WorldWideScience

Sample records for psa staff work

  1. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  2. Hospital staff corridor conversations: work in passing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Esther; Bangerter, Adrian; Lê Van, Kim; Navarro, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    First, to document the prevalence of corridor occupations and conversations among the staff of a hospital clinic, and their main features. Second, to examine the activities accomplished through corridor conversations and their interactional organization. Despite extensive research on mobility in hospital work, we still know fairly little about the prevalence and features of hospital staff corridor conversations and how they are organized. We conducted a study combining descriptive statistical analysis and multimodal conversation analysis of video recordings of staff corridor practices in a hospital outpatient clinic in Switzerland. In 2012, we collected 59 hours of video recordings in a corridor of a hospital clinic. We coded and statistically analysed the footage that showed the clinic staff exclusively. We also performed qualitative multimodal conversation analysis on a selection of the recorded staff conversations. Corridor occupations by the clinic staff are frequent and brief and rarely involve stops. Talk events (which include self-talk, face-to-face conversations and telephone conversations) during occupations are also brief and mobile, overwhelmingly focus on professional topics and are particularly frequent when two or more staff members occupy the corridor. The conversations present several interactional configurations and comprise an array of activities consequential to the provision of care and work organization. These practices are related to the fluid work organization of a spatially distributed team in a fast-paced, multitasking environment and should be taken into consideration in any undertaking aimed at improving hospital units' functioning. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Survey of how staff commute to work

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A survey was initiated by the Canton of Geneva (Direction Générale des Transports) and the Swiss Permanent Mission to the United Nations, and is aimed at better understanding how staff in International Organisations commute to/from work so as to better plan future works (road access, public transport, etc.). The ILO, WHO, UNAIDs, Global Fund, IFRC, CERN and UNOG are taking part in this important survey.   People living in Switzerland or France are invited to respond to this survey. The purpose of this survey is to better understand: - your commuting habits, - your willingness to explore alternative commuting options, - your expectations and needs. All data provided to this external company (www.mobilidee.ch) will be kept confidential and will only be used for this particular study. CERN has received all guarantees of confidentiality from this company. Many thanks for your collaboration! GS Department

  4. Work-family conflict and job burnout among correctional staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Eric G; Hogan, Nancy L

    2010-02-01

    Work-family conflict and job burnout are both issues for 272 correctional staff (response rate of 68%). The two major forms of work-family conflict are work-on-family conflict and family-on-work conflict. Multivariate analysis of survey data from 272 correctional staff at a state prison indicated work-on-family conflict had a significant positive relation with job burnout, while family-on-work conflict did not.

  5. Staff happiness and work satisfaction in a tertiary psychiatric centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruch, Y; Swartz, M; Sirkis, S; Mirecki, I; Barak, Y

    2013-09-01

    Mental health professionals are at a high risk of burnout. Positive psychology outcomes of staff in acute in-patient psychiatric wards are poorly researched and unclear. To quantify the satisfaction with life and work-life satisfaction of mental health staff at a large university-affiliated tertiary psychiatric centre. We utilized the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) and the Work-Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (WLSQ). Two hundred and nine out of 450 staff members (46%) participated; mean age 48.2 + 9.9 years; 63% were male. On average the participants had been practising their speciality for 21.1 + 9.8 years (range: 2-48). The mean total SWLS scores differed significantly between professions (P happiness were reported by psychologists and social workers, followed by the administrative staff, the psychiatrists and finally the nursing staff. Staff scored the highest for work as a 'calling' followed by work as a 'career' and the lowest rating for work as a 'job'. The mean total WLSQ score differed between professions, (P happiness may contribute to increase in moral and counter burnout.

  6. Nursing unit managers, staff retention and the work environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, Christine M; Roche, Michael A; Blay, Nicole; Stasa, Helen

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of leadership characteristics of nursing unit managers, as perceived by staff nurses, on staff satisfaction and retention. A positive work environment will increase levels of job satisfaction and staff retention. Nurse leaders play a critical role in creating a positive work environment. Important leadership characteristics of the front-line nurse manager include visibility, accessibility, consultation, recognition and support. Secondary analysis of data collected on 94 randomly selected wards in 21 public hospitals across two Australian states between 2004-2006. All nurses (n = 2488, 80·3% response rate) on the selected wards were asked to complete a survey that included the 49-item Nursing Work Index-Revised [NWI-R] together with measures of job satisfaction, satisfaction with nursing and intention to leave. Subscales of the NWI-R were calculated. Leadership, the domain of interest, consisted of 12 items. Wards were divided into those reporting either positive or negative leadership. Data were analysed at the nurse level using spss version 16. A nursing manager who was perceived to be a good leader, was visible, consulted with staff, provided praise and recognition and where flexible work schedules were available was found to distinguish the positive and negative wards. However, for a ward to be rated as positive overall, nurse leaders need to perform well on all the leadership items. An effective nursing unit manager who consults with staff and provides positive feedback and who is rated highly on a broad range of leadership items is instrumental in increasing job satisfaction and satisfaction with nursing. Good nurse managers play an important role in staff retention and satisfaction. Improved retention will lead to savings for the organisation, which may be allocated to activities such as training and mentorship to assist nurse leaders in developing these critical leadership skills. Strategies also need to be put in place to

