless, acquisition of second-order fear conditioning is completely blocked. Our findings strongly support the view that NMDA receptors are critically involved in synaptic plasticity.

  2. Modelling of Two-Phase Flow with Second-Order Accurate Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiselj, Iztok; Petelin, Stojan

    1997-09-01

    A second-order accurate scheme based on high-resolution shock-capturing methods was used with a typical two-phase flow model which is used in the computer codes for simulation of nuclear power plant accidents. The two-fluid model, which has been taken from the computer code RELAP5, consists of six first-order partial differential equations that represent 1D mass, momentum, and energy balances for vapour and liquid. The partial differential equations are ill-posed-nonhyperbolic. The hyperbolicity required by the presented numerical scheme was obtained in the practical range of the physical parameters by minor modification of the virtual mass term. No conservative form of the applied equations exists, therefore, instead of the Riemann solver, more basic averaging was used for the evaluation of the Jacobian matrix. The equations were solved using nonconservative and conservative basic variables. Since the source terms are stiff, they were integrated with time steps which were shorter than or equal to the convection time step. The sources were treated with Strang splitting to retain the second-order accuracy of the scheme. The numerical scheme has been used for the simulations of the two-phase shock tube problem and the Edwards pipe experiment. Results show the importance of the closure laws which have a crucial impact on the accuracy of two-fluid models. Advantages of the second-order accurate schemes are evident especially in the area of fast transients dominated by acoustic phenomena.

  3. Synthesis for Negative Group Delay Circuits Using Distributed and Second-Order RC Circuit Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyoung-Pyo; Ishikawa, Ryo; Saitou, Akira; Honjo, Kazuhiko

    This paper describes the characteristic of negative group delay (NGD) circuits for various configurations including first-order, distributed, and second-order RC circuit configurations. This study includes locus, magnitude, and phase characteristics of the NGD circuits. The simplest NGD circuit is available using first-order RC or RL configuration. As an example of distributed circuit configuration, it is verified that losses in a distributed line causes NGD characteristic at higher cut-off band of a coupled four-line bandpass filter. Also, novel wideband NGD circuits using second-order RC configuration, instead of conventional RLC configuration, are proposed. Adding a parallel resistor to a parallel-T filter enables NGD characteristic to it. Also, a Wien-Robinson bridge is modified to have NGD characteristic by controlling the voltage division ratio. They are fabricated on MMIC substrate, and their NGD characteristics are verified with measured results. They have larger insertion loss than multi-stage RLC NGD circuits, however they can realize second-order NGD characteristic without practical implementation of inductors.

  4. Global motion processing in human color vision: a deficit for second-order stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Suarez, Luis; Mullen, Kathy T

    2010-12-16

    The investigation of the mechanism of global motion in color vision has been limited because the processing of the first-order chromatic RDK elements, based on low-level linear motion detectors, is impaired. Here we return to this problem by using second-order elements in a global motion stimulus. Second-order RDK elements were circular contrast-modulated (CM) envelopes of a low-pass filtered noise carrier. The stimuli were achromatic or isolated L/M- or S-cone opponent mechanisms. We measured simultaneously detection and motion direction identification thresholds at 100% motion coherence and at different RDK speeds with a 2-AFC paradigm. We found that direction identification thresholds were higher than detection thresholds for both chromatic and achromatic stimuli. The gap between these thresholds was greater for the chromatic than the achromatic stimuli and motion direction thresholds for the chromatic RDK were very high or impossible to obtain. We also measured global motion performance (RDK speed of 4 deg/s) by varying the coherence of limited lifetime RDK stimuli. Global motion thresholds could only be obtained for achromatic stimuli and not for chromatic ones. Within the limits of the present stimulus conditions, we found no global motion processing of second-order chromatic stimuli.

  5. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A,; Chokani, N.

    2013-07-01

    Offshore winds are generally stronger and more consistent than winds on land, making the offshore environment attractive for wind energy development. A large part of the offshore wind resource is however located in deep water, where floating turbines are the only economical way of harvesting the energy. The design of offshore floating wind turbines relies on the use of modeling tools that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At present, most of these tools include only first-order hydrodynamic theory. However, observations of supposed second-order hydrodynamic responses in wave-tank tests performed by the DeepCwind consortium suggest that second-order effects might be critical. In this paper, the methodology used by the oil and gas industry has been modified to apply to the analysis of floating wind turbines, and is used to assess the effect of second-order hydrodynamics on floating offshore wind turbines. The method relies on combined use of the frequency-domain tool WAMIT and the time-domain tool FAST. The proposed assessment method has been applied to two different floating wind concepts, a spar and a tension-leg-platform (TLP), both supporting the NREL 5-MW baseline wind turbine. Results showing the hydrodynamic forces and motion response for these systems are presented and analysed, and compared to aerodynamic effects.

  6. Effects of Second-Order Hydrodynamic Forces on Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, T.; Sarmento, A. J. N. A.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-04-01

    Relative to first-order, second-order wave-excitation loads are known to cause significant motions and additional loads in offshore oil and gas platforms. The design of floating offshore wind turbines was partially inherited from the offshore oil and gas industry. Floating offshore wind concepts have been studied with powerful aero-hydro-servo-elastic tools; however, most of the existing work on floating offshore wind turbines has neglected the contribution of second-order wave-excitation loads. As a result, this paper presents a computationally efficient methodology to consider these loads within FAST, a wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The method implemented was verified against the commercial OrcaFlex tool, with good agreement, and low computational time. A reference floating offshore wind turbine was studied under several wind and wave load conditions, including the effects of second-order slow-drift and sum-frequency loads. Preliminary results revealed that these loads excite the turbine's natural frequencies, namely the surge and pitch natural frequencies.

  7. Second-order optimality conditions for problems with C1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginchev, Ivan; Ivanov, Vsevolod I.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we obtain second-order optimality conditions of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker type and Fritz John one for a problem with inequality constraints and a set constraint in nonsmooth settings using second-order directional derivatives. In the necessary conditions we suppose that the objective function and the active constraints are continuously differentiable, but their gradients are not necessarily locally Lipschitz. In the sufficient conditions for a global minimum we assume that the objective function is differentiable at and second-order pseudoconvex at , a notion introduced by the authors [I. Ginchev, V.I. Ivanov, Higher-order pseudoconvex functions, in: I.V. Konnov, D.T. Luc, A.M. Rubinov (Eds.), Generalized Convexity and Related Topics, in: Lecture Notes in Econom. and Math. Systems, vol. 583, Springer, 2007, pp. 247-264], the constraints are both differentiable and quasiconvex at . In the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum of order two we suppose that the problem belongs to the class C1,1. We show that they do not hold for C1 problems, which are not C1,1 ones. At last a new notion parabolic local minimum is defined and it is applied to extend the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum from problems with C1,1 data to problems with C1 one.

  8. Second-order advantage obtained from standard addition first-order instrumental data and multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares. Calculation of the feasible bands of results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohseni, Naimeh; Bahram, Morteza; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2014-03-25

    In order to achieve the second-order advantage, second-order data per sample is usually required, e.g., kinetic-spectrophotometric data. In this study, instead of monitoring the time evolution of spectra (and collecting the kinetic-spectrophotometric data) replicate spectra are used to build a virtual second order data. This data matrix (replicate mode×λ) is rank deficient. Augmentation of these data with standard addition data [or standard sample(s)] will break the rank deficiency, making the quantification of the analyte of interest possible. The MCR-ALS algorithm was applied for the resolution and quantitation of the analyte in both simulated and experimental data sets. In order to evaluate the rotational ambiguity in the retrieved solutions, the MCR-BANDS algorithm was employed. It has been shown that the reliability of the quantitative results significantly depends on the amount of spectral overlap in the spectral region of occurrence of the compound of interest and the remaining constituent(s). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lead removal from aqueous solution by natural and pretreated clinoptilolite: Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenay, Ahmet [Chairmenship of Environmental Protection Department, Antalya Great Municipality, Antalya (Turkey); Arslankaya, Ertan [Department of Environmental Engineering, Yildiz Technical University, 34349 Yildiz, Istanbul (Turkey); Tosun, Ismail [Department of Environmental Engineering, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey)]. E-mail: ismailt@mmf.sdu.edu.tr

    2007-07-19

    Adsorption of Pb(II) ions from aqueous solution onto clinoptilolite has been investigated to evaluate the effects of contact time, initial concentration and pretreatment of clinoptilolite on the removal of Pb(II). Experimental data obtained from batch equilibrium tests have been analyzed by four two-parameter (Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich), four three-parameter (Redlich-Peterson, Sips, Toth and Khan) isotherm models, and kinetic models including the pseudo-first order, the pseudo-second order and Elovich equations using nonlinear regression technique. Of the two-parameter isotherms, Temkin isotherm was the best to describe the experimental data. Three-parameter isotherms have higher regression coefficients (>0.99) and lower relative errors (<5%) than two-parameter isotherms. The best fitting isotherm was the Sips followed by Toth and Redlich-Peterson isotherm equations. Maximum experimental adsorption capacity was found to be 80.933 and 122.400 mg/g for raw and pretreated clinoptilolite, respectively, for the initial concentration of 400 mg/L. Kinetic parameters; rate constants, equilibrium adsorption capacities and related coefficients for each kinetic model were evaluated according to relative errors and correlation coefficients. Results of the kinetic studies show that best fitted kinetic models are obtained to be in the order: the pseudo-first order, the pseudo-second order and Elovich equations. Using the thermodynamic equilibrium coefficients, Gibbs free energy of the Pb(II)-clinoptilolite system was evaluated. The negative value of change in Gibbs free energy ({delta}G{sup o}) indicates that adsorption of Pb(II) on clinoptilolite is spontaneous.

  10. Kinetic sorption of contaminants of emerging concern by a palygorskite-montmorillonite filter medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berhane, Tedros M; Levy, Jonathan; Krekeler, Mark P S; Danielson, Neil D

    2017-06-01

    Kinetic sorption of bisphenol A (BPA), carbamazepine (CMZ) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) by three palygorskite-montmorillonite (Pal-Mt) granule sizes was studied. For BPA, CMZ and CIP, apparent sorption equilibrium was reached within about 3, 5 and 16 h, respectively. The highest and the lowest sorption capacities were by the small and the large granule sizes, respectively. Experimental results were compared to various sorption kinetics models to gain insights regarding the sorption processes and achieve a predictive capacity. The pseudo-second order (PSO) and the Elovich models performed the best while the pseudo-first order (PFO) model was only adequate for CMZ. The intraparticle-diffusion (IPD) model showed a two-step linear plot of BPA, CMZ and CIP sorption versus square root of time that was indicative of surface-sorption followed by IPD as a rate-limiting process before equilibrium was reached. Using the pseudo-first order (PFO) and the pseudo-second order (PSO) rate constants combined with previously-established Langmuir equilibrium sorption models, the kinetic sorption (ka) and desorption (kd) Langmuir kinetic rate constants were theoretically calculated for BPA and CIP. Kinetic sorption was then simulated using these theoretically calculated ka and kd values, and the simulations were compared to the observed behavior. The simulations fit the observed sorbed concentrations better during the early part of the experiments; the observed sorption during later times occurred more slowly than expected, supporting the hypothesis that IPD becomes a rate-limiting process during the course of the experiment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Second-order conditioning and conditioned inhibition: influences of speed versus accuracy on human causal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jessica C; Livesey, Evan J

    2012-01-01

    In human causal learning, excitatory and inhibitory learning effects can sometimes be found in the same paradigm by altering the learning conditions. This study aims to explore whether learning in the feature negative paradigm can be dissociated by emphasising speed over accuracy. In two causal learning experiments, participants were given a feature negative discrimination in which the outcome caused by one cue was prevented by the addition of another. Participants completed training trials either in a self-paced fashion with instructions emphasising accuracy, or under strict time constraints with instructions emphasising speed. Using summation tests in which the preventative cue was paired with another causal cue, participants in the accuracy groups correctly rated the preventative cue as if it reduced the probability of the outcome. However, participants in the speed groups rated the preventative cue as if it increased the probability of the outcome. In Experiment 1, both speed and accuracy groups later judged the same cue to be preventative in a reasoned inference task. Experiment 2 failed to find evidence of similar dissociations in retrospective revaluation (release from overshadowing vs. mediated extinction) or learning about a redundant cue (blocking vs. augmentation). However in the same experiment, the tendency for the accuracy group to show conditioned inhibition and the speed group to show second-order conditioning was consistent even across sub-sets of the speed and accuracy groups with equivalent accuracy in training, suggesting that second-order conditioning is not merely a consequence of poorer acquisition. This dissociation mirrors the trade-off between second-order conditioning and conditioned inhibition observed in animal conditioning when training is extended.

  12. Enhancing second-order conditioning with lesions of the basolateral amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Peter C

    2016-04-01

    Because the occurrence of primary reinforcers in natural environments is relatively rare, conditioned reinforcement plays an important role in many accounts of behavior, including pathological behaviors such as the abuse of alcohol or drugs. As a result of pairing with natural or drug reinforcers, initially neutral cues acquire the ability to serve as reinforcers for subsequent learning. Accepting a major role for conditioned reinforcement in everyday learning is complicated by the often-evanescent nature of this phenomenon in the laboratory, especially when primary reinforcers are entirely absent from the test situation. Here, I found that under certain conditions, the impact of conditioned reinforcement could be extended by lesions of the basolateral amygdala (BLA). Rats received first-order Pavlovian conditioning pairings of 1 visual conditioned stimulus (CS) with food prior to receiving excitotoxic or sham lesions of the BLA, and first-order pairings of another visual CS with food after that surgery. Finally, each rat received second-order pairings of a different auditory cue with each visual first-order CS. As in prior studies, relative to sham-lesioned control rats, lesioned rats were impaired in their acquisition of second-order conditioning to the auditory cue paired with the first-order CS that was trained after surgery. However, lesioned rats showed enhanced and prolonged second-order conditioning to the auditory cue paired with the first-order CS that was trained before amygdala damage was made. Implications for an enhanced role for conditioned reinforcement by drug-related cues after drug-induced alterations in neural plasticity are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Adolescent but not adult rats exhibit ethanol-mediated appetitive second-order conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautassi, Ricardo Marcos; Myers, Mallory; Spear, Linda Patia; Molina, Juan Carlos; Spear, Norman E

    2008-11-01

    Adolescent rats are less sensitive to the sedative effects of ethanol than older animals. They also seem to perceive the reinforcing properties of ethanol. However, unlike neonates or infants, ethanol-mediated appetitive behavior is yet to be clearly shown in adolescents. Appetitive ethanol reinforcement was assessed in adolescent (postnatal day 33, P33) and adult rats (P71) through second-order conditioning (SOC). On P32 or P70, animals were intragastrically administered ethanol (0.5 or 2.0 g/kg) paired with intra-oral pulses of sucrose (CS(1), first-order conditioning phase). CS(1) delivery took place either 5-20 (early pairing) or 30-45 minutes (late pairing) following ethanol administration. The time interval between CS(1) exposure and ethanol administration was 240 minutes in unpaired controls. On P33 or P71, animals were presented the CS(1) (second-order conditioning phase) in a distinctive chamber (CS(2), second-order conditioning). Then they were tested for CS(2) preference. Early and late paired adolescents, but not adults, had greater preference for the CS(2) than controls, a result indicative of ontogenetic variation in ethanol-mediated reinforcement. During the CS(1)-CS(2) associative phase, paired adolescents given 2.0 g/kg ethanol wall-climbed more than controls. Blood and brain ethanol levels associated with the 0.5 and 2.0 g/kg doses at the onset of each conditioning phase did not differ substantially across age, with mean blood ethanol concentration of 38 and 112 mg%. These data indicate age-related differences between adolescent and adult rats in terms of sensitivity to ethanol's motivational effects. Adolescents exhibited high sensitivity for ethanol's appetitive effects. These animals also showed ethanol-mediated behavioral activation during the SOC phase. The SOC preparation provides a valuable conditioning model for assessing ethanol's motivational effects across ontogeny.

  14. Failure of extinction of fear responses in posttraumatic stress disorder: evidence from second-order conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessa, Michèle; Flor, Herta

    2007-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is characterized by the re-experiencing of a traumatic event, although the trauma itself occurred in the past. The extinction of the traumatic response might be impeded if trauma reminders maintain fear responses by their association with the original trauma through second-order conditioning. A differential conditioning paradigm with a trauma-specific picture, used as an acquired unconditioned stimulus, and graphic representations, used as conditioned stimuli, were employed in 14 PTSD patients, 15 trauma-exposed subjects without PTSD, and 15 healthy comparison subjects. The authors used event-related potentials of electroencephalogram (EEG), self-report measures, skin conductance responses, heart rate, and startle modulation to assess the differential conditioned response among subjects. Trauma-exposed subjects with and without PTSD but not healthy comparison subjects showed successful differential conditioning to the trauma-relevant cue indicative of second-order conditioning. Only PTSD patients exhibited enhanced conditioned responses to the trauma reminder during acquisition and impaired extinction as evident in more negative evaluations of the conditioned stimuli associated with a trauma reminder as well as enhanced peripheral and brain responses. These findings suggest that PTSD may be maintained by second-order conditioning where trauma-relevant cues come to serve as unconditioned stimuli, thus generalizing enhanced emotional responses to many previously neutral cues and impeding extinction. The extinction deficit in PTSD patients observed in this study underlines the need for therapies focusing on the extinction of learned responses, such as behavioral treatment, with or without the addition of pharmacological substances that enhance the extinction of a learned response.

  15. Preparing for Citizenship: Second Order Thinking Concepts in Social Science Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Sandahl

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Social Science as a school subject aims at making students knowledgeable in societal issues as well as preparing them for citizenship. Despite the strong position of Social Science in the Swedish school curricula little research has been done in the field. Previous research has mainly concentrated on factual knowledge and conceptual learning, or the role of deliberation in class activities. Less research has focused on the role of disciplinary thinking and how that might promote learning how to think like a social scientist and at the same time prepare students for citizenship. By using a conceptual framework from history didactics Social Science education is explored in search of second-order concepts. Also, the relationship between these concepts and democratic socialisation is investigated. By focusing on one substantial case, globalisation, this study tries to reach beyond the various topics commonly covered in Social Science education. This was done by observations of teaching in Social Science and interviews with six experienced teachers. Manifested in the teachers’ voices were ideas on how to organise, analyse, interpret and critically review discourses in society. The proposed second order concepts of Social Science found in the teachers’ voices were: social science perspectives, social science causality, social science evidence and inference, social science abstraction, social science comparison and contrast, and the evaluative dimension of social science. In order to reach their goals in Social Science the teachers underlined the importance of using these concepts. When pupils work scientifically they develop a way of thinking about society and they challenge their set opinions about different topics. Therefore, second order concepts are important for learning Social Science and at the same time preparing students for a life as citizens.

