WorldWideScience

Sample records for psd ice particles

  1. Ice particle collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampara, Naresh; Turnbull, Barbara; Hill, Richard; Swift, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Granular interactions of ice occur in a range of geophysical, astrophysical and industrial applications. For example, Saturn's Rings are composed of icy particles from micrometers to kilometres in size - inertial and yet too small to interact gravitationally. In clouds, ice crystals are smashed to pieces before they re-aggregate to for snow floccules in a process that is very much open to interpretation. In a granular flow of ice particles, the energy spent in collisions can lead to localized surface changes and wetting, which in turn can promote aggregation. To understand the induced wetting and its effects, we present two novel experimental methods which provide snippets of insight into the collisional behaviour of macroscopic ice particles. Experiment 1: Microgravity experiments provide minute details of the contact between the ice particles during the collision. A diamagnetic levitation technique, as alternative to the parabolic flight or falling tower experiments, was used to understand the collisional behaviour of individual macroscopic icy bodies. A refrigerated cylinder, that can control ambient conditions, was inserted into the bore of an 18 Tesla superconducting magnet and cooled to -10°C. Initial binary collisions were created, where one 4 mm ice particle was levitated in the magnet bore whilst another particle was dropped vertically from the top of the bore. The trajectories of both particles were captured by high speed video to provide the three-dimensional particle velocities and track the collision outcome. Introducing complexity, multiple particles were levitated in the bore and an azimuthal turbulent air flow introduced, allowing the particles to collide with other particles within a coherent fluid structure (mimicking Saturn's rings, or an eddy in a cloud). In these experiments, a sequence of collisions occur, each one different to the previous one due to the changes in surface characteristics created by the collisions themselves. Aggregation

  2. Plastic Bonded Explosive (PBX) Particle Size Distribution (PSD) Measurements Using an Image Analysis System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Gregg K. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2003-06-01

    The slurry process for producing plastic bonded explosives (PBX) has been used for many years. However, until recently the mechanisms involved have not been studied quantitatively to determine the effects of the various control variables. Recently, the effects of operating variables on the final product have been studied; however, no attempt was made to measure particle growth during the slurry process. This study applies an image analysis tool to measure particle size distributions (PSDs) during the slurry process to produce PBX 9501, a specific formulation used in nuclear weapons. The observed PBX 9501 slurry behavior leads away from the typical population balance description of agglomeration, that is, a discrete particle-particle coalescence mechanism. The behavior observed in these experiments indicates that the initial state of the system contains a number of smaller particles clustered together. The cluster then coalesces into a large particle as solvent is removed and the slurry continuously mixed. Other small fragments are picked up and a relatively small amount of growth is observed. A mass transfer model adequately describes solvent removal, and an empirical model is developed to describe the growth behavior in terms of measured process variables. The image system is applied to dried molding powders. The PSD measurement results of the PBX 9501 library lots, historic samples set aside as PBX 9501 lots were accepted from the manufacturer, are also discussed and analyzed. A correlation analysis was conducted to find relationships between the measured PSD and other properties such as bulk density and pressed densities. While no significant correlation was found between the measured PSD and averaged bulk densities for the library lots, significant correlations are found between the measured PSD and pressed density. The final part of the study was to scale-up the PSD measurement capability. Since the large-scale processes are not yet operational, this work

  3. Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    We use x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) to probe the dynamics of colloidal particles in polycrystalline ice. During freezing, the dendritic ice morphology and rejection of particles from the ice created regions of high particle density, where some of the colloids were forced into contact and formed disordered aggregates. The particles in these high density regions underwent ballistic motion, with a characteristic velocity that increased with temperature. This ballistic motion is coupled with both stretched and compressed exponential decays of the intensity autocorrelation function. We suggest that this behavior could result from ice grain boundary migration. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Activity of different proteinaceous ice nucleating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Susann; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Grawe, Sarah; Ling, Meilee; Hellner, Lisa; Zapf, Jean-Michel; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Pummer, Bernhard; Boesen, Thomas; Wex, Heike; Finster, Kai; Stratmann, Frank

    2017-04-01

    A variety of microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, lichen) from land produce protein structures, which act as a template for ice nucleation [1]. Also marine sources of ice nucleating particles (INPs) came in focus in the recent years. The atmospheric spatio-temporal distribution of INPs from microorganisms is still not well known. However, it is often assumed that the observed onset of atmospheric ice nucleation (T>-20°C) is due to the existence of ice-nucleation active biological particles. In this study we compare the ice nucleation activity of different proteinaceous particles produced by bacteria and fungi. For bacteria we investigate (i) cells and fragments of Pseudomonas syringae from commercially available SnomaxTM and (ii) the Pseudomonas syringae INA protein expressed in living Escherichia coli bacteria. We also analyzed freeze-dried leaves [2] where we assume that proteinaceous particles are responsible for the ice nucleation activity. For fungi the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina was investigated which had been extracted from natural soil [3]. Immersion freezing experiments are performed at the cold stage LINA (Leipzig Ice Nucleation Array). We attempt to describe the activity of a single proteinaceous ice nucleating particle [4] in order to achieve direct comparability. Further, the results are compared with complex natural systems e.g. soil dust. The objectives of this study are to clarify potential differences in the ice nucleation potential of proteinaceous particles and to draw conclusions concerning the need to differentiate them for modelling purposes. 1. Szyrmer, W. and I. Zawadzki, Biogenic and anthropogenic sources of ice-forming nuclei: A review, Bull. Amer. Meteorol. Soc., 1997. 2. Schnell, R.C. and G. Vali, Biogenic ice nucleai .1: Terrestrial and marine sources, doi: 10.1175/1520-0469(1976)0332.0.co;2, 1976. 3. Froehlich-Nowoisky, J. et al., Ice nucleation activity in the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina, doi: 10.5194/bg-12

  5. Ice Particle Charge Transfer Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-30

    efficiency of an ice sphere for very small ice crystals has been investigated by only a few workers, in- cluding Hosler and Hallgren (1960), Hallgren ...than unity in all cases. Rogers, and Latham and Saunders, used only small plate crystals at all temperatures, whereas Hosler and Hallgren dealt with the...crystal types which occur at the temperature at which the experi- ments were performed. Hosler and Hallgren found that the collec- tion efficiency was

  6. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  7. The PHOCUS Project: Mesospheric Ice Particle Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaplanov, M.; Hedin, J.; Gumbel, J.

    2012-12-01

    On the morning of July 21, 2011, the PHOCUS sounding rocket was launched from Esrange, Sweden, intostrong noctilucent clouds (NLC) and polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The aim of the PHOCUS project (Particles, Hydrogen and Oxygen Chemistry in the Upper Summer mesosphere) is to study mesospheric particles (ice and meteoric smoke) and their interaction with their neutral and charged environment. Interactions of interest comprise the charging and nucleation of particles, the relationship between meteoric smoke and ice, and the influence of these particles on gas-phase chemistry. Here we will describe the optical measurements of the ice particlesand present first results including comparison to the other simultaneous measurements.Ice particle properties were probed with a set of three NLC photometers from Stockholm University. NLC photometry is currently the best technique available for determining altitude ranges of NLC in situ. At the same time, UV photometry allows a study of particle properties like size and shape by analysing the spectral dependence (colour ratio), angle dependence (phase function), and polarisation of the scattering. The set of NLC photometer flown on PHOCUS was a unique photometer package that for the first time investigated all three parameters simultaneously. Two forward-viewing photometers measured at different wavelengths (one in the UV at 220 nm and the other in the visible at 440 nm) and were both equipped with fixed linear polarisers. The payload spin was utilised to scan through the polarisation direction, thus providing us with the Stokes vectors I, Q and U at both wavelengths. The third photometer (also measured in the UV at 220 nm)was mounted sideways, viewing the overhead sky at an angle of 40°from the rocket spin axis. Due to the payload spin, the NLC was observed under varying scattering geometries as the payload approached the cloud layer. Thus, this set of NLC photometers provided a complete optical characterization of the

  8. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy of Captured Cirrus Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, N. B.; Boaggio, K.; Bandamede, M.; Bancroft, L.; Hurler, K.

    2016-12-01

    We present the latest collection of high-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy images and microanalysis of cirrus ice particles captured by high-altitude balloon (ICE-Ball, see abstracts by K. Boaggio and M. Bandamede). Ice particle images and sublimation-residues are derived from particles captured during approximately 15 balloon flights conducted in Pennsylvania and New Jersey over the past 12 months. Measurements include 3D digital elevation model reconstructions of ice particles, and associated statistical analyses of entire particles and particle sub-facets and surfaces. This 3D analysis reveals that morphologies of most ice particles captured deviate significantly from ideal habits, and display geometric complexity and surface roughness at multiple measureable scales, ranging from 100's nanometers to 100's of microns. The presentation suggests potential a path forward for representing scattering from a realistically complex array of ice particle shapes and surfaces.

  9. Ice Formation by Soot-Containing Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demott, P. J.; Petters, M. D.; Prenni, A. J.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Carrico, C. M.; Bennett, M. R.; Stanglmaier, R.; Volckens, J.; Popovicheva, O. B.

    2006-12-01

    A role for soot particles as atmospheric ice forming nuclei remains highly uncertain and poorly quantified. A relatively small amount of data exists and most of this is for laboratory surrogates that may not be well characterized or of assured relevance to the atmosphere. It is important to constrain the role of soot particles as ice nuclei due to their abundance in the atmosphere and the large contribution from anthropogenic activities. Further, global climate models are beginning to be capable of treating the impact of different aerosol types, including soot particles. This paper reports on studies of ice formation by or within surrogates for hydrophobic soot and realistic carbonaceous particles from combustion of fuel in a diesel engine, burning of an assortment biomass materials, and real jet fuel combustor particles. Measurements of primarily monodisperse particles were focused below -30°C to emphasize the transition between temperatures where heterogeneous ice nucleation is required for ice formation and those for which homogeneous freezing processes are also possible. Ice nucleation measurements were made with a continuous flow diffusion chamber. Simultaneous measurements of hygroscopic water uptake and cloud condensation nucleation behavior were also made at 30°C for each aerosol type. Small fractions of hydrophobic soot particles are found capable of initiating heterogeneous ice formation at low temperatures. Results of studies of more realistic particles suggest that any process that increases hygroscopicity tends to limit the conditions for ice formation within soot particles. Most biomass burning particles, showing a range of dry/wet diameter hygroscopic growth factors (1.03 activity as CCN to 102% RH, yet behaved as particles containing solutions in which homogeneous freezing was supported at temperatures below -38°C. This is tentatively attributed to condensation of semi-volatiles during cooling. Ice forming ability as warm as -30°C was limited to

  10. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of α-pinene SOA particles before and after ice cloud processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Robert; Höhler, Kristina; Huang, Wei; Kiselev, Alexei; Möhler, Ottmar; Mohr, Claudia; Pajunoja, Aki; Saathoff, Harald; Schiebel, Thea; Shen, Xiaoli; Virtanen, Annele

    2017-05-01

    The ice nucleation ability of α-pinene secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles was investigated at temperatures between 253 and 205 K in the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud simulation chamber. Pristine SOA particles were nucleated and grown from pure gas precursors and then subjected to repeated expansion cooling cycles to compare their intrinsic ice nucleation ability during the first nucleation event with that observed after ice cloud processing. The unprocessed α-pinene SOA particles were found to be inefficient ice-nucleating particles at cirrus temperatures, with nucleation onsets (for an activated fraction of 0.1%) as high as for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solution droplets. Ice cloud processing at temperatures below 235 K only marginally improved the particles' ice nucleation ability and did not significantly alter their morphology. In contrast, the particles' morphology and ice nucleation ability was substantially modified upon ice cloud processing in a simulated convective cloud system, where the α-pinene SOA particles were first activated to supercooled cloud droplets and then froze homogeneously at about 235 K. As evidenced by electron microscopy, the α-pinene SOA particles adopted a highly porous morphology during such a freeze-drying cycle. When probing the freeze-dried particles in succeeding expansion cooling runs in the mixed-phase cloud regime up to 253 K, the increase in relative humidity led to a collapse of the porous structure. Heterogeneous ice formation was observed after the droplet activation of the collapsed, freeze-dried SOA particles, presumably caused by ice remnants in the highly viscous material or the larger surface area of the particles.

  11. A marine biogenic source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, T. W.; Ladino, L. A.; Alpert, Peter A.; Breckels, M. N.; Brooks, I. M.; Browse, J.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Carslaw, K. S.; Huffman, J. A.; Judd, C.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; McFiggans, Gordon; Miller, L. A.; Najera, J.; Polishchuk, E. A.; Rae, S.; Schiller, C. L.; Si, M.; Vergara Temprado, J.; Whale, Thomas; Wong, J P S; Wurl, O.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Abbatt, JPD; Aller, Josephine Y.; Bertram, Allan K.; Knopf, Daniel A.; Murray, Benjamin J.

    2015-09-09

    The formation of ice in clouds is facilitated by the presence of airborne ice nucleating particles1,2. Sea spray is one of the major global sources of atmospheric particles, but it is unclear to what extent these particles are capable of nucleating ice3–11. Here we show that material in the sea surface microlayer, which is enriched in surface active organic material representative of that found in sub-micron sea- spray aerosol12–21, nucleates ice under conditions that occur in mixed-phase clouds and high-altitude ice clouds. The ice active material is likely biogenic and is less than ~0.2 ?m in size. We also show that organic material (exudate) released by a common marine diatom nucleates ice when separated from cells and propose that organic material associated with phytoplankton cell exudates are a candidate for the observed ice nucleating ability of the microlayer samples. By combining our measurements with global model simulations of marine organic aerosol, we show that ice nucleating particles of marine origin are dominant in remote marine environments, such as the Southern Ocean, the North Pacific and the North Atlantic.

  12. Ice nucleation by particles immersed in supercooled cloud droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B J; O'Sullivan, D; Atkinson, J D; Webb, M E

    2012-10-07

    The formation of ice particles in the Earth's atmosphere strongly affects the properties of clouds and their impact on climate. Despite the importance of ice formation in determining the properties of clouds, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2007) was unable to assess the impact of atmospheric ice formation in their most recent report because our basic knowledge is insufficient. Part of the problem is the paucity of quantitative information on the ability of various atmospheric aerosol species to initiate ice formation. Here we review and assess the existing quantitative knowledge of ice nucleation by particles immersed within supercooled water droplets. We introduce aerosol species which have been identified in the past as potentially important ice nuclei and address their ice-nucleating ability when immersed in a supercooled droplet. We focus on mineral dusts, biological species (pollen, bacteria, fungal spores and plankton), carbonaceous combustion products and volcanic ash. In order to make a quantitative comparison we first introduce several ways of describing ice nucleation and then summarise the existing information according to the time-independent (singular) approximation. Using this approximation in combination with typical atmospheric loadings, we estimate the importance of ice nucleation by different aerosol types. According to these estimates we find that ice nucleation below about -15 °C is dominated by soot and mineral dusts. Above this temperature the only materials known to nucleate ice are biological, with quantitative data for other materials absent from the literature. We conclude with a summary of the challenges our community faces.

  13. Ice particle size variations and possible non-ice materials on Ganymede's and Callisto's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Katrin; Hoffmann, Harald; Hibbitts, Charles A.; Wagner, Roland; Jaumann, Ralf

    2017-10-01

    Band depth ratios (BDRs) of the major H2O-ice absorptions in the spectra of the Jovian satellites Ganymede and Callisto acquired by the Galileo-NIMS spectrometer have been found to be mainly unaffected by the abundance of the dark non-ice material and therefore provide semi-quantitative indicators of variations in the H2O-ice particle sizes across their surfaces. Intriguingly, H2O-ice particle sizes vary continuously with geographic latitude on both satellites. Ice particles on Callisto appear slightly larger at low and mid latitude than observed on Ganymede, whereas the BDR values converge toward the poles indicating similarly small ice particle sizes. This smooth latitudinal trend on both satellites may be related to the surface temperatures and possible thermal migration of water vapor to higher latitudes and grain welding at lower latitudes. It is not expected that the observed relationship between the BDRs and H2O-ice particle sizes occurs for mixtures with every non-ice material expected to exist on planetary surfaces. Therefore, ice mixtures with a variety of considered non-ice materials such as carbon-rich materials, phyllosilicates and salts have been calculated and the validity of the relationship tested depending on different H2O-ice abundances and particle sizes. The relationship seems to be valid for most materials if the amount of the non-ice material in the mixture does not exceed 10 percent. Best results across the full range of percentage could be achieved for carbon-rich material and hydroxylated phyllosilicates, which are expected to be the major constituent of carbonaceous chondrites. In contrast, significant amounts of hydrated material, as identified on Europa, significantly changes the BDRs and could not fully explain the global trend.

  14. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, R.; Möhler, O.; Saathoff, H.; Schnaiter, M.; Skrotzki, J.; Leisner, T.; Wilson, T. W.; Malkin, T. L.; Murray, B. J.

    2012-09-01

    The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA), levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition) before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosol particles that have re-vitrified in contact

  15. Ice cloud processing of ultra-viscous/glassy aerosol particles leads to enhanced ice nucleation ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation potential of airborne glassy aqueous aerosol particles has been investigated by controlled expansion cooling cycles in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology at temperatures between 247 and 216 K. Four different solutes were used as proxies for oxygenated organic matter found in the atmosphere: raffinose, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-DL-mandelic acid (HMMA, levoglucosan, and a multi-component mixture of raffinose with five dicarboxylic acids and ammonium sulphate. Similar to previous experiments with citric acid aerosols, all particles were found to nucleate ice heterogeneously before reaching the homogeneous freezing threshold provided that the freezing cycles were started well below the respective glass transition temperatures of the compounds; this is discussed in detail in a separate article. In this contribution, we identify a further mechanism by which glassy aerosols can promote ice nucleation below the homogeneous freezing limit. If the glassy aerosol particles are probed in freezing cycles started only a few degrees below their respective glass transition temperatures, they enter the liquid regime of the state diagram upon increasing relative humidity (moisture-induced glass-to-liquid transition before being able to act as heterogeneous ice nuclei. Ice formation then only occurs by homogeneous freezing at elevated supersaturation levels. When ice forms the remaining solution freeze concentrates and re-vitrifies. If these ice cloud processed glassy aerosol particles are then probed in a second freezing cycle at the same temperature, they catalyse ice formation at a supersaturation threshold between 5 and 30% with respect to ice. By analogy with the enhanced ice nucleation ability of insoluble ice nuclei like mineral dusts after they nucleate ice once, we refer to this phenomenon as pre-activation. We propose a number of possible explanations for why glassy aerosol particles that have re

  16. Effects of Ice Particle Size Vertical Inhomogeneity on the Passive Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven; Yang, Ping; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    The solar reflectance bi-spectral (SRBS) and infrared split-window (IRSpW) methods are two of the most popular techniques for passive ice cloud property retrievals from multispectral imagers. Ice clouds are usually assumed to be vertically homogeneous in global operational algorithms based on these methods, although significant vertical variations of ice particle size are typically observed in ice clouds. In this Study we investigate uncertainties in retrieved optical thickness, effective particle size, and ice water path introduced by a homogeneous cloud assumption in both the SRBS and IRSpW methods, and focus on whether the assumption can lead to significant discrepancies between the two methods. The study simulates the upwelling spectral radiance associated with vertically structured clouds and passes the results through representative SRBS and IRSpW retrieval algorithms. Cloud optical thickness is limited to values for which IRSpW retrievals are possible (optical thickness less than about 7). When the ice cloud is optically thin and yet has a significant ice particle size vertical variation, it is found that both methods tend to underestimate the effective radius and ice water path. The reason for the underestimation is the nonlinear dependence of ice particle scattering properties (extinction and single scattering albedo) on the effective radius. Because the nonlinearity effect is stronger in the IRSpW than the SRBS method, the IRSpW-based IWP tends to be smaller than the SRBS counterpart. When the ice cloud is moderately optically thick, the IRSpW method is relatively insensitive to cloud vertical structure and effective radius retrieval is weighted toward smaller ice particle size, while the weighting function makes the SRBS method more sensitive to the ice particle size in the upper portion of the cloud. As a result, when ice particle size increases monotonically toward cloud base, the two methods are in qualitative agreement; in the event that ice particle

  17. Ice lollies: An ice particle generated in supercooled conveyor belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppas, S. Ch.; Crosier, J.; Choularton, T. W.; Bower, K. N.

    2017-05-01

    On 21 January 2009, a maturing low-pressure weather system approached the UK along with several associated frontal systems. As a part of the Aerosol Properties, PRocesses And InfluenceS on the Earth's climate-Clouds project, an observational research flight took place in southern England, sampling the leading warm front of this system. During the flight, a distinctive hydrometeor type was repeatedly observed which has not been widely reported in previous studies. We refer to the hydrometeors as "drizzle-rimed columnar ice" or "ice lollies" for short due to their characteristic shape. We discuss the processes that led to their formation using in situ and remote sensing data.

  18. Impact of ice particle habits on simulated clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, T.; Wacker, U.

    2004-11-01

    The effect of the choice of ice particle type in the parameterization of cloud microphysics on the simulated cloud and precipitation properties is investigated. Generalized parameterization equations for riming and deposition rates as well as sedimentation fluxes are given. Simulation studies with a mesoscale numerical weather prediction model for a two-dimensional flow over a hill show that the fields of condensate content and precipitation strongly depend on the interpretation of the sedimenting ice particles as e.g., graupel or unrimed aggregates. A parameterization model to account for the variation of particle attributes due to riming is presented.

  19. Particle physics in ice with IceCube DeepCore

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeYoung, Tyce, E-mail: deyoung@psu.edu [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-11-11

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is the world's largest high energy neutrino telescope, using the Antarctic ice cap as a Cherenkov detector medium. DeepCore, the low energy extension to IceCube, is an infill array with a fiducial volume of around 30 MTon in the deepest, clearest ice, aiming for an energy threshold as low as 10 GeV and extending IceCube's sensitivity to indirect dark matter searches and atmospheric neutrino oscillation physics. We will discuss the analysis of the first year of DeepCore data, as well as ideas for a further extension of the particle physics program in the ice with a future PINGU detector.

  20. Real-time analysis of insoluble particles in glacial ice using single-particle mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Matthew; Zawadowicz, Maria A.; Das, Sarah B.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2017-11-01

    Insoluble aerosol particles trapped in glacial ice provide insight into past climates, but analysis requires information on climatically relevant particle properties, such as size, abundance, and internal mixing. We present a new analytical method using a time-of-flight single-particle mass spectrometer (SPMS) to determine the composition and size of insoluble particles in glacial ice over an aerodynamic size range of ˜ 0.2-3.0 µm diameter. Using samples from two Greenland ice cores, we developed a procedure to nebulize insoluble particles suspended in melted ice, evaporate condensed liquid from those particles, and transport them to the SPMS for analysis. We further determined size-dependent extraction and instrument transmission efficiencies to investigate the feasibility of determining particle-class-specific mass concentrations. We find SPMS can be used to provide constraints on the aerodynamic size, composition, and relative abundance of most insoluble particulate classes in ice core samples. We describe the importance of post-aqueous processing to particles, a process which occurs due to nebulization of aerosols from an aqueous suspension of originally soluble and insoluble aerosol components. This study represents an initial attempt to use SPMS as an emerging technique for the study of insoluble particulates in ice cores.

  1. A new optical ice particle counter at LACIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieligk, Henner; Voelker, Georg Sebastian; Clauss, Tina; Grundmann, Marius; Stratmann, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Clouds play an important role within the climate system, especially for the radiative energy budget of the earth. The radiative properties of a cloud depend strongly on the fractions of ice crystals and water droplets, their size distributions, and the ice crystal shapes within the particular cloud. One option to gain this kind of information is using optical particle counters. A new optical particle counter is developed for laboratory work and is based on the concept of the Thermostabilized Optical Particle Spectrometer for the Detection of Ice Particles (TOPS-Ice, Clauss et al., 2013). TOPS-Ice uses linearly polarized green laser light and the depolarization of the scattered light at a scattering angle of 42.5° to discriminate between liquid water droplets and ice crystals in the lower μm range. However, the measurements are usually limited to ice fractions in the order of 1%. To improve the determination of the ice fraction, several modifications of the original setup are implemented including an additional detection system at another scattering angle. The new scattering angle is optimized for least interference between the droplet and ice signals. This is achieved by finding the angle with the maximum difference in scattered intensity of water droplets compared to ice crystals with the same volume equivalent diameter. The suitable scattering angle of 100° for linearly polarized light was chosen based on calculations using T-Matrix method, Lorenz-Mie theory, Müller matrices and distribution theory. The new optical setup is designed to run in combination with a laminar flow tube, the so-called Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS, Stratmann et al., 2004; Hartmann et al., 2011). Using LACIS and its precisely controlled thermodynamic conditions, we are able to form small water droplets and ice crystals which will then be detected, classified and sized by our new optical device. This setup is planned to be tested in ice measurements including

  2. Remote Laser Diffraction PSD Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2000-06-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of radioactive slurry samples were obtained using a modified "off-the-shelf" classical laser light scattering particle size analyzer. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model La-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a "hot cell" (gamma radiation) environment. The general details of the modifications to this analyzer are presented in this paper. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not achievable - making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used previously. Remote deployment and utilization of this technology is in an exploratory stage. The risk of malfunction in this radiation environment is countered by gaining of this tremendously useful fundamental engineering data. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  3. Mapping the Ice Depth of Europa with Ultrahigh Energy Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Wolf, A.; Naudet, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    There has been recent interest in applying radio emission of ultra-high energy neutrinos interacting in the ice of Europa. The idea was first described by Gorham (2004)[1] in the context of ultra-high energy particle detection. Shoji, Kurita, and Tanaka (2011)[2] proposed a technique for measuring ice depth using the radio intensity distribution of radio impulses emitted by interactions deep in the Europan ice. Miller, Schaefer, and Sequeira (2012)[3] follow up this study with a simulation of a radio detector mission to constrain the ice depth of Europa. The radio signal results from an effect proposed by Askar'yan (1962)[4] where the particle shower induced by the neutrino interaction accumulates a charge excess traveling faster than the speed of light in the medium and produces a coherent Cherenkov pulse at radio frequencies. We evaluate the feasibility of such a mission given the current state of knowledge of ultra-high energy particle detection and radio pulse production. References [1] Gorham (2004), Planet-sized Detectors for Ultra-high Energy Neutrinos & Cosmic Rays, NASA Advanced Planning Office's Capability Roadmap Public Workshop, Nov. 30, 2004, astro-ph/0411510 [2] Shoji, Kurita, and Tanaka (2011), Constraint of Europan ice thickness by measuring electromagnetic emissions induced by neutrino interaction, Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L08202 [3] Miller, Shaefer, Sequeira, PRIDE (Passive Radio [frequency] Ice Depth Experiment): An instrument to passively measure ice depth from a Europan orbiter using neutrinos, Icarus 220 877-888 [4] Askar'yan (1962), Excess negative charge of an electron photon shower and its coherent radiation originating from it. Radio recording of showers under the ground and on the Moon, Sov. Phys. JETP, 14, 441-443.

  4. Partitioning of ice nucleating particles: Which modes matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hande, Luke; Hoose, Corinna

    2017-04-01

    Ice particles in clouds have a large impact on cloud lifetime, precipitation amount, and cloud radiative properties through the indirect aerosol effect. Thus, correctly modelling ice formation processes is important for simulations preformed on all spatial and temporal scales. Ice forms on aerosol particles through several different mechanisms, namely deposition nucleation, immersion freezing, and contact freezing. However there is conflicting evidence as to which mode dominates, and the relative importance of the three heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanisms, as well as homogeneous nucleation, remains an open question. The environmental conditions, and hence the cloud type, have a large impact on determining which nucleation mode dominates. In order to understand this, simulations were performed with the COSMO-LES model, utilising state of the art parameterisations to describe the different nucleation mechanisms for several semi-idealised cloud types commonly occurring over central Europe. The cloud types investigated include a semi-idealised, and an idealised convective cloud, an orographic cloud, and a stratiform cloud. Results show that immersion and contact freezing dominate at warmer temperatures, and under most conditions, deposition nucleation plays only a minor role. In clouds where sufficiently high levels of water vapour are present at colder temperatures, deposition nucleation can play a role, however in general homogeneous nucleation dominates at colder temperatures. Since contact nucleation depends on the environmental relative humidity, enhancements in this nucleation mode can be seen in areas of dry air entrainment. The results indicate that ice microphysical processes are somewhat sensitve to the environmental conditions and therefore the cloud type.

  5. Ice particle habit and surface roughness derived from PARASOL polarization measurements

    OpenAIRE

    B. H. Cole; P. Yang; B. A. Baum; J. Riedi; L. C.-Labonnote

    2014-01-01

    Ice clouds are an important element in the radiative balance of the earth's climate system, but their microphysical and optical properties still are not well constrained, especially ice particle habit and the degree of particle surface roughness. In situ observations have revealed common ice particle habits and evidence for surface roughness, but these observations are limited. An alternative is to infer the ice particle shape and surface roughness from satellite observat...

  6. Soot Aerosol Particles as Cloud Condensation Nuclei: from Ice Nucleation Activity to Ice Crystal Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirim, Claire; Ikhenazene, Raouf; Ortega, Isamel Kenneth; Carpentier, Yvain; Focsa, Cristian; Chazallon, Bertrand; Ouf, François-Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Emissions of solid-state particles (soot) from engine exhausts due to incomplete fuel combustion is considered to influence ice and liquid water cloud droplet activation [1]. The activity of these aerosols would originate from their ability to be important centers of ice-particle nucleation, as they would promote ice formation above water homogeneous freezing point. Soot particles are reported to be generally worse ice nuclei than mineral dust because they activate nucleation at higher ice-supersaturations for deposition nucleation and at lower temperatures for immersion freezing than ratios usually expected for homogeneous nucleation [2]. In fact, there are still numerous opened questions as to whether and how soot's physico-chemical properties (structure, morphology and chemical composition) can influence their nucleation ability. Therefore, systematic investigations of soot aerosol nucleation activity via one specific nucleation mode, here deposition nucleation, combined with thorough structural and compositional analyzes are needed in order to establish any association between the particles' activity and their physico-chemical properties. In addition, since the morphology of the ice crystals can influence their radiative properties [3], we investigated their morphology as they grow over both soot and pristine substrates at different temperatures and humidity ratios. In the present work, Combustion Aerosol STandart soot samples were produced from propane using various experimental conditions. Their nucleation activity was studied in deposition mode (from water vapor), and monitored using a temperature-controlled reactor in which the sample's relative humidity is precisely measured with a cryo-hygrometer. Formation of water/ice onto the particles is followed both optically and spectroscopically, using a microscope coupled to a Raman spectrometer. Vibrational signatures of hydroxyls (O-H) emerge when the particle becomes hydrated and are used to characterize ice

  7. Deciphering sub-micron ice particles on Enceladus surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, F.; Schenk, P.; Tosi, F.; D'Aversa, E.; Clark, R.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Ore, C. M. Dalle

    2017-07-01

    The surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus is composed primarily by pure water ice. The Cassini spacecraft has observed present-day geologic activity at the moon's South Polar Region, related with the formation and feeding of Saturn's E-ring. Plumes of micron-sized particles, composed of water ice and other non-ice contaminants (e.g., CO2, NH3, CH4), erupt from four terrain's fractures named Tiger Stripes. Some of this material falls back on Enceladus' surface to form deposits that extend to the North at ∼40°W and ∼220°W, with the highest concentration found at the South Pole. In this work we analyzed VIMS-IR data to identify plumes deposits across Enceladus' surface through the variation in band depth of the main water ice spectral features. To characterize the global variation of water ice band depths across Enceladus, the entire surface was sampled with an angular resolution of 1° in both latitude and longitude, and for each angular bin we averaged the value of all spectral indices as retrieved by VIMS. The position of the plumes' deposits predicted by theoretical models display a good match with water ice band depths' maps on the trailing hemisphere, whereas they diverge significantly on the leading side. Space weathering processes acting on Enceladus' surface ionize and break up water ice molecules, resulting in the formation of particles smaller than one micron. We also mapped the spectral indices for sub-micron particles and we compared the results with the plumes deposits models. Again, a satisfactory match is observed on the trailing hemisphere only. Finally, we investigated the variation of the depth of the water ice absorption bands as a function of the phase angle. In the visible range, some terrains surrounding the Tiger Stripes show a decrease in albedo when the phase angle is smaller than 10°. This unusual effect cannot be confirmed by near infrared data, since observations with a phase angle lower than 10° are not available. For phase angle

  8. The fate of meteoric metals in ice particles: Effects of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T. P.; Frankland, V. L.; Murray, B. J.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2017-08-01

    The uptake and potential reactivity of metal atoms on water ice can be an important process in planetary atmospheres and on icy bodies in the interplanetary and interstellar medium. For instance, metal atom uptake affects the gas-phase chemistry of the Earth's mesosphere, and has been proposed to influence the agglomeration of matter into planets in protoplanetary disks. In this study the fate of Mg and K atoms incorporated into water-ice films, prepared under ultra-high vacuum conditions at temperatures of 110-140 K, was investigated. Temperature-programmed desorption experiments reveal that Mg- and K-containing species do not co-desorb when the ice sublimates, demonstrating that uptake on ice particles causes irreversible removal of the metals from the gas phase. This implies that uptake on ice particles in terrestrial polar mesospheric clouds accelerates the formation of large meteoric smoke particles (≥1 nm radius above 80 km) following sublimation of the ice. Energetic sputtering of metal-dosed ice layers by 500 eV Ar+ and Kr+ ions shows that whereas K reacts on (or within) the ice surface to form KOH, adsorbed Mg atoms are chemically inert. These experimental results are consistent with electronic structure calculations of the metals bound to an ice surface, where theoretical adsorption energies on ice are calculated to be -68 kJ mol-1 for K, -91 kJ mol-1 for Mg, and -306 kJ mol-1 for Fe. K can also insert into a surface H2O to produce KOH and a dangling H atom, in a reaction that is slightly exothermic.

  9. Discovering sub-micron ice particles across Dione' surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, Francesca; Schenk, Pual; Tosi, Federico; Clark, Roger; Dalle Ore, Cristina; Combe, Jean-Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Water ice is the most abundant component of Saturn’s mid-sized moons. However, these moons show an albedo asymmetry - their leading sides are bright while their trailing side exhibits dark terrains. Such differences arise from two surface alteration processes: (i) the bombardment of charged particles from the interplanetary medium and driven by Saturn’s magnetosphere on the trailing side, and (ii) the impact of E-ring water ice particles on the satellites’ leading side. As a result, the trailing hemisphere appears to be darker than the leading side. This effect is particularly evident on Dione's surface. A consequence of these surface alteration processes is the formation or the implantation of sub-micron sized ice particles.The presence of such particles influences and modifies the surfaces' spectrum because of Rayleigh scattering by the particles. In the near infrared range of the spectrum, the main sub-micron ice grains spectral indicators are: (i) asymmetry and (ii) long ward minimum shift of the absorption band at 2.02 μm (iii) a decrease in the ratio between the band depths at 1.50 and 2.02 μm (iv) a decrease in the height of the spectral peak at 2.6 μm (v) the suppression of the Fresnel reflection peak at 3.1 μm and (vi) the decrease of the reflection peak at 5 μm relative to those at 3.6 μm.We present results from our ongoing work mapping the variation of sub-micron ice grains spectral indicators across Dione' surface using Cassini-VIMS cubes acquired in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). To characterize the global variations of spectral indicators across Dione' surface, we divided it into a 1°x1° grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell.We will investigate if there exist a correspondence with water ice abundance variations by producing water ice' absorption band depths at 1.25, 1.52 and 2.02 μm, and with surface morphology by comparing the results with ISS color maps in the ultraviolet, visible and infrared

  10. Arctic sea ice melt leads to atmospheric new particle formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall Osto, M; Beddows, D C S; Tunved, P; Krejci, R; Ström, J; Hansson, H-C; Yoon, Y J; Park, Ki-Tae; Becagli, S; Udisti, R; Onasch, T; O Dowd, C D; Simó, R; Harrison, Roy M

    2017-06-12

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) and growth significantly influences climate by supplying new seeds for cloud condensation and brightness. Currently, there is a lack of understanding of whether and how marine biota emissions affect aerosol-cloud-climate interactions in the Arctic. Here, the aerosol population was categorised via cluster analysis of aerosol size distributions taken at Mt Zeppelin (Svalbard) during a 11 year record. The daily temporal occurrence of NPF events likely caused by nucleation in the polar marine boundary layer was quantified annually as 18%, with a peak of 51% during summer months. Air mass trajectory analysis and atmospheric nitrogen and sulphur tracers link these frequent nucleation events to biogenic precursors released by open water and melting sea ice regions. The occurrence of such events across a full decade was anti-correlated with sea ice extent. New particles originating from open water and open pack ice increased the cloud condensation nuclei concentration background by at least ca. 20%, supporting a marine biosphere-climate link through sea ice melt and low altitude clouds that may have contributed to accelerate Arctic warming. Our results prompt a better representation of biogenic aerosol sources in Arctic climate models.

  11. Mass transfer during ice particle collisions in planetary rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, J. S. B.; Hatzes, A.; Bridges, F.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental results are presented from laboratory environment simulations of the ice particle collisional properties defining the structure and dynamical evolution of planetary rings. It is inferred from these data that there is a dependence of the interacting volume on the impact velocity. Although the volume fraction exchanged during a collision is small, the net amount of material transferred can be substantially smaller. Attention is given to the implications of these determinations for planetary ring structure and evolution.

  12. Small particles big effect? - Investigating ice nucleation abilities of soot particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrt, Fabian; David, Robert O.; Lohmann, Ulrike; Stopford, Chris; Wu, Zhijun; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric soot particles are primary particles produced by incomplete combustion of biomass and/or fossil fuels. Thus soot mainly originates from anthropogenic emissions, stemming from combustion related processes in transport vehicles, industrial and residential uses. Such soot particles are generally complex mixtures of black carbon (BC) and organic matter (OM) (Bond et al., 2013; Petzold et al., 2013), depending on the sources and the interaction of the primary particles with other atmospheric matter and/or gases BC absorbs solar radiation having a warming effect on global climate. It can also act as a heterogeneous ice nucleating particle (INP) and thus impact cloud-radiation interactions, potentially cooling the climate (Lohmann, 2002). Previous studies, however, have shown conflicting results concerning the ice nucleation ability of soot, limiting the ability to predict its effects on Earth's radiation budget. Here we present a laboratory study where we systematically investigate the ice nucleation behavior of different soot particles. Commercial soot samples are used, including an amorphous, industrial carbon frequently used in coatings and coloring (FW 200, Orion Engineered Carbons) and a fullerene soot (572497 ALDRICH), e.g. used as catalyst. In addition, we use soot generated from a propane flame Combustion Aerosol Standard Generator (miniCAST, JING AG), as a proxy for atmospheric soot particles. The ice nucleation ability of these soot types is tested on size-selected particles for a wide temperature range from 253 K to 218 K, using the Horizontal Ice Nucleation Chamber (HINC), a Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC) (Kanji and Abbatt, 2009). Ice nucleation results from these soot surrogates will be compared to chemically more complex real world samples, collected on filters. Filters will be collected during the 2016/2017 winter haze periods in Beijing, China and represent atmospheric soot particles with sources from both industrial and residential

  13. Using Ice Nucleating Particles to Enable Desublimation on Chilled Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Julia; Failor, Kevin; Bisbano, Caitlin; Mulroe, Megan; Nath, Saurabh; Vinatzer, Boris; Boreyko, Jonathan

    2017-11-01

    On a subfreezing surface, nucleating embryos usually form as supercooled condensate that later freeze into ice, as opposed to desublimation. Ice nucleating particles (INPs) have been widely used to freeze existing water; however, nobody has studied how they might affect the initial mode of nucleation. Here, we show that INPs deposited on a substrate can switch the mode of embryo nucleation to desublimation, rather than supercooled condensation. Deposition was achieved by evaporating a water droplet containing INPs on a hydrophobic silicon wafer. A Peltier stage was used to cool the wafer down inside of a controlled humidity chamber, such that the desired set point temperature correlated with the dew point and onset of nucleation. Beneath a critical surface temperature, microscopy indicated that desublimation occurred on the circular patch of deposited INPs, compared to supercooled condensation outside the circle. The hydrophobic surface was then patterned with hydrophilic stripe arrays, which facilitated the deposition of stripes of INPs via the same evaporation method. The resulting array of desublimating ice stripes created dry zones free of condensation or frost in the intermediate areas, as the hygroscopic ice stripes served as overlapping humidity sinks.

  14. Water ice and sub-micron ice particles on Tethys and Mimas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipioni, Francesca; Nordheim, Tom; Clark, Roger Nelson; D'Aversa, Emiliano; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Tosi, Federico; Schenk, Paul M.; Combe, Jean-Philippe; Dalle Ore, Cristina M.

    2017-10-01

    IntroductionWe present our ongoing work, mapping the variation of the main water ice absorption bands, and the distribution of the sub-micron particles, across Mimas and Tethys’ surfaces using Cassini-VIMS cubes acquired in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). We present our results in the form of maps of variation of selected spectral indicators (depth of absorption bands, reflectance peak height, spectral slopes).Data analysisVIMS acquires hyperspectral data in the 0.3-5.1 μm spectral range. We selected VIMS cubes of Tethys and Mimas in the IR range (0.8-5.1 μm). For all pixels in the selected cubes, we measured the band depths for water-ice absorptions at 1.25, 1.5 and 2.02 μm and the height of the 3.6 μm reflection peak. Moreover, we considered the spectral indictors for particles smaller than 1 µm [1]: (i) the 2 µm absorption band is asymmetric and (ii) it has the minimum shifted to longer λ (iii) the band depth ratio 1.5/2.0 µm decreases; (iv) the reflection peak at 2.6 µm decreases; (v) the Fresnel reflection peak is suppressed; (vi) the 5 µm reflectance is decreased relative to the 3.6 µm peak. To characterize the global variation of water-ice band depths, and of sub-micron particles spectral indicators, across Mimas and Tethys, we sampled the two satellites’ surfacees with a 1°x1° fixed-resolution grid and then averaged the band depths and peak values inside each square cell.3. ResultsFor both moons we find that large geologic features, such as the Odysseus and Herschel impact basins, do not correlate with water ice’s abundance variation. For Tethys, we found a quite uniform surface on both hemispheres. The only deviation from this pattern shows up on the trailing hemisphere, where we notice two north-oriented, dark areas around 225° and 315°. For Mimas, the leading and trailing hemispheres appear to be quite similar in water ice abundance, the trailing portion having water ice absorption bands lightly more suppressed than the leading side

  15. Export of ice nucleating particles from a watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jarl Are; Conen, Franz; Alewell, Christine

    2017-08-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INP) active at a few degrees below 0°C are produced by a range of organisms and released into the environment. They may affect cloud properties and precipitation when becoming airborne. So far, our knowledge about sources of biological INP is based on grab samples of vegetation, soil or water studied in the laboratory. By combining measurements of INP concentrations in river water with river water discharge rates over the course of 16 months, we obtained a lower limit for the production rate of INP in a watershed covering most of Switzerland (4 × 105 INP-8 m-2 d-1). Coincidentally, we found that INP-8 are likely to retain their potential for catalysing ice formation in the natural environment for at least several months before they are mobilized by an intensive rainfall, washed into the river and exported from the watershed.

  16. Ice Nucleating Particle Concentrations Increase When Leaves Fall in Autumn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Conen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleating particles active at −8 °C or warmer (INP−8 are produced by plants and by microorganisms living from and on them. Laboratory studies have shown that large numbers of INP−8 are produced by decaying leaves. At three widely dispersed locations in Northwestern Eurasia, we saw, from an analysis of PM10 filter samples, that seasonal median concentrations of INP−8 in the boundary layer doubled from summer to autumn. Concentrations of INP−8 increased in autumn soon after the normalized differential vegetation index had started to decrease. Whether the large-scale phenological event of leaf senescence and shedding in autumn has an impact on ice formation in clouds is a justified question.

  17. In-situ measurements of ice nucleating particles with FINCH (Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Rebecca; Frank, Fabian; Curtius, Joachim; Rose, Diana

    2017-04-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs), which are a small fraction of the total aerosol population, are capable of triggering ice formation under atmospheric conditions. Since INPs play an important role for the radiative properties of clouds as well as for the formation of precipitation it is important to get quantitative information on the ice activity of various atmospheric aerosol species. With the Fast Ice Nucleus Chamber (FINCH; Bundke et al., 2008) the number concentration of INP is determined at different freezing temperatures and supersaturations. In contrast to other commonly used INP counters, i.e., continuous flow diffusion chambers (CFDCs, DeMott et al., 2011), in FINCH the supersaturation is reached by mixing the sample flow of ambient aerosol with a warm moist as well as a cold dry airflow. By changing the flow rates and temperatures of the individual airflows the freezing temperature (down to -50°C) and supersaturation (up to above water saturation) can be varied relatively quickly. Particles that are ice active at the prescribed freezing temperature and supersaturation grow to crystals and are counted by a home-built optical particle counter (OPC) mounted below the chamber (Bundke et al., 2010). FINCH was operated during the four-week INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS field campaign in Cyprus in April 2016. The measuring site was the location of the Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory (CAO) at Agia Marina Xyliatou, which is typically influenced by dust from the Sahara and the Middle East, an aerosol that is known to have relatively good ice nucleating ability. First results from this campaign will be presented. Acknowledgements: The authors thank the entire INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS campaign team for their cooperation and support. The INUIT-2 project is financed by the German Research Foundation DFG (FOR 1525). The INUIT-Cyprus campaign is a cooperation with the EU-funded project BACCHUS and is also funded by ACTRIS-TNA. References: Bundke, U., Nillius, B., Jaenicke, R

  18. Effect of the Inhomogeneity of Ice Crystals on Retrieving Ice Cloud Optical Thickness and Effective Particle Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu; Minnis, Patrick; Hu, Yong X.; Kattawar, George W.; Yang, Ping

    2008-01-01

    Spherical or spheroidal air bubbles are generally trapped in the formation of rapidly growing ice crystals. In this study the single-scattering properties of inhomogeneous ice crystals containing air bubbles are investigated. Specifically, a computational model based on an improved geometric-optics method (IGOM) has been developed to simulate the scattering of light by randomly oriented hexagonal ice crystals containing spherical or spheroidal air bubbles. A combination of the ray-tracing technique and the Monte Carlo method is used. The effect of the air bubbles within ice crystals is to smooth the phase functions, diminish the 22deg and 46deg halo peaks, and substantially reduce the backscatter relative to bubble-free particles. These features vary with the number, sizes, locations and shapes of the air bubbles within ice crystals. Moreover, the asymmetry factors of inhomogeneous ice crystals decrease as the volume of air bubbles increases. Cloud reflectance lookup tables were generated at wavelengths 0.65 m and 2.13 m with different air-bubble conditions to examine the impact of the bubbles on retrieving ice cloud optical thickness and effective particle size. The reflectances simulated for inhomogeneous ice crystals are slightly larger than those computed for homogenous ice crystals at a wavelength of 0.65 microns. Thus, the retrieved cloud optical thicknesses are reduced by employing inhomogeneous ice cloud models. At a wavelength of 2.13 microns, including air bubbles in ice cloud models may also increase the reflectance. This effect implies that the retrieved effective particle sizes for inhomogeneous ice crystals are larger than those retrieved for homogeneous ice crystals, particularly, in the case of large air bubbles.

  19. IceCube: Particle Astrophysics with High Energy Neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Université de Genève

    2012-01-01

    GENEVA UNIVERSITY École de physique Département de physique nucléaire et corspusculaire 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet 1211 Genève 4 Tél.: (022) 379 62 73 Fax: (022) 379 69 92 Monday 7 May 2012 17h. - Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg IceCube: Particle Astrophysics with High Energy Neutrinos Prof. Francis Halzen / University of Wisconsin, Madison Construction and commissioning of the cubic-kilometer IceCube neutrino detector and its low energy extension DeepCore have been completed. The instrument detects neutrinos over a wide energy range: from 10 GeV atmospheric neutrinos to 1010 GeV cosmogenic neutrinos. We will discuss initial results based on a subsample of the ~100,000 neutrino events recorded during construction. We will emphasize the first measurement of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino spectrum, the search for the still enigmatic sources of the Galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays and for the particle nature of dark matter. Une ve...

  20. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-09-13

    We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  1. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias; Gilles, Mary K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-01

    Ice formation induced by atmospheric particles through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Onset conditions for heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by particles collected in Los Angeles and Mexico City were determined as a function of temperature (200-273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice). Four dominant particle types were identified including soot associated with organics, soot with organic and inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn-containing particles apportioned to emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, significant differences in onsets of water uptake and immersion freezing of different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation efficiencies and formed ice atRHicewell below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data suggest that water uptake and immersion freezing are more sensitive to changes in particle chemical composition compared to deposition ice nucleation. The data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine influenced particles, exhibiting various chemical and physical properties, possess distinctly different ice nucleation efficiencies and can serve as efficient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed-phase clouds.

  2. Study of agglomeration of ice particles and of trichlorofluoromethane hydrate particles suspended in a hydrocarbon phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombel, E.; Palermo, T.; Barre, L.; Gateau, P. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Physico-Chemistry; Gruy, F. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Saint Etienne (France)

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates may lead to pipeline blockage during oil production in offshore conditions. A study was conducted to better understand the agglomeration mechanism of gas hydrate particles in water in oil emulsions. The model system chosen to study this mechanism was ice or trichlorofluoromethane (CCl{sub 3}F) hydrate particles dispersed in xylene with asphaltenes as surfactants. The system illustrated what occurs in pipelines as produced water with oil is dispersed by surfactants that are naturally present in the oil phase. Freon was selected because it models methane behaviour very well. Both methane and freon are soluble in oil and insoluble in water. CCl{sub 3}F hydrates are stable under atmospheric pressure. As such, different techniques can be applied without being limited by high pressure conditions. The agglomeration mechanism in these particles can be modelled and compared with ice crystals. This study focused on the kinetics of agglomeration formation and mechanisms of hydrate and ice particle agglomeration in a hydrocarbon phase. Two characterization techniques were implemented in this study, notably nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry and rheology. The different relaxation rate for solids or liquids was used to monitor in situ the ratio between the solid and total hydrogen or fluorine as a function of time with controlled shearing conditions. NMR provided information on the formation kinetics and the conversion rate of water in ice crystals. The rest of the study focused on the formation of Freon hydrate crystals. The study confirmed that the physico-chemistry of the water/oil interface has an important role in agglomeration. 9 refs., 5 tabs., 18 figs.

  3. Depositional ice nucleation on solid ammonium sulfate and glutaric acid particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Baustian

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous ice nucleation on solid ammonium sulfate and glutaric acid particles was studied using optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Optical microscopy was used to detect selective nucleation events as water vapor was slowly introduced into an environmental sample cell. Particles that nucleated ice were dried via sublimation and examined in detail using Raman spectroscopy. Depositional ice nucleation is highly selective and occurred preferentially on just a few ammonium sulfate and glutaric acid particles in each sample. For freezing temperatures between 214 K and 235 K an average ice saturation ratio of S = 1.10±0.07 for solid ammonium sulfate was observed. Over the same temperature range, S values observed for ice nucleation on glutaric acid particles increased from 1.2 at 235 K to 1.6 at 218 K. Experiments with externally mixed particles further show that ammonium sulfate is a more potent ice nucleus than glutaric acid. Our results suggest that heterogeneous nucleation on ammonium sulfate may be an important pathway for atmospheric ice nucleation and cirrus cloud formation when solid ammonium sulfate aerosol particles are available for ice formation. This pathway for ice formation may be particularly significant near the tropical tropopause region where sulfates are abundant and other species known to be good ice nuclei are depleted.

  4. Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

    2011-10-13

    We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

  5. Effect of photochemical ageing on the ice nucleation properties of diesel and wood burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Chou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A measurement campaign (IMBALANCE conducted in 2009 was aimed at characterizing the physical and chemical properties of freshly emitted and photochemically aged combustion particles emitted from a log wood burner and diesel vehicles: a EURO3 Opel Astra with a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC but no particle filter and a EURO2 Volkswagen Transporter TDI Syncro without emission aftertreatment. Ice nucleation experiments in the deposition and condensation freezing modes were conducted with the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC at three nominal temperatures, −30 °C, −35 °C and −40 °C. Freshly emitted diesel particles showed ice formation only at −40 °C in the deposition mode at 137% relative humidity with respect to ice (RHi and 92% relative humidity with respect to water (RHw, and photochemical ageing did not play a role in modifying their ice nucleation behaviour. Only one diesel experiment where α-pinene was added for the ageing process, showed an ice nucleation enhancement at −35 °C. Wood burning particles also act as ice nuclei (IN at −40 °C in the deposition mode at the same conditions as for diesel particles and photochemical ageing also did not alter the ice formation properties of the wood burning particles. Unlike diesel particles, wood burning particles form ice via condensation freezing at −35 °C whereas no ice nucleation was observed at −30 °C. Photochemical ageing did not affect the ice nucleation ability of the diesel and wood burning particles at the three different temperatures investigated but a broader range of temperatures below −40 °C need to be investigated in order to draw an overall conclusion on the effect of photochemical ageing on deposition/condensation ice nucleation across the entire temperature range relevant to cold clouds.

  6. Ice nuclei in marine air: biogenic particles or dust?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Burrows

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ice nuclei impact clouds, but their sources and distribution in the atmosphere are still not well known. Particularly little attention has been paid to IN sources in marine environments, although evidence from field studies suggests that IN populations in remote marine regions may be dominated by primary biogenic particles associated with sea spray. In this exploratory model study, we aim to bring attention to this long-neglected topic and identify promising target regions for future field campaigns. We assess the likely global distribution of marine biogenic ice nuclei using a combination of historical observations, satellite data and model output. By comparing simulated marine biogenic immersion IN distributions and dust immersion IN distributions, we predict strong regional differences in the importance of marine biogenic IN relative to dust IN. Our analysis suggests that marine biogenic IN are most likely to play a dominant role in determining IN concentrations in near-surface-air over the Southern Ocean, so future field campaigns aimed at investigating marine biogenic IN should target that region. Climate-related changes in the abundance and emission of biogenic marine IN could affect marine cloud properties, thereby introducing previously unconsidered feedbacks that influence the hydrological cycle and the Earth's energy balance. Furthermore, marine biogenic IN may be an important aspect to consider in proposals for marine cloud brightening by artificial sea spray production.

  7. Model updating approach for icing forecast of transmission lines by using particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Haigang; Liang, Naifeng; Zhao, Puzhi; Wang, Xuan; Zhu, Chuangwei; Zhang, Sanchun; Wang, Wei

    2017-06-01

    With the purpose of predicting icing of transmission lines, a model updating approach is presented in this study. The changes of structural dynamic response of transmission lines that is caused by icing is studied firstly by using finite element method. Then, model updating method and particle swarm optimization is implemented to indentify the thickness of icing according to the alternation of natural frequencies. The results show that the proposed methodology is meaningful to monitor line icing.

  8. A polarimetric scattering database for non-spherical ice particles at microwave wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yinghui; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Aydin, Kultegin; Verlinde, Johannes; Clothiaux, Eugene E.; Botta, Giovanni

    2016-10-01

    The atmospheric science community has entered a period in which electromagnetic scattering properties at microwave frequencies of realistically constructed ice particles are necessary for making progress on a number of fronts. One front includes retrieval of ice-particle properties and signatures from ground-based, airborne, and satellite-based radar and radiometer observations. Another front is evaluation of model microphysics by application of forward operators to their outputs and comparison to observations during case study periods. Yet a third front is data assimilation, where again forward operators are applied to databases of ice-particle scattering properties and the results compared to observations, with their differences leading to corrections of the model state. Over the past decade investigators have developed databases of ice-particle scattering properties at microwave frequencies and made them openly available. Motivated by and complementing these earlier efforts, a database containing polarimetric single-scattering properties of various types of ice particles at millimeter to centimeter wavelengths is presented. While the database presented here contains only single-scattering properties of ice particles in a fixed orientation, ice-particle scattering properties are computed for many different directions of the radiation incident on them. These results are useful for understanding the dependence of ice-particle scattering properties on ice-particle orientation with respect to the incident radiation. For ice particles that are small compared to the wavelength, the number of incident directions of the radiation is sufficient to compute reasonable estimates of their (randomly) orientation-averaged scattering properties. This database is complementary to earlier ones in that it contains complete (polarimetric) scattering property information for each ice particle - 44 plates, 30 columns, 405 branched planar crystals, 660 aggregates, and 640 conical

  9. Sources of organic ice nucleating particles in soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Tom C. J.; DeMott, Paul J.; Tobo, Yutaka; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine; Moffett, Bruce F.; Franc, Gary D.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2016-06-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) may be a significant source of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INPs), especially of those active > -15 °C. However, due to both a lack of investigations and the complexity of the SOM itself, the identities of these INPs remain unknown. To more comprehensively characterize organic INPs we tested locally representative soils in Wyoming and Colorado for total organic INPs, INPs in the heat-labile fraction, ice nucleating (IN) bacteria, IN fungi, IN fulvic and humic acids, IN plant tissue, and ice nucleation by monolayers of aliphatic alcohols. All soils contained ≈ 106 to ≈ 5 × 107 INPs g-1 dry soil active at -10 °C. Removal of SOM with H2O2 removed ≥ 99 % of INPs active > -18 °C (the limit of testing), while heating of soil suspensions to 105 °C showed that labile INPs increasingly predominated > -12 °C and comprised ≥ 90 % of INPs active > -9 °C. Papain protease, which inactivates IN proteins produced by the fungus Mortierella alpina, common in the region's soils, lowered INPs active at ≥ -11 °C by ≥ 75 % in two arable soils and in sagebrush shrubland soil. By contrast, lysozyme, which digests bacterial cell walls, only reduced INPs active at ≥ -7.5 or ≥ -6 °C, depending on the soil. The known IN bacteria were not detected in any soil, using PCR for the ina gene that codes for the active protein. We directly isolated and photographed two INPs from soil, using repeated cycles of freeze testing and subdivision of droplets of dilute soil suspensions; they were complex and apparently organic entities. Ice nucleation activity was not affected by digestion of Proteinase K-susceptible proteins or the removal of entities composed of fulvic and humic acids, sterols, or aliphatic alcohol monolayers. Organic INPs active colder than -10 to -12 °C were resistant to all investigations other than heat, oxidation with H2O2, and, for some, digestion with papain. They may originate from decomposing plant material, microbial

  10. Investigation of ice particle habits to be used for ice cloud remote sensing for the GCOM-C satellite mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Letu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, various ice particle habits are investigated in conjunction with inferring the optical properties of ice clouds for use in the Global Change Observation Mission-Climate (GCOM-C satellite programme. We develop a database of the single-scattering properties of five ice habit models: plates, columns, droxtals, bullet rosettes, and Voronoi. The database is based on the specification of the Second Generation Global Imager (SGLI sensor on board the GCOM-C satellite, which is scheduled to be launched in 2017 by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. A combination of the finite-difference time-domain method, the geometric optics integral equation technique, and the geometric optics method is applied to compute the single-scattering properties of the selected ice particle habits at 36 wavelengths, from the visible to the infrared spectral regions. This covers the SGLI channels for the size parameter, which is defined as a single-particle radius of an equivalent volume sphere, ranging between 6 and 9000 µm. The database includes the extinction efficiency, absorption efficiency, average geometrical cross section, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, size parameter of a volume-equivalent sphere, maximum distance from the centre of mass, particle volume, and six nonzero elements of the scattering phase matrix. The characteristics of calculated extinction efficiency, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor of the five ice particle habits are compared. Furthermore, size-integrated bulk scattering properties for the five ice particle habit models are calculated from the single-scattering database and microphysical data. Using the five ice particle habit models, the optical thickness and spherical albedo of ice clouds are retrieved from the Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances-3 (POLDER-3 measurements, recorded on board the Polarization and Anisotropy of Reflectances for Atmospheric Sciences coupled with

  11. FINAL REPORT FOR THE DOE/ARM PROJECT TITLED Representation of the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds in SCMs and GCMs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, David L.