  7. Burnout and Work Stress among Disability Centers Staff in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed Hassan Hemdan

    2015-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to maximize the potential of children with disabilities in Oman. The establishment of Al-Wafaa centers of disabilities served as a channel to help families secure a variety of services provided to children with different disabling conditions. The purpose of this study was to explore the burnout of staff working in…

  8. Serum total PSA and free PSA in breast tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Dash, Prakruti; Pati, Sanghamitra; Mangaraj, Manaswini; Sahu, Pratima Kumari; Mohapatra, Prakash Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Now a days measurement of molecular forms of PSA has gained importance in clinical practice. Several studies have demonstrated the production of PSA in female tissues, such as breast. The present piece of work has been undertaken with an objective to estimate the relative proportion of the molecular forms of PSA in serum along with serum testosterone in benign and malignant breast tumor cases and to analyze their association with the severity of the disease process 34 malignant and 26 benign ...

  9. Transformational leadership and innovative work behavior among nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Mariam; Afsar, Bilal

    2017-10-01

    The importance of innovation within organizations has been demonstrated on numerous occasions, which has subsequently led to the identification of effective leadership as a potential catalyst. Most of us would acknowledge that effective leadership plays a pivotal role to engender innovativeness among nursing staff. Although research has identified some leadership styles to foster a nurse's innovative work behavior, a comprehensive model explaining the effect of transformational leadership on nurses' innovative work behavior is still unclear. This research built and tested a theoretical model linking transformational leadership and innovative work behavior via several intervening variables. Data were collected from 587 nurses and 164 doctors (nursing supervisors) through structured questionnaires from public sector hospitals in Pakistan. Results of the study indicated that, as anticipated, transformational leadership positively affected psychological empowerment of nurses, which in turn influenced both intrinsic motivation and knowledge sharing behavior. These latter two variables then had a positive influence on innovative work behavior. Empowerment role identity moderated the link between transformational leadership and psychological empowerment, whereas willingness to rely on leader (reliance-based trust) and willingness to share sensitive information with leader (disclosure-based trust) moderated the connection between knowledge sharing behavior and innovative work behavior. These results imply that transformational leadership through psychological empowerment, knowledge sharing, and intrinsic motivation fosters nurse's innovative work behavior. The results also show that the relationship between transformational leadership and innovative work behavior is stronger among nurses who frequently share their knowledge about best practices and mistakes with co-workers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Path analysis of empowerment and work effectiveness among staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Hae; Lee, Nae-Young

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to test a predictive model that could predict and explain work effectiveness among staff nurses at local hospitals. Between April 1 and May 15, 2009, 340 nurses were recruited from two hospitals (one in Ulsan and one in Yangsan). Data were collected via self-administered questionnaires and analyzed using structural equation modeling. A modified model was retained, as the final path model showed a very good fit with the data. Job characteristics and compensation justice were found to have direct and positive effects on empowerment. Job characteristics, transformational leadership, and empowerment were found to directly and positively affect work effectiveness. In addition, job characteristics were found to have a greater effect on empowerment and work effectiveness than other factors do. This structural equation model was used to test the relationships between these factors and work effectiveness. Empowerment mediated the relationship between job characteristics, transformational leadership, and work effectiveness. Findings from this study can be used to design the strategies for increasing work effectiveness in Korean nurses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehner, John R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mubayi, Vinod [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pratt, W. Trevor [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Kim, Do Sam [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Goo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-17

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering & Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E&C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal [Ref. 1]. The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E&C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report [Ref. 2] that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E&C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  12. Staff Stress and Burnout in Intellectual Disability Services: Work Stress Theory and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Jason; Hastings, Richard; Noone, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Background: Staff in intellectual disability services can be at risk of stress and burnout at work. Given that staff well-being has implications for the quality of life of the staff themselves and people with intellectual disabilities themselves, this is an important research and practical topic. In this paper, we review work stress theories that…