  16. Assessment of First- and Second-Order Wave-Excitation Load Models for Cylindrical Substructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, Brandon; Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason

    2016-07-01

    The hydrodynamic loads on an offshore wind turbine's support structure present unique engineering challenges for offshore wind. Two typical approaches used for modeling these hydrodynamic loads are potential flow (PF) and strip theory (ST), the latter via Morison's equation. This study examines the first- and second-order wave-excitation surge forces on a fixed cylinder in regular waves computed by the PF and ST approaches to (1) verify their numerical implementations in HydroDyn and (2) understand when the ST approach breaks down. The numerical implementation of PF and ST in HydroDyn, a hydrodynamic time-domain solver implemented as a module in the FAST wind turbine engineering tool, was verified by showing the consistency in the first- and second-order force output between the two methods across a range of wave frequencies. ST is known to be invalid at high frequencies, and this study investigates where the ST solution diverges from the PF solution. Regular waves across a range of frequencies were run in HydroDyn for a monopile substructure. As expected, the solutions for the first-order (linear) wave-excitation loads resulting from these regular waves are similar for PF and ST when the diameter of the cylinder is small compared to the length of the waves (generally when the diameter-to-wavelength ratio is less than 0.2). The same finding applies to the solutions for second-order wave-excitation loads, but for much smaller diameter-to-wavelength ratios (based on wavelengths of first-order waves).

  17. A second-order unconstrained optimization method for canonical-ensemble density-functional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygaard, Cecilie R; Olsen, Jeppe

    2013-03-07

    A second order converging method of ensemble optimization (SOEO) in the framework of Kohn-Sham Density-Functional Theory is presented, where the energy is minimized with respect to an ensemble density matrix. It is general in the sense that the number of fractionally occupied orbitals is not predefined, but rather it is optimized by the algorithm. SOEO is a second order Newton-Raphson method of optimization, where both the form of the orbitals and the occupation numbers are optimized simultaneously. To keep the occupation numbers between zero and two, a set of occupation angles is defined, from which the occupation numbers are expressed as trigonometric functions. The total number of electrons is controlled by a built-in second order restriction of the Newton-Raphson equations, which can be deactivated in the case of a grand-canonical ensemble (where the total number of electrons is allowed to change). To test the optimization method, dissociation curves for diatomic carbon are produced using different functionals for the exchange-correlation energy. These curves show that SOEO favors symmetry broken pure-state solutions when using functionals with exact exchange such as Hartree-Fock and Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr. This is explained by an unphysical contribution to the exact exchange energy from interactions between fractional occupations. For functionals without exact exchange, such as local density approximation or Becke Lee-Yang-Parr, ensemble solutions are favored at interatomic distances larger than the equilibrium distance. Calculations on the chromium dimer are also discussed. They show that SOEO is able to converge to ensemble solutions for systems that are more complicated than diatomic carbon.

  18. Comparison of Second-Order Loads on a Semisubmersible Floating Wind Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gueydon, S.; Duarte, T.; Jonkman, J.; Bayati, I.; Sarmento, A.

    2014-03-01

    As offshore wind projects move to deeper waters, floating platforms become the most feasible solution for supporting the turbines. The oil and gas industry has gained experience with floating platforms that can be applied to offshore wind projects. This paper focuses on the analysis of second-order wave loading on semisubmersible platforms. Semisubmersibles, which are being chosen for different floating offshore wind concepts, are particularly prone to slow-drift motions. The slack catenary moorings usually result in large natural periods for surge and sway motions (more than 100 s), which are in the range of the second-order difference-frequency excitation force. Modeling these complex structures requires coupled design codes. Codes have been developed that include turbine aerodynamics, hydrodynamic forces on the platform, restoring forces from the mooring lines, flexibility of the turbine, and the influence of the turbine control system. In this paper two different codes are employed: FAST, which was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and aNySIM, which was developed by the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands. The hydrodynamic loads are based on potential-flow theory, up to the second order. Hydrodynamic coefficients for wave excitation, radiation, and hydrostatic forces are obtained with two different panel codes, WAMIT (developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and DIFFRAC (developed by MARIN). The semisubmersible platform, developed for the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation project is used as a reference platform. Irregular waves are used to compare the behavior of this platform under slow-drift excitation loads. The results from this paper highlight the effects of these loads on semisubmersible-type platforms, which represent a promising solution for the commercial development of the offshore deepwater wind resource.

  19. Second-order conditioning and conditioned inhibition: influences of speed versus accuracy on human causal learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica C Lee

    Full Text Available In human causal learning, excitatory and inhibitory learning effects can sometimes be found in the same paradigm by altering the learning conditions. This study aims to explore whether learning in the feature negative paradigm can be dissociated by emphasising speed over accuracy. In two causal learning experiments, participants were given a feature negative discrimination in which the outcome caused by one cue was prevented by the addition of another. Participants completed training trials either in a self-paced fashion with instructions emphasising accuracy, or under strict time constraints with instructions emphasising speed. Using summation tests in which the preventative cue was paired with another causal cue, participants in the accuracy groups correctly rated the preventative cue as if it reduced the probability of the outcome. However, participants in the speed groups rated the preventative cue as if it increased the probability of the outcome. In Experiment 1, both speed and accuracy groups later judged the same cue to be preventative in a reasoned inference task. Experiment 2 failed to find evidence of similar dissociations in retrospective revaluation (release from overshadowing vs. mediated extinction or learning about a redundant cue (blocking vs. augmentation. However in the same experiment, the tendency for the accuracy group to show conditioned inhibition and the speed group to show second-order conditioning was consistent even across sub-sets of the speed and accuracy groups with equivalent accuracy in training, suggesting that second-order conditioning is not merely a consequence of poorer acquisition. This dissociation mirrors the trade-off between second-order conditioning and conditioned inhibition observed in animal conditioning when training is extended.

  20. Spacecraft Attitude Estimation Using the Second-Order Extended H Infinity Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Silva, William; Koiti Kuga, Helio; Zanardi, Maria Cecilia

    In this work, will be described the attitude determination and the gyros drift estimation using the Second-Order Extended H Infinity Filter for nonlinear systems. Such filter uses the Taylor series to approximate the non-linearity of the known dynamics and assumes that the noise sources have approximately known statistical properties. The application uses simulated measurement data for orbit and attitude through the propagator PROPAT. The attitude dynamical model is described by nonlinear equations involving the Euler angles. The attitude sensors available are two DSS (Digital Sun Sensors), two IRES (Infra-Red Earth Sensor), and one triad of mechanical gyros. These sensors configurations are similar to those found in real satellite CBERS-2 (China Brazil Earth Resources Satellite). According to the theory, in comparison with the Kalman filtering, the H Infinity filtering has some advantages in state estimation. In the H Infinity filter, the nature is assumed to be perverse and actively seeks to degrade our state estimate as much as possible, whereas the Kalman filtering, the nature is assumed to be indifferent. Thus, Extended H Infinity Filter is simply a robust version of the extended Kalman filter because to add tolerance to unmodeled noise and dynamics. Using the Second-Order Extend H Infinity Filter, the aim is to highlight and magnify the properties of the H Infinity Filter in terms of its favourable characteristics, since this is a refinement of the Extended H∞ Filter and certainly the Second-Order Extend H Infinity Filter provides better results. The results in this work show that one can reach accuracies in attitude determination within the prescribed requirements, besides providing estimates of the gyro drifts which can be further used to enhance the gyro error model. It is known that gyros present several sources of error of which the drift is the most troublesome,because over time the accumulation of errorshinder the accuracy in the estimation process

  1. Second-Order Free-Riding on Antisocial Punishment Restores the Effectiveness of Prosocial Punishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attila Szolnoki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Economic experiments have shown that punishment can increase public goods game contributions over time. However, the effectiveness of punishment is challenged by second-order free-riding and antisocial punishment. The latter implies that noncooperators punish cooperators, while the former implies unwillingness to shoulder the cost of punishment. Here, we extend the theory of cooperation in the spatial public goods game by considering four competing strategies, which are traditional cooperators and defectors, as well as cooperators who punish defectors and defectors who punish cooperators. We show that if the synergistic effects are high enough to sustain cooperation based on network reciprocity alone, antisocial punishment does not deter public cooperation. Conversely, if synergistic effects are low and punishment is actively needed to sustain cooperation, antisocial punishment does is viable, but only if the cost-to-fine ratio is low. If the costs are relatively high, cooperation again dominates as a result of spatial pattern formation. Counterintuitively, defectors who do not punish cooperators, and are thus effectively second-order free-riding on antisocial punishment, form an active layer around punishing cooperators, which protects them against defectors that punish cooperators. A stable three-strategy phase that is sustained by the spontaneous emergence of cyclic dominance is also possible via the same route. The microscopic mechanism behind the reported evolutionary outcomes can be explained by the comparison of invasion rates that determine the stability of subsystem solutions. Our results reveal an unlikely evolutionary escape from adverse effects of antisocial punishment, and they provide a rationale for why second-order free-riding is not always an impediment to the evolutionary stability of punishment.

  2. A porous flow model of flank eruptions on Mt. Etna: second-order perturbation theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cenni

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available A porous flow model for magma migration from a deep source within a volcanic edifice is developed. The model is based on the assumption that an isotropic and homogeneous system of fractures allows magma migration from one localized feeding dyke up to the surface of the volcano. The maximum level that magma can reach within the volcano (i.e., the «free surface» of magma, where fluid pressure equals the atmospheric pressure is reproduced through a second-order perturbation approach to the non-linear equations governing the migration of incompressible fluids through a porous medium. The perturbation parameter is found to depend on the ratio of the volumic discharge rate at the source (m3/s divided by the product of the hydraulic conductivity of the medium (m1/s times the square of the source depth. The second-order corrections for the free surface of Mt. Etna are found to be small but not negligible; from the comparison between first-order and second-order free surfaces it appears that the former is higher near the summit, slightly lower at intermediate altitudes and slightly higher far away from the axis of the volcano. Flank eruptions in the southern sector are found to be located in regions where the topography is actually lower than the theoretical free surface of magma. In this sector, modulations in the eruption site density correlate well with even minor differences between free surface and topography. In the northern and western sectors similar good fits are found, while the NE rift and the eastern sector seem to require mechanisms or structures respectively favouring and inhibiting magma migration.

  3. Assessment of First- and Second-Order Wave-Excitation Load Models for Cylindrical Substructures: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereyra, Brandon; Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason

    2017-03-09

    The hydrodynamic loads on an offshore wind turbine's support structure present unique engineering challenges for offshore wind. Two typical approaches used for modeling these hydrodynamic loads are potential flow (PF) and strip theory (ST), the latter via Morison's equation. This study examines the first- and second-order wave-excitation surge forces on a fixed cylinder in regular waves computed by the PF and ST approaches to (1) verify their numerical implementations in HydroDyn and (2) understand when the ST approach breaks down. The numerical implementation of PF and ST in HydroDyn, a hydrodynamic time-domain solver implemented as a module in the FAST wind turbine engineering tool, was verified by showing the consistency in the first- and second-order force output between the two methods across a range of wave frequencies. ST is known to be invalid at high frequencies, and this study investigates where the ST solution diverges from the PF solution. Regular waves across a range of frequencies were run in HydroDyn for a monopile substructure. As expected, the solutions for the first-order (linear) wave-excitation loads resulting from these regular waves are similar for PF and ST when the diameter of the cylinder is small compared to the length of the waves (generally when the diameter-to-wavelength ratio is less than 0.2). The same finding applies to the solutions for second-order wave-excitation loads, but for much smaller diameter-to-wavelength ratios (based on wavelengths of first-order waves).

  4. First- and second-order stimulus length selectivity in New World monkey striate cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, J A; Lui, L; Tweedale, R; Rosa, M G P

    2004-01-01

    Motion is a powerful cue for figure-ground segregation, allowing the recognition of shapes even if the luminance and texture characteristics of the stimulus and background are matched. In order to investigate the neural processes underlying early stages of the cue-invariant processing of form, we compared the responses of neurons in the striate cortex (V1) of anaesthetized marmosets to two types of moving stimuli: bars defined by differences in luminance, and bars defined solely by the coherent motion of random patterns that matched the texture and temporal modulation of the background. A population of form-cue-invariant (FCI) neurons was identified, which demonstrated similar tuning to the length of contours defined by first- and second-order cues. FCI neurons were relatively common in the supragranular layers (where they corresponded to 28% of the recorded units), but were absent from layer 4. Most had complex receptive fields, which were significantly larger than those of other V1 neurons. The majority of FCI neurons demonstrated end-inhibition in response to long first- and second-order bars, and were strongly direction selective. Thus, even at the level of V1 there are cells whose variations in response level appear to be determined by the shape and motion of the entire second-order object, rather than by its parts (i.e. the individual textural components). These results are compatible with the existence of an output channel from V1 to the ventral stream of extrastriate areas, which already encodes the basic building blocks of the image in an invariant manner.

  5. QED second order corrections on the speed of light at low temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M ‎Razmi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We want to study thermal corrections on the speed of light at low temperature considering temperature dependence of photon vacuum polarization tensor at two-loop level in the standard QED‎. It is found that the heat bath behaves as a dispersive medium for the propagation of light and reduces its speed proportional to the second order of temperature‎. ‎Similarities and differences‎, ‎in light of already known calculations which are based on Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian and/or those using temperature dependent electromagnetic properties of the medium are discussed‎.

  6. Dispersion of the resonant second order nonlinearity in 2D semiconductors probed by femtosecond continuum pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mokim

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an effective microspectroscopy technique by tracing the dispersion of second order nonlinear susceptibility (χ(2 in a monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2. The χ(2 dispersion obtained with better than 3 meV photon energy resolution showed peak value being within 6.3-8.4×10-19 m2/V range. We estimate the fundamental bandgap to be at 2.2 eV. Sub-structure in the χ(2 dispersion reveals a contribution to the nonlinearity due to exciton transitions with exciton binding energy estimated to be at 0.7 eV.

  7. Error analysis of Newmark's method for the second order equation with inhomogeneous term

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiba, F.; Kako, T. [Department of Computer Science, University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    For the second order time evolution equation with a general dissipation term, we introduce a recurrence relation of Newmark's method. Deriving an energy inequality from this relation, we consider the stability and the convergence criteria of Newmark's method. We treat a dissipation term under the assumption that the coefficient-damping matrix is constant in time and non-negative. We can relax however the assumptions for the dissipation and the rigidity matrices to be arbitrary symmetric matrices. (author)

  8. Ultra-fast digital holography of the femto-second order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Hongchen; Wang, Xiaolei; Mu, Guoguang

    2007-01-01

    We report on pulsed digital micro holographic systems recording ultra-fast process of the femto-second order, by spatially angular division multiplexing (SADM) and wavelength division multiplexing (WDM), respectively. Both intensity and phase images of the digitally reconstructed images are obtained through Fourier transformation and digital filtering, which show clearly the plasma forming and propagating dynamic process of laser induced ionization of ambient air at the wavelength of 800 nm, with a time resolution of 50 fs and frame intervals of 300 to 550 fs.

  9. Effect of Second-Order Hydrodynamics on a Floating Offshore Wind Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roald, L.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-05-01

    The design of offshore floating wind turbines uses design codes that can simulate the entire coupled system behavior. At the present, most codes include only first-order hydrodynamics, which induce forces and motions varying with the same frequency as the incident waves. Effects due to second- and higher-order hydrodynamics are often ignored in the offshore industry, because the forces induced typically are smaller than the first-order forces. In this report, first- and second-order hydrodynamic analysis used in the offshore oil and gas industry is applied to two different wind turbine concepts--a spar and a tension leg platform.

  10. Observation of a second order magnetic phase transition in CsFeS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Y. K.; Iannarella, L.; Wagner, F. E.; Taft, C. A.; Furtado, N. C.; Arsenio, T. P.

    1988-12-01

    Mössbauer experiments performed on CsFeS2 at temperatures between 4.2 K and 300 K show that the orthorhombic high temperature phase undergoes a second order magnetic phase transition near 69 K, when the previously reported first order magnetic and structural transition to a triclinic modification near 75 K is suppressed by lattice defects or internal stresses. The saturation values of the hyperfine fields are 19.1 T for the triclinic and 15.5 and 14.1 T for the orthorhombic phase.

  11. The Vacuole Model Revisited: New Repulsive Terms in the Second Order Deflection of Light

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Amrita; Potapov, Alexander A; Bhadra, Arunava; Nandi, Kamal K

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the light deflection angle in the Schwarzschild-de Sitter vacuole truly to second order. The derived formulas reveal several new repulsion terms due to the cosmological constant $lambda$, including a modification of the term derived by Ishak et al. (2008). The analysis here also includes the effect of a conformal parameter $gamma$ on light deflection. Much depends on the sign and exact value of $gamma$. Their impact on deflection is addressed. Our deflection calculations naturally reveal an upper limit $lambda$ less than 10E-51. Various deflection components are tabulated at the end.

  12. The second-order theory of electromagnetic hot ion beam instabilities. [in interplanetary magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary, S. P.; Tokar, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the application of a second-order theory for electromagnetic instabilities in a collisionless plasma to two modes which resonate with hot ion beams. The application of the theory is strictly limited to the linear growth phase. However, the application of the theory may be extended to obtain a description of the beam at postsaturation if the wave-beam resonance is sufficiently broad in velocity space. Under the considered limitations, it is shown that, as in the cold beam case, the fluctuating fields do not gain appreciable momentum and that the primary exchange of momentum is between the beam and main component.

  13. Temporal mode selectivity by frequency conversion in second-order nonlinear optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, D. V.; Raymer, M. G.; McKinstrie, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    in a transparent optical network using temporally orthogonal waveforms to encode different channels. We model the process using coupled-mode equations appropriate for wave mixing in a uniform second-order nonlinear optical medium pumped by a strong laser pulse. We find Green functions describing the process......We explore theoretically the feasibility of using frequency conversion by sum- or difference-frequency generation, enabled by three-wave-mixing, for selectively multiplexing orthogonal input waveforms that overlap in time and frequency. Such a process would enable a drop device for use...