    2005-08-08

    The broad goal of this research is to improve climate prediction through better representation of cirrus cloud microphysical and radiative properties in global climate models (GCMs). Clouds still represent the greatest source of uncertainty in climate prediction, and the representation of ice clouds is considerably more challenging than liquid water clouds. While about 40% of cloud condensate may be in the form of ice by some estimates, there have been no credible means of representing the ice particle size distribution and mass removal rates from ice clouds in GCMs. Both factors introduce large uncertainties regarding the global net flux, the latter factor alone producing a change of 10 W/m2 in the global net flux due to plausible changes in effective ice particle fallspeed. In addition, the radiative properties of ice crystals themselves are in question. This research provides GCMs with a credible means of representing the full (bimodal) ice particle size distribution (PSD) in ice clouds, including estimates of the small crystal (D < 65 microns) mode of the PSD. It also provides realistic estimates of mass sedimentation rates from ice clouds, which have a strong impact on their ice contents and radiative properties. This can be done through proper analysis of ice cloud microphysical data from ARM and other field campaigns. In addition, this research tests the ice cloud radiation treatment developed under two previous ARM projects by comparing it against laboratory measurements of ice cloud extinction efficiency and by comparing it with explicit theoretical calculations of ice crystal optical properties. The outcome of this project includes two PSD schemes for ice clouds; one appropriate for mid-latitude cirrus clouds and another for tropical anvil cirrus. Cloud temperature and ice water content (IWC) are the inputs for these PSD schemes, which are based on numerous PSD observations. The temperature dependence of the small crystal mode of the PSD for tropical

  12. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice

  13. Susceptibility of contrail ice crystal numbers to aircraft soot particle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärcher, B.; Voigt, C.

    2017-08-01

    We develop an idealized, physically based model describing combined effects of ice nucleation and sublimation on ice crystal number during persistent contrail formation. Our study represents the first effort to predict ice numbers at the point where contrails transition into contrail cirrus—several minutes past formation—by connecting them to aircraft soot particle emissions and atmospheric supersaturation with respect to ice. Results averaged over an observed exponential distribution of ice supersaturation (mean value 15%) indicate that large reductions in soot particle numbers are needed to lower contrail ice crystal numbers significantly for soot emission indices around 1015 (kg fuel)-1, because reductions in nucleated ice number are partially compensated by sublimation losses. Variations in soot particle (-50%) and water vapor (+10%) emission indices at threefold lower soot emissions resulting from biofuel blending cause ice crystal numbers to change by -35% and <5%, respectively. The efficiency of reduction depends on ice supersaturation and the size distribution of nucleated ice crystals in jet exhaust plumes and on atmospheric ice supersaturation, making the latter another key factor in contrail mitigation. We expect our study to have important repercussions for planning airborne measurements targeting contrail formation, designing parameterization schemes for use in large-scale models, reducing uncertainties in predicting contrail cirrus, and mitigating the climate impact of aviation.

  14. Efficiency of the deposition mode ice nucleation on mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Möhler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition mode ice nucleation efficiency of various dust aerosols was investigated at cirrus cloud temperatures between 196 and 223 K using the aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere. Arizona test dust (ATD as a reference material and two dust samples from the Takla Makan desert in Asia (AD1 and the Sahara (SD2 were used for the experiments at simulated cloud conditions. The dust particle sizes were almost lognormally distributed with mode diameters between 0.3 and 0.5 μm and geometric standard deviations between 1.6 and 1.9. Deposition ice nucleation was most efficient on ATD particles with ice-active particle fractions of about 0.6 and 0.8 at an ice saturation ratio SiSiSi. This indicates that deposition ice nucleation on mineral particles may not be treated in the same stochastic sense as homogeneous freezing. The suggested formulation of ice activation spectra may be used to calculate the formation rate of ice crystals in models, if the number concentration of dust particles is known. More experimental work is needed to quantify the variability of the ice activation spectra as function of the temperature and dust particle properties.

  15. Fast particle-driven ion cyclotron emission (ICE) in tokamak plasmas and the case for an ICE diagnostic in ITER

    CERN Document Server

    McClements, K G; Dendy, R O; Carbajal, L; Chapman, S C; Cook, J W S; Harvey, R W; Heidbrink, W W; Pinches, S D

    2014-01-01

    Fast particle-driven waves in the ion cyclotron frequency range (ion cyclotron emission or ICE) have provided a valuable diagnostic of confined and escaping fast ions in many tokamaks. This is a passive, non-invasive diagnostic that would be compatible with the high radiation environment of deuterium-tritium plasmas in ITER, and could provide important information on fusion {\\alpha}-particles and beam ions in that device. In JET, ICE from confined fusion products scaled linearly with fusion reaction rate over six orders of magnitude and provided evidence that {\\alpha}-particle confinement was close to classical. In TFTR, ICE was observed from super-Alfv\\'enic {\\alpha}-particles in the plasma edge. The intensity of beam-driven ICE in DIII-D is more strongly correlated with drops in neutron rate during fishbone excitation than signals from more direct beam ion loss diagnostics. In ASDEX Upgrade ICE is produced by both super-Alfv\\'enic DD fusion products and sub-Alfv\\'enic deuterium beam ions.

  16. PSD Increment Consumption Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  17. PSD Increment Consumption Question

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  18. Pre-activation of ice-nucleating particles by the pore condensation and freezing mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the resurgence in ice nucleation research a comparatively small number of studies deal with the phenomenon of pre-activation in heterogeneous ice nucleation. Fifty years ago, it was shown that various mineral dust and volcanic ash particles can be pre-activated to become nuclei for ice crystal formation even at temperatures as high as 270–271 K. Pre-activation was achieved under ice-subsaturated conditions without any preceding macroscopic ice growth by just temporarily cooling the particles to temperatures below 228 K. A two-step mechanism involving capillary condensation of supercooled water and subsequent homogeneous freezing was proposed to account for the particles' enhanced ice nucleation ability at high temperatures. This work reinvestigates the efficiency of the proposed pre-activation mechanism in temperature-cycling experiments performed in a large cloud chamber with suspended particles. We find the efficiency to be highest for the clay mineral illite as well as for highly porous materials like zeolite and diatomaceous earth, whereas most aerosols generated from desert dust surface samples did not reveal a measurable pre-activation ability. The pre-activation efficiency is linked to particle pores in a certain size range. As estimated by model calculations, only pores with diameters between about 5 and 8 nm contribute to pre-activation under ice-subsaturated conditions. This range is set by a combination of requirements from the negative Kelvin effect for condensation and a critical size of ice embryos for ice nucleation and melting. In contrast to the early study, pre-activation is only observed for temperatures below 260 K. Above that threshold, the particles' improved ice nucleation ability disappears due to the melting of ice in the pores.

  19. Particle Size Measurements from the first Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics Test in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael C.; Bachalo, William; Kurek, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    This presentation shows particle measurements by the Artium Technologies, Inc. Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the first Fundamental Ice Crystal Icing Physics test conducted in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory. The work focuses on humidity sweeps at a larger and a smaller median volumetric diameter. The particle size distribution, number density, and water content measured by the Phase Doppler Interferometer and High Speed Imaging instruments from the sweeps are presented and compared. The current capability for these two instruments to measure and discriminate ICI conditions is examined.

  20. On the Retrieval of Ice Cloud Particle Shapes from POLDER Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Yang, P.

    2004-01-01

    Shapes of ice crystals can significantly affect the radiative transfer in ice clouds. The angular distribution of the polarized reflectance over ice clouds strongly depends on ice crystal shapes. Although the angular-distribution features of the total or polarized reflectance over ice clouds implies a possibility of retrieving ice cloud particle shapes by use of remote sensing data, the accuracy of the retrieval must be evaluated. In this study, a technique, which applies single ice crystal habit and multidirectional polarized radiance to retrieve ice cloud particle shapes, is assessed. Our sensitivity studies show that the retrieved particle shapes &om this algorithm can be considered good approximations to those in actual clouds in calculation of the phase matrix elements. Although a fractal poly-crystal shape or an inhomogeneous hexagonal column may also produce this type of phase functions, more representative single-scattering properties from combinations of natural particle shapes and size distributions may still be necessary in accurate retrieval of other cloud properties such as optical thickness and particle size.

  1. Search for neutrino-induced particle showers with IceCube-40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the search for neutrino-induced particle-showers, so-called cascades, in the IceCube-40 detector. The data for this search was collected between April 2008 and May 2009 when the first 40 IceCube strings were deployed and operational. Three complementary searches were performed, each......-only hypothesis. Our observation of neutrino event candidates above 100 TeV complements IceCube's recently observed evidence for high-energy astrophysical neutrinos....

  2. Characteristics of Atmospheric Ice Particles: A Survey of Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    has sample volumen %.z., and an effective resolutii %, 15 =rn in reconstruction, with samples obtained at I s intervals. A specific advantage of this...the properties of the ice crystals it would be necessary to investigate experimentally the magnitude and sign of the pulse generated when ice crystals...dependent. Anderson and Hallett (1979) have shown that humidity also has an effect on the ice surface and influences the charge magnitude and sign

  3. Parametric studies of contrail ice particle formation in jet regime using microphysical parcel modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Condensation trails (contrails formed from water vapor emissions behind aircraft engines are the most uncertain components of the aviation impacts on climate change. To gain improved knowledge of contrail and contrail-induced cirrus cloud formation, understanding of contrail ice particle formation immediately after aircraft engines is needed. Despite many efforts spent in modeling the microphysics of ice crystal formation in jet regime (with a plume age <5 s, systematic understanding of parametric effects of variables affecting contrail ice particle formation is still limited. In this work, we apply a microphysical parcel modeling approach to study contrail ice particle formation in near-field aircraft plumes up to 1000 m downstream of an aircraft engine in the soot-rich regime (soot number emission index >1×1015 (kg-fuel−1 at cruise. The effects of dilution history, ion-mediated nucleation, ambient relative humidity, fuel sulfur contents, and initial soot emissions were investigated. Our simulation results suggest that ice particles are mainly formed by water condensation on emitted soot particles. The growth of ice coated soot particles is driven by water vapor emissions in the first 1000 m and by ambient relative humidity afterwards. The presence of chemi-ions does not significantly contribute to the formation of ice particles in the soot-rich regime, and the effect of fuel sulfur contents is small over the range typical of standard jet fuels. The initial properties of soot emissions play the most critical role, and our calculations suggest that higher number concentration and smaller size of contrail particle nuclei may be able to effectively suppress the formation of contrail ice particles. Further modeling and experimental studies are needed to verify if our findings can provide a possible approach for contrail mitigation.

  4. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H.; Wu, J.; Zhou, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE). The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  5. The formation of multiple layers of ice particles in the polar summer mesopause region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a two-dimensional theoretical model to study the formation process of multiple layers of small ice particles in the polar summer mesosphere as measured by rockets and associated with polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. The proposed mechanism primarily takes into account the transport processes induced by gravity waves through collision coupling between the neutral atmosphere and the ice particles. Numerical solutions of the model indicate that the dynamic influence of wind variation induced by gravity waves can make a significant contribution to the vertical and horizontal transport of ice particles and ultimately transform them into thin multiple layers. Additionally, the pattern of the multiple layers at least partially depends on the vertical wavelength of the gravity wave, the ice particle size and the wind velocity. The results presented in this paper will be helpful to better understand the occurrence of multiple layers of PMSE as well as its variation process.

  6. Simulations of ice pellets and freezing rain using an explicit parameterization of the bulk liquid fraction of ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholette, Melissa; Thériault, Julie M.; Milbrandt, Jason A.; Morrison, Hugh

    2017-04-01

    During the cold season, storms can often be associated with the favorable vertical temperature structure for the formation of several winter precipitation types, such as snow, wet snow, freezing rain, ice pellets and rain. The types of precipitation reaching the surface depend on the degree of melting and re-freezing of particles as they fall through the atmosphere. For example, when a warm layer is overlaying a refreezing layer, ice particles can melt partially or completely in the warm layer to produce either ice pellets, freezing rain or a combination of the two at the surface. In this study, an explicit prognostic liquid fraction is implemented in a bulk microphysical scheme to predict freezing rain and ice pellets, and to evaluate their interactions with the environmental conditions. The approach is to modify the Predicted Particle Properties (P3) microphysics scheme by adding a prognostic variable for the liquid water mass-mixing ratio of the solid precipitation category in order to predict its bulk liquid fraction. This predicted liquid fraction is the key variable to differentiate the surface precipitation type occurring when temperatures are near 0°C. First, using a one-dimensional cloud model, it will be shown that the explicit simulation of mixed-phase particles improves the representation of the surface precipitation types with respect to the original scheme. Second, the impact of the partial melting of ice will be studied by simulating the 1998 Ice Storm over eastern North America using a full 3D mesoscale model. Overall, the prediction of the bulk liquid fraction allows a more accurate differentiation of surface winter precipitation types, which contributes to improve their forecasts.

  7. Pre-activation of aerosol particles by ice preserved in pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    Pre-activation denotes the capability of particles or materials to nucleate ice at lower relative humidities or higher temperatures compared to their intrinsic ice nucleation efficiency after having experienced an ice nucleation event or low temperature before. This review presumes that ice preserved in pores is responsible for pre-activation and analyses pre-activation under this presumption. Idealized trajectories of air parcels are used to discuss the pore characteristics needed for ice to persist in pores and to induce macroscopic ice growth out of the pores. The pore width needed to keep pores filled with water decreases with decreasing relative humidity as described by the inverse Kelvin equation. Thus, narrow pores remain filled with ice well below ice saturation. However, the smaller the pore width, the larger the melting and freezing point depressions within the pores. Therefore, pre-activation due to pore ice is constrained by the melting of ice in narrow pores and the sublimation of ice from wide pores imposing restrictions on the temperature and relative humidity range of pre-activation for cylindrical pores. Ice is better protected in ink-bottle-shaped pores with a narrow opening leading to a large cavity. However, whether pre-activation is efficient also depends on the capability of ice to grow macroscopically, i.e. out of the pore. A strong effect of pre-activation is expected for swelling pores, because at low relative humidity (RH) their openings narrow and protect the ice within them against sublimation. At high relative humidities, they open up and the ice can grow to macroscopic size and form an ice crystal. Similarly, ice protected in pockets is perfectly sheltered against sublimation but needs the dissolution of the surrounding matrix to be effective. Pores partially filled with condensable material may also show pre-activation. In this case, complete filling occurs at lower RH than for empty pores and freezing shifts to lower temperatures

  8. Laboratory studies of immersion and deposition mode ice nucleation of ozone aged mineral dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. A. Kanji

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice nucleation in the atmosphere is central to the understanding the microphysical properties of mixed-phase and cirrus clouds. Ambient conditions such as temperature (T and relative humidity (RH, as well as aerosol properties such as chemical composition and mixing state play an important role in predicting ice formation in the troposphere. Previous field studies have reported the absence of sulfate and organic compounds on mineral dust ice crystal residuals sampled at mountain top stations or aircraft based measurements despite the long-range transport mineral dust is subjected to. We present laboratory studies of ice nucleation for immersion and deposition mode on ozone aged mineral dust particles for 233 T ns are reported and observed to increase as a function of decreasing temperature. We present first results that demonstrate enhancement of the ice nucleation ability of aged mineral dust particles in both the deposition and immersion mode due to ageing. We also present the first results to show a suppression of heterogeneous ice nucleation activity without the condensation of a coating of (inorganic material. In immersion mode, low ozone exposed Ka particles showed enhanced ice activity requiring a median freezing temperature of 1.5 K warmer than that of untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD particles showed suppressed ice nucleation requiring a median freezing temperature of 3 K colder than that of untreated ATD. In deposition mode, low exposure Ka had ice active fractions of an order of magnitude higher than untreated Ka, whereas high ozone exposed ATD had ice active fractions up to a factor of 4 lower than untreated ATD. From our results, we derive and present parameterizations in terms of ns(T that can be used in models to predict ice nuclei concentrations based on available aerosol surface area.

  9. Kaolinite particles as ice nuclei: learning from the use of different kaolinite samples and different coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wex

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaolinite particles from two different sources (Fluka and Clay Minerals Society (CMS were examined with respect to their ability to act as ice nuclei (IN. This was done in the water-subsaturated regime where often deposition ice nucleation is assumed to occur, and for water-supersaturated conditions, i.e., in the immersion freezing mode. Measurements were done using a flow tube (the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, LACIS and a continuous-flow diffusion chamber (CFDC. Pure and coated particles were used, with coating thicknesses of a few nanometers or less, where the coating consisted of levoglucosan, succinic acid or sulfuric acid. In general, it was found that the coatings strongly reduced deposition ice nucleation. Remaining ice formation in the water-subsaturated regime could be attributed to immersion freezing, with particles immersed in concentrated solutions formed by the coatings. In the immersion freezing mode, ice nucleation rate coefficients jhet from both instruments agreed well with each other, particularly when the residence times in the instruments were accounted for. Fluka kaolinite particles coated with either levoglucosan or succinic acid showed the same IN activity as pure Fluka kaolinite particles; i.e., it can be assumed that these two types of coating did not alter the ice-active surface chemically, and that the coatings were diluted enough in the droplets that were formed prior to the ice nucleation, so that freezing point depression was negligible. However, Fluka kaolinite particles, which were either coated with pure sulfuric acid or were first coated with the acid and then exposed to additional water vapor, both showed a reduced ability to nucleate ice compared to the pure particles. For the CMS kaolinite particles, the ability to nucleate ice in the immersion freezing mode was similar for all examined particles, i.e., for the pure ones and the ones with the different types of coating. Moreover, jhet derived

  10. Improved ice particle optical property simulations in the ultraviolet to far-infrared regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping

    2017-03-01

    To derive the bulk radiative properties of ice clouds, aircraft contrails and snow grains, which are fundamental to atmospheric radiative transfer calculations in downstream applications, it is necessary to accurately simulate the scattering of light by individual ice particles. An ice particle optical property database reported in 2013 (hereafter, TAMUice2013) is updated (hereafter, TAMUice2016) to incorporate recent advances in computation of the optical properties of nonspherical particles. Specifically, we employ the invariant imbedding T-matrix (II-TM) method to compute the optical properties of particles with small to moderate size parameters. Both versions use the Improved Geometric Optics Method (IGOM) to compute the optical properties of large ice crystals, but TAMUice2016 improves the treatment of inhomogeneous waves inside the scattering particles in the case where ice is absorptive such as at infrared wavelengths. To bridge the gap between the extinction efficiencies computed from the II-TM and the IGOM, TAMUice2016 includes spectrally dependent higher order terms of the edge effect in addition to the first order counterpart considered in TAMUice2013. Furthermore, the differences between TAMUice2013 and TAMUice2016 are quantified with respect to the computation of the bulk optical properties of ice clouds.

  11. Ice Particle Growth Rates Under Upper Troposphere Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Harold; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 m, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  12. Ice Particle Growth Under Conditions of the Upper Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Harold S.; Bailey, Matthew; Hallett, John

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions for growth of ice crystals (temperature and ice supersaturation) are often not well constrained and it is necessary to simulate such conditions in the laboratory to investigate such growth under well controlled conditions over many hours. The growth of ice crystals from the vapour in both prism and basal planes was observed at temperatures of -60 C and -70 C under ice supersaturation up to 100% (200% relative humidity) at pressures derived from the standard atmosphere in a static diffusion chamber. Crystals grew outward from a vertical glass filament, thickening in the basal plane by addition of macroscopic layers greater than 2 microns, leading to growth in the prism plane by passing of successive layers conveniently viewed by time lapse video.

  13. The formation of molecular hydrogen from water ice in the lunar regolith by energetic charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A. P.; Stubbs, T. J.; Joyce, C. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Spence, H. E.; Wilson, J. K.

    2013-06-01

    On 9 October 2009, the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) mission impacted a spent Centaur rocket into the permanently shadowed region (PSR) within Cabeus crater and detected water vapor and ice, as well as other volatiles, in the ejecta plume. The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP), a far ultraviolet (FUV) imaging spectrograph on board the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), observed this plume as FUV emissions from the fluorescence of sunlight by molecular hydrogen (H2) and other constituents. Energetic charged particles, such as galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar energetic particles (SEPs), can dissociate the molecules in water ice to form H2. We examine how much H2can be formed by these types of particle radiation interacting with water ice sequestered in the regolith within PSRs, and we assess whether it can account for the H2 observed by LAMP. To estimate H2formation, we use the GCR and SEP radiation dose rates measured by the LRO Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation (CRaTER). The exposure time of the ice is calculated by considering meteoritic gardening and the penetration depth of the energetic particles. We find that GCRs and SEPs could convert at least 1-7% of the original water molecules into H2. Therefore, given the amount of water detected by LCROSS, such particle radiation‒induced dissociation of water ice could likely account for a significant percentage (10-100%) of the H2measured by LAMP.

  14. Chlorine-containing salts as water ice nucleating particles on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Materese, D. L.; Iraci, L. T.; Clapham, M. E.; Chuang, P. Y.

    2018-03-01

    Water ice cloud formation on Mars largely is expected to occur on the most efficient ice nucleating particle available. Salts have been observed on the Martian surface and have been known to facilitate water cloud formation on Earth. We examined heterogeneous ice nucleation onto sodium chloride and sodium perchlorate substrates under Martian atmospheric conditions, in the range of 150 to 180 K and 10-7 to 10-5 Torr water partial pressure. Sub-155 K data for the critical saturation ratio (Scrit) suggests an exponential model best describes the temperature-dependence of nucleation onset of water ice for all substrates tested. While sodium chloride does not facilitate water ice nucleation more easily than bare silicon, sodium perchlorate does support depositional nucleation at lower saturation levels than other substrates shown and is comparable to smectite-rich clay in its ability to support cloud initiation. Perchlorates could nucleate water ice at partial pressures up to 40% lower than other substrates examined to date under Martian atmospheric conditions. These findings suggest air masses on Mars containing uplifted salts such as perchlorates could form water ice clouds at lower saturation ratios than in air masses absent similar particles.

  15. Effects of injected ice particles in the lower stratosphere on the Antarctic ozone hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, H.; Kinnison, D. E.; Petersen, A. K.; Vitt, F.; Brasseur, G. P.

    2015-05-01

    The Antarctic ozone hole will continue to be observed in the next 35-50 years, although the emissions of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) have gradually been phased out during the last two decades. In this paper, we suggest a geo-engineering approach that will remove substantial amounts of hydrogen chloride (HCl) from the lower stratosphere in fall, and hence limit the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole in late winter and early spring. HCl will be removed by ice from the atmosphere at temperatures higher than the threshold under which polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) are formed if sufficiently large amounts of ice are supplied to produce water saturation. A detailed chemical-climate numerical model is used to assess the expected efficiency of the proposed geo-engineering method, and specifically to calculate the removal of HCl by ice particles. The size of ice particles appears to be a key parameter: larger particles (with a radius between 10 and 100 µm) appear to be most efficient for removing HCl. Sensitivity studies lead to the conclusions that the ozone recovery is effective when ice particles are supplied during May and June in the latitude band ranging from 70°S to 90°S and in the altitude layer ranging from 10 to 26 km. It appears, therefore, that supplying ice particles to the Antarctic lower stratosphere could be effective in reducing the depth of the ozone hole. In addition, photodegradation of CFCs might be accelerated when ice is supplied due to enhanced vertical transport of this efficient greenhouse gas.

  16. Ice nucleation properties of atmospheric aerosol particles collected during a field campaign in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Petya; Maier, Stefanie; Lang-Yona, Naama; Tamm, Alexandra; Meusel, Hannah; Pöschl, Ulrich; Weber, Bettina; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles, including desert and soil dust as well as marine aerosols, are well known to act as ice nuclei (IN) and thus have been investigated in numerous ice nucleation studies. Based on their cloud condensation nuclei potential and their impacts on radiative properties of clouds (via scattering and absorption of solar radiation), aerosol particles may significantly affect the cloud and precipitation development. Atmospheric aerosols of the Eastern Mediterranean have been described to be dominated by desert dust, but only little is known on their composition and ice nucleating properties. In this study we investigated the ice nucleating ability of total suspended particles (TSP), collected at the remote site Agia Marina Xyliatou on Cyprus during a field campaign in April 2016. Airborne TSP samples containing air masses of various types such as African (Saharan) and Arabian dust and European and Middle Eastern pollution were collected on glass fiber filters at 24 h intervals. Sampling was performed ˜5 m above ground level and ˜521 m above sea level. During the sampling period, two major dust storms (PM 10max 118 μg/m3 and 66 μg/m3) and a rain event (rainfall amount: 3.4 mm) were documented. Chemical and physical characterizations of the particles were analyzed experimentally through filtration, thermal, chemical and enzyme treatments. Immersion freezing experiments were performed at relatively high subzero temperatures (-1 to -15˚ C) using the mono ice nucleation array. Preliminary results indicate that highest IN particle numbers (INPs) occurred during the second dust storm event with lower particle concentrations. Treatments at 60˚ C lead to a gradual IN deactivation, indicating the presence of biological INPs, which were observed to be larger than 300 kDa. Additional results originating from this study will be shown. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Ice Nuclei Research Unit (INUIT).

  17. Interactions of frazil and anchor ice with sedimentary particles in a flume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempema, E.W.; Reimnitz, E.; Clayton, J.R.; Payne, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Frazil and anchor ice forming in turbulent, supercooled water have been studied extensively because of problems posed to man-made hydraulic structures. In spite of many incidental observations of interactions of these ice forms with sediment, their geologic effects remain unknown. The present flume study was designed to learn about the effects of salinity, current speed, and sediment type on sediment dynamics in supercooled water. In fresh-water, frazil ice formed flocs as large as 8 cm in diameter that tended to roll along a sandy bottom and collect material from the bed. The heavy flocs often came to rest in the shelter of ripples, forming anchor ice that subsequently was buried by migrating ripples. Burial compressed porous anchor ice into ice-bonded, sediment-rich masses. This process disrupts normal ripple cross-bedding and may produce unique sedimentary structures. Salt-water flocs were smaller, incorporated less bed load, and formed less anchor ice than their fresh-water counterparts. In four experiments, frazil carried a high sediment load only for a short period in supercooled salt water, but released it with slight warming. This suggests that salt-water frazil is either sticky or traps particles only while surrounded by supercooled water (0.05 to 0.1 ??C supercooling), a short-lived phase in simple, small tanks. Salt water anchor ice formed readily on blocks of ice-bonded sediment, which may be common in nature. The theoretical maximum sediment load in neutrally-buoyant ice/sediment mixture is 122 g/l, never reported in nature so far. The maximum sediment load measured in this laboratory study was 88 g/l. Such high theoretical and measured sediment concentrations suggest that frazil and anchor ice are important sediment transport agents in rivers and oceans. ?? 1993.

  18. Evidence for ice particles in the tropical stratosphere from in-situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. de Reus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In-situ ice crystal size distribution measurements are presented within the tropical troposphere and lower stratosphere. The measurements were performed using a combination of a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP-100 and a Cloud Imaging Probe (CIP, which were installed on the Russian high altitude research aircraft M55 "Geophysica" during the SCOUT-O3 campaign in Darwin, Australia. One of the objectives of the campaign was to characterise the Hector convective system, which appears on an almost daily basis during the pre-monsoon season over the Tiwi Islands, north of Darwin. In total 90 encounters with ice clouds, between 10 and 19 km altitude were selected from the dataset and were analysed. Six of these encounters were observed in the lower stratosphere, up to 1.4 km above the local tropopause. Concurrent lidar measurements on board "Geophysica" indicate that these ice clouds were a result of overshooting convection. Large ice crystals, with a maximum dimension up to 400 μm, were observed in the stratosphere. The stratospheric ice clouds included an ice water content ranging from 7.7×10−5 to 8.5×10−4 g m−3 and were observed at ambient relative humidities (with respect to ice between 75 and 157%. Three modal lognormal size distributions were fitted to the average size distributions for different potential temperature intervals, showing that the shape of the size distribution of the stratospheric ice clouds are similar to those observed in the upper troposphere.

    In the tropical troposphere the effective radius of the ice cloud particles decreases from 100 μm at about 10 km altitude, to 3 μm at the tropopause, while the ice water content decreases from 0.04 to 10−5 g m−3. No clear trend in the number concentration was observed with altitude, due to the thin and inhomogeneous characteristics of the observed cirrus clouds.

    The ice water

  19. Design, fabrication, and evaluation of a partially melted ice particle cloud facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, Jared T.

    High altitude ice crystal clouds created by highly convective storm cells are dangerous to jet transport aircraft because the crystals are ingested into the compressor section, partially melt, accrete, and cause roll back or flame out. Current facilities to test engine particle icing are not ideal for fundamental mixed-phase ice accretion experiments or do not generate frozen droplet clouds under representative conditions. The goal of this research was to develop a novel facility capable of testing fundamental partially melted ice particle icing physics and to collect ice accretion data related to mixed-phase ice accretion. The Penn State Icing Tunnel (PSIT) has been designed and fabricated to conduct partially melted ice particle cloud accretion. The PSIT generated a cloud with air assisted atomizing nozzles. The water droplets cool from the 60psi pressure drop as the water exited the nozzle and fully glaciate while flowing in the -11.0°C tunnel air flow. The glaciated cloud flowed through a duct in the center of the tunnel where hot air was introduced. The temperature of the duct was regulated from 3.3°C to 24°C which melted particle the frozen particle from 0% to 90%. The partially melted particle cloud impinged on a temperature controlled flat plate. Ice accretion data was taken for a range of duct temperature from 3.3°C to 24°C and plate temperature from -4.5°C to 7.0°C. The particle median volumetric diameter was 23mum, the total water content was 4.5 g/m 3, the specific humidity was 1.12g/kg, and the wet bulb temperature ranged from 1.0°C to 7.0°C depending on the duct temperature. The boundaries between ice particle bounce off, ice accretion, and water run off were determined. When the particle were totally frozen and the plate surface was below freezing, the ice particle bounced off as expected. Ice accretion was seen for all percent melts tested, but the plate temperature boundary between water runoff and ice accretion increased from 0°C at 8

  20. Surface modification of mineral dust particles by sulphuric acid processing: implications for ice nucleation abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Reitz

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The ability of coated mineral dust particles to act as ice nuclei (IN was investigated at LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator during the FROST1- and FROST2-campaigns (Freezing of dust. Sulphuric acid was condensed on the particles which afterwards were optionally humidified, treated with ammonia vapour and/or heat. By means of aerosol mass spectrometry we found evidence that processing of mineral dust particles with sulphuric acid leads to surface modifications of the particles. These surface modifications are most likely responsible for the observed reduction of the IN activation of the particles. The observed particle mass spectra suggest that different treatments lead to different chemical reactions on the particle surface. Possible chemical reaction pathways and products are suggested and the implications on the IN efficiency of the treated dust particles are discussed.

  1. Light emission of sputtered particles induced by ion bombardment on water-enriched molecular ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chin Shuang; Ip, Wing; Liu, S. H.; Hsu, G. Y.; Lee, Shyong

    2007-03-01

    We had measured the light of sputtered particles in a visible region induced by various projectiles bombarding water-enriched molecular ices, like mixed ices of CH4 + NH3 + H2O (1:1:1). In this experiment, each constituent contained in this iced sample was found to emit a characteristic wavelength of light. We believe this characteristic is due to certain ion attached to parent molecule (constituent) that are dissociated with parent molecule in the collision process. Some of those ions, before emerging out the iced film, will become neutralized and develop into excited states due to electron capture. Then the characteristic wavelengths of light will decay from these excited sputtered particles; hence, from the light emission, one can analyze the constituents of an unknown ice. On the other hand, the intensity of the distribution of light emission during ion bombardment can be interpreted as an ion-ice interaction following the similar collision mechanism as ion-metal interaction, i.e. mainly the linear-cascade collision model.

  2. The effect of rock particles and D2O replacement on the flow behaviour of ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Ceri A; Grindrod, Peter M; Sammonds, Peter R

    2017-02-13

    Ice-rock mixtures are found in a range of natural terrestrial and planetary environments. To understand how flow processes occur in these environments, laboratory-derived properties can be extrapolated to natural conditions through flow laws. Here, deformation experiments have been carried out on polycrystalline samples of pure ice, ice-rock and D2O-ice-rock mixtures at temperatures of 263, 253 and 233 K, confining pressure of 0 and 48 MPa, rock fraction of 0-50 vol.% and strain-rates of 5 × 10-7 to 5 × 10-5 s-1 Both the presence of rock particles and replacement of H2O by D2O increase bulk strength. Calculated flow law parameters for ice and H2O-ice-rock are similar to literature values at equivalent conditions, except for the value of the rock fraction exponent, here found to be 1. D2O samples are 1.8 times stronger than H2O samples, probably due to the higher mass of deuterons when compared with protons. A gradual transition between dislocation creep and grain-size-sensitive deformation at the lowest strain-rates in ice and ice-rock samples is suggested. These results demonstrate that flow laws can be found to describe ice-rock behaviour, and should be used in modelling of natural processes, but that further work is required to constrain parameters and mechanisms for the observed strength enhancement.This article is part of the themed issue 'Microdynamics of ice'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Aerosolization, Chemical Characterization, Hygroscopicity and Ice Formation of Marine Biogenic Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P. A.; Radway, J.; Kilthau, W.; Bothe, D.; Knopf, D. A.; Aller, J. Y.

    2013-12-01

    The oceans cover the majority of the earth's surface, host nearly half the total global primary productivity and are a major source of atmospheric aerosol particles. However, effects of biological activity on sea spray generation and composition, and subsequent cloud formation are not well understood. Our goal is to elucidate these effects which will be particularly important over nutrient rich seas, where microorganisms can reach concentrations of 10^9 per mL and along with transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) can become aerosolized. Here we report the results of mesocosm experiments in which bubbles were generated by two methods, either recirculating impinging water jets or glass frits, in natural or artificial seawater containing bacteria and unialgal cultures of three representative phytoplankton species, Thalassiosira pseudonana, Emiliania huxleyi, and Nannochloris atomus. Over time we followed the size distribution of aerosolized particles as well as their hygroscopicity, heterogeneous ice nucleation potential, and individual physical-chemical characteristics. Numbers of cells and the mass of dissolved and particulate organic carbon (DOC, POC), TEP (which includes polysaccharide-containing microgels and nanogels >0.4 μm in diameter) were determined in the bulk water, the surface microlayer, and aerosolized material. Aerosolized particles were also impacted onto substrates for ice nucleation and water uptake experiments, elemental analysis using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX), and determination of carbon bonding with scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Regardless of bubble generation method, the overall concentration of aerosol particles, TEP, POC and DOC increased as concentrations of bacterial and phytoplankton cells increased, stabilized, and subsequently declined. Particles cloud formation and potential

  4. Chemical compositions of soluble particles around the Termination 1 in the Dome Fuji ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyabu, I.; Iizuka, Y.; Sakurai, T.; Suzuki, T.; Miyake, T.; Hirabayashi, M.; Motoyama, H.; Hondoh, T.

    2012-04-01

    Micro sized particles preserved in Antarctic ice cores are useful proxies for reconstructing past climate and environmental changes. The recent studies on chemical compounds of the particles by using the Dome Fuji ice core showed that sulfate salts were main soluble particles, and chemical compositions of primary sulfate salt were calcium sulfate during the glacial maximum and sodium sulfate during the Holocene #1. However, it is still unknown that how chemical compositions of sulfate particles have changed on millennial time scale. In this study, we focused on sulfate salts and sea salts (precursor of sulfate salts) and measured constituent element of non-volatile particles in the Dome Fuji ice core around the Termination 1(9-25 kyr BP). A total of 48 samples were distributed from Dome Fuji ice core section from 298.900m to 582.590m (Holocene to Last Glacial Maximum: LGM, 9-25 kyr BP), with a time resolution of about 320 year. Non-volatile particles were extracted from the samples by sublimation system #2. Constituent elements and diameter of each non-volatile particle were measured by scanning electron micro scope (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). By using a method in our recent paper #3, we made a classification of non-volatile particles into insoluble dust, soluble sulfate salts and soluble chloride salts. Also we assumed that particles containing Ca and S are calcium sulfate, particles containing Na and S are sodium sulfate and particles containing Na and Cl are sodium chloride. We found several fluctuations of calcium sulfate, sodium sulfate, and sodium chloride around the Termination 1, and these fluctuations are associated with changes in terrestrial as well as marine environments. Main sulfate salts changed from calcium sulfate to sodium sulfate after 16.5 kyr BP. A plausible explanation is that sulfuric acid in atmosphere became to react with sodium chloride instead of dusts (calcium carbonate) after 16.5 kyr BP, because atmospheric

  5. Fe embedded in ice: The impacts of sublimation and energetic particle bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankland, Victoria L.; Plane, John M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Icy particles containing a variety of Fe compounds are present in the upper atmospheres of planets such as the Earth and Saturn. In order to explore the role of ice sublimation and energetic ion bombardment in releasing Fe species into the gas phase, Fe-dosed ice films were prepared under UHV conditions in the laboratory. Temperature-programmed desorption studies of Fe/H2O films revealed that no Fe atoms or Fe-containing species co-desorbed along with the H2O molecules. This implies that when noctilucent ice cloud particles sublimate in the terrestrial mesosphere, the metallic species embedded in them will coalesce to form residual particles. Sputtering of the Fe-ice films by energetic Ar+ ions was shown to be an efficient mechanism for releasing Fe into the gas phase, with a yield of 0.08 (Ar+ energy=600 eV). Extrapolating with a semi-empirical sputtering model to the conditions of a proton aurora indicates that sputtering by energetic protons (>100 keV) should also be efficient. However, the proton flux in even an intense aurora will be too low for the resulting injection of Fe species into the gas phase to compete with that from meteoric ablation. In contrast, sputtering of the icy particles in the main rings of Saturn by energetic O+ ions may be the source of recently observed Fe+ in the Saturnian magnetosphere. Electron sputtering (9.5 keV) produced no detectable Fe atoms or Fe-containing species. Finally, it was observed that Fe(OH)2 was produced when Fe was dosed onto an ice film at 140 K (but not at 95 K). Electronic structure theory shows that the reaction which forms this hydroxide from adsorbed Fe has a large barrier of about 0.7 eV, from which we conclude that the reaction requires both translationally hot Fe atoms and mobile H2O molecules on the ice surface.

  6. Solar Energetic Particle Spectrum on 13 December 2006 Determined by IceTop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2008-10-11

    The IceTop air shower array now under construction at the South Pole as the surface component of the IceCube neutrino telescope (Achterberg et al. 2006) detected an unusual near-solar-minimum Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) after a solar flare on 13 December 2006. Beginning at 0220 UT, the 4B class flare occurred at solar coordinates S06 W24, accompanied by strong (X3.4) X-ray emission and type II and IV radio bursts. The LASCO coronagraph on the SOHO spacecraft observed a halo CME launch from the Sun at {approx} 0225 UT with speed estimated to be {approx} 1770 km/s. We have begun (Bieber et al. 2007) a comprehensive analysis of the propagation of solar energetic particles in this event. However the focus of this Letter is the new and unique ability of IceTop to derive the energy spectrum of these particles in the multi-GeV regime from a single detector with a well defined viewing direction. When completed, IceTop will have approximately 500 square meters of ice Cherenkov collecting area arranged in an array of 80 stations on a 125 m triangular grid to detect air showers from one PeV to one EeV. Each station consists of two, two meter diameter tanks filled with ice to a depth of 90 cm. Tanks are instrumented with two Digital Optical Modules (DOM) operated at different gain settings to provide appropriate dynamic range to cover both large and small air showers. Each DOM contains a 10 inch photomultiplier and an advanced readout system capable of digitizing the full waveform. For historical reasons, the two discriminator counting rates recorded in each DOM are termed SPE (Single Photo Electron), and MPE (Multi Photo Electron). In the present analysis the SPE threshold corresponds approximately to 20 photoelectrons (PE), and the MPE threshold to 100 PE. Due to the high altitude (2835m) and the nearly zero geomagnetic cutoff at the South Pole, secondary particle spectra at the detector retain a significant amount of information on the spectra of the primary particles

  7. Ice nucleation by surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust and mineral dust/sulfate particles at cirrus temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Archuleta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the potential role of some types of mineral dust and mineral dust with sulfuric acid coatings as heterogeneous ice nuclei at cirrus temperatures. Commercially-available nanoscale powder samples of aluminum oxide, alumina-silicate and iron oxide were used as surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust particles, with and without multilayer coverage of sulfuric acid. A sample of Asian dust aerosol particles was also studied. Measurements of ice nucleation were made using a continuous-flow ice-thermal diffusion chamber (CFDC operated to expose size-selected aerosol particles to temperatures between -45 and -60°C and a range of relative humidity above ice-saturated conditions. Pure metal oxide particles supported heterogeneous ice nucleation at lower relative humidities than those required to homogeneously freeze sulfuric acid solution particles at sizes larger than about 50 nm. The ice nucleation behavior of the same metal oxides coated with sulfuric acid indicate heterogeneous freezing at lower relative humidities than those calculated for homogeneous freezing of the diluted particle coatings. The effect of soluble coatings on the ice activation relative humidity varied with the respective uncoated core particle types, but for all types the heterogeneous freezing rates increased with particle size for the same thermodynamic conditions. For a selected size of 200 nm, the natural mineral dust particles were the most effective ice nuclei tested, supporting heterogeneous ice formation at an ice relative humidity of approximately 135%, irrespective of temperature. Modified homogeneous freezing parameterizations and theoretical formulations are shown to have application to the description of heterogeneous freezing of mineral dust-like particles with soluble coatings.

  8. Particle Size Control for PIV Seeding Using Dry Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    in flight actually being carried out, the observations, drawings and notes of Leonardo da Vinci showed an analytical process to develop a way for...theoretical particle response: dvp dt = −C(vp − U) C = 18µ ρpd2p 86 87 Bibliography 1. Linscott, R. N. and Da Vinci , L., The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci

  9. Particle trajectory computer program for icing analysis of axisymmetric bodies - A progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltezos, Dimitrios G.; Osonitsch, Charles; Shaw, Robert J.; Kaercher, Arthur

    1987-01-01

    Aircraft exposed to an atmospheric icing environment can accumulate ice, resulting in a sharp increase in drag, a reduction in lift, control surface fouling, and engine damage all of which result in a hazardous flight situation. NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has conducted a program to examine, with the aid of high-speed computer codes, how the trajectories of particles contribute to the ice accumulation on airfoils and engine inlets. For this effort, a computer code was developed to calculate icing particle trajectories and impingement limits for axisymmetric inlets. The original research-oriented NASA code was upgraded and modified to meet the requirements of the design engineer. The improved code is capable of performing trajectory calculations for any atmospheric conditions and droplet sizes. It can handle single droplets or a distribution of various droplet sizes. The four programs that comprise the code are described and the results of a test case using flight conditions for a Fokker F100 icing tunnel test are presented.

  10. A laboratory investigation on the influence of adsorbed gases and particles from the exhaust of a kerosene burner on the evaporation rate of ice crystals and the ice nucleating ability of the exhaust particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, K.; Mitra, S.K.; Pruppacher, H.R. [Johannes Gutenberg Univ., Mainz (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik der Atmosphaere

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory experiments are described during which the influence of the exhausts of a kerosene burner on microphysical processes were studied. In one experimental investigation the evaporation rates of polluted ice crystals were compared with the evaporation rates of pure ice crystals. During another experimental investigation the ice nucleating ability of the exhaust particles was studied. The results show that the evaporation rate of polluted ice crystals was significantly reduced and also that ice nucleation takes place between -20 and -38 deg C. (author) 7 refs.

  11. Ice cloud formation potential by free tropospheric particles from long-range transport over the Northern Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    China, Swarup; Alpert, Peter A.; Zhang, Bo; Schum, Simeon; Dzepina, Katja; Wright, Kendra; Owen, R. Chris; Fialho, Paulo; Mazzoleni, Lynn R.; Mazzoleni, Claudio; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Long-range transported free tropospheric particles can play a significant role on heterogeneous ice nucleation. Using optical and electron microscopy we examine the physicochemical characteristics of ice nucleating particles (INPs). Particles were collected on substrates from the free troposphere at the remote Pico Mountain Observatory in the Azores Islands, after long-range transport and aging over the Atlantic Ocean. We investigate four specific events to study the ice formation potential by the collected particles with different ages and transport patterns. We use single-particle analysis, as well as bulk analysis to characterize particle populations. Both analyses show substantial differences in particle composition between samples from the four events; in addition, single-particle microscopy analysis indicates that most particles are coated by organic material. The identified INPs contained mixtures of dust, aged sea salt and soot, and organic material acquired either at the source or during transport. The temperature and relative humidity (RH) at which ice formed, varied only by 5% between samples, despite differences in particle composition, sources, and transport patterns. We hypothesize that this small variation in the onset RH may be due to the coating material on the particles. This study underscores and motivates the need to further investigate how long-range transported and atmospherically aged free tropospheric particles impact ice cloud formation.

  12. Radar cross-section measurements of ice particles using vector network analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhu Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We carried out radar cross-section (RSC measurements of ice particles in a microwave anechoic chamber at Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology. We used microwave similarity theory to enlarge the size of particle from the micrometer to millimeter scale and to reduce the testing frequency from 94 GHz to 10 GHz. The microwave similarity theory was validated using the method of moments for single metal sphere, single dielectric sphere, and spherical and non-spherical dielectric particle swarms. The differences between the retrieved and theoretical results at 94 GHz were 0.016117%, 0.0023029%, 0.027627%, and 0.0046053%, respectively. We proposed a device that can measure the RCS of ice particles in the chamber based on the S21 parameter obtained from vector network analyzer. On the basis of the measured S21 parameter of the calibration material (metal plates and their corresponding theoretical RCS values, the RCS values of a spherical Teflon particle swarm and cuboid candle particle swarm was retrieved at 10 GHz. In this case, the differences between the retrieved and theoretical results were 12.72% and 24.49% for the Teflon particle swarm and cuboid candle swarm, respectively.

  13. Viscous organic aerosol particles in the upper troposphere: diffusivity-controlled water uptake and ice nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Lienhard

    2015-12-01

    secondary organic aerosol (SOA material produced by oxidation of α-pinene and in a number of organic/inorganic model mixtures (3-methylbutane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid (3-MBTCA, levoglucosan, levoglucosan/NH4HSO4, raffinose are presented. These indicate that water diffusion coefficients are determined by several properties of the aerosol substance and cannot be inferred from the glass transition temperature or bouncing properties. Our results suggest that water diffusion in SOA particles is faster than often assumed and imposes no significant kinetic limitation on water uptake and release at temperatures above 220 K. The fast diffusion of water suggests that heterogeneous ice nucleation on a glassy core is very unlikely in these systems. At temperatures below 220 K, model simulations of SOA particles suggest that heterogeneous ice nucleation may occur in the immersion mode on glassy cores which remain embedded in a liquid shell when experiencing fast updraft velocities. The particles absorb significant quantities of water during these updrafts which plasticize their outer layers such that these layers equilibrate readily with the gas phase humidity before the homogeneous ice nucleation threshold is reached. Glass formation is thus unlikely to restrict homogeneous ice nucleation. Only under most extreme conditions near the very high tropical tropopause may the homogeneous ice nucleation rate coefficient be reduced as a consequence of slow condensed-phase water diffusion. Since the differences between the behavior limited or non limited by diffusion are small even at the very high tropical tropopause, condensed-phase water diffusivity is unlikely to have significant consequences on the direct climatic effects of SOA particles under tropospheric conditions.

  14. Impact of bacterial ice nucleating particles on weather predicted by a numerical weather prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahyoun, Maher; Korsholm, Ulrik S.; Sørensen, Jens H.; Šantl-Temkiv, Tina; Finster, Kai; Gosewinkel, Ulrich; Nielsen, Niels W.

    2017-12-01

    Bacterial ice-nucleating particles (INP) have the ability to facilitate ice nucleation from super-cooled cloud droplets at temperatures just below the melting point. Bacterial INP have been detected in cloud water, precipitation, and dry air, hence they may have an impact on weather and climate. In modeling studies, the potential impact of bacteria on ice nucleation and precipitation formation on global scale is still uncertain due to their small concentration compared to other types of INP, i.e. dust. Those earlier studies did not account for the yet undetected high concentration of nanoscale fragments of bacterial INP, which may be found free or attached to soil dust in the atmosphere. In this study, we investigate the sensitivity of modeled cloud ice, precipitation and global solar radiation in different weather scenarios to changes in the fraction of cloud droplets containing bacterial INP, regardless of their size. For this purpose, a module that calculates the probability of ice nucleation as a function of ice nucleation rate and bacterial INP fraction was developed and implemented in a numerical weather prediction model. The threshold value for the fraction of cloud droplets containing bacterial INP needed to produce a 1% increase in cloud ice was determined at 10-5 to 10-4. We also found that increasing this fraction causes a perturbation in the forecast, leading to significant differences in cloud ice and smaller differences in convective and total precipitation and in net solar radiation reaching the surface. These effects were most pronounced in local convective events. Our results show that bacterial INP can be considered as a trigger factor for precipitation, but not an enhancement factor.

  15. Ice nucleation active particles in continental air samples over Mainz, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pummer, Bernhard G.; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol particles are of central importance for atmospheric chemistry and physics, climate and public health. Some of these particles possess ice nucleation activity (INA), which is highly relevant for cloud formation and precipitation. In 2010, air filter samples were collected with a high-volume filter sampler separating fine and coarse particles (aerodynamic cut-off diameter 3 μm) in Mainz, Germany. In this study, the INA of the atmospheric particles deposited on these filters was determined. Therefore,they were extracted with ultrapure water, which was then measured in a droplet freezing assay, as described in Fröhlich-Nowoisky et al. (2015). The determined concentration of ice nucleators (INs) was between 0.3 and 2per m³ at 266 K, and between5 and 75 per m³ at 260 K. The INs were further characterized by different treatments, like heating (308 K, 371 K), filtration (0.1 μm, 300 kDa), and digestion with papain (10 mg/ml). We further investigated, which atmospheric conditions (e.g. weather) and distinguished events (e.g. dust storms, volcanic eruptions, and pollen peaks) influenced the number and nature of these INs. Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., Hill, T. C. J., Pummer, B. G., Yordanova, P., Franc, G. D., and Pöschl, U.: Ice nucleation activity in the widespread soil fungus Mortierella alpina, Biogeosci., 12, 1057-1071, doi:10.5194/bg-12-1057-2015, 2015.

  16. CO2 trapping in amorphous H2O ice: Relevance to polar mesospheric cloud particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, T. P.; Frankland, V. L.; Plane, J. M. C.

    2015-05-01

    Polar mesospheric clouds form in the summer high latitude mesopause region and are primarily comprised of H2O ice, forming at temperatures below 150 K. Average summertime temperatures in the polar mesosphere (78°N) are approximately 125 K and can be driven lower than 100 K by gravity waves. Under these extreme temperature conditions and given the relative mesospheric concentrations of CO2 and H2O (~360 ppmv and ~10 ppmv, respectively) it has been hypothesised that CO2 molecules could become trapped within amorphous mesospheric ice particles, possibly making a significant contribution to the total condensed volume. Studies of CO2 trapping in co-deposited gas mixtures of increasing CO2:H2O ratio (deposited at 98 K) were analysed via temperature programmed desorption. CO2 trapping was found to be negligible when the H2O flux to the surface was reduced to 4.8×1013 molecules cm-2 s-1. This corresponds to an average of 0.4 H2O molecules depositing on an adsorbed CO2 molecule and thereby trapping it in amorphous ice. Extrapolating the experimental data to mesospheric conditions shows that a mesospheric temperature of 100 K would be required (at a maximum mesospheric H2O concentration of 10 ppmv) in order to trap CO2 in the ice particles. Given the rarity of this temperature being reached in the mesosphere, this process would be an unlikely occurrence.

  17. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  18. Individual particle morphology, coatings, and impurities of black carbon aerosols in Antarctic ice and tropical rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Aja; Edwards, Ross; Saunders, Martin; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Subramanian, R.; Timms, Nicholas E.; Riessen, Arie; Smith, Andrew M.; Lambrinidis, Dionisia; Nunes, Laurie J.; Vallelonga, Paul; Goodwin, Ian D.; Moy, Andrew D.; Curran, Mark A. J.; Ommen, Tas D.

    2016-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosols are a large source of climate warming, impact atmospheric chemistry, and are implicated in large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation. Inventories of BC emissions suggest significant changes in the global BC aerosol distribution due to human activity. However, little is known regarding BC's atmospheric distribution or aged particle characteristics before the twentieth century. Here we investigate the prevalence and structural properties of BC particles in Antarctic ice cores from 1759, 1838, and 1930 Common Era (C.E.) using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The study revealed an unexpected diversity in particle morphology, insoluble coatings, and association with metals. In addition to conventionally occurring BC aggregates, we observed single BC monomers, complex aggregates with internally, and externally mixed metal and mineral impurities, tar balls, and organonitrogen coatings. The results of the study show BC particles in the remote Antarctic atmosphere exhibit complexity that is unaccounted for in atmospheric models of BC.

  19. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O& amp; apos; Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O& amp; apos; Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-01-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  20. Contribution of feldspar and marine organic aerosols to global ice nucleating particle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara-Temprado, Jesús; Murray, Benjamin J.; Wilson, Theodore W.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Browse, Jo; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Ardon-Dryer, Karin; Bertram, Allan K.; Burrows, Susannah M.; Ceburnis, Darius; DeMott, Paul J.; Mason, Ryan H.; O'Dowd, Colin D.; Rinaldi, Matteo; Carslaw, Ken S.

    2017-03-01

    Ice-nucleating particles (INPs) are known to affect the amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, thereby influencing many of their properties. The atmospheric INP concentration changes by orders of magnitude from terrestrial to marine environments, which typically contain much lower concentrations. Many modelling studies use parameterizations for heterogeneous ice nucleation and cloud ice processes that do not account for this difference because they were developed based on INP measurements made predominantly in terrestrial environments without considering the aerosol composition. Errors in the assumed INP concentration will influence the simulated amount of ice in mixed-phase clouds, leading to errors in top-of-atmosphere radiative flux and ultimately the climate sensitivity of the model. Here we develop a global model of INP concentrations relevant for mixed-phase clouds based on laboratory and field measurements of ice nucleation by K-feldspar (an ice-active component of desert dust) and marine organic aerosols (from sea spray). The simulated global distribution of INP concentrations based on these two species agrees much better with currently available ambient measurements than when INP concentrations are assumed to depend only on temperature or particle size. Underestimation of INP concentrations in some terrestrial locations may be due to the neglect of INPs from other terrestrial sources. Our model indicates that, on a monthly average basis, desert dusts dominate the contribution to the INP population over much of the world, but marine organics become increasingly important over remote oceans and they dominate over the Southern Ocean. However, day-to-day variability is important. Because desert dust aerosol tends to be sporadic, marine organic aerosols dominate the INP population on many days per month over much of the mid- and high-latitude Northern Hemisphere. This study advances our understanding of which aerosol species need to be included in order to

  1. Impeded ice nucleation in glassy and highly viscous aerosol particles: the role of water diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolli, C.; Peter, T.; Zobrist, B.; Krieger, U. K.; Luo, B. P.; Soonsin, V.; Pedernera, D. A.; Koop, T.