  13. The Influence of Nurse Manager Leadership Style on Staff Nurse Work Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Nursing literature supports the importance of an engaged nursing workforce as a means to positively influence performance. Nurse manager leadership style plays a critical role in engaging staff nurses. These relationships have been minimally studied in nurse managers and staff nurses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of nurse manager leadership style factors on staff nurse work engagement. Using a descriptive correlational research design, 441 staff nurses working in 3 acute care hospitals were surveyed. Survey instruments included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire 5X short form. Transactional and transformational leadership styles in nurse managers positively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Passive-avoidant leadership style in nurse managers negatively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Nurse managers who provide support and communication through transformational and transactional leadership styles can have a positive impact on staff nurse work engagement and ultimately improve organizational outcomes.

  14. Development of a PSA information management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Seok; Dong Kyu, Kim; Sun Koo, Kang [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In general, Probabilistic Safety Agreement (PSA) is a very complicated work that uses and generates a lot of resources such as reports, procedures, drawings, assumptions, calculation sheets, PSA model, and so on. In many PSAs, however, the data, materials and knowledge considered and generated during performing PSA are scattered in many documents so that overall structure of PSA and information relationship between documents and models cannot easily be understood. To organize and manage all documents related to PSA, to capture knowledge of analysts, and finally to improve the quality of PSA, a PSA information management system (PIMS) was developed. The PIMS can manage all the documents of a PSA in a database and connect the causal relation between one information to another in the scattered documents via link. The PIMS can manage all the assumptions and technical basis used in PSA, and it can keep the record of the design changes the revision of PSA model. It can also control the review results of PSA models. The link of the PIMS can explicitly describe and reveal the expertise of the PSA analysts, and it enables the users to capture the knowledge and to understand the structure and contents of a PSA with ease. We are planning to apply the PIMS to the PSA of Shin Kori Units 1 and 2 as feasibility study and then to all the PSAs of the nuclear power plants in Korea. The PIMS is expected to contribute to enhancing the quality and confidence of PSA and reducing the efforts and costs of maintenance and update of PSA. (authors)

  15. Organisational commitment, work engagement and meaning of work of nursing staff in hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilka Beukes

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Nursing is a noble profession but not always an easy job. Work overload, few resources, limited promotion and development opportunities have a negative impact on the sustainability of the profession.Research purpose: The primary objective of this research was to investigate the relationship between organisational commitment, work engagement and meaning of work amongst nursing staff at various hospitals.Motivation for study: It is important to understand how to optimise the work experience of nursing staff in order to ensure a committed and engaged workforce.Research design, approach and method: A survey design with a cluster sample (n = 199 was used. The Organisational Commitment Questionnaire, Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, Work-Life Questionnaire and a biographical questionnaire were administered.Main findings: The majority of the scales showed acceptable reliability. Results indicated that the majority of nursing staff view their work as either a job or a calling. This impacts the organisation in the sense that viewing work as a calling predicts 19% of the variance in organisational commitment and 30% of the variance in work engagement. Practical/managerial implications: Viewing work as a calling will accompany higher levels of engagement and commitment to the organisation. Nurses who feel that they make a meaningful contribution to the hospital are more inclined to stay in the organisation.Contribution/value-add: Strategies can be put in place to focus on experiencing work as a calling, rather than a job. Enhancing this experience and creating awareness could lead to higher levels of organisational commitment and work engagement.

  16. An Infrastructure to Advance the Scholarly Work of Staff Nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Parkosewich, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    The traditional role of the acute care staff nurse is changing. The new norm establishes an expectation that staff nurses base their practice on best evidence. When evidence is lacking, nurses are charged with using the research process to generate and disseminate new knowledge. This article describes the critical forces behind the transformation of this role and the organizational mission, culture, and capacity required to support practice that is based on science. The vital role of senior n...

  17. Confederate Staff Work At Chickamauga: An Analysis of the Staff of the Army of Tennessee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-05

    schooling had by now moved from staff to line service. Lieut. Col. Robert Bogardus Snowden is an example. He had been a student of General Bushrod Johnson’s...action reports in the O.R., Volumes XXIII, XXX, and LII. Finally, the CSR, micro- film rolls 51, 101, 165, 191, 199, 211, and 223 confirmed the presence

  18. Serum total PSA and free PSA in breast tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Prakruti; Pati, Sanghamitra; Mangaraj, Manaswini; Sahu, Pratima Kumari; Mohapatra, Prakash Chandra