  14. Second-order domain derivative of normal-dependent boundary integrals

    KAUST Repository

    Balzer, Jonathan

    2010-03-17

    Numerous reconstruction tasks in (optical) surface metrology allow for a variational formulation. The occurring boundary integrals may be interpreted as shape functions. The paper is concerned with the second-order analysis of such functions. Shape Hessians of boundary integrals are considered difficult to find analytically because they correspond to third-order derivatives of an, in a sense equivalent, domain integral. We complement previous results by considering cost functions depending explicitly on the surface normal. The correctness and practicability of our calculations are verified in the context of a Newton-type shape reconstruction method. © 2010 Birkhäuser / Springer Basel AG.

  15. Second-Order Statistics for Wave Propagation through Complex Optical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yura, H.T.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    1989-01-01

    Closed-form expressions are derived for various statistical functions that arise in optical propagation through arbitrary optical systems that can be characterized by a complex ABCD matrix in the presence of distributed random inhomogeneities along the optical path. Specifically, within the second......-order Rytov approximation, explicit general expressions are presented for the mutual coherence function, the log-amplitude and phase correlation functions, and the mean-square irradiance that are obtained in propagation through an arbitrary paraxial ABCD optical system containing Gaussian-shaped limiting...

  16. Iterative oscillation results for second-order differential equations with advanced argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Jadlovska

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the oscillation of solutions to a linear second-order differential equation with advanced argument. Sufficient oscillation conditions involving limit inferior are given which essentially improve known results. We base our technique on the iterative construction of solution estimates and some of the recent ideas developed for first-order advanced differential equations. We demonstrate the advantage of our results on Euler-type advanced equation. Using MATLAB software, a comparison of the effectiveness of newly obtained criteria as well as the necessary iteration length in particular cases are discussed.

  17. Second-order shaped pulsed for solid-state quantum computation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Pinaki [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present the construction and detailed analysis of highly optimized self-refocusing pulse shapes for several rotation angles. We characterize the constructed pulses by the coefficients appearing in the Magnus expansion up to second order. This allows a semianalytical analysis of the performance of the constructed shapes in sequences and composite pulses by computing the corresponding leading-order error operators. Higher orders can be analyzed with the numerical technique suggested by us previously. We illustrate the technique by analyzing several composite pulses designed to protect against pulse amplitude errors, and on decoupling sequences for potentially long chains of qubits with on-site and nearest-neighbor couplings.

  18. Team Resilience as a Second-Order Emergent State: A Theoretical Model and Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Clint; Kreutzer, Christine; Cannon-Bowers, Janis; Lamb, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    Resilience has been recognized as an important phenomenon for understanding how individuals overcome difficult situations. However, it is not only individuals who face difficulties; it is not uncommon for teams to experience adversity. When they do, they must be able to overcome these challenges without performance decrements.This manuscript represents a theoretical model that might be helpful in conceptualizing this important construct. Specifically, it describes team resilience as a second-order emergent state. We also include research propositions that follow from the model. PMID:28861013

  19. Evidence of second order transition induced by the porosity in the thermal conductivity of sintered metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïmen E. Gheribi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, using both experimental data and theoretical modelling, we investigate the degradation of the thermal conductivity of sintered metals due simultaneously to the grain boundary thermal resistance and the porosity. We show that the porosity dependence of the thermal conductivity of sintered material from spherical particle powder, exhibits a critical behaviour associated with a second order phase transition. An analytical model with a single parameter is proposed to describe the critical behaviour of the thermal conductivity of sintered metals versus porosity.

  20. Communication: Explicitly correlated formalism for second-order single-particle Green's function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Peng, Chong; Ortiz, J V; Valeev, Edward F

    2017-09-28

    We present an explicitly correlated formalism for the second-order single-particle Green's function method (GF2-F12) that does not assume the popular diagonal approximation and describes the energy dependence of the explicitly correlated terms. For small and medium organic molecules, the basis set errors of ionization potentials of GF2-F12 are radically improved relative to GF2: the performance of GF2-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ is better than that of GF2/aug-cc-pVQZ, at a significantly lower cost.

  1. Fast curvature matrix-vector products for second-order gradient descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraudolph, Nicol N

    2002-07-01

    We propose a generic method for iteratively approximating various second-order gradient steps - Newton, Gauss-Newton, Levenberg-Marquardt, and natural gradient - in linear time per iteration, using special curvature matrix-vector products that can be computed in O(n). Two recent acceleration techniques for on-line learning, matrix momentum and stochastic meta-descent (SMD), implement this approach. Since both were originally derived by very different routes, this offers fresh insight into their operation, resulting in further improvements to SMD.

  2. Weak Second Order Explicit Stabilized Methods for Stiff Stochastic Differential Equations

    KAUST Repository

    Abdulle, Assyr

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new family of explicit integrators for stiff Itô stochastic differential equations (SDEs) of weak order two. These numerical methods belong to the class of one-step stabilized methods with extended stability domains and do not suffer from the step size reduction faced by standard explicit methods. The family is based on the standard second order orthogonal Runge-Kutta-Chebyshev (ROCK2) methods for deterministic problems. The convergence, meansquare, and asymptotic stability properties of the methods are analyzed. Numerical experiments, including applications to nonlinear SDEs and parabolic stochastic partial differential equations are presented and confirm the theoretical results. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  3. Grid Synchronization of Power Converters using Multiple Second Order Generalized Integrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Teodorescu, Remus; Candela, Ignacio

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a new frequency-adaptive synchronization method for grid-connected power converters which allows estimating not only the positive- and negative- sequence components of the power signal at the fundamental frequency, but also other sequence components at higher frequencies....... The proposed system is called the MSOGI-FLL since it is based on a decoupled network consisting of multiple second order generalized integrators (MSOGI) which are frequency adaptive by using a frequency-locked loop (FLL). In this paper, the MSOGI-FLL is analyzed and its performance is evaluated by both...

  4. An Iterative Regularization Method for Identifying the Source Term in a Second Order Differential Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairouz Zouyed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the inverse problem of determining an unknown source in a second order differential equation from measured final data. This problem is ill-posed; that is, the solution (if it exists does not depend continuously on the data. In order to solve the considered problem, an iterative method is proposed. Using this method a regularized solution is constructed and an a priori error estimate between the exact solution and its regularized approximation is obtained. Moreover, numerical results are presented to illustrate the accuracy and efficiency of this method.

  5. Second-order cone programming with probabilistic regularization for robust adaptive beamforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xijing; Miron, Sebastian; Yang, Yixin; Yang, Shi'e

    2017-03-01

    Probabilistic regularization (PR) is introduced to make superdirective array beamforming robust against sensor characteristic mismatches. The objective is to enlarge the directivity while ensuring robustness with high probability. The PR problem is solved via the second-order cone programming where the regularization parameter is chosen through a statistical analysis of the system perturbations, based on Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments are carried out on a miniaturized 3 × 3 uniform rectangular array without calibration. The results show that for this particular array, the PR method is robust to sensor mismatches and achieves a higher level of directivity compared with other robust adaptive beamforming approaches.

  6. Leader-following consensus of the second-order multi-agent systems under directed topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wanli

    2016-11-01

    This paper investigates the consensus problem for second-order multi-agent systems with a dynamical leader. A simple and novel protocol based on the relative state of the neighboring agents is proposed. Using the linear matrix inequality method, sufficient conditions are derived to ensure the consensus for both the cases without and with communication delay in the multi-agent systems. Some numerical simulations are also given to show the effectiveness of the proposed results. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Second-order quantum phase transition of a homogeneous Bose gas with attractive interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziń, P.; Oleś, B.; Trippenbach, M.; Sacha, K.

    2008-08-01

    We consider a homogeneous Bose gas of particles with an attractive interaction in an elongated three-dimensional box with periodic boundary conditions. Mean-field theory predicts for this system a spontaneous breaking of the translational symmetry at a certain value of the interaction strength. We show that at this point a second-order quantum phase transition occurs. We investigate the system in the vicinity of the critical point using Bogoliubov theory and a continuous description, that allows us to analyze quantum fluctuations in the system even when the Bogoliubov approach breaks down.

  8. A new simple model for composite fading channels: Second order statistics and channel capacity

    KAUST Repository

    Yilmaz, Ferkan

    2010-09-01

    In this paper, we introduce the most general composite fading distribution to model the envelope and the power of the received signal in such fading channels as millimeter wave (60 GHz or above) fading channels and free-space optical channels, which we term extended generalized-K (EGK) composite fading distribution. We obtain the second-order statistics of the received signal envelope characterized by the EGK composite fading distribution. Expressions for probability density function, cumulative distribution function, level crossing rate and average fade duration, moments, amount of fading and average capacity are derived. Numerical and computer simulation examples validate the accuracy of the presented mathematical analysis. © 2010 IEEE.

  9. Green's Function for Discrete Second-Order Problems with Nonlocal Boundary Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Svetlana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a second-order discrete problem with two additional conditions which are described by a pair of linearly independent linear functionals. We have found the solution to this problem and presented a formula and the existence condition of Green's function if the general solution of a homogeneous equation is known. We have obtained the relation between two Green's functions of two nonhomogeneous problems. It allows us to find Green's function for the same equation but with different additional conditions. The obtained results are applied to problems with nonlocal boundary conditions.

  10. Semantic Characterisations of Second-Order Computability over the Real Numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korovina, Margarita V.; Kudinov, Oleg V.

    2001-01-01

    We propose semantic characterisations of second-order computability over the reals based on σ-definability theory. Notions of computability for operators and real-valued functionals defined on the class of continuous functions are introduced via domain theory. We consider the reals with and without...... equality and prove theorems which connect computable operators and real-valued functionals with validity of finite σ-formulas. This research was supported in part by the RFBR (grants N 99-01-00485, N 00-01-00810) and by the Siberian Division of RAS (a grant for young researchers, 2000)...

  11. Communication: Explicitly correlated formalism for second-order single-particle Green's function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavošević, Fabijan; Peng, Chong; Ortiz, J. V.; Valeev, Edward F.

    2017-09-01

    We present an explicitly correlated formalism for the second-order single-particle Green's function method (GF2-F12) that does not assume the popular diagonal approximation and describes the energy dependence of the explicitly correlated terms. For small and medium organic molecules, the basis set errors of ionization potentials of GF2-F12 are radically improved relative to GF2: the performance of GF2-F12/aug-cc-pVDZ is better than that of GF2/aug-cc-pVQZ, at a significantly lower cost.

  12. Second-order nonlinear optical properties of mexylaminotriazine-functionalized glass-forming azobenzene derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Hirohito; Jackson, Matthew; Lebel, Olivier; Nunzi, Jean-Michel; Sabat, Ribal Georges

    2016-10-01

    The second-order nonlinear optical coefficients of thin films of mexylaminotriazine-functionalized azobenzene molecular glass derivatives were measured using second harmonic generation. The thin films were poled using a custom corona poling set-up and the second harmonic light from a pulsed 1064-nm laser was detected. Four out of the six tested compounds showed optical nonlinearity and a maximum coefficient of 75 pm/V was obtained. The time dependence of the nonlinear coefficients was studied under ambient light and under dark; the second harmonic generation intensity stayed constant for thiazole-containing derivatives while a significant decay was measured for the other compounds.

  13. Adaptive Second-Order Total Variation: An Approach Aware of Slope Discontinuities

    KAUST Repository

    Lenzen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Total variation (TV) regularization, originally introduced by Rudin, Osher and Fatemi in the context of image denoising, has become widely used in the field of inverse problems. Two major directions of modifications of the original approach were proposed later on. The first concerns adaptive variants of TV regularization, the second focuses on higher-order TV models. In the present paper, we combine the ideas of both directions by proposing adaptive second-order TV models, including one anisotropic model. Experiments demonstrate that introducing adaptivity results in an improvement of the reconstruction error. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.

  14. Mixed FEM for Second Order Elliptic Problems on Polygonal Meshes with BEM-Based Spaces

    KAUST Repository

    Efendiev, Yalchin

    2014-01-01

    We present a Boundary Element Method (BEM)-based FEM for mixed formulations of second order elliptic problems in two dimensions. The challenge, we would like to address, is a proper construction of H(div)-conforming vector valued trial functions on arbitrary polygonal partitions of the domain. The proposed construction generates trial functions on polygonal elements which inherit some of the properties of the unknown solution. In the numerical realization, the relevant local problems are treated by means of boundary integral formulations. We test the accuracy of the method on two model problems. © 2014 Springer-Verlag.

  15. Iterative Reproducing Kernel Method for Solving Second-Order Integrodifferential Equations of Fredholm Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Komashynska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an efficient iterative method for solving a class of nonlinear second-order Fredholm integrodifferential equations associated with different boundary conditions. A simple algorithm is given to obtain the approximate solutions for this type of equations based on the reproducing kernel space method. The solution obtained by the method takes form of a convergent series with easily computable components. Furthermore, the error of the approximate solution is monotone decreasing with the increasing of nodal points. The reliability and efficiency of the proposed algorithm are demonstrated by some numerical experiments.

  16. Non-commutative gauge gravity: second-order correction and scalar particle creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaim, Slimane [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite de Batna (Algeria); Khodja, Lamine, E-mail: zaimslimane@yahoo.f [Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences Exactes, Universite Mentouri, Constantine (Algeria)

    2010-05-01

    We construct a non-commutative gauge theory for a charged scalar field and verify its invariance under local Poincare and general coordinate transformations. We derive a general Klein-Gordon equation up to the second order of the non-commutativity parameter using the general modified field equation. As an application, we choose the Bianchi I universe and use the Seiberg-Witten maps to obtain the deformed non-commutative metric and study a particle production process. We show that non-commutativity plays the same role as an electric field, gravity and chemical potential.

  17. Techniques for ultrastructure synthesis: stabilization of large second-order optical nonlinearities of poled polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chengzeng; Becker, Mark W.; Wu, Bo; Dalton, Larry R.; Shi, Yongqiang; Ranon, Peter M.; Steier, William H.

    1993-12-01

    Ultrastructure synthesis techniques for stabilization of large second order optical nonlinearities of poled polymers are reviewed. These techniques include covalent attachment of chromophores onto polyimide backbones, use of double-end crosslinkable chromophores, crosslinking of main-chain polymers with chromophores as polymer backbone components, and in-situ poling and polymerization of chromophores with multiple functionalities. By using these techniques, second harmonic generation coefficients, measured at 1064 nm wavelength, on the order of 10-7 esu and long term stability of optical nonlinearity at 90 - 125$DEGC have been realized.

  18. Calix(4)arenes, versatile molecules for second-order nonlinear optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenis, Paul Johan Andre

    This thesis deals with the preparation and characterization of second-order nonlinear optical active calix(4) arene molecules and of calix(4) arene-based materials. The theoretical background of nonlinear optics, the possible applications, and the current research efforts in this area are reviewed after a description of the historical development of nonlinear optics (NLO) and the objectives of the research described in this thesis. Secondly, the molecular second-order NLO properties of different calix (4) arenes are discussed. The second- order nonlinear optical properties of the four possible extreme conformers of tetranitrotetrapropoxy-calix (4) arene are related to their symmetries and dynamics and are compared with predicted properties based on the structures obtained from X-ray diffraction, molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations. Furthermore, calix (4) arene derivatives functionalized with highly polarizable conjugated π-systems and strongly electron-accepting groups, and resorcin (4) arenes functionalized with highly NLO-active groups are synthesized in order to obtain higher NLO activity. The third part deals with calix (4) arene-based systems with macroscopic second-order NLO activity. The calix (4) arene-based polyimides combine the desired properties of good processability, high transparency above 410 nm and, most importantly, second-harmonic generation coefficients that are stable at 80oC. This renders them suitable for frequency doubling applications from 820 to 410 nm. Annealed, unpoled thin films consisting of tetranitrotetrapropoxy-calix (4) arene only (neat films) show two optically and morphologically different domains. In scanning force microscopy (SFM) they exhibit a unique inversion of relative friction upon change of the load on the SFM tip. Furthermore, friction anisotropy was observed in one of the two domains, which originates from different orientations of the surface crystal structure. Poled neat films with second

  19. On the Use of Second-Order Descriptors To Predict Queueing Behavior of MAPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Allan T.; Nielsen, Bo Friis

    2002-01-01

    The contributions of this paper are the following: We derive a formula for the IDI (Index of Dispersion for Intervals) for the Markovian Arrival Process (MAP). We show that two-state MAPs with identical fundamental rate, IDI and IDC (Index of Dispersion for Counts), define interval stationary point...... stationary and time stationary behavior of the two-state model. We give various illustrative numerical examples on the merits in predicting queueing behavior on the basis of first- and second-order descriptors by considering queueing behavior of MAPs with constant fundamental rate and IDC, respectively...

  20. Second order sliding power control for a variable speed-constant frequency energy conversion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenciaga, Fernando, E-mail: fval@ing.unlp.edu.a [CONICET, Laboratorio de Electronica Industrial Control e Instrumentacion (LEICI), Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CC.91, C.P. 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-12-15

    This paper presents a decoupled active and reactive power control for a variable speed-constant frequency generation system based on a brushless doubly fed reluctance machine. The control design is approached using multi-input second order sliding techniques which are specially appropriate to deal with nonlinear system models in presence of external disturbances and model inaccuracies. The controller synthesized through this theoretical framework presents very good robustness features, a finite reaching time and a chattering-free behavior. The performance of the closed loop system is assessed through representative computer simulations.

  1. On Passband and Stopband CIC Improvements Using a Second Order IIR Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Jovanovic Dolecek

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient second order IIR filter which considerably improves the passband as well as the stopband of the Cascaded-Integrator-Comb (CIC filter. Using the polyphase decomposition of the proposed filte, all filtering can be moved to a lower rate, which is D times less than the high input rate, where D is the decimation factor. The overall phase response of the compensated CIC is approximately linear in the passband. The design parameters are the number of cascaded CIC filter N, the decimator factor D, the passband frequency wp, and a weighted parameter a.