    2010-05-01

    In situ and remote observations in the upper troposphere have disclosed the existence of water vapor pressures up to and even above water saturation. Under such conditions ice particle formation by homogeneous nucleation is expected to set in followed by ice crystal growth until the supersaturation is consumed. While the highest measured water vapor values might not withstand rigorous quality checks, values up to water saturation seem to be occurring. Since air masses appear to contain sufficient numbers of aerosol particles for cloud formation, the question arises why these aerosols are not successful at nucleating ice. The atmospheric aerosol is a complex mixture of various inorganic and organic components, whereas the organic fraction can represent more than 50% of the total aerosol mass. The homogeneous ice nucleation threshold was established for atmospherically relevant salt solutions and sulfuric acid, but only for a few organic species. The organic aerosol fraction tends to remain liquid instead of crystallizing as the temperature is decreased and, thus, organic aerosol particles may form highly viscous liquids. When the viscosity of such liquids reaches values in the order of 1012 Pa s, the molecular motion becomes so slow, that the sample vitrifies at the glass transition temperature Tg. If aerosol particles were present as glasses, this would influence several physical and chemical processes in the atmosphere significantly: Water uptake from the gas phase would be drastically impeded and ice nucleation inhibited. We investigated the glass transition temperature of a series of aqueous organic solutions such as polyols, sugars and dicarboxylic acids as a function of the solute concentration using a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These measurements show that the higher the molar mass of the organic solutes, the higher Tg of their respective solutions at a given water activity. Aerosol particles containing larger (≥150 g mol-1) organic molecules

  2. Ice nucleation properties of fine ash particles from the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Steinke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available During the eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano in the south of Iceland in April/May 2010, about 40 Tg of ash mass were emitted into the atmosphere. It was unclear whether volcanic ash particles with d < 10 μm facilitate the glaciation of clouds. Thus, ice nucleation properties of volcanic ash particles were investigated in AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere cloud chamber experiments simulating atmospherically relevant conditions. The ash sample that was used for our experiments had been collected at a distance of 58 km from the Eyjafjallajökull during the eruption period in April 2010. The temperature range covered by our ice nucleation experiments extended from 219 to 264 K, and both ice nucleation via immersion freezing and deposition nucleation could be observed. Immersion freezing was first observed at 252 K, whereas the deposition nucleation onset lay at 242 K and RHice =126%. About 0.1% of the volcanic ash particles were active as immersion freezing nuclei at a temperature of 249 K. For deposition nucleation, an ice fraction of 0.1% was observed at around 233 K and RHice =116%. Taking ice-active surface site densities as a measure for the ice nucleation efficiency, volcanic ash particles are similarly efficient ice nuclei in immersion freezing mode (ns,imm ~ 109 m−2 at 247 K compared to certain mineral dusts. For deposition nucleation, the observed ice-active surface site densities ns,dep were found to be 1011 m−2 at 224 K and RHice =116%. Thus, volcanic ash particles initiate deposition nucleation more efficiently than Asian and Saharan dust but appear to be poorer ice nuclei than ATD particles. Based on the experimental data, we have derived ice-active surface site densities as a function of temperature for immersion freezing and of relative humidity over ice and temperature for

  3. Jet Engine Powerloss in Ice Particle Conditions: An Aviation Industry Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapp, J. W.

    2009-09-01

    Since about the 1990, there have been in excess of 100 engine powerloss events in jet aircraft that have now been attributed to the ingestion of ice particles. These powerloss events are observed in essentially all engine types, and on all airframes. Almost all cases have occurred in the vicinity of deep convection usually associated with warm and moist atmospheres. Events have occurred all throughout the world, although there is a somewhat higher concentration in the area of southeast Asia. Powerloss can result from stall, surge, flameout and rollback events in the engine. Many are momentary, with engines relighting automatically, while others require a manual engine relight. In some cases, particularly in rollback cases on smaller commuter-transport aircraft, engine power has only been recovered by melting of ice buildup in the engine below the freezing level. There have been cases of multiple simultaneous engine powerloss, and one case of a landing with no engine power. The frequency of the events, and the potential for multiple-engine powerloss, has led the FAA to note that that these occurrences constitute a significant safety issue. Analysis of the events using aircraft flight data recorder information, pilot interviews, standard meteorological radar and satellite data, and information from several past flight test programs, have led to the conclusion that the powerloss is due to ice buildup in the engine from high concentrations of ice particles in the atmosphere, and that supercooled LWC is not required. This is an unconventional form of icing that had not been previously considered possible by engine designers. The Engine Harmonization Working Group (EHWG), an industry-led committee composed of engine manufacturers, airframe manufacturers, regulators, and government agencies have been studying the powerloss issue since 2004, and have suggested a 4-part technical plan to resolve the issue, which includes improvement of instrumentation to measure high ice

  4. Snow-borne nanosized particles: Abundance, distribution, composition, and significance in ice nucleation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel-Alvarado, Rodrigo Benjamin; Nazarenko, Yevgen; Ariya, Parisa A.

    2015-11-01

    Physicochemical processes of nucleation constitute a major uncertainty in understanding aerosol-cloud interactions. To improve the knowledge of the ice nucleation process, we characterized physical, chemical, and biological properties of fresh snow using a suite of state-of-the-art techniques based on mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, chromatography, and optical particle sizing. Samples were collected at two North American Arctic sites, as part of international campaigns (2006 and 2009), and in the city of Montreal, Canada, over the last decade. Particle size distribution analyses, in the range of 3 nm to 10 µm, showed that nanosized particles are the most numerous (38-71%) in fresh snow, with a significant portion (11 to 19%) less than 100 nm in size. Particles with diameters less than 200 nm consistently exhibited relatively high ice-nucleating properties (on average ranged from -19.6 ± 2.4 to -8.1 ± 2.6°C). Chemical analysis of the nanosized fraction suggests that they contain bioorganic materials, such as amino acids, as well as inorganic compounds with similar characteristics to mineral dust. The implication of nanoparticle ubiquity and abundance in diverse snow ecosystems are discussed in the context of their importance in understanding atmospheric nucleation processes.

  5. Updated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics for Simulating Bending and Compression Failure Progress of Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ningbo Zhang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an updated Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH method based on the Simplified Finite Difference Interpolation scheme (SPH_SFDI is presented to simulate the failure process of ice. The Drucker–Prager model is embedded into the SPH code to simulate the four point bending and uniaxial compression failure of ice. The cohesion softening elastic–plastic model is also used in the SPH_SFDI framework. To validate the proposed modeling approach, the numerical results of SPH_SFDI are compared with the standard SPH and the experimental data. The good agreement demonstrated that the proposed SPH_SFDI method including the elastic–plastic cohesion softening Drucker–Prager failure model can provide a useful numerical tool for simulating failure progress of the ice in practical field. It is also shown that the SPH_SFDI can significantly improve the capability and accuracy for simulating ice bending and compression failures as compared with the original SPH scheme.

  6. Possible Catalytic Effects of Ice Particles on the Production of NOx by Lightning Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    One mechanism by which NO(x) is produced in the atmosphere is heating in lightning discharge channels. Since most viable proposed electrification mechanisms involve ice crystals, it is reasonable to assume that lightning discharge channels frequently pass through fields of ice particles of various kinds. We address the question of whether ice crystals may serve as catalysts for the production of NO(x) by lightning discharges. If so, and if the effect is large, it would need to be taken into account in estimates of global NO(x) production by lightning. In this study, we make a series of plausible assumptions about the temperature and concentration of reactant species in the environment of discharges and we postulate a mechanism by which ice crystals are able to adsorb nitrogen atoms. We then compare production rates between uncatalyzed and catalytic reactions at 2000 K, 3000 K, and 4000 K. Catalyzed NO production rates are greater at 2000 K, whereas uncatalyzed production occurs most rapidly at 4000 K. 2010

  7. PSD Determination, Portland Cement Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Boundary layer new particle formation over East Antarctic sea ice – possible Hg-driven nucleation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Humphries

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol observations above the Southern Ocean and Antarctic sea ice are scarce. Measurements of aerosols and atmospheric composition were made in East Antarctic pack ice on board the Australian icebreaker Aurora Australis during the spring of 2012. One particle formation event was observed during the 32 days of observations. This event occurred on the only day to exhibit extended periods of global irradiance in excess of 600 W m−2. Within the single air mass influencing the measurements, number concentrations of particles larger than 3 nm (CN3 reached almost 7700 cm−3 within a few hours of clouds clearing, and grew at rates of 5.6 nm h−1. Formation rates of 3 nm particles were in the range of those measured at other Antarctic locations at 0.2–1.1 ± 0.1 cm−3 s−1. Our investigations into the nucleation chemistry found that there were insufficient precursor concentrations for known halogen or organic chemistry to explain the nucleation event. Modelling studies utilising known sulfuric acid nucleation schemes could not simultaneously reproduce both particle formation or growth rates. Surprising correlations with total gaseous mercury (TGM were found that, together with other data, suggest a mercury-driven photochemical nucleation mechanism may be responsible for aerosol nucleation. Given the very low vapour pressures of the mercury species involved, this nucleation chemistry is likely only possible where pre-existing aerosol concentrations are low and both TGM concentrations and solar radiation levels are relatively high (∼ 1.5 ng m−3 and ≥ 600 W m−2, respectively, such as those observed in the Antarctic sea ice boundary layer in this study or in the global free troposphere, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere.

  9. Arctic climate response to forcing from light-absorbing particles in snow and sea ice in CESM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Goldenson

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of light-absorbing aerosol particles deposited on arctic snow and sea ice influences the surface albedo, causing greater shortwave absorption, warming, and loss of snow and sea ice, lowering the albedo further. The Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1 now includes the radiative effects of light-absorbing particles in snow on land and sea ice and in sea ice itself. We investigate the model response to the deposition of black carbon and dust to both snow and sea ice. For these purposes we employ a slab ocean version of CESM1, using the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4, run to equilibrium for year 2000 levels of CO2 and fixed aerosol deposition. We construct experiments with and without aerosol deposition, with dust or black carbon deposition alone, and with varying quantities of black carbon and dust to approximate year 1850 and 2000 deposition fluxes. The year 2000 deposition fluxes of both dust and black carbon cause 1–2 °C of surface warming over large areas of the Arctic Ocean and sub-Arctic seas in autumn and winter and in patches of Northern land in every season. Atmospheric circulation changes are a key component of the surface-warming pattern. Arctic sea ice thins by on average about 30 cm. Simulations with year 1850 aerosol deposition are not substantially different from those with year 2000 deposition, given constant levels of CO2. The climatic impact of particulate impurities deposited over land exceeds that of particles deposited over sea ice. Even the surface warming over the sea ice and sea ice thinning depends more upon light-absorbing particles deposited over land. For CO2 doubled relative to year 2000 levels, the climate impact of particulate impurities in snow and sea ice is substantially lower than for the year 2000 equilibrium simulation.

  10. Particle physics on ice: constraints on neutrino interactions far above the weak scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A; Feng, Jonathan L; Goldberg, Haim

    2006-01-20

    Ultrahigh energy cosmic rays and neutrinos probe energies far above the weak scale. Their usefulness might appear to be limited by astrophysical uncertainties; however, by simultaneously considering up- and down-going events, one may disentangle particle physics from astrophysics. We show that present data from the AMANDA experiment in the South Pole ice already imply an upper bound on neutrino cross sections at energy scales that will likely never be probed at man-made accelerators. The existing data also place an upper limit on the neutrino flux valid for any neutrino cross section. In the future, similar analyses of IceCube data will constrain neutrino properties and fluxes at the theta(10%) level.

  11. Ice nucleating particles over the Eastern Mediterranean measured by unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrod, Jann; Weber, Daniel; Drücke, Jaqueline; Keleshis, Christos; Pikridas, Michael; Ebert, Martin; Cvetković, Bojan; Nickovic, Slobodan; Marinou, Eleni; Baars, Holger; Ansmann, Albert; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Sciare, Jean; Curtius, Joachim; Bingemer, Heinz G.

    2017-04-01

    During an intensive field campaign on aerosol, clouds, and ice nucleation in the Eastern Mediterranean in April 2016, we measured the abundance of ice nucleating particles (INPs) in the lower troposphere from unmanned aircraft systems (UASs). Aerosol samples were collected by miniaturized electrostatic precipitators onboard the UASs at altitudes up to 2.5 km. The number of INPs in these samples, which are active in the deposition and condensation modes at temperatures from -20 to -30 °C, were analyzed immediately after collection on site using the ice nucleus counter FRIDGE (FRankfurt Ice nucleation Deposition freezinG Experiment). During the 1-month campaign, we encountered a series of Saharan dust plumes that traveled at several kilometers' altitude. Here we present INP data from 42 individual flights, together with aerosol number concentrations, observations of lidar backscattering, dust concentrations derived by the dust transport model DREAM (Dust Regional Atmospheric Model), and results from scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the dust plumes is reflected by the coincidence of INPs with the particulate matter (PM), the lidar signal, and the predicted dust mass of the model. This suggests that mineral dust or a constituent related to dust was a major contributor to the ice nucleating properties of the aerosol. Peak concentrations of above 100 INPs std L-1 were measured at -30 °C. The INP concentration in elevated plumes was on average a factor of 10 higher than at ground level. Since desert dust is transported for long distances over wide areas of the globe predominantly at several kilometers' altitude, we conclude that INP measurements at ground level may be of limited significance for the situation at the level of cloud formation.

  12. Laboratory and modeling studies on the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on the properties of contrail ice particles in the jet regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Wong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Contrails and contrail-induced cirrus clouds are identified as the most uncertain components in determining aviation impacts on global climate change. Parameters affecting contrail ice particle formation immediately after the engine exit plane (< 5 s in plume age may be critical to ice particle properties used in large-scale models predicting contrail radiative forcing. Despite this, detailed understanding of these parametric effects is still limited. In this paper, we present results from recent laboratory and modeling studies conducted to investigate the effects of water and soot emissions and ambient conditions on near-field formation of contrail ice particles and ice particle properties. The Particle Aerosol Laboratory (PAL at the NASA Glenn Research Center and the Aerodyne microphysical parcel model for contrail ice particle formation were employed. Our studies show that exhaust water concentration has a significant impact on contrail ice particle formation and properties. When soot particles were introduced, ice particle formation was observed only when exhaust water concentration was above a critical level. When no soot or sulfuric acid was introduced, no ice particle formation was observed, suggesting that ice particle formation from homogeneous nucleation followed by homogeneous freezing of liquid water was unfavorable. Soot particles were found to compete for water vapor condensation, and higher soot concentrations emitted into the chamber resulted in smaller ice particles being formed. Chamber conditions corresponding to higher cruising altitudes were found to favor ice particle formation. The microphysical model captures trends of particle extinction measurements well, but discrepancies between the model and the optical particle counter measurements exist as the model predicts narrower ice particle size distributions and ice particle sizes nearly a factor of two larger than measured. These discrepancies are likely due to particle

  13. Effects of locust bean gum and mono- and diglyceride concentrations on particle size and melting rates of ice cream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cropper, S L; Kocaoglu-Vurma, N A; Tharp, B W; Harper, W J

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how varying concentrations of the stabilizer, locust bean gum (LBG), and different levels of the emulsifier, mono- and diglycerides (MDGs), influenced fat aggregation and melting characteristics of ice cream. Ice creams were made containing MDGs and LBG singly and in combination at concentrations ranging between 0.0% to 0.14% and 0.0% to 0.23%, respectively. Particle size analysis, conducted on both the mixes and ice cream, and melting rate testing on the ice cream were used to determine fat aggregation. No significant differences (P ice cream mixes. However, higher concentrations of both LBG and MDG in the ice creams resulted in values that were larger than the control. This study also found an increase in the particle size values when MDG levels were held constant and LBG amounts were increased in the ice cream. Ice creams with higher concentrations of MDG and LBG together had the greatest difference in the rate of melting than the control. The melting rate decreased with increasing LBG concentrations at constant MDG levels. These results illustrated that fat aggregation may not only be affected by emulsifiers, but that stabilizers may play a role in contributing to the destabilization of fat globules. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Investigating evaporation of melting ice particles within a bin melting layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Andrea J.

    Single column models have been used to help develop algorithms for remote sensing retrievals. Assumptions in the single-column models may affect the assumptions of the remote sensing retrievals. Studies of the melting layer that use single column models often assume environments that are near or at water saturation. This study investigates the effects of evaporation upon melting particles to determine whether the assumption of negligible mass loss still holds within subsaturated melting layers. A single column, melting layer model is modified to include the effects of sublimation and evaporation upon the particles. Other changes to the model include switching the order in which the model loops over particle sizes and model layers; including a particle sedimentation scheme; adding aggregation, accretion, and collision and coalescence processes; allowing environmental variables such as the water vapor diffusivity and the Schmidt number to vary with the changes in the environment; adding explicitly calculated particle temperature, changing the particle terminal velocity parameterization; and using a newly-derived effective density-dimensional relationship for use in particle mass calculations. Simulations of idealized melting layer environments show that significant mass loss due to evaporation during melting is possible within subsaturated environments. Short melting distances, accelerating particle fall speeds, and short melting times help constrain the amount of mass lost due to evaporation while melting is occurring, even in subsaturated profiles. Sublimation prior to melting can also be a significant source of mass loss. The trends shown on the particle scale also appear in the bulk distribution parameters such as rainfall rate and ice water content. Simulations incorporating observed melting layer environments show that significant mass loss due to evaporation during the melting process is possible under certain environmental conditions. A profile such as the

  15. A Study of Cirrus Ice Particle Size Distribution Using TC4 Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Li, Lihua; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Bansemer, Aaron; Twohy, Cynthia H.; Srivastava, Ramesh C.

    2010-01-01

    An analysis of two days of in situ observations of ice particle size spectra, in convectively generated cirrus, obtained during NASA s Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) mission is presented. The observed spectra are examined for their fit to the exponential, gamma, and lognormal function distributions. Characteristic particle size and concentration density scales are determined using two (for the exponential) or three (for the gamma and lognormal functions) moments of the spectra. It is shown that transformed exponential, gamma, and lognormal distributions should collapse onto standard curves. An examination of the transformed spectra, and of deviations of the transformed spectra from the standard curves, shows that the lognormal function provides a better fit to the observed spectra.

  16. Sinking Particle Flux in the Sea Ice Zone of the Amundsen Shelf, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M.; Hwang, J.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, D.; Ducklow, H. W.; Lee, S. H.; Yang, E. J.; Lee, S.

    2014-12-01

    We have examined the flux, compositions of biogenic components, and isotopic values of sinking particles collected by a sediment trap deployed in the sea ice zone (SIZ) of the Amundsen Sea from January 2011 for one year. Major portion of the particle flux occurred during the austral summer in January and February when sea ice concentration was reduced to below 60 %. Biogenic components, dominated by opal, accounted for over 75 % during this high flux period. The dominant source of sinking particles shifted from diatoms to soft-tissued organisms, evidenced by high particulate organic carbon (POC) content (> 30 %) during the polar night. CaCO3 content and its contribution to total particle flux were low throughout the study period. Contribution of aged POC likely supplied from sediment resuspension was considerable only from October to December, evidenced by low radiocarbon content and relatively high (30-50 %) content of the non-biogenic component. When compared to POC flux inside the Amundsen Sea polynya obtained by the US Amundsen Sea Polynya International Research Expedition (ASPIRE), the POC flux integrated over the austral summer in the SIZ was virtually identical although maximum POC flux was about half that inside the Amundsen Sea polynya. This comparatively high POC flux in the SIZ may be caused by persistence of phytoplankton bloom for longer period and more efficient export of organic matter owing to the diatom-dominant plankton community. If this observation is a general phenomenon on the Amundsen shelf, the role of the SIZ compared to the polynyas need to be examined more carefully when trying to characterize the POC export in this region.

  17. The coefficient of restitution of ice particles in glancing collisions: Experimental results for unfrosted surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supulver, Kimberley D.; Bridges, Frank G.; Lin, D. N. C.

    1995-01-01

    Both Saturn's rings and planetesimal disks are made up of particles in Keplerian orbits. Inelastic collisions between these particles regulate their dynamical evolution and possible aggregation. We present an experiment to simulate glancing collisions in Saturn's rings and in planetesimal disks and thus measure contributions to the energy loss for both normal and tangential velocity components. In this experiment, a spherical iceball mounted on a long-period, two dimensional pendulum is made to impact a flat ice surface in a low-temperature environment. This paper describes the experimental apparatus in detail and presents results for smooth unfrosted surfaces. The energy loss for tangential motion is suprisingly low, indicating that very little friction is present at low impact speeds for relatively smooth ice surfaces and temperatures near 100 K. We have also investigated room-temperature collisions of a rubber ball on a rough surface to understand the energy loss in situations where the tangential friction force is not small. In this analogous case, the energy loss is maximum for impact angles in the range 45 deg-60 deg.

  18. A Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Study of Sea Salt Particles Acting as Cloud Seeds: Deliquescence, Ice Nucleation and Sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, X.; Wolf, M. J.; Garimella, S.; Roesch, M.; Cziczo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Sea Salt Aerosols (SSA) are abundant in the atmosphere, and important to the Earth's chemistry and energy budget. However, the roles of sea salts in the context of cloud formation are still poorly understood, which is partially due to the complexity of the water-salt phase diagram. At ambient temperatures, even well below 0°C, SSA deliquesces at sub-water saturated conditions. Since the ratio of the partial pressure over ice versus super-cooled water continuously declines with decreasing temperatures, it is interesting to consider if SSA continues to deliquesce under a super-saturated condition of ice, or if particles act as depositional ice nuclei when a critical supersaturation is reached. Some recent studies suggest hydrated NaCl and simulated sea salt might deliquesce between -35°C to -44°C, and below that deposition freezing becomes possible. Deliquesced droplets can subsequently freeze via the immersion or homogenous freezing mode, depending on if the deliquescence processes is complete. After the droplets or ice particles are formed, it is also interesting to consider how the different processes influence physical properties after evaporation or sublimation. This data is important for climate modeling that includes bromine burst observed in Antarctica, which is hypothesized to be relevant to the sublimation of blowing snow particles. In this study we use a SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN; DMT, Inc., Boulder, CO) to perform experiments over a wide range of temperature and RH conditions to quantify deliquescence, droplet formation and ice nucleation. The formation of droplets and ice particles is detected by an advanced Optical Particle Counter (OPC) and the liquid/solid phases are distinguished by a machine learning method based on laser scattering and polarization data. Using an atomizer, four different sea salt samples are generated: pure NaCl and MgCl2 solutions, synthetic seawater, and natural seawater. Downstream of the SPIN chamber, a Pumped

  19. A model predicting the evolution of ice particle size spectra and radiative properties of cirrus clouds. Part 2: Dependence of absorption and extinction on ice crystal morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, David L.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    1994-01-01

    geometrical properties of ice crystals before the influence of ice crystal shape on cirrus radiative properties can be adequately understood. This study provides a way of coupling the radiative properties of absorption, extinction, and single scatter albedo to the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds. The dependence of extinction and absorption on ice crystal shape was not just due to geometrical differences between crystal types, but was also due to the effect these differences had on the evolution of ice particle size spectra. The ice particle growth model in Part 1 and the radiative properties treated here are based on analytical formulations, and thus represent a computationally efficient means of modeling the microphysical and radiative properties of cirrus clouds.

  20. Modeling global impacts of heterogeneous loss of HO2 on cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huijnen, V.; Williams, J. E.; Flemming, J.

    2014-03-01

    The abundance and spatial variability of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO2) in the troposphere strongly affects atmospheric composition through tropospheric ozone production and associated HOx chemistry. One of the largest uncertainties in the chemical HO2 budget is its heterogeneous loss on the surface of cloud droplets, ice particles and aerosols. We quantify the importance of the heterogeneous HO2 loss at global scale using the latest recommendations on the scavenging efficiency on various surfaces. For this we included the simultaneous loss on cloud droplets and ice particles as well as aerosol in the Composition-Integrated Forecast System (C-IFS). We show that cloud surface area density (SAD) is typically an order of magnitude larger than aerosol SAD, using assimilated satellite retrievals to constrain both meteorology and global aerosol distributions. Depending on the assumed uptake coefficients, loss on liquid water droplets and ice particles accounts for ∼53-70% of the total heterogeneous loss of HO2, due to the ubiquitous presence of cloud droplets. This indicates that HO2 uptake on cloud should be included in chemistry transport models that already include uptake on aerosol. Our simulations suggest that the zonal mean mixing ratios of HO2 are reduced by ∼25% in the tropics and up to ∼50% elsewhere. The subsequent decrease in oxidative capacity leads to a global increase of the tropospheric carbon monoxide (CO) burden of up to 7%, and an increase in the ozone tropospheric lifetime of ∼6%. This increase results in an improvement in the global distribution when compared against CO surface observations over the Northern Hemisphere, although it does not fully resolve the wintertime bias in the C-IFS. There is a simultaneous increase in the high bias in C-IFS for tropospheric CO over the Southern Hemisphere, which constrains on the assumptions regarding HO2 uptake on a global scale. We show that enhanced HO2 uptake on aerosol types associated with

  1. Lidar observations of ice-nucleating particle (INPC) and ice crystal number (ICNC) concentrations: height-resolved INPC-ICNC closure studies in mixed-phase altocumulus layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, Albert; Bühl, Johannes; Mamouri, Rodanthi-Elisavet; Engelmann, Ronny; Seifert, Patric; Nisantzi, Argyro; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Sciare, Jean

    2017-04-01

    During the six-week Cyprus-2015 field campaign in March and April 2015, conducted in the framework of the BACCHUS project (Impact of Biogenic versus Anthropogenic emissions on Clouds and Climate: towards a Holistic UnderStanding, collaborative project of the seventh EU framework programme, ENV.2013.6.1-2), we observed the evolution of extended liquid-water altocumulus fields with subsequent heterogeneous ice formation. The altocumulus layers developed in aged Saharan dust layers between 3.5 km (-20°C) and 7.5 km height (-35°C cloud top temperature). We observed such altocumulus developments on 12 days. By applying our recently developed polarization-lidar method we estimated the ice-nucleating particle concentration (INPC, immersion freezing) at cloud level (before the clouds developed and after their dissolution). Simultaneously performed Doppler lidar observations of the terminal velocities of falling ice crystals in virga below the shallow altocumulus layers allowed us to estimate the ice crystal number concentration (ICNC) of the falling ice crystals. In this retrieval, a realistic ice crystal size distribution has to be assumed. In addition, the volume extinction coefficient of the ice crystals has to be known (to obtain the total ice crystal concentration), and is obtained from the polarization lidar observations by using classical backscatter or Raman lidar retrieval methods. We assume that all ice crystals, which nucleated in the 300-500 m thick altocumulus layers, grow fast (according to the literature to about 100 µm size within 1 minute) and immediately fall out of the main shallow cloud layer so that the derived ICNC values provide us with the number of nucleated ice crystals as a function of cloud top temperature and given INP conditions. Based on this unique observational approach we investigated, to our knowledge for the first time, the consistency between the INPC and ICNC in mixed-phase clouds. We found reasonable agreement between INPC

  2. Large ice particles associated with small ice water content observed by AIM CIPS imagery of polar mesospheric clouds: Evidence for microphysical coupling with small-scale dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, D.; Thomas, G.; Merkel, A.; Olivero, J.; Chandran, A.; Lumpe, J.; Carstans, J.; Randall, C.; Bailey, S.; Russell, J.

    2017-09-01

    Observations by the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument on the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite have demonstrated the existence of Polar Mesospheric Cloud (PMC) regions populated by particles whose mean sizes range between 60 and 100 nm (radii of equivalent volume spheres). It is known from numerous satellite experiments that typical mean PMC particle sizes are of the order of 40-50 nm. Determination of particle size by CIPS is accomplished by measuring the scattering of solar radiation at various scattering angles at a spatial resolution of 25 km2. In this size range we find a robust anti-correlation between mean particle size and albedo. These very-large particle-low-ice (VLP-LI) clouds occur over spatially coherent areas. The surprising result is that VLP-LI are frequently present either in the troughs of gravity wave-like features or at the edges of PMC voids. We postulate that an association with gravity waves exists in the low-temperature summertime mesopause region, and illustrate the mechanism by a gravity wave simulation through use of the 2D Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA). The model results are consistent with a VLP-LI population in the cold troughs of monochromatic gravity waves. In addition, we find such events in Whole Earth Community Climate Model/CARMA simulations, suggesting the possible importance of sporadic downward winds in heating the upper cloud regions. This newly-discovered association enhances our understanding of the interaction of ice microphysics with dynamical processes in the upper mesosphere.

  3. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Prenni, A. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Mason, R. H.; Robinson, N. H.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Tobo, Y.; Després, V. R.; Garcia, E.; Gochis, D. J.; Harris, E.; Müller-Germann, I.; Ruzene, C.; Schmer, B.; Sinha, B.; Day, D. A.; Andreae, M. O.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gallagher, M.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Bertram, A. K.; Pöschl, U.

    2013-07-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties, and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a North American forest ecosystem increases significantly during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 μm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including groups containing human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to detecting known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN, and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  4. Biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during rain, and other insights (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, J. A.; Prenni, A. J.; DeMott, P. J.; Pöhlker, C.; Mason, R.; Robinson, N.; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.; Tobo, Y.; Després, V.; Gochis, D. J.; Harris, E. J.; Sinha, B.; Day, D. A.; Andreae, M. O.; Jimenez, J. L.; Gallagher, M. W.; Kreidenweis, S. M.; Bertram, A. K.; Poeschl, U.

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties, and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a North American forest ecosystem increases significantly during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN). The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2-6 μm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including groups containing human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteraceae, Pseudomonadaceae). In addition to detecting known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides), we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum). Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN, and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  5. High concentrations of biological aerosol particles and ice nuclei during and after rain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Huffman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bioaerosols are relevant for public health and may play an important role in the climate system, but their atmospheric abundance, properties, and sources are not well understood. Here we show that the concentration of airborne biological particles in a North American forest ecosystem increases significantly during rain and that bioparticles are closely correlated with atmospheric ice nuclei (IN. The greatest increase of bioparticles and IN occurred in the size range of 2–6 μm, which is characteristic for bacterial aggregates and fungal spores. By DNA analysis we found high diversities of airborne bacteria and fungi, including groups containing human and plant pathogens (mildew, smut and rust fungi, molds, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonadaceae. In addition to detecting known bacterial and fungal IN (Pseudomonas sp., Fusarium sporotrichioides, we discovered two species of IN-active fungi that were not previously known as biological ice nucleators (Isaria farinosa and Acremonium implicatum. Our findings suggest that atmospheric bioaerosols, IN, and rainfall are more tightly coupled than previously assumed.

  6. The Melting of Spherical Ice Particles Falling at Terminal Velocity in Air: AN Experimental and Theoretical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Roy Martin

    This study utilized the UCLA cloud physics wind tunnel and the IBM 3033 computer. The wind tunnel experiments were conducted using two separate procedures, depending on the size of the spherical particle. Particles less than 1 mm diameter, were melted in free fall while experiencing a time varying environmental temperature, similar to the variation of temperature it would encounter while freely falling in the atmosphere. Particles larger than 1 mm diameter have a tendency to wander towards the tunnel walls, requiring restraint by a thin nylon fiber frozen halfway through the particle. Using this fiber, the particle was suspended from above. Although attached to a thread, the particle's terminal velocity was constantly maintained during melting by keeping the fiber slack. Particles less than 1 mm diameter usually undergo "sailing" motions upon melting due to the melting of surface protuberances. Once the protuberances are melted, the particle falls with no horizontal drift. The melting ice core was observed to remain tangent with the downstream end of the particle, resulting in an eccentric melting location. The meltwater itself was also observed to circulate due to the external shear of the air on the meltwater surface. For these small particles, no meltwater was shed. Particles larger than 9 mm diameter were found to shed meltwater, with the fraction shed increasing with particle size. Particles between 9 mm and 5 mm diameter did not shed their meltwater, and did not develop an internal circulation. Particles between 1 mm and 5 mm, however, did develop a significant internal circulation, resulting in a conically shaped ice core. For each of the above size ranges, melting theories are developed which are able to quantitatively describe the melting rates of these particles.

  7. Studies of propane flame soot acting as heterogeneous ice nuclei in conjunction with single particle soot photometer measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Crawford

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice nucleation efficiency of propane flame soot particles with and without a sulphuric acid coating was investigated using the aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere. The test soot for cloud formation simulations was produced using a propane flame Combustion Aerosol Standard generator (CAST, Jing-CAST Technologies. The organic carbon content (OC of the test soot was altered in a reproducible fashion by changing the fuel/air mixture of the generator. The soot content of ice nuclei was subsequently investigated using a combination of a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI to separate and evaporate the ice crystals, and a DMT single particle soot photometer (SP2 to examine the mixing state of the BC containing ice residuals.

    Ice nucleation was found to be most efficient for uncoated soot of low organic carbon content (~5 % organic carbon content where deposition freezing occurred at an ice saturation ratio Sice ~ 1.22 at a temperature T = 226.6 K with 25 % of the test soot becoming active as ice nuclei. Propane flame soot of higher organic carbon content (~30 % and ~70 % organic carbon content showed significantly lower ice nucleation efficiency (an activated fraction of the order of a few percent in the experiments than the low organic carbon content soot, with water saturation being required for freezing to occur. Ice nucleation occurred over the range Sice = 1.22–1.70, and T = 223.2–226.6 K. Analysis of the SP2 data showed that the 5 % organic carbon content soot had an undetectable OC coating whereas the 30 % organic carbon content soot had a thicker or less volatile OC coating.

    The application of a sulphuric acid coating to the flame soot shifted the threshold of the onset of freezing towards that of the homogeneous freezing of sulphuric acid; for the minimum OC flame soot this inhibited nucleation since the

  8. Contrail ice particle formation in the wakes of airliners - insights from in-situ measurements and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Ulrich; Jeßberger, Philipp; Voigt, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    The role of soot and volatile aerosol in controlling ice particle formation in cirrus clouds is of global importance for climate. In particular, contrail studies may help to better understand the role of various aerosols in ice formation. Recent results suggest that contrails may contribute a large share to the climate impact of aviation. Hence, better knowledge on contrails is needed for developing a sustainable air transport system. So far, contrail models either specify the initial number of ice particles per flight distance or assume that the initial number of ice particles is determined by the number of soot particles emitted. Previous measurements were unable to decide conclusively whether the number of ice particles is directly related to the number of soot particles. Also information on the relative distribution of the mean ice particle concentration in the primary and secondary wakes is missing. Here, we analyze particle concentrations and trace gas mixing ratios, their dilution and their correlations in 2 min old contrails from four airliners of types A319, A340, B737, and A380 under similar meteorological conditions. The measurements were performed with the research aircraft Falcon above northern Germany during the CONCERT campaign in November 2008. The instrumentation and observation methods were described before (Voigt et al., 2010). The number of ice particles in contrails of the four airliners at cruise is determined from the measurements and a dilution model, and compared with estimated soot emissions. Dilution is derived from measured concentrations of NO, NOy, SO2 and HONO. The trace gas concentrations are largest in the primary wake and decrease with altitude in the secondary wake, consistent with emissions and aircraft-dependent dilution. In contrast, ice particle concentrations are slightly larger in the secondary wake than in the primary wake, and significantly larger than expected from dilution and emissions. The total particle concentration

  9. Ice nucleating particles over the Eastern Mediterranean measured at ground and by unmanned aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Daniel; Schrod, Jann; Drücke, Jaqueline; Keleshis, Christos; Pikridas, Michael; Ebert, Martin; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Nickovic, Slobodan; Baars, Holger; Marinou, Eleni; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Sciare, Jean; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Curtius, Joachim; Bingemer, Heinz G.

    2017-04-01

    During the intensive INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS field campaign focusing on aerosols, clouds and ice nucleation in the Eastern Mediterranean in April 2016, we have measured the abundance of ice nucleating particles (INP) in the lower troposphere both with unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) as well as from the ground. Aerosol samples were collected by miniaturized electrostatic precipitators onboard the UAS and were analyzed immediately after collection on site in the ice nucleus counter FRIDGE for INP active at -20˚ C to -30˚ C in the deposition/condensation mode (INPD). Immersion freezing INP (INPI) were sampled on membrane filters and were analysed in aqueous extracts by the drop freezing method on the cold stage of FRIDGE. Ground samples were collected at the Cyprus Atmospheric Observatory (CAO) in Agia Marina Xyliatou (Latitude; 35˚ 2' 8" N; Longitude: 33˚ 3' 26" E; Altitude: 532 m a.s.l.). During the one-month campaign, we encountered a series of Saharan dust plumes that traveled at several kilometers altitude. Here we present INP data from 42 individual flights, together with OPC aerosol number concentrations, backscatter and depolarization retrievals from the Polly-XT Raman Lidar, dust concentrations derived by the dust transport model DREAM (Dust Regional Atmospheric Model), and results from scanning electron microscopy. The effect of the dust plumes is reflected by the coincidence of INP with the particulate mass (PM), the Lidar retrievals and the predicted dust mass of the model. This suggests that mineral dust or a constituent related to dust was a major contributor to the ice nucleating properties of the aerosol. Peak concentrations of above 100 INP std.l-1 were measured at -30˚ C. The INPD concentration in elevated plumes was on average a factor of 10 higher than at ground level. The INPI concentration at ground also agreed with PM levels and exceeded the ground-based INPD concentration by more than one order of magnitude. Since desert dust is transported

  10. Adsorption and reactions of atmospheric constituents and pollutants on ice particles: an FTIR study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudakova, A. V.; Marinov, I. L.; Poretskiy, M. S.; Tsyganenko, A. A.

    2009-04-01

    Processes on icy particles attract much attention due to their importance for atmospheric science, ecology and astrophysics. In this work, adsorption and ecologically important reactions of some molecules on pure and mixed water icy films by means of FTIR spectroscopy have been investigated. The cell for spectral studies of adsorbed molecules at variable temperatures (55-370 K), described elsewhere1, enables one to run the spectra in the presence of gaseous adsorbate, and even to perform adsorption from the solution in some cryogenic solvents. For the studies of ice films, it was equipped with a device for water vapour sputtering from the heated capillaries and deposition onto the inner BaF2 or ZnSe windows of the cell, cooled by liquid nitrogen. Lower temperatures were obtained by pumping off evaporating nitrogen from the coolant volume. The estimated specific surface area of freshly deposited at 77 K water ice film was about 160 m2/g and decreases on raising the temperature together with the diminishing intensity of the bands of dangling OH (OD) groups at 3696 (2727) cm-1 until the latter disappear at 130 - 160 K when the changes of bulk absorption provide evidence for a phase transition from amorphous to polycrystalline ice. CO adsorption at 77 K results in two bands at 2153 and 2137 cm-1 assigned to molecules forming weak H-bond with the dangling hydroxyl groups and bound to unsaturated surface oxygen atoms, respectively2. The band of dangling hydroxyl groups moves to lower wavenumbers on adsorption of different molecules (hydrogen, nitrogen, methane, ozone, NO, ethane or chlorinated ethenes, etc.). The shift value depends on the nature of adsorbate. Besides this shift, spectra of adsorbed nitrogen and methane registered at 55 K reveal the adsorption intensity decrease at ~ 2650 cm-1 at the high-frequency slope of bulk adsorption, and increase at about 25 cm-1 below. We interpret this perturbation as a strengthening of H-bonds between surface water molecules

  11. Single particle analysis of ice crystal residuals observed in orographic wave clouds over Scandinavia during INTACC experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Targino

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Individual ice crystal residual particles collected over Scandinavia during the INTACC (INTeraction of Aerosol and Cold Clouds experiment in October 1999 were analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM equipped with Energy-Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX. Samples were collected onboard the British Met Office Hercules C-130 aircraft using a Counterflow Virtual Impactor (CVI. This study is based on six samples collected in orographic clouds. The main aim of this study is to characterize cloud residual elemental composition in conditions affected by different airmasses. In total 609 particles larger than 0.1 μm diameter were analyzed and their elemental composition and morphology were determined. Thereafter a hierarchical cluster analysis was performed on the signal detected with SEM-EDX in order to identify the major particle classes and their abundance. A cluster containing mineral dust, represented by aluminosilicates, Fe-rich and Si-rich particles, was the dominating class of particles, accounting for about 57.5% of the particles analyzed, followed by low-Z particles, 23.3% (presumably organic material and sea salt (6.7%. Sulfur was detected often across all groups, indicating ageing and in-cloud processing of particles. A detailed inspection of samples individually unveiled a relationship between ice crystal residual composition and airmass origin. Cloud residual samples from clean airmasses (that is, trajectories confined to the Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and/or with source altitude in the free troposphere were dominated primarily by low-Z and sea salt particles, while continentally-influenced airmasses (with trajectories that originated or traveled over continental areas and with source altitude in the continental boundary layer contained mainly mineral dust residuals. Comparison of residual composition for similar cloud ambient temperatures around –27°C revealed that supercooled clouds are more likely to persist in conditions where

  12. Microgram level radiocarbon (14C) determination on carbonaceous particles in ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenk, Theo Manuel; Szidat, S.; Schwikowski, M.

    2007-01-01

    Accelerator mass spectrometry; Organic carbon; Elemental carbon; Radiocarbon dating; Ice cores; Paleo-record Udgivelsesdato: June......Accelerator mass spectrometry; Organic carbon; Elemental carbon; Radiocarbon dating; Ice cores; Paleo-record Udgivelsesdato: June...

  13. Ice-nucleating particles in Canadian Arctic sea-surface microlayer and bulk seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Victoria E.; Elizondo, Pablo; Chen, Jessie; Chou, Cédric; Charette, Joannie; Lizotte, Martine; Ladino, Luis A.; Wilson, Theodore W.; Gosselin, Michel; Murray, Benjamin J.; Polishchuk, Elena; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Miller, Lisa A.; Bertram, Allan K.

    2017-09-01

    The sea-surface microlayer and bulk seawater can contain ice-nucleating particles (INPs) and these INPs can be emitted into the atmosphere. Our current understanding of the properties, concentrations, and spatial and temporal distributions of INPs in the microlayer and bulk seawater is limited. In this study we investigate the concentrations and properties of INPs in microlayer and bulk seawater samples collected in the Canadian Arctic during the summer of 2014. INPs were ubiquitous in the microlayer and bulk seawater with freezing temperatures in the immersion mode as high as -14 °C. A strong negative correlation (R = -0. 7, p = 0. 02) was observed between salinity and freezing temperatures (after correction for freezing depression by the salts). One possible explanation is that INPs were associated with melting sea ice. Heat and filtration treatments of the samples show that the INPs were likely heat-labile biological materials with sizes between 0.02 and 0.2 µm in diameter, consistent with previous measurements off the coast of North America and near Greenland in the Arctic. The concentrations of INPs in the microlayer and bulk seawater were consistent with previous measurements at several other locations off the coast of North America. However, our average microlayer concentration was lower than previous observations made near Greenland in the Arctic. This difference could not be explained by chlorophyll a concentrations derived from satellite measurements. In addition, previous studies found significant INP enrichment in the microlayer, relative to bulk seawater, which we did not observe in this study. While further studies are needed to understand these differences, we confirm that there is a source of INP in the microlayer and bulk seawater in the Canadian Arctic that may be important for atmospheric INP concentrations.

  14. Ice-nucleating particles in Canadian Arctic sea-surface microlayer and bulk seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. E. Irish

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The sea-surface microlayer and bulk seawater can contain ice-nucleating particles (INPs and these INPs can be emitted into the atmosphere. Our current understanding of the properties, concentrations, and spatial and temporal distributions of INPs in the microlayer and bulk seawater is limited. In this study we investigate the concentrations and properties of INPs in microlayer and bulk seawater samples collected in the Canadian Arctic during the summer of 2014. INPs were ubiquitous in the microlayer and bulk seawater with freezing temperatures in the immersion mode as high as −14 °C. A strong negative correlation (R = −0. 7, p = 0. 02 was observed between salinity and freezing temperatures (after correction for freezing depression by the salts. One possible explanation is that INPs were associated with melting sea ice. Heat and filtration treatments of the samples show that the INPs were likely heat-labile biological materials with sizes between 0.02 and 0.2 µm in diameter, consistent with previous measurements off the coast of North America and near Greenland in the Arctic. The concentrations of INPs in the microlayer and bulk seawater were consistent with previous measurements at several other locations off the coast of North America. However, our average microlayer concentration was lower than previous observations made near Greenland in the Arctic. This difference could not be explained by chlorophyll a concentrations derived from satellite measurements. In addition, previous studies found significant INP enrichment in the microlayer, relative to bulk seawater, which we did not observe in this study. While further studies are needed to understand these differences, we confirm that there is a source of INP in the microlayer and bulk seawater in the Canadian Arctic that may be important for atmospheric INP concentrations.

  15. Automation and heat transfer characterization of immersion mode spectroscopy for analysis of ice nucleating particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Charlotte M.; Stokes, M. Dale; Hill, Thomas C.; DeMott, Paul J.; DeWald, Jesse T.; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2017-07-01

    Ice nucleating particles (INPs) influence cloud properties and can affect the overall precipitation efficiency. Developing a parameterization of INPs in global climate models has proven challenging. More INP measurements - including studies of their spatial distribution, sources and sinks, and fundamental freezing mechanisms - must be conducted in order to further improve INP parameterizations. In this paper, an immersion mode INP measurement technique is modified and automated using a software-controlled, real-time image stream designed to leverage optical changes of water droplets to detect freezing events. For the first time, heat transfer properties of the INP measurement technique are characterized using a finite-element-analysis-based heat transfer simulation to improve accuracy of INP freezing temperature measurement. The heat transfer simulation is proposed as a tool that could be used to explain the sources of bias in temperature measurements in INP measurement techniques and ultimately explain the observed discrepancies in measured INP freezing temperatures between different instruments. The simulation results show that a difference of +8.4 °C between the well base temperature and the headspace gas results in an up to 0.6 °C stratification of the aliquot, whereas a difference of +4.2 °C or less results in a thermally homogenous water volume within the error of the thermal probe, ±0.2 °C. The results also show that there is a strong temperature gradient in the immediate vicinity of the aliquot, such that without careful placement of temperature probes, or characterization of heat transfer properties of the water and cooling environment, INP measurements can be biased toward colder temperatures. Based on a modified immersion mode technique, the Automated Ice Spectrometer (AIS), measurements of the standard test dust illite NX are reported and compared against six other immersion mode droplet assay techniques featured in Hiranuma et al. (2015) that used

  16. Thin ice clouds in the Arctic: cloud optical depth and particle size retrieved from ground-based thermal infrared radiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Blanchard

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multiband downwelling thermal measurements of zenith sky radiance, along with cloud boundary heights, were used in a retrieval algorithm to estimate cloud optical depth and effective particle diameter of thin ice clouds in the Canadian High Arctic. Ground-based thermal infrared (IR radiances for 150 semitransparent ice clouds cases were acquired at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory (PEARL in Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80° N, 86° W. We analyzed and quantified the sensitivity of downwelling thermal radiance to several cloud parameters including optical depth, effective particle diameter and shape, water vapor content, cloud geometric thickness and cloud base altitude. A lookup table retrieval method was used to successfully extract, through an optimal estimation method, cloud optical depth up to a maximum value of 2.6 and to separate thin ice clouds into two classes: (1 TIC1 clouds characterized by small crystals (effective particle diameter  ≤  30 µm, and (2 TIC2 clouds characterized by large ice crystals (effective particle diameter  >  30 µm. The retrieval technique was validated using data from the Arctic High Spectral Resolution Lidar (AHSRL and Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR. Inversions were performed over three polar winters and results showed a significant correlation (R2 =  0.95 for cloud optical depth retrievals and an overall accuracy of 83 % for the classification of TIC1 and TIC2 clouds. A partial validation relative to an algorithm based on high spectral resolution downwelling IR radiance measurements between 8 and 21 µm was also performed. It confirms the robustness of the optical depth retrieval and the fact that the broadband thermal radiometer retrieval was sensitive to small particle (TIC1 sizes.

  17. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMullan, G., E-mail: gm2@mrc-lmb.cam.ac.uk; Vinothkumar, K.R.; Henderson, R.

    2015-11-15

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å{sup 2} for every incident 300 keV e{sup −}/Å{sup 2}. The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e{sup −}/Å{sup 2} per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination. - Highlights: • Thon rings can be seen from amorphous ice. • Radiation damage to amorphous ice randomly displaces water molecules. • Each incident 300 keV e{sup −}/Å{sup 2} displaces water molecules on average by ∼1 Å. • Macromolecules embedded in amorphous ice undergo beam induced Brownian motion.

  18. Modelling the reversible uptake of chemical species in the gas phase by ice particles formed in a convective cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Marécal

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is a preliminary study preparing the introduction of reversible trace gas uptake by ice particles into a 3-D cloud resolving model. For this a 3-D simulation of a tropical deep convection cloud was run with the BRAMS cloud resolving model using a two-moment bulk microphysical parameterization. Trajectories within the convective clouds were computed from these simulation outputs along which the variations of the pristine ice, snow and aggregate mixing ratios and concentrations were extracted. The reversible uptake of 11 trace gases by ice was examined assuming applicability of Langmuir isotherms using recently evaluated (IUPAC laboratory data. The results show that ice uptake is only significant for HNO3, HCl, CH3COOH and HCOOH. For H2O2, using new results for the partition coefficient results in significant partitioning to the ice phase for this trace gas also. It was also shown that the uptake is largely dependent on the temperature for some species. The adsorption saturation at the ice surface for large gas mixing ratios is generally not a limiting factor except for HNO3 and HCl for gas mixing ratio greater than 1 ppbv. For HNO3, results were also obtained using a trapping theory, resulting in a similar order of magnitude of uptake, although the two approaches are based on different assumptions. The results were compared to those obtained using a BRAMS cloud simulation based on a single-moment microphysical scheme instead of the two moment scheme. We found similar results with a slightly more important uptake when using the single-moment scheme which is related to slightly higher ice mixing ratios in this simulation. The way to introduce these results in the 3-D cloud model is discussed.

  19. Chemical composition of ambient aerosol, ice residues and cloud droplet residues in mixed-phase clouds: single particle analysis during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kamphus

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Two different single particle mass spectrometers were operated in parallel at the Swiss High Alpine Research Station Jungfraujoch (JFJ, 3580 m a.s.l. during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 6 in February and March 2007. During mixed phase cloud events ice crystals from 5–20 μm were separated from larger ice aggregates, non-activated, interstitial aerosol particles and supercooled droplets using an Ice-Counterflow Virtual Impactor (Ice-CVI. During one cloud period supercooled droplets were additionally sampled and analyzed by changing the Ice-CVI setup. The small ice particles and droplets were evaporated by injection into dry air inside the Ice-CVI. The resulting ice and droplet residues (IR and DR were analyzed for size and composition by the two single particle mass spectrometers: a custom-built Single Particle Laser-Ablation Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT and a commercial Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS, TSI Model 3800. During CLACE 6 the SPLAT instrument characterized 355 individual IR that produced a mass spectrum for at least one polarity and the ATOFMS measured 152 IR. The mass spectra were binned in classes, based on the combination of dominating substances, such as mineral dust, sulfate, potassium and elemental carbon or organic material. The derived chemical information from the ice residues is compared to the JFJ ambient aerosol that was sampled while the measurement station was out of clouds (several thousand particles analyzed by SPLAT and ATOFMS and to the composition of the residues of supercooled cloud droplets (SPLAT: 162 cloud droplet residues analyzed, ATOFMS: 1094. The measurements showed that mineral dust was strongly enhanced in the ice particle residues. Close to all of the SPLAT spectra from ice residues did contain signatures from mineral compounds, albeit connected with varying amounts of soluble compounds. Similarly, close to all of the ATOFMS IR spectra show a

  20. Characterization of individual ice residual particles by the single droplet freezing method: a case study in the Asian dust outflow region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Iwata

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to better characterize ice nucleating (IN aerosol particles in the atmosphere, we investigated the chemical composition, mixing state, and morphology of atmospheric aerosols that nucleate ice under conditions relevant for mixed-phase clouds. Five standard mineral dust samples (quartz, K-feldspar, Na-feldspar, Arizona test dust, and Asian dust source particles were compared with actual aerosol particles collected from the west coast of Japan (the city of Kanazawa during Asian dust events in February and April 2016. Following droplet activation by particles deposited on a hydrophobic Si (silicon wafer substrate under supersaturated air, individual IN particles were located using an optical microscope by gradually cooling the temperature to −30 °C. For the aerosol samples, both the IN active particles and non-active particles were analyzed individually by atomic force microscopy (AFM, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX. Heterogeneous ice nucleation in all standard mineral dust samples tested in this study was observed at consistently higher temperatures (e.g., −22.2 to −24.2 °C with K-feldspar than the homogeneous freezing temperature (−36.5 °C. Meanwhile, most of the IN active atmospheric particles formed ice below −28 °C, i.e., at lower temperatures than the standard mineral dust samples of pure components. The most abundant IN active particles above −30 °C were predominantly irregular solid particles that showed clay mineral characteristics (or mixtures of several mineral components. Other than clay, Ca-rich particles internally mixed with other components, such as sulfate, were also regarded as IN active particle types. Moreover, sea salt particles were predominantly found in the non-active fraction, and internal mixing with sea salt clearly acted as a significant inhibiting agent for the ice nucleation activity of mineral

  1. Dust optical properties in antarctic ice cores: application of the Single Particle Extinction and Scattering (SPES) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Marco; Villa, Stefano; Sanvito, Tiziano; Albani, Samuel; Delmonte, Barbara; Maggi, Valter

    2015-04-01

    From the point of view of light scattering each particle is characterized by several parameters, the size being by far the most important in determining the amount of radiated power. Nevertheless, composition, internal structure, shape do slightly affect the way light is scattered, and in turn also prevent the possibility to extract the correct size. Recovering the whole information is of paramount difficulty, if not impossibile for single particles. A trade off can be obtained by introducing the optical thickness, i.e. the product of the size and the refractive index, which determines the optical properties. Here we focus at studying the optical thickness of dust particles from the EPICA Dome C ice core. We provide for the first time a direct measurement of dust optical parameters that is the most direct information needed by climate models, and highlight important differences among samples. The SPES method is named after its capability to access both the extinction cross section and the forward scattered field amplitude for each particle. This method is well working with extremely dilute suspensions, such as Antarctic ice core samples. The SPES method is based upon combined and simultaneous measurements of the power reduction of a laser beam in presence of the particle (extinction by definition) and the interference between the intense transmitted beam and the much fainter forward scattered wave (scattering). In such a way it is possible to access both the amplitude and phase of the scattered wave, which means both the real and imaginary parts of the complex field amplitude. This makes the difference with traditional approaches. We show some preliminary results from glacial and interglacial samples from the EPICA ice core and suggest a method to extract information which is important for the light scattering properties of the ensemble of dust particles contained in each sample.

  2. The rate of water vapor evaporation from ice substrates in the presence of HCl and HBr: implications for the lifetime of atmospheric ice particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Delval

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a multidiagnostic approach the rate Rev [ molec cm-3 s-1] or flux Jev [ molec cm-2 s-1] of evaporation of H2O and its corresponding rate constant for condensation, kcond [s-1 ], on a 1 µm thick ice film have been studied in the temperature range 190 to 240 K as well as in the presence of small amounts of HCl and HBr that left the vapor pressure of H2O on ice unchanged. The resulting Arrhenius expressions for pure ice are Jev = 1.6 · 10 28 ± 1 · exp  (- 10.3 ± 1.2/ RT  [ molec cm-2 s-1] , kcond = 1.7 · 10 - 2 ± 1 · exp  (+ 1.6 ± 1.5/ RT [s -1], in the presence of a HCl mole fraction in the range 3.2 · 10 - 5 - 6.4 · 10 - 3 : Jev = 6.4 · 10 26 ± 1 · exp  (- 9.7 ± 1.2/ RT  [ molec cm-2 s-1] , kcond = 2.8 · 10 - 2 ± 1 · exp ( + 1.5 ± 1.6 /RT  [s -1], and a HBr mole fraction smaller than 6.4 · 10 - 3 : Jev = 7.4 · 10 25 ± 1 · exp ( - 9.1 ± 1.2 /RT  [ molec cm-2 s-1] , kcond = 7.1 · 10 - 5 ± 1 · exp (+ 2.6 ± 1.5/ RT [s -1]. The small negative activation energy for H2O condensation on ice points to a precursor mechanism. The corresponding enthalpy of sublimation is DHsubl = Eev - Econd = 11.9 ± 2.7 kcal mol-1 , DHsubl = 11.2 ± 2.8 kcal mol-1, and DHsubl = 11.7 ± 2.8 kcal mol-1 whose values are identical within experimental uncertainty to the accepted literature value of 12.3 kcal mol-1 . Interferometric data at 633 nm and FTIR absorption spectra in transmission support the kinetic results. The data are consistent with a significant lifetime enhancement for HCl- and HBr-contaminated ice particles by a factor of 3–6 and 10–20, respectively, for submonolayer coverages of HX once the fraction of the ice not contaminated by HX has evaporated.

  3. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Cloud particles containing ammonia and water ices indicate a deep convective origin. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Baines, K. H.; Fry, P.

    2013-12-01

    Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 was first detected by amateur astronomers in early December 2010 and later found in Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) images taken on 5 December, when it took the form of a 1000 km wide bright spot. Within a week the head of the storm grew by a factor of ten in width and within a few months created a wake that encircled the planet. This is the sixth Great Saturn Storm in recorded history, all having appeared in the northern hemisphere, and most near northern summer solstice at intervals of roughly 30 years (Sanchez-Lavega et al. 1991, Nature 353, 397-401). That the most recent storm appeared 10 years early proved fortunate because Cassini was still operating in orbit around Saturn and was able to provide unique observations from which we could learn much more about these rare and enormous events. Besides the dramatic dynamical effects displayed at the visible cloud level by high-resolution imaging observations (Sayanagi et al. 2013, Icarus 223, 460-478), dramatic thermal changes also occurred in the stratosphere above the storm (Fletcher et al. 2011, Science 332, 1413), and radio measurements of lightning (Fischer et al., 2011, Nature 475, 75-77) indicated strong convective activity at deeper levels. Numerical models of Saturn's Giant storms (Hueso and Sanchez-Lavega 2004, Icarus 172, 255-271) suggest that they are fueled by water vapor condensation beginning at the 10-12 bar level, some 250 km below the visible cloud tops. That idea is also supported by our detection of water ice near the cloud tops (Sromovsky et al. 2013, Icarus 226, 402-418). From Cassini VIMS spectral imaging taken in February 2011, we learned that the storm's cloud particles are strong absorbers of sunlight at wavelengths from 2.8 to 3.1 microns. Such absorption is not seen on Saturn outside of storm regions, implying a different kind of cloud formation process as well as different cloud composition inside the storm region. We found compelling evidence

  4. Rainfall drives atmospheric ice-nucleating particles in the coastal climate of southern Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Conen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice-nucleating particles (INPs active at modest supercooling (e.g. −8 °C; INP−8 can transform clouds from liquid to mixed phase, even at very small number concentrations (< 10 m−3. Over the course of 15 months, we found very similar patterns in weekly concentrations of INP−8 in PM10 (median  =  1.7 m−3, maximum  =  10.1 m−3 and weekly amounts of rainfall (median  =  28 mm, maximum  =  153 mm at Birkenes, southern Norway. Most INP−8 were probably aerosolised locally by the impact of raindrops on plant, litter and soil surfaces. Major snowfall and heavy rain onto snow-covered ground were not mirrored by enhanced numbers of INP−8. Further, transport model calculations for large (> 4 m−3 and small (< 4 m−3 numbers of INP−8 revealed that potential source regions likely to provide precipitation to southern Norway were associated with large numbers of INP−8. The proportion of land cover and land use type in potential source regions was similar for large and small numbers of INP−8. In PM2. 5 we found consistently about half as many INP−8 as in PM10. From mid-May to mid-September, INP−8 correlated positively with the fungal spore markers arabitol and mannitol, suggesting that some fraction of INP−8 during that period may consist of fungal spores. In the future, warmer winters with more rain instead of snow may enhance airborne concentrations of INP−8 during the cold season in southern Norway and in other regions with a similar climate.