    2011-04-01

    Now a days measurement of molecular forms of PSA has gained importance in clinical practice. Several studies have demonstrated the production of PSA in female tissues, such as breast. The present piece of work has been undertaken with an objective to estimate the relative proportion of the molecular forms of PSA in serum along with serum testosterone in benign and malignant breast tumor cases and to analyze their association with the severity of the disease process 34 malignant and 26 benign breast disease cases along with 33 healthy controls of same age group were enrolled in this study for evaluation. Serum testosterone was measured by ELISA, whereas serum total PSA (TPSA) and free PSA (FPSA) were estimated by electrochemiluminescence immunoassay. A significant rise of fasting plasma glucose along with prominent dyslipidemia was observed in breast tumor cases. Marked rise in serum testosterone as well as TPSA and FPSA was documented in both benign and malignant breast tumor cases. Serum testosterone revealed a significant positive association with both TPSA and FPSA pointing towards an etiological association between them. However, surgical removal of tumor mass resulted in a marked decline of presurgical value of both TPSA and FPSA with a non-significant fall in serum testosterone revealing tumor tissue as the source of FPSA and TPSA. Thus, estimation of PSA provides prognostic information that may assist in future treatment.

  19. Working with Staff Using Baumrind's Parenting Styles Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Hollace Anne

    2012-01-01

    The author's presentation at the staff meeting centered on Diana Baumrind's parenting styles framework (Baumrind, 1967). Baumrind believed that there were four requirements for effective guidance: nurturing, communication, maturity demands, and control. She rated parents on these four dimensions and identified the pattern of parenting that…

  20. The ESA Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio Rossi, Angelo; Cecconi, Baptiste; Fraenz, Markus; Hagermann, Axel; Heather, David; Rosenblatt, Pascal; Svedhem, Hakan; Widemann, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    ESA has established a Planetary Science Archive User Group (PSA-UG), with the task of offering independent advice to ESA's Planetary Science Archive (e.g. Heather et al., 2013). The PSA-UG is an official and independent body that continuously evaluates services and tools provided by the PSA to the community of planetary data scientific users. The group has been tasked with the following top level objectives: a) Advise ESA on future development of the PSA. b) Act as a focus for the interests of the scientific community. c) Act as an advocate for the PSA. d) Monitor the PSA activities. Based on this, the PSA-UG will report through the official ESA channels. Disciplines and subjects represented by PSA-UG members include: Remote Sensing of both Atmosphere and Solid Surfaces, Magnetospheres, Plasmas, Radio Science and Auxilliary data. The composition of the group covers ESA missions populating the PSA both now and in the near future. The first members of the PSA-UG were selected in 2013 and will serve for 3 years, until 2016. The PSA-UG will address the community through workshops, conferences and the internet. Written recommendations will be made to the PSA coordinator, and an annual report on PSA and the PSA-UG activities will be sent to the Solar System Exploration Working Group (SSEWG). Any member of the community and planetary data user can get in touch with individual members of the PSA-UG or with the group as a whole via the contacts provided on the official PSA-UG web-page: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa/psa-ug. The PSA is accessible via: http://archives.esac.esa.int/psa References: Heather, D., Barthelemy, M., Manaud, N., Martinez, S., Szumlas, M., Vazquez, J. L., Osuna, P. and the PSA Development Team (2013) ESA's Planetary Science Archive: Status, Activities and Plans. EuroPlanet Sci. Congr. #EPSC2013-626

  1. Working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers: a critical incident analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipeta, Effie; Bradley, Susan; Chimwaza-Manda, Wanangwa; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2016-08-26

    Malawi continues to experience critical shortages of key health technical cadres that can adequately respond to Malawi's disease burden. Difficult working conditions contribute to low morale and frustration among health care workers. We aimed to understand how obstetric care staff perceive their working relationships with managers. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in health facilities in Malawi between October and December 2008. Critical Incident Analysis interviews were done in government district hospitals, faith-based health facilities, and a sample of health centres' providing emergency obstetric care. A total of 84 service providers were interviewed. Data were analyzed using NVivo 8 software. Poor leadership styles affected working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers. Main concerns were managers' lack of support for staff welfare and staff performance, lack of mentorship for new staff and junior colleagues, as well as inadequate supportive supervision. All this led to frustrations, diminished motivation, lack of interest in their job and withdrawal from work, including staff seriously considering leaving their post. Positive working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers are essential for promoting staff motivation and positive work performance. However, this study revealed that staff were demotivated and undermined by transactional leadership styles and behavior, evidenced by management by exception and lack of feedback or recognition. A shift to transformational leadership in nurse-manager relationships is essential to establish good working relationships with staff. Improved providers' job satisfaction and staff retentionare crucial to the provision of high quality care and will also ensure efficiency in health care delivery in Malawi.