  2. Kinetics of biosorption of hazardous metals by green soil supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagla, Hemlata; Khilnani, Roshan

    2016-04-01

    of the biosorption in terms of the order of the rate constant were studied applying different kinetic models such as First order, Second order, Pseudo-first order, Pseudo-second order and the intra particle diffusion model. But among these models best fitting model was Lagergren pseudo second order model. The correlation coefficients of all the elements have R2 values close to 1 indicating the applicability of pseudo second order model to the present system. The applicability of this model suggested that biosorption of elements under study, on DCP was based on chemical interactions between metals and active sites of biosorbent. References 1. E. Tipping, Cation Binding by Humic Substances. Cambridge University Press, 2002. 2. S. Lagergren, Zur theorie der sogenannten adsorption geloster stoffe. Kungliga Svenska Vetenskapsakademiens, Handlingar vol. 24, no.4, pp. 1-39, 1898. 3. Y. S. Ho and G. McKay, "Pseudo-second order model for sorption processes," Process Biochem., vol. 34, no. 5, pp. 451-465, Jul. 1999. 4. N. S. Barot and H. K. Bagla, "Extraction of humic acid from biological matrix - dry cow dung powder," Green Chem. Lett. Rev., vol. 2, no. 4, pp. 217-221, 2009.

  3. ADSORPTION OF Pb2+ IONS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS ONTO BAEL TREE LEAF POWDER: ISOTHERMS, KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. SENTHIL KUMAR

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, bael tree (BT leaf powder was used as an adsorbent for removal of Pb2+ ions from aqueous solutions through batch equilibrium technique. The influence of pH, equilibrium time, temperature, adsorbent dosage and initial concentration of metal ions on adsorbed amount of metals ions were investigated. Studies showed that the pH of aqueous solutions affected Pb2+ ions removal as a result of removal efficiency increased with increasing solution pH. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich equations. The monolayer adsorption capacity is 4.065 mg/g with the correlation coefficient of 0.993. The experiments showed that highest removal rate was 84.93% at solution pH 5, contact time 60 min and initial concentration of 50 mg/L. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy have also been evaluated and it has been found that the sorption process was feasible, spontaneous and exothermic in nature. Three simplified kinetic models including a pseudo-first-order equation, pseudo-second-order equation and intraparticle diffusion equation were selected to follow the adsorption process. Kinetic parameters, rate constants, equilibrium sorption capacities and related correlation coefficients, for each kinetic model were calculated and discussed. It was shown that the adsorption of Pb2+ ions could be described by the pseudo-second order equation, suggesting that the adsorption process is presumable a chemisorption.

  4. Carrageenan-based semi-IPN nanocomposite hydrogels: Swelling kinetic and slow release of sequestrene Fe 138 fertilizer

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    Mohammad Kazem Bahrami

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite hydrogels based on kappa-carrageenan were synthesized by incorporating natural sodium montmorillonite (Cloisite nanoclay. Acrylamide (AAm and methylenebisacrylamide (MBA were used as a monomer and a crosslinker, respectively. Effects of reaction variables on the swelling kinetics were studied. The results revealed that the rate of swelling for nanocomposites with high content of MBA was higher than those of nanocomposites consisting of low content of MBA. Similar to the effect of MBA, the rate of swelling enhanced as the carrageenan content was decreased. The influence of clay content on swelling rate was not remarkable. The experimental swelling data were evaluated by pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The swelling data described well by pseudo-second-order kinetic model. Sequestrene Fe 138 (Sq as an agrochemical was loaded into nanocomposites and releasing of this active agent from nanocomposites was studied. The clay-free hydrogel released the whole loaded Sq; whereas the presence of clay restricted the release of Sq.

  5. Study of Fluoride Affinity by Zirconium Impregnated Walnut Shell Carbon in Aqueous Phase: Kinetic and Isotherm Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the kinetics of fluoride removal from water by the adsorbent zirconium-impregnated walnut-shell carbon (ZIWSC, exploring the mechanisms involved. The dependence of the adsorption of fluoride on the pH of the solution has been studied to achieve the optimum pH value and a better understanding of the adsorption mechanism. The presence of bicarbonate ions in aqueous solution was found to affect the fluoride removal indicating that these anions compete with the sorption of fluoride on adsorbents. The kinetic profile has been modeled using pseudo-first-order model, pseudo-second-order model, and intraparticle diffusion model. The kinetic sorption profiles offered excellent fit with pseudo-second-order model. Adsorption isotherms have been modeled by Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin equations, and their constants were determined. The equilibrium adsorption data were fitted reasonably well for Freundlich isotherm model. XRD and SEM patterns of the ZIWSC were recorded to get better insight into the mechanism of adsorption process.

  6. Adsorption characteristics of graphene oxide as a solid adsorbent for aniline removal from aqueous solutions: Kinetics, thermodynamics and mechanism studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Fakhri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the possibility of graphene oxide (GO as an alternative adsorbent for aniline removal from aqueous solution. Adsorption properties of GO for aniline removal were regularly investigated, including pH effect, adsorbent dose, temperature, contact time and initial concentration. The adsorption amount of aniline decreased with increasing pH. The experimental data were evaluated by Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin and Harkins–Jura models in order to describe the equilibrium isotherms. Equilibrium data fitted well to the Langmuir model. The kinetic parameters achieved at different concentrations were analyzed using a pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order kinetic equation and intra-particle diffusion model. The experimental data fitted very well the pseudo second-order kinetic model. Thermodynamic parameters (free energy change, enthalpy change, and entropy change announced that the removal of aniline from GO was endothermic and spontaneous. The study showed that GO could be used as an efficient adsorbent material for the adsorption of aniline from aqueous solution.

  7. Adsorptive Removal of Formaldehyde by Chemically Bamboo Activated Carbon with addition of Ag nanoparticle: Equilibrium and Kinetic

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    Pita Rengga Wara Dyah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon was prepared from dried waste bamboo (Dendrocalamus asper using chemical activation with KOH. The carbon was prepared with the activating agent in a mass ratio of KOH and dried bamboo (3:1 at 800oC. Using impregnation technique, the bamboo-based activated carbon has developed with modified Ag nanoparticle (Ag-AC to capture formaldehyde. The Ag-AC has characteristics of moderate surface area of 685 m2/g and average pore size of 2.7 nm. The adsorption equilibriums and kinetics of formaldehyde on Ag-AC measured. The influences of initial formaldehyde on adsorption performance have measured in a batch system. The equilibrium data were evaluated by isotherm models of Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin. The Langmuir model well describes the adsorptive removal of formaldehyde on Ag-AC in this study. Pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic equations were applied to test the experimental data. The pseudo-second-order exhibited the best fit for kinetic study.

  8. Potential Use of Molecular Sieves for the Removal of Ni2+ Metal Ion: Kinetics, Isotherms and Thermodynamic Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddala, Babu Rao; Monditoka, Krishna Prasad; Challa, Venkata Ramachandra Murthy; Kadimpati, Kishore Kumar

    2016-10-01

    The potential of using molecular sieves as adsorbent for the removal of nickel from aqueous solution was investigated. The isotherms and kinetics of nickel adsorption using 3 Å molecular sieves were evaluated. The results indicated that equilibrium was established in about 5 h. The effect of the pH was examined in the range of 2-6. The maximum removal of nickel obtained is at pH value of 5. The effect of dosage also evaluated to get optimum adsorption of nickel. The maximum adsorption capacity at 25 °C is 18.25 mg/g. The effect of temperature has been carried out at 15, 25, 30, and 40 °C. The data obtained from adsorption isotherms of nickel at different temperatures fit to linear form of Freundlich adsorption equation followed by Langmuir equations. Adsorption kinetic data were modelled using the pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order equation models. The results indicated that the pseudo-second-order model was best described adsorption kinetic data. The thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy (ΔH°), free energy (ΔG°), and entropy (ΔS°) were calculated. They show that adsorption of nickel onto molecular sieves is an exothermic process. These results show that molecular sieves are a good adsorbent for the removal of nickel from aqueous solutions and could be used as a purifier for water and wastewater.

  9. Kinetic and equilibrium profile of the adsorptive removal of Acid Red 17 dye by surfactant-modified fuller's earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jasmin; Jan, Muhammad Rasul; Muhammad, Mian; Ara, Behisht; Fahmeeda, Fahmeeda

    2017-03-01

    In the present study, fuller's earth (FE) was modified with sodium dodecyl sulfate for removal of Acid Red 17 (AR 17) dye from aqueous solutions. The surfactant-modified FE and FE were characterized by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, thermogravimetric analyzer and scanning electron microscope. Batch adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of contact time, pH, initial concentration of AR 17 and adsorbent dosage. About 99.1% adsorption efficiency was achieved within 60 min at adsorbent dose of 0.1 g for initial dye concentration of 1,000 mg L-1 at pH 10. The adsorption data were well fitted with the Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherm model implying physisorption as the major phenomenon for adsorption. The kinetic data were analyzed using four kinetic equations: pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, intraparticle diffusion and Elovich equations. The rates of adsorption confirmed the pseudo-second-order kinetics with good correlation value (R2 = 0.999). The results indicate that the modified adsorbent can effectively be used for the removal of AR 17 from wastewater with high absorption capacity of 2164.61 mg g-1.

  10. A kinetic modeling study of phosphate adsorption onto Phoenix dactylifera L. date palm fibers in batch mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalifa Riahi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of phosphates from aqueous solutions by adsorption onto date palm fibers (DPF has been studied in batch mode. The aim of this study was to understand the mechanisms that govern phosphate sorption and find an appropriate model for the kinetics of removal. In order to investigate the mechanism of sorption and potential rate controlling steps, pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, intra-particle diffusion and the Elovich equations have been used to test experimental data. Kinetic analysis of the four models has been carried out for initial phosphate concentration in the range of 30–110 mg/L. The rate constants for the four models have been determined and the correlation coefficients have been calculated in order to assess which model provides the best fit predicted data with experimental results. Seven statistical functions were used to estimate the error deviations between experimental and theoretically predicted kinetic adsorption values, including the average relative error deviation (ARED, Marquardt’s percent standard error deviation (MPSED, the hybrid fractional error function (HYBRID, the sum of the squares of the errors (SSE and three alternative statistical functions, including the Chi-square test, the F-test and Student’s T-test. The results showed that, both Elovich equation and pseudo second-order equation provide the best fit to experimental data for different initial phosphate concentrations.

  11. Equilibrium and kinetic studies on free cyanide adsorption from aqueous solution by activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behnamfard, Ali; Salarirad, Mohammad Mehdi

    2009-10-15

    Adsorption equilibrium and kinetics of free cyanide onto activated carbon were investigated in the batch tests, and the effects of contact time (1-72 h) and initial cyanide concentrations in the range of 102-532 mg/L were studied. Linear regression was used to determine the best fit of equilibrium and kinetics expressions. The two-parameter models including Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich, Temkin and four different linearized forms of Langmuir and three-parameter models including Redlich-Peterson and Koble-Corrigan were employed for fitting the equilibrium data and it was found that, three-parameter models fitted the data better than the two-parameter models and among the three-parameter models the equilibrium data are best represented by Koble-Corrigan model. A number of kinetic models including fractional power, zero order, first order, pseudo-first order, Elovich, second order, intraparticle diffusion and four different linearized forms of pseudo-second order models were tested to fit the kinetic data. The latter was found to be consistent with the data. Intraparticle diffusion plots show that the adsorption process of free cyanide is a two steps process. In the first step, the adsorption of cyanide is fast while in the second step, cyanide adsorption slows down.

  12. Removal of methylparaben from synthetic aqueous solutions using polyacrylonitrile beads: kinetic and equilibrium studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forte, Maurizio; Mita, Luigi; Perrone, Rosa; Rossi, Sergio; Argirò, Mario; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Guida, Marco; Portaccio, Marianna; Godievargova, Tzonka; Ivanov, Yavour; Tamer, Mahmoud T; Omer, Ahmed M; Mohy Eldin, Mohamed S

    2017-01-01

    The removal of methylparaben (MP), a well-known endocrine disruptor, from aqueous solutions using polyacrylonitrile (PAN) beads has been studied under batch conditions, at room temperature and at different initial MP concentrations. The kinetic and equilibrium results have been analyzed. Kinetic modeling analysis has been carried out with three different types of adsorption models: pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, and Elovich model. Kinetic data analysis indicated that the adsorption was a second-order process. The MP adsorption by PAN was also quantitatively evaluated by using the equilibrium adsorption isotherm models of Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R), and Temkin and the applicability of the respective isotherm equations has been compared through the correlation coefficients. Adsorption data resulted well fitted by the Freundlich isotherm model. Data of MP adsorption have also been used to test different adsorption diffusion models. The diffusion rate equations inside particulate of Dumwald-Wagner and the intraparticle diffusion model have been used to calculate the diffusion rate. The actual rate-controlling step involved in the MB adsorption process was determined. The kinetic expression by Boyd gave the right indications. All together, our results indicate that PAN beads are a useful tool to remediate water bodies polluted by endocrine disruptors.

  13. Equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic studies for the biosorption of aqueous lead(II) ions onto the seed husk of Calophyllum inophyllum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, O S; Sanni, A R; Ajayi, I A; Rabiu, O O

    2010-05-15

    Biosorption of lead(II) ions from aqueous solution onto the seed husk of Calophyllum inophyllum was investigated in a batch system. Equilibrium, thermodynamics and kinetic studies were conducted by considering the effects of pH, initial metal ion concentration, contact time, and temperature. The results showed that the uptake of the metal ions increased with increase in initial metal ion concentration. The pH for optimum adsorption was 4 for the Pb(II) ions (q=4.86 mg/g and 97.2% adsorption). Langmuir isotherm described the biosorption of Pb(II) ions onto the biomass (R(2)=0.9531) better than the Freundlich model (R(2)=0.7984), and the Temkin model (R(2)=0.8761). Biosorption kinetics data obtained for the metal ions sorption were fitted using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. It was found that the kinetics data fitted well into the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy (DeltaG), standard enthalpy (DeltaH) and standard entropy (DeltaS) were evaluated. The result showed that biosorption of the metal ion onto C. inophyllum biomass was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The results of FTIR (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy) revealed that carboxyl, amine, and hydroxyl groups on the biomass surface were involved in the adsorption of Pb(II) ions. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Equilibrium, thermodynamic and kinetic studies for the biosorption of aqueous lead(II) ions onto the seed husk of Calophyllum inophyllum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawal, O.S., E-mail: laidelawal2@yahoo.com [Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Olabisi Onabanjo University, P.M.B 2002, Ago Iwoye, Ogun State (Nigeria); Sanni, A.R. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Olabisi Onabanjo University, P.M.B 2002, Ago Iwoye, Ogun State (Nigeria); Ajayi, I.A. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Ibadan (Nigeria); Rabiu, O.O. [Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of Science, Olabisi Onabanjo University, P.M.B 2002, Ago Iwoye, Ogun State (Nigeria)

    2010-05-15

    Biosorption of lead(II) ions from aqueous solution onto the seed husk of Calophyllum inophyllum was investigated in a batch system. Equilibrium, thermodynamics and kinetic studies were conducted by considering the effects of pH, initial metal ion concentration, contact time, and temperature. The results showed that the uptake of the metal ions increased with increase in initial metal ion concentration. The pH for optimum adsorption was 4 for the Pb(II) ions (q = 4.86 mg/g and 97.2% adsorption). Langmuir isotherm described the biosorption of Pb(II) ions onto the biomass (R{sup 2} = 0.9531) better than the Freundlich model (R{sup 2} = 0.7984), and the Temkin model (R{sup 2} = 0.8761). Biosorption kinetics data obtained for the metal ions sorption were fitted using pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order. It was found that the kinetics data fitted well into the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Thermodynamic parameters such as Gibbs free energy ({Delta}G), standard enthalpy ({Delta}H) and standard entropy ({Delta}S) were evaluated. The result showed that biosorption of the metal ion onto C. inophyllum biomass was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The results of FTIR (Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy) revealed that carboxyl, amine, and hydroxyl groups on the biomass surface were involved in the adsorption of Pb(II) ions.

  15. Kinetic, equilibrium and thermodynamic studies for the removal of lead (II) and copper (II) ions from aqueous solutions by nanocrystalline TiO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidi, Fatemeh; Sarabi, Reza Sadeghi; Ghasemi, Zinab; Seif, Ahmad

    2010-12-01

    Titanium dioxide nanocrystallites were synthesized as adsorbents through the hydrolysis of titanium tetrachloride as the precursor in hydrochloric acid. The product was analyzed by XRD, BET and SEM-EDX; analysis indicated that the particles were a mixture of 86.8% rutile and 13.2% anatase TiO 2 with spherical shapes. The adsorption of Pb (II) and Cu (II) metal ions from aqueous solution onto nano- TiO 2 were investigated with variations in pH, contact time, initial metal ion concentration and temperature. The kinetics, adsorption isotherm and adsorption thermodynamics of the heavy metals were studied. The kinetics data were analyzed by the pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order and intraparticle diffusion kinetic models; the best correlation coefficients were obtained for the pseudo-second order kinetic model. The adsorption results obtained from equilibrium experiments were analyzed by Freundlich, Langmuir, Temkin and Dubinin-Radushkevich isotherms with the Freundlich isotherm giving the best fitting isotherm to the equilibrium data. The thermodynamic parameters ( ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS°) were calculated and it was found that the adsorption process is spontaneous and endothermic and is favored at higher temperature.

  16. Delta-Nabla Type Maximum Principles for Second-Order Dynamic Equations on Time Scales and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some delta-nabla type maximum principles for second-order dynamic equations on time scales are proved. By using these maximum principles, the uniqueness theorems of the solutions, the approximation theorems of the solutions, the existence theorem, and construction techniques of the lower and upper solutions for second-order linear and nonlinear initial value problems and boundary value problems on time scales are proved, the oscillation of second-order mixed delat-nabla differential equations is discussed and, some maximum principles for second order mixed forward and backward difference dynamic system are proved.

  17. Second-Order Controllability of Multi-Agent Systems with Multiple Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Shi, Yun-Tao; Su, Hou-Sheng; Han, Xiao

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new second-order continuous-time multi-agent model and analyzes the controllability of second-order multi-agent system with multiple leaders based on the asymmetric topology. This paper considers the more general case: velocity coupling topology is different from location coupling topology. Some sufficient and necessary conditions are presented for the controllability of the system with multiple leaders. In addition, the paper studies the controllability of the system with velocity damping gain. Simulation results are given to illustrate the correctness of theoretical results. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61473129, 61304049, 61104140, 61473002, the Beijing Natural Science Foundation Program under Grant No. 4132021, the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University from Chinese Ministry of Education under Grant NCET-12-0215, “The-Great-Wall-Scholar” Candidate Training-Plan of North China University of Technology (NX130), and the Plan Training Project of Excellent Young Teacher of North China University of Technology (NX132), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, (HUST: Grant No. 2015TS025), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (WUT: Grant No. 2015VI015)

  18. Excitonic effects on the second-order nonlinear optical properties of semi-spherical quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flórez Jefferson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We study the excitonic effects on the second-order nonlinear optical properties of semi-spherical quantum dots considering, on the same footing, the confinement potential of the electron-hole pair and the Coulomb interaction between them. The exciton is confined in a semi-spherical geometry by means of a three-dimensional semi-parabolic potential. We calculate the optical rectification and second harmonic generation coefficients for two different values of the confinement frequency based on the numerically computed energies and wavefunctions of the exciton. We present the results as a function of the incident photon energy for GaAs/AlGaAs quantum dots ranging from few nanometers to tens of nanometers. We find that the second-order nonlinear coefficients exhibit not only a blue-shift of the order of meV but also a change of intensity compared with the results obtained ignoring the Coulomb interaction in the so-called strong-confinement limit.