  5. Structure of the first PDZ domain of human PSD-93

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiorentini, Monica; Nielsen, Ann Kallehauge; Kristensen, Ole

    2009-01-01

    the PDZ1-PDZ2 linker region at the extreme C-terminus of PDZ1, implying that the oligomerization that is observed is not of biological significance in full-length PSD-93. Comparison of the structures of the binding cleft of PSD-93 PDZ1 with the previously reported structures of PSD-93 PDZ2 and PDZ3...

  6. Some upper and lower bounds on PSD-rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. J. Lee (Troy); Z. Wei (Zhaohui); R. M. de Wolf (Ronald)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractPositive semidefinite rank (PSD-rank) is a relatively new quantity with applications to combinatorial optimization and communication complexity. We first study several basic properties of PSD-rank, and then develop new techniques for showing lower bounds on the PSD-rank. All of these

  7. Some upper and lower bounds on PSD-rank

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, T.; Wei, Z.; de Wolf, R.

    Positive semidefinite rank (PSD-rank) is a relatively new complexity measure on matrices, with applications to combinatorial optimization and communication complexity. We first study several basic properties of PSD-rank, and then develop new techniques for showing lower bounds on the PSD-rank. All

  8. Bimodality and variability of particle size distributions in high Ice Water Content regions and their implications for microphysical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; McFarquhar, G. M.; Leroy, D.; Korolev, A.; Schwarzenboeck, A.; Wu, W.; Strapp, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    Aviation records since the 1990s indicate that aircraft engines are facing a threat of occasional power loss due to ice ingestion over tropical oceanic convective clouds. The typical absence of radar echoes greater than 30 dBZ during such incidents suggests the existence of large amounts of small ice particles. The industrial aviation safety concerns inspired the High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content (HAIC/HIWC) campaign, whose Phase I was conducted between January and March 2014. A 2-D Stereo (2DS) probe, Precipitation Imaging Probe (PIP) and Isokinetic Evaporator Probe were installed on the French Falcon 20 making in-situ observations off the coast of Darwin, Australia. Composite particle size distributions (PSDs) using 2DS and PIP data were derived for each 5 second period in cloud. Using an automated technique to identify multiple modes in PSDs and an Incomplete Gamma Fit technique, the intercept (N0), slope (λ) and shape parameter (μ) of each mode of a gamma distribution were determined. The variation of PSDs and fit parameters for Ice Water Contents (IWCs) > 1.5 g m-3 with cloud and environmental parameters and their differences from PSDs measured outside of high IWC conditions are summarized here. Two types of HIWC conditions were observed, according to whether the median mass diameters (MMD) were positively or negatively correlated with IWC. The principal findings about high IWC regions are as follows: 1) larger μ and N0 are found in high IWC regions while λ tends to remain unchanged; 2) PSDs are more likely to be bimodal at lower temperatures. 3) Positive MMD-IWC correlations are associated with larger μ and smaller N0; 4) Bimodal distributions are more frequent for positive MMD-IWC correlations; and 5) Positive MMD-IWC correlations are usually associated with longer-aged clouds, but there are exceptions, showing other factors affect the occurrence of frequent small particles in high IWC regions. Implications for modeling of high IWC

  9. GeV Solar Energetic Particle Observation and Search by IceTop from 2011 to 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evenson, P. A.; Muangha, P.; Ruffolo, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Only three Ground Level Enhancements (GLEs) produced by GeV solar energetic particles have been confirmed in the present solar cycle, and those have been quite small by historical standards. At the same time direct observations of high energy solar particles from spacecraft have become available. This has resulted in some discussion as to whether the definition of a GLE as an event detectable on the ground (as opposed to a statement about the spectral form of the event) is an appropriate scientific classification. The combination of instruments at the Amundsen - Scott Station at the geographic South Pole offers an opportunity to span the two worlds. Operating at high altitude and low geomagnetic cutoff the neutron monitor at Pole has nevertheless traditionally been accepted as making a "ground level" observation. An enhanced array of bare neutron detectors and IceTop (the surface component of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory) now allow spectral information to be extracted from events that are too small to use geomagnetic techniques to obtain spectra. We report our spectral measurements for the three confirmed GLEs and compare them to other available data on these events. We also present preliminary results of an ongoing study of 34 particle events selected to have significant enhancements in the > 100 MeV channel in GOES data in terms of possible detections and sensitivity limits. Supported in part by Thailand Research Fund grant RTA5980003 and US National Science Foundation awards PLR-1341562 and PHY-1505990.

  10. Thermodynamics of TMPC/PSd/Fullerene Nanocomposites: SANS Study

    KAUST Repository

    Chua, Yang-Choo

    2010-11-23

    Wereport a small angle neutron scattering study of the thermodynamics of a polymer mixture in the presence of nanoparticles, both in equilibrium and during phase separation. Neutron cloud point measurements and random phase approximation (RPA) analysis demonstrate that 1-2 mass % of C60 fullerenes destabilizes a highly interacting mixture of poly(tetramethyl bisphenol A polycarbonate) and deuterated polystyrene (TMPC/PSd). We unequivocally corroborate these findings with time-resolved temperature jump experiments that, in identical conditions, result in phase separation for the nanocomposite and stability for the neat polymer mixture. At lower C 60 loadings (viz. 0.2-0.5 mass %), stabilization of the mixture is observed. The nonmonotonic variation of the spinodal temperature with fullerene addition suggests a competitive interplay of asymmetric component interactions and nanoparticle dispersion. The stability line shift depends critically on particle dispersion and vanishes upon nanoparticle agglomeration. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  11. Micrometer-sized Water Ice Particles for Planetary Science Experiments: Influence of Surface Structure on Collisional Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gärtner, S.; Gundlach, B.; Headen, T. F.; Ratte, J.; Oesert, J.; Gorb, S. N.; Youngs, T. G. A.; Bowron, D. T.; Blum, J.; Fraser, H. J.

    2017-10-01

    Models and observations suggest that ice-particle aggregation at and beyond the snowline dominates the earliest stages of planet formation, which therefore is subject to many laboratory studies. However, the pressure-temperature gradients in protoplanetary disks mean that the ices are constantly processed, undergoing phase changes between different solid phases and the gas phase. Open questions remain as to whether the properties of the icy particles themselves dictate collision outcomes and therefore how effectively collision experiments reproduce conditions in protoplanetary environments. Previous experiments often yielded apparently contradictory results on collision outcomes, only agreeing in a temperature dependence setting in above ≈210 K. By exploiting the unique capabilities of the NIMROD neutron scattering instrument, we characterized the bulk and surface structure of icy particles used in collision experiments, and studied how these structures alter as a function of temperature at a constant pressure of around 30 mbar. Our icy grains, formed under liquid nitrogen, undergo changes in the crystalline ice-phase, sublimation, sintering and surface pre-melting as they are heated from 103 to 247 K. An increase in the thickness of the diffuse surface layer from ≈10 to ≈30 Å (≈2.5 to 12 bilayers) proves increased molecular mobility at temperatures above ≈210 K. Because none of the other changes tie-in with the temperature trends in collisional outcomes, we conclude that the surface pre-melting phenomenon plays a key role in collision experiments at these temperatures. Consequently, the pressure-temperature environment, may have a larger influence on collision outcomes than previously thought.

  12. Tank Farm WM-182 and WM 183 Heel Slurry Samples PSD Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas

    2000-09-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) analysis of INTEC Tank Farm WM-182 and WM-183 heel slurry samples were performed using a modified Horiba LA-300 PSD analyzer at the RAL facility. There were two types of testing performed: typical PSD analysis, and setting rate testing. Although the heel slurry samples were obtained from two separate vessels, the particle size distribution results were quite similar. The slurry solids were from approximately a minimum particle size of 0.5 mm to a maximum of 230 mm-with about 90% of the material between 2-to-133 mm, and the cumulative 50% value at approximately 20 mm. This testing also revealed that high frequency sonication with an ultrasonic element may break-up larger particles in the WM-182 and WM-183 tank from heel slurries. This finding represents useful information regarding ultimate tank heel waste processing. Settling rate testing results were also fairly consistent with material from both vessels in that it appears that most of the mass of solids settle to an agglomerated, yet easily redispersed layer at the bottom. A dispersed and suspended material remained in the "clear" layer above the settled layer after about one-half an hour of settling time. This material had a statistical mode of approximately 5 mm and a maximum particle size of 30 mm.

  13. PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars: Ice particles and their effect on ambient electron densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Rapp, Markus

    2013-11-01

    It is now well understood that the occurrence of PMSE is closely connected to the presence of ice particles. These ice particles modify the ambient electron density by electron attachment which occasionally leads to large electron density depletions which have also been called ‘biteouts’. There has been some debate in the literature regarding the relative depth of such depletions which is usually expressed by the parameter Λ=|ZA|NA/ne. Here, |ZA|NA is the charge number density of ice particles and ne is the electron density. In this paper, we present, for the first time, the statistical distribution of Λ using measurements with the EISCAT VHF- and UHF-radars. Based on 25 h of simultaneous observations, we derived a total of 757 Λ values based on 15 min of data each. In each of these cases, PMSE were observed with the EISCAT VHF-radar but not with the UHF-radar and the UHF-measurement were hence used to determine the electron density profile. From these 757 cases, there are 699 cases with Λ⪡1, and only 33 cases with Λ>0.5 (21 cases with Λ>1). A correlation analysis of Λ versus PMSE volume reflectivities further reveals that there is no strong dependence between the two parameters. This is in accordance with current PMSE-theory based on turbulence in combination with a large Schmidt-number. The maxima of Λ from each profile show a negative relationship with the undisturbed electron densities deduced at the same altitudes. This reveals that the variability of Λ mainly depends on the variability of the electron densities. In addition, variations of aerosol number densities may also play a role. Although part of the observations were conducted during the HF heating experiments, the so-called overshoot effects did not significantly bias our statistical results. In order to avoid missing biteouts because of a superposition of coherent and incoherent scatter in the UHF-data, we finally calculated spectral parameters n by applying a simple fit to auto

  14. What does it mean to be pseudo single domain? Demystifying the PSD state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascu, I.; Harrison, R. J.; Einsle, J. F.; Ball, M.

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, non-interacting stable single domain grains were thought to be the sole reliable paleomagnetic recorders. However most natural samples contain so-called "non-ideal" paleomagnetic recorders, which are either interacting single domain particles, or magnetic grains larger than single domain grains, but smaller than proper multi domain grains, which are poor paleomagnetic recorders. The grain size range for these recorders, which for magnetite comprises grains from 100 nm to a few μm in size, is known as the pseudo single domain (PSD) state. Natural samples containing abundant PSD grains have been shown time and again to reliably record thermomagnetic remanent magnetizations that are stable over billions of years. Here we attempt to shed new light on the PSD state by investigating obsidian varieties found at Glass Butte, Oregon, which present the opportunity to study simple cases of magnetic grains encapsulated in volcanic glass. We do this by combining rock magnetism, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) nanotomography, and finite-element micromagnetic modeling. Using rock magnetism we have identified PSD signatures in these samples via their fingerprint in first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagrams. Tomographic reconstructions obtained by stacking SEM images acquired via sequential milling through sample volumes of a few tens of cubic μm reveal the presence of abundant grains that span the PSD grain size interval. These grains have a variety of shapes, from simple ellipsoidal particles, to more complex morphologies attained through the coalescence of neighboring grains during crystallization, to intricate "rolling snowball" morphologies in larger grains that contain appendices formed as a result of particle growth in a dynamic environment as the flowing lava cooled. Micromagnetic modeling of the simplest morphologies reveals that these grains are in single vortex states, with the remanence controlled by irregularities in grain morphology. Coalesced

  15. Measurements and modelling of snow particle size and shortwave infrared albedo over a melting Antarctic ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirazzini, R.; Räisänen, P.; Vihma, T.; Johansson, M.; Tastula, E.-M.

    2015-12-01

    The albedo of a snowpack depends on the single-scattering properties of individual snow crystals, which have a variety of shapes and sizes, and are often bounded in clusters. From the point of view of optical modelling, it is essential to identify the geometric dimensions of the population of snow particles that synthesize the scattering properties of the snowpack surface. This involves challenges related to the complexity of modelling the radiative transfer in such an irregular medium, and to the difficulty of measuring microphysical snow properties. In this paper, we illustrate a method to measure the size distribution of a snow particle parameter, which roughly corresponds to the smallest snow particle dimension, from two-dimensional macro photos of snow particles taken in Antarctica at the surface layer of a melting ice sheet. We demonstrate that this snow particle metric corresponds well to the optically equivalent effective radius utilized in radiative transfer modelling, in particular when snow particles are modelled with the droxtal shape. The surface albedo modelled on the basis of the measured snow particle metric showed an excellent match with the observed albedo when there was fresh or drifted snow at the surface. In the other cases, a good match was present only for wavelengths longer than 1.4 μm. For shorter wavelengths, our modelled albedo generally overestimated the observations, in particular when surface hoar and faceted polycrystals were present at the surface and surface roughness was increased by millimetre-scale cavities generated during melting. Our results indicate that more than just one particle metric distribution is needed to characterize the snow scattering properties at all optical wavelengths, and suggest an impact of millimetre-scale surface roughness on the shortwave infrared albedo.

  16. Eulerian Method for Ice Crystal Icing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norde, Ellen; van der Weide, Edwin Theodorus Antonius; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie

    In this study, an ice accretion method aimed at ice crystal icing in turbofan engines is developed and demonstrated for glaciated as well as mixed-phase icing conditions. The particle trajectories are computed by an Eulerian trajectory method. The effects of heat transfer and phase change on the

  17. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Modelling of Non-Spherical Particle Evolution for Ice Crystals Simulation with an Eulerian Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iuliano, E.; Montreuil, E.; Norde, Ellen; van der Weide, Edwin Theodorus Antonius; Hoeijmakers, Hendrik Willem Marie

    2015-01-01

    In this study a comparison is made between results from three Eulerian-based computational methods that predict the ice crystal trajectories and impingement on a NACA-0012 airfoil. The computational methods are being developed within CIRA (Imp2D/3D), ONERA (CEDRE/Spiree) and University of Twente

  19. Multiyear observations of deposition-mode ice nucleating particles at two high-altitude stations in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Sandeep D.; Nagare, Baban; More, Sanjay D.; Kumar, P. Pradeep

    2017-12-01

    Ice nucleating particle (INP) measurements were made at two high-altitude stations in India. Aerosols collected on filter paper at Girawali Observatory, Inter University Center for Astronomy & Astrophysics (IGO), and at the Radio Astronomy Center, Ooty (RAC), were activated in deposition mode using a thermal gradient diffusion chamber to determine the INP concentrations. The measurement campaigns at IGO were conducted during 2011, 2013 and 2014, and at RAC during 2013 and 2014. When the aerosol samples were exposed to an ice supersaturation of between 5% and 23% in the temperature range -17.6°C to -22°C, the maximum INP number concentration at IGO and RAC was 1.0 L-1 and 1.6 L-1, respectively. A maximum correlation coefficient of 0.76 was observed between the INP number concentration and ice supersaturation. The airmass trajectories analyzed for the measurement campaigns showed that the Arabian Desert and arid regions were the main INP contributors. Elemental analysis of particles showed the presence of Na, Cl, Si, Al, Fe, Cu, Co, Cd, S, Mn and K, as well as some rare-Earth elements like Mo, Ru, La, Ce, V and Zr. When aerosols in the size range 0.5-20 μm were considered, the fraction that acted as INPs was 1: 104 to 1: 106 at IGO, and 1: 103 to 1: 104 at RAC. The higher ratio of INPs to aerosols at RAC than IGO may be attributable to the presence of rare-Earth elements observed in the aerosol samples at RAC, which were absent at IGO.

  20. Particle size distribution control of Pt particles used for particle gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiji, M.; Akiba, H.; Nagao, H.; Hirasawa, I.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is particle size distribution (PSD) control of submicron sized Pt particles used for particle gun. In this report, simple reaction crystallization is conducted by mixing H2PtCl6 and ascorbic acid. Without the additive, obtained Pt particles have broad PSD and reproducibility of experiment is low. With seeding, Pt particles have narrow PSD and reproducibility improved. Additionally, mean particle diameter of 100-700 nm is controlled by changing seeding amount. Obtained particles are successfully characterized as Pt by XRD results. Moreover, XRD spectra indicate that obtained particles are polycrystals. These experimental results suggest that seeding consumed nucleation, as most nuclei attached on the seed surface. This mechanism virtually restricted nucleation to have narrow PSD can be obtained.

  1. PSD Applicability: Industrial Scrap Processing Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Baseline Value for PSD Increment Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. PSD Applicability Determination - Southwestern Public Service Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  4. PSD Determination - Consolidated Edison of New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  5. PSD Determination Cabot Corporation - Fuel Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  6. PSD Applicability Pulp and Paper Mill

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  7. Turbine Enhancements and PSD Applicability -- Holcomb Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Posttranslational Modifications Regulate the Postsynaptic Localization of PSD-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Daniela; Codocedo, Juan F; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2017-04-01

    The postsynaptic density (PSD) consists of a lattice-like array of interacting proteins that organizes and stabilizes synaptic receptors, ion channels, structural proteins, and signaling molecules required for normal synaptic transmission and synaptic function. The scaffolding and hub protein postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) is a major element of central chemical synapses and interacts with glutamate receptors, cell adhesion molecules, and cytoskeletal elements. In fact, PSD-95 can regulate basal synaptic stability as well as the activity-dependent structural plasticity of the PSD and, therefore, of the excitatory chemical synapse. Several studies have shown that PSD-95 is highly enriched at excitatory synapses and have identified multiple protein structural domains and protein-protein interactions that mediate PSD-95 function and trafficking to the postsynaptic region. PSD-95 is also a target of several signaling pathways that induce posttranslational modifications, including palmitoylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, nitrosylation, and neddylation; these modifications determine the synaptic stability and function of PSD-95 and thus regulate the fates of individual dendritic spines in the nervous system. In the present work, we review the posttranslational modifications that regulate the synaptic localization of PSD-95 and describe their functional consequences. We also explore the signaling pathways that induce such changes.

  9. Possible Increase in Nitric Oxide Production by Lightning Discharges Due to Catalytic Effects of Ice Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Harold; Beasley, William

    2011-01-01

    We address the question of whether ice crystals with habits typically encountered by lightning discharges may serve as catalysts for the production of NOx by lightning. If so, and if the effect is sufficiently large, it would need to be taken into account in estimates of global NOx production by lightning. In this study, we make a series of plausible assumptions about the temperatures and concentrations of reactant species in the environment of discharges and we postulate a mechanism by which ice crystals could adsorb nitrogen atoms. We then compare production rates between uncatalyzed and catalyzed reactions at 2000 K, 3000 K, and 4000 K, temperatures observed in lightning channels during the cool-down period after a return stroke. Catalyzed NO production rates are greater at 2000 K, whereas uncatalyzed production occurs most rapidly at 4000 K. The channel temperature stays around 2000 K for a longer period of time than at 4000 K. The longer residence time at 2000 K is sufficient to allow fresh reactants to participate in the mix in. Therefore, our results suggest that nearly three times as much NO per flash is produced by ice-catalyzed reactions as compared with uncatalyzed reactions.

  10. Some effects of ice crystals on the FSSP measurements in mixed phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Febvre

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we show that in mixed phase clouds, the presence of ice crystals may induce wrong FSSP 100 measurements interpretation especially in terms of particle size and subsequent bulk parameters. The presence of ice crystals is generally revealed by a bimodal feature of the particle size distribution (PSD. The combined measurements of the FSSP-100 and the Polar Nephelometer give a coherent description of the effect of the ice crystals on the FSSP-100 response. The FSSP-100 particle size distributions are characterized by a bimodal shape with a second mode peaked between 25 and 35 μm related to ice crystals. This feature is observed with the FSSP-100 at airspeed up to 200 m s−1 and with the FSSP-300 series. In order to assess the size calibration for clouds of ice crystals the response of the FSSP-100 probe has been numerically simulated using a light scattering model of randomly oriented hexagonal ice particles and assuming both smooth and rough crystal surfaces. The results suggest that the second mode, measured between 25 μm and 35 μm, does not necessarily represent true size responses but corresponds to bigger aspherical ice particles. According to simulation results, the sizing understatement would be neglected in the rough case but would be significant with the smooth case. Qualitatively, the Polar Nephelometer phase function suggests that the rough case is the more suitable to describe real crystals. Quantitatively, however, it is difficult to conclude. A review is made to explore different hypotheses explaining the occurrence of the second mode. However, previous cloud in situ measurements suggest that the FSSP-100 secondary mode, peaked in the range 25–35 μm, is likely to be due to the shattering of large ice crystals on the probe inlet. This finding is supported by the rather good relationship between the concentration of particles larger than 20 μm (hypothesized to be ice shattered-fragments measured by the

  11. New insight into icing and de-icing properties of hydrophobic and hydrophilic structured surfaces based on core-shell particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Jagannath; Ionov, Leonid; Kirillova, Alina; Synytska, Alla

    2015-12-21

    Icing is an important problem, which often leads to emergency situations in northern countries. The reduction of icing requires a detailed understanding of this process. In this work, we report on a systematic investigation of the effects of geometry and chemical properties of surfaces on the formation of an ice layer, its properties, and thawing. We compare in detail icing and ice thawing on flat and rough hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. We also show advantages and disadvantages of the surfaces of each kind. We demonstrate that water condenses in a liquid form, leading to the formation of a thin continuous water layer on a hydrophilic surface. Meanwhile, separated rounded water droplets are formed on hydrophobic surfaces. As a result of slower heat exchange, the freezing of rounded water droplets on a hydrophobic surface occurs later than the freezing of the continuous water layer on a hydrophilic one. Moreover, growth of ice on hydrophobic surfaces is slower than on the hydrophilic ones, because ice grows due to the condensation of water vapor on already formed ice crystals, and not due to the condensation on the polymer surface. Rough hydrophobic surfaces also demonstrate a very low ice adhesion value, which is because of the reduced contact area with ice. The main disadvantage of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces is the pinning of water droplets on them after thawing. Flat hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol)-modified surfaces also exhibit very low ice adhesion, which is due to the very low freezing point of the water-poly(ethylene glycol) mixtures. Water easily leaves from flat hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol)-modified surfaces, and they quickly become dry. However, the ice growth rate on poly(ethylene glycol)-modified hydrophilic surfaces is the highest. These results indicate that neither purely (super)hydrophobic polymeric surfaces, nor "antifreeze" hydrophilic ones provide an ideal solution to the problem of icing.

  12. Final scientific report for DOE award title: Improving the Representation of Ice Sedimentation Rates in Global Climate Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, David L. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    2013-09-05

    It is well known that cirrus clouds play a major role in regulating the earth’s climate, but the details of how this works are just beginning to be understood. This project targeted the main property of cirrus clouds that influence climate processes; the ice fall speed. That is, this project improves the representation of the mass-weighted ice particle fall velocity, Vm, in climate models, used to predict future climate on global and regional scales. Prior to 2007, the dominant sizes of ice particles in cirrus clouds were poorly understood, making it virtually impossible to predict how cirrus clouds interact with sunlight and thermal radiation. Due to several studies investigating the performance of optical probes used to measure the ice particle size distribution (PSD), as well as the remote sensing results from our last ARM project, it is now well established that the anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals often reported prior to 2007 were measurement artifacts. Advances in the design and data processing of optical probes have greatly reduced these ice artifacts that resulted from the shattering of ice particles on the probe tips and/or inlet tube, and PSD measurements from one of these improved probes (the 2-dimensional Stereo or 2D-S probe) are utilized in this project to parameterize Vm for climate models. Our original plan in the proposal was to parameterize the ice PSD (in terms of temperature and ice water content) and ice particle mass and projected area (in terms of mass- and area-dimensional power laws or m-D/A-D expressions) since these are the microphysical properties that determine Vm, and then proceed to calculate Vm from these parameterized properties. But the 2D-S probe directly measures ice particle projected area and indirectly estimates ice particle mass for each size bin. It soon became apparent that the original plan would introduce more uncertainty in the Vm calculations

  13. Problems in obtaining perfect images by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy of biological structures in amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Richard; McMullan, Greg

    2013-02-01

    Theoretical considerations together with simulations of single-particle electron cryomicroscopy images of biological assemblies in ice demonstrate that atomic structures should be obtainable from images of a few thousand asymmetric units, provided the molecular weight of the whole assembly being studied is greater than the minimum needed for accurate position and orientation determination. However, with present methods of specimen preparation and current microscope and detector technologies, many more particles are needed, and the alignment of smaller assemblies is difficult or impossible. Only larger structures, with enough signal to allow good orientation determination and with enough images to allow averaging of many hundreds of thousands or even millions of asymmetric units, have successfully produced high-resolution maps. In this review, we compare the contrast of experimental electron cryomicroscopy images of two smaller molecular assemblies, namely apoferritin and beta-galactosidase, with that expected from perfect simulated images calculated from their known X-ray structures. We show that the contrast and signal-to-noise ratio of experimental images still require significant improvement before it will be possible to realize the full potential of single-particle electron cryomicroscopy. In particular, although reasonably good orientations can be obtained for beta-galactosidase, we have been unable to obtain reliable orientation determination from experimental images of apoferritin. Simulations suggest that at least 2-fold improvement of the contrast in experimental images at ~10 Å resolution is needed and should be possible.

  14. Application of infrared remote sensing to constrain in-situ estimates of ice crystal particle size during SPartICus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Cooper

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In a prior paper (Cooper and Garrett, 2010, an infrared remote sensing technique was developed that quantifies the effective radius re of ice crystals in cirrus clouds. By accounting for a broad range of expected inversion uncertainties, this retrieval scheme isolates those radiometric signatures that can only occur if the cirrus has nominally "small" values of re below 20 μm. The method is applicable only for specific cloud and atmospheric conditions. However, it can be particularly useful in constraining in-situ estimates of cirrus cloud re obtained from aircraft. Recent studies suggest that airborne measurements may be compromised by the shattering of ice crystals on airborne instrument inlets, so robust, independent confirmation of these measurements is needed. Here, we expand the Cooper and Garrett (2010 retrieval scheme to identify ice clouds that are likely to have "large" values of re greater than 20 μm. Using MODIS observations, we then compare assessments of cirrus cloud re with in-situ measurements obtained during three test cases from the 2010 SPartICus campaign. In general, there is good agreement between retrievals and in-situ measurements for a "small" and "large" crystal case. For a more ambiguously "small" re case, the 2D-S cloud probe indicates values of re that are slightly larger than expected from infrared retrievals, possibly indicating a slight bias in the 2D-S results towards large particles. For our test cases, there is no evidence to suggest that an FSSP-100 with unmodified inlets produces measurements of re in cirrus that are strongly biased low.

  15. Backscattering Properties of Nonspherical Ice Particles Calculated by Geometrical-Optics-Integral-Equation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Backscattering properties of ice crystal models (Voronoi aggregates (VA, hexagonal columns (COL, and six-branched bullet rosettes (BR6 are calculated by using geometrical-opticsintegral-equation (GOIE method. Characteristics of depolarization ratio (δ and lidar ratio (L of the crystal models are examined. δ (L values are 0.2~0.3 (4~50, 0.3~0.4 (10~25, and 0.5~0.6 (50~100 for COL, BR6, and VA, respectively, at wavelength λ=0.532 μm. It is found that small deformation of COL model could produce significant changes in δ and L.

  16. Classification of Particle Shapes from Lidar Depolarization Ratios in Convective Ice Clouds Compared to in situ Observations During CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Vincent; Winker, David; McGill, Matthew; Lawson, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This manuscript describes a method to class@ cirrus cloud ice particle shape using lidar depolarization measurements as a basis for segregating different particle shape regimes. Measurements from the ER-2 Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) system during CRYSTAL-FACE provide the basis for this work. While the CPL onboard the ER-2 aircraft was providing remote sensing measurements of cirrus clouds, the Cloud Particle Imager (CPI) onboard the WB-57 aircraft was flying inside those same clouds to sample particle sizes. The results of classifying particle shapes using the CPL data are compared to the in situ measurements made using the CPI , and there is found to be good agreement between the particle shape inferred from the CPL data and that actually measured by the CPI. If proven practical, application of this technique to spaceborne observations could lead to large-scale classification of cirrus cloud particle shapes.

  17. A comparison of ice water content measurement techniques on the FAAM BAe-146 aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Abel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison of ice water content (qi data from a variety of measurement techniques on the Facility for Airborne Atmospheric Measurements (FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft. Data are presented from a range of cloud types measured during the PIKNMIX field experiment that include mixed-phase stratocumulus, cumulus congestus and cirrus clouds. These measurements cover a broad range of conditions in which atmospheric ice particles are found in nature, such as the low-ice-water-content environments typically found in midlatitude cirrus and the environments with much higher ice water content often observed in cold convective clouds. The techniques include bulk measurements from (i a Nevzorov hot-wire probe, (ii the difference between the measured total water content (condensed plus vapour and the water vapour content of the atmosphere and (iii a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI (only for cirrus measurements. We also estimate the qi from integration of the measured particle size distribution (PSD with assumptions on how the density of ice particles varies as a function of size. The results show that the only bulk ice water content technique capable of measuring high qi values (several g m−3 was the method of total water content minus water vapour. For low ice water contents we develop a new parametrisation of the Nevzorov baseline drift that enables the probe to be sensitive to qi ± 0.002 g m−3. In cirrus clouds the agreement between the Nevzorov and other bulk measurements was typically better than a factor of 2 for the CVI (qi > 0.008 g m−3 and the method of total water content minus water vapour (qi > 0.02 g m−3. Good agreement with the bulk measurements for all cases could be obtained with the estimate from the PSD provided that appropriate a priori assumptions on the mass–dimension relationship were made. This is problematic in the convective clouds sampled because pristine ice particles, heavily rimed particles and

  18. Influence of particle size and shape on the backscattering linear depolarisation ratio of small ice crystals – cloud chamber measurements in the context of contrail and cirrus microphysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the laser scattering and depolarisation instrument SIMONE that is installed at the large aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. SIMONE uses a 488 nm cw laser to probe simulated atmospheric clouds by measuring the scattered light from the 1.8° and 178.2° directions. At 178.2°, the scattered light is analysed for the linear polarisation state to deduce the particle linear depolarisation ratio δp which is a common measurement parameter of atmospheric lidar applications. The optical setup and the mathematical formalism of the depolarisation detection concept are given. SIMONE depolarisation measurements in spheroidal hematite aerosol and supercooled liquid clouds are used to validate the instrument. SIMONE data from a series of AIDA ice nucleation experiments at temperatures between 195 and 225 K were analysed in terms of the impact of the ice particle microphysics on δp. We found strong depolarisation values of up to 0.4 in case of small growing and sublimating ice particles with volume equivalent diameters of only a few micrometers. Modelling runs with the T-matrix method showed that the measured depolarisation ratios can be accurately reproduced assuming spheroidal and cylindrical particles with a size distribution that has been constrained by IR extinction spectroscopy. Based on the T-matrix modelling runs, we demonstrate that in case of small ice crystals the SIMONE depolarisation results are representative for the lidar depolarisation ratio which is measured at exact backscattering direction of 180°. The relevance of our results for the interpretation of recent lidar observations in cirrus and contrails is discussed. In view of our results, the high depolarisation ratios observed by the spaceborne lidar CALIOP in the tropical upper troposphere might be a hint for the presence of small (sublimating ice particles in the outflows of deep convective systems.

  19. Image Analysis for Particle Size Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Shanthi, C; R. Kingsley Porpatham; Pappa, N.

    2014-01-01

    Particle size distribution (PSD) affects properties of particulate materials and is used for denoting their quality and performance. Among many techniques available to measure PSD, many are quite often offline methods and are time consuming. Also methods like sieving involve, handling of the material physically and electromagnetically, which is healthy, if avoided for certain materials. Thus the need for an online PSD analyzer and the advent of digital image processing has rendered the drift ...

  20. Sea Spray and Icing in the Emerging Open Water of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    the NOAA /OAR/ESRL PSD, Boulder, Colorado, USA, from http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/psd/ ) for 1979- 2014 into three-month blocks. The plan is to analyze...hours. The highest winds we experienced, during the nor’easter, were accompanied by snow. Salinities of ice/snow samples from antennas and cables on

  1. On the relationship of polar mesospheric cloud ice water content, particle radius and mesospheric temperature and its use in multi-dimensional models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. J. Jensen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of ice layers in the polar summer mesosphere (called polar mesospheric clouds or PMCs is sensitive to background atmospheric conditions and therefore affected by global-scale dynamics. To investigate this coupling it is necessary to simulate the global distribution of PMCs within a 3-dimensional (3-D model that couples large-scale dynamics with cloud microphysics. However, modeling PMC microphysics within 3-D global chemistry climate models (GCCM is a challenge due to the high computational cost associated with particle following (Lagrangian or sectional microphysical calculations. By characterizing the relationship between the PMC effective radius, ice water content (iwc, and local temperature (T from an ensemble of simulations from the sectional microphysical model, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA, we determined that these variables can be described by a robust empirical formula. The characterized relationship allows an estimate of an altitude distribution of PMC effective radius in terms of local temperature and iwc. For our purposes we use this formula to predict an effective radius as part of a bulk parameterization of PMC microphysics in a 3-D GCCM to simulate growth, sublimation and sedimentation of ice particles without keeping track of the time history of each ice particle size or particle size bin. This allows cost effective decadal scale PMC simulations in a 3-D GCCM to be performed. This approach produces realistic PMC simulations including estimates of the optical properties of PMCs. We validate the relationship with PMC data from the Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE.

  2. The Microwave Radiative Properties of Falling Snow Derived from Nonspherical Ice Particle Models. Part II: Initial Testing Using Radar, Radiometer and In Situ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, William S.; Tian, Lin; Grecu, Mircea; Kuo, Kwo-Sen; Johnson, Benjamin; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Bansemer, Aaron; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Wang, James R.; Meneghini, Robert

    2016-01-01

    In this study, two different particle models describing the structure and electromagnetic properties of snow are developed and evaluated for potential use in satellite combined radar-radiometer precipitation estimation algorithms. In the first model, snow particles are assumed to be homogeneous ice-air spheres with single-scattering properties derived from Mie theory. In the second model, snow particles are created by simulating the self-collection of pristine ice crystals into aggregate particles of different sizes, using different numbers and habits of the collected component crystals. Single-scattering properties of the resulting nonspherical snow particles are determined using the discrete dipole approximation. The size-distribution-integrated scattering properties of the spherical and nonspherical snow particles are incorporated into a dual-wavelength radar profiling algorithm that is applied to 14- and 34-GHz observations of stratiform precipitation from the ER-2 aircraft-borne High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) radar. The retrieved ice precipitation profiles are then input to a forward radiative transfer calculation in an attempt to simulate coincident radiance observations from the Conical Scanning Millimeter-Wave Imaging Radiometer (CoSMIR). Much greater consistency between the simulated and observed CoSMIR radiances is obtained using estimated profiles that are based upon the nonspherical crystal/aggregate snow particle model. Despite this greater consistency, there remain some discrepancies between the higher moments of the HIWRAP-retrieved precipitation size distributions and in situ distributions derived from microphysics probe observations obtained from Citation aircraft underflights of the ER-2. These discrepancies can only be eliminated if a subset of lower-density crystal/aggregate snow particles is assumed in the radar algorithm and in the interpretation of the in situ data.

  3. North Coast Unified Air Quality Management District: PSD Delegation Agreements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agreements for Partial Delegation of the Federal Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Program Set Forth in 40 CPR 52.21 by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, Region 9 to the North Coast Unified Air Quality Management District.

  4. Psd1 Effects on Candida albicans Planktonic Cells and Biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Gonçalves

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an important human pathogen, causing opportunistic infections. The adhesion of planktonic cells to a substrate is the first step for biofilm development. The antimicrobial peptide (AMP Psd1 is a defensin isolated from Pisum sativum seeds. We tested the effects of this AMP on C. albicans biofilms and planktonic cells, comparing its activity with amphotericin B and fluconazole. Three C. albicans variants were studied, one of them a mutant deficient in glucosylceramide synthase, conferring resistance to Psd1 antifungal action. Atomic force microscopy (AFM was used to assess morphological and biomechanical changes on fungal cells. Surface alterations, with membrane disruption and leakage of cellular contents, were observed. Cytometry assays and confocal microscopy imaging showed that Psd1 causes cell death, in a time and concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate Psd1 pleiotropic action against a relevant fungal human pathogen, suggesting its use as natural antimycotic agent.

  5. Experimental investigation of ice nucleation in water droplets and sulphate particles in the temperature range between -30 C and -65 C; Experimente zur Eisnukleation von Wassertroepfchen und Sulfatpartikeln bei Temperaturen zwischen -65 C und -30 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, S.

    2007-10-15

    High altitude cirrus clouds influence the climate by scattering and absorption of radiation. The cloud and aerosol chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe allows generation and observation of ice clouds in laboratory at realistic conditions. Experiments were carried out to investigate the ice formation in clouds of supercooled liquid water droplets and in sulphate aerosols. The homogeneous ice nucleation rate, given as the product of the number of critical ice germs to initiate the freezing and the rate at which additional molecules are incorporated into a critical germ, was measured at typical cloud conditions in the temperature range between -36 C and -37 C for supercooled water droplets with diameters smaller than 10 {mu}m. The comparison of the results shows good agreement both with recent data from literature gained from considerably larger droplets and with classical ice nucleation theory. Thereby, the hypothesis that a critical germ is formed preferentially near the surface of a supercooled droplet could not be confirmed. The ice formation from ammonium sulphate aerosol was examined in the temperature range from -50 C to -65 C. It was shown that ammonium sulphate solution particles, which were produced by neutralization of sulphuric acid solution particles by gaseous ammonia, freeze homogeneously at conditions comparable to sulphuric acid solution particles. If ammonium sulphate particles crystallize they start to form ice at comparatively low supersaturation values (10-20%) by direct deposition of water vapour onto the solid particles. Ammonia, which is highly anthropogenically affected, may influence the properties of upper tropospheric ice clouds. (orig.)

  6. Decadal changes in carbon fluxes at the East Siberian continental margin: interactions of ice cover, ocean productivity, particle sedimentation and benthic life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boetius, A.; Bienhold, C.; Felden, J.; Fernandez Mendez, M.; Gusky, M.; Rossel, P. E.; Vedenin, A.; Wenzhoefer, F.

    2015-12-01

    The observed and predicted Climate-Carbon-Cryosphere interactions in the Arctic Ocean are likely to alter productivity and carbon fluxes of the Siberian continental margin and adjacent basins. Here, we compare field observations and samples obtained in the nineties, and recently in 2012 during the sea ice minimum, to assess decadal changes in the productivity, export and recycling of organic matter at the outer East Siberian margin. In the 90s, the Laptev Sea margin was still largely ice-covered throughout the year, and the samples and measurements obtained represent an ecological baseline against which current and future ecosystem shifts can be assessed. The POLARSTERN expedition IceArc (ARK-XXVII/3) returned in September 2012 to resample the same transects between 60 and 3400 m water depth as well as stations in the adjacent deep basins. Our results suggest that environmental changes in the past two decades, foremost sea ice thinning and retreat, have led to a substantial increase in phytodetritus sedimentation to the seafloor, especially at the lower margin and adjacent basins. This is reflected in increased benthic microbial activities, leading to higher carbon remineralization rates, especially deeper than 3000 m. Besides a relative increase in typical particle degrading bacterial types in surface sediments, bacterial community composition showed little variation between the two years, suggesting that local microbial communities can cope with changing food input. First assessments of faunal abundances suggest an increase in polychaetes,holothurians and bivalves at depth, which fits the prediction of higher productivity and particle deposition rates upon sea ice retreat. The presentation also discusses the controversial issue whether there is evidence for an Arctic-wide increase in carbon flux, or whether we are looking at a spatial shift of the productive marginal ice zone as the main factor to enhance carbon flux to the deep Siberian margin.

  7. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dust particles: determination of onset RHi, IN active fraction, nucleation time-lag, and the effect of active sites on contact angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dobbie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed ice nucleation experimental set up was used to investigate the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of three Saharan and one Spanish dust particle samples. It was observed that the spread in the onset relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi for Saharan dust particles varied from 104% to 110%, whereas for the Spanish dust from 106% to 110%. The elemental composition analysis shows a prominent Ca feature in the Spanish dust sample which could potentially explain the differences in nucleation threshold. Although the spread in the onset RHi for the three Saharan dust samples were in agreement, the active fractions and nucleation time-lags calculated at various temperature and RHi conditions were found to differ. This could be due to the subtle variation in the elemental composition of the dust samples, and surface irregularities like steps, cracks, cavities etc. A combination of classical nucleation theory and active site theory is used to understand the importance of these surface irregularities on the nucleability parameter, contact angle that is widely used in ice cloud modeling. These calculations show that the surface irregularities can reduce the contact angle by approximately 10 degrees.

  8. Chemical characterization of individual particles and residuals of cloud droplets and ice crystals collected on board research aircraft in the ISDAC 2008 study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiranuma, N.; Brooks, S. D.; Moffet, R. C.; Glen, A.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M. K.; Liu, P.; MacDonald, A. M.; Strapp, J. W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2013-06-01

    Ambient particles and the dry residuals of mixed-phase cloud droplets and ice crystals were collected during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) near Barrow, Alaska, in spring of 2008. The collected particles were analyzed using Computer Controlled Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis and Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy coupled with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy to identify physico-chemical properties that differentiate cloud-nucleating particles from the total aerosol population. A wide range of individually mixed components was identified in the ambient particles and residuals including organic carbon compounds, inorganics, carbonates, and black carbon. Our results show that cloud droplet residuals differ from the ambient particles in both size and composition, suggesting that both properties may impact the cloud-nucleating ability of aerosols in mixed-phase clouds. The percentage of residual particles which contained carbonates (47%) was almost four times higher than those in ambient samples. Residual populations were also enhanced in sea salt and black carbon and reduced in organic compounds relative to the ambient particles. Further, our measurements suggest that chemical processing of aerosols may improve their cloud-nucleating ability. Comparison of results for various time periods within ISDAC suggests that the number and composition of cloud-nucleating particles over Alaska can be influenced by episodic events bringing aerosols from both the local vicinity and as far away as Siberia.

  9. Investigation of the Deposition and Densification Parameters on the Mechanical Properties of Pressurized Spray Deposited (PSD) 3-D Printed Ceramic Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menchhofer, Paul A [ORNL; Becker, Benjamin [Hot End Works

    2016-07-28

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and HotEnd Works teamed to investigate the use of pressurized spray deposition (PSD) technology for the production of ceramic parts via additive manufacturing. Scanning electron microscopy of sintered parts provided by HotEnd Works revealed voids large enough to compromise the mechanical properties of PSD manufactured parts. Scanning electron microscopy and particle size analysis of the alumina oxide powder feedstocks indicated that the powders contained some large particles and some agglomerations in the powder. Further classification of the powder feedstocks and removal of the agglomerates by sonication in the liquid used for the PSD process are recommended. Analysis of sintered parts indicated that the sonic modulus for the alumina part is consistent with other known values for alumina. The density for this part was determined by standard Archimedes immersion density methods and was found to be > 99.7 % of the theoretical density for pure alumina.

  10. Raman Scattering Proof-of-Concept Investigation to Detect Particle Phase in the Propulsion System Lab (PSL) Icing Duct Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To determine a percent freeze-out between liquid water and solid ice will add an important dimension to the cloud characterization. This Raman technique might also...

  11. Ice Crystal Icing Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2017-01-01

    Ice crystals found at high altitude near convective clouds are known to cause jet engine power-loss events. These events occur due to ice crystals entering a propulsion systems core flowpath and accreting ice resulting in events such as uncommanded loss of thrust (rollback), engine stall, surge, and damage due to ice shedding. As part of a community with a growing need to understand the underlying physics of ice crystal icing, NASA has been performing experimental efforts aimed at providing datasets that can be used to generate models to predict the ice accretion inside current and future engine designs. Fundamental icing physics studies on particle impacts, accretion on a single airfoil, and ice accretions observed during a rollback event inside a full-scale engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory are summarized. Low fidelity code development using the results from the engine tests which identify key parameters for ice accretion risk and the development of high fidelity codes are described. These activities have been conducted internal to NASA and through collaboration efforts with industry, academia, and other government agencies. The details of the research activities and progress made to date in addressing ice crystal icing research challenges are discussed.

  12. Ice Crystal Icing Research at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.

    2017-01-01

    Ice crystals found at high altitude near convective clouds are known to cause jet engine power-loss events. These events occur due to ice crystals entering a propulsion system's core flowpath and accreting ice resulting in events such as uncommanded loss of thrust (rollback), engine stall, surge, and damage due to ice shedding. As part of a community with a growing need to understand the underlying physics of ice crystal icing, NASA has been performing experimental efforts aimed at providing datasets that can be used to generate models to predict the ice accretion inside current and future engine designs. Fundamental icing physics studies on particle impacts, accretion on a single airfoil, and ice accretions observed during a rollback event inside a full-scale engine in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory are summarized. Low fidelity code development using the results from the engine tests which identify key parameters for ice accretion risk and the development of high fidelity codes are described. These activities have been conducted internal to NASA and through collaboration efforts with industry, academia, and other government agencies. The details of the research activities and progress made to date in addressing ice crystal icing research challenges are discussed.

  13. Particle size distribution of exosomes and microvesicles determined by transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry, nanoparticle tracking analysis, and resistive pulse sensing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pol, E; Coumans, F. A. W; Grootemaat, A. E; Gardiner, C; Sargent, I. L; Harrison, P; Sturk, A; Leeuwen, T. G; Nieuwland, R

    2014-01-01

    ... the particle size distribution (PSD) of vesicles . The PSD describes the concentration as a function of size, and defines which vesicle types are measured . Unexpectedly, our simulations predicted that each method would obtain a different PSD, thereby hampering data interpretation, data comparison, and standardization. In this study, w...

  14. Mathematical Modeling of the Growth and Coarsening of Ice Particles in the Context of High Pressure Shift Freezing Processes

    KAUST Repository

    Smith, N. A. S.

    2013-07-25

    High pressure shift freezing (HPSF) has been proven more beneficial for ice crystal size and shape than traditional (at atmospheric pressure) freezing.1-3 A model for growth and coarsening of ice crystals inside a frozen food sample (either at atmospheric or high pressure) is developed, and some numerical experiments are given, with which the model is validated by using experimental data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first model suited for freezing crystallization in the context of high pressure. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Experimental evidence of a stratospheric circulation influence on mesospheric temperatures and ice-particles during the 2010-2011 austral summer at 69°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Ray J.; Höffner, Josef; Lübken, Franz-Josef; Viehl, Timo P.; Kaifler, Bernd; Klekociuk, Andrew R.

    2012-11-01

    A significant inter-annual decrease in polar mesosphere ice-particles, i.e., PMSE and PMC, during 2010-2011 is compared with earlier austral summers, in particular with 2009-2010. The first IAP iron lidar temperature measurement at Davis (68.6°S), Antarctica from 14 December 2010 are used to assess thermal effects of atmospheric processes on the mesopause region. We report low average temperatures of ˜125 K measured by Fe-lidar near 90 km when the PMSE season commenced, whereas temperatures were warmer in 2010-2011 compared to 2009-2010 at altitudes where PMSE normally occur (around 86 km). Summer mesopause region temperature anomalies are derived using Aura MLS records. We reveal that the late break-down of the Antarctic stratospheric polar vortex on 5 January 2010, coupled with enhanced early summer mesospheric zonal wind field, provide a barrier to upward propagation of atmospheric gravity waves to be the main mechanism for the observed warm early summer season below the mesopause. The mesopause in 2010-2011 was unusually high and cold. We conclude that the timing of the annual break-down of the southern polar stratospheric vortex as manifest in zonal winds at 30 hPa impacts mesosphere temperature and ice-particle formation early in the austral summer.

  16. Carbonaceous particles reveal that Late Holocene dust causes the dark region in the western ablation zone of the Greenland ice sheet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wientjes, I.G.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Schwikowski, M.; Zapf, A.; Fahrni, S.; Wacker, L.

    2012-01-01

    A dark region in the western ablation zone of the Greenland ice sheet is caused by outcropping ice layers that contain more dust than the surrounding brighter ice. These higher amounts of dust were deposited in the accumulation zone of the ice sheet and travelled with the ice to the ablation zone.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) KM Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnadoe, Tom; McCarter, Mike

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities with in the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center Of Excellence (AISCE), Intergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KM implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to support the planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have been performed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural/KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  18. A Comparison of PSD Enveloping Methods for Nonstationary Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Tom

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to derive a power spectral density (PSD) envelope for nonstationary acceleration time histories, including launch vehicle data, so that components can be designed and tested accordingly. This paper presents the results of the three methods for an actual flight accelerometer record. Guidelines are given for the application of each method to nonstationary data. The method can be extended to other scenarios, including transportation vibration.

  19. A comparative study of K-rich and Na/Ca-rich feldspar ice-nucleating particles in a nanoliter droplet freezing assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckhaus, Andreas; Kiselev, Alexei; Hiron, Thibault; Ebert, Martin; Leisner, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A recently designed droplet freezing assay was used to study the freezing of up to 1500 identical 0.2 nL water droplets containing suspensions of one Na/Ca-rich feldspar and three K-rich and one Na/Ca-rich feldspar particles. Three types of experiments have been conducted: cooling ramp, isothermal freezing at a constant temperature, and freeze-thaw cycles. The observed freezing behavior has been interpreted with the help of a model based on the classical nucleation theory (soccer ball model (SBM); Niedermeier et al., 2015). By applying the model to the different freezing experiments conducted with the same ice-nucleating material, the unique sets of model parameters for specific feldspar suspensions could be derived. The SBM was shown to adequately describe the observed cooling rate dependence, the ice-nucleating active sites (INAS) surface density ns(T) in a wide temperature range, and the shift of the freezing curves towards lower temperature with dilution. Moreover, the SBM was capable of reproducing the variation of INAS surface density ns(T) with concentration of ice-nucleating particles in the suspension droplets and correctly predicting the leveling-off of ns(T) at low temperature. The freeze-thaw experiments have clearly shown that the heterogeneous freezing induced even by very active ice-nucleating species still possesses a stochastic nature, with the degree of randomness increasing towards homogeneous nucleation. A population of the high-temperature INAS has been identified in one of the K-rich feldspar samples. The freezing of 0.8 wt % suspension droplets of this particular feldspar was observed already at -5 °C. These high-temperature active sites could be deactivated by treating the sample with hydrogen peroxide but survived heating up to 90 °C. Given a high mass concentration of these high-temperature active sites (2.9 × 108 g-1) and a very low value of contact angle (0.56 rad) the possibility of biological contamination of the sample was

  20. Winter precipitation particle size distribution measurement by Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gwo-Jong; Kleinkort, Cameron; Bringi, V. N.; Notaroš, Branislav M.

    2017-12-01

    From the radar meteorology viewpoint, the most important properties for quantitative precipitation estimation of winter events are 3D shape, size, and mass of precipitation particles, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD). In order to measure these properties precisely, optical instruments may be the best choice. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) is a relatively new instrument equipped with three high-resolution cameras to capture the winter precipitation particle images from three non-parallel angles, in addition to measuring the particle fall speed using two pairs of infrared motion sensors. However, the results from the MASC so far are usually presented as monthly or seasonally, and particle sizes are given as histograms, no previous studies have used the MASC for a single storm study, and no researchers use MASC to measure the PSD. We propose the methodology for obtaining the winter precipitation PSD measured by the MASC, and present and discuss the development, implementation, and application of the new technique for PSD computation based on MASC images. Overall, this is the first study of the MASC-based PSD. We present PSD MASC experiments and results for segments of two snow events to demonstrate the performance of our PSD algorithm. The results show that the self-consistency of the MASC measured single-camera PSDs is good. To cross-validate PSD measurements, we compare MASC mean PSD (averaged over three cameras) with the collocated 2D Video Disdrometer, and observe good agreements of the two sets of results.

  1. Ice slurry applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauffeld, M. [Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Moltkestr. 30, 76133 Karlsruhe (Germany); Wang, M.J.; Goldstein, V. [Sunwell Technologies Inc., 180 Caster Avenue, Woodbridge, L4L 5Y (Canada); Kasza, K.E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    The role of secondary refrigerants is expected to grow as the focus on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions increases. The effectiveness of secondary refrigerants can be improved when phase changing media are introduced in place of single-phase media. Operating at temperatures below the freezing point of water, ice slurry facilitates several efficiency improvements such as reductions in pumping energy consumption as well as lowering the required temperature difference in heat exchangers due to the beneficial thermo-physical properties of ice slurry. Research has shown that ice slurry can be engineered to have ideal ice particle characteristics so that it can be easily stored in tanks without agglomeration and then be extractable for pumping at very high ice fraction without plugging. In addition ice slurry can be used in many direct contact food and medical protective cooling applications. This paper provides an overview of the latest developments in ice slurry technology. (author)

  2. Predicting abundance and variability of ice nucleating particles in precipitation at the high-altitude observatory Jungfraujoch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stopelli, Emiliano; Conen, Franz; Morris, Cindy E; Herrmann, Erik; Henne, Stephan; Steinbacher, Martin; Alewell, Christine

    2016-01-01

    .... Those singularly presenting the best correlations with observed number of INPs−8 (residual fraction of water vapour, wind speed, air temperature, number of particles with diameter larger than 0.5...

  3. Comparative measurements of ambient atmospheric concentrations of ice nucleating particles using multiple immersion freezing methods and a continuous flow diffusion chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMott, Paul J.; Hill, Thomas C. J.; Petters, Markus D.; Bertram, Allan K.; Tobo, Yutaka; Mason, Ryan H.; Suski, Kaitlyn J.; McCluskey, Christina S.; Levin, Ezra J. T.; Schill, Gregory P.; Boose, Yvonne; Rauker, Anne Marie; Miller, Anna J.; Zaragoza, Jake; Rocci, Katherine; Rothfuss, Nicholas E.; Taylor, Hans P.; Hader, John D.; Chou, Cedric; Huffman, J. Alex; Pöschl, Ulrich; Prenni, Anthony J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.

    2017-09-01

    A number of new measurement methods for ice nucleating particles (INPs) have been introduced in recent years, and it is important to address how these methods compare. Laboratory comparisons of instruments sampling major INP types are common, but few comparisons have occurred for ambient aerosol measurements exploring the utility, consistency and complementarity of different methods to cover the large dynamic range of INP concentrations that exists in the atmosphere. In this study, we assess the comparability of four offline immersion freezing measurement methods (Colorado State University ice spectrometer, IS; North Carolina State University cold stage, CS; National Institute for Polar Research Cryogenic Refrigerator Applied to Freezing Test, CRAFT; University of British Columbia micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor-droplet freezing technique, MOUDI-DFT) and an online method (continuous flow diffusion chamber, CFDC) used in a manner deemed to promote/maximize immersion freezing, for the detection of INPs in ambient aerosols at different locations and in different sampling scenarios. We also investigated the comparability of different aerosol collection methods used with offline immersion freezing instruments. Excellent agreement between all methods could be obtained for several cases of co-sampling with perfect temporal overlap. Even for sampling periods that were not fully equivalent, the deviations between atmospheric INP number concentrations measured with different methods were mostly less than 1 order of magnitude. In some cases, however, the deviations were larger and not explicable without sampling and measurement artifacts. Overall, the immersion freezing methods seem to effectively capture INPs that activate as single particles in the modestly supercooled temperature regime (> -20 °C), although more comparisons are needed in this temperature regime that is difficult to access with online methods. Relative to the CFDC method, three immersion freezing

  4. Characterizing Single-Scattering Properties of Snow Aggregate Particles Integrated over Size Distributions in the Microwave Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, K.; Van Aartsen, B.; Haddad, Z. S.; Tanelli, S.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Olson, W. S.

    2012-12-01

    Approximately 7000 snow aggregate particles have been synthesized, using a heuristic aggregation algorithm, from 9 realistic snowflake habits simulated using the now famous Snowfake ice crystal growth model. These particles exhibit mass-dimension relations consistent with those derived from observations. In addition, ranging from 0.1 to 3.5 mm in liquid-equivalent diameter, the sizes of these particle cover ranges wide enough for assemblies of realistic particle size distributions. The single-scattering properties, such as scattering/absorption/extinction/backscatter cross sections, single-scattering albedo, asymmetry factor, as well as the scattering matrix, are obtained for each aggregate particle using the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) code DDSCAT at 13 microwave frequencies, ranging from 10 to 190 GHz. Preliminary radiative transfer calculations show that the single-scattering properties so obtained yield much more reasonable brightness temperatures than those derived from "fluffy sphere" Mie approximations. However, in order to achieve better retrievals involving these complex particles, we need to be able to characterize their single-scattering with only a few parameters. In this study, we present such an attempt using a pair of generalized effective radii, expressed as ratios of particle volume to particle surface area and to orientation-averaged particle cross section, in addition to mass content. It is shown that these effective radii are indeed effective in characterizing the PSD-integrated single-scattering properties of these complex particles. Pristine ice crystals simulated using the "Snowfake" ice crystal growth mode (3rd row from top) and example aggregates generated using the corresponding pristine particles (bottom 3 rows, i.e. 4th to 6th rows from top).