  2. Applying equity theory to staff working with individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disley, Philip; Hatton, Chris; Dagnan, Dave

    2009-03-01

    This paper provides an overview of the empirical research on equity theory amongst staff working in services for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Relevant articles were identified by using the PsycINFO computerised database and by conducting manual searches of reference lists. Six studies were identified and reviewed. Staff often report that they feel under-benefited in their work-based relationships. Associations were found between staff equity perceptions and staff outcomes such as burnout, absenteeism and intention to leave. Previous research findings on staff outcomes are discussed within the context of equity theory. The implications of staff equity perceptions for ID services are discussed and possible directions for future research are forwarded. It is suggested that equity theory may have some utility as a theoretical starting point from which to develop a comprehensive theory to integrate various strands of research on staffing.

  3. Review article: Staff perception of the emergency department working environment: Integrative review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Amy; Abraham, Louisa; Greenslade, Jaimi; Thom, Ogilvie; Carlstrom, Eric; Wallis, Marianne; Crilly, Julia

    2016-02-01

    Employees in EDs report increasing role overload because of critical staff shortages, budgetary cuts and increased patient numbers and acuity. Such overload could compromise staff satisfaction with their working environment. This integrative review identifies, synthesises and evaluates current research around staff perceptions of the working conditions in EDs. A systematic search of relevant databases, using MeSH descriptors ED/EDs, Emergency room/s, ER/s, or A&E coupled with (and) working environment, working condition/s, staff perception/s, as well as reference chaining was conducted. We identified 31 key studies that were evaluated using the mixed methods assessment tool (MMAT). These comprised 24 quantitative-descriptive studies, four mixed descriptive/comparative (non-randomised controlled trial) studies and three qualitative studies. Studies included varied widely in quality with MMAT scores ranging from 0% to 100%. A key finding was that perceptions of working environment varied across clinical staff and study location, but that high levels of autonomy and teamwork offset stress around high pressure and high volume workloads. The large range of tools used to assess staff perception of working environment limits the comparability of the studies. A dearth of intervention studies around enhancing working environments in EDs limits the capacity to recommend evidence-based interventions to improve staff morale. © 2016 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  4. Staff needs when working in secure forensic child and adolescent mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing recognition regarding the psychological impact of working in demanding healthcare settings. However, little empirical research has been conducted, especially within a child and adolescent setting. This study investigates the needs of staff working with adolescents in a secure forensic psychiatric environment. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 13 staff members within a secure forensic unit for adolescents with mental health problems. The interviews were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Participants encountered varying experiences, both positive and negative. The dominant themes identified from the analysis were risk of isolation, meaningful contact, openness, safety, control and structure, staff relationships, and complex task. Staff faced numerous challenges such as negotiating complex relationships with management, other staff, and the young people while in a complex working environment. Various levels of support are required to manage the challenges placed on them, including both individual and group support.

  5. Organizational culture and work-related attitudes among staff in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the author examines the relationship between staff perceptions of organizational culture and their work-related attitudes in assisted living. Data were collected from 317 staff in 61 facilities using self-administered questionnaires. Staff who had more favorable perceptions of organizational culture reported greater job satisfaction, coworker satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Among the dimensions of organizational culture, perceptions of teamwork had the strongest influence on satisfaction with coworkers, and perceptions of organizational morale had the strongest influence on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Those who want to improve staff attitudes should focus on creating organizational cultures that promote teamwork and high organizational morale.

  6. Preparing Writing Centers and Tutors for Literacy Mediation for Working Class Campus-Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslund, Christy M.

    2011-01-01

    This study grew out of the realization that implicit literacy expectations between working class United Auto Workers (UAW) staff and professional class staff were complicating the filling out and filing of a position audit form. Professional class supervisors had designed the form as a measure of fairness, in that each UAW employee on campus was…

  7. Influence of work-related characteristics and work ability on changing employer or leaving the profession among nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, Anne; Robroek, Suzan; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Schouteten, Roel L.J.; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate how work-related characteristics and work ability influence nursing staff decisions to change employer or leave the profession. Background Previous cross-sectional studies have indicated that decreased work ability and unfavourable work-related characteristics are important

  8. Examining the temporal relationship between psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R; Hunter, Brooke D

    2013-02-01

    Relative to the broader industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology field, research on the turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff is in its infancy. Despite its long and rich history, recent reviews of the turnover literature within I-O psychology have noted that there remains considerable room