  19. Learning to fear a second-order stimulus following vicarious learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Gemma; Field, Andy P; Askew, Chris

    2017-04-01

    Vicarious fear learning refers to the acquisition of fear via observation of the fearful responses of others. The present study aims to extend current knowledge by exploring whether second-order vicarious fear learning can be demonstrated in children. That is, whether vicariously learnt fear responses for one stimulus can be elicited in a second stimulus associated with that initial stimulus. Results demonstrated that children's (5-11 years) fear responses for marsupials and caterpillars increased when they were seen with fearful faces compared to no faces. Additionally, the results indicated a second-order effect in which fear-related learning occurred for other animals seen together with the fear-paired animal, even though the animals were never observed with fearful faces themselves. Overall, the findings indicate that for children in this age group vicariously learnt fear-related responses for one stimulus can subsequently be observed for a second stimulus without it being experienced in a fear-related vicarious learning event. These findings may help to explain why some individuals do not recall involvement of a traumatic learning episode in the development of their fear of a specific stimulus.

  20. On the properness condition for modal analysis of non-symmetric second-order systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouisse, Morvan; Foltête, Emmanuel

    2011-02-01

    Non-symmetric second-order systems can be found in several engineering contexts, including vibroacoustics, rotordynamics, or active control. In this paper, the notion of properness for complex modes is extended to the case of non-self-adjoint problems. The properness condition is related to the ability of a set of complex modes to represent in an exact way the behavior of a physical second-order system, meaning that the modes are the solutions of a quadratic eigenvalue problem whose matrices are those of a physical system. This property can be used to identify the damping matrices which may be difficult to obtain with mathematical modeling techniques. The first part of the paper demonstrates the properness condition for non symmetric systems in general. In the second part, the authors propose a methodology to enforce that condition in order to perform an optimal reconstruction of the "closest" physical system starting from a given basis complex modes. The last part is dedicated to numerical and experimental illustrations of the proposed methodology. A simulated academic test case is first used to investigate the numerical aspects of the method. A physical application is then considered in the context of rotordynamics. Finally, an experimental test case is presented using a structure with an active control feedback. An extension of the LSCF identification technique is also introduced to identify both left and right complex mode shapes from measured frequency response functions.

  1. Fast and efficient second-order method for training radial basis function networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tiantian; Yu, Hao; Hewlett, Joel; Rózycki, Paweł; Wilamowski, Bogdan

    2012-04-01

    This paper proposes an improved second order (ISO) algorithm for training radial basis function (RBF) networks. Besides the traditional parameters, including centers, widths and output weights, the input weights on the connections between input layer and hidden layer are also adjusted during the training process. More accurate results can be obtained by increasing variable dimensions. Initial centers are chosen from training patterns and other parameters are generated randomly in limited range. Taking the advantages of fast convergence and powerful search ability of second order algorithms, the proposed ISO algorithm can normally reach smaller training/testing error with much less number of RBF units. During the computation process, quasi Hessian matrix and gradient vector are accumulated as the sum of related sub matrices and vectors, respectively. Only one Jacobian row is stored and used for multiplication, instead of the entire Jacobian matrix storage and multiplication. Memory reduction benefits the computation speed and allows the training of problems with basically unlimited number of patterns. Several practical discrete and continuous classification problems are applied to test the properties of the proposed ISO training algorithm.

  2. Distributed event-triggered scheme for discrete-time second-order multi-agent systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Quansheng

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the consistency of multi-agent systems, each agent needs to communicate with its adjacent agents, which will consume energy of sensors embedded on the agents and occupy network bandwidth of multi-agent systems. Both resources are limited. To solve the above problem, a novel distributed event-triggered scheme of discrete-time second-order multi-agent systems are proposed in this article. The characteristics of the scheme have two aspects. Firstly, the event-triggered conditions are considered for the state and the velocity separately. Secondly, when the event is triggered on an agent, the agent only communicates with its local neighbors. Then, the agent and its local neighbors update their controls while the other agents' controllers remain unchanged. So the scheme can maximize reduction of the sensor energy consuming and communication burden in the multi-agent network. Based on the Lyapunov functional method, a sufficient condition is obtained to achieve the stability of the second-order multi-agent systems in terms of linear matrix inequality. Finally, numerical examples are presented to validate the proposed event-triggered consensus control.

  3. Modified Dual Second-order Generalized Integrator FLL for Frequency Estimation Under Various Grid Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpeshkumar Rohitbhai Patil

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Proper synchronization of Distributed Generator with grid and its performance in grid-connected mode relies on fast and precise estimation of phase and amplitude of the fundamental component of grid voltage. However, the accuracy with which the frequency is estimated is dependent on the type of grid voltage abnormalities and structure of the phase-locked loop or frequency locked loop control schemes. Among various control schemes, second-order generalized integrator based frequency- locked loop (SOGI-FLL is reported to have the most promising performance. It tracks the frequency of grid voltage accurately even when grid voltage is characterized by sag, swell, harmonics, imbalance, frequency variations etc. However, estimated frequency contains low frequency oscillations in case when sensed grid-voltage has a dc offset. This paper presents a modified dual second-order generalized integrator frequency-locked loop (MDSOGI-FLL for three-phase systems to cope with the non-ideal three-phase grid voltages having all type of abnormalities including the dc offset. The complexity in control scheme is almost the same as the standard dual SOGI-FLL, but the performance is enhanced. Simulation results show that the proposed MDSOGI-FLL is effective under all abnormal grid voltage conditions. The results are validated experimentally to justify the superior performance of MDSOGI-FLL under adverse conditions.

  4. Second-Order Nonlinear Analysis of Steel Tapered Beams Subjected to Span Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hadidi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A second-order elastic analysis of tapered steel members with I-shaped sections subjected to span distributed and concentrated loadings is developed. Fixed end forces and moments as well as exact stiffness matrix of tapered Timoshenko-Euler beam are obtained with exact geometrical properties of sections. The simultaneous action of bending moment, shear, and axial force including P−δ effects is also considered in the analysis. A computer code has been developed in MATLAB software using a power series method to solve governing second-order differential equation of equilibrium with variable coefficients for beams with distributed span loading. A generalized matrix condensation technique is then utilized for analysis of beams with concentrated span loadings. The accuracy and efficiency of the results of the proposed method are verified through comparing them to those obtained from other approaches such as finite element methods, which indicates the robustness and time saving of this method even for large scale frames with tapered members.

  5. Study of the conditional covariance and variance equations for second order conditional moment closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, N.; Bilger, R. W.

    1999-09-01

    Presence of transient events like extinction/ignition in turbulent reacting flows increase conditional fluctuations. Thus, one needs to include the conditional fluctuations of reactive scalars, second order quantities, for conditional moment closure calculation when there are transient events and for predictions of sensitive species like NOx. Transport equations for conditional variances Gii and covariances Gij are derived and studied using a direct numerical simulation (DNS) data base. In high Damköhler number situations, chemically reactive and turbulent diffusive processes balance the effect of scalar dissipation-scalar fluctuations correlation on Gij evolution. Additionally, the dissipation of scalar fluctuation becomes important for low Damköhler number situations. Simple models for the different physical processes are proposed and evaluated. Chemical contributions are modeled using a presumed probability density function (PDF) approach which includes second order contributions. The conditional joint PDF of progress variables for the two steps used are observed to be jointly log-normal or jointly Gaussian depending on whether there is extinction or not. The scalar dissipation rate-scalar fluctuations correlation coefficient does not depend on Reynolds or Damköhler numbers. However, the model constant in the classical model for conditional dissipation of scalar fluctuations depends on Damköhler number. Based on the gradient alignment characteristics observed in the DNS, a new model for the above dissipation is proposed using stationary laminar flamelet theory. This model prediction of the above dissipation is better than the classical model prediction.

  6. Assessment of Patellar Tendon Reflex Responses Using Second-Order System Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett D. Steineman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep tendon reflex tests, such as the patellar tendon reflex (PTR, are widely accepted as simple examinations for detecting neurological disorders. Despite common acceptance, the grading scales remain subjective, creating an opportunity for quantitative measures to improve the reliability and efficacy of these tests. Previous studies have demonstrated the usefulness of quantified measurement variables; however, little work has been done to correlate experimental data with theoretical models using entire PTR responses. In the present study, it is hypothesized that PTR responses may be described by the exponential decay rate and damped natural frequency of a theoretical second-order system. Kinematic data was recorded from both knees of 45 subjects using a motion capture system and correlation analysis found that the mean R2 value was 0.99. Exponential decay rate and damped natural frequency ranges determined from the sample population were −5.61 to −1.42 and 11.73 rad/s to 14.96 rad/s, respectively. This study confirmed that PTR responses strongly correlate to a second-order system and that exponential decay rate and undamped natural frequency are novel measurement variables to accurately measure PTR responses. Therefore, further investigation of these measurement variables and their usefulness in grading PTR responses is warranted.

  7. Temperature dependence of first- and second-order Raman scattering in silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachadorian, S.; Scheel, H.; Vierck, A.; Thomsen, C. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Colli, A. [Nokia Research Centre, Broers Building, 21 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    The first- and second-order Raman scattering of the silicon nanowires grown without any metal catalyst is studied in the temperature range from 77 to 873 K. The first- and second-order Raman peaks were found to shift and broaden differently with increasing temperature. We show that this is due to the confinement related enhanced anharmonic effects in silicon nanowires. Our measurements also show that both the second- to first-order Raman peak intensity ratio [I(2TA){sub int.}/I(1TO){sub int.} and I(2TO){sub int.}/I(1TO){sub int.}] and the Raman relative intensities [I(2TA){sub int.}/I(2TO){sub int.}] increase with increasing temperature. TEM image of SiNWs. The SiNW are 15 nm in diameter and up to a few microns long. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Reliability Measures of Second-Order Semi-Markov Chain Applied to Wind Energy Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo D'Amico

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of wind energy production by using a second-order semi-Markov chain in state and duration as a model of wind speed. The model used in this paper is based on our previous work where we have shown the ability of second-order semi-Markov process in reproducing statistical features of wind speed. Here we briefly present the mathematical model and describe the data and technical characteristics of a commercial wind turbine (Aircon HAWT-10 kW. We show how, by using our model, it is possible to compute some of the main dependability measures such as reliability, availability, and maintainability functions. We compare, by means of Monte Carlo simulations, the results of the model with real energy production obtained from data available in the Lastem station (Italy and sampled every 10 minutes. The computation of the dependability measures is a crucial point in the planning and development of a wind farm. Through our model, we show how the values of this quantity can be obtained both analytically and computationally.

  9. Studies of Second Order Optical Nonlinearities of 4-Aminobenzophenone (ABP) Single Crystal Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmik, Achintya; Thakur, Mrinal

    1998-03-01

    Specific organic materials exhibit very high second order optical susceptibilities. Growth of single crystal films of these materials and characterization of nonlinear optical properties are necessary for implementation of device applications. We have grown large-area films ( 1 cm^2 area, 4 μm thick) of ABP by a modification of the shear method. Single crystal nature of the films was confirmed by polarized optical microscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a [100] surface orientation. The absorption spectra revealed transparency from 390 nm to 1940 nm. Significant elements of the second order optical susceptibility tensor were measured by detailed SHG experiments using a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 100 ps, 82 MHz). Second-harmonic power was measured using lock-in detection with carefully selected polarization conditions while the film was rotated about the propagation direction. Using LiNbØas the reference, d-coefficients of ABP were found to be d_23=7.2 pm/V and d_22=0.7 pm/V. Type-I and type-II phase-matching directions were identified on the film by analyzing the optical indicatrix surfaces at fundamental and second-harmonic frequencies.

  10. Effects of second-order slip on the flow of a fractional Maxwell MHD fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqing Liu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD flow of a generalized Maxwell fluid induced by a moving plate has been investigated, where the second-order slip between the wall and the fluid in the wall is considered. The fractional calculus approach is used to establish the constitutive relationship model of the non-Newtonian fluid model. Exact analytical solutions for the velocity field and shear stress in terms of Fox H-function are obtained by means of the Laplace transform. The solutions for the generalized Maxwell second-order slip model without magnetic field, the MHD flow of generalized Maxwell flow without slip effects or first-order slip model can be derived as the special cases. Furthermore, the influence of the order of fractional derivative, the magnetic body force, the slip coefficients and power index on the velocity and shear stress are analyzed and discussed in detail. The results show that the velocity corresponding to flows with slip condition is lower than that for flow with non-slip conditions, and the velocity with second-slip condition is lower than that with first-order slip condition.

  11. A generalized LSTM-like training algorithm for second-order recurrent neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monner, Derek; Reggia, James A

    2012-01-01

    The long short term memory (LSTM) is a second-order recurrent neural network architecture that excels at storing sequential short-term memories and retrieving them many time-steps later. LSTM's original training algorithm provides the important properties of spatial and temporal locality, which are missing from other training approaches, at the cost of limiting its applicability to a small set of network architectures. Here we introduce the generalized long short-term memory(LSTM-g) training algorithm, which provides LSTM-like locality while being applicable without modification to a much wider range of second-order network architectures. With LSTM-g, all units have an identical set of operating instructions for both activation and learning, subject only to the configuration of their local environment in the network; this is in contrast to the original LSTM training algorithm, where each type of unit has its own activation and training instructions. When applied to LSTM architectures with peephole connections, LSTM-g takes advantage of an additional source of back-propagated error which can enable better performance than the original algorithm. Enabled by the broad architectural applicability of LSTM-g, we demonstrate that training recurrent networks engineered for specific tasks can produce better results than single-layer networks. We conclude that LSTM-g has the potential to both improve the performance and broaden the applicability of spatially and temporally local gradient-based training algorithms for recurrent neural networks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Application potential of grapefruit peel as dye sorbent: Kinetics, equilibrium and mechanism of crystal violet adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeed, Asma, E-mail: asmadr@wol.net.pk [Environmental Biotechnology Group, Biotechnology and Food Research Centre, PCSIR Laboratories Complex, Ferozepur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan); Sharif, Mehwish [School of Biological Sciences, University of the Punjab, Lahore 54590 (Pakistan); Iqbal, Muhammad [Environmental Biotechnology Group, Biotechnology and Food Research Centre, PCSIR Laboratories Complex, Ferozepur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

    2010-07-15

    This study reports the sorption of crystal violet (CV) dye by grapefruit peel (GFP), which has application potential in the remediation of dye-contaminated wastewaters using a solid waste generated by the citrus fruit juice industry. Batch adsorption of CV was conducted to evaluate the effect of initial pH, contact time, temperature, initial dye concentration, GFP adsorbent dose, and removal of the adsorbate CV dye from aqueous solution to understand the mechanism of sorption involved. Sorption equilibrium reached rapidly with 96% CV removal in 60 min. Fit of the sorption experimental data was tested on the pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics mathematical equations, which was noted to follow the pseudo-second-order kinetics better, with coefficient of correlation {>=}0.992. The equilibrium process was well described by the Langmuir isotherm model, with maximum sorption capacity of 254.16 mg g{sup -1}. The GFP was regenerated using 1 M NaOH, with up to 98.25% recovery of CV and could be reused as a dye sorbent in repeated cycles. GFP was also shown to be highly effective in removing CV from aqueous solution in continuous-flow fixed-bed column reactors. The study shows that GFP has the potential of application as an efficient sorbent for the removal of CV from aqueous solutions.

  13. Ni (II) adsorption onto Chrysanthemum indicum: Influencing factors, isotherms, kinetics, and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilvanathan, Sowmya; Shanthakumar, S

    2016-10-02

    The study explores the adsorption potential of Chrysanthemum indicum biomass for nickel ion removal from aqueous solution. C. indicum flowers in raw (CIF-I) and biochar (CIF-II) forms were used as adsorbents in this study. Batch experiments were conducted to ascertain the optimum conditions of solution pH, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and temperature for varying initial Ni(II) ion concentrations. Surface area, surface morphology, and functionality of the adsorbents were characterized by Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) surface analysis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Adsorption kinetics were modeled using pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, Elovich, intraparticle diffusion, Bangham's, and Boyd's plot. The equilibrium data were modeled using Langmuir, Freundlich, Temkin, and Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) isotherm models. Experimental data provided the best fit to pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm model for the adsorption of Ni(II) ion on both CIF-I and CIF-II with maximum adsorption capacities of 23.97 and 44.02 mg g(-1), respectively. Thermodynamic analysis of the data proved the process to be spontaneous and endothermic in nature. Desorption studies were conducted to evaluate the possibility of reusing the adsorbents. Findings of the present study provide substantial evidence for the use of C. indicum flower as an eco-friendly and potential adsorbent for the removal of Ni(II) ions from aqueous solution.

  14. Kinetics and mechanism of arsenate removal by nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, M G; Chen, Yen-Hua; Jean, Jiin-Shuh; Liu, Chia-Chuan; Lee, Yao-Chang

    2011-03-15

    This study discussed the adsorption kinetics of As(V) onto nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite. The effects of pH, initial concentration of As(V) and common anions on the adsorption efficiency were also investigated. It was observed that a 100% As(V) adsorption was achieved at pH value of 4-8 from the initial concentration containing 1.0 mg-As(V)L(-1) and the adsorption percentage depended on the initial concentration; the phosphate and silicate ions would not interfere with the adsorption efficiency. Furthermore, nanosized iron oxide-coated perlite (IOCP) has been shown to be an effective adsorbent for the removal of arsenate from water. The adsorption kinetics were studied using pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order models, and the experimental data fitted well with the pseudo-second-order model. Moreover, it suggests that the Langmuir isotherm is more adequate than the Freundlich isotherm in simulating the adsorption isotherm of As(V). The adsorption rate constant is 44.84 L mg(-1) and the maximum adsorption capacity is 0.39 mg g(-1). These findings indicate that the adsorption property of IOCP gives the compound a great potential for applications in environmental remediation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. EQUILIBRIUM AND KINETIC STUDY OF ADSORPTION OF NICKEL FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTION ONTO BAEL TREE LEAF POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. SENTHIL KUMAR

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The ability of bael tree (BT leaf powder to adsorb nickel, Ni2+, from aqueous solutions has been investigated through batch experiments. The Ni2+ adsorption was found to be dependent on adsorbent dosage, initial concentration and contact time. All batch experiments were carried out at natural solution pH and at a constant temperature of 30°C using wrist-action shaker that operated at 120 rpm. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin equations. The monolayer adsorption capacity is 1.527 mg Ni per g BT leaf powder. The experiments showed that highest removal rate was 60.21% for Ni2+ under optimal conditions. The kinetic processes of Ni2+ adsorption on BT leaf powder were described by applying pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order rate equations. The kinetic data for the adsorption process obeyed pseudo-second-order rate equations. The BT leaf powder investigated in this study exhibited a high potential for the removal of Ni2+ from aqueous solution.