  5. Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Emission Thresholds for Fountain Foundry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  6. Memo on PSD Applicability Determination for an Ethanol Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  7. National Asphalt Pavement Association Questions and Answers on PSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  8. Request for Guidance on PSD Applicability Determinations for Boiler Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  9. Applicability of PSD to Pennsylvania Power and Light Auxiliary Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  10. Valero Hydrocarbons BACT Analysis, PSD-TX-746

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  11. USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Region PSD Permit Completeness Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  12. PSD Applicability - Public Service Electric and Gas Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  13. Applicability of EPA's PSD Regulations to Floating Seafood Processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  14. Applicability of PSD to the Consolidated Edison Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. Appeal Procedures for PSD Permits Under The Consolidated Permit Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  16. PSD Determination of Applicability - UMD Coal Gasification Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  17. Determining PSD Applicability Thresholds for Gas Turbine Based Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  18. Applicability of PSD to Carter Oil Company Pilot Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  19. Union Carbide Chemicals and Plastics Company, Inc PSD Applicability

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  20. Ice, Ice, Baby!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) has developed an outreach program based on hands-on activities called "Ice, Ice, Baby". These lessons are designed to teach the science principles of displacement, forces of motion, density, and states of matter. These properties are easily taught through the interesting topics of glaciers, icebergs, and sea level rise in K-8 classrooms. The activities are fun, engaging, and simple enough to be used at science fairs and family science nights. Students who have participated in "Ice, Ice, Baby" have successfully taught these to adults and students at informal events. The lessons are based on education standards which are available on our website www.cresis.ku.edu. This presentation will provide information on the activities, survey results from teachers who have used the material, and other suggested material that can be used before and after the activities.

  1. VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Non; Miyoshi, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Takanori; Nakazono, Toshimitsu; Tani, Motohiro; Kuge, Osamu

    2015-12-15

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is synthesized through decarboxylation of phosphatidylserine (PS), catalysed by PS decarboxylase 1 (Psd1p) and 2 (Psd2p) and the cytidine 5'-diphosphate (CDP)-ethanolamine (CDP-Etn) pathway. PSD1 null (psd1Δ) and PSD2 null (psd2Δ) mutants are viable in a synthetic minimal medium, but a psdpsd2Δ double mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy, which is incorporated into PE through the CDP-Etn pathway. We have previously shown that psd1Δ is synthetic lethal with deletion of VID22 (vid22Δ) [Kuroda et al. (2011) Mol. Microbiol. 80: , 248-265]. In the present study, we found that vid22Δ mutant exhibits Etn auxotrophy under PSD1-depressed conditions. Deletion of VID22 in wild-type and PSD1-depressed cells caused partial defects in PE formation through decarboxylation of PS. The enzyme activity of PS decarboxylase in an extract of vid22Δ cells was ∼70% of that in wild-type cells and similar to that in psd2Δ cells and the PS decarboxylase activity remaining in the PSD1-depressed cells became almost negligible with deletion of VID22. Thus, the vid22Δ mutation was suggested to cause a defect in the Psd2p activity. Furthermore, vid22Δ cells were shown to be defective in expression of the PSD2 gene tagged with 6×HA, the defect being ameliorated by replacement of the native promoter of the PSD2 gene with a CYC1 promoter. In addition, an α-galactosidase reporter assay revealed that the activity of the promoter of the PSD2 gene in vid22Δ cells was ∼5% of that in wild-type cells. These results showed that VID22 is required for transcriptional activation of the PSD2 gene. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  2. Recent Advances in the LEWICE Icing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, William B.; Addy, Gene; Struk, Peter; Bartkus, Tadas

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe two recent modifications to the Glenn ICE software. First, a capability for modeling ice crystals and mixed phase icing has been modified based on recent experimental data. Modifications have been made to the ice particle bouncing and erosion model. This capability has been added as part of a larger effort to model ice crystal ingestion in aircraft engines. Comparisons have been made to ice crystal ice accretions performed in the NRC Research Altitude Test Facility (RATFac). Second, modifications were made to the run back model based on data and observations from thermal scaling tests performed in the NRC Altitude Icing Tunnel.

  3. Active Well Counting Using New PSD Plastic Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Newby, Jason [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report presents results and analysis from a series of proof-of-concept measurements to assess the suitability of segmented detectors constructed from Eljen EJ-299-34 PSD-plastic scintillator with pulse-shape discrimination capability for the purposes of quantifying uranium via active neutron coincidence counting. Present quantification of bulk uranium materials for international safeguards and domestic materials control and accounting relies on active neutron coincidence counting systems, such as the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) and the Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (UNCL), that use moderated He-3 proportional counters along with necessarily low-intensity 241Am(Li) neutron sources. Scintillation-based fast-neutron detectors are a potentially superior technology to the existing AWCC and UNCL designs due to their spectroscopic capability and their inherently short neutron coincidence times that largely eliminate random coincidences and enable interrogation by stronger sources. One of the past impediments to the investigation and adoption of scintillation counters for the purpose of quantifying bulk uranium was the commercial availability of scintillators having the necessary neutron-gamma pulse-shape discrimination properties only as flammable liquids. Recently, Eljen EJ-299-34 PSD-plastic scintillator became commercially available. The present work is the first assessment of an array of PSD-plastic detectors for the purposes of quantifying bulk uranium. The detector panel used in the present work was originally built as the focal plane for a fast-neutron imager, but it was repurposed for the present investigation by construction of a stand to support the inner well of an AWCC immediately in front of the detector panel. The detector panel and data acquisition of this system are particularly well suited for performing active-well fast-neutron counting of LEU and HEU samples because the active detector volume is solid, the 241Am(Li) interrogating

  4. Ice Sheets & Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Troels Bøgeholm

    Since the discovery of the Ice Ages it has been evident that Earth’s climate is liable to undergo dramatic changes. The previous climatic period known as the Last Glacial saw large oscillations in the extent of ice sheets covering the Northern hemisphere. Understanding these oscillations known...... as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events would add to our knowledge of the climatic system and – hopefully – enable better forecasts. Likewise, to forecast possible future sea level rise it is crucial to correctly model the large ice sheets on Greenland and Antarctica. This project is divided into two parts...

  5. 75 FR 70254 - PSD and Title V Permitting Guidance for Greenhouse Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-17

    ... AGENCY PSD and Title V Permitting Guidance for Greenhouse Gases AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... the EPA has posted its guidance titled, ``PSD and Title V Permitting Guidance for Greenhouse Gases... for Greenhouse Gases.'' This document has been determined to be an EPA Significant Guidance Document...

  6. 76 FR 23489 - Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ..., ``Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR): Reconsideration of... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 51 and 52 RIN 2060-AQ73 Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR): Reconsideration of Inclusion of Fugitive Emissions; Interim Rule; Stay...

  7. 75 FR 6823 - Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-11

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 51 and 52 RIN 2060-AP73 Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR): Reconsideration of Inclusion of Fugitive Emissions; Proposal for... emissions requirements in the federal Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) program published in the...

  8. 75 FR 27191 - Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR): Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-14

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 51 and 52 RIN 2060-AP80 Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR): Aggregation AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice... period on our proposed reconsideration of the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and...

  9. On the Ice Nucleation Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, D.

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle) and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population). The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign data can be

  10. On the ice nucleation spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Barahona

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel formulation of the ice nucleation spectrum, i.e. the function relating the ice crystal concentration to cloud formation conditions and aerosol properties. The new formulation is physically-based and explicitly accounts for the dependency of the ice crystal concentration on temperature, supersaturation, cooling rate, and particle size, surface area and composition. This is achieved by introducing the concepts of ice nucleation coefficient (the number of ice germs present in a particle and nucleation probability dispersion function (the distribution of ice nucleation coefficients within the aerosol population. The new formulation is used to generate ice nucleation parameterizations for the homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and the heterogeneous deposition ice nucleation on dust and soot ice nuclei. For homogeneous freezing, it was found that by increasing the dispersion in the droplet volume distribution the fraction of supercooled droplets in the population increases. For heterogeneous ice nucleation the new formulation consistently describes singular and stochastic behavior within a single framework. Using a fundamentally stochastic approach, both cooling rate independence and constancy of the ice nucleation fraction over time, features typically associated with singular behavior, were reproduced. Analysis of the temporal dependency of the ice nucleation spectrum suggested that experimental methods that measure the ice nucleation fraction over few seconds would tend to underestimate the ice nuclei concentration. It is shown that inferring the aerosol heterogeneous ice nucleation properties from measurements of the onset supersaturation and temperature may carry significant error as the variability in ice nucleation properties within the aerosol population is not accounted for. This work provides a simple and rigorous ice nucleation framework where theoretical predictions, laboratory measurements and field campaign

  11. Information-weighted constrained regularization for particle size distribution recovery in multiangle dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Shen, Jin; Thomas, John C; Huang, Yu; Zhu, Xinjun; Clementi, Luis A; Vega, Jorge R

    2018-01-08

    In particle size measurement with dynamic light scattering (DLS), it is difficult to get an accurate recovery of a bimodal particle size distribution (PSD) with a peak position ratio less than ~2:1, especially when large particles (>350nm) are present. This is due to the inherent noise in the autocorrelation function (ACF) data and the scarce utilization of PSD information during the inversion process. In this paper, the PSD information distribution in the ACF data is investigated. It was found that the initial decay section of the ACF contains more information, especially for a bimodal PSD. Based on this, an information-weighted constrained regularization (IWCR) method is proposed in this paper and applied in multiangle DLS analysis for bimodal PSD recovery. By using larger (or smaller) coefficients for weighting the ACF data, more (or less) weight can then be given to the initial part of the ACF. In this way, the IWCR method can enhance utilization of the PSD information in the ACF data, and effectively weaken the effect of noise at large delay time on PSD recovery. Using this method, bimodal PSDs (with nominal diameters of 400:608 nm, 448:608 nm, 500:600 nm) were recovered successfully from simulated data and it appears that the IWCR method can improve the recovery resolution for closely spaced bimodal particles. Results of the PSD recovery from experimental DLS data confirm the performance of this method.

  12. The influence of the fractal particle size distribution on the mobility of dry granular materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallejo Luis E.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents an experimental analysis on the influence of the particle size distribution (psd on the mobility of dry granular materials. The psd obeys a power law of the form: N(L>d=kd-Df, where N is the number of particles with diameter L greater than a given diameter d, k is a proportionality constant, and Df is the fractal dimension of the psd. No laboratory or numerical study has been conducted to date analysing how a fractal psd influences the mobility of granular flows as in the case of rock avalanches. In this study, the flow characteristics of poly-dispersed granular materials that have a fractal psd were investigated in the laboratory. Granular mixtures having different fractal psd values were placed in a hollow cylinder. The cylinder was lifted and the distance of flow of the mixture was measured with respect to the original position of the cylinder. It was determined that the distance of flow of the mixtures was directly related to their fractal psd values. That is, the larger the distance of flow of the mixture, the larger is the fractal psd of the granular mixture tested. Thus, the fractal psd in dry granular mixtures seems to have a large influence on the easiness by which dry granular mixtures move in the field.

  13. The influence of the fractal particle size distribution on the mobility of dry granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Luis E.; Espitia, Jairo M.; Caicedo, Bernardo

    2017-06-01

    This study presents an experimental analysis on the influence of the particle size distribution (psd) on the mobility of dry granular materials. The psd obeys a power law of the form: N(L>d)=kd-Df, where N is the number of particles with diameter L greater than a given diameter d, k is a proportionality constant, and Df is the fractal dimension of the psd. No laboratory or numerical study has been conducted to date analysing how a fractal psd influences the mobility of granular flows as in the case of rock avalanches. In this study, the flow characteristics of poly-dispersed granular materials that have a fractal psd were investigated in the laboratory. Granular mixtures having different fractal psd values were placed in a hollow cylinder. The cylinder was lifted and the distance of flow of the mixture was measured with respect to the original position of the cylinder. It was determined that the distance of flow of the mixtures was directly related to their fractal psd values. That is, the larger the distance of flow of the mixture, the larger is the fractal psd of the granular mixture tested. Thus, the fractal psd in dry granular mixtures seems to have a large influence on the easiness by which dry granular mixtures move in the field.

  14. Modeling Commercial Turbofan Engine Icing Risk With Ice Crystal Ingestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which are ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  15. p-sd Shell Gap Reduction in Neutron-Rich Systems and Cross-ShellExcitations in 20O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedeking, M.; Tabor, S.L.; Pavan, J.; Volya, A.; Aguilar, A.L.; Calderin, I.J.; Campbell, D.B.; Cluff, W.T.; Diffenderfer, E.; Fridmann,J.; Hoffman, C.R.; Kemper, K.W.; Lee, S.; Riley, M.A.; Roeder, B.T.; Teal, C.; Tripathi, V.; Wiedenhover, I.

    2005-04-07

    Excited states in {sup 20}O were populated in the reaction {sup 10}Be({sup 14}C,{alpha}) at Florida State University (FSU). Charged particles were detected with a particle telescope consisting of 4 annularly segmented Si surface barrier detectors and {gamma} radiation was detected with the FSU {gamma} detector array. Five new states were observed below 6 MeV from the {alpha}-{gamma} and {alpha}-{gamma}-{gamma} coincidence data. Shell model calculations suggest that most of the newly observed states are core-excited 1p-1h excitations across the N=Z=8 shell gap. Comparisons between experimental data and calculations for the neutron-rich O and F isotopes imply a steady reduction of the p-sd shell gap as neutrons are added.

  16. Final PSD Permit Extension Letter - Energy Answers Arecibo, LLC/Energy Answers Arecibo Puerto Rico Renewable Energy Project, PR

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains the Final PSD Permit Extension Letter for Energy Answers Arecibo Puerto Rico Renewable Energy Project, issued on April 10, 2017 and the EPA Public Announcement for Final PSD Permit Extension for Energy Answers Arecibo, PR.

  17. Calibration measurements and systematic studies on the detection of cosmic particles in the IceTop tank; Eichmessungen und systematische Untersuchungen zum Nachweis kosmischer Teilchen im IceTop-Tank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Christian

    2012-05-15

    IceCube is an 1 km{sup 3} large observatory at the south pole. It consists of the surface detector IceTop and the underground detector In-Ice. By the detection of Cherenkov Radiation iceCube tries to determine the sources of cosmic radiation and cosmic neutrinos. IceTop possesses a large number of IceTop tanks (ITT), which are filled with ice. In these tanks the Cherenkov radiation of the cosmic radiation can be detected with so-called digital optical modules. By this it is possible to determine the chemical composition of the cosmic radiation. Simultaneously this surface detector serves also as veto for the In-Ice detector. In this bachelor thesis the charge spectra in the ITT at DESY were studied under regardment of the electromagnetic, hadronic, and muonic component. Additionally in cooperation with 6 1 m{sup 2} large scintillator planes by different coincidence conditions a direction selection of the cosmic radiation could be performed. By this the positions of the muon peaks could be considered for different conditions.

  18. The IceProd Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Abbasi, R.; Ackermann, M.

    2015-01-01

    IceCube is a one-gigaton instrument located at the geographic South Pole, designed to detect cosmic neutrinos, iden- tify the particle nature of dark matter, and study high-energy neutrinos themselves. Simulation of the IceCube detector and processing of data require a significant amount...... of computational resources. IceProd is a distributed management system based on Python, XML-RPC and GridFTP. It is driven by a central database in order to coordinate and admin- ister production of simulations and processing of data produced by the IceCube detector. IceProd runs as a separate layer on top of other...

  19. A ubiquitous ice size bias in simulations of tropical deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Stanford

    2017-08-01

    errors in parameterized hydrometeor PSD and single particle properties, but because it is present in all schemes, it may also partly result from errors in parameterized microphysical processes present in all schemes. Because of these ubiquitous ice size biases, the frequently used microphysical parameterizations evaluated in this study inherently produce a high bias in convective reflectivity for a wide range of temperatures, vertical velocities, and TWCs.

  20. A ubiquitous ice size bias in simulations of tropical deep convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, McKenna W.; Varble, Adam; Zipser, Ed; Strapp, J. Walter; Leroy, Delphine; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Potts, Rodney; Protat, Alain

    2017-08-01

    The High Altitude Ice Crystals - High Ice Water Content (HAIC-HIWC) joint field campaign produced aircraft retrievals of total condensed water content (TWC), hydrometeor particle size distributions (PSDs), and vertical velocity (w) in high ice water content regions of mature and decaying tropical mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). The resulting dataset is used here to explore causes of the commonly documented high bias in radar reflectivity within cloud-resolving simulations of deep convection. This bias has been linked to overly strong simulated convective updrafts lofting excessive condensate mass but is also modulated by parameterizations of hydrometeor size distributions, single particle properties, species separation, and microphysical processes. Observations are compared with three Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations of an observed MCS using different microphysics parameterizations while controlling for w, TWC, and temperature. Two popular bulk microphysics schemes (Thompson and Morrison) and one bin microphysics scheme (fast spectral bin microphysics) are compared. For temperatures between -10 and -40 °C and TWC > 1 g m-3, all microphysics schemes produce median mass diameters (MMDs) that are generally larger than observed, and the precipitating ice species that controls this size bias varies by scheme, temperature, and w. Despite a much greater number of samples, all simulations fail to reproduce observed high-TWC conditions ( > 2 g m-3) between -20 and -40 °C in which only a small fraction of condensate mass is found in relatively large particle sizes greater than 1 mm in diameter. Although more mass is distributed to large particle sizes relative to those observed across all schemes when controlling for temperature, w, and TWC, differences with observations are significantly variable between the schemes tested. As a result, this bias is hypothesized to partly result from errors in parameterized hydrometeor PSD and single particle

  1. PSD-95 is post-transcriptionally repressed during early neural development by PTBP1 and PTBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Sika; Gray, Erin E; Chawla, Geetanjali

    2012-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is essential for synaptic maturation and plasticity. Although its synaptic regulation has been widely studied, the control of PSD-95 cellular expression is not understood. We found that Psd-95 was controlled post-transcriptionally during neural development...

  2. Effects of cloud condensation nuclei and ice nucleating particles on precipitation processes and supercooled liquid in mixed-phase orographic clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Jiwen; Leung, L. Ruby; Rosenfeld, Daniel; DeMott, Paul J.

    2017-01-01

    How orographic mixed-phase clouds respond to the change in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nucleating particles (INPs) are highly uncertain. The main snow production mechanism in warm and cold mixed-phase orographic clouds (referred to as WMOCs and CMOCs, respectively, distinguished here as those having cloud tops warmer and colder than -20°C) could be very different. We quantify the CCN and INP impacts on supercooled water content, cloud phases, and precipitation for a WMOC case and a CMOC case, with sensitivity tests using the same CCN and INP concentrations between the WMOC and CMOC cases. It was found that deposition plays a more important role than riming for forming snow in the CMOC case, while the role of riming is dominant in the WMOC case. As expected, adding CCN suppresses precipitation, especially in WMOCs and low INPs. However, this reverses strongly for CCN of 1000 cm-3 and larger. We found a new mechanism through which CCN can invigorate mixed-phase clouds over the Sierra Nevada and drastically intensify snow precipitation when CCN concentrations are high (1000 cm-3 or higher). In this situation, more widespread shallow clouds with a greater amount of cloud water form in the Central Valley and foothills west of the mountain range. The increased latent heat release associated with the formation of these clouds strengthens the local transport of moisture to the windward slope, invigorating mixed-phase clouds over the mountains, and thereby producing higher amounts of snow precipitation. Under all CCN conditions, increasing the INPs leads to decreased riming and mixed-phase fraction in the CMOC as a result of liquid-limited conditions, but has the opposite effects in the WMOC as a result of ice-limited conditions. However, precipitation in both cases is increased by increasing INPs due to an increase in deposition for the CMOC but enhanced riming and deposition in the WMOC. Increasing the INPs dramatically reduces

  3. Maximum Likelihood PSD Estimation for Speech Enhancement in Reverberation and Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuklasinski, Adam; Doclo, Simon; Jensen, Søren Holdt

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we focus on the problem of power spectral density (PSD) estimation from multiple microphone signals in reverberant and noisy environments. The PSD estimation method proposed in this paper is based on the maximum likelihood (ML) methodology. In particular, we derive a novel ML...... instrumental measures and is shown to be higher than when the competing estimator is used. Moreover, we perform a speech intelligibility test where we demonstrate that both the proposed and the competing PSD estimators lead to similar intelligibility improvements....

  4. Use of S-PolKa Particles IDentification and TMI and MADRAS brightness temperatures to characterize the ice microphysics in rain systems as a function of their life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Audrey; Viltard, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    In the framework of the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques Mission, a specific campaign was dedicated to ice microphysics studies during the CYNDIE-DYNAMO experiment. This contribution consisted in deploying the French Falcon 20 from mid-November to mid-December in Gan and perform about 40 hours of microphysics flights. The Falcon was equipped with a up- and downward looking W-Band Doppler Radar (RASTA) and a series of microphysics probes in order to characterize the ice particles in terms of density. This information is of dramatic importance to the microwave-based rain retrieval algorithms and more specifically the operational algorithm used in Megha-Tropiques known as BRAIN (Viltard et al 2006, Viltard et al 2012). This algorithm uses a retrieval database to reduce the number of possible solutions to those actually physical. This requires the computation of microwave brightness temperatures through a radiative transfer model in which the ice microphysics properties are parameterized. This parametrization is key for all brightness temperature simulation above roughly 30 GHz and strongly affects the quality of the rain retrieval. For the limited number of cases when the Falcon flew, we have a rather detailed description of the ice microphysics properties but this happens to be insufficient to build a robust statistics of the ice as a function of rain system life cycle. Hence the use of particles identification (PID) obtained from the ground-based polarimetric data from NCAR SPol-Ka. This dataset covers almost 5 month within a 200 km radius centered on Gan. We will briefly present our contribution in the CYNDIE-DYNAMO campaign and interpret in terms of microphysical properties the comparisons between these PIDs and the brightness temperatures measured by two passive microwave radiometers: TMI on TRMM and MADRAS on Megha-Tropiques.

  5. POWER SPECTRUM DENSITY (PSD ANALYSIS OF AUTOMOTIVE PEDAL-PAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMED RITHAUDDEEN YUSOFF

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Vibration at the pedal-pad may contribute to discomfort of foot plantar fascia during driving. This is due to transmission of vibration to the mount, chassis, pedal, and then to the foot plantar fascia. This experimental study is conducted to determine the estimation of peak value using the power spectral density of the vertical vibration input at the foot. The power spectral density value is calculated based on the frequency range between 13 Hz to 18 Hz. This experiment was conducted using 12 subjects testing on three size of pedal-pads; small, medium and large. The result shows that peak value occurs at resonance frequency of 15 Hz. The PSD values at that resonance frequency are 0.251 (m/s2 2/Hz for small pedal-pad, followed by the medium pedal-pad is at 0.387 (m/s2 2/Hz and lastly for the large pedal-pad is at 0.483 (m/s22/Hz. The resultsindicate that during driving, the foot vibration when interact with the large pedal-pad contributed higher stimulus compared with the small and medium pedal-pad. The pedal-pad size plays an important role in the pedal element designs in terms of vibration-transfer from pedal-pads on the feet, particularly to provide comfort to the driver while driving.

  6. Interaction partners of PSD-93 studied by X-ray crystallography and fluorescence polarization spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiorentini, Monica; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    the extreme C-terminus of GluD2 with PSD-93 PDZ1 have been investigated in the crystalline phase. Two different binding modes of these residues were observed, suggesting that the peptide is not tightly bound to PSD-93 PDZ1. In accordance, the two N-terminal PSD-93 PDZ domains show no appreciable binding...... affinity for a GluD2-derived C-terminal octapeptide, whereas micromolar affinity was observed for a GluN2B-derived C-terminal octapeptide. This indicates that if present, the interactions between GluD2 and PSD-93 involve more than the extreme terminus of the receptor. In contrast, the tumour...

  7. Arc Requires PSD95 for Assembly into Postsynaptic Complexes Involved with Neural Dysfunction and Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esperanza Fernández

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Arc is an activity-regulated neuronal protein, but little is known about its interactions, assembly into multiprotein complexes, and role in human disease and cognition. We applied an integrated proteomic and genetic strategy by targeting a tandem affinity purification (TAP tag and Venus fluorescent protein into the endogenous Arc gene in mice. This allowed biochemical and proteomic characterization of native complexes in wild-type and knockout mice. We identified many Arc-interacting proteins, of which PSD95 was the most abundant. PSD95 was essential for Arc assembly into 1.5-MDa complexes and activity-dependent recruitment to excitatory synapses. Integrating human genetic data with proteomic data showed that Arc-PSD95 complexes are enriched in schizophrenia, intellectual disability, autism, and epilepsy mutations and normal variants in intelligence. We propose that Arc-PSD95 postsynaptic complexes potentially affect human cognitive function.

  8. PSD microscopy: a new technique for adaptive local scanning of microscale objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Shen, Yantao

    2017-01-01

    A position-sensitive detector/device (PSD) is a sensor that is capable of tracking the location of a laser beam on its surface. PSDs are used in many scientific instruments and technical applications including but not limited to atomic force microscopy, human eye movement monitoring, mirrors or machine tool alignment, vibration analysis, beam position control and so on. This work intends to propose a new application using the PSD. That is a new microscopy system called scanning PSD microscopy. The working mechanism is about putting an object on the surface of the PSD and fast scanning its area with a laser beam. To achieve a high degree of accuracy and precision, a reliable framework was designed using the PSD. In this work, we first tried to improve the PSD reading and its measurement performance. This was done by minimizing the effects of noise, distortion and other disturbing parameters. After achieving a high degree of confidence, the microscopy system can be implemented based on the improved PSD measurement performance. Later to improve the scanning efficiency, we developed an adaptive local scanning system to scan the whole area of the PSD in a short matter of time. It was validated that our comprehensive and adaptive local scanning method can shorten the scanning time in order of hundreds of times in comparison with the traditional raster scanning without losing any important information about the scanned 2D objects. Methods are also introduced to scan very complicated objects with bifurcations and crossings. By incorporating all these methods, the new microscopy system is capable of scanning very complicated objects in the matter of a few seconds with a resolution that is in order of a few micrometers.

  9. Small RNAs regulate the biocontrol property of fluorescent Pseudomonas strain Psd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Anamika; Kochar, Mandira; Upadhyay, Ashutosh; Tripathy, Soumya; Rajam, Manchikatla Venkat; Srivastava, Sheela

    2017-03-01

    The production of biocontrol factors by Pseudomonads is reported to be controlled at the post-transcriptional level by the GacS/GacA signal transduction pathway. This involves RNA-binding translational repressor proteins, RsmA and RsmE, and the small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) RsmX, RsmY, and RsmZ. While the former represses genes involved in secondary metabolite production, the latter relieves this repression at the end of exponential growth. We have studied the fluorescent Pseudomonas strain Psd, possessing good biocontrol potential, and confirmed the presence of rsmY and rsmZ by PCR amplification. Gene constructs for all the three small RNAs (RsmX, RsmY and RsmZ) carried on broad host-range plasmid, pME6032 were mobilized into strain Psd. Expression analysis of gacA in the recombinant strains over-expressing rsmX (Psd-pME7320), rsmY (Psd-pME6359) and rsmZ (Psd-pME6918) revealed a significant upregulation of the response regulator. Besides, a remarkable down-regulation of rsmA was also reported in all the strains. The variant strains were found to produce comparatively higher levels of phenazines. Indole acetic acid levels were higher to some extent, and strain Psd-pME6918 also showed elevated production of HCN. The tomato seedlings infected with Fusarium oxysporum and Verticillium dahliae in the presence of culture filtrate of the recombinant strains showed better plant protection response in comparison to the wild-type strain Psd. These results suggest that small RNAs are important determinants in regulation of the biocontrol property of strain Psd. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Live imaging of endogenous PSD-95 using ENABLED: a conditional strategy to fluorescently label endogenous proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Dale A; Tillo, Shane E; Yang, Guang; Rah, Jong-Cheol; Melander, Joshua B; Bai, Suxia; Soler-Cedeño, Omar; Qin, Maozhen; Zemelman, Boris V; Guo, Caiying; Mao, Tianyi; Zhong, Haining

    2014-12-10

    Stoichiometric labeling of endogenous synaptic proteins for high-contrast live-cell imaging in brain tissue remains challenging. Here, we describe a conditional mouse genetic strategy termed endogenous labeling via exon duplication (ENABLED), which can be used to fluorescently label endogenous proteins with near ideal properties in all neurons, a sparse subset of neurons, or specific neuronal subtypes. We used this method to label the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with mVenus without overexpression side effects. We demonstrated that mVenus-tagged PSD-95 is functionally equivalent to wild-type PSD-95 and that PSD-95 is present in nearly all dendritic spines in CA1 neurons. Within spines, while PSD-95 exhibited low mobility under basal conditions, its levels could be regulated by chronic changes in neuronal activity. Notably, labeled PSD-95 also allowed us to visualize and unambiguously examine otherwise-unidentifiable excitatory shaft synapses in aspiny neurons, such as parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dopaminergic neurons. Our results demonstrate that the ENABLED strategy provides a valuable new approach to study the dynamics of endogenous synaptic proteins in vivo. Copyright © 2014 the authors 0270-6474/14/3416698-15$15.00/0.

  11. Stabilization of the angiotensin-(1-7) receptor Mas through interaction with PSD95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Weihua; Sun, Licui; Yang, Longyan; Li, Ji-Feng; Hu, Jia; Zheng, Shuai; Guo, Ruihan; Feng, Duiping; Ma, Qian; Shi, Xiaocui; Xiong, Ying; Yang, Xiaomei; Song, Ran; Xu, Jianguo; Wang, Songlin; He, Junqi

    2013-08-01

    The functions and signalling mechanisms of the Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)] receptor Mas have been studied extensively. However, less attention has been paid to the intracellular regulation of Mas protein. In the present study, PSD95 (postsynaptic density 95), a novel binding protein of Mas receptor, was identified, and their association was characterized further. Mas specifically interacts with PDZ1-2, but not the PDZ3, domain of PSD95 via Mas-CT (Mas C-terminus), and the last four amino acids [ETVV (Glu-Thr-Val-Val)] of Mas-CT were determined to be essential for this interaction, as shown by GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal co-localization experiments. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies indicated that PSD95 enhanced Mas protein expression by increasing the stabilization of the receptor. Mas degradation was robustly inhibited by the proteasome inhibitor MG132 in time- and dose-dependent manners, and the expression of PSD95 impaired Mas ubiquitination, indicating that the PSD95-Mas association inhibits Mas receptor degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of Mas receptor regulation by which its expression is modulated at the post-translational level by ubiquitination, and clarify the role of PSD95, which binds directly to Mas, blocking the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the receptor via the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway.

  12. The dependence of cirrus gamma size distributions expressed as volumes in N0-λ-μ phase space and bulk cloud properties on environmental conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-10-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N0, λ, μ) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D > 15 µm collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N0, μ, and λ from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension Dmm as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N0, μ, and λ, bulk extinction, IWC, and Dmm with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 µm, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N0, μ, and λ between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  13. The Dependence of Cirrus Gamma Size Distributions Expressed as Volumes in N(sub 0)-Lambda-Mu Phase Space and Bulk Cloud Properties on Environmental Conditions: Results from the Small Ice Particles in Cirrus Experiment (SPARTICUS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert C.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Fridlind, Ann M.; Atlas, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    The variability of cirrus ice microphysical properties is investigated using observations obtained during the Small Particles in Cirrus (SPARTICUS) campaign. An existing approach that represents a size distribution (SD) as a single gamma function using an ellipsoid of equally realizable solutions in (N(sub 0), lambda, mu) phase space is modified to automatically identify multiple modes in SDs and characterize each mode by such an ellipsoid. The modified approach is applied to ice crystals with maximum dimension D greater than15 micrometers collected by the 2-D stereo and 2-D precipitation probes on the Stratton Park Engineering Company Learjet. The dependencies of N(sub 0), mu, and lambda from each mode, total number concentration, bulk extinction, ice water content (IWC), and mass median maximum dimension D(sub mm) as a function of temperature T and cirrus type are then analyzed. The changes in the observed codependencies between N(sub 0), mu, and lambda, bulk extinction, IWC, and D(sub mm) with environmental conditions indicate that particles were larger at higher T during SPARTICUS. At most two modes were observed in any SD during SPARTICUS, with the average boundary between them at 115 micrometers, similar to past studies not using probes with shatter mitigating tips and artifact removal algorithms. The bimodality of the SDs increased with T. This and the differences in N(sub 0), mu, and lambda between the modes suggest that particles with smaller D nucleated more recently than particles with larger D, which grew via vapor deposition and aggregation. Because smaller crystals, whose concentrations are uncertain, make marginal contributions to higher order moments, the use of higher moments for evaluating model fields is suggested.

  14. Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hayashi, Kanetoshi [NKK Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

  15. IceCube SWIRP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dongliang L.

    2017-01-01

    Clouds, ice clouds in particular, are a major source of uncertainty in climate models. Submm-wave sensors fill the sensitivity gap between MW and IR.Cloud microphysical properties (particle size and shape) account for large (200 and 40) measurement uncertainty.

  16. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  17. Sea Ice Detection Based on Differential Delay-Doppler Maps from UK TechDemoSat-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongchao; Yu, Kegen; Zou, Jingui; Wickert, Jens

    2017-07-12

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be exploited to remotely sense atmosphere and land and ocean surface to retrieve a range of geophysical parameters. This paper proposes two new methods, termed as power-summation of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PS-D) and pixel-number of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PN-D), to distinguish between sea ice and sea water using differential Delay-Doppler Maps (dDDMs). PS-D and PN-D make use of power-summation and pixel-number of dDDMs, respectively, to measure the degree of difference between two DDMs so as to determine the transition state (water-water, water-ice, ice-ice and ice-water) and hence ice and water are detected. Moreover, an adaptive incoherent averaging of DDMs is employed to improve the computational efficiency. A large number of DDMs recorded by UK TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) over the Arctic region are used to test the proposed sea ice detection methods. Through evaluating against ground-truth measurements from the Ocean Sea Ice SAF, the proposed PS-D and PN-D methods achieve a probability of detection of 99.72% and 99.69% respectively, while the probability of false detection is 0.28% and 0.31% respectively.

  18. Sea Ice Detection Based on Differential Delay-Doppler Maps from UK TechDemoSat-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongchao Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS signals can be exploited to remotely sense atmosphere and land and ocean surface to retrieve a range of geophysical parameters. This paper proposes two new methods, termed as power-summation of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PS-D and pixel-number of differential Delay-Doppler Maps (PN-D, to distinguish between sea ice and sea water using differential Delay-Doppler Maps (dDDMs. PS-D and PN-D make use of power-summation and pixel-number of dDDMs, respectively, to measure the degree of difference between two DDMs so as to determine the transition state (water-water, water-ice, ice-ice and ice-water and hence ice and water are detected. Moreover, an adaptive incoherent averaging of DDMs is employed to improve the computational efficiency. A large number of DDMs recorded by UK TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1 over the Arctic region are used to test the proposed sea ice detection methods. Through evaluating against ground-truth measurements from the Ocean Sea Ice SAF, the proposed PS-D and PN-D methods achieve a probability of detection of 99.72% and 99.69% respectively, while the probability of false detection is 0.28% and 0.31% respectively.

  19. Evaluation of radar reflectivity factor simulations of ice crystal populations from in situ observations for the retrieval of condensed water content in tropical mesoscale convective systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fontaine

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the evaluation of a technique to estimate cloud condensed water content (CWC in tropical convection from airborne cloud radar reflectivity factors at 94 GHz and in situ measurements of particle size distributions (PSDs and aspect ratios of ice crystal populations. The approach is to calculate from each 5 s mean PSD and flight-level reflectivity the variability of all possible solutions of m(D relationships fulfilling the condition that the simulated radar reflectivity factor (T-matrix method matches the measured radar reflectivity factor. For the reflectivity simulations, ice crystals were approximated as oblate spheroids, without using a priori assumptions on the mass–size relationship of ice crystals. The CWC calculations demonstrate that individual CWC values are in the range ±32 % of the retrieved average CWC value over all CWC solutions for the chosen 5 s time intervals. In addition, during the airborne field campaign performed out of Darwin in 2014, as part of the international High Altitude Ice Crystals/High Ice Water Content (HAIC/HIWC projects, CWCs were measured independently with the new IKP-2 (isokinetic evaporator probe instrument along with simultaneous particle imagery and radar reflectivity. Retrieved CWCs from the T-matrix radar reflectivity simulations are on average 16 % higher than the direct CWCIKP measurements. The differences between the CWCIKP and averaged retrieved CWCs are found to be primarily a function of the total number concentration of ice crystals. Consequently, a correction term is applied (as a function of total number concentration that significantly improves the retrieved CWC. After correction, the retrieved CWCs have a median relative error with respect to measured values of only −1 %. Uncertainties in the measurements of total concentration of hydrometeors are investigated in order to calculate their contribution to the relative error of calculated CWC with respect to

  20. Ice cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Ice cores from Antarctica, from Greenland, and from a number of smaller glaciers around the world yield a wealth of information on past climates and environments. Ice cores offer unique records on past temperatures, atmospheric composition (including greenhouse gases), volcanism, solar activity......, dustiness, and biomass burning, among others. In Antarctica, ice cores extend back more than 800,000 years before present (Jouzel et al. 2007), whereas. Greenland ice cores cover the last 130,000 years...

  1. Anti-icing superhydrophobic coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liangliang; Jones, Andrew K; Sikka, Vinod K; Wu, Jianzhong; Gao, Di

    2009-11-03

    We use nanoparticle-polymer composites to demonstrate the anti-icing capability of superhydrophobic surfaces and report direct experimental evidence that such surfaces are able to prevent ice formation upon impact of supercooled water both in laboratory conditions and in natural environments. We find that the anti-icing capability of these composites depends not only on their superhydrophobicity but also on the size of the particles exposed on the surface. The critical particle sizes that determine the superhydrophobicity and the anti-icing property are in two different length scales. The effect of particle size on ice formation is explained by using a classical heterogeneous nucleation theory. This result implies that the anti-icing property of a surface is not directly correlated with the superhydrophobicity, and thus, it is uncertain whether a superhydrophobic surface is anti-icing without detailed knowledge of the surface morphology. The result also opens up possibilities for rational design of anti-icing superhydrophobic surfaces by tuning surface textures in multiple length scales.

  2. Ice Cream

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, E.

    2014-01-01

    Ice cream is a popular dessert, which owes its sensorial properties (mouth feel) to its complex microstructure. The microstructure is a result of the combination of the ingredients and the production process. Ice cream is produced by simultaneous freezing and shearing of the ice cream mix, which

  3. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  4. International Workshop on Comparing Ice Nucleation Measuring Systems 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cziczo, Daniel [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2016-04-30

    The relationship of ambient aerosol particles to the formation of ice-containing clouds is one of the largest uncertainties in understanding the Earth’s climate. The uncertainty is due to several poorly understood processes and measurements including, but not limited to: (1) the microphysics of how particles nucleate ice, (2) the number of ice forming particles as a function of atmospheric properties such as temperature and relative humidity, (3) the atmospheric distribution of ice forming particles and (4) the role of anthropogenic activities in producing or changing the behavior of ice forming particles. The ways in which ice forming particles can impact climate is also multi-faceted. More ice forming particles can lead to clouds with more ice crystals and different optical properties than clouds with less ice forming particles. More effective ice forming particles can lead to ice at higher temperature and/or lower saturation, resulting in clouds at lower altitude or latitude which also changes the Earth’s radiative balance. Ice nucleation also initiates most of the Earth’s precipitation, even in the mid- and low-latitudes, since cloud-top temperatures are often below freezing. The limited measurements and lack of understanding directly translates to restrictions in our ability to model atmospheric ice formation and project changes into the future. The importance of ice nucleation research is further exemplified by Figure 1 which shows the publications per decade and citations per year on the topic of ice nucleation [DeMott et al., 2011]. After a lull at the end of the last century, there has been a dramatic increase in both publications and citations related to ice nucleation; this directly corresponds to the importance of ice nucleation on the Earth’s climate and the uncertainty in this area noted by the Solomon [2007].

  5. Novel Method of Detecting Movement of the Interference Fringes Using One-Dimensional PSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a method of using a one-dimensional position-sensitive detector (PSD by replacing charge-coupled device (CCD to measure the movement of the interference fringes is presented first, and its feasibility is demonstrated through an experimental setup based on the principle of centroid detection. Firstly, the centroid position of the interference fringes in a fiber Mach-Zehnder (M-Z interferometer is solved in theory, showing it has a higher resolution and sensitivity. According to the physical characteristics and principles of PSD, a simulation of the interference fringe’s phase difference in fiber M-Z interferometers and PSD output is carried out. Comparing the simulation results with the relationship between phase differences and centroid positions in fiber M-Z interferometers, the conclusion that the output of interference fringes by PSD is still the centroid position is obtained. Based on massive measurements, the best resolution of the system is achieved with 5.15, 625 μm. Finally, the detection system is evaluated through setup error analysis and an ultra-narrow-band filter structure. The filter structure is configured with a one-dimensional photonic crystal containing positive and negative refraction material, which can eliminate background light in the PSD detection experiment. This detection system has a simple structure, good stability, high precision and easily performs remote measurements, which makes it potentially useful in material small deformation tests, refractivity measurements of optical media and optical wave front detection.

  6. Particle emission from polymer-doped water ice matrices induced by non-linear absorption of laser light at 1064 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purice, A.; Schou, Jørgen; Dinescu, M.

    2006-01-01

    Emission of PEG (polyethylene glycol) molecules and ions from an ice target induced by laser irradiation in the infrared (IR) regime at 1064 nm was studied. Matrices of 1 wt% PEG flash-frozen solutions were used for polymer deposition with MAPLE (matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation). Even...... though linear absorption in defect-free water ice is two orders of magnitude larger at 1064 ran than 355 nm, the deposition rate and ion current density are much smaller for IR than for ultraviolet laser light. The similarity of results for both wavelengths indicates that non-linear absorption...

  7. Suspended sediment concentration and particle size distribution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... particle size distribution (PSD) were correlated with HMC by using bivariate and multivariate regression models. Proposed models were then selected based on statistical criteria. The results showed high correlation between dissolved and particulate chromium content with efficiency coefficients beyond 77% ( > 0.001).

  8. The effect of particle size distribution on the design of urban stormwater control measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbig, William R.; Fienen, Michael N.; Horwatich, Judy A.; Bannerman, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    An urban pollutant loading model was used to demonstrate how incorrect assumptions on the particle size distribution (PSD) in urban runoff can alter the design characteristics of stormwater control measures (SCMs) used to remove solids in stormwater. Field-measured PSD, although highly variable, is generally coarser than the widely-accepted PSD characterized by the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program (NURP). PSDs can be predicted based on environmental surrogate data. There were no appreciable differences in predicted PSD when grouped by season. Model simulations of a wet detention pond and catch basin showed a much smaller surface area is needed to achieve the same level of solids removal using the median value of field-measured PSD as compared to NURP PSD. Therefore, SCMs that used the NURP PSD in the design process could be unnecessarily oversized. The median of measured PSDs, although more site-specific than NURP PSDs, could still misrepresent the efficiency of an SCM because it may not adequately capture the variability of individual runoff events. Future pollutant loading models may account for this variability through regression with environmental surrogates, but until then, without proper site characterization, the adoption of a single PSD to represent all runoff conditions may result in SCMs that are under- or over-sized, rendering them ineffective or unnecessarily costly.

  9. Legal Ice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandsbjerg, Jeppe

    The idealised land|water dichotomy is most obviously challenged by ice when ‘land practice’ takes place on ice or when ‘maritime practice’ is obstructed by ice. Both instances represent disparity between the legal codification of space and its social practice. Logically, then, both instances call...... for alternative legal thought and practice; in the following I will emphasise the former and reflect upon the relationship between ice, law and politics. Prior to this workshop I had worked more on the relationship between cartography, geography and boundaries than specifically on ice. Listening to all...... the interesting conversations during the workshop, however, made me think that much of the concern with the Polar Regions in general, and the presence of ice in particular, reverberates around the question of how to accommodate various geographical presences and practices within the regulatory framework that we...

  10. Improved mathematical models for particle-size distribution data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prior studies have suggested that particle-size distribution data of soils is central and helpful in this regard. This study proposes two improved mathematical models to describe and represent the varied particle-size distribution (PSD) data for tropically weathered residual (TWR) soils. The theoretical analysis and the ...

  11. Variability of Particle Size Distributions in the Bohai Sea and the Yellow Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongfeng Qiu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Particle size distribution (PSD is an important parameter that is relevant to many aspects of marine ecosystems, such as phytoplankton functional types, optical absorption and scattering from particulates, sediment fluxes, and carbon export. However, only a handful of studies have documented the PSD variability in different regions. Here, we investigate the PSD properties and variability in two shallow and semi-enclosed seas (the Bohai Sea (BS and Yellow Sea (YS, using in situ laser diffraction measurements (LISST-100X Type C and other measurements at 79 stations in November 2013. The results show large variability in particle concentrations (in both volume and number concentrations, with volume concentrations varying by 57-fold. The median particle diameter (Dv50 from each of the water samples also covers a large range (22.4–307.0 μm and has an irregular statistical distribution, indicating complexity in the PSD. The PSD slopes (2.7–4.5, estimated from a power-law model, cover nearly the entire range reported previously for natural waters. Small mineral particles (with large PSD slopes are characteristic of near-shore waters prone to sediment resuspension by winds and tides, while large biological particles (with small PSD slopes dominate the total suspended particulates for waters away from the coast. For the BS and YS, this study provides the first report on the properties and spatial variability of the PSD, which may influence the optical properties of the ocean surface and remote sensing algorithms that are based on estimations of particle concentrations and sizes.

  12. Rheology of planetary ices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durham, W.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Kirby, S.H.; Stern, L.A. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1996-04-24

    The brittle and ductile rheology of ices of water, ammonia, methane, and other volatiles, in combination with rock particles and each other, have a primary influence of the evolution and ongoing tectonics of icy moons of the outer solar system. Laboratory experiments help constrain the rheology of solar system ices. Standard experimental techniques can be used because the physical conditions under which most solar system ices exist are within reach of conventional rock mechanics testing machines, adapted to the low subsolidus temperatures of the materials in question. The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of a decade-long experimental deformation program and to provide some background in deformation physics in order to lend some appreciation to the application of these measurements to the planetary setting.

  13. Impairment of TrkB-PSD-95 signaling in Angelman syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cong Cao

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopment disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment and a high rate of autism. AS is caused by disrupted neuronal expression of the maternally inherited Ube3A ubiquitin protein ligase, required for the proteasomal degradation of proteins implicated in synaptic plasticity, such as the activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc/Arg3.1. Mice deficient in maternal Ube3A express elevated levels of Arc in response to synaptic activity, which coincides with severely impaired long-term potentiation (LTP in the hippocampus and deficits in learning behaviors. In this study, we sought to test whether elevated levels of Arc interfere with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF TrkB receptor signaling, which is known to be essential for both the induction and maintenance of LTP. We report that TrkB signaling in the AS mouse is defective, and show that reduction of Arc expression to control levels rescues the signaling deficits. Moreover, the association of the postsynaptic density protein PSD-95 with TrkB is critical for intact BDNF signaling, and elevated levels of Arc were found to impede PSD-95/TrkB association. In Ube3A deficient mice, the BDNF-induced recruitment of PSD-95, as well as PLCγ and Grb2-associated binder 1 (Gab1 with TrkB receptors was attenuated, resulting in reduced activation of PLCγ-α-calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII and PI3K-Akt, but leaving the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk pathway intact. A bridged cyclic peptide (CN2097, shown by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR studies to uniquely bind the PDZ1 domain of PSD-95 with high affinity, decreased the interaction of Arc with PSD-95 to restore BDNF-induced TrkB/PSD-95 complex formation, signaling, and facilitate the induction of LTP in AS mice. We propose that the failure of TrkB receptor signaling at synapses in AS is directly linked to elevated levels of Arc associated with PSD-95 and PSD-95

  14. Climatic implications of ice microphysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liou, K.N. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Based on aircraft measurements of mid-latitude cirrus clouds, ice crystal size distribution and ice water content (IWC) are shown to be dependent on temperature. This dependence is also evident from the theoretical consideration of ice crystal growth. Using simple models of the diffusion and accretion growth of ice particles, the computed mean ice crystal size and IWC compare reasonably well with the measured mean values. The temperature dependence of ice crystal size and IWC has important climatic implications in that the temperature field perturbed by external radiative forcings, such as greenhouse warming, can alter the composition of ice crystal clouds. Through radiative transfer, ice microphysics can in turn affect the temperature field. Higher IWC would increase cloud solar albedo and infrared emissivity, while for a given IWC, larger crystals would reduce cloud albedo and emissivity. The competing effects produced by greenhouse temperature perturbations via ice micro-physics and radiation interactions and feedbacks are assessed by a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model that includes an advanced radiation parameterization program. 3 figs.

  15. Radiative properties of ice clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, D.L.; Koracin, D.; Carter, E. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A new treatment of cirrus cloud radiative properties has been developed, based on anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), which does not parameterize size distributions in terms of an effective radius. Rather, is uses the size distribution parameters directly, and explicitly considers the ice particle shapes. There are three fundamental features which characterize this treatment: (1) the ice path radiation experiences as it travels through an ice crystal is parameterized, (2) only determines the amount of radiation scattered and absorbed, and (3) as in other treatments, the projected area of the size distribution is conserved. The first two features are unique to this treatment, since it does not convert the ice particles into equivalent volume or area spheres in order to apply Mie theory.

  16. Rigidified Clicked Dimeric Ligands for Studying the Dynamics of the PDZ1-2 Supramodule of PSD-95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eildal, Jonas N N; Bach, Anders; Dogan, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    PSD-95 is a scaffolding protein of the MAGUK protein family, and engages in several vital protein-protein interactions in the brain with its PDZ domains. It has been suggested that PSD-95 is composed of two supramodules, one of which is the PDZ1-2 tandem domain. Here we have developed rigidified...

  17. Mysteries at Ice Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fain, Samuel C., Jr.

    1996-03-01

    Michael Faraday noted that ``two pieces of thawing ice, if put together, adhere and become one...the effect will take place in air, or in water, or in vacuo." Why? He proposed that ``a particle of water, which could retain the liquid state whilst touching ice only on one side, could not retain the liquid state if it were touched by ice on both sides."footnote M. Faraday, Proc. Roy. Soc. London 10, 440 (1860) The existence of special properties at interfaces of ice is generally agreed and has important environmental consequences.(J. G. Dash, H. Fu, and J. S. Wettlaufer, Rep. Prog. Phys. 58), 115 (1995) Why do different experiments infer different properties for this layer? Impurities and electric fields at the interfaces may be responsible for some of the variations in experimental results.footnote V. F. Petrenko, U. S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory Report 94-22 (1994) Some background on the physical properties of ice will be discussed, including recent force microscopy measurements done at the University of Washington.footnote C.R. Slaughterbeck, E.W. Kukes, B. Pittenger, D.J. Cook, P.C. Williams, V.L. Eden, S.C. Fain, Jr., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. (in press) Supported by NSF Grant DMR-91-19701.

  18. Ice Ages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    argued that when summers are cool and winters are mild the ice sheets in the northern continents grow because of more snowfall in winter and lesser melting of ice in the summer and vice versa. The variation in the earth-sun geometry changes solar radiation incident at the surface. Milankovitch showed that the changes.

  19. Ice Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane

    2017-05-01

    Ice is a fundamental solid with important environmental, biological, geological, and extraterrestrial impact. The stable form of ice at atmospheric pressure is hexagonal ice, Ih. Despite its prevalence, Ih remains an enigmatic solid, in part due to challenges in preparing samples for fundamental studies. Surfaces of ice present even greater challenges. Recently developed methods for preparation of large single-crystal samples make it possible to reproducibly prepare any chosen face to address numerous fundamental questions. This review describes preparation methods along with results that firmly establish the connection between the macroscopic structure (observed in snowflakes, microcrystallites, or etch pits) and the molecular-level configuration (detected with X-ray or electron scattering techniques). Selected results of probing interactions at the ice surface, including growth from the melt, surface vibrations, and characterization of the quasi-liquid layer, are discussed.

  20. An alternative method for determining particle-size distribution of forest road aggregate and soil with large-sized particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakjun Rhee; Randy B. Foltz; James L. Fridley; Finn Krogstad; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of particle-size distribution (PSD) of soil with large-sized particles (e.g., 25.4 mm diameter) requires a large sample and numerous particle-size analyses (PSAs). A new method is needed that would reduce time, effort, and cost for PSAs of the soil and aggregate material with large-sized particles. We evaluated a nested method for sampling and PSA by...

  1. Design and synthesis of triazole-based peptidomimetics of a PSD-95 PDZ domain inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders; Pedersen, Thomas B.; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    PSD-95 PDZ domains are biologically important and promising drug targets. Here, we discover a triazole-based peptidomimetic, 10, by ‘click chemistry’. Compound 10 inhibits the PDZ2/GluN2B interaction with affinity similar to tripeptide SAV and better than current small-molecules. Thus, 10...

  2. Maximum likelihood PSD estimation for speech enhancement in reverberant and noisy conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuklasinski, Adam; Doclo, Simon; Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    estimator. Instrumental performance measures indicate an advantage of the proposed estimator over the competing one. In a speech intelligibility test all algorithms significantly improved the word intelligibility score. While the results suggest a minor advantage of using the proposed PSD estimator...

  3. Reduced SNAP-25 increases PSD-95 mobility and impairs spine morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossati, G; Morini, R; Corradini, I; Antonucci, F; Trepte, P; Edry, E; Sharma, V; Papale, A; Pozzi, D; Defilippi, P; Meier, J C; Brambilla, R; Turco, E; Rosenblum, K; Wanker, E E; Ziv, N E; Menna, E; Matteoli, M

    2015-09-01

    Impairment of synaptic function can lead to neuropsychiatric disorders collectively referred to as synaptopathies. The SNARE protein SNAP-25 is implicated in several brain pathologies and, indeed, brain areas of psychiatric patients often display reduced SNAP-25 expression. It has been recently found that acute downregulation of SNAP-25 in brain slices impairs long-term potentiation; however, the processes through which this occurs are still poorly defined. We show that in vivo acute downregulation of SNAP-25 in CA1 hippocampal region affects spine number. Consistently, hippocampal neurons from SNAP-25 heterozygous mice show reduced densities of dendritic spines and defective PSD-95 dynamics. Finally, we show that, in brain, SNAP-25 is part of a molecular complex including PSD-95 and p140Cap, with p140Cap being capable to bind to both SNAP-25 and PSD-95. These data demonstrate an unexpected role of SNAP-25 in controlling PSD-95 clustering and open the possibility that genetic reductions of the protein levels - as occurring in schizophrenia - may contribute to the pathology through an effect on postsynaptic function and plasticity.

  4. Arc Requires PSD95 for Assembly into Postsynaptic Complexes Involved with Neural Dysfunction and Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Esperanza; Collins, Mark O; Frank, René A W; Zhu, Fei; Kopanitsa, Maksym V; Nithianantharajah, Jess; Lemprière, Sarah A; Fricker, David; Elsegood, Kathryn A; McLaughlin, Catherine L; Croning, Mike D R; Mclean, Colin; Armstrong, J Douglas; Hill, W David; Deary, Ian J; Cencelli, Giulia; Bagni, Claudia; Fromer, Menachem; Purcell, Shaun M; Pocklington, Andrew J; Choudhary, Jyoti S; Komiyama, Noboru H; Grant, Seth G N

    2017-10-17

    Arc is an activity-regulated neuronal protein, but little is known about its interactions, assembly into multiprotein complexes, and role in human disease and cognition. We applied an integrated proteomic and genetic strategy by targeting a tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag and Venus fluorescent protein into the endogenous Arc gene in mice. This allowed biochemical and proteomic characterization of native complexes in wild-type and knockout mice. We identified many Arc-interacting proteins, of which PSD95 was the most abundant. PSD95 was essential for Arc assembly into 1.5-MDa complexes and activity-dependent recruitment to excitatory synapses. Integrating human genetic data with proteomic data showed that Arc-PSD95 complexes are enriched in schizophrenia, intellectual disability, autism, and epilepsy mutations and normal variants in intelligence. We propose that Arc-PSD95 postsynaptic complexes potentially affect human cognitive function. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Design of a large dynamic range readout unit for the PSD detector of DAMPE

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Yong; Sun, Zhiyu; Zhang, Yongjie; Fang, Fang; Chen, Junling; Hu, Bitao

    2016-01-01

    A large dynamic range is required by the Plastic Scintillator Detector (PSD) of DArk Matter Paricle Explorer (DAMPE), and a double-dynode readout has been developed. To verify this design, a prototype detector module has been constructed and tested with cosmic rays and heavy ion beams. The results match with the estimation and the readout unit could easily cover the required dynamic range.

  6. 75 FR 28227 - Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR): Aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 51 and 52 RIN 2060-AP80 Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and Nonattainment New Source Review (NSR): Aggregation Correction Proposed Rule document 2010-11578 was...

  7. Event-based total suspended sediment particle size distribution model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jennifer; Sattar, Ahmed M. A.; Gharabaghi, Bahram; Warner, Richard C.

    2016-05-01

    One of the most challenging modelling tasks in hydrology is prediction of the total suspended sediment particle size distribution (TSS-PSD) in stormwater runoff generated from exposed soil surfaces at active construction sites and surface mining operations. The main objective of this study is to employ gene expression programming (GEP) and artificial neural networks (ANN) to develop a new model with the ability to more accurately predict the TSS-PSD by taking advantage of both event-specific and site-specific factors in the model. To compile the data for this study, laboratory scale experiments using rainfall simulators were conducted on fourteen different soils to obtain TSS-PSD. This data is supplemented with field data from three construction sites in Ontario over a period of two years to capture the effect of transport and deposition within the site. The combined data sets provide a wide range of key overlooked site-specific and storm event-specific factors. Both parent soil and TSS-PSD in runoff are quantified by fitting each to a lognormal distribution. Compared to existing regression models, the developed model more accurately predicted the TSS-PSD using a more comprehensive list of key model input parameters. Employment of the new model will increase the efficiency of deployment of required best management practices, designed based on TSS-PSD, to minimize potential adverse effects of construction site runoff on aquatic life in the receiving watercourses.

  8. Hysteresis in suspended sediment to turbidity relations due to changing particle size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Mark N.; Sturm, Terry W.