  16. Efficient removal of cadmium using magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotube nanoadsorbents: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashai Gatabi, Maliheh; Milani Moghaddam, Hossain; Ghorbani, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    Adsorptive potential of maghemite decorated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for the removal of cadmium ions from aqueous solution was investigated. The magnetic nanoadsorbent was synthesized using a versatile and cost effective chemical route. Structural, magnetic and surface charge properties of the adsorbent were characterized using FTIR, XRD, TEM, VSM analysis and pHPZC determination. Batch adsorption experiments were performed under varied system parameters such as pH, contact time, initial cadmium concentration and temperature. Highest cadmium adsorption was obtained at pH 8.0 and contact time of 30 min. Adsorption behavior was kinetically studied using pseudo first-order, pseudo second-order, and Weber-Morris intra particle diffusion models among which data were mostly correlated to pseudo second-order model. Adsorbate-adsorbent interactions as a function of temperature was assessed by Langmuir, Freundlich, Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) and Temkin isotherm models from which Freundlich model had the highest consistency with the data. The adsorption capacity increased with increasing temperature and maximum Langmuir's adsorption capacity was found to be 78.81 mg g-1 at 298 K. Thermodynamic parameters and activation energy value suggest that the process of cadmium removal was spontaneous and physical in nature, which lead to fast kinetics and high regeneration capability of the nanoadsorbent. Results of this work are of great significance for environmental applications of magnetic MWCNTs as promising adsorbent for heavy metals removal from aqueous solutions.

  17. Eriobotrya japonica seed biocomposite efficiency for copper adsorption: Isotherms, kinetics, thermodynamic and desorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Mehwish; Bhatti, Haq Nawaz; Iqbal, Munawar; Noreen, Saima

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption techniques are widely used to remove pollutants from wastewater; however, composites are gaining more importance due to their excellent adsorption properties. Bentonite composite with Eriobotrya japonica seed was prepared and used for the adsorption of copper (Cu) metal from aqueous media. The process variables such as pH, Cu(II) ions initial concentration, adsorbent dose, contact time and temperature were optimized for maximum Cu(II) adsorption. At pH 5, adsorbent dose 0.1 g, contact time 45 min, Cu(II) ions initial concentration 75 mg/L and temperature 45 °C, maximum Cu(II) adsorption was achieved. Desorption studies revealed that biocomposite is recyclable. Langmuir, Freundlich and Harkins-Jura isotherms as well as pseudo-first and pseudo-second-order kinetics models were applied to understand the adsorption mechanism. Thermodynamic parameters (ΔG(0), ΔH(0) and ΔS(0)) suggest that the adsorption process was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm fitted well to the adsorption data. Results showed that biocomposite was more efficient for Cu(II) adsorption in comparison to individuals native Eriobotrya japonica seed biomass and Na-bentonite. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Adsorption isotherm, kinetic and mechanism of expanded graphite for sulfadiazine antibiotics removal from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Yong; Jin, SuWan; Lu, QunZan; Ji, Jiang

    2017-10-01

    The adsorption of sulfadiazine from water by expanded graphite (EG), a low cost and environmental-friendly adsorbent, was investigated. Several adsorption parameters (including the initial sulfadiazine concentration, contact time, pH of solution, ionic strength and temperature) were studied. Results of equilibrium experiments indicated that adsorption of sulfadiazine onto EG were better described by the Langmuir and Tempkin models than by the Freundlich model. The maximum adsorption capacity is calculated to be 16.586 mg/g at 298 K. The kinetic data were analyzed by pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order and intraparticle models. The results indicated that the adsorption process followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and may be controlled by two steps. Moreover, the pH significantly influenced the adsorption process, with the relatively high adsorption capacity at pH 2-10. The electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions are manifested to be two main mechanisms for sulfadiazine adsorption of EG. Meanwhile, the ionic concentration of Cl - slightly impacted the removal of sulfadiazine. Results of thermodynamics analysis showed spontaneous and exothermic nature of sulfadiazine adsorption on EG. In addition, regeneration experiments imply that the saturated EG could be reused for sulfadiazine removal by immersing sodium hydroxide.

  19. Kinetics, equilibrium data and modeling studies for the sorption of chromium by Prosopis juliflora bark carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kumar

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the activated carbon was prepared from Prosopis juliflora bark as a novel adsorbent. Removal of chromium (Cr was assessed by varying the parameters like metal concentration, temperature, pH, adsorbent dose and contact time. The feasibility of the sorption was studied using Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms including linear and non-linear regression methods. In Langmuir, various forms of linearized equations were evaluated. The isotherm parameter of dimensionless separation factor (RL was also studied. The kinetics of adsorption was studied by using Lagergren’s pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order equations and the results have shown that the adsorption process follows pseudo-second order kinetics and the adsorption process depends on both time and concentration. The mechanistic pathway of the adsorption process was evaluated with intraparticle diffusion model. The effect of heat of adsorption of the adsorbate onto the adsorbent material was determined using the thermodynamic parameters and the reusability of the adsorbent materials was ascertained with desorption studies. The adsorbent material characterization was done by using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, X-ray Diffraction (XRD method and morphology of the surface of adsorbent was identified with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM.

  20. Adsorption and kinetic studies of seven different organic dyes onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste and removal of them from wastewater samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrakian, Tayyebeh; Afkhami, Abbas; Ahmadi, Mazaher

    2012-12-01

    Adsorption of seven different organic dyes from aqueous solutions onto magnetite nanoparticles loaded tea waste (MNLTW) was studied. MNLTW was prepared via a simple method and was fully characterized. The properties of this magnetic adsorbent were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Adsorption characteristics of the MNLTW adsorbent was examined using Janus green, methylene blue, thionine, crystal violet, Congo red, neutral red and reactive blue 19 as adsorbates. Dyes adsorption process was thoroughly studied from both kinetic and equilibrium points of view for all adsorbents. The experimental isotherm data were analyzed using Langmuir, Freundlich, Sips, Redlich-Peterson, Brouers-Sotolongo and Temkin isotherms. The results from Langmuir isotherm indicated that the capacity of MNLTW for the adsorption of cationic dyes was higher than that for anionic dyes. The adsorption kinetics was tested for the pseudo-first order and pseudo-second order kinetic models at different experimental conditions.

  1. Adsorption kinetics of aromatic compounds on carbon nanotubes and activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shujuan; Shao, Ting; Kose, H Selcen; Karanfil, Tanju

    2012-01-01

    Adsorption kinetics of two organic compounds on four types of carbonaceous adsorbents (a granular activated carbon [HD4000], an activated carbon fiber [ACF10], a single-walled carbon nanotube [SWNT], and a multiwalled carbon nanotube [MWNT]) was examined in aqueous solutions. The times needed for the adsorption to reach apparent equilibrium on the four carbons followed the order of ACF10 > HD4000 > SWNT > MWNT. Ultrasonication of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs) accelerated their adsorption kinetics but had no effect on their equilibrium adsorption capacities. The pseudo-second order model (PSOM) provided good fitting for the kinetic data. The fitting of kinetic data with the intraparticle diffusion model indicated that external mass transfer controls the sorption process in the organic compound-CNT systems, whereas intraparticle diffusion dominates in the sorption of organic compounds onto activated carbons. Copyright © 2011 SETAC.

  2. Punishing second-order free riders before first-order free riders: The effect of pool punishment priority on cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Hiroki; Kamijo, Yoshio; Shimizu, Kazumi

    2017-10-30

    Second-order free riders, who do not owe punishment cost to first-order free riders in public goods games, lead to low cooperation. Previous studies suggest that for stable cooperation, it is critical to have a pool punishment system with second-order punishment, which gathers resources from group members and punishes second-order free riders as well as first-order free riders. In this study, we focus on the priority of punishment. We hypothesize that the pool punishment system that prioritizes second-order punishment is more likely to achieve cooperation than the system that prioritizes first-order punishment, because the former is more likely to obtain sufficient punishment resources. In the experiments, we compare four pool punishment systems: 1To2 (first-order punishment to second-order punishment), 2To1 (second-order punishment to first-order punishment), 1ONLY (first-order punishment only), and 2ONLY (second-order punishment only). We find that the 2To1 and 2ONLY systems can receive more support than the 1To2 and 1ONLY systems and only the 2To1 system can achieve high cooperation. However, the effect of priority of second-order punishment is observed only when the punishment ratio (PR) is low (Experiment 1), not high (Experiment 2), in which the punishment resource is relatively abundant.

  3. Integrability of systems of two second-order ordinary differential equations admitting four-dimensional Lie algebras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainetdinova, A A; Gazizov, R K

    2017-01-01

    We suggest an algorithm for integrating systems of two second-order ordinary differential equations with four symmetries. In particular, if the admitted transformation group has two second-order differential invariants, the corresponding system can be integrated by quadratures using invariant representation and the operator of invariant differentiation. Otherwise, the systems reduce to partially uncoupled forms and can also be integrated by quadratures.

  4. The Development of Expert Face Processing: Are Infants Sensitive to Normal Differences in Second-Order Relational Information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Angela; Bhatt, Ramesh S.; Reed, Andrea; Corbly, Christine R.; Joseph, Jane E.

    2007-01-01

    Sensitivity to second-order relational information (i.e., spatial relations among features such as the distance between eyes) is a vital part of achieving expertise with face processing. Prior research is unclear on whether infants are sensitive to second-order differences seen in typical human populations. In the current experiments, we examined…

  5. The development of second-order social cognition and its relation with complex language understanding and working memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arslan, Burcu; Hohenberger, Annette; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the development of second-order social cognition and its possible relationship with language and memory were investigated. For this reason two second-order false belief tasks (FBT_2), a short term memory task (WST), a complex working memory task (LST), a linguistic perspective-taking

  6. On second-order consensus in multi-agent dynamical systems with directed topologies and time delays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Wenwu; Chen, Guanrong; Cao, Ming

    2009-01-01

    This paper establishes some necessary and sufficient conditions for second-order consensus in multi-agent dynamical systems with directed topologies and time delays. First, theoretical analysis is carried out for the basic, but fundamentally important case where agents’ second-order dynamics are

  7. An optimal PID controller via LQR for standard second order plus time delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Saurabh; Misra, Anuraag; Thakur, S K; Pandit, V S

    2016-01-01

    An improved tuning methodology of PID controller for standard second order plus time delay systems (SOPTD) is developed using the approach of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) and pole placement technique to obtain the desired performance measures. The pole placement method together with LQR is ingeniously used for SOPTD systems where the time delay part is handled in the controller output equation instead of characteristic equation. The effectiveness of the proposed methodology has been demonstrated via simulation of stable open loop oscillatory, over damped, critical damped and unstable open loop systems. Results show improved closed loop time response over the existing LQR based PI/PID tuning methods with less control effort. The effect of non-dominant pole on the stability and robustness of the controller has also been discussed. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ramses-GPU: Second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestener, Pierre

    2017-10-01

    RamsesGPU is a reimplementation of RAMSES (ascl:1011.007) which drops the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) features to optimize 3D uniform grid algorithms for modern graphics processor units (GPU) to provide an efficient software package for astrophysics applications that do not need AMR features but do require a very large number of integration time steps. RamsesGPU provides an very efficient C++/CUDA/MPI software implementation of a second order MUSCL-Handcock finite volume fluid solver for compressible hydrodynamics as a magnetohydrodynamics solver based on the constraint transport technique. Other useful modules includes static gravity, dissipative terms (viscosity, resistivity), and forcing source term for turbulence studies, and special care was taken to enhance parallel input/output performance by using state-of-the-art libraries such as HDF5 and parallel-netcdf.

  9. DPDC (double-pass donor cell): A second-order monotone scheme for advection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beason, C W; Margolin, L G

    1988-09-26

    We are developing a new, second-order, monotone scheme for advection. DPDC (i.e., double-pass donor cell) is based on Smolarkiewicz' simple, positive definite method. Both schemes are multipass methods in which upstream approximations to the truncation error are subtracted from the equations. We describe two significant improvements to Smolarkiewicz' method. First, we use a local gauge transformation to convert the method from being positive definite to the stronger condition of being monotone. Second, we analytically approximate the sum of the corrections of all the passes to use in a single corrective pass. This increases the accuracy of the method, but does not increase the order of accuracy. We compare DPDC with van Leer's method for advection of several different pulses in a constant velocity field. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Transmission performance improvement using random DFB laser based Raman amplification and bidirectional second-order pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, M; Rosa, P; Le, S T; Iqbal, Md A; Phillips, I D; Harper, P

    2016-02-08

    We demonstrate that a distributed Raman amplification scheme based on random distributed feedback (DFB) fiber laser enables bidirectional second-order Raman pumping without increasing relative intensity noise (RIN) of the signal. This extends the reach of 10 × 116 Gb/s DP-QPSK WDM transmission up to 7915 km, compared with conventional Raman amplification schemes. Moreover, this scheme gives the longest maximum transmission distance among all the Raman amplification schemes presented in this paper, whilst maintaining relatively uniform and symmetric signal power distribution, and is also adjustable in order to be highly compatible with different nonlinearity compensation techniques, including mid-link optical phase conjugation (OPC) and nonlinear Fourier transform (NFT).

  11. Second-order conditioning in human predictive judgements when there is little time to think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karazinov, Danielle M; Boakes, Robert A

    2007-03-01

    Associative accounts uniquely predict that second-order conditioning might be observed in human predictive judgements. Such an effect was found for cue X in two experiments in which participants were required to predict the outcomes of a series of training trials that included P + and PX-, but only when training was paced by requiring participants to make a prediction within 3 s on each trial. In Experiment 1 training on P + ended before training was given on PX - . In Experiment 2 trials with P+, PX-, T + and other cues were intermixed. In the unpaced group inhibitory learning was revealed by a summation test, TX versus TM, where M was a control stimulus. These results suggest either that pacing interferes with learning successive associations more than with learning simultaneous associations or that lack of time to think interferes with inferential processes required for this type of inhibitory learning.

  12. Mechanisms of second-order conditioning with a backward conditioned stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D A; Hurlburt, J L

    2000-07-01

    Five conditioned suppression experiments with rats examined the conditions under which backward pairings endow a first-order conditioned stimulus (CS1) with the ability to serve as a secondary reinforcer. Experiments 2-5B found evidence for excitatory second-order conditioning (SOC) if, during first-order pairings, the US-CS1 interval was 0 s rather than 3 s. Levels of SOC were comparable after forward and backward pairings (Experiments 1-3), and were unaffected by extinction of CS1 after SOC (Experiment 3). These results suggest that forward and backward CS1s support SOC for the same reason, and they call into question the need to invoke any special mechanism such as memory integration.

  13. Growth and Zeros of Meromorphic Solutions to Second-Order Linear Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maamar Andasmas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to investigate the growth of meromorphic solutions to homogeneous and non-homogeneous second order linear differential equations f00+Af0+Bf = F, where A(z, B (z and F (z are meromorphic functions with finite order having only finitely many poles. We show that, if there exist a positive constants σ > 0, α > 0 such that |A(z| ≥ eα|z|σ as |z| → +∞, z ∈ H, where dens{|z| : z ∈ H} > 0 and ρ = max{ρ(B, ρ(F} < σ, then every transcendental meromorphic solution f has an infinite order. Further, we give some estimates of their hyper-order, exponent and hyper-exponent of convergence of distinct zeros.

  14. A finite difference method for nonlinear parabolic-elliptic systems of second order partial differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Malec

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a finite difference method for a wide class of weakly coupled nonlinear second-order partial differential systems with initial condition and weakly coupled nonlinear implicit boundary conditions. One part of each system is of the parabolic type (degenerated parabolic equations and the other of the elliptic type (equations with a parameter in a cube in \\(\\mathbf{R}^{1+n}\\. A suitable finite difference scheme is constructed. It is proved that the scheme has a unique solution, and the numerical method is consistent, convergent and stable. The error estimate is given. Moreover, by the method, the differential problem has at most one classical solution. The proof is based on the Banach fixed-point theorem, the maximum principle for difference functional systems of the parabolic type and some new difference inequalities. It is a new technique of studying the mixed-type systems. Examples of physical applications and numerical experiments are presented.

  15. Discrete Second-Order Sliding Mode Adaptive Controller Based on Characteristic Model for Servo Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the varying inertia and load torque in high speed and high accuracy servo systems, a novel discrete second-order sliding mode adaptive controller (DSSMAC based on characteristic model is proposed, and a command observer is also designed. Firstly, the discrete characteristic model of servo systems is established. Secondly, the recursive least square algorithm is adopted to identify time-varying parameters in characteristic model, and the observer is applied to predict the command value of next sample time. Furthermore, the stability of the closed-loop system and the convergence of the observer are analyzed. The experimental results show that the proposed method not only can adapt to varying inertia and load torque, but also has good disturbance rejection ability and robustness to uncertainties.

  16. Evaluation of a second-order directional microphone hearing aid: II. Self-report outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Catherine; Bentler, Ruth; Mueller, H Gustav

    2006-03-01

    This clinical trial was undertaken to evaluate the subjective benefit obtained from hearing aids employing automatic switching second-order adaptive directional microphone technology, used in conjunction with digital noise reduction, as compared to a fixed directional microphone or omnidirectional microphone response with the same digital noise reduction. Data were collected for 49 participants across two sites. Both new and experienced hearing aid users were fit bilaterally with behind-the-ear hearing aids using the NAL-NL1 (National Acoustics Laboratory-Nonlinear version 1) prescriptive method with manufacturer default settings for various signal processing (e.g., noise reduction, compression parameters, etc.). During ten days of hearing aid use, participants responded to daily journal questions. Subjective ratings for each of the three hearing aid responses (omnidirectional, automatic-adaptive directional, and automatic-fixed directional) were similar. Overall preference for a microphone condition was equally distributed between no preference, omnidirectional, and automatic adaptive and/or fixed directional.