    2013-01-01

    Turbidity (T) is the most ubiquitous of surrogate technologies used to estimate suspended-sediment concentration (SSC). The effects of sediment size on turbidity are well documented; however, effects from changes in particle size distributions (PSD) are rarely evaluated. Hysteresis in relations of SSC-to-turbidity (SSC~T) for single stormflow events was observed and quantified for a data set of 195 concurrent measurements of SSC, turbidity, discharge, velocity, and volumetric PSD collected during five stormflows in 2009–2010 on Yellow River at Gees Mill Road in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Regressions of SSC-normalized turbidity (T/SSC) on concurrently measured PSD percentiles show an inverse, exponential influence of particle size on turbidity that is not constant across the size range of the PSD. The majority of the influence of PSD on T/SSC is from particles of fine-silt and smaller sizes (finer than 16 microns). This study shows that small changes in the often assumed stability of the PSD are significant to SSC~T relations. Changes of only 5 microns in the fine silt and smaller size fractions of suspended sediment PSD can produce hysteresis in the SSC~T rating that can increase error and produce bias. Observed SSC~T hysteresis may be an indicator of changes in sediment properties during stormflows and of potential changes in sediment sources. Trends in the PSD time series indicate that sediment transport is capacity-limited for sand-sized sediment in the channel and supply-limited for fine silt and smaller sediment from the hillslope.

  9. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Final design report: PSD-I, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-06-30

    The PSD-I program provides a heat exchanger sytem consisting of an evaporator, condenser and various ancillaries with ammonia used as a working fluid in a closed simulated Rankine cycle. It is to be installed on the Chepachet Research Vessel for test and evaluation of a number of OTEC concepts in a true ocean environment. It is one of several test articles to be tested. Primary design concerns include control of biofouling, corrosion and erosion of aluminum tubes, selection of materials, and the development of a basis for scale-up to large heat exchangers so as to ultimately demonstrate economic feasibility on a commercial scale. The PSD-I test article is devised to verify thermodynamic, environmental, and mechanical performance of basic design concepts. The detailed design, development, fabrication, checklist, delivery, installation support, and operation support for the Test Article Heat Exchangers are described. (WHK)

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) Knowledge Management (KM) Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnedoe, Tom; Smith, Randy; McCarter, Mike; Wilson, Barry; Porter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities within the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center of Excellence (AISCE), lntergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KNI implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to suppoth e planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have beon pedormed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural1KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  11. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kok, Gregory [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States); Kulkarni, Gourihar [Droplet Measurement Technologies, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70°C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  12. Sticking properties of ice grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongmanns, M.; Kumm, M.; Wurm, G.; Wolf, D. E.; Teiser, J.

    2017-06-01

    We study the size dependence of pull-off forces of water ice in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. To determine the pull-off force in our laboratory experiments, we use a liquid nitrogen cooled centrifuge. Depending on its rotation frequency, spherical ice grains detach due to the centrifugal force which is related to the adhesive properties. Numerical simulations are conducted by means of molecular dynamics simulations of hexagonal ice using a standard coarse-grained water potential. The pull-off force of a single contact between two spherical ice grains is measured due to strain controlled simulations. Both, the experimental study and the simulations reveal a dependence between the pull-off force and the (reduced) particle radii, which differ significantly from the linear dependence of common contact theories.

  13. Sticking properties of ice grains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongmanns M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the size dependence of pull-off forces of water ice in laboratory experiments and numerical simulations. To determine the pull-off force in our laboratory experiments, we use a liquid nitrogen cooled centrifuge. Depending on its rotation frequency, spherical ice grains detach due to the centrifugal force which is related to the adhesive properties. Numerical simulations are conducted by means of molecular dynamics simulations of hexagonal ice using a standard coarse-grained water potential. The pull-off force of a single contact between two spherical ice grains is measured due to strain controlled simulations. Both, the experimental study and the simulations reveal a dependence between the pull-off force and the (reduced particle radii, which differ significantly from the linear dependence of common contact theories.

  14. Simulated power spectral density (PSD) of background electrocorticogram (ECoG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Walter J; Zhai, Jian

    2009-03-01

    The ECoG background activity of cerebral cortex in states of rest and slow wave sleep resembles broadband noise. The power spectral density (PSD) then may often conform to a power-law distribution: a straight line in coordinates of log power vs. log frequency. The exponent, x, of the distribution, 1/f(x), ranges between 2 and 4. These findings are explained with a model of the neural source of the background activity in mutual excitation among pyramidal cells. The dendritic response of a population of interactive excitatory neurons to an impulse input is a rapid exponential rise and a slow exponential decay, which can be fitted with the sum of two exponential terms. When that function is convolved as the kernel with pulses from a Poisson process and summed, the resulting "brown" or "black noise conforms to the ECoG time series and the PSD in rest and sleep. The PSD slope is dependent on the rate of rise. The variation in the observed slope is attributed to variation in the level of the background activity that is homeostatically regulated by the refractory periods of the excitatory neurons. Departures in behavior from rest and sleep to action are accompanied by local peaks in the PSD, which manifest emergent nonrandom structure in the ECoG, and which prevent reliable estimation of the 1/f(x) exponents in active states. We conclude that the resting ECoG truly is low-dimensional noise, and that the resting state is an optimal starting point for defining and measuring both artifactual and physiological structures emergent in the activated ECoG.

  15. A spongy icing model for aircraft icing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Researches have indicated that impinging droplets can be entrapped as liquid in the ice matrix and the temperature of accreting ice surface is below the freezing point. When liquid entrapment by ice matrix happens, this kind of ice is called spongy ice. A new spongy icing model for the ice accretion problem on airfoil or aircraft has been developed to account for entrapped liquid within accreted ice and to improve the determination of the surface temperature when entering clouds with supercooled droplets. Different with conventional icing model, this model identifies icing conditions in four regimes: rime, spongy without water film, spongy with water film and glaze. By using the Eulerian method based on two-phase flow theory, the impinging droplet flow was investigated numerically. The accuracy of the Eulerian method for computing the water collection efficiency was assessed, and icing shapes and surface temperature distributions predicted with this spongy icing model agree with experimental results well.

  16. Initiation and growth of martian ice lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, Hanna G.; Zent, Aaron P.; Rempel, Alan W.

    2015-05-01

    Water ice in the upper meters of the martian regolith is a major volatile reservoir. Although the geographic extent, burial depth, and thermal stability of this shallow ice are well understood, its origin, history, and stratigraphy are not. Over the past decade, a growing body of observational evidence has indicated that shallow ground ice exceeds the pore volume of its host soil over large regions of both martian hemispheres. This is confounding, given that (1) the physical theory that accurately predicts the location of ground ice also assumes that ice should be pore-filling in the upper meter of regolith, and (2) the Phoenix spacecraft uncovered far more pore-filling ice than excess ice at its landing site in the northern hemisphere. The development of ice lenses by low-temperature in situ segregation - analogous to the processes that generate frost heave on Earth - has been hypothesized to explain shallow excess ice on Mars. We have developed a numerical model of ice lens initiation and growth in the martian environment, and used it to test this hypothesis for the first time. We carried out a large suite of numerical simulations in order to place quantitative constraints on the timing and location of ice lens initiation, and on the magnitude of ice lens growth in a variety of host soils. We find that ice lens initiation is a ubiquitous process in the martian high latitudes, but the ultimate magnitude of lens growth, or frost heave, is sensitive to the properties of the host soil. Depending on the specific properties of martian soils, in situ segregation may be a very slow process sufficient to explain the excess ice observed in the Dodo-Goldilocks trench at the Phoenix landing site, but without regionally significant effects. Alternatively, if clay-sized particles or perchlorate salts are present, in situ segregation may be a vigorous process that has significantly affected the stratigraphy of ground ice in the upper meter of regolith throughout the high

  17. Does modifying the particle size distribution of a granular material (i.e., material scalping alters its shear strength?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azéma Emilien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available By means of two dimensional contact dynamics simulations, we analyzed the effect of the particle size distribution (PSD on the shear strength of granular materials composed of un-breakable disks. We modelled PSDs with a normalized beta function, which allows for building S-shaped gradation curves, such as those that typically occur in soils. We systematically controlled and varied the size span and the shape of the PSD, and found that the shear strength is independent both characteristics. This implies that PSD modification procedures such as material scalping (i.e., removing the smallest and/or largest particles in the sample should not affect significantly the shear strength of the material composed of unbreakable discs. In order to explore the origins of the invariance of the shear strength with PSD, we analyzed the connectivity, force transmission, and friction mobilization in terms of anisotropies, finding that the constant shear strength is due to a subtle compensation of anisotropies.

  18. PSD95 gene specific siRNAs attenuate neuropathic pain through modulating neuron sensibility and postsynaptic CaMKIIα phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Shen; Xu, Li; Wen, Chen; Li, Xu; Wei, Liu; Xue-rong, Yu; Yu-guang, Huang

    2011-12-01

    To observe the effects of PSD95 gene specific siRNAs on neuropathic pain relief, neuron viability, and postsynaptic calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (CaMKIIα) phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Gene-specific siRNAs of rat PSD95 were synthesized chemically for transfection. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: naïve group (n=6), sham group (n=6), and sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury (CCI) group (n=24). The CCI group was further divided into 4 groups (n=6 in each group), which were pretreated with normal saline, transfection vehicle, negative control siRNAs, and PSD95 gene specific siRNAs respectively. All the subgroups received corresponding agents intrathecally for 3 days, started one day before the CCI of sciatic nerve. Both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were measured on post-operative day 3 and 7. PSD95 gene silenced NG108-15 cells were further stimulated by glutamate, with the cell viability and the expression/phosphorylation of CaMKIIα measured by MTT cell proliferation assay and Western blot, respectively. The siRNAs decreased PSD95 mRNA level significantly both in vivo and in vitro. Neuropathic pain rats pretreated with PSD95 gene specific siRNAs exhibited significant elevation in the mechanical withdrawal threshold and paw withdrawal thermal latency, without affecting the baseline nociception. PSD95 gene silencing enhanced neuronal tolerance against the glutamate excitotoxicity, meanwhile the phosphorylation of CaMKIIα Thr286 was attenuated. Pre-emptive administration of PSD95 gene specific siRNAs may attenuate the central sensitization CaMKIIα-related signaling cascades, leading to the relief of neuropathic pain.

  19. Remote Laser Diffraction Particle Size Distribution Analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batcheller, Thomas Aquinas; Huestis, Gary Michael; Bolton, Steven Michael

    2001-03-01

    In support of a radioactive slurry sampling and physical characterization task, an “off-the-shelf” laser diffraction (classical light scattering) particle size analyzer was utilized for remote particle size distribution (PSD) analysis. Spent nuclear fuel was previously reprocessed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC—formerly recognized as the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) which is on DOE’s INEEL site. The acidic, radioactive aqueous raffinate streams from these processes were transferred to 300,000 gallon stainless steel storage vessels located in the INTEC Tank Farm area. Due to the transfer piping configuration in these vessels, complete removal of the liquid can not be achieved. Consequently, a “heel” slurry remains at the bottom of an “emptied” vessel. Particle size distribution characterization of the settled solids in this remaining heel slurry, as well as suspended solids in the tank liquid, is the goal of this remote PSD analyzer task. A Horiba Instruments Inc. Model LA-300 PSD analyzer, which has a 0.1 to 600 micron measurement range, was modified for remote application in a “hot cell” (gamma radiation) environment. This technology provides rapid and simple PSD analysis, especially down in the fine and microscopic particle size regime. Particle size analysis of these radioactive slurries down in this smaller range was not previously achievable—making this technology far superior than the traditional methods used. Successful acquisition of this data, in conjunction with other characterization analyses, provides important information that can be used in the myriad of potential radioactive waste management alternatives.

  20. Comparing the response of PSD-capable plastic scintillator to standard liquid scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Gwon, Chul; Phlips, Bernard F.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a test campaign to characterize the response of the recently developed plastic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination (PSD) capabilities (EJ-299-33). PSD is a property exhibited by certain types of scintillating material in which incident stimuli (fast neutrons or γ rays) can be separated by exploiting differences in the scintillation light pulse tail. Detector geometries used were: a 10 cm×10 cm×10 cm cube and a 10-cm diameter×10-cm long cylinder. EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators with well-known responses were also tested. The work was conducted at the University of Massachusetts Lowell Van De Graaff accelerator. The facility accelerated protons on a thin Li target to yield quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n)7Be reaction (Q-value: -1.644 MeV). Collimated fast neutrons were obtained by placing detectors behind a neutron spectrometer. Rotating the spectrometer, and thus changing the neutron energy, allowed us to achieve 0.5-3.2 MeV neutrons in 200-300 keV steps. Data were acquired through a flash analog-to-digital converter (ADC) capable of performing digital PSD measurements. By using the PSD technique to separate the neutron events from unwanted γ background, we constructed a pulse height spectrum at each energy. Obtaining a relationship of the relative light output versus energy allowed us to construct the response function for the EJ-299-33 and liquid scintillator. The EJ-299-33 response in terms of electron equivalent energy (Ee.e.) vs. proton equivalent energy (Ep.e.), how it compared with the standard xylene-based EJ-301 (or, NE-213/BC-501 A equivalent) and EJ-309 liquid scintillator response, and how the EJ-301 and EJ-309 compared, are presented. We find that the EJ-299-33 demonstrated a lower light output by up to 40% for environment affected the detector response. We find relatively good agreement between our results and the modeling; however, the observed response could not be fully accounted for due to

  1. Charging of ice-vapor interfaces: applications to thunderstorms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Nelson

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The build-up of intrinsic Bjerrum and ionic defects at ice-vapor interfaces electrically charges ice surfaces and thus gives rise to many phenomena including thermoelectricity, ferroelectric ice films, sparks from objects in blizzards, electromagnetic emissions accompanying cracking in avalanches, glaciers, and sea ice, and charge transfer during ice-ice collisions in thunderstorms. Fletcher's theory of the ice surface in equilibrium proposed that the Bjerrum defects have a higher rate of creation at the surface than in the bulk, which produces a high concentration of surface D defects that then attract a high concentration of OH- ions at the surface. Here, we add to this theory the effect of a moving interface caused by growth or sublimation. This effect can increase the amount of ionic surface charges more than 10-fold for growth rates near 1 mm s-1 and can extend the spatial separation of interior charges in qualitative agreement with many observations. In addition, ice-ice collisions should generate sufficient pressure to melt ice at the contact region and we argue that the ice particle with the initially sharper point at contact loses more mass of melt than the other particle. A simple analytic model of this process with parameters that are consistent with observations leads to predicted collisional charge exchange that semiquantitatively explains the negative charging region of thunderstorms. The model also has implications for snowflake formation, ferroelectric ice, polarization of ice in snowpacks, and chemical reactions in ice surfaces

  2. Particle-size distribution models for the conversion of Chinese data to FAO/USDA system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Wei; Dai, YongJiu; García-Gutiérrez, Carlos; Yuan, Hua

    2014-01-01

    We investigated eleven particle-size distribution (PSD) models to determine the appropriate models for describing the PSDs of 16349 Chinese soil samples. These data are based on three soil texture classification schemes, including one ISSS (International Society of Soil Science) scheme with four data points and two Katschinski's schemes with five and six data points, respectively. The adjusted coefficient of determination r (2), Akaike's information criterion (AIC), and geometric mean error ratio (GMER) were used to evaluate the model performance. The soil data were converted to the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) standard using PSD models and the fractal concept. The performance of PSD models was affected by soil texture and classification of fraction schemes. The performance of PSD models also varied with clay content of soils. The Anderson, Fredlund, modified logistic growth, Skaggs, and Weilbull models were the best.

  3. Particle-Size Distribution Models for the Conversion of Chinese Data to FAO/USDA System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shangguan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated eleven particle-size distribution (PSD models to determine the appropriate models for describing the PSDs of 16349 Chinese soil samples. These data are based on three soil texture classification schemes, including one ISSS (International Society of Soil Science scheme with four data points and two Katschinski’s schemes with five and six data points, respectively. The adjusted coefficient of determination r2, Akaike’s information criterion (AIC, and geometric mean error ratio (GMER were used to evaluate the model performance. The soil data were converted to the USDA (United States Department of Agriculture standard using PSD models and the fractal concept. The performance of PSD models was affected by soil texture and classification of fraction schemes. The performance of PSD models also varied with clay content of soils. The Anderson, Fredlund, modified logistic growth, Skaggs, and Weilbull models were the best.

  4. Monolayer ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zangi, R; Mark, AE

    2003-01-01

    We report results from molecular dynamics simulations of water under confinement and at ambient conditions that predict a first-order freezing transition from a monolayer of liquid water to a monolayer of ice induced by increasing the distance between the confining parallel plates. Since a slab

  5. Estimation and calibration of the water isotope differential diffusion length in ice core records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. van der Wel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Palaeoclimatic information can be retrieved from the diffusion of the stable water isotope signal during firnification of snow. The diffusion length, a measure for the amount of diffusion a layer has experienced, depends on the firn temperature and the accumulation rate. We show that the estimation of the diffusion length using power spectral densities (PSDs of the record of a single isotope species can be biased by uncertainties in spectral properties of the isotope signal prior to diffusion. By using a second water isotope and calculating the difference in diffusion lengths between the two isotopes, this problem is circumvented. We study the PSD method applied to two isotopes in detail and additionally present a new forward diffusion method for retrieving the differential diffusion length based on the Pearson correlation between the two isotope signals. The two methods are discussed and extensively tested on synthetic data which are generated in a Monte Carlo manner. We show that calibration of the PSD method with this synthetic data is necessary to be able to objectively determine the differential diffusion length. The correlation-based method proves to be a good alternative for the PSD method as it yields precision equal to or somewhat higher than the PSD method. The use of synthetic data also allows us to estimate the accuracy and precision of the two methods and to choose the best sampling strategy to obtain past temperatures with the required precision. In addition to application to synthetic data the two methods are tested on stable-isotope records from the EPICA (European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica ice core drilled in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, showing that reliable firn temperatures can be reconstructed with a typical uncertainty of 1.5 and 2 °C for the Holocene period and 2 and 2.5 °C for the last glacial period for the correlation and PSD method, respectively.

  6. Recent vs from IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer R.

    2008-10-03

    IceCube is a 1 km3 neutrino detector now being built at the South Pole. Its 4800 optical modules will detect Cherenkov radiation from charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. IceCube will search for neutrinos of astrophysical origin, with energies from 100 GeV up to 1019 eV. It will be able to separate nue, nu mu and nu tau. In addition to detecting astrophysical neutrinos, IceCube will also search for neutrinos from WIMP annihilation in the Sun and the Earth, look for low-energy (10 MeV) neutrinos from supernovae, and search for a host of exotic signatures. With the associated IceTop surface air shower array, it will study cosmic-ray air showers. IceCube construction is now 50percent complete. After presenting preliminary results from the partial detector, I will discuss IceCube's future plans.

  7. The latest IceCube results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mase, K.

    2014-12-01

    The IceCube detector is unique. It uses the Antarctic glacial ice as an interaction and detection medium. An array of optical sensors observes Cherenkov light from secondary charged particles resulting from neutrino interactions. The high transparency of the ice enabled the realization of a 1 km{sup 3} large detection volume in order to detect rarely interacting particles. Neutrinos are ideal probes of the deep universe because they rarely interact with matter and propagate in straight lines. Neutrinos are thought to be produced in hadronic processes at astronomical sources such as active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts. IceCube aims to detect neutrinos from such astronomical sources. IceCube recently found 28 events in an energy range approximately from 50 TeV to 1 PeV. These events are not easily explained by background derived from atmospheric origin, and therefore represent the first evidence for high energy neutrinos from an extraterrestrial origin. IceCube can also perform elementary particle physics by searching for neutrinos from SUSY particles such as neutralinos and measuring atmospheric neutrino oscillations. An overview of the latest IceCube results is provided in this paper including the 28 candidate observations and the corresponding implications. - Highlights: • IceCube has been completed and it is performing as expected. • Two PeV events were observed and the follow-up search found an additional 26 events. • This is the first evidence of an extraterrestrial high-energy neutrino flux above 50 TeV. • IceCube can also perform elementary particle physics.

  8. Role of stacking disorder in ice nucleation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupi, Laura; Hudait, Arpa; Peters, Baron; Grünwald, Michael; Gotchy Mullen, Ryan; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Molinero, Valeria

    2017-11-01

    The freezing of water affects the processes that determine Earth’s climate. Therefore, accurate weather and climate forecasts hinge on good predictions of ice nucleation rates. Such rate predictions are based on extrapolations using classical nucleation theory, which assumes that the structure of nanometre-sized ice crystallites corresponds to that of hexagonal ice, the thermodynamically stable form of bulk ice. However, simulations with various water models find that ice nucleated and grown under atmospheric temperatures is at all sizes stacking-disordered, consisting of random sequences of cubic and hexagonal ice layers. This implies that stacking-disordered ice crystallites either are more stable than hexagonal ice crystallites or form because of non-equilibrium dynamical effects. Both scenarios challenge central tenets of classical nucleation theory. Here we use rare-event sampling and free energy calculations with the mW water model to show that the entropy of mixing cubic and hexagonal layers makes stacking-disordered ice the stable phase for crystallites up to a size of at least 100,000 molecules. We find that stacking-disordered critical crystallites at 230 kelvin are about 14 kilojoules per mole of crystallite more stable than hexagonal crystallites, making their ice nucleation rates more than three orders of magnitude higher than predicted by classical nucleation theory. This effect on nucleation rates is temperature dependent, being the most pronounced at the warmest conditions, and should affect the modelling of cloud formation and ice particle numbers, which are very sensitive to the temperature dependence of ice nucleation rates. We conclude that classical nucleation theory needs to be corrected to include the dependence of the crystallization driving force on the size of the ice crystallite when interpreting and extrapolating ice nucleation rates from experimental laboratory conditions to the temperatures that occur in clouds.

  9. Windows in Arctic sea ice: Light transmission and ice algae in a refrozen lead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauko, Hanna M.; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Assmy, Philipp; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Mundy, C. J.; Duarte, Pedro; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Olsen, Lasse M.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Johnsen, Geir; Elliott, Ashley; Wang, Feiyue; Granskog, Mats A.

    2017-06-01

    The Arctic Ocean is rapidly changing from thicker multiyear to thinner first-year ice cover, with significant consequences for radiative transfer through the ice pack and light availability for algal growth. A thinner, more dynamic ice cover will possibly result in more frequent leads, covered by newly formed ice with little snow cover. We studied a refrozen lead (≤0.27 m ice) in drifting pack ice north of Svalbard (80.5-81.8°N) in May-June 2015 during the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition (N-ICE2015). We measured downwelling incident and ice-transmitted spectral irradiance, and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM), particle absorption, ultraviolet (UV)-protecting mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), and chlorophyll a (Chl a) in melted sea ice samples. We found occasionally very high MAA concentrations (up to 39 mg m-3, mean 4.5 ± 7.8 mg m-3) and MAA to Chl a ratios (up to 6.3, mean 1.2 ± 1.3). Disagreement in modeled and observed transmittance in the UV range let us conclude that MAA signatures in CDOM absorption spectra may be artifacts due to osmotic shock during ice melting. Although observed PAR (photosynthetically active radiation) transmittance through the thin ice was significantly higher than that of the adjacent thicker ice with deep snow cover, ice algal standing stocks were low (≤2.31 mg Chl a m-2) and similar to the adjacent ice. Ice algal accumulation in the lead was possibly delayed by the low inoculum and the time needed for photoacclimation to the high-light environment. However, leads are important for phytoplankton growth by acting like windows into the water column.

  10. On the ridging of intact lead ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Mark A.

    1994-08-01

    The sea ice pressure ridging process is modeled using a two-dimensional particle simulation technique. In this model, blocks are broken from an intact sheet of relatively thin lead ice driven against a thick, multiyear floe at a constant speed. The blocks of ice rubble accumulate to form the ridge sail and keel. The energy consumed in ridge growth, including dissipation, is explicitly calculated. A series of numerical experiments are performed to establish the dependence of the energetics on the thickness of the ice sheet and the friction between blocks. The results suggest that the total energy required to create a pressure ridge is an order of magnitude greater than the potential energy in the ridge structure. A typical sea ice cover in the polar regions contains a variety of ice thicknesses that evolve in response to both dynamic and thermodynamic forcing. The variable thickness of the ice cover is created by deformation, which simultaneously causes formation of thick ice through ridge building and thin ice through lead creation. Since the energy expended in deformation is largely determined by the ridging process, an understanding of the energetics of pressure ridging is critical in the determination of ice strength on a geophysical scale.

  11. CO2 (dry ice) cleaning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Donald M.

    1995-03-01

    Tomco Equipment Company has participated in the dry ice (solid carbon dioxide, CO2) cleaning industry for over ten years as a pioneer in the manufacturer of high density, dry ice cleaning pellet production equipment. For over four years Tomco high density pelletizers have been available to the dry ice cleaning industry. Approximately one year ago Tomco introduced the DI-250, a new dry ice blast unit making Tomco a single source supplier for sublimable media, particle blast, cleaning systems. This new blast unit is an all pneumatic, single discharge hose device. It meters the insertion of 1/8 inch diameter (or smaller), high density, dry ice pellets into a high pressure, propellant gas stream. The dry ice and propellant streams are controlled and mixed from the blast cabinet. From there the mixture is transported to the nozzle where the pellets are accelerated to an appropriate blasting velocity. When directed to impact upon a target area, these dry ice pellets have sufficient energy to effectively remove most surface coatings through dry, abrasive contact. The meta-stable, dry ice pellets used for CO2 cleaning, while labeled 'high density,' are less dense than alternate, abrasive, particle blast media. In addition, after contacting the target surface, they return to their equilibrium condition: a superheated gas state. Most currently used grit blasting media are silicon dioxide based, which possess a sharp tetrahedral molecular structure. Silicon dioxide crystal structures will always produce smaller sharp-edged replicas of the original crystal upon fracture. Larger, softer dry ice pellets do not share the same sharp-edged crystalline structures as their non-sublimable counterparts when broken. In fact, upon contact with the target surface, dry ice pellets will plastically deform and break apart. As such, dry ice cleaning is less harmful to sensitive substrates, workers and the environment than chemical or abrasive cleaning systems. Dry ice cleaning system

  12. Multi-wavelength UV-detection in capillary hydrodynamic fractionation. Data treatment for an absolute estimate of the particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Luis A.; Aguirre, Miren; Leiza, José R.; Gugliotta, Luis M.; Vega, Jorge R.

    2017-03-01

    A new approach is proposed for estimating the particle size distribution (PSD) of hydrophobic colloids by capillary hydrodynamic fractionation (CHDF) based on UV-detection at several wavelengths. At each elution time, the multi-wavelength UV signal is used to estimate the instantaneous PSD at the detector cell by solving the involved inverse problem through an artificial neural network. Then, the global PSD is obtained as a weighted sum of the estimated instantaneous PSDs along the entire elution time interval. With the current approach, the estimation procedure is absolute in the sense that no calibration of diameters is required and the instrumental broadening introduced by the fractionation capillary is automatically compensated for. The proposed method was evaluated on the basis of narrow polystyrene standards, as follows: i) a single standard, to emulate a narrow unimodal PSD; ii) a mixture of three standards of relatively close average diameters, to emulate a broad unimodal PSD; and iii) a mixture of two standards of quite different average diameters, to emulate a bimodal PSD. Experimental results indicate that the new approach is able to produce adequate PSD estimates provided that the particle refractive index is known with a relatively high accuracy.

  13. PSD Applicability Determination for Power Boiler No. 4 at the Potlatch Corporation Facility in Lewiston, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  14. Simpson Pulp and Paper Mill in Tacoma, Washington, PSD applicability determination for Power Boiler No. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. Applicability of the PSD Regulations to Certain Modifications Made by Cooper Tire and Rubber Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  16. Tire Derived Fuel Classified as Municipal Solid Waste for a PSD Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  17. Contingency Plan for FGD Systems During Downtime as a Function of PSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  18. Automatic or Blanket Exemptions for Excess Emissions During Startup, and Shutdowns Under PSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  19. PSD Applicability Determination for AEG Bovoni Power's Waste-to-Energy Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  20. PSD and NSPS Applicability Determination for Guardian Industries' Flat Glass Plant in Corsicana, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  1. Clarification That BACT Analysis Under PSD is Applicable for A Proposed Modification to the Rotary Kiln

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. PSD Analysis for SIP Relaxation in Metropolitan Boston Air Pollution Control District - Eastman Gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. Applicablitiy Determinations on the PSD 100 tpy Major Source Threshold Catergory for Fossil Fuel Boilers Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  4. Inclusion of Haul Road Emissions in PSD Applicability Determination for Coal Mine and Preparation Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  5. Applicability of PSD and NSPS to the Cleveland Electric, Incorporated, Plant in Willoughby, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  6. NSR Advisory Memo # 1 : TSP PSD Increment Consumption in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  7. Modeling Wave-Ice Interactions in the Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Mark; Shi, Fengyan; Bateman, Sam; Veeramony, Jay; Calantoni, Joe

    2015-04-01

    The small-scale (O(m)) interactions between waves and ice floes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) are investigated with a coupled model system. Waves are simulated with the non-hydrostatic finite-volume model NHWAVE (Ma et al., 2012) and ice floes are represented as bonded collections of smaller particles with the discrete element system LIGGGHTS (Kloss et al., 2012). The physics of fluid and ice are recreated as authentically as possible, to allow the coupled system to supplement and/or substitute for more costly and demanding field experiments. The presentation will first describe the development and validation of the coupled system, then discuss the results of a series of virtual experiments in which ice floe and wave characteristics are varied to examine their effects on energy dissipation, MIZ floe size distribution, and ice pack retreat rates. Although Wadhams et al. (1986) suggest that only a small portion (roughly 10%) of wave energy entering the MIZ is reflected, dissipation mechanisms for the remaining energy have yet to be delineated or measured. The virtual experiments are designed to focus on specific properties and processes - such as floe size and shape, collision and fracturing events, and variations in wave climate - and measure their relative roles the transfer of energy and momentum from waves to ice. Questions to be examined include: How is energy dissipated by ice floe collisions, fracturing, and drag, and how significant is the wave attenuation associated with each process? Do specific wave/floe length scale ratios cause greater wave attenuation? How does ice material strength affect the rate of wave energy loss? The coupled system will ultimately be used to test and improve upon wave-ice parameterizations for large-scale climate models. References: >Kloss, C., C. Goniva, A. Hager, S. Amberger, and S. Pirker (2012). Models, algorithms and validation for opensource DEM and CFD-DEM. Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics 12(2/3), 140-152. >Ma, G

  8. GPM Ground Validation NCAR Particle Probes OLYMPEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation NCAR Particle Probes OLYMPEX dataset consists of ice water content, particle concentration normalized by bin width, and total particle...

  9. Simulated and Real Sheet-of-Light 3D Object Scanning Using a-Si:H Thin Film PSD Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Contreras

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A MATLAB/SIMULINK software simulation model (structure and component blocks has been constructed in order to view and analyze the potential of the PSD (Position Sensitive Detector array concept technology before it is further expanded or developed. This simulation allows changing most of its parameters, such as the number of elements in the PSD array, the direction of vision, the viewing/scanning angle, the object rotation, translation, sample/scan/simulation time, etc. In addition, results show for the first time the possibility of scanning an object in 3D when using an a-Si:H thin film 128 PSD array sensor and hardware/software system. Moreover, this sensor technology is able to perform these scans and render 3D objects at high speeds and high resolutions when using a sheet-of-light laser within a triangulation platform. As shown by the simulation, a substantial enhancement in 3D object profile image quality and realism can be achieved by increasing the number of elements of the PSD array sensor as well as by achieving an optimal position response from the sensor since clearly the definition of the 3D object profile depends on the correct and accurate position response of each detector as well as on the size of the PSD array.

  10. Ice condensation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate: Implications for polar stratospheric ice clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Fortin

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of ice nucleation to form Type 2 PSCs is important for controlling the ice particle size and hence the possible dehydration in the polar winter stratosphere. This paper probes heterogeneous ice nucleation on sulfuric acid tetrahydrate (SAT. Laboratory experiments were performed using a thin-film, high-vacuum apparatus in which the condensed phase is monitored via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and water pressure is monitored with the combination of an MKS baratron and an ionization gauge. Results show that SAT is an efficient ice nucleus with a critical ice saturation ratio of S*ice = 1.3 to 1.02 over the temperature range 169.8-194.5 K. This corresponds to a necessary supercooling of 0.1-1.3 K below the ice frost point. The laboratory data is used as input for a microphysical/photochemical model to probe the effect that this heterogeneous nucleation mechanism could have on Type 2 PSC formation and stratospheric dehydration. In the model simulations, even a very small number of SAT particles (e.g., 10-3 cm-3 result in ice nucleation on SAT as the dominant mechanism for Type 2 PSC formation. As a result, Type 2 PSC formation is more widespread, leading to larger-scale dehydration. The characteristics of the clouds are controlled by the assumed number of SAT particles present, demonstrating that a proper treatment of SAT is critical for correctly modeling Type 2 PSC formation and stratospheric dehydration.

  11. Impact of screw configuration on the particle size distribution of granules produced by twin screw granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercruysse, J; Burggraeve, A; Fonteyne, M; Cappuyns, P; Delaet, U; Van Assche, I; De Beer, T; Remon, J P; Vervaet, C

    2015-02-01

    Twin screw granulation (TSG) has been reported by different research groups as an attractive technology for continuous wet granulation. However, in contrast to fluidized bed granulation, granules produced via this technique typically have a wide and multimodal particle size distribution (PSD), resulting in suboptimal flow properties. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the impact of granulator screw configuration on the PSD of granules produced by TSG. Experiments were performed using a 25 mm co-rotating twin screw granulator, being part of the ConsiGma™-25 system (a fully continuous from-powder-to-tablet manufacturing line from GEA Pharma Systems). Besides the screw elements conventionally used for TSG (conveying and kneading elements), alternative designs of screw elements (tooth-mixing-elements (TME), screw mixing elements (SME) and cutters) were investigated using an α-lactose monohydrate formulation granulated with distilled water. Granulation with only conveying elements resulted in wide and multimodal PSD. Using kneading elements, the width of the PSD could be partially narrowed and the liquid distribution was more homogeneous. However, still a significant fraction of oversized agglomerates was obtained. Implementing additional kneading elements or cutters in the final section of the screw configuration was not beneficial. Furthermore, granulation with only TME or SME had limited impact on the width of the PSD. Promising results were obtained by combining kneading elements with SME, as for these configurations the PSD was narrower and shifted to the size fractions suitable for tableting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fuzzy norm method for evaluating random vibration of airborne platform from limited PSD data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zhongyu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For random vibration of airborne platform, the accurate evaluation is a key indicator to ensure normal operation of airborne equipment in flight. However, only limited power spectral density (PSD data can be obtained at the stage of flight test. Thus, those conventional evaluation methods cannot be employed when the distribution characteristics and priori information are unknown. In this paper, the fuzzy norm method (FNM is proposed which combines the advantages of fuzzy theory and norm theory. The proposed method can deeply dig system information from limited data, which probability distribution is not taken into account. Firstly, the FNM is employed to evaluate variable interval and expanded uncertainty from limited PSD data, and the performance of FNM is demonstrated by confidence level, reliability and computing accuracy of expanded uncertainty. In addition, the optimal fuzzy parameters are discussed to meet the requirements of aviation standards and metrological practice. Finally, computer simulation is used to prove the adaptability of FNM. Compared with statistical methods, FNM has superiority for evaluating expanded uncertainty from limited data. The results show that the reliability of calculation and evaluation is superior to 95%.

  13. Explosive Ice Multiplication Induced by multiplicative-Noise fluctuation of Mechanical Break-up in Ice-Ice Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Jun-Ichi; Phillips, Vaughan

    2017-04-01

    The number of ice fragments generated by break-up of large graupel in collisions with small graupel fluctuates randomly due to fluctuations in relative sizes and densities of colliding graupel particles and the stochastic nature of fracture propagation. This paper investigates an impact of the stochasticity of break-up on ice multiplication. When both the rate of generation of primary ice and the initial number concentration of ice-crystals are low, the system most likely loses all the initial ice and graupel due to a lack of sustaining sources. Even randomness does not change this mean evolution of the system in its phase-space. However, a fluctuation of ice break-up number gives a small but finite chance that substantial ice crystal fragments are generated by break-up of large graupel. That, in turn, generates more large graupel. This multiplicative process due to fluctuations potentially leads to a small but finite chance of explosive growth of ice number. A rigorous stochastic analysis demonstrates this point quantitatively. The randomness considered here belongs to a particular category called "multiplicative" noise, because the noise amplitude is proportional to a given physical state. In order to contrast the multiplicative-noise nature of ice break-up with a standard "additive" noise process, fluctuation of the primary ice generation rate is also considered as an example of the latter. These processes are examined by taking the Fokker-Planck equation that explicitly describes evolution of the probability distribution with time. As an important conclusion, stability in the phase-space of the cloud-microphysical system of break-up in ice-ice collisions is substantially altered by the multiplicative noise.

  14. Wave-induced stress and breaking of sea ice in a coupled hydrodynamic discrete-element wave-ice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Agnieszka

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, a coupled sea ice-wave model is developed and used to analyze wave-induced stress and breaking in sea ice for a range of wave and ice conditions. The sea ice module is a discrete-element bonded-particle model, in which ice is represented as cuboid grains floating on the water surface that can be connected to their neighbors by elastic joints. The joints may break if instantaneous stresses acting on them exceed their strength. The wave module is based on an open-source version of the Non-Hydrostatic WAVE model (NHWAVE). The two modules are coupled with proper boundary conditions for pressure and velocity, exchanged at every wave model time step. In the present version, the model operates in two dimensions (one vertical and one horizontal) and is suitable for simulating compact ice in which heave and pitch motion dominates over surge. In a series of simulations with varying sea ice properties and incoming wavelength it is shown that wave-induced stress reaches maximum values at a certain distance from the ice edge. The value of maximum stress depends on both ice properties and characteristics of incoming waves, but, crucially for ice breaking, the location at which the maximum occurs does not change with the incoming wavelength. Consequently, both regular and random (Jonswap spectrum) waves break the ice into floes with almost identical sizes. The width of the zone of broken ice depends on ice strength and wave attenuation rates in the ice.

  15. Ice Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    blugerman, n.

    2015-10-01

    My project is to make ice observatories to perceive astral movements as well as light phenomena in the shape of cosmic rays and heat, for example.I find the idea of creating an observation point in space, that in time will change shape and eventually disappear, in consonance with the way we humans have been approaching the exploration of the universe since we started doing it. The transformation in the elements we use to understand big and small transformations, within the universe elements.

  16. Effect of particle nonsphericity on bidirectional reflectance of cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishchenko, M.I.; Rossow, W.B.; Macke, A.; Lacis, A.A. [Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the use of the fractal ice particle method to study the differences in bidirectional reflectance caused by the differences in the single scattering phase functions of spherical water droplets and nonspherical ice crystals.

  17. Rationale behind the optimum efficiency of columns packed with new 1.9μm fully porous particles of narrow particle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, Martina; Ismail, Omar H; Cavazzini, Alberto; Ciogli, Alessia; Villani, Claudio; Pasti, Luisa; Bergantin, Caterina; Cabooter, Deirdre; Desmet, Gert; Gasparrini, Francesco; Bell, David S

    2016-07-08

    Columns packed with new commercially available 1.9 fully porous particles of narrow particle size distribution (nPSD) are characterized by extremely high efficiency. Under typical reversed phase conditions, these columns are able to generate very high number of theoretical plates (in the order of 300,000plates/m and more). In this paper, we investigate the origin of the high performance of these nPSD columns by performing a series of measurements that include, in addition to the traditional determination of the van Deemter curve, peak parking, pore blocking and inverse size exclusion experiments. Two nPSD columns (both 100×3.0mm) have been considered in this study: the first one, packed with particles of 80Å pore size, is commercially available. The second one is a prototype column packed with 1.9 fully porous particles of 120Å pore size. The main conclusion of our study is that these nPSD columns are characterized by extremely low eddy dispersion, while longitudinal diffusion and mass transfer kinetics are substantially equivalent to those of other fully porous particles of similar chemistry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Great Lakes Ice Charts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Charts show ice extent and concentration three times weekly during the ice season, for all lakes except Ontario, from the 1973/74 ice season through the 2001/2002...

  19. Tolerance to ethanol intoxication after chronic ethanol: role of GluN2A and PSD-95.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daut, Rachel A; Busch, Erica F; Ihne, Jessica; Fisher, Daniel; Mishina, Masayoshi; Grant, Seth G N; Camp, Marguerite; Holmes, Andrew

    2015-03-01

    The neural and genetic factors underlying chronic tolerance to alcohol are currently unclear. The GluN2A N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) subunit and the NMDAR-anchoring protein PSD-95 mediate acute alcohol intoxication and represent putative mechanisms mediating tolerance. We found that chronic intermittent ethanol exposure (CIE) did not produce tolerance [loss of righting reflex (LORR)] or withdrawal-anxiety in C57BL/6J, GluN2A or PSD-95 knockout mice assayed 2-3 days later. However, significant tolerance to LORR was evident 1 day after CIE in C57BL/6J and PSD-95 knockouts, but absent in GluN2A knockouts. These data suggest a role for GluN2A in tolerance, extending evidence that human GluN2A gene variation is involved in alcohol dependence. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Medical ice slurry production device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasza, Kenneth E [Palos Park, IL; Oras, John [Des Plaines, IL; Son, HyunJin [Naperville, IL

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  1. Effect of complex aerobic physical exercise on PSD-95 in the hippocampus and on cognitive function in juvenile mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satriani, W. H.; Redjeki, S.; Kartinah, N. T.

    2017-08-01

    Increased neuroplasticity induced by complex aerobic physical exercise is associated with improved cognitive function in adult mice. Increased cognitive function is assumed to be based on increased synapse formation. One of the regions of the brain that is important in cognitive function is the hippocampus, which plays a role in memory formation. Post synaptic density-95 (PSD-95) is an adhesion protein of the post-synaptic density scaffolding that is essential to synaptic stabilization. As we age, the PSD-95 molecule matures the synapses needed for the formation of the basic circuitry of the nervous system in the brain. However, during the growth period, synapse elimination is higher than its formation. This study aims to determine whether complex aerobic exercise can improve cognitive function and PSD-95 levels in the hippocampus of juvenile mice during their growth stage. The mice performed complex aerobic exercise starting at five weeks of age and continuing for seven weeks with a gradual increase of 8 m/min. At eight weeks it was increased to 10 m/min. The exercise was done for five days of each week. The subjects of the study were tested for cognition one week before being sacrificed (at 12 weeks). The PSD-95 in the hippocampus was measured with ELISA. The results showed that there was a significant difference in cognitive function, where p exercise and a control group that did not. However, the PSD-95 levels did not differ significantly between the two groups. The results of this study indicate that early complex aerobic exercise can improve cognitive ability in adulthood but does not increase the levels of PSD-95 in adults.

  2. Deconvolution of the particle size distribution of ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, William Nguyen; Shakibaie, Fardad; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements contain two types of particles, namely Portland cement (PC) (nominally 80% w/w) and bismuth oxide (BO) (20%). This study aims to determine the particle size distribution (PSD) of PC and BO found in MTA. Materials and methods The PSDs of ProRoot MTA (MTA-P) and MTA Angelus (MTA-A) powder were determined using laser diffraction, and compared to samples of PC (at three different particle sizes) and BO. The non-linear least squares method was used to deconvolute the PSDs into the constituents. MTA-P and MTA-A powders were also assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Results BO showed a near Gaussian distribution for particle size, with a mode distribution peak at 10.48 μm. PC samples milled to differing degrees of fineness had mode distribution peaks from 19.31 down to 4.88 μm. MTA-P had a complex PSD composed of both fine and large PC particles, with BO at an intermediate size, whereas MTA-A had only small BO particles and large PC particles. Conclusions The PSD of MTA cement products is bimodal or more complex, which has implications for understanding how particle size influences the overall properties of the material. Smaller particles may be reactive PC or unreactive radiopaque agent. Manufacturers should disclose particle size information for PC and radiopaque agents to prevent simplistic conclusions being drawn from statements of average particle size for MTA materials.

  3. Ice nucleation activity of polysaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bichler, Magdalena; Felgitsch, Laura; Haeusler, Thomas; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Grothe, Hinrich

    2015-04-01

    Heterogeneous ice nucleation is an important process in the atmosphere. It shows direct impact on our climate by triggering ice cloud formation and therefore it has much influence on the radiation balance of our planet (Lohmann et al. 2002; Mishchenko et al. 1996). The process itself is not completely understood so far and many questions remain open. Different substances have been found to exhibit ice nucleation activity (INA). Due to their vast differences in chemistry and morphology it is difficult to predict what substance will make good ice nuclei and which will not. Hence simple model substances must be found and be tested regarding INA. Our work aims at gaining to a deeper understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation. We intend to find some reference standards with defined chemistry, which may explain the mechanisms of heterogeneous ice nucleation. A particular focus lies on biological carbohydrates in regards to their INA. Biological carbohydrates are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life. Mostly they are specific for certain organisms and have well defined purposes, e.g. structural polysaccharides like chitin (in fungi and insects) and pectin (in plants), which has also water-binding properties. Since they are widely distributed throughout our biosphere and mostly safe to use for nutrition purposes, they are well studied and easily accessible, rendering them ideal candidates as proxies. In our experiments we examined various carbohydrates, like the already mentioned chitin and pectin, as well as their chemical modifications. Lohmann U.; A Glaciation Indirect Aerosol Effect Caused by Soot Aerosols; J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 24 No.4; pp 11-1 - 11-4; 2002 Mishchenko M.I., Rossow W.B., Macke A., Lacis A. A.; Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Albedo, Bidirectional Reflectance and Optical Thickness Retrieval Accuracy to Ice Particle Shape, J. Geoph. Res.; Vol. 101, No D12; pp. 16,973 - 16,985; 1996

  4. The Science of Solar System Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The Science of Solar System Ices The role of laboratory research and simulations in advancing our understanding of solar system ices (including satellites, KBOs, comets, and giant planets) is becoming increasingly important. Understanding ice surface radiation processing, particle and radiation penetration depths, surface and subsurface chemistry, morphology, phases, density, conductivity, etc., are only a few examples of the inventory of issues that are being addressed by Earth-based laboratory research. As a response to the growing need for cross-disciplinary dialog and communication in the planetary ices science community, this book aims to foster focused collaborations among the observational, modeling, and laboratory research communities. The book is a compilation of articles from experts in ices: experimentalists, modelers, and observers (ground-based telescopes and space missions). Most of the contributors featured in this book are renowned experts in their respective fields. Many of these scientists h...

  5. Method development and validation for measuring the particle size distribution of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) powders.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Sharissa Gay

    2005-09-01

    Currently, the critical particle properties of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) that influence deflagration-to-detonation time in exploding bridge wire detonators (EBW) are not known in sufficient detail to allow development of a predictive failure model. The specific surface area (SSA) of many PETN powders has been measured using both permeametry and gas absorption methods and has been found to have a critical effect on EBW detonator performance. The permeametry measure of SSA is a function of particle shape, packed bed pore geometry, and particle size distribution (PSD). Yet there is a general lack of agreement in PSD measurements between laboratories, raising concerns regarding collaboration and complicating efforts to understand changes in EBW performance related to powder properties. Benchmarking of data between laboratories that routinely perform detailed PSD characterization of powder samples and the determination of the most appropriate method to measure each PETN powder are necessary to discern correlations between performance and powder properties and to collaborate with partnering laboratories. To this end, a comparison was made of the PSD measured by three laboratories using their own standard procedures for light scattering instruments. Three PETN powder samples with different surface areas and particle morphologies were characterized. Differences in bulk PSD data generated by each laboratory were found to result from variations in sonication of the samples during preparation. The effect of this sonication was found to depend on particle morphology of the PETN samples, being deleterious to some PETN samples and advantageous for others in moderation. Discrepancies in the submicron-sized particle characterization data were related to an instrument-specific artifact particular to one laboratory. The type of carrier fluid used by each laboratory to suspend the PETN particles for the light scattering measurement had no consistent effect on the resulting

  6. PSD-95 uncoupling from NMDA receptors by Tat-N-dimer ameliorates neuronal depolarisation in cortical spreading depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucharz, Krzysztof; Søndergaard Rasmussen, Ida; Bach, Anders

    2017-01-01

    , UCCB01-144 (Tat-N-dimer) ameliorates the persistent effects of cortical spreading depression on cortical function. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy in somatosensory cortex in mice, we show that fluorescently labelled Tat-N-dimer readily crosses blood-brain barrier and accumulates in nerve cells...... depression on cortical blood flow and CMRO2 We suggest that uncoupling of PSD-95 from NMDA receptors reduces overall neuronal excitability and the amplitude of the spreading depolarisation wave. These findings may be of interest for understanding the neuroprotective effects of the nNOS/PSD-95 uncoupling...

  7. Single-Molecule Imaging of PSD-95 mRNA Translation in Dendrites and Its Dysregulation in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifrim, Marius F; Williams, Kathryn R; Bassell, Gary J

    2015-05-06

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA binding protein that regulates translation of numerous target mRNAs, some of which are dendritically localized. Our previous biochemical studies using synaptoneurosomes demonstrate a role for FMRP and miR-125a in regulating the translation of PSD-95 mRNA. However, the local translation of PSD-95 mRNA within dendrites and spines, as well as the roles of FMRP or miR-125a, have not been directly studied. Herein, local synthesis of a Venus-PSD-95 fusion protein was directly visualized in dendrites and spines using single-molecule imaging of a diffusion-restricted Venus-PSD-95 reporter under control of the PSD-95 3'UTR. The basal translation rates of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA was increased in cultured hippocampal neurons from Fmr1 KO mice compared with WT neurons, which correlated with a transient elevation of endogenous PSD-95 within dendrites. Following mGluR stimulation with (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, the rate of Venus-PSD-95 mRNA translation increased rapidly in dendrites of WT hippocampal neurons, but not in those of Fmr1 KO neurons or when the binding site of miR125a, previously shown to bind PSD-95 3'UTR, was mutated. This study provides direct support for the hypothesis that local translation within dendrites and spines is dysregulated in FXS. Impairments in the regulated local synthesis of PSD-95, a critical regulator of synaptic structure and function, may affect the spatiotemporal control of PSD-95 levels and affect dendritic spine development and synaptic plasticity in FXS. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/357116-15$15.00/0.

  8. Accelerated dissolution of iron oxides in ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jeong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Iron dissolution from mineral dusts and soil particles is vital as a source of bioavailable iron in various environmental media. In this work, the dissolution of iron oxide particles trapped in ice was investigated as a new pathway of iron supply. The dissolution experiments were carried out in the absence and presence of various organic complexing ligands under dark condition. In acidic pH conditions (pH 2, 3, and 4, the dissolution of iron oxides was greatly enhanced in the ice phase compared to that in water. The dissolved iron was mainly in the ferric form, which indicates that the dissolution is not a reductive process. The extent of dissolved iron was greatly affected by the kind of organic complexing ligands and the surface area of iron oxides. The iron dissolution was most pronounced with high surface area iron oxides and in the presence of strong iron binding ligands. The enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice is mainly ascribed to the "freeze concentration effect", which concentrates iron oxide particles, organic ligands, and protons in the liquid like ice grain boundary region and accelerates the dissolution of iron oxides. The ice-enhanced dissolution effect gradually decreased when decreasing the freezing temperature from −10 to −196 °C, which implies that the presence and formation of the liquid-like ice grain boundary region play a critical role. The proposed phenomenon of enhanced dissolution of iron oxides in ice may provide a new pathway of bioavailable iron production. The frozen atmospheric ice with iron-containing dust particles in the upper atmosphere thaws upon descending and may provide bioavailable iron upon deposition onto the ocean surface.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Variability of Surface Energy Fluxes During Autumn Ice Advance: Observations and Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, O. P. G.; Blomquist, B.; Grachev, A. A.; Guest, P. S.; Stammerjohn, S. E.; Solomon, A.; Cox, C. J.; Capotondi, A.; Fairall, C. W.; Intrieri, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    From Oct 4 to Nov 5, 2015, the Office of Naval Research - sponsored Sea State cruise in the Beaufort Sea with the new National Science Foundation R/V Sikuliaq obtained extensive in-situ and remote sensing observations of the lower troposphere, the advancing sea ice, wave state, and upper ocean conditions. In addition, a coupled atmosphere, sea ice, upper-ocean model, based on the RASM model, was run at NOAA/PSD in a hindcast mode for this same time period, providing a 10-day simulation of the atmosphere/ice/ocean evolution. Surface energy fluxes quantitatively represent the air-ice, air-ocean, and ice-ocean interaction processes, determining the cooling (warming) rate of the upper ocean and the growth (melting) rate of sea ice. These fluxes also impact the stratification of the lower troposphere and the upper ocean. In this presentation, both direct and indirect measurements of the energy fluxes during Sea State will be used to explore the spatial and temporal variability of these fluxes and the impacts of this variability on the upper ocean, ice, and lower atmosphere during the autumn ice advance. Analyses have suggested that these fluxes are impacted by atmospheric synoptic evolution, proximity to existing ice, ice-relative wind direction, ice thickness and snow depth. In turn, these fluxes impact upper-ocean heat loss and timing of ice formation, as well as stability in the lower troposphere and upper ocean, and hence heat transport to the free troposphere and ocean mixed-layer. Therefore, the atmospheric structure over the advancing first-year ice differs from that over the nearby open water. Finally, these observational analyses will be used to provide a preliminary validation of the spatial and temporal variability of the surface energy fluxes and the associated lower-tropospheric and upper-ocean structures in the simulations.

  10. Iron in sea ice: Review and new insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lannuzel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The discovery that melting sea ice can fertilize iron (Fe-depleted polar waters has recently fostered trace metal research efforts in sea ice. The aim of this review is to summarize and synthesize the current understanding of Fe biogeochemistry in sea ice. To do so, we compiled available data on particulate, dissolved, and total dissolvable Fe (PFe, DFe and TDFe, respectively from sea-ice studies from both polar regions and from sub-Arctic and northern Hemisphere temperate areas. Data analysis focused on a circum-Antarctic Fe dataset derived from 61 ice cores collected during 10 field expeditions carried out between 1997 and 2012 in the Southern Ocean. Our key findings are that 1 concentrations of all forms of Fe (PFe, DFe, TDFe are at least a magnitude larger in fast ice and pack ice than in typical Antarctic surface waters; 2 DFe, PFe and TDFe behave differently when plotted against sea-ice salinity, suggesting that their distributions in sea ice are driven by distinct, spatially and temporally decoupled processes; 3 DFe is actively extracted from seawater into growing sea ice; 4 fast ice generally has more Fe-bearing particles, a finding supported by the significant negative correlation observed between both PFe and TDFe concentrations in sea ice and water depth; 5 the Fe pool in sea ice is coupled to biota, as indicated by the positive correlations of PFe and TDFe with chlorophyll a and particulate organic carbon; and 6 the vast majority of DFe appears to be adsorbed onto something in sea ice. This review also addresses the role of sea ice as a reservoir of Fe and its role in seeding seasonally ice-covered waters. We discuss the pivotal role of organic ligands in controlling DFe concentrations in sea ice and highlight the uncertainties that remain regarding the mechanisms of Fe incorporation in sea ice.

  11. Investigating the contribution of secondary ice production to in-cloud ice crystal numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S. C.; Hoose, C.; Nenes, A.

    2017-09-01

    In-cloud measurements of ice crystal number concentration can be orders of magnitude higher than the precloud ice nucleating particle number concentration. This disparity may be explained with secondary ice production processes. Several such processes have been proposed, but their relative importance and even the exact physics are not well known. In this work, a six-hydrometeor-class parcel model is developed to investigate the ice crystal number enhancement, both its bounds and its value for different cloud states, from rime splintering and breakup upon graupel-graupel collision. The model also includes ice aggregation and droplet coalescence, ice hydrometeor nonsphericity, and a time delay formulation for hydrometeor growth. Conditions to maximize the breakup contribution, as well as the effects of nonsphericity and turbulence, are discussed. We find that the largest enhancement of ice crystal number occurs for "intermediate" conditions, characterized by moderate updrafts and activation and nucleation rates. In this case, vertical motion is strong enough, and new hydrometeor formation limited enough, to sustain supersaturation as hydrometeors grow to larger sizes. After these larger hydrometeors form at sufficient number concentrations, the ice crystal number can be enhanced by a factor of 104 in some cases relative to the number generated by primary ice nucleation alone. Excluding ice hydrometeor nonsphericity limits secondary production significantly, and the parcel updraft can modulate it by about an order of magnitude.

  12. Effect of particle size distribution on the separation efficiency in liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Krisztián; Lukács, Diána; Sepsey, Annamária; Felinger, Attila

    2014-09-26

    In this work, the influence of the width of particle size distribution (PSD) on chromatographic efficiency is studied. The PSD is described by lognormal distribution. A theoretical framework is developed in order to calculate heights equivalent to a theoretical plate in case of different PSDs. Our calculations demonstrate and verify that wide particle size distributions have significant effect on the separation efficiency of molecules. The differences of fully porous and core-shell phases regarding the influence of width of PSD are presented and discussed. The efficiencies of bimodal phases were also calculated. The results showed that these packings do not have any advantage over unimodal phases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The integral suspension pressure method (ISP) for precise particle-size analysis by gravitational sedimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durner, Wolfgang; Iden, Sascha C.; von Unold, Georg

    2017-04-01

    The particle-size distribution (PSD) of a soil expresses the mass fractions of various sizes of mineral particles which constitute the soil material. It is a fundamental soil property, closely related to most physical and chemical soil properties and it affects almost any soil function. The experimental determination of soil texture, i.e., the relative amounts of sand, silt, and clay-sized particles, is done in the laboratory by a combination of sieving (sand) and gravitational sedimentation (silt and clay). In the latter, Stokes' law is applied to derive the particle size from the settling velocity in an aqueous suspension. Traditionally, there are two methodologies for particle-size analysis from sedimentation experiments: the pipette method and the hydrometer method. Both techniques rely on measuring the temporal change of the particle concentration or density of the suspension at a certain depth within the suspension. In this paper, we propose a new method which is based on the pressure in the suspension at a selected depth, which is an integral measure of all particles in suspension above the measuring depth. We derive a mathematical model which predicts the pressure decrease due to settling of particles as function of the PSD. The PSD of the analyzed sample is identified by fitting the simulated time series of pressure to the observed one by inverse modeling using global optimization. The new method yields the PSD in very high resolution and its experimental realization completely avoids any disturbance by the measuring process. A sensitivity analysis of different soil textures demonstrates that the method yields unbiased estimates of the PSD with very small estimation variance and an absolute error in the clay and silt fraction of less than 0.5%

  14. Phenology of particle size distributions and primary productivity in the North Pacific subtropical gyre (Station ALOHA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Angelicque E.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Whitmire, Amanda L.; Barone, Benedetto; Bidigare, Robert R.; Church, Matthew J.; Karl, David M.