  17. Evaluation of a second-order directional microphone hearing aid: I. Speech perception outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentler, Ruth; Palmer, Catherine; Mueller, H Gustav

    2006-03-01

    This clinical trial was undertaken to evaluate the benefit obtained from hearing aids employing second-order adaptive directional microphone technology, used in conjunction with digital noise reduction. Data were collected for 49 subjects across two sites. New and experienced hearing aid users were fit bilaterally with behind-the-ear hearing aids using the National Acoustics Laboratory-Nonlinear version 1 (NAL-NL1) prescriptive method with manufacturer default settings for various parameters of signal processing (e.g., noise reduction, compression, etc.). Laboratory results indicated that (1) for the stationary noise environment, directional microphones provided better speech perception than omnidirectional microphones, regardless of the number of microphones; and (2) for the moving noise environment, the three-microphone option (whether in adaptive or fixed mode) and the two-microphone option in its adaptive mode resulted in better performance than the two-microphone fixed mode, or the omnidirectional modes.

  18. A second-order focusing electrostatic toroidal electron spectrometer with 2pi radian collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khursheed, Anjam; Hoang, Hung Quang

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a toroidal electron energy spectrometer designed to capture electrons in the full 2pi azimuthal angular direction while at the same time having second-order focusing optics. Simulation results based upon direct ray tracing predict that the relative energy resolution of the spectrometer will be 0.146% and 0.0188% at input angular spreads of +/- 6 degrees and +/- 3 degrees, respectively, comparable to the theoretically best resolution of the cylindrical mirror analyzer (CMA), and an order of magnitude better than existing toroidal spectrometers. Also predicted for the spectrometer is a parallel energy acquisition mode of operation, where the energy bandwidth is expected to be > +/- 10% (20% total) of the pass energy. The spectrometer is designed to allow for retardation of the pass energy without the need to incorporate auxiliary lenses.

  19. Gravitational effective action at second order in curvature and gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Capozziello, Salvatore; Pryer, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We consider the full effective theory for quantum gravity at second order in curvature including non-local terms. We show that the theory contains two new degrees of freedom beyond the massless graviton: namely a massive spin-2 ghost and a massive scalar field. Furthermore, we show that it is impossible to fine-tune the parameters of the effective action to eliminate completely the classical spin-2 ghost because of the non-local terms in the effective action. Being a classical field, it is not clear anyway that this ghost is problematic. It simply implies a repulsive contribution to Newton's potential. We then consider how to extract the parameters of the effective action and show that it is possible to measure, at least in principle, the parameters of the local terms independently of each other using a combination of observations of gravitational waves and measurements performed by pendulum type experiments searching for deviations of Newton's potential.

  20. Sliding Mode Based Self-Tuning PID Controller for Second Order Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alper BAYRAK

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a sliding mode based self-tuning PID controller is proposed for uncertain second order systems. While developing the controller, it is assumed that the system model has a part which contains nonlinear terms similar to PID structure which is a new approach in the literature. The controller and update rules for controller parameters are obtained from Lyapunov stability analysis. The proposed controller with update rule is experienced on an experimental 2-DOF helicopter which is also known as Twin-Rotor Multi-Input Multi-Output System (TRMS. From experiments, it was seen that the PID parameter update rules run satisfactorily and, in parallel with this, the controller achieved the control objective by providing the system track the desired trajectory.

  1. Second order classical perturbation theory for atom surface scattering: Analysis of asymmetry in the angular distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yun, E-mail: zhou.yun.x@gmail.com; Pollak, Eli, E-mail: eli.pollak@weizmann.ac.il [Chemical Physics Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Miret-Artés, Salvador, E-mail: s.miret@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-01-14

    A second order classical perturbation theory is developed and applied to elastic atom corrugated surface scattering. The resulting theory accounts for experimentally observed asymmetry in the final angular distributions. These include qualitative features, such as reduction of the asymmetry in the intensity of the rainbow peaks with increased incidence energy as well as the asymmetry in the location of the rainbow peaks with respect to the specular scattering angle. The theory is especially applicable to “soft” corrugated potentials. Expressions for the angular distribution are derived for the exponential repulsive and Morse potential models. The theory is implemented numerically to a simplified model of the scattering of an Ar atom from a LiF(100) surface.

  2. Second-Order Geometric Sliding Mode Attitude Observer with Application to Quadrotor on a Test Bench

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honglei An

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A sliding mode observer design framework is proposed based on the Lie group method of numerical integration on manifolds, and a Second-Order Geometric Sliding Mode Attitude Observer (SOGSMAO is designed for angular velocity estimation of quadrotor attitude. The algorithm constructs feedback in the angular velocity space and the space of equivalent Lie algebra of unit quaternion space, respectively. It avoids not only the complexity of constructing feedback in unit quaternion space but also the process of mandatory rescaling which is seen to deteriorate the accuracy of the angular velocity estimates during sliding. The performance of SOGSMAO is compared with traditional quaternion based sliding mode observer in which multiplicative quaternion correction is used and the results show that SOGSMAO gains better tracking performance. Then SOGSMAO is realized on a test bed and the effectiveness of the observer algorithm is verified by experimental studies.

  3. A novel optimal PID plus second order derivative controller for AVR system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouayad A. Sahib

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel controller for automatic voltage regulator (AVR system. The controller is a four term control type consisting of proportional, integral, derivative, and second order derivative terms (PIDD2. The four parameters of the proposed controller are optimized using particle swarm optimization (PSO algorithm. The performance of the proposed PIDD2 is compared with various PID controllers tuned by modern heuristic optimization algorithms. In addition, a comparison with the fractional order PID (FOPID controller tuned by Chaotic Ant Swarm (CAS algorithm is also performed. Furthermore, a frequency response, zero-pole map, and robustness analysis of the AVR system with PIDD2 is performed. Practical implementation issues of the proposed controller are also addressed. Simulation results showed a superior response performance of the PIDD2 controller in comparison to PID and FOPID controllers. Moreover, the proposed PIDD2 can highly improve the system robustness with respect to model uncertainties.

  4. Characterization method of unusual second-order-harmonic generation based on vortex transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chaojin; Wu, Erheng; Gu, Mingliang; Hu, Zhengfeng; Liu, Chengpu

    2017-09-01

    When a few-cycle laser beam nonresonantly propagates through an inversion-symmetric medium, beyond the usual odd-order harmonics in the transmission spectra, a well-defined spectral peak at twice the incident laser central frequency is disclosed [T. Tritschler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 217404 (2003), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.90.217404]. Beyond the characterization method via the rf measurement of its carrier-envelope phase dependence, here a more direct mode of characterization is proposed by means of vortex transformation where a few-cycle vortex laser is adopted instead: One can easily clarify its origin as an usual third-order harmonic that appears to be a second-order harmonic, based on the criteria that the topological charge number of harmonics is directly proportional to its harmonic order.

  5. Estimation of ibuprofen and famotidine in tablets by second order derivative spectrophotometery method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimal A. Shah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple and accurate method for the analysis of ibuprofen (IBU and famotidine (FAM in their combined dosage form was developed using second order derivative spectrophotometery. IBU and FAM were quantified using second derivative responses at 272.8 nm and 290 nm in the spectra of their solutions in methanol. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 100–600 μg/mL for IBU and 5–25 μg/mL for FAM. The method was validated and found to be accurate and precise. Developed method was successfully applied for the estimation of IBU and FAM in their combined dosage form.

  6. Asymptotic solution for first and second order linear Volterra integro-differential equations with convolution kernels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bologna, Mauro, E-mail: mauroh69@libero.i [Instituto de Alta Investigacion, Universidad de Tarapaca-Casilla 7-D Arica (Chile)

    2010-09-17

    This paper addresses the problem of finding an asymptotic solution for first- and second-order integro-differential equations containing an arbitrary kernel, by evaluating the corresponding inverse Laplace and Fourier transforms. The aim of the paper is to go beyond the Tauberian theorem in the case of integral-differential equations which are widely used by the scientific community. The results are applied to the convolute form of the Lindblad equation setting generic conditions on the kernel in such a way as to generate a positive definite density matrix, and show that the structure of the eigenvalues of the correspondent Liouvillian operator plays a crucial role in determining the positivity of the density matrix.

  7. Numerical simulation of the second-order Stokes theory using finite difference method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Maâtoug

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear water waves problem is of great importance because, according to the mechanical modeling of this problem, a relationship exists between the potential flow and pressure exerted by water waves. The difficulty of this problem comes not only from the fact that the kinematic and dynamic conditions are nonlinear in relation to the velocity potential, but especially because they are applied at an unknown and variable free surface. To overcome this difficulty, Stokes used an approach consisting of perturbations series around the still water level to develop a nonlinear theory. This paper deals with computation of the second-order Stokes theory in order to simulate the potential flow and the surface elevation and then to deduct the pressure loads. The Crank–Nicholson scheme and the finite difference method are used. The modeling accuracy was proved and is of order two in time and in space. Some computational results are presented and discussed.

  8. Dynamics of Equilibrium Points in a Uniformly Rotating Second-Order and Degree Gravitational Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jinglang; Hou, Xiyun

    2017-07-01

    Using tools such as periodic orbits and invariant manifolds, the global dynamics around equilibrium points (EPs) in a rotating second-order and degree gravitational field are studied. For EPs on the long axis, planar and vertical periodic families are computed, and their stability properties are investigated. Invariant manifolds are also computed, and their relation to the first-order resonances is briefly discussed. For EPs on the short axis, planar and vertical periodic families are studied, with special emphasis on the genealogy of the planar periodic families. Our studies show that the global dynamics around EPs are highly similar to those around libration points in the circular restricted three-body problem, such as spatial halo orbits, invariant manifolds, and the genealogy of planar periodic families.

  9. Dynamics of Equilibrium Points in a Uniformly Rotating Second-Order and Degree Gravitational Field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jinglang; Hou, Xiyun, E-mail: jinglang@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: silence@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, 210093 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Using tools such as periodic orbits and invariant manifolds, the global dynamics around equilibrium points (EPs) in a rotating second-order and degree gravitational field are studied. For EPs on the long axis, planar and vertical periodic families are computed, and their stability properties are investigated. Invariant manifolds are also computed, and their relation to the first-order resonances is briefly discussed. For EPs on the short axis, planar and vertical periodic families are studied, with special emphasis on the genealogy of the planar periodic families. Our studies show that the global dynamics around EPs are highly similar to those around libration points in the circular restricted three-body problem, such as spatial halo orbits, invariant manifolds, and the genealogy of planar periodic families.

  10. Explicitly correlated frequency-independent second-order green's function for accurate ionization energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Yu-Ya; Ten-No, Seiichiro

    2016-10-15

    Explicitly correlated second-order Green's function (GF2-F12) is presented and applied to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), oligothiophene, and porphyrins. GF2 suffers from slow convergence of orbital expansions as in the ordinary post Hartree-Fock methods in ab initio theory, albeit the method is capable of providing quantitatively accurate ionization energies (IE) near the complete basis set limit. This feature is significantly mitigated by introducing F12 terms of explicitly correlated electronic structure theory. It is demonstrated that GF2-F12 presents accurate IE with augmented triple-zeta quality of basis sets. The errors from experimental results are typically less than 0.15 eV for PAHs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Second-order QCD effects in Higgs boson production through vector boson fusion arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz-Martinez, J.; Glover, E.W.N.; Huss, A.

    We compute the factorising second-order QCD corrections to the electroweak production of a Higgs boson through vector boson fusion. Our calculation is fully differential in the kinematics of the Higgs boson and of the final state jets, and uses the antenna subtraction method to handle infrared singular configurations in the different parton-level contributions. Our results allow us to reassess the impact of the next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs-plus-three-jet production and of the next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD corrections to electroweak Higgs-plus-two-jet production. The NNLO corrections are found to be limited in magnitude to around $\\pm 5\\%$ and are uniform in several of the kinematical variables, displaying a kinematical dependence only in the transverse momenta and rapidity separation of the two tagging jets.

  12. Physical applications of second-order linear differential equations that admit polynomial solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciftci, Hakan; Dogu, Ebubekir [Gazi Ueniversitesi, Fen-Edebiyat Fakueltesi, Fizik Boel uemue, 06500 Teknikokullar-Ankara (Turkey); Hall, Richard L [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve Boulevard West, Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1M8 (Canada); Saad, Nasser, E-mail: hciftci@gazi.edu.t, E-mail: rhall@mathstat.concordia.c, E-mail: nsaad@upei.c [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Prince Edward Island, 550 University Avenue, Charlottetown, PEI, C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    In this paper conditions for the second-order linear differential equation ({Sigma}{sub i=0}{sup 3}a{sub 3,i}x{sup i})y'' + ({Sigma}{sub i=0}{sup 2}a{sub 2,i}x{sup i})y' - ({Sigma}{sub i=0}{sup 1{tau}}{sub 1,i}x{sup i})y = 0 to have polynomial solutions are given. Several applications of these results to Schroedinger's equation are discussed. Conditions under which the confluent, biconfluent and general Heun equation yields polynomial solutions are explicitly given. Some new classes of exactly solvable differential equations are also discussed. The results of this work are expressed in such a way as to allow direct use, without preliminary analysis.

  13. Fluid/gravity correspondence: second order transport coefficients in compactified D4-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chao; Chen, Yidian [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Huang, Mei [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Chinese Academy of Sciences,Beijing 100049 (China)

    2017-01-26

    We develop the boundary derivative expansion (BDE) formalism of fluid/gravity correspondence to nonconformal version through the compactified, near-extremal black D4-brane. We offer an explicit calculation of 9 second order transport coefficients, i.e., the τ{sub π}, τ{sub π}{sup ∗}, τ{sub Π}, λ{sub 1,2,3} and ξ{sub 1,2,3} for the strongly coupled, uncharged and nonconformal relativistic fluid which is the holographic dual of compactified, near extremal black D4-brane. We also show that the nonconformal fluid considered in this work is free of causal problem and admits the Haack-Yarom relation 4λ{sub 1}−λ{sub 2}=2ητ{sub π}.

  14. Optimal tracking and second order sliding power control of the DFIG wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeddaim, S.; Betka, A.; Charrouf, O.

    2017-02-01

    In the present paper, an optimal operation of a grid-connected variable speed wind turbine equipped with a Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) is presented. The proposed cascaded nonlinear controller is designed to perform two main objectives. In the outer loop, a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm based on fuzzy logic theory is designed to permanently extract the optimal aerodynamic energy, whereas in the inner loop, a second order sliding mode control (2-SM) is applied to achieve smooth regulation of both stator active and reactive powers quantities. The obtained simulation results show a permanent track of the MPP point regardless of the turbine power-speed slope moreover the proposed sliding mode control strategy presents attractive features such as chattering-free, compared to the conventional first order sliding technique (1-SM).

  15. Sound dispersion in a spin-1 Ising system near the second-order phase transition point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, Ryza; Keskin, Mustafa

    2003-04-07

    Sound dispersion relation is derived for a spin-1 Ising system and its behaviour near the second-order phase transition point or the critical point is analyzed. The method used is a combination of molecular field approximation and Onsager theory of irreversible thermodynamics. If we assume a linear coupling of sound wave with the order parameter fluctuations in the system, we find that the dispersion which is the relative sound velocity change with frequency behaves as {omega}{sup 0}{epsilon}{sup 0}, where {omega} is the sound frequency and {epsilon} the temperature distance from the critical point. In the ordered region, one also observes a frequency-dependent velocity or dispersion minimum which is shifted from the corresponding attenuation maxima. These phenomena are in good agreement with the calculations of sound velocity in other magnetic systems such as magnetic metals, magnetic insulators, and magnetic semiconductors.

  16. Sound dispersion in a spin-1 Ising system near the second-order phase transition point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Rýza; Keskin, Mustafa

    2003-04-01

    Sound dispersion relation is derived for a spin-1 Ising system and its behaviour near the second-order phase transition point or the critical point is analyzed. The method used is a combination of molecular field approximation and Onsager theory of irreversible thermodynamics. If we assume a linear coupling of sound wave with the order parameter fluctuations in the system, we find that the dispersion which is the relative sound velocity change with frequency behaves as ω0ε0, where ω is the sound frequency and ε the temperature distance from the critical point. In the ordered region, one also observes a frequency-dependent velocity or dispersion minimum which is shifted from the corresponding attenuation maxima. These phenomena are in good agreement with the calculations of sound velocity in other magnetic systems such as magnetic metals, magnetic insulators, and magnetic semiconductors.

  17. A Separation Algorithm for Sources with Temporal Structure Only Using Second-order Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.G. Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Unlike conventional blind source separation (BSS deals with independent identically distributed (i.i.d. sources, this paper addresses the separation from mixtures of sources with temporal structure, such as linear autocorrelations. Many sequential extraction algorithms have been reported, resulting in inevitable cumulated errors introduced by the deflation scheme. We propose a robust separation algorithm to recover original sources simultaneously, through a joint diagonalizer of several average delayed covariance matrices at positions of the optimal time delay and its integers. The proposed algorithm is computationally simple and efficient, since it is based on the second-order statistics only. Extensive simulation results confirm the validity and high performance of the algorithm. Compared with related extraction algorithms, its separation signal-to-noise rate for a desired source can reach 20dB higher, and it seems rather insensitive to the estimation error of the time delay.

  18. Nonsingular Terminal Sliding Mode Control of Uncertain Second-Order Nonlinear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Duc Tran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a high-performance nonsingular terminal sliding mode control method for uncertain second-order nonlinear systems. First, a nonsingular terminal sliding mode surface is introduced to eliminate the singularity problem that exists in conventional terminal sliding mode control. By using this method, the system not only can guarantee that the tracking errors reach the reference value in a finite time with high-precision tracking performance but also can overcome the complex-value and the restrictions of the exponent (the exponent should be fractional number with an odd numerator and an odd denominator in traditional terminal sliding mode. Then, in order to eliminate the chattering phenomenon, a super-twisting higher-order nonsingular terminal sliding mode control method is proposed. The stability of the closed-loop system is established using the Lyapunov theory. Finally, simulation results are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Adaptive fuzzy wavelet network control of second order multi-agent systems with unknown nonlinear dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Mehdi; Sheikholeslam, Farid; Najafi, Majddedin; Zekri, Maryam

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, consensus problem is considered for second order multi-agent systems with unknown nonlinear dynamics under undirected graphs. A novel distributed control strategy is suggested for leaderless systems based on adaptive fuzzy wavelet networks. Adaptive fuzzy wavelet networks are employed to compensate for the effect of unknown nonlinear dynamics. Moreover, the proposed method is developed for leader following systems and leader following systems with state time delays. Lyapunov functions are applied to prove uniformly ultimately bounded stability of closed loop systems and to obtain adaptive laws. Three simulation examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control algorithms. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Second Order Harmonics Suppression With Glass Filters for Synchrotron UV Radiation Calibration Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Burattini, E; Gambicorti, L; Malvezzi, F; Marcelli, A; Monti, F; Pace, E

    2005-01-01

    This development is the latest result of the cooperation between the National Laboratories of Frascati and the Department of Astronomy and Space Science of the University of Florence to improve the capabilities of the existing DXR-2 beam line at the DAΦNE-LIGHT laboratories. This collaboration has assessed a new facility in order to characterize optics and sensors in a wide spectral range (ranging from VUV to IR). Previous measurements [1] have highlighted some limitations in the present setup, as higher signal levels due to the diffracted radiation of the grating in the second order have to be removed to allow an accurate detection. In this work a glass filter is used to remove such spurious signal present in the spectral region with λ > 360 nm. The characteristics of the filter and its application to the optical system used to measure the sensitivity of a diamond-based photoconductor have been discussed.

  1. Second-order phase transition at high-pressure in GeS crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimzade, F. M.; Huseinova, D. A.; Jahangirli, Z. A.; Mehdiyev, B. H.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we give a theoretical proof of the existence of a second-order structural phase transition in the GeS at a pressure of 35.4 GPa. We use the plane-wave pseudopotential approach to the density functional theory in the local density approximation. The evidence of the phase transition is the abrupt change in the bulk modulus as the volume of the unit cell of the crystal changes continuously. We show that the phase transition is caused by the softening of the low-frequency fully symmetric interlayer mode with increasing pressure. As a result, phase transition of a displacement type takes place with the change of translational symmetry of the crystal from the simple orthorhombic to the base-centered orthorhombic (Pbnm(D2h16)→Cmcm(D2h17)).

  2. Second order optical effects in Au nanoparticle-deposited ZnO nanocrystallite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozga, K; Slezak, A [Institute of Biology and Biophysics, Technical University Czestochowa, PL-42214, Aleja Armii Krajowej 36, Czestochowa (Poland); Kawaharamura, T [Department of Electronic Engineering and Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan); Umar, A Ali; Oyama, M; Nouneh, K; Fujita, S [International Innovation Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan); Piasecki, M; Reshak, A H [Institute of Physical Biology, South Bohemia University, Institute of System Biology and Ecology, Academy of Sciences, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); Kityk, I V [Department of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, ul. Marcina Strzody 9, PL-44100 Gliwice (Poland)], E-mail: cate.ozga@wp.pl

    2008-05-07

    Photoinduced second harmonic generation (SHG) in Au nanoparticle-deposited ZnO nanocrystallite (NC) films was explored by applying bicolor coherent treatment of a Nd-YAG laser with wavelength 1.06 {mu}m and its SHG. We have established that coexistence of the ZnO and Au nanoparticles gives a substantially larger SHG output with respect to pure ZnO NC deposited on the glass substrate. It was established that the value of the second order susceptibility is about 23 pm V{sup -1}. Better nonlinear optical susceptibilities were obtained during phototreatment at temperatures near 30-35 deg. C for the Au doped samples. The samples without gold NCs are temperature independent. Generally an increasing temperature leads to a decrease of the optical SHG.

  3. Second order optical effects in Au nanoparticle-deposited ZnO nanocrystallite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozga, K; Kawaharamura, T; Ali Umar, A; Oyama, M; Nouneh, K; Slezak, A; Fujita, S; Piasecki, M; Reshak, A H; Kityk, I V

    2008-05-07

    Photoinduced second harmonic generation (SHG) in Au nanoparticle-deposited ZnO nanocrystallite (NC) films was explored by applying bicolor coherent treatment of a Nd-YAG laser with wavelength 1.06 µm and its SHG. We have established that coexistence of the ZnO and Au nanoparticles gives a substantially larger SHG output with respect to pure ZnO NC deposited on the glass substrate. It was established that the value of the second order susceptibility is about 23 pm V(-1). Better nonlinear optical susceptibilities were obtained during phototreatment at temperatures near 30-35 °C for the Au doped samples. The samples without gold NCs are temperature independent. Generally an increasing temperature leads to a decrease of the optical SHG.

  4. Boundary-value problems for second-order differential operators with nonlocal boundary conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Denche

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study a second-order differential operator combining weighting integral boundary condition with another two-point boundary condition. Under certain conditions on the weighting functions, called regular and non regular cases, we prove that the resolvent decreases with respect to the spectral parameter in $L^{p}(0,1$, but there is no maximal decrease at infinity for $p>1$. Furthermore, the studied operator generates in $L^{p}(0,1 $, an analytic semi group for $p=1$ in the regular case, and an analytic semi group with singularities for $p>1$, in both cases, and for $p=1$, in the non regular case only. The obtained results are then used to show the correct solvability of a mixed problem for parabolic partial differential equation with non regular boundary conditions.

  5. Numerical simulation of second-order hyperbolic telegraph type equations with variable coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Sapna; Kumar, Manoj; Tiwari, Surabhi

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the authors proposed a numerical scheme based on Crank-Nicolson finite difference scheme and Haar wavelets to find numerical solutions of different types of second order hyperbolic telegraph equations (i.e. telegraph equation with constant coefficients, with variable coefficients, and singular telegraph equation). This work is an extension of the scheme by Jiwari (2012) for hyperbolic equations. The use of Haar basis function is made with multiresolution analysis to get the fast and accurate results on collocation points. The convergence of the proposed scheme is proved by doing its error analysis. Four test examples are considered to demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the scheme. The scheme is easy and very suitable for computer implementation and provides numerical solutions close to the exact solutions and available in the literature.

  6. Extended observer based on adaptive second order sliding mode control for a fixed wing UAV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Herman; Salas-Peña, Oscar S; León-Morales, Jesús de

    2017-01-01

    This paper addresses the design of attitude and airspeed controllers for a fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicle. An adaptive second order sliding mode control is proposed for improving performance under different operating conditions and is robust in presence of external disturbances. Moreover, this control does not require the knowledge of disturbance bounds and avoids overestimation of the control gains. Furthermore, in order to implement this controller, an extended observer is designed to estimate unmeasurable states as well as external disturbances. Additionally, sufficient conditions are given to guarantee the closed-loop stability of the observer based control. Finally, using a full 6 degree of freedom model, simulation results are obtained where the performance of the proposed method is compared against active disturbance rejection based on sliding mode control. Copyright © 2016 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gravitational effective action at second order in curvature and gravitational waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, Xavier; Capozziello, Salvatore; Pryer, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    We consider the full effective theory for quantum gravity at second order in curvature including non-local terms. We show that the theory contains two new degrees of freedom beyond the massless graviton: namely a massive spin-2 ghost and a massive scalar field. Furthermore, we show that it is impossible to fine-tune the parameters of the effective action to eliminate completely the classical spin-2 ghost because of the non-local terms in the effective action. Being a classical field, it is not clear anyway that this ghost is problematic. It simply implies a repulsive contribution to Newton's potential. We then consider how to extract the parameters of the effective action and show that it is possible to measure, at least in principle, the parameters of the local terms independently of each other using a combination of observations of gravitational waves and measurements performed by pendulum type experiments searching for deviations of Newton's potential.

  8. Building a Library Subculture to Sustain Information Literacy Practice with Second Order Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Wetzel Wilkinson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses development for information literacy (IL practice through building internal library organizational culture. Using an analysis of relevant literature and reflection on lived experience, the authors explore issues and concepts for instruction librarians and leaders to consider as they advance and sustain IL initiatives. Through a lens of second order change the article proposes change agency theory and organizational development as theoretical approaches; calling on librarians to adopt roles and techniques that honor personal learning and continuing education while simultaneously focusing on student learning. It additionally suggests a flexible roadmap for managed change processes including organizational assessment techniques, inspiration for conversations and inclusive dialogues, reasons for and ways to address resistance, and steps to implement action plans. The authors conclude IL initiatives will be more effective if supported by an internal library culture that is embraced and implemented by knowledgeable instruction librarians and their leaders.

  9. Second-Order Multiagent Systems with Event-Driven Consensus Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangping Hu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Event-driven control scheduling strategies for multiagent systems play a key role in future use of embedded microprocessors of limited resources that gather information and actuate the agent control updates. In this paper, a distributed event-driven consensus problem is considered for a multi-agent system with second-order dynamics. Firstly, two kinds of event-driven control laws are, respectively, designed for both leaderless and leader-follower systems. Then, the input-to-state stability of the closed-loop multi-agent system with the proposed event-driven consensus control is analyzed and the bound of the inter-event times is ensured. Finally, some numerical examples are presented to validate the proposed event-driven consensus control.

  10. Cross-cultural second order factor structures of the 16PF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, C J

    1978-04-01

    Cross-cultural personality research has generated a great amount of data on individual difference patterns in diverse cultures. One of the major instruments used in this research has been Cattell's 16PF. A major question in this research is whether the underlying personality structure is equivalent for different cultures. The present study evaluated the second order factor structure of the 16PF in 101 subjects of European ancestry and 117 subjects of Japanese ancestry. The factor structure for the Japanese was significantly different from that of the caucasian group. The caucasian results did not differ from those reported by Cattell and his associates. The implications of these results for personality theory and for cross-cultural evaluation were briefly discussed.

  11. The Interaction Between Control Rods as Estimated by Second-Order One-Group Perturbation Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persson, Rolf

    1966-10-15

    The interaction effect between control rods is an important problem for the reactivity control of a reactor. The approach of second order one-group perturbation theory is shown to be attractive due to its simplicity. Formulas are derived for the fully inserted control rods in a bare reactor. For a single rod we introduce a correction parameter b, which with good approximation is proportional to the strength of the absorber. For two and more rods we introduce an interaction function g(r{sub ij}), which is assumed to depend only on the distance r{sub ij} between the rods. The theoretical expressions are correlated with the results of several experiments in R0, ZEBRA and the Aagesta reactor, as well as with more sophisticated calculations. The approximate formulas are found to give quite good agreement with exact values, but in the case of about 8 or more rods higher-order effects are likely to be important.

  12. Cooperative Adaptive Output Regulation for Second-Order Nonlinear Multiagent Systems With Jointly Connected Switching Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Huang, Jie

    2017-01-11

    This paper studies the cooperative global robust output regulation problem for a class of heterogeneous second-order nonlinear uncertain multiagent systems with jointly connected switching networks. The main contributions consist of the following three aspects. First, we generalize the result of the adaptive distributed observer from undirected jointly connected switching networks to directed jointly connected switching networks. Second, by performing a new coordinate and input transformation, we convert our problem into the cooperative global robust stabilization problem of a more complex augmented system via the distributed internal model principle. Third, we solve the stabilization problem by a distributed state feedback control law. Our result is illustrated by the leader-following consensus problem for a group of Van der Pol oscillators.

  13. Combined first- and second-order Fermi acceleration in cometary environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gombosi, T. I.; Lorencz, K.; Jokipii, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Two-dimensional (one velocity space and one spatial dimension), time-dependent model calculations indicate that an interplay between velocity and spatial diffusion may be responsible for the acceleration of implanted heavy ions in the cometary preshock region. Velocity diffusion (second-order Fermi acceleration) accelerates the pickup ions to moderate energies, thus creating a seed population for the more efficient diffusive-compressive shock acceleration. Solar wind convection limits the time available for diffusive-compressive acceleration. Therefore, the resulting energy spectrum above the pickup energy is a combination of an exponential decrease at lower energies (up to about 100 keV) and a power law spectrum at higher energies. The calculated energy spectra constitute a surprisingly good fit to the published Vega and Giotto energy spectra above the pickup energy.

  14. Analytical energy gradients for local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azhary, Adel; Rauhut, Guntram; Pulay, Peter; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    1998-04-01

    Based on the orbital invariant formulation of Møller-Plesset (MP) perturbation theory, analytical energy gradients have been formulated and implemented for local second order MP (LMP2) calculations. The geometry-dependent truncation terms of the LMP2 energy have to be taken into account. This leads to a set of coupled-perturbed localization (CPL) equations which must be solved together with the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF) equations. In analogy to the conventional non-local theory, the repeated solution of these equations for each degree of freedom can be avoided by using the z-vector method of Handy and Schaefer. Explicit equations are presented for the Pipek-Mezey localization. Test calculations on smaller organic molecules demonstrate that the local approximations introduce only minor changes of computed equilibrium structures.

  15. EVALUATION OF NUSSELT NUMBER FOR A FLOW IN A MICROTUBE USING SECOND-ORDER SLIP MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbaros Cetin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the fully-developed temperature profile and corresponding Nusselt value is determined analytically for a gaseous flow in a microtube with a thermal boundary condition of constant wall heat flux. The flow assumed to be laminar, and hydrodynamically and thermally fully developed. The fluid is assumed to be constant property and incompressible. The effect of rarefaction, viscous dissipation and axial conduction, which are important at the microscale, are included in the analysis. Second-order slip model is used for the slip-flow and temperature jump boundary conditions for the implementation of the rarefaction effect. Closed form solutions for the temperature field and the fully-developed Nusselt number is derived as a function of Knudsen number, Brinkman number and Peclet number.

  16. Silica coating and photocatalytic activities of ZnO nanoparticles: Effect of operational parameters and kinetic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, L. F. M.; Emara, M. M.; El-Moselhy, M. M.; Maziad, N. A.; Hussein, O. K.

    2014-10-01

    Silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using the hydrothermal method. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). It was found that ultrafine core/shell structured silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were successfully obtained. TEM analysis revealed a continuous and uniform silica coating layer of about 8 nm in thickness on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance of silica-coating ZnO core/shell nanoparticles in methylene blue aqueous solution was investigated. The effects of some operational parameters such as pH value, nanocatalyst loading and initial MB concentration on the degradation efficiency were discussed. Kinetic parameters were experimentally determined and a pseudo-first-order kinetic was observed. Thus, the main advantage of the coating is the stability of the photocatalysts and the better performance in acidic or alkaline solutions. Compared to ZnO the maximum apparent rate constant is obtained at pH 8.5 (pH 11.5 in case of bare ZnO). Moreover, the Langmuir adsorption model was applied to describe the equilibrium isotherm at different MB concentration. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm suggests monolayer coverage of the MB onto surface of silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles. The kinetics of the adsorption with respect to the initial dye concentration, were also investigated. The pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated. The kinetic studies revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model better represented the adsorption kinetics, suggesting that the adsorption process may be chemisorption.

  17. Silica coating and photocatalytic activities of ZnO nanoparticles: effect of operational parameters and kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, L F M; Emara, M M; El-Moselhy, M M; Maziad, N A; Hussein, O K

    2014-10-15

    Silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were prepared using the hydrothermal method. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX). It was found that ultrafine core/shell structured silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles were successfully obtained. TEM analysis revealed a continuous and uniform silica coating layer of about 8nm in thickness on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. The photocatalytic performance of silica-coating ZnO core/shell nanoparticles in methylene blue aqueous solution was investigated. The effects of some operational parameters such as pH value, nanocatalyst loading and initial MB concentration on the degradation efficiency were discussed. Kinetic parameters were experimentally determined and a pseudo-first-order kinetic was observed. Thus, the main advantage of the coating is the stability of the photocatalysts and the better performance in acidic or alkaline solutions. Compared to ZnO the maximum apparent rate constant is obtained at pH 8.5 (pH 11.5 in case of bare ZnO). Moreover, the Langmuir adsorption model was applied to describe the equilibrium isotherm at different MB concentration. The applicability of the Langmuir isotherm suggests monolayer coverage of the MB onto surface of silica-coating ZnO nanoparticles. The kinetics of the adsorption with respect to the initial dye concentration, were also investigated. The pseudo-first-order and second-order kinetic models were used and the rate constants were evaluated. The kinetic studies revealed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model better represented the adsorption kinetics, suggesting that the adsorption process may be chemisorption. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Independence in the processing of first- and second-order motion signals at the local-motion-pooling level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Mark; Metcalf, Olivia

    2010-02-08

    The interaction of first- and second-order motion signals at the local-motion-pooling level were investigated using locally-paired dots that moved orthogonally to each other. Dots were either luminance-defined, which could, potentially drive both first- and second-order local-motion units, or contrast-defined, which only drive second-order local-motion units. The response measure used was the nature of the motion percept: either unidirectional or transparent motion. The likelihood of perceiving transparent motion was varied by adjusting the trajectory length of the dots. Increasing the trajectory length increased the likelihood that observers would perceive transparency. The results, taken as a whole, support the notion of independent first-order and second-order local-motion-pooling units, with the spatial extent of the second-order units being larger than that of the first-order units. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Discrete pseudo-integrals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mesiar, Radko; Li, J.; Pap, E.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 3 (2013), s. 357-364 ISSN 0888-613X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP402/11/0378 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : concave integral * pseudo-addition * pseudo- multiplication Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.977, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/E/mesiar-discrete pseudo-integrals. pdf

  20. Biosorption Behavior of Ciprofloxacin onto Enteromorpha prolifera: Isotherm and Kinetic Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaoling; Li, Yanhui; Zhao, Xindong; Du, Qiuju; Wang, Zonghua; Xia, Yanzhi; Xia, Linhua

    2015-01-01

    The studies aimed at the feasibility of using Enteromorpha prolifera for the removal of ciprofloxacin from aqueous solutions. Batch experiments were carried out for the biosorption of ciprofloxacin onto Enteromorpha prolifera. The factors affecting the biosorption process such as the initial concentration, dosage, pH and the contact time were studied. Enteromorpha prolifera exhibited a maximum biosorption capacity of 21.7 mg/g. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model described the ciprofloxacin biosorption process with a good fitting. The optimum pH of ciprofloxacin adsorbed by Enteromorpha prolifera was 10. Biosorption equilibrium studies demonstrated that the biosorption followed Freundlich isotherm model, which implied a heterogeneous biosorption phenomenon.