    2015-11-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) is a critical aspect of the oceanic ecosystem. Local variability in the PSD can be indicative of shifts in microbial community structure and reveal patterns in cell growth and loss. The PSD also plays a central role in particle export by influencing settling speed. Satellite-based models of primary productivity (PP) often rely on aspects of photophysiology that are directly related to community size structure. In an effort to better understand how variability in particle size relates to PP in an oligotrophic ecosystem, we collected laser diffraction-based depth profiles of the PSD and pigment-based classifications of phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) on an approximately monthly basis at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA, in the North Pacific subtropical gyre. We found a relatively stable PSD in the upper water column. However, clear seasonality is apparent in the vertical distribution of distinct particle size classes. Neither laser diffraction-based estimations of relative particle size nor pigment-based PFTs was found to be significantly related to the rate of 14C-based PP in the light-saturated upper euphotic zone. This finding indicates that satellite retrievals of particle size, based on particle scattering or ocean color would not improve parameterizations of present-day bio-optical PP models for this region. However, at depths of 100-125 m where irradiance exerts strong control on PP, we do observe a significant linear relationship between PP and the estimated carbon content of 2-20 μm particles.

  15. Effects of soil surface roughness on interrill erosion processes and sediment particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wenfeng; Huang, Chihua

    2017-10-01

    Soil surface roughness significantly impacts runoff and erosion under rainfall. Few previous studies on runoff generation focused on the effects of soil surface roughness on the sediment particle size distribution (PSD), which greatly affects interrill erosion and sedimentation processes. To address this issue, a rainfall-simulation experiment was conducted with treatments that included two different initial soil surface roughnesses and two rainfall intensities. Soil surface roughness was determined by using photogrammetric method. For each simulated event, runoff and sediment samples were collected at different experimental times. The effective (undispersed) PSD of each sediment sample and the ultimate (after dispersion) PSD were used to investigate the detachment and transport mechanisms involved in sediment movement. The results show that soil surface roughness significantly delayed runoff initiation, but had no significant effect on the steady runoff rate. However, a significant difference in the soil loss rate was observed between the smooth and rough soil surfaces. Sediments from smooth soil surfaces were more depleted in clay-size particles, but more enriched in sand-size particles than those from rough soil surfaces, suggesting that erosion was less selective on smooth than on rough soil surfaces. The ratio of different sizes of transported sediment to the soil matrix indicates that most of the clay was eroded in the form of aggregates, silt-size particles were transported mainly as primary particles, and sand-size particles were predominantly aggregates of finer particles. Soil surface roughness has a crucial effect on the sediment size distribution and erosion processes. Significant differences of the enrichment ratios for the effective PSD and the ultimate PSD were observed under the two soil surface roughness treatments. These findings demonstrate that we should consider each particle size separately rather than use only the total sediment discharge in

  16. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine...

  17. Forecasting Turbine Icing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Neil; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Clausen, Niels-Erik

    In this study, we present a method for forecasting icing events. The method is validated at two European wind farms in with known icing events. The icing model used was developed using current ice accretion methods, and newly developed ablation algorithms. The model is driven by inputs from the WRF...... mesoscale model, allowing for both climatological estimates of icing and short term icing forecasts. The current model was able to detect periods of icing reasonably well at the warmer site. However at the cold climate site, the model was not able to remove ice quickly enough leading to large ice...... accumulations, which have not been seen in observations. In addition to the model evaluation we were able to investigate the potential occurrence of ice induced power loss at two wind parks in Europe using observed data. We found that the potential loss during an icing event is large even when the turbine...

  18. Thresholds in the sliding resistance of simulated basal ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Emerson

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We report laboratory determinations of the shear resistance to sliding melting ice with entrained particles over a hard, impermeable surface. With higher particle concentrations and larger particle sizes, Coulomb friction at particle-bed contacts dominates and the shear stress increases linearly with normal load. We term this the sandy regime. When either particle concentration or particle size is reduced below a threshold, the dependence of shear resistance on normal load is no longer statistically significant. We term this regime slippery. We use force and mass balance considerations to examine the flow of melt water beneath the simulated basal ice. At high particle concentrations, the transition from sandy to slippery behavior occurs when the particle size is comparable to the thickness of the melt film that separates the sliding ice from its bed. For larger particle sizes, a transition from sandy to slippery behavior occurs when the particle concentration drops sufficiently that the normal load is no longer transferred completely to the particle-bed contacts. We estimate that the melt films separating the particles from the ice are approximately 0.1 µm thick at this transition. Our laboratory results suggest the potential for abrupt transitions in the shear resistance beneath hard-bedded glaciers with changes in either the thickness of melt layers or the particle loading.

  19. PSD Camera Based Position and Posture Control of Redundant Robot Considering Contact Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Naoki; Kotani, Kentaro

    The paper describes a position and posture controller design based on the absolute position by external PSD vision sensor for redundant robot manipulator. The redundancy enables a potential capability to avoid obstacle while continuing given end-effector jobs under contact with middle link of manipulator. Under contact motion, the deformation due to joint torsion obtained by comparing internal and external position sensor, is actively suppressed by internal/external position hybrid controller. The selection matrix of hybrid loop is given by the function of the deformation. And the detected deformation is also utilized in the compliant motion controller for passive obstacle avoidance. The validity of the proposed method is verified by several experimental results of 3link planar redundant manipulator.

  20. Critical evaluation of particle size distribution models using soil data obtained with a laser diffraction method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Weipeng

    Full Text Available Mathematical descriptions of classical particle size distribution (PSD data are often used to estimate soil hydraulic properties. Laser diffraction methods (LDM now provide more detailed PSD measurements, but deriving a function to characterize the entire range of particle sizes is a major challenge. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of eighteen PSD functions for fitting LDM data sets from a wide range of soil textures. These models include five lognormal models, five logistic models, four van Genuchten models, two Fredlund models, a logarithmic model, and an Andersson model. The fits were evaluated using Akaike's information criterion (AIC, adjusted R2, and root-mean-square error (RMSE. The results indicated that the Fredlund models (FRED3 and FRED4 had the best performance for most of the soils studied, followed by one logistic growth function extension model (MLOG3 and three lognormal models (ONLG3, ORLG3, and SHCA3. The performance of most PSD models was better for soils with higher silt content and poorer for soils with higher clay and sand content. The FRED4 model best described the PSD of clay, silty clay, clay loam, silty clay loam, silty loam, loam, and sandy loam, whereas FRED3, MLOG3, ONLG3, ORLG3, and SHCA3 showed better performance for most soils studied.

  1. UCCB01-125, a dimeric inhibitor of PSD-95, reduces inflammatory pain without disrupting cognitive or motor performance: Comparison with the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jesper T.; Bach, Anders; Gynther, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    Excessive N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent production of nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the development and maintenance of chronic pain states, and is mediated by postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95). By binding to both the NMDAR and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS), PSD-95 mediates...... the NMDAR/PSD-95/nNOS complex by targeting PSD-95, thereby decreasing NO production without interfering with the NMDAR ion channel function. Here, we compared the effects of a dimeric PSD-95 inhibitor, UCCB01-125, and the NMDAR antagonist, MK-801, on mechanical hypersensitivity in the complete Freund......-induced mechanical hypersensitivity 1 and 24 h after treatment. Moreover, UCCB01-125 was found to reverse CFA-induced hypersensitivity when administered 24 h after CFA treatment, an effect lasting for at least 3 days. At the dose reducing hypersensitivity, MK-801 disrupted attention, long-term memory, and motor...

  2. Ice sheet margins and ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of climate warming on the size of ice sheet margins in polar regions is considered. Particular attention is given to the possibility of a rapid response to warming on the order of tens to hundreds of years. It is found that the early response of the polar regions to climate warming would be an increase in the area of summer melt on the ice sheets and ice shelves. For sufficiently large warming (5-10C) the delayed effects would include the breakup of the ice shelves by an increase in ice drainage rates, particularly from the ice sheets. On the basis of published data for periodic changes in the thickness and melting rates of the marine ice sheets and fjord glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica, it is shown that the rate of retreat (or advance) of an ice sheet is primarily determined by: bedrock topography; the basal conditions of the grounded ice sheet; and the ice shelf condition downstream of the grounding line. A program of satellite and ground measurements to monitor the state of ice sheet equilibrium is recommended.

  3. Ice Lithography for Nanodevices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Anpan; Kuan, A.; Wang, J.

    Water vapor is condensed onto a cold sample, coating it with a thin-film of ice. The ice is sensitive to electron beam lithography exposure. 10 nm ice patterns are transferred into metals by “melt-off”. Non-planar samples are coated with ice, and we pattern on cantilevers, AFM tips, and suspended...

  4. Effects of the dimeric PSD-95 inhibitor UCCB01-144 in mouse models of pain, cognition and motor function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jesper T; Nasser, Arafat; Caballero-Puntiverio, Maitane

    2016-01-01

    NMDAR antagonism shows analgesic action in humans and animal pain models, but disrupts cognitive and motor functions. NMDAR-dependent NO production requires tethering of the NMDAR to neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) by the postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95). Perturbing the NMDAR/PSD-95/nNOS inte...... in the STFP test. Collectively, UCCB01-144 reversed both CFA and SNI-induced hypersensitivity, but the efficacy in the SNI model was only transient. This suggests that enhanced BBB permeability of PSD-95 inhibitors improves the analgesic action in neuropathic pain states.......NOS interaction has therefore been proposed as an alternative analgesic mechanism. We recently reported that UCCB01-125, a dimeric PSD-95 inhibitor with limited blood-brain-barrier permeability, reduced mechanical hypersensitivity in the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) inflammatory pain model, without disrupting...... of neuropathic pain. Potential cognitive effects of UCCB01-144 were examined using the social transmission of food preference (STFP) test and the V-maze test, and motor coordination was assessed with the rotarod test. UCCB01-144 (10mg/kg) reversed CFA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity after 1h, and completely...

  5. Ice Core Dating Software for Interactive Dating of Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatov, A. V.; Mayewski, P. A.; Abdul Jawad, B. S.

    2005-12-01

    Scientists involved in ice core dating are well familiar with the problem of identification and recording the depth of annual signals using stable isotopes, glaciochemistry, ECM (electrical conductivity), DEP (dielectric properties) and particle counter data. Traditionally all parameters used for ice core dating were plotted as a function of depth, printed and after years were marked on the paper, converted to depth vs. age time scale. To expedite this tedious and manual process we developed interactive computer software, Ice core Dating (ICD) program. ICD is written in Java programming language, and uses GPL and GPL site licensed graphic libraries. The same 3.5 Mb in size pre-compiled single jar file, that includes all libraries and application code, was successfully tested on WinOS, Mac OSX, Linux, and Solaris operating systems running Java VM version 1.4. We have followed the modular design philosophy in our source code so potential integration with other software modules, data bases and server side distributed computer environments can be easily implemented. We expect to continue development of new suites of tools for easy integration of ice core data with other available time proxies. ICD is thoroughly documented and comes with a technical reference and cookbook that explains the purpose of the software and its many features, and provides examples to help new users quickly become familiar with the operation and philosophy of the software. ICD is available as a free download from the Climate Change Institute web site ( under the terms of GNU GPL public license.

  6. Noise effect in an improved conjugate gradient algorithm to invert particle size distribution and the algorithm amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yongjie; Ge, Baozhen; Wei, Yaolin

    2009-03-20

    In general, model-independent algorithms are sensitive to noise during laser particle size measurement. An improved conjugate gradient algorithm (ICGA) that can be used to invert particle size distribution (PSD) from diffraction data is presented. By use of the ICGA to invert simulated data with multiplicative or additive noise, we determined that additive noise is the main factor that induces distorted results. Thus the ICGA is amended by introduction of an iteration step-adjusting parameter and is used experimentally on simulated data and some samples. The experimental results show that the sensitivity of the ICGA to noise is reduced and the inverted results are in accord with the real PSD.

  7. Shear strength and microstructure of polydisperse packings: The effect of size span and shape of particle size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azéma, Emilien; Linero, Sandra; Estrada, Nicolas; Lizcano, Arcesio

    2017-08-01

    By means of extensive contact dynamics simulations, we analyzed the effect of particle size distribution (PSD) on the strength and microstructure of sheared granular materials composed of frictional disks. The PSDs are built by means of a normalized β function, which allows the systematic investigation of the effects of both, the size span (from almost monodisperse to highly polydisperse) and the shape of the PSD (from linear to pronouncedly curved). We show that the shear strength is independent of the size span, which substantiates previous results obtained for uniform distributions by packing fraction. Notably, the shear strength is also independent of the shape of the PSD, as shown previously for systems composed of frictionless disks. In contrast, the packing fraction increases with the size span, but decreases with more pronounced PSD curvature. At the microscale, we analyzed the connectivity and anisotropies of the contacts and forces networks. We show that the invariance of the shear strength with the PSD is due to a compensation mechanism which involves both geometrical sources of anisotropy. In particular, contact orientation anisotropy decreases with the size span and increases with PSD curvature, while the branch length anisotropy behaves inversely.

  8. Melting ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Elmo

    2018-01-01

    In this brief frontline, we want to describe the well-known fact that, when freshwater ice melts, the freshwater liquid level does not change. In the Italian Ministerial programs, fluid statics is introduced in the three years of middle school (students of 11–13 years) and during the first two years of high school (14–15 years). The Italian textbooks do not clearly explain why the abovementioned phenomenon occurs. The explanations are qualitative and they may lead to misinterpretation. I have noted that the students are very curious about this phenomenon. They sought a demonstration from books and from the web; and when they do not find it they asked me. Moreover, they have allowed me to observe that there are contradictory statements about the melting of icebergs. Some authors claim that they would not raise the sea-level, others say the opposite. Honestly speaking, I had never thought about this phenomenon and in classroom I tried to give them proof, expressing my opinion about the melting of icebergs.

  9. ESTIMATING SOIL PARTICLE-SIZE DISTRIBUTION FOR SICILIAN SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Bagarello

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The soil particle-size distribution (PSD is commonly used for soil classification and for estimating soil behavior. An accurate mathematical representation of the PSD is required to estimate soil hydraulic properties and to compare texture measurements from different classification systems. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of the Haverkamp and Parlange (HP and Fredlund et al. (F PSD models to fit 243 measured PSDs from a wide range of 38 005_Bagarello(547_33 18-11-2009 11:55 Pagina 38 soil textures in Sicily and to test the effect of the number of measured particle diameters on the fitting of the theoretical PSD. For each soil textural class, the best fitting performance, established using three statistical indices (MXE, ME, RMSE, was obtained for the F model with three fitting parameters. In particular, this model performed better in the fine-textured soils than the coarse-textured ones but a good performance (i.e., RMSE < 0.03 was detected for the majority of the investigated soil textural classes, i.e. clay, silty-clay, silty-clay-loam, silt-loam, clay-loam, loamy-sand, and loam classes. Decreasing the number of measured data pairs from 14 to eight determined a worse fitting of the theoretical distribution to the measured one. It was concluded that the F model with three fitting parameters has a wide applicability for Sicilian soils and that the comparison of different PSD investigations can be affected by the number of measured data pairs.

  10. The new PARIOTM device for determining continuous particle-size distributions of soils and sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alina; Pertassek, Thomas; Steins, Andreas; Durner, Wolfgang; Göttlein, Axel; Petrik, Wolfgang; von Unold, Georg

    2017-04-01

    The particle-size distribution (PSD) is a key property of soils. The reference method for determining the PSD is based on gravitational sedimentation of particles in an initially homogeneous suspension. Traditional methods measure manually (i) the uplift of a floating body in the suspension at different times (Hydrometer method) or (ii) the mass of solids in extracted suspension aliquots at predefined sampling depths and times (Pipette method). Both methods lead to a disturbance of the sedimentation process and provide only discrete data of the PSD. Durner et al. (2017) recently developed a new automated method to determine particle-size distributions of soils and sediments from gravitational sedimentation (Durner, W., S.C. Iden, and G. von Unold: The integral suspension pressure method (ISP) for precise particle-size analysis by gravitational sedimentation, Water Resources Research, doi:10.1002/2016WR019830, 2017). The so-called integral suspension method (ISP) method estimates continuous PSD's from sedimentation experiments by recording the temporal evolution of the suspension pressure at a certain measurement depth in a sedimentation cylinder. It requires no manual interaction after start and thus no specialized training of the lab personnel and avoids any disturbance of the sedimentation process. The required technology to perform these experiments was developed by the UMS company, Munich and is now available as an instrument called PARIO, traded by the METER Group. In this poster, the basic functioning of PARIO is shown and key components and parameters of the technology are explained.

  11. Effects of soil surface roughness on interrill erosion processes and sediment particle size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil surface roughness significantly impacts runoff and erosion under rainfall. Few previous studies on runoff generation focused on the effects of soil surface roughness on the sediment particle size distribution (PSD), which greatly affects interrill erosion and sedimentation processes. To address...

  12. Ice megadunes on Mars: analogy with Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herny, Clémence; Massé, Marion; Bourgeois, Olivier; Carpy, Sabrina; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Appéré, Thomas; Smith, Isaac; Spiga, Aymeric; Rodriguez, Sébastien

    2014-05-01

    roles of wind-driven particle transport, heat and mass transfer of water vapor, ice metamorphism and glacial flow of ice sheets.

  13. Ice for air cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, J.

    1987-04-09

    The first ice plant on an industrial scale came into service at Harmony goldmine in November 1985. This surface installation has a refrigeration output of about 5.2 MW, corresponding to 1000 t/d of ice. The ice melting tank is at a depth of 1088m. The planning and construction of this first industrial-scale ice plant were based on the result obtained from a research project which gave particular emphasis to investigating the problems related to the transport of ice in pipelines and to the ice-to-water heat transfer in ice-melting tanks. The particular advantage of ice as a coolant is that the mass circulation needed with ice is five times less than with water. It is claimed that, in the circumstances which are specific to Harmony mine, ice cooling is economically viable at a depth of only 1,100 m or thereabouts; however, calculations for very powerful cooling systems have shown that ice has a cost advantage over water + Pelton turbines only at depths of 3,000 m or more. Cost comparisons apart, this ice plant is useful for the testing of technology and safety in the production, transport and melting of the ice and prepares the way for a powerful ice cooling system which will work at great depths. 6 references.

  14. Top Sounder Ice Penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, D. L.; Goemmer, S. A.; Sweeney, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    Ice draft measurements are made as part of normal operations for all US Navy submarines operating in the Arctic Ocean. The submarine ice draft data are unique in providing high resolution measurements over long transects of the ice covered ocean. The data has been used to document a multidecadal drop in ice thickness, and for validating and improving numerical sea-ice models. A submarine upward-looking sonar draft measurement is made by a sonar transducer mounted in the sail or deck of the submarine. An acoustic beam is transmitted upward through the water column, reflecting off the bottom of the sea ice and returning to the transducer. Ice thickness is estimated as the difference between the ship's depth (measured by pressure) and the acoustic range to the bottom of the ice estimated from the travel time of the sonar pulse. Digital recording systems can provide the return off the water-ice interface as well as returns that have penetrated the ice. Typically, only the first return from the ice hull is analyzed. Information regarding ice flow interstitial layers provides ice age information and may possibly be derived with the entire return signal. The approach being investigated is similar to that used in measuring bottom sediment layers and will involve measuring the echo level from the first interface, solving the reflection loss from that transmission, and employing reflection loss versus impedance mismatch to ascertain ice structure information.

  15. A new ice nuclei counter SPIN: characterization and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, F.; Abbatt, J.; Cziczo, D. J.; Gallagher, M. W.; Lachlan-Cope, T.; Garemilla, S.; Ignatius, K.; Kristensen, T. B.; Moreno, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ice nuclei (IN) play an important role in a number of processes related to cloud formation and cloud properties. Despite significant progress within ice nucleation research in the past decades - a lot of questions remain to be answered. In situ measurements with portable IN counters are an important way to gain knowledge in this field. Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN, Droplet Measurement Technologies, Inc.) is a new commercially available portable IN counter. SPIN is a continuous flow diffusion chamber with parallel plate geometry following the design of the portable IN counter PINC (Chou et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11:4725-4738, 2011). The aerosol sample flows through a chamber, where a supersaturation of water vapor with respect to ice is obtained by applying a temperature gradient between two ice covered plates. The aerosol sample is exposed to an evaporation section for evaporation of liquid droplets before detection of particles with an optical particle counter (OPC). Thus the formed ice crystals can be distinguished from other particles by size. With SPIN, it is possible to quantify ice nucleation in both, deposition nucleation and condensation/immersion freezing modes. In the laboratory, with SPIN, the involved groups studied various aerosol particle types, including ammonium sulfate, mineral dusts and biological particles. Results of these studies will be presented and discussed.

  16. Leipzig Ice Nucleation chamber Comparison (LINC): intercomparison of four online ice nucleation counters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkert-Kohn, Monika; Wex, Heike; Welti, André; Hartmann, Susan; Grawe, Sarah; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Atkinson, James D.; Stratmann, Frank; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2017-09-01

    Ice crystal formation in atmospheric clouds has a strong effect on precipitation, cloud lifetime, cloud radiative properties, and thus the global energy budget. Primary ice formation above 235 K is initiated by nucleation on seed aerosol particles called ice-nucleating particles (INPs). Instruments that measure the ice-nucleating potential of aerosol particles in the atmosphere need to be able to accurately quantify ambient INP concentrations. In the last decade several instruments have been developed to investigate the ice-nucleating properties of aerosol particles and to measure ambient INP concentrations. Therefore, there is a need for intercomparisons to ensure instrument differences are not interpreted as scientific findings.In this study, we intercompare the results from parallel measurements using four online ice nucleation chambers. Seven different aerosol types are tested including untreated and acid-treated mineral dusts (microcline, which is a K-feldspar, and kaolinite), as well as birch pollen washing waters. Experiments exploring heterogeneous ice nucleation above and below water saturation are performed to cover the whole range of atmospherically relevant thermodynamic conditions that can be investigated with the intercompared chambers. The Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS) and the Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber coupled to the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PIMCA-PINC) performed measurements in the immersion freezing mode. Additionally, two continuous-flow diffusion chambers (CFDCs) PINC and the Spectrometer for Ice Nuclei (SPIN) are used to perform measurements below and just above water saturation, nominally presenting deposition nucleation and condensation freezing.The results of LACIS and PIMCA-PINC agree well over the whole range of measured frozen fractions (FFs) and temperature. In general PINC and SPIN compare well and the observed differences are explained by the ice crystal growth and different residence times in

  17. Simulations of a PSD Plastic Neutron Collar for Assaying Fresh Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hausladen, Paul [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Newby, Jason [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McElroy, Robert Dennis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The potential performance of a notional active coincidence collar for assaying uranium fuel based on segmented detectors constructed from the new PSD plastic fast organic scintillator with pulse shape discrimination capability was investigated in simulation. Like the International Atomic Energy Agency's present Uranium Neutron Collar for LEU (UNCL), the PSD plastic collar would also function by stimulating fission in the 235U content of the fuel with a moderated 241Am/Li neutron source and detecting instances of induced fission via neutron coincidence counting. In contrast to the moderated detectors of the UNCL, the fast time scale of detection in the scintillator eliminates statistical errors due to accidental coincidences that limit the performance of the UNCL. However, the potential to detect a single neutron multiple times historically has been one of the properties of organic scintillator detectors that has prevented their adoption for international safeguards applications. Consequently, as part of the analysis of simulated data, a method was developed by which true neutron-neutron coincidences can be distinguished from inter-detector scatter that takes advantage of the position and timing resolution of segmented detectors. Then, the performance of the notional simulated coincidence collar was evaluated for assaying a variety of fresh fuels, including some containing burnable poisons and partial defects. In these simulations, particular attention was paid to the analysis of fast mode measurements. In fast mode, a Cd liner is placed inside the collar to shield the fuel from the interrogating source and detector moderators, thereby eliminating the thermal neutron flux that is most sensitive to the presence of burnable poisons that are ubiquitous in modern nuclear fuels. The simulations indicate that the predicted precision of fast mode measurements is similar to what can be achieved by the present UNCL in thermal mode. For example, the

  18. Double-tract reconstruction after laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy using detachable ENDO-PSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburatani, Tomoki; Kojima, Kazuyuki; Otsuki, Sho; Murase, Hideaki; Okuno, Keisuke; Gokita, Kentaro; Tomii, Chiharu; Tanioka, Toshiro; Inokuchi, Mikito

    2017-04-07

    Proximal gastrectomy (PG) is widely performed in Japan as a function-preserving surgical approach. Since esophagogastrostomy (EG) was associated with increased reflux symptoms and anastomotic strictures, we have chosen double-tract reconstruction (DTR) as the standard reconstruction method since March 2013. In this study, we described a novel method of laparoscopic DTR using detachable ENDO-PSD and compared its 1-year outcome with EG performed formerly in our institution. Patients who underwent laparoscopic PG between May 2005 and July 2014 were retrospectively divided into two groups based on the type of reconstruction and were subsequently analyzed (19 patients in the DTR group and 22 in the EG group). All of them underwent a laparoscopic PG with regional lymph node dissection. In the DTR group, the lower left port site was extended to 4 cm, and an intracorporeal purse-string suture was performed using the detachable ENDO-PSD. The jejunogastrostomy was fashioned on the anterior side of the remnant stomach parallel to the transection line, 2 cm from the cut end. The EG group used the conventional purse-string suture instrument through the 6 cm upper midline mini-laparotomy incision. Patient characteristics, operative data, early operative complications and 1-year postoperative follow-up findings were compared between the two groups. The frequencies of reflux symptoms (10.5 vs. 54.5%, P = 0.003), usage of proton pump inhibitors (31.6 vs. 72.7%, P = 0.008), and anastomotic strictures (0 vs. 27%, P = 0.014) were significantly lower in the DTR group as compared to the EG group. There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to operation time, blood loss, postoperative hospital stay, postoperative complications, average postoperative/preoperative weight loss ratio, and postoperative/preoperative ratio of biochemical markers (hemoglobin, total protein, albumin, cholesterol). Our results indicate that DTR is a useful reconstruction

  19. Simple Cloud Chambers Using a Freezing Mixture of Ice and Cooking Salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Kyohei; Kubota, Miki; Kamata, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    We have developed much simpler cloud chambers that use only ice and cooking salt instead of the dry ice or ice gel pack needed for the cloud chambers produced in our previous work. The observed alpha-ray particle tracks are as clear as those observed using our previous cloud chambers. The tracks can be observed continuously for about 20?min, and…

  20. Estimation of the particle size distribution of colloids from multiangle dynamic light scattering measurements with particle swarm optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Antonio Bermeo Varón

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper particle Swarm Optimization (PSO algorithms are applied to estimate the particle size distribution (PSD of a colloidal system from the average PSD diameters, which are measured by multi-angle dynamic light scattering. The system is considered a nonlinear inverse problem, and for this reason the estimation procedure requires a Tikhonov regularization method. The inverse problem is solved through several PSO strategies. The evaluated PSOs are tested through three simulated examples corresponding to polysty-rene (PS latexes with different PSDs, and two experimental examples obtained by simply mixing 2 PS standards. In general, the evalu-ation results of the PSOs are excellent; and particularly, the PSO with the Trelea’s parameter set shows a better performance than other implemented PSOs.

  1. IceCube: A Cubic Kilometer Radiation Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer R; Klein, S.R.

    2008-06-01

    IceCube is a 1 km{sup 3} neutrino detector now being built at the Amudsen-Scott South Pole Station. It consists of 4800 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) which detect Cherenkov radiation from the charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. IceCube will observe astrophysical neutrinos with energies above about 100 GeV. IceCube will be able to separate {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub t}, and {nu}{sub {tau}} interactions because of their different topologies. IceCube construction is currently 50% complete.

  2. Antarctic Ice Velocity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This compilation of recent ice velocity data of the Antarctic ice sheet is intended for use by the polar scientific community. The data are presented in tabular form...

  3. IOMASA SEA ICE DEVELOPMENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Søren; Tonboe, Rasmus; Heygster, Georg

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity studies show that the radiometer ice concentration estimate can be biased by +10% by anomalous atmospheric emissivity and -20% by anomalous ice surface emissivity. The aim of the sea ice activities in EU 5th FP project IOMASA is to improve sea ice concentration estimates at higher...... spatial resolution. The project is in the process of facilitating an ice concentration observing system through validation and a better understanding of the microwave radiative transfer of the sea ice and overlying snow layers. By use of a novel modelling approach, it is possible to better detect...... and determine the circumstances that may lead to anomalous sea ice concentration retrieval as well as to assess and possibly minimize the sensitivities of the retrieval system. Through an active partnership with the SAF on Ocean and Sea Ice, a prototype system will be implemented as an experimental product...

  4. Current Icing Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Current Icing Product (CIP) is an automatically-generated index suitable for depicting areas of potentially hazardous airframe icing. The CIP algorithm combines...

  5. An effective inversion algorithm for retrieving bimodal aerosol particle size distribution from spectral extinction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhenzong; Qi, Hong; Yao, Yuchen; Ruan, Liming

    2014-12-01

    The Ant Colony Optimization algorithm based on the probability density function (PDF-ACO) is applied to estimate the bimodal aerosol particle size distribution (PSD). The direct problem is solved by the modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation (ADA, as an approximation for optically large and soft spheres, i.e., χ≫1 and |m-1|≪1) and the Beer-Lambert law. First, a popular bimodal aerosol PSD and three other bimodal PSDs are retrieved in the dependent model by the multi-wavelength extinction technique. All the results reveal that the PDF-ACO algorithm can be used as an effective technique to investigate the bimodal PSD. Then, the Johnson's SB (J-SB) function and the modified beta (M-β) function are employed as the general distribution function to retrieve the bimodal PSDs under the independent model. Finally, the J-SB and M-β functions are applied to recover actual measurement aerosol PSDs over Beijing and Shanghai obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET). The numerical simulation and experimental results demonstrate that these two general functions, especially the J-SB function, can be used as a versatile distribution function to retrieve the bimodal aerosol PSD when no priori information about the PSD is available.

  6. Advances in heterogeneous ice nucleation research: Theoretical modeling and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beydoun, Hassan

    In the atmosphere, cloud droplets can remain in a supercooled liquid phase at temperatures as low as -40 °C. Above this temperature, cloud droplets freeze via heterogeneous ice nucleation whereby a rare and poorly understood subset of atmospheric particles catalyze the ice phase transition. As the phase state of clouds is critical in determining their radiative properties and lifetime, deficiencies in our understanding of heterogeneous ice nucleation poses a large uncertainty on our efforts to predict human induced global climate change. Experimental challenges in properly simulating particle-induced freezing processes under atmospherically relevant conditions have largely contributed to the absence of a well-established model and parameterizations that accurately predict heterogeneous ice nucleation. Conversely, the sparsity of reliable measurement techniques available struggle to be interpreted by a single consistent theoretical or empirical framework, which results in layers of uncertainty when attempting to extrapolate useful information regarding ice nucleation for use in atmospheric cloud models. In this dissertation a new framework for describing heterogeneous ice nucleation is developed. Starting from classical nucleation theory, the surface of an ice nucleating particle is treated as a continuum of heterogeneous ice nucleating activity and a particle specific distribution of this activity g is derived. It is hypothesized that an individual particle species exhibits a critical surface area. Above this critical area the ice nucleating activity of a particle species can be described by one g distribution, g, while below it g expresses itself expresses externally resulting in particle to particle variability in ice nucleating activity. The framework is supported by cold plate droplet freezing measurements for dust and biological particles in which the total surface area of particle material available is varied. Freezing spectra above a certain surface area

  7. Preparation and Characterization of Latex Particles as Potential Physical Shale Stabilizer in Water-Based Drilling Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer were successfully synthesized with potassium persulfate as an initiator in isopropanol-water medium. The synthesized latex particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, particle size distribution measurement (PSD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. FT-IR and TGA analysis confirmed that the latex particles were prepared by polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate and maintained good thermal stability. TEM and PSD analysis indicated that the spherical latex particles possessed unimodal distribution from 80 nm to 345 nm with the D90 value of 276 nm. The factors influencing particle size distribution (PSD of latex particles were also discussed in detail. The interaction between latex particles and natural shale cores was investigated quantitatively via pore pressure transmission tests. The results indicated that the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer could be deformable to bridge and seal the nanopores and microfractures of shale to reduce the shale permeability and prevent pore pressure transmission. What is more, the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer work synergistically with chemical shale stabilizer to impart superior shale stability.

  8. Preparation and characterization of latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer in water-based drilling fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junyi; Qiu, Zhengsong; Huang, Wei'an; Song, Dingding; Bao, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate) latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer were successfully synthesized with potassium persulfate as an initiator in isopropanol-water medium. The synthesized latex particles were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), particle size distribution measurement (PSD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis confirmed that the latex particles were prepared by polymerization of styrene and methyl methacrylate and maintained good thermal stability. TEM and PSD analysis indicated that the spherical latex particles possessed unimodal distribution from 80 nm to 345 nm with the D90 value of 276 nm. The factors influencing particle size distribution (PSD) of latex particles were also discussed in detail. The interaction between latex particles and natural shale cores was investigated quantitatively via pore pressure transmission tests. The results indicated that the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer could be deformable to bridge and seal the nanopores and microfractures of shale to reduce the shale permeability and prevent pore pressure transmission. What is more, the latex particles as potential physical shale stabilizer work synergistically with chemical shale stabilizer to impart superior shale stability.

  9. Players over the Surface: Unraveling the Role of Exopolysaccharides in Zinc Biosorption by Fluorescent Pseudomonas Strain Psd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Anamika; Kochar, Mandira; Rajam, Manchikatla V; Srivastava, Sheela

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescent Pseudomonas strain Psd is a soil isolate, possessing multiple plant growth promoting (PGP) properties and biocontrol potential. In addition, the strain also possesses high Zn2+ biosorption capability. In this study, we have investigated the role exopolysaccharides (EPS) play in Zn2+ biosorption. We have identified that alginates are the prime components contributing to Zn2+ biosorption. Deletion of the alg8 gene, which codes for a sub-unit of alginate polymerase, led to a significant reduction in EPS production by the organism. We have also demonstrated that the increased alginate production in response to Zn2+ exposure leads to improved biofilm formation by the strain. In the alg8 deletion mutant, however, biofilm formation was severely compromised. Further, we have studied the functional implications of Zn2+ biosorption by Pseudomonas strain Psd by demonstrating the effect on the PGP and biocontrol potential of the strain.

  10. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  11. Fractal and Morphological Characteristics of Single Marble Particle Crushing in Uniaxial Compression Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Crushing of rock particles is a phenomenon commonly encountered in geotechnical engineering practice. It is however difficult to study the crushing of rock particles using classical theory because the physical structure of the particles is complex and irregular. This paper aims at evaluating fractal and morphological characteristics of single rock particle. A large number of particle crushing tests are conducted on single rock particle. The force-displacement curves and the particle size distributions (PSD of crushed particles are analysed based on particle crushing tests. Particle shape plays an important role in both the micro- and macroscale responses of a granular assembly. The PSD of an assortment of rocks are analysed by fractal methods, and the fractal dimension is obtained. A theoretical formula for particle crushing strength is derived, utilising the fractal model, and a simple method is proposed for predicting the probability of particle survival based on the Weibull statistics. Based on a few physical assumptions, simple equations are derived for determining particle crushing energy. The results of applying these equations are tested against the actual experimental data and prove to be very consistent. Fractal theory is therefore applicable for analysis of particle crushing.

  12. Effects of ice-phase cloud microphysics in simulating wintertime precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinwon [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Cho, Han-Ru [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Physics; Soong, Sy-Tzai [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Land, Air, and Water Resources

    1995-11-01

    We compare two numerical experiments to investigate the effects of ice-phase cloud microphysical processes on simulations of wintertime precipitation in the southwestern United States. Results of these simulations, one with and the other without ice-phase microphysics, suggest that an inclusion of ice-phase microphysics plays a crucial role in simulating wintertime precipitation. The simulation that employs both the ice and water-phase microphysics better reproduced the observed spatial distribution of precipitation compared to the one without ice-phase microphysics. The most significant effect of ice-phase microphysics appeared in local production of precipitating particles by collection processes, rather than in local condensation.

  13. Using Antifreeze Proteins to understand ice microstructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer-Giraldi, Maddalena; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa; Weikusat, Christian; Kondo, Hidemasa; Kipfstuhl, Sepp

    2017-04-01

    Polar ice sheets are considered a unique climate archive. The chemical analysis of its impurities and the development of its microstructure with depth give insight in past climate conditions as well as in the development of the ice sheet with time and deformation. Microstructural patterns like small grain size observed in specific depths are thought to be linked to the retarding effect of impurities on ice grain growth. Clear evidence of size or chemical composition of the impurities causing this effect is missing, but in this context a major role of nanoparticles has been suggested. In order to shed light on different mechanisms by which nanoparticles can control microstructure development we used antifreeze proteins (AFPs) as proxies for particles in ice. These proteins are small nanoparticles, approx. 5 nm in size, with the special characteristics of firmly binding to ice through several hydrogen bonds. We used AFPs from the sea-ice microalgae Fragilariopsis cylindrus (fcAFPs) in bubble-free, small-grained polycrystalline ice obtained by the phase-transition size refinement method. We explain how fcAFP bind to ice by presenting the 3-D-protein structure model inferred by X-ray structure analysis, and show the importance of the chemical interaction between particles and ice in controlling normal grain growth, comparing fcAFPs to other protein nanoparticles. We used modifications of fcAFPs for particle localization through fluorescence spectroscopy. Furthermore, the effect of fcAFPs on the driving factors for ice deformation during creep, i.e. on internal dislocations due to incorporation within the lattice and on the mobility of grain boundaries due to pinning, makes these proteins particularly interesting in studying the process of ice deformation.

  14. Observing thermomagnetic stability of nonideal magnetite particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almeida, Trevor P.; Kasama, Takeshi; Muxworthy, Adrian R.

    2014-01-01

    The thermomagnetic behavior of remanence-induced magnetite (Fe3O4) particles in the pseudo-single-domain (PSD) size range (similar to 0.1-10 mu m), which dominate the magnetic signature of many rock lithologies, is investigated using off-axis electron holography. Construction of magnetic induction...... maps allowed for the visualization of the vortex domain state in an individual Fe3O4 grain (similar to 200nm in diameter) as a function of temperature. Acquisition of a series of electron holograms at 100 degrees C intervals during in situ heating up to 700 degrees C demonstrates the vortex state...

  15. G quadruplex RNA structures in PSD-95 mRNA: potential regulators of miR-125a seed binding site accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanovic, Snezana; Bassell, Gary J; Mihailescu, Mihaela Rita

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability caused by the CGG trinucleotide expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of the FMR1 gene on the X chromosome, that silences the expression of the Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP has been shown to bind to a G-rich region within the PSD-95 mRNA which encodes for the postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), and together with the microRNA miR-125a, to play an important role in the reversible inhibition of the PSD-95 mRNA translation in neurons. The loss of FMRP in Fmr1 KO mice disables this translation control in the production of the PSD-95 protein. Interestingly, the miR-125a binding site on PSD-95 mRNA is embedded in the G-rich region bound by FMRP and postulated to adopt one or more G quadruplex structures. In this study, we have used different biophysical techniques to validate and characterize the formation of parallel G quadruplex structures and binding of miR-125a to its complementary sequence located within the 3' UTR of PSD-95 mRNA. Our results indicate that the PSD-95 mRNA G-rich region folds into alternate G quadruplex conformations that coexist in equilibrium. miR-125a forms a stable complex with PSD-95 mRNA, as evident by characteristic Watson-Crick base-pairing that coexists with one of the G quadruplex forms, suggesting a novel mechanism for G quadruplex structures to regulate the access of miR-125a to its binding site. © 2014 Stefanovic et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  16. Beta1-adrenergic receptor-mediated dilation of rat cerebral artery requires Shaker-type KV1 channels on PSD95 scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher L; McClenahan, Samantha J; Hanvey, Hillary M; Jang, Dae-Song; Nelson, Piper L; Joseph, Biny K; Rhee, Sung W

    2015-09-01

    Postsynaptic density-95 (PSD95) is a scaffolding protein in cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells (cVSMCs), which binds to Shaker-type K(+) (KV1) channels and facilitates channel opening through phosphorylation by protein kinase A. β1-Adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) also have a binding motif for PSD95. Functional association of β1AR with KV1 channels through PSD95 may represent a novel vasodilator complex in cerebral arteries (CA). We explored whether a β1AR-PSD95-KV1 complex is a determinant of rat CA dilation. RT-PCR and western blots revealed expression of β1AR in CA. Isoproterenol induced a concentration-dependent dilation of isolated, pressurized rat CA that was blocked by the β1AR blocker CGP20712. Cranial window imaging of middle cerebral arterioles in situ showed isoproterenol- and norepinephrine-induced dilation that was blunted by β1AR blockade. Isoproterenol-induced hyperpolarization of cVSMCs in pressurized CA was blocked by CGP20712. Confocal images of cVSMCs immunostained with antibodies against β1AR and PSD95 indicated strong colocalization, and PSD95 co-immunoprecipitated with β1AR in CA lysate. Blockade of KV1 channels, β1AR or disruption of PSD95-KV1 interaction produced similar blunting of isoproterenol-induced dilation in pressurized CA. These findings suggest that PSD95 mediates a vasodilator complex with β1AR and KV1 channels in cVSMCs. This complex may be critical for proper vasodilation in rat CA.

  17. Effect of particle size distribution on the correlation between liquefaction resistance and shear wave velocity of granular soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changtao; Xu, Xiao Min; Cheng, Yi Pik

    2017-06-01

    Shear wave method has been increasingly popular in assessing the liquefaction potential of granular soils. Two particle-scale parameters, the inter-particle friction and the shear modulus of grains, play vital roles in correlation between Cyclic Resistance Ratio (CRR) and shear wave velocity corrected by overburden stress (Vs1). Series of drained one-dimensional compression tests were simulated on samples of different inter-particle friction angles assigned during preparation stage. Uniformity coefficients of these Particle Size Distribution (PSD) curves are 2 and 4 whose average particle size d50 are identical. The shearing results, as well as their assigned inter-particle friction angles form calibration curves for real sands. Dissimilar PSD curves result in different calibration outcomes. For Silica sand no.8, these curves give divergent inter-particle friction angles. This study calibrates particle shear modulus for Silica sand no.8 as well. Different PSD curves give divergent values of particle shear modulus. PSDs show impacts on calibrations of both vital parameters, which have converse effects on CRR-Vs1 curves. This study suggests that the CRR-Vs1 correlation should be independent of PSDs.

  18. Variability of particle size distribution with respect to inherent optical properties in Poyang Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jue; Chen, Xiaoling; Jiang, Tao; Yang, Fanlin; Chen, Liqiong; Yan, Liwen

    2016-08-01

    Suspended particulate matter plays a significant role in the studies of sediment fluxes, phytoplankton dynamics, and water optical properties. This study focuses on the relationships between particle size distribution (PSD), water's inherent optical properties (IOPs), and water constituents. We investigated the complex waters of Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, in wet and dry seasons during 2008-2011. Because of the distinct temporal-spatial variation of Poyang Lake, these parameters and relationships also demonstrate seasonal and regional variability. The variation range of the concentration of suspended particulate matter is 0.32-69.08  mg/l, with a mean value of 22.21  mg/l. The median particle size in the dry season is much larger than that of the wet season. The Junge distribution fits the PSD of Poyang Lake very well in the scope of 6.21-331 μm. Furthermore, the slopes of the PSD range from 3.54 to 4.69, with a mean value of 4.11, with the steepest slopes (>4.5) occurring in the waters around Songmen Mountain Island and the northern waterway. A negative correlation was found between median particle size (Dv50) and the mass-specific absorption coefficient at 443 nm [apm(443)] for both wet and dry seasons. Identical to analogous waters, the spectral slopes of the PSD correlate well with the spectral slopes of the attenuation coefficient, but with different fitted formulas. In the dry season, the particle size can better explain the variability of the scattering coefficient, while the mass-specific scattering coefficient is better explained by the apparent density. However, no similar results were found for the wet season. In addition, the spectral slopes of the backscattering coefficient correlated well with the PSD slope, and the bulk refractive index calculated from the backscattering ratio and PSD slope can indicate the particle composition of Poyang Lake. Overall, the knowledge on the PSD and IOPs gained in this study broadens our

  19. Ice sheet in peril

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Christine Schøtt

    2016-01-01

    Earth's large ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are major contributors to sea level change. At present, the Greenland Ice Sheet (see the photo) is losing mass in response to climate warming in Greenland (1), but the present changes also include a long-term response to past climate transitions....... On page 590 of this issue, MacGregor et al. (2) estimate the mean rates of snow accumulation and ice flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet over the past 9000 years based on an ice sheet-wide dated radar stratigraphy (3). They show that the present changes of the Greenland Ice Sheet are partly an ongoing...... response to the last deglaciation. The results help to clarify how sensitive the ice sheet is to climate changes....

  20. Production of the active antifungal Pisum sativum defensin 1 (Psd1) in Pichia pastoris: overcoming the inefficiency of the STE13 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Kátia M S; Almeida, Marcius S; Valente, Ana Paula; Almeida, Fábio C L; Kurtenbach, Eleonora

    2003-09-01

    Plant defensins are small cysteine-rich proteins that present high activity against fungi and bacteria and inhibition of insect proteases and alpha-amylases. Here, we present the expression in Pichia pastoris, purification and characterization of the recombinant Pisum sativum defensin 1(rPsd1); a pea defensin which presents four disulfide bridges and high antifungal activity. For this, we had to overcome the inefficiency of the STE13 protease. Our strategy was to clone the corresponding cDNA directly in-frame with a variant of the widely used secretion signal from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-mating factor, devoid of the STE13 proteolytic signal cleavage sequence. Using an optimized expression protocol, which included a buffered basal salt media formulation, it was possible to obtain about 63.0mg/L of 15N-labeled and unlabeled rPsd1. The recombinants were purified to homogeneity by gel filtration chromatography, followed by reversed-phase HPLC. Mass spectrometry of native and recombinant Psd1 revealed that the protein expressed heterologously was post-translationally processed to the same mature protein as the native one. Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis indicated that the recombinant protein had the same folding when compared to native Psd1. In addition, the rPsd1 was fully active against Aspergillus niger, if compared with native Psd1. To our knowledge, this is the first heterologous expression of a fully active plant defensin in a high-yield flask.

  1. DA Negatively Regulates IGF-I Actions Implicated in Cognitive Function via Interaction of PSD95 and nNOS in Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saidan Ding

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I has been positively correlated with cognitive ability. Cognitive decline in minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE was shown to be induced by elevated intracranial dopamine (DA. The beneficial effect of IGF-I signaling in MHE remains unknown. In this study, we found that IGF-I content was reduced in MHE rats and that IGF-I administration mitigated cognitive decline of MHE rats. A protective effect of IGF-I on the DA-induced interaction between postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS was found in neurons. Ribosomal S6 protein kinase (RSK phosphorylated nNOS in response to IGF-I by recruiting extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2. In turn, DA inactivated the ERK1/2/RSK pathway and stimulated the PSD95–nNOS interaction by downregulating IGF-I. Inhibition of the interaction between PSD95 and nNOS ameliorated DA-induced memory impairment. As DA induced deficits in the ERK1/2/RSK pathway and the interaction between PSD95 and nNOS in MHE brains, IGF-I administration exerted a protective effect via interruption of the interaction between PSD95 and nNOS. These results suggest that IGF-I antagonizes DA-induced cognitive loss by disrupting PSD95–nNOS interactions in MHE.

  2. Photophysiology and albedo-changing potential of the ice algal community on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallop, Marian L; Anesio, Alexandre M; Perkins, Rupert G; Cook, Joseph; Telling, Jon; Fagan, Daniel; MacFarlane, James; Stibal, Marek; Barker, Gary; Bellas, Chris; Hodson, Andy; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2012-01-01

    Darkening of parts of the Greenland ice sheet surface during the summer months leads to reduced albedo and increased melting. Here we show that heavily pigmented, actively photosynthesising microalgae and cyanobacteria are present on the bare ice. We demonstrate the widespread abundance of green algae in the Zygnematophyceae on the ice sheet surface in Southwest Greenland. Photophysiological measurements (variable chlorophyll fluorescence) indicate that the ice algae likely use screening mechanisms to downregulate photosynthesis when exposed to high intensities of visible and ultraviolet radiation, rather than non-photochemical quenching or cell movement. Using imaging microspectrophotometry, we demonstrate that intact cells and filaments absorb light with characteristic spectral profiles across ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, whereas inorganic dust particles typical for these areas display little absorption. Our results indicate that the phototrophic community growing directly on the bare ice, through their photophysiology, most likely have an important role in changing albedo, and subsequently may impact melt rates on the ice sheet. PMID:23018772

  3. Photophysiology and albedo-changing potential of the ice algal community on the surface of the Greenland ice sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallop, Marian L; Anesio, Alexandre M; Perkins, Rupert G; Cook, Joseph; Telling, Jon; Fagan, Daniel; MacFarlane, James; Stibal, Marek; Barker, Gary; Bellas, Chris; Hodson, Andy; Tranter, Martyn; Wadham, Jemma; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2012-12-01

    Darkening of parts of the Greenland ice sheet surface during the summer months leads to reduced albedo and increased melting. Here we show that heavily pigmented, actively photosynthesising microalgae and cyanobacteria are present on the bare ice. We demonstrate the widespread abundance of green algae in the Zygnematophyceae on the ice sheet surface in Southwest Greenland. Photophysiological measurements (variable chlorophyll fluorescence) indicate that the ice algae likely use screening mechanisms to downregulate photosynthesis when exposed to high intensities of visible and ultraviolet radiation, rather than non-photochemical quenching or cell movement. Using imaging microspectrophotometry, we demonstrate that intact cells and filaments absorb light with characteristic spectral profiles across ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, whereas inorganic dust particles typical for these areas display little absorption. Our results indicate that the phototrophic community growing directly on the bare ice, through their photophysiology, most likely have an important role in changing albedo, and subsequently may impact melt rates on the ice sheet.

  4. Icing Operations - De-Icing Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaromír Procházka

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of ice, frost and snow on aircraft surfaces can drastically reduce the climb and maneuvering capabilities of an aircraft. The removal of such contamination prior to take off MUST be strictly adhered to in accordance with regulations and standards. The policy with respect to aircraft icing contamination should be “MAKE IT CLEAN AND KEEP IT CLEAN”. All personnel associated with the dispatch and/or operation of aircraft share the responsibility for ensuring that no aircraft is dispatched unless it is clear of ice, snow or frost.

  5. Autonomous Aerial Ice Observation for Ice Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joakim Haugen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the tasks in ice defense is to gather information about the surrounding ice environment using various sensor platforms. In this manuscript we identify two monitoring tasks known in literature, namely dynamic coverage and target tracking, and motivate how these tasks are relevant in ice defense using RPAS. An optimization-based path planning concept is outlined for solving these tasks. A path planner for the target tracking problem is elaborated in more detail and a hybrid experiment, which consists of both a real fixed-wing aircraft and simulated objects, is included to show the applicability of the proposed framework.

  6. SPH Modelling of Sea-ice Pack Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staroszczyk, Ryszard

    2017-12-01

    The paper is concerned with the problem of sea-ice pack motion and deformation under the action of wind and water currents. Differential equations describing the dynamics of ice, with its very distinct mateFfigrial responses in converging and diverging flows, express the mass and linear momentum balances on the horizontal plane (the free surface of the ocean). These equations are solved by the fully Lagrangian method of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH). Assuming that the ice behaviour can be approximated by a non-linearly viscous rheology, the proposed SPH model has been used to simulate the evolution of a sea-ice pack driven by wind drag stresses. The results of numerical simulations illustrate the evolution of an ice pack, including variations in ice thickness and ice area fraction in space and time. The effects of different initial ice pack configurations and of different conditions assumed at the coast-ice interface are examined. In particular, the SPH model is applied to a pack flow driven by a vortex wind to demonstrate how well the Lagrangian formulation can capture large deformations and displacements of sea ice.

  7. Modeling Pancake Formation with a Coupled Wave-Ice Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeramony, J.; Orzech, M.; Shi, F.; Bateman, S. P.; Calantoni, J.

    2016-12-01

    Recent results from the ONR-sponsored Arctic Sea State DRI cruise (Thomson et al., 2016, EOS, in press) suggest that small-scale pancake ice formation is an important process in the initial recovery and refreezing of the Arctic pack ice each autumn. Ocean surface waves and ambient temperature play significant roles in shaping and/or limiting the pancake growth patterns, which may either facilitate or delay the recovery of the ice pack. Here we apply a phase-resolving, coupled wave-ice system, consisting of a CFD wave model (NHWAVE) and a discrete-element ice model (LIGGGHTS), to investigate the formation processes of pancake ice under different conditions. A series of simulations is run, each beginning with a layer of disconnected ice particles floating on the ocean surface. Wave conditions and ice bonding properties are varied to examine the effects of mild versus stormy conditions, wind waves versus swell, and warmer versus colder temperatures. Model runs are limited to domains of O(1 sq km). Initial tests have shown some success in replicating qualitative results from the Sea State cruise, including the formation of irregularly shaped pancakes from the "frazil" ice layer, changes in formation processes caused by varying ambient temperature (represented through variations in ice bonding strength), occasional rafting of one pancake on top of another, and increased wave attenuation as pancakes grow larger.

  8. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  9. First Results from IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Spencer R.

    2006-01-12

    IceCube is a 1 km{sup 3} neutrino observatory being built to study neutrino production in active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants, and a host of other astrophysical sources. High-energy neutrinos may signal the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. IceCube will also study many particle-physics topics: searches for WIMP annihilation in the Earth or the Sun, and for signatures of supersymmetry in neutrino interactions, studies of neutrino properties, including searches for extra dimensions, and searches for exotica such as magnetic monopoles or Q-balls. IceCube will also study the cosmic-ray composition. In January, 2005, 60 digital optical modules (DOMs) were deployed in the South Polar ice at depths ranging from 1450 to 2450 meters, and 8 ice-tanks, each containing 2 DOMs were deployed as part of a surface air-shower array. All 76 DOMs are collecting high-quality data. After discussing the IceCube physics program and hardware, I will present some initial results with the first DOMs.

  10. Probing ice clouds by broadband mid-infrared extinction spectroscopy: case studies from ice nucleation experiments in the AIDA aerosol and cloud chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wagner

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Series of infrared extinction spectra of ice crystals were recorded in the 6000–800 cm−1 wavenumber regime during expansion cooling experiments in the large aerosol and cloud chamber AIDA of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. Either supercooled sulphuric acid solution droplets or dry mineral dust particles were added as seed aerosols to initiate ice formation after having established ice supersaturated conditions inside the chamber. The various ice nucleation runs were conducted at temperatures between 237 and 195 K, leading to median sizes of the nucleated ice particles of 1–15 µm. The measured infrared spectra were fitted with reference spectra from T-matrix calculations to retrieve the number concentration as well as the number size distribution of the generated ice clouds. The precise evaluation of the time-dependent ice particle number concentrations, i.e., the rates of new ice particle formation, is of particular importance to quantitatively analyse the ice nucleation experiments in terms of nucleation rates and ice activation spectra. The ice particles were modelled as finite circular cylinders with aspect ratios ranging from 0.5 to 3.0. Benefiting from the comprehensive diagnostic tools for the characterisation of ice clouds which are available at the AIDA facility, the infrared retrieval results with regard to the ice particle number concentration could be compared to independent measurements with various optical particle counters. This provided a unique chance to quantitatively assess potential errors or solution ambiguities in the retrieval procedure which mainly originate from the difficulty to find an appropriate shape representation for the aspherical particle habits of the ice crystals. Based on these inter-comparisons, we demonstrate that there is no standard retrieval approach which can be routinely applied to all different experimental scenarios. In particular, the concept to account for the asphericity of the ice crystals

  11. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junge, K.; Swanson, B. D.

    2008-05-01

    Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for ice formation in Arctic clouds (Bigg and Leck, 2001), the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA) of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium - which for artificial seawater was -42.2±0.3°C. Our results suggest that immersion freezing of these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses would not be important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in polar clouds or to the formation of sea ice. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  12. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junge

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for ice formation in Arctic clouds (Bigg and Leck, 2001, the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium – which for artificial seawater was –42.2±0.3°C. Our results suggest that immersion freezing of these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses would not be important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in polar clouds or to the formation of sea ice. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  13. Fractal Features of Soil Particle Size Distribution Under Different Plant Communities in the Forested Region of Mountain Yimeng, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to explore the effect of changes in plant communities and land use on soil properties, as a result of anthropogenic disturbances, we apply the theory of fractals and soil physics as a means to better quantify changes in particle-size distribution (PSD) and soil porosity. Fractal dimension a...

  14. Terahertz Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds - Sensitivity on Ice Dielectric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendrok, J.; Baron, P.; Kasai, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Initiated by current developments in terahertz sensor technology the application of instruments operating in the spectral region between 0.1 - 30 THz is considered for a number of remote sensing issues. Accounting for more than 50 percent of the outgoing longwave radiation and with the major component of cirrus radiative forcing in the far-infrared, satellite measurements in this spectral region will significantly support the determination of the radiation budget of the Earth. Furthermore, spanning the whole range of particle sizes found in tropospheric ice clouds, the Terahertz region bears the potential to complement existing methods and improve our knowlegde and understanding of those clouds. Both, determination of the Earth's radiation budget as well as retrieving ice cloud properties require appropriately accurate calculations of radiative transfer. Hence, a good knowledge of the input parameters to the radiative transfer models is needed. In particular, this includes spectrally dependent properties of the molecular as well as particulate atmospheric matter, i.e., spectroscopic parameters of the molecular absorption lines and continua as well as the dielectric properties of aerosol and cloud particle material. Due to the lack of Terahertz light source and receiver technology in the past, measurements of these parameters have been sparse and the knowledge about them is rather poor. In preparation to evaluate the feasibility of monitoring tropospheric ice clouds using passive Terahertz observations, we study the modeling uncertainties due to the unconfident knowledge of the complex refractive index of ice. We give an overview of the consistency and discrepancies, respectively, of the existing measurements and models for ice refractive index in the Terahertz region. Using calculations of particle optical properties according to Mie theory as well as the radiative transfer models Moliere and SARTre, we estimate the deviations in particle optical properties and

  15. Land Ice: Greenland & Antarctic ice mass anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Data from NASA's Grace satellites show that the land ice sheets in both Antarctica and Greenland are losing mass. The continent of Antarctica (left chart) has been...

  16. Deposition and fine particle production during dynamic flow in a dry powder inhaler: a CFD approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, J; Alexopoulos, A H; Kiparissides, C

    2014-01-30

    In this work the dynamic flow as well as the particle motion and deposition in a commercial dry powder inhaler, DPI (i.e., Turbuhaler) is described using computational fluid dynamics, CFD. The dynamic flow model presented here is an extension of a steady flow model previously described in Milenkovic et al. (2013). The model integrates CFD simulations for dynamic flow, an Eulerian-fluid/Lagrangian-particle description of particle motion as well as a particle/wall interaction model providing the sticking efficiency of particles colliding with the DPI walls. The dynamic flow is imposed by a time varying outlet pressure and the particle injections into the DPI are assumed to occur instantaneously and follow a prescribed particle size distribution, PSD. The total particle deposition and the production of fine particles in the DPI are determined for different peak inspiratory flow rates, PIFR, flow increase rates, FIR, and particle injection times. The simulation results for particle deposition are found to agree well with available experimental data for different values of PIFR and FIR. The predicted values of fine particle fraction are in agreement with available experimental results when the mean size of the injected PSD is taken to depend on the PIFR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Review of Discrete Element Method (DEM) Particle Shapes and Size Distributions for Lunar Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, John E.; Metzger, Philip T.; Wilkinson, R. Allen

    2010-01-01

    As part of ongoing efforts to develop models of lunar soil mechanics, this report reviews two topics that are important to discrete element method (DEM) modeling the behavior of soils (such as lunar soils): (1) methods of modeling particle shapes and (2) analytical representations of particle size distribution. The choice of particle shape complexity is driven primarily by opposing tradeoffs with total number of particles, computer memory, and total simulation computer processing time. The choice is also dependent on available DEM software capabilities. For example, PFC2D/PFC3D and EDEM support clustering of spheres; MIMES incorporates superquadric particle shapes; and BLOKS3D provides polyhedra shapes. Most commercial and custom DEM software supports some type of complex particle shape beyond the standard sphere. Convex polyhedra, clusters of spheres and single parametric particle shapes such as the ellipsoid, polyellipsoid, and superquadric, are all motivated by the desire to introduce asymmetry into the particle shape, as well as edges and corners, in order to better simulate actual granular particle shapes and behavior. An empirical particle size distribution (PSD) formula is shown to fit desert sand data from Bagnold. Particle size data of JSC-1a obtained from a fine particle analyzer at the NASA Kennedy Space Center is also fitted to a similar empirical PSD function.

  18. Sensitivity Study of Ice Crystal Optical Properties in the 874 GHz Submillimeter Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Guanglin; Yang, Ping; Wu, Dong L.

    2015-01-01

    Testing of an 874 GHz submillimeter radiometer on meteorological satellites is being planned to improve ice water content retrievals. In this paper we study the optical properties of ice cloud particles in the 874 GHz band. The results show that the bulk scattering and absorption coefficients of an ensemble of ice cloud particles are sensitive to the particle shape and effective diameter, whereas the latter is also sensitive to temperature. The co-polar back scattering cross-section is not sensitive to particle shape, temperature, and the effective diameter in the range of 50200 m.

  19. The kinetics of ice-lens growth in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Style, Robert W.

    2012-01-09

    Abstract We analyse the growth rate of segregated ice (ice lenses) in freezing porous media. For typical colloidal materials such as soils we show that the commonly employed Clapeyron equation is not valid macroscopically at the interface between the ice lens and the surrounding porous medium owing to the viscous dynamics of flow in premelted films. The flow in these films gives rise to an \\'interfacial resistance\\' to flow towards the growing ice which causes a significant drop in predicted ice-growth (heave) rates. This explains why many previous models predict ice-growth rates that are much larger than those seen in experiments. We derive an explicit formula for the ice-growth rate in a given porous medium, and show that this only depends on temperature and on the external pressures imposed on the freezing system. This growth-rate formula contains a material-specific function which can be calculated (with knowledge of the geometry and material of the porous medium), but which is also readily experimentally measurable. We apply the formula to plate-like particles, and show that the results can be matched with previous experimental data. Finally we show how the interfacial resistance explains the observation that the maximum heave rate in soils occurs in medium-grained particles such as silts, while heave rates are smaller for fine-and coarse-grained particles. © 2012 Cambridge University Press.

  20. Documentation of tests on particle size methodologies for laser diffraction compared to traditional sieving and sedimentation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Charlotte; Dalsgaard, Kristian

    Sieving and sedimentation analyses by pipette or hydrometer are historically the traditional methods for determining particle size distributions (PSD). A more informative and faster alternative has for years been laser diffraction (LD). From 2003 to 2013 the authors of this paper have worked...... intensively with PSD and performed various tests and investigations, using LD, sedimentation (by pipette) and sieving. The aim was to improve and understand the relationship between these various techniques, pre-treatment effects and preferably find a unifying correlation factor. As a result, method...

  1. Ice Cloud Property Retrievals Using Far Infrared Upwelling Radiance Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrelli, A. J.; Turner, D. D.

    2012-12-01

    Spectral measurements of the upwelling radiance in the mid-infrared (MIR, 8 - 12 μm wavelength) have proven sensitivity to microphysical and macrophysical parameters of ice clouds. This sensitivity is caused by the spectrally varying index of refraction, as well as the ice crystal shape and particle size parameter. Many methods have been demonstrated that utilize this sensitivity to retrieve bulk ice cloud microphysical properties such as effective ice particle size, and macrophysical properties such as optical depth and height. By extending the spectral observations into the far-infrared (FIR, 17 - 50 μm wavelength), additional information can be retrieved due to the different sensitivities exhibited by cloud ice at these longer wavelengths. Typically, in the far-infrared, ice exhibits stronger scattering across all particle sizes, due to a smaller complex index of refraction, and weaker forward scattering due to the smaller size parameter. In this research, a modeling framework is used to quantify the information content of the FIR spectrum for ice cloud property retrieval. The information content is quantitatively compared to the MIR, to show how ice cloud retrievals could be improved with FIR spectral measurements. For cases where the MIR spectrum contains a high amount of information (e.g., moderate optical depths with small particle size), the FIR spectrum adds only a marginal amount of information. In other cases where the MIR spectrum contains low information (e.g., high optical depth clouds), the FIR spectrum is shown to add significant information. The FIR spectrum can thus be shown to extend the region in state space where passive infrared measurements can effectively constrain ice cloud properties.

  2. Building predictive models of soil particle-size distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Samuel-Rosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Is it possible to build predictive models (PMs of soil particle-size distribution (psd in a region with complex geology and a young and unstable land-surface? The main objective of this study was to answer this question. A set of 339 soil samples from a small slope catchment in Southern Brazil was used to build PMs of psd in the surface soil layer. Multiple linear regression models were constructed using terrain attributes (elevation, slope, catchment area, convergence index, and topographic wetness index. The PMs explained more than half of the data variance. This performance is similar to (or even better than that of the conventional soil mapping approach. For some size fractions, the PM performance can reach 70 %. Largest uncertainties were observed in geologically more complex areas. Therefore, significant improvements in the predictions can only be achieved if accurate geological data is made available. Meanwhile, PMs built on terrain attributes are efficient in predicting the particle-size distribution (psd of soils in regions of complex geology.

  3. Control of Ice Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Ching-Wen; Sahoo, Venkataraman; Lu, Ming-Chang

    2017-03-28

    Ice formation is a catastrophic problem affecting our daily life in a number of ways. At present, deicing methods are costly, inefficient, and environmentally unfriendly. Recently, the use of superhydrophobic surfaces has been suggested as a potential passive anti-icing method. However, no surface is able to repel frost formation at a very cold temperature. In this work, we demonstrated the abilities of spatial control of ice formation and confinement of the ice-stacking direction. The control and confinement were achieved by manipulating the local free energy barrier for frosting. The V-shaped microgroove patterned surface, which possessed these abilities, exhibited the best anti-icing and deicing performances among the studied surfaces. The insight of this study can be applied to alleviate the impact of icing on our daily life and in many industrial systems.

  4. Producing desired ice faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Brumberg, Alexandra; Bisson, Patrick J; Shultz, Ryan

    2015-11-10

    The ability to prepare single-crystal faces has become central to developing and testing models for chemistry at interfaces, spectacularly demonstrated by heterogeneous catalysis and nanoscience. This ability has been hampered for hexagonal ice, Ih--a fundamental hydrogen-bonded surface--due to two characteristics of ice: ice does not readily cleave along a crystal lattice plane and properties of ice grown on a substrate can differ significantly from those of neat ice. This work describes laboratory-based methods both to determine the Ih crystal lattice orientation relative to a surface and to use that orientation to prepare any desired face. The work builds on previous results attaining nearly 100% yield of high-quality, single-crystal boules. With these methods, researchers can prepare authentic, single-crystal ice surfaces for numerous studies including uptake measurements, surface reactivity, and catalytic activity of this ubiquitous, fundamental solid.

  5. Improvements on the ice cloud modeling capabilities of the Community Radiative Transfer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Bingqi; Yang, Ping; Liu, Quanhua; van Delst, Paul; Boukabara, Sid-Ahmed; Weng, Fuzhong

    2016-11-01

    Noticeable improvements on the ice cloud modeling capabilities of the Community Radiative Transfer Model (CRTM) are reported, which are based on the most recent advances in understanding ice cloud microphysical (particularly, ice particle habit/shape characteristics) and optical properties. The new CRTM ice cloud model is derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) collection 6 ice cloud habit model, which represents ice particles as severely roughened hexagonal ice column aggregates with a gamma size distribution. The single-scattering properties of the new ice particle model are derived from a state-of-the-art ice optical property library and are constructed as look-up tables for rapid CRTM computations. Various sensitivity studies concerning instrument-specific applications and simulations are performed to validate CRTM against satellite observations. In particular, radiances in a spectral region covering the infrared wavelengths are simulated. Comparisons of brightness temperatures between CRTM simulations and observations (from MODIS, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder, and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit) show that the new ice cloud optical property look-up table substantially enhances the performance of the CRTM under ice cloud conditions.

  6. Processes causing electrification of ice crystals in thunderclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonnegut, B.; Moore, C. B.

    Jayaratne and Saunders (1991) have performed a useful service by reporting their laboratory experiments demonstrating, contrary to the findings of Odencrantz and Buecher (1967), that ice crystal charging does not take place in an unmixed cloud of ice crystals. Jayaratne and Saunders' further cold box experiments showing that the ice crystals become electrified when a fan in the cold box is turned on, support their view that an ice-ice charging process takes place on the surfaces of the moving ice-covered fan-blades. Their conclusion, that this phenomenon might be capable of producing each second the several coulombs of charged cloud particles necessary to maintain the electrification of a thundercloud, appears justified. However, because their paper is lacking in experimental details and because it is unknown whether the conditions in their cold chamber accurately duplicate those in a thunderstorm, this point is not possible to resolve. There is good reason to doubt J and S's final conclusion, that "… in thunderstorms, ice crystal charges are similarly acquired by collision processes RATHER THAN BY ANY OTHER MECHANISM". It is puzzling to understand why the authors have chosen to ignore ion attachment, an important ice crystal charging process that does not involve collisions between ice crystals. Beginning with Gish and Wait (1950), numerous investigators have demonstrated that ion currents flow to the tops of thunderclouds as predicted by Wilson (1920). Marshall et al. (1989) and Byrne et al. (1989) have found that ice particles at cloud top carry appreciable charges that appear to be derived from the Wilson current. In an average storm there can be little doubt that this mechanism too could be producing charged ice crystals at the required rate of about a coulomb per second (Vonnegut, 1990).

  7. Marginal Ice Zone Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    on sea ice area.) Akademiia Nauk SSSR. Tikho- okeanskii Institut Geografii. Issledovanie Sistemy ’Lednikii-Okean- Atmosfera ’. Vladivostok, p.23-28. 66...Sistemy ’Lednikii-Okean- Atmosfera ’. Vladivostok, p.23-28. Keen, R.A., 1977: The response of Baffin Bay ice conditions to changes in atmospheric...surface atmosphere on sea ice area.) Akademiia Nauk SSSR. Tikho- okeanskii Institut Geografii. Issledovanie Sistemy ’Lednikii-Okean- Atmosfera

  8. Decrease in neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit and PSD-93 transcript levels in the male mouse MPG after cavernous nerve injury or explant culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Beatrice M.; Merriam, Laura A.; Tompkins, John D.; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR was used to test whether cavernous nerve injury leads to a decrease in major pelvic ganglia (MPG) neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) subunit and postsynaptic density (PSD)-93 transcript levels. Subunits α3, β4, and α7, commonly expressed in the MPG, were selected for analysis. After 72 h in explant culture, MPG transcript levels for α3, β4, α7, and PSD-93 were significantly depressed. Three days after cavernous nerve axotomy or crush in vivo, transcript levels for α3, β4, and PSD-93, but not for α7, were significantly depressed. Three days after dissection of the cavernous nerve free of underlying tissue and application of a 5-mm lateral stretch (manipulation), transcript levels for α3 and PSD-93 were also significantly decreased. Seven days after all three surgical procedures, α3 transcript levels remained depressed, but PSD-93 transcript levels were still decreased only after axotomy or nerve crush. At 30 days postsurgery, transcript levels for the nAChR subunits and PSD-93 had recovered. ACh-induced currents were significantly smaller in MPG neurons dissociated from 3-day explant cultured ganglia than from those recorded in neurons dissociated from acutely isolated ganglia; this observation provides direct evidence showing that a decrease in nAChR function was coincident with a decrease in nAChR subunit transcript levels. We conclude that a downregulation of nAChR subunit and PSD-93 expression after cavernous nerve injury, or even manipulation, could interrupt synaptic transmission within the MPG and thus contribute to the loss of neural control of urogenital organs after pelvic surgeries. PMID:24049141

  9. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ignatius

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation and thus influence cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from −38 to −10 °C at 5–15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between −39.0 and −37.2 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle budget.

  10. Heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous secondary organic aerosol produced from ozonolysis of α-pinene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatius, Karoliina; Kristensen, Thomas B.; Järvinen, Emma; Nichman, Leonid; Fuchs, Claudia; Gordon, Hamish; Herenz, Paul; Hoyle, Christopher R.; Duplissy, Jonathan; Garimella, Sarvesh; Dias, Antonio; Frege, Carla; Höppel, Niko; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Robert; Yan, Chao; Amorim, Antonio; Baltensperger, Urs; Curtius, Joachim; Donahue, Neil M.; Gallagher, Martin W.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Möhler, Ottmar; Saathoff, Harald; Schnaiter, Martin; Tomé, Antonio; Virtanen, Annele; Worsnop, Douglas; Stratmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    There are strong indications that particles containing secondary organic aerosol (SOA) exhibit amorphous solid or semi-solid phase states in the atmosphere. This may facilitate heterogeneous ice nucleation and thus influence cloud properties. However, experimental ice nucleation studies of biogenic SOA are scarce. Here, we investigated the ice nucleation ability of viscous SOA particles. The SOA particles were produced from the ozone initiated oxidation of α-pinene in an aerosol chamber at temperatures in the range from -38 to -10 °C at 5-15 % relative humidity with respect to water to ensure their formation in a highly viscous phase state, i.e. semi-solid or glassy. The ice nucleation ability of SOA particles with different sizes was investigated with a new continuous flow diffusion chamber. For the first time, we observed heterogeneous ice nucleation of viscous α-pinene SOA for ice saturation ratios between 1.3 and 1.4 significantly below the homogeneous freezing limit. The maximum frozen fractions found at temperatures between -39.0 and -37.2 °C ranged from 6 to 20 % and did not depend on the particle surface area. Global modelling of monoterpene SOA particles suggests that viscous biogenic SOA particles are indeed present in regions where cirrus cloud formation takes place. Hence, they could make up an important contribution to the global ice nucleating particle budget.

  11. Response to Request for Guidance on PSD Definition Referencing Cogeneration Gas Turbines that are Separated by One-Half Mile

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  12. Determination of the Applicability of NSPS and PSD to Stationary Gas Turbines Converting From Middle Distillates to Natural Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  13. Effects of dimeric PSD-95 inhibition on excitotoxic cell death and outcome after controlled cortical impact in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Bach, Anders; Rytter, Hana Malá

    2017-01-01

    be an effective therapeutic strategy in TBI. The objectives of the present study were to assess the effects of a dimeric inhibitor of PSD-95, UCCB01-144, on excitotoxic cell death in vitro and outcome after experimental TBI in rats in vivo. In addition, the pharmacokinetic parameters of UCCB01-144 were...... assessed in a water maze at two weeks post-trauma, and at four weeks lesion volumes were estimated. Overall, UCCB01-144 did not protect against NMDA-toxicity in neuronal cultures or experimental TBI in rats. Important factors that should be investigated further in future studies assessing the effects...

  14. PSD Applicability Analysis for a Past Change at the Georgia-Pacific Taylorsville Facility Particleboard Plant, Taylorsville, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  15. Conditions for Sublimating Water Ice to Supply Ceres' Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, M. E.; Byrne, S.; Schörghofer, N.; Schmidt, B. E.; Hayne, P. O.; Castillo-Rogez, J.; Sykes, M. V.; Combe, J.-P.; Ermakov, A. I.; Prettyman, T. H.; Raymond, C. A.; Russell, C. T.

    2017-10-01

    Observations of a water vapor exosphere around Ceres suggest that the dwarf planet may be episodically outgassing at a rate of 6 kg s-1 from unknown sources. With data from the Dawn mission as constraints, we use a coupled thermal and vapor diffusion model to explore three different configurations of water ice (global buried pore-filling ice, global buried excess ice, and local exposed surface ice) that could be present on Ceres. We conclude that a buried ice table cannot alone explain the vapor production rates previously measured, but newly exposed surface ice, given the right conditions, can exceed that vapor production rate. Sublimation lag deposits form that bury and darken this surface ice over a large range of timescales (from <1 year to approximately hundreds of kyr) that depend on latitude and ice regolith content. Sublimating water vapor can loft regolith particles from the surface of exposed ice, possibly prolonging the visible lifespan of those areas. We find that this process is only effective for regolith grains smaller than approximately ones of microns.

  16. Ice and ocean velocity in the Arctic marginal ice zone: Ice roughness and momentum transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia T. Cole

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The interplay between sea ice concentration, sea ice roughness, ocean stratification, and momentum transfer to the ice and ocean is subject to seasonal and decadal variations that are crucial to understanding the present and future air-ice-ocean system in the Arctic. In this study, continuous observations in the Canada Basin from March through December 2014 were used to investigate spatial differences and temporal changes in under-ice roughness and momentum transfer as the ice cover evolved seasonally. Observations of wind, ice, and ocean properties from four clusters of drifting instrument systems were complemented by direct drill-hole measurements and instrumented overhead flights by NASA operation IceBridge in March, as well as satellite remote sensing imagery about the instrument clusters. Spatially, directly estimated ice-ocean drag coefficients varied by a factor of three with rougher ice associated with smaller multi-year ice floe sizes embedded within the first-year-ice/multi-year-ice conglomerate. Temporal differences in the ice-ocean drag coefficient of 20–30% were observed prior to the mixed layer shoaling in summer and were associated with ice concentrations falling below 100%. The ice-ocean drag coefficient parameterization was found to be invalid in September with low ice concentrations and small ice floe sizes. Maximum momentum transfer to the ice occurred for moderate ice concentrations, and transfer to the ocean for the lowest ice concentrations and shallowest stratification. Wind work and ocean work on the ice were the dominant terms in the kinetic energy budget of the ice throughout the melt season, consistent with free drift conditions. Overall, ice topography, ice concentration, and the shallow summer mixed layer all influenced mixed layer currents and the transfer of momentum within the air-ice-ocean system. The observed changes in momentum transfer show that care must be taken to determine appropriate parameterizations

  17. Evaluation of Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Microphysics Using CALIPSO/CloudSat and Earthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We performed several sensitivity studies to evaluate uncertainties in the retrieved ice microphysics due to ice particle orientation and shape. It was found that the implementation of orientation of horizontally oriented ice plate model in the algorithm drastically improved the retrieval results in both for nadir- and off-nadir lidar pointing periods. Differences in the retrieved microphysics between only randomly oriented ice model (3D-ice and mixture of 3D-ice and Q2Dplate model were large especially in off-nadir period, e.g., 100% in effective radius and one order in ice water content, respectively. And differences in the retrieved ice microphysics among different mixture models were smaller than about 50% for effective radius in nadir period.

  18. Deconvolution of the particle size distribution of ProRoot MTA and MTA Angelus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, William Nguyen; Shakibaie, Fardad; Kahler, Bill; Walsh, Laurence James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) cements contain two types of particles, namely Portland cement (PC) (nominally 80% w/w) and bismuth oxide (BO) (20%). This study aims to determine the particle size distribution (PSD) of PC and BO found in MTA. Materials and methods The PSDs of ProRoot MTA (MTA-P) and MTA Angelus (MTA-A) powder were determined using laser diffraction, and compared to samples of PC (at three different particle sizes) and BO. The non-linear least squares method was used to deconvolute the PSDs into the constituents. MTA-P and MTA-A powders were also assessed with scanning electron microscopy. Results BO showed a near Gaussian distribution for particle size, with a mode distribution peak at 10.48 μm. PC samples milled to differing degrees of fineness had mode distribution peaks from 19.31 down to 4.88 μm. MTA-P had a complex PSD composed of both fine and large PC particles, with BO at an intermediate size, whereas MTA-A had only small BO particles and large PC particles. Conclusions The PSD of MTA cement products is bimodal or more complex, which has implications for understanding how particle size influences the overall properties of the material. Smaller particles may be reactive PC or unreactive radiopaque agent. Manufacturers should disclose particle size information for PC and radiopaque agents to prevent simplistic conclusions being drawn from statements of average particle size for MTA materials. PMID:27335899

  19. First Experience with Dry-Ice Cleaning on SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Reschke, D

    2004-01-01

    The surface of superconducting (s.c.) accelerator cavities must be cleaned from any kind of contaminations, like particles or chemical residues. Contaminations might act as centers for field emission, thus limiting the maximum gradient. Today's final cleaning is based on high pressure rinsing with ultra pure water. Application of dry-ice cleaning might result in additional cleaning potential. Dry-ice cleaning using the sublimation-impulse method removes particulate and film contaminations without residues. As a first qualifying step intentionally contaminated niobium samples were treated by dry ice cleaning. It resulted in a drastic reduction of DC field emission up to fields of 100 MV/m as well as in the reduction of particle numbers. The dry ice jet caused no observable surface damage. First cleaning tests on single-cell cavities showed Q-values at low fields up to 4x1010

  20. Thermal and hydrodynamic considerations of ice slurry in heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedecarrats, Jean-Pierre; Strub, Francoise; Peuvrel, Christophe [Laboratoire de Thermique, Energetique et Procedes, Equipe Energetique, Universite de Pau et des Pays de l' Adour, Avenue de l' Universite, BP 1155, 64013 Pau Cedex (France)

    2009-11-15

    This article focuses on the behavior in heat exchangers of an ice slurry composed of fine ice particles inside an ethanol-water solution. The heat transfer and friction characteristics were studied in two double pipe heat exchangers, one with a smooth surface and another with an improved surface. Heat transfer coefficients and pressure drops were experimentally investigated for the slurry flowing in the internal tube with ice mass fractions ranging from 0 to 30% and with flow velocities between 0.3 and 1.9 m s{sup -1}. For some flow velocities, the results showed that an increase in the ice fractions caused a change in the slurry flow structure influencing the evolution of the pressure drops and the heat transfer coefficients. Critical ice fraction values were determined corresponding to a change flow structure from laminar to turbulent motion revealed by the evolution of the friction factor. (author)

  1. Experimental study on heat transfer characteristics of ice slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Hiroyuki; Hirata, Tetsuo [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1, Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Shouji, Ryouta [Chubu Plant Service Co., Ltd., 11-22, Gohommatsu-cho, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 456-8516 (Japan); Shirakawa, Michito [Toyota Motor Corp., 1 Toyota-cho, Toyota, Aichi 471-8571 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Heat transfer characteristics of ice slurry were investigated experimentally. The Reynolds number, diameter of the tubes and ice packing factor (IPF) were varied as experimental parameters. For laminar flow, it was found that the ratio of the Nusselt numbers increased with the IPF, and an approximation equation of the Nusselt number could be derived using the apparent Reynolds number, IPF and the ratio of the average diameter of the ice particles to the diameter of the test tube. For turbulent flow, the ratio of the Nusselt numbers was 1 for each condition in the case of a low IPF. However, the ratio of the Nusselt numbers increased with the IPF in the high-IPF region. Moreover, the apparent Reynolds number, which can be derived by treating the ice slurry as a pseudoplastic fluid, can be used to determine the condition under which variation in the heat transfer characteristics of ice slurry in turbulent flow occurs. (author)

  2. Measuring the optical properties of IceCube drill holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongen Martin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The IceCube Neutrino Observatory consists of 5160 digital optical modules (DOMs in a cubic kilometer of deep ice below the South Pole. The DOMs record the Cherenkov light from charged particles interacting in the ice. A good understanding of the optical properties of the ice is crucial to the quality of the event reconstruction. While the optical properties of the undisturbed ice are well understood, the properties of the refrozen drill holes still pose a challenge. A new data-acquisition and analysis approach using light originating from LEDs within one DOM detected by the photomultiplier of the same DOM will be described. This method allows us to explore the scattering length in the immediate vicinity of the considered DOMs.

  3. Academic Airframe Icing Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Mike; Rothmayer, Alric; Thompson, David

    2009-01-01

    2-D ice accretion and aerodynamics reasonably well understood for engineering applications To significantly improve our current capabilities we need to understand 3-D: a) Important ice accretion physics and modeling not well understood in 3-D; and b) Aerodynamics unsteady and 3-D especially near stall. Larger systems issues important and require multidisciplinary team approach

  4. Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Meth (Crank, Ice) Facts Listen Methamphetamine—meth for short—is a white, bitter powder. Sometimes ... clear or white shiny rock (called a crystal). Meth powder can be eaten or snorted up the ...

  5. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  6. A comparative study of submicron particle sizing platforms: accuracy, precision and resolution analysis of polydisperse particle size distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Will; Kozak, Darby; Coleman, Victoria A; Jämting, Åsa K; Trau, Matt

    2013-09-01

    The particle size distribution (PSD) of a polydisperse or multimodal system can often be difficult to obtain due to the inherent limitations in established measurement techniques. For this reason, the resolution, accuracy and precision of three new and one established, commercially available and fundamentally different particle size analysis platforms were compared by measuring both individual and a mixed sample of monodisperse, sub-micron (220, 330, and 410 nm - nominal modal size) polystyrene particles. The platforms compared were the qNano Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor, Nanosight LM10 Particle Tracking Analysis System, the CPS Instruments's UHR24000 Disc Centrifuge, and the routinely used Malvern Zetasizer Nano ZS Dynamic Light Scattering system. All measurements were subjected to a peak detection algorithm so that the detected particle populations could be compared to 'reference' Transmission Electron Microscope measurements of the individual particle samples. Only the Tunable Resistive Pulse Sensor and Disc Centrifuge platforms provided the resolution required to resolve all three particle populations present in the mixed 'multimodal' particle sample. In contrast, the light scattering based Particle Tracking Analysis and Dynamic Light Scattering platforms were only able to detect a single population of particles corresponding to either the largest (410 nm) or smallest (220 nm) particles in the multimodal sample, respectively. When the particle sets were measured separately (monomodal) each platform was able to resolve and accurately obtain a mean particle size within 10% of the Transmission Electron Microscope reference values. However, the broadness of the PSD measured in the monomodal samples deviated greatly, with coefficients of variation being ~2-6-fold larger than the TEM measurements across all four platforms. The large variation in the PSDs obtained from these four, fundamentally different platforms, indicates that great care must still be taken in

  7. New particle dependant parameterizations of heterogeneous freezing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Karoline; Mitra, Subir K.

    2014-05-01

    For detailed investigations of cloud microphysical processes an adiabatic air parcel model with entrainment is used. It represents a spectral bin model which explicitly solves the microphysical equations. The initiation of the ice phase is parameterized and describes the effects of different types of ice nuclei (mineral dust, soot, biological particles) in immersion, contact, and deposition modes. As part of the research group INUIT (Ice Nuclei research UnIT), existing parameterizations have been modified for the present studies and new parameterizations have been developed mainly on the basis of the outcome of INUIT experiments. Deposition freezing in the model is dependant on the presence of dry particles and on ice supersaturation. The description of contact freezing combines the collision kernel of dry particles with the fraction of frozen drops as function of temperature and particle size. A new parameterization of immersion freezing has been coupled to the mass of insoluble particles contained in the drops using measured numbers of ice active sites per unit mass. Sensitivity studies have been performed with a convective temperature and dew point profile and with two dry aerosol particle number size distributions. Single and coupled freezing processes are studied with different types of ice nuclei (e.g., bacteria, illite, kaolinite, feldspar). The strength of convection is varied so that the simulated cloud reaches different levels of temperature. As a parameter to evaluate the results the ice water fraction is selected which is defined as the relation of the ice water content to the total water content. Ice water fractions between 0.1 and 0.9 represent mixed-phase clouds, larger than 0.9 ice clouds. The results indicate the sensitive parameters for the formation of mixed-phase and ice clouds are: 1. broad particle number size distribution with high number of small particles, 2. temperatures below -25°C, 3. specific mineral dust particles as ice nuclei such

  8. Islands in the ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tina; Kjær, Kurt H.; Haile, James Seymour

    2012-01-01

    nunataks on the northern hemisphere - some 30 km from the nearest biological source. They constitute around 2 km(2) of ice-free land that was established in the early Holocene. We have investigated the changes in plant composition at these nunataks using both the results of surveys of the flora over......Nunataks are isolated bedrocks protruding through ice sheets. They vary in age, but represent island environments in 'oceans' of ice through which organism dispersals and replacements can be studied over time. The J.A.D. Jensen's Nunataks at the southern Greenland ice sheet are the most isolated...... where the botanical survey was exhaustive. As no animals and humans are found on the nunataks, this change in diversity over a period of just 42 years must relate to environmental changes probably being climate-driven. This suggests that even the flora of fairly small and isolated ice-free areas reacts...

  9. Indoor Positioning System Based on a PSD Detector, Precise Positioning of Agents in Motion Using AoA Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Navarro, David; Lázaro-Galilea, José Luis; De-La-Llana-Calvo, Álvaro; Bravo-Muñoz, Ignacio; Gardel-Vicente, Alfredo; Tsirigotis, Georgios; Iglesias-Miguel, Juan

    2017-09-15

    Here, we present an indoor positioning system (IPS) for detecting mobile agents based on a single Position Sensitive Device sensor (PSD) sited in the environment and InfraRed Emitter Diode (IRED) located on mobile agents. The main goal of the work is to develop an alternative IPS to other sensing technologies, cheaper, easier to install and with a low computational load to obtain a high rate of measurements per second. The proposed IPS has the capacity to accurately determine 3D position from the angle of arrival (AoA) of the signal received at the PSD sensor. In this first approach to the method, the agents are considered to move along a plane. We propose two alternatives for determining position: in one, tones are emitted on a frequency unique to each transmitter, while in the other, sequences are emitted.The paper proposes and set up a very simple and easy to deploy system capable of performing 3D positioning with a single analog sensor, obtaining a high accurate positioning and a reduced execution time for the signal processing. The low computational load of the IPS makes it possible to obtain a very high position update rate (more than 100 times per second), yielding millimetric accuracies.

  10. Ices Under Conditions of Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeghikyan, A. G.

    2017-07-01

    A large number of molecules are observed in planetary nebulae, both simple, the most common (H2, CO and OH), and more complex (H2O, SiO, HCN, HNC, HCO+), and even the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and fullerenes containing a few dozen and more atoms. The water molecules are observed, as a rule, in the young objects, in the gas phase (water "fountains" and related water masers) and solid phase (emission of crystalline ice particles), and, regardless of the C/O ratio, water and carbon-containing molecules may be linked to the same object. On the other hand, the results of calculations by the well known Cloudy computer program given in this paper for stationery models, show that the abundance of water ice in planetary nebulae, other conditions being equal, is dependent on the ionization rate of hydrogen, which depends in turn on the flux of energetic particles (protons and alpha particles) in the range of MeV energies and higher. The possibility of the increased flux of such particles in planetary nebulae under conditions of the standard interacting stellar winds scenario is discussed, when the flux may locally exceed by 1-3 orders of magnitude that of caused by galactic cosmic rays. Calculated water ice column densities reach values up to 1018-1019 cm-2 at the usual average ISM H2 ionisation rate of 10-16s -1 and sharply decrease for the thousands times larger rates. Known observed results of NGC 6302 show for the column density of crystalline ice about 1019cm-2 close to the calculated one.

  11. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Arctic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Figure 1). When the ice is snow covered there is little difference in albedo and partitioning between first year and multiyear ice. Once the snow melts...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a...and iv) onset dates of melt and freeze up. 4. Assess the magnitude of the contribution from ice- albedo feedback to the observed decrease of sea ice

  12. Sunlight, Sea Ice, and the Ice Albedo Feedback in a Changing Artic Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-30

    When the ice is snow covered there is little difference in albedo and partitioning between first year and multiyear ice. Once the snow melts there is...reflection to the atmosphere, absorption in the snow and sea ice, and transmission to the ocean. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Arctic sea ice, sunlight, albedo ...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. SUNLIGHT, SEA ICE, AND THE ICE ALBEDO FEEDBACK IN A

  13. GLERL Radiation Transfer Through Freshwater Ice

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Radiation transmittance (ratio of transmitted to incident radiation) through clear ice, refrozen slush ice and brash ice, from ice surface to ice-water interface in...

  14. The importance of feldspar for ice nucleation by mineral dust in mixed-phase clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, James D; Murray, Benjamin J; Woodhouse, Matthew T; Whale, Thomas F; Baustian, Kelly J; Carslaw, Kenneth S; Dobbie, Steven; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Malkin, Tamsin L

    2013-06-20

    The amount of ice present in mixed-phase clouds, which contain both supercooled liquid water droplets and ice particles, affects cloud extent, lifetime, particle size and radiative properties. The freezing of cloud droplets can be catalysed by the presence of aerosol particles known as ice nuclei. One of the most important ice nuclei is thought to be mineral dust aerosol from arid regions. It is generally assumed that clay minerals, which contribute approximately two-thirds of the dust mass, dominate ice nucleation by mineral dust, and many experimental studies have therefore focused on these materials. Here we use an established droplet-freezing technique to show that feldspar minerals dominate ice nucleation by mineral dusts under mixed-phase cloud conditions, despite feldspar being a minor component of dust emitted from arid regions. We also find that clay minerals are relatively unimportant ice nuclei. Our results from a global aerosol model study suggest that feldspar ice nuclei are globally distributed and that feldspar particles may account for a large proportion of the ice nuclei in Earth's atmosphere that contribute to freezing at temperatures below about -15 °C.

  15. Ice nucleation activity of agricultural soil dust aerosols from Mongolia, Argentina, and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, I.; Funk, R.; Busse, J.; Iturri, A.; Kirchen, S.; Leue, M.; Möhler, O.; Schwartz, T.; Schnaiter, M.; Sierau, B.; Toprak, E.; Ullrich, R.; Ulrich, A.; Hoose, C.; Leisner, T.

    2016-11-01

    Soil dust particles emitted from agricultural areas contain considerable mass fractions of organic material. Also, soil dust particles may act as carriers for potentially ice-active biological particles. In this work, we present ice nucleation experiments conducted in the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud chamber. We investigated the ice nucleation efficiency of four types of soil dust from different regions of the world. The results are expressed as ice nucleation active surface site (INAS) densities and presented for the immersion freezing and the deposition nucleation mode. For immersion freezing occurring at 254 K, samples from Argentina, China, and Germany show ice nucleation efficiencies which are by a factor of 10 higher than desert dusts. On average, the difference in ice nucleation efficiencies between agricultural and desert dusts becomes significantly smaller at temperatures below 247 K. In the deposition mode the soil dusts showed higher ice nucleation activity than Arizona Test Dust over a temperature range between 232 and 248 K and humidities RHice up to 125%. INAS densities varied between 109 and 1011 m-2 for these thermodynamic conditions. For one soil dust sample (Argentinian Soil), the effect of treatments with heat was investigated. Heat treatments (383 K) did not affect the ice nucleation efficiency observed at 249 K. This finding presumably excludes proteinaceous ice-nucleating entities as the only source of the increased ice nucleation efficiency.

  16. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Anders

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical...... and biophysical methods, such as fluorescence polarization (FP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR. Our data show that under the applied in vitro conditions, ZL006 and IC87201 do not interact with the PDZ domains of nNOS or PSD-95, nor inhibit the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interface...... by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action....

  17. An Initial Study of the Fundamentals of Ice Crystal Icing Physics in the NASA Propulsion Systems Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struk, Peter M.; Ratvasky, Thomas P.; Bencic, Timothy J.; Van Zante, Judith F.; King, Michael C.; Tsao, Jen-Ching; Bartkus, Tadas P.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents results from an initial study of the fundamental physics of ice-crystal ice accretion using the NASA Propulsion Systems Lab (PSL). Ice accretion due to the ingestion of ice-crystals is being attributed to numerous jet-engine power-loss events. The NASA PSL is an altitude jet-engine test facility which has recently added a capability to inject ice particles into the flow. NASA is evaluating whether this facility, in addition to full-engine and motor-driven-rig tests, can be used for more fundamental ice-accretion studies that simulate the different mixed-phase icing conditions along the core flow passage of a turbo-fan engine compressor. The data from such fundamental accretion tests will be used to help develop and validate models of the accretion process. The present study utilized a NACA0012 airfoil. The mixed-phase conditions were generated by partially freezing the liquid-water droplets ejected from the spray bars. This paper presents data regarding (1) the freeze out characteristics of the cloud, (2) changes in aerothermal conditions due to the presence of the cloud, and (3) the ice accretion characteristics observed on the airfoil model. The primary variable in this test was the PSL plenum humidity which was systematically varied for two duct-exit-plane velocities (85 and 135 ms) as well as two particle size clouds (15 and 50 m MVDi). The observed clouds ranged from fully glaciated to fully liquid, where the liquid clouds were at least partially supercooled. The air total temperature decreased at the test section when the cloud was activated due to evaporation. The ice accretions observed ranged from sharp arrow-like accretions, characteristic of ice-crystal erosion, to cases with double-horn shapes, characteristic of supercooled water accretions.

  18. Development of an indicator for characterizing particle size distribution and quality of stormwater runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Zhang, Qionghua; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Lian, Bin; Wu, Yaketon; Wang, Xiaochang C

    2018-01-05

    Stormwater particles washed from road-deposited sediments (RDS) are traditionally characterized as either turbidity or total suspended solids (TSS). Although these parameters are influenced by particle sizes, neither of them characterizes the particle size distribution (PSD), which is of great importance in pollutant entrainment and treatment performance. Therefore, the ratio of turbidity to TSS (Tur/TSS) is proposed and validated as a potential surrogate for the bulk PSD and quality of stormwater runoff. The results show an increasing trend of Tur/TSS with finer sizes of both RDS and stormwater runoff. Taking heavy metals (HMs, including Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, and Ni) as typical pollutants in stormwater runoff, the concentrations (mg/kg) were found to vary significantly during rainfall events and tended to increase significantly with Tur/TSS. Therefore, Tur/TSS is a valid parameter to characterize the PSD and quality of stormwater. The high negative correlations between Tur/TSS and rainfall intensity demonstrate that stormwater with higher Tur/TSS generates under low intensity and, thus, characterizes small volume, finer sizes, weak settleability, greater mobility, and bioavailability. Conversely, stormwater with lower Tur/TSS generates under high intensity and, thus, characterizes large volume, coarser sizes, good settleability, low mobility, and bioavailability. These results highlight the need to control stormwater with high Tur/TSS. Moreover, Tur/TSS can aid the selection of stormwater control measures with appropriate detention storage, pollution loading, and removal effectiveness of particles.

  19. Comparative study of ice nucleating efficiency of K-feldspar in immersion and deposition freezing modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiron, T.; Hoffmann, N.; Peckhaus, A.; Kiselev, A. A.; Leisner, T.; Flossmann, A. I.

    2016-12-01

    One of the main challenges in understanding the evolution of Earth's climate resides in the understanding the role of ice nucleation on the development of tropospheric clouds as well as its initiation. K-feldspar is known to be a very active ice nucleating particle and this study focuses on the characterization of its activity in two heterogeneous nucleation modes, immersion and deposition freezing.We use a newly built humidity-controlled cold stage allowing the simultaneous observation of up to 2000 identical 0.6-nanoliter droplets containing suspension of mineral dust particles. The droplets are first cooled down to observe immersion freezing, the obtained ice crystals are then evaporated and finally, the residual particles are exposed to the water vapor supersaturated with respect to ice.The ice nucleation abilities for the individual residual particles are then compared for the different freezing modes and correlation between immersion ice nuclei and deposition ice nuclei is investigated.Based on the electron microscopy analysis of the residual particles, we discuss the possible relationship between the ice nucleation properties of feldspar and its microstructure. Finally, we discuss the atmospheric implications of our experimental results, using DESCAM, a 1.5D bin-resolved microphysics model.

  20. PSD95 suppresses dendritic arbor development in mature hippocampal neurons by occluding the clustering of NR2B-NMDA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando J Bustos

    Full Text Available Considerable evidence indicates that the NMDA receptor (NMDAR subunits NR2A and NR2B are critical mediators of synaptic plasticity and dendritogenesis; however, how they differentially regulate these processes is unclear. Here we investigate the roles of the NR2A and NR2B subunits, and of their scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and SAP102, in remodeling the dendritic architecture of developing hippocampal neurons (2-25 DIV. Analysis of the dendritic architecture and the temporal and spatial expression patterns of the NMDARs and anchoring proteins in immature cultures revealed a strong positive correlation between synaptic expression of the NR2B subunit and dendritogenesis. With maturation, the pruning of dendritic branches was paralleled by a strong reduction in overall and synaptic expression of NR2B, and a significant elevation in synaptic expression of NR2A and PSD95. Using constructs that alter the synaptic composition, we found that either over-expression of NR2B or knock-down of PSD95 by shRNA-PSD95 augmented dendritogenesis in immature neurons. Reactivation of dendritogenesis could also be achieved in mature cultured neurons, but required both manipulations simultaneously, and was accompanied by increased dendritic clustering of NR2B. Our results indicate that the developmental increase in synaptic expression of PSD95 obstructs the synaptic clustering of NR2B-NMDARs, and thereby restricts reactivation of dendritic branching. Experiments with shRNA-PSD95 and chimeric NR2A/NR2B constructs further revealed that C-terminus of the NR2B subunit (tail was sufficient to induce robust dendritic branching in mature hippocampal neurons, and suggest that the NR2B tail is important in recruiting calcium-dependent signaling proteins and scaffolding proteins necessary for dendritogenesis.

  1. High Speed Ice Friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour-Pierce, Alexandra; Sammonds, Peter; Lishman, Ben

    2014-05-01

    Many different tribological experiments have been run to determine the frictional behaviour of ice at high speeds, ostensibly with the intention of applying results to everyday fields such as winter tyres and sports. However, experiments have only been conducted up to linear speeds of several metres a second, with few additional subject specific studies reaching speeds comparable to these applications. Experiments were conducted in the cold rooms of the Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, UCL, on a custom built rotational tribometer based on previous literature designs. Preliminary results from experiments run at 2m/s for ice temperatures of 271 and 263K indicate that colder ice has a higher coefficient of friction, in accordance with the literature. These results will be presented, along with data from further experiments conducted at temperatures between 259-273K (in order to cover a wide range of the temperature dependent behaviour of ice) and speeds of 2-15m/s to produce a temperature-velocity-friction map for ice. The effect of temperature, speed and slider geometry on the deformation of ice will also be investigated. These speeds are approaching those exhibited by sports such as the luge (where athletes slide downhill on an icy track), placing the tribological work in context.

  2. Immersion freezing of biological particles at LACIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, T.; Hartmann, S.; Temkiv, T. S.; Augustin, S.; Gosewinkel Karlson, U.; Sahyoun, M. M.; Niedermeier, D.; Wex, H.; Voigtländer, J.; Raddatz, M.; Stratmann, F.

    2012-04-01

    Biological particles, especially bacteria being ubiquitous in the atmosphere, belong to the most efficient ice nuclei (IN) (Möhler, 2008) and hence might have a large impact on weather and climate. In this study, the immersion freezing behavior of different size segregated biological particles is investigated at the laminar flow tube LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Hartmann et al., 2011). For these experiments, SNOMAX and outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are used as IN. SNOMAX industrially produced from Pseudomonas-syringae bacteria, which are very ice nucleation active, can be seen as a proxy for ice nucleating bacteria in general. On the surface of these bacteria, ice nucleating proteins that initiate the freezing are situated (Maki et al., 1974). Additionally, it has been found that some ice nucleating bacteria strains have the ability to produce OMV, i.e., strangulated parts of the bacterial cell consisting of the same membrane material (Phelps et al., 1986). These OMV might contain the same ice nucleating proteins on their surface and thus might be able to nucleate ice as well. The OMV used in our experiments were extracted from bacteria cultivated from rain samples collected in Denmark from 30 m height. In our experiments, the biological particles are suspended in air via atomization, size selected by means of a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer, and then fed into LACIS. In LACIS, well defined droplets are produced by activating the biological particles to cloud droplets, so that each droplet contains only one biological particle. By decreasing the temperature in LACIS, these droplets are frozen. To determine the ice fraction, i.e., the fraction of frozen droplets to all particles, the liquid and frozen droplets are distinguished by means of a newly self-built optical device, which is positioned under LACIS, using the depolarization of light scattered by a single particle. The ice fractions are measured as a function of temperature and

  3. The Ice Selective Inlet: a novel technique for exclusive extraction of pristine ice crystals in mixed-phase clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kupiszewski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Climate predictions are affected by high uncertainties partially due to an insufficient knowledge of aerosol–cloud interactions. One of the poorly understood processes is formation of mixed-phase clouds (MPCs via heterogeneous ice nucleation. Field measurements of the atmospheric ice phase in MPCs are challenging due to the presence of much more numerous liquid droplets. The Ice Selective Inlet (ISI, presented in this paper, is a novel inlet designed to selectively sample pristine ice crystals in mixed-phase clouds and extract the ice residual particles contained within the crystals for physical and chemical characterization. Using a modular setup composed of a cyclone impactor, droplet evaporation unit and pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI, the ISI segregates particles based on their inertia and phase, exclusively extracting small ice particles between 5 and 20 μm in diameter. The setup also includes optical particle spectrometers for analysis of the number size distribution and shape of the sampled hydrometeors. The novelty of the ISI is a droplet evaporation unit, which separates liquid droplets and ice crystals in the airborne state, thus avoiding physical impaction of the hydrometeors and limiting potential artefacts. The design and validation of the droplet evaporation unit is based on modelling studies of droplet evaporation rates and computational fluid dynamics simulations of gas and particle flows through the unit. Prior to deployment in the field, an inter-comparison of the optical particle size spectrometers and a characterization of the transmission efficiency of the PCVI was conducted in the laboratory. The ISI was subsequently deployed during the Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE 2013 and 2014 – two extensive international field campaigns encompassing comprehensive measurements of cloud microphysics, as well as bulk aerosol, ice residual and ice nuclei properties. The campaigns provided an important

  4. Modeling of Commercial Turbofan Engine With Ice Crystal Ingestion: Follow-On

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Philip C. E.; Veres, Joseph P.; Coennen, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    The occurrence of ice accretion within commercial high bypass aircraft turbine engines has been reported under certain atmospheric conditions. Engine anomalies have taken place at high altitudes that have been attributed to ice crystal ingestion, partially melting, and ice accretion on the compression system components. The result was degraded engine performance, and one or more of the following: loss of thrust control (roll back), compressor surge or stall, and flameout of the combustor. As ice crystals are ingested into the fan and low pressure compression system, the increase in air temperature causes a portion of the ice crystals to melt. It is hypothesized that this allows the ice-water mixture to cover the metal surfaces of the compressor stationary components which leads to ice accretion through evaporative cooling. Ice accretion causes a blockage which subsequently results in the deterioration in performance of the compressor and engine. The focus of this research is to apply an engine icing computational tool to simulate the flow through a turbofan engine and assess the risk of ice accretion. The tool is comprised of an engine system thermodynamic cycle code, a compressor flow analysis code, and an ice particle melt code that has the capability of determining the rate of sublimation, melting, and evaporation through the compressor flow path, without modeling the actual ice accretion. A commercial turbofan engine which has previously experienced icing events during operation in a high altitude ice crystal environment has been tested in the Propulsion Systems Laboratory (PSL) altitude test facility at NASA Glenn Research Center. The PSL has the capability to produce a continuous ice cloud which is ingested by the engine during operation over a range of altitude conditions. The PSL test results confirmed that there was ice accretion in the engine due to ice crystal ingestion, at the same simulated altitude operating conditions as experienced previously in

  5. Ice data management systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, B.F. (Compusult Ltd. (Canada)); Lapp, D.J.; Balko, C.L. (Norland Science and Engineering Ltd. (Canada)); Hancock, K.E.; Lapp, P.A. (Lapp-Hancock Associates Ltd. (Canada))

    1989-07-01

    Oil and gas companies engaged in exploration and production drilling off the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador must cope with the seasonal presence of pack ice and icebergs. This task is assisted through ice data management systems. In late 1983, the 3 oil companies planning drilling programs in winter 1984 responded to a set of regulatory guidelines/directives regarding winter drilling on the Grand Banks by establishing a cooperative arrangement known as the Grand Banks Operators' Joint Ice Management Plan. In 1984 and 1985, the plan called for the establishment and operation of a central land-based ice data management system. This study analysed the 1985 system and future ice data management requirements. The downturn in exploration drilling offshore Newfoundland and Labrador which began in 1986 led to the implementation by active drilling companies of a decentralized joint ice data management system. In view of the forecast of a continued low level of drilling activity, it is concluded that the decentralized system is better suited to industry and regulatory requirements. The conceptual design of such a system includes standardization by industry of the specifications each company provides to the contractors who provide data communications services and ice data management system components. It is recommended that a working group be established, to include representatives of the oil industry, industry regulators, ice management contractors and other interested parties, to develop a detailed specification whereby the subsystems in a decentralized system can most efficiently and effectively meet the data management requirements of the Joint Ice Management Plan. 15 figs., 20 tabs.

  6. Synchronizing ice cores from the Renland and Agassiz ice caps to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Bo Møllesøe; Clausen, Henrik Brink; Fischer, D. A.

    2008-01-01

    Four ice cores from the Agassiz ice cap in the Canadian high arctic and one ice core from the Renland ice cap in eastern Greenland have been synchronized to the Greenland Ice Core Chronology 2005 (GICC05) which is based on annual layer counts in the DYE-3, GRIP and NGRIP ice cores. Volcanic....... Annual layer thicknesses in the Agassiz ice cores point to a well-developed Raymond bump in the Agassiz ice cap....... reference horizons, seen in electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) have been used to carry out the synchronization throughout the Holocene. The Agassiz ice cores have been matched to the NGRIP ice core ECM signal, while the Renland core has been matched to the GRIP ice core ECM signal, thus tying...

  7. Ice nucleation terminology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vali, G.; DeMott, P.; Möhler, O.; Whale, T. F.

    2014-08-01

    Progress in the understanding of ice nucleation is being hampered by the lack of uniformity in how some terms are used in the literature. This even extends to some ambiguity of meanings attached to some terms. Suggestions are put forward here for common use of terms. Some are already well established and clear of ambiguities. Others are less engrained and will need a conscious effort in adoption. Evolution in the range of systems where ice nucleation is being studied enhances the need for a clear nomenclature. The ultimate limit in the clarity of definitions is, of course, the limited degree to which ice nucleation processes are understood.

  8. Proceedings of ICED'09

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The 17th International Conference on Engineering Design, ICED'09, was held August 24-27 2009 at Stanford University, California, USA. The Conference is the flagship event of the Design Society, a society dedicated to contributing to a broad and established understanding of development and design....... The ICED series of conferences has a long tradition, which started in 1981 with the first ICED in Rome. A total of 379 papers were presented at ICED’09, each double-blind reviewed by multiple reviewers. The papers included research papers and case studies on a variety of topics concerned with design...

  9. Initial Cooling Experiment (ICE)

    CERN Multimedia

    Photographic Service; CERN PhotoLab

    1978-01-01

    In 1977, in a record-time of 9 months, the magnets of the g-2 experiment were modified and used to build a proton/antiproton storage ring: the "Initial Cooling Experiment" (ICE). It served for the verification of the cooling methods to be used for the "Antiproton Project". Stochastic cooling was proven the same year, electron cooling followed later. Also, with ICE the experimental lower limit for the antiproton lifetime was raised by 9 orders of magnitude: from 2 microseconds to 32 hours. For its previous life as g-2 storage ring, see 7405430. More on ICE: 7711282, 7809081, 7908242.

  10. The seeding of ice algal blooms in Arctic pack ice: The multiyear ice seed repository hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Lasse M.; Laney, Samuel R.; Duarte, Pedro; Kauko, Hanna M.; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Mundy, Christopher J.; Rösel, Anja; Meyer, Amelie; Itkin, Polona; Cohen, Lana; Peeken, Ilka; Tatarek, Agnieszka; Róźańska-Pluta, Magdalena; Wiktor, Józef; Taskjelle, Torbjørn; Pavlov, Alexey K.; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Hop, Haakon; Assmy, Philipp

    2017-07-01

    During the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition (N-ICE2015) from January to June 2015 the pack ice in the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard was studied during four drifts between 83° and 80°N. This pack ice consisted of a mix of second year, first year, and young ice. The physical properties and ice algal community composition was investigated in the three different ice types during the winter-spring-summer transition. Our results indicate that algae remaining in sea ice that survived the summer melt season are subsequently trapped in the upper layers of the ice column during winter and may function as an algal seed repository. Once the connectivity in the entire ice column is established, as a result of temperature-driven increase in ice porosity during spring, algae in the upper parts of the ice are able to migrate toward the bottom and initiate the ice algal spring bloom. Furthermore, this algal repository might seed the bloom in younger ice formed in adjacent leads. This mechanism was studied in detail for the dominant ice diatom Nitzschia frigida. The proposed seeding mechanism may be compromised due to the disappearance of older ice in the anticipated regime shift toward a seasonally ice-free Arctic Ocean.

  11. Wave-ice Interaction and the Marginal Ice Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    single buoys that were moved from place to place. These new data, obtained within the comprehensive set of ocean, ice and atmosphere sensors and remote...1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Wave- ice interaction and the Marginal Ice Zone Prof...between ocean waves and a sea ice cover, in terms, of scattering, attenuation, and mechanical effect of the waves on the ice . OBJECTIVES The

  12. Microwave single-scattering properties of randomly oriented soft-ice hydrometeors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Casella

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Large ice hydrometeors are usually present in intense convective clouds and may significantly affect the upwelling radiances that are measured by satellite-borne microwave radiometers – especially, at millimeter-wavelength frequencies. Thus, interpretation of these measurements (e.g., for precipitation retrieval requires knowledge of the single scattering properties of ice particles. On the other hand, shape and internal structure of these particles (especially, the larger ones is very complex and variable, and therefore it is necessary to resort to simplifying assumptions in order to compute their single-scattering parameters.

    In this study, we use the discrete dipole approximation (DDA to compute the absorption and scattering efficiencies and the asymmetry factor of two kinds of quasi-spherical and non-homogeneous soft-ice particles in the frequency range 50–183 GHz. Particles of the first kind are modeled as quasi-spherical ice particles having randomly distributed spherical air inclusions. Particles of the second kind are modeled as random aggregates of ice spheres having random radii. In both cases, particle densities and dimensions are coherent with the snow hydrometeor category that is utilized by the University of Wisconsin – Non-hydrostatic Modeling System (UW-NMS cloud-mesoscale model. Then, we compare our single-scattering results for randomly-oriented soft-ice hydrometeors with corresponding ones that make use of: a effective-medium equivalent spheres, b solid-ice equivalent spheres, and c randomly-oriented aggregates of ice cylinders. Finally, we extend to our particles the scattering formulas that have been developed by other authors for randomly-oriented aggregates of ice cylinders.

  13. Micro-Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging of Individual Identified Marine Biogenic and Ambient Organic Ice Nuclei (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R. C.; Aller, J. Y.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation represents one of the least understood atmospheric processes with important implications for the hydrological cycle and climate. Current freezing descriptions assume that ice active sites on the particle surface initiate ice nucleation, however, the nature of these sites remains elusive. Here, we present a new experimental method that allows us to relate physical and chemical properties of individual particles with observed water uptake and ice nucleation ability using a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical techniques. We apply this method to field-collected particles and particles generated via bursting of bubbles produced by glass frit aeration and plunging water impingement jets in a mesocosm containing artificial sea water and bacteria and/or phytoplankton. The most efficient ice nuclei (IN) within a particle population are identified and characterized. Single particle characterization is achieved by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A vapor controlled cooling-stage coupled to an optical microscope is used to determine the onsets of water uptake, immersion freezing, and deposition ice nucleation of the individual particles as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. In addition, we perform CCSEM/EDX to obtain on a single particle level the elemental composition of the entire particle population. Thus, we can determine if the IN are exceptional in nature or belong to a major particle type class with respect to composition and size. We find that ambient and sea spray particles are coated by organic material and can induce ice formation under tropospheric relevant conditions. Micro-spectroscopic single particle analysis of the investigated particle samples invokes a potential

  14. Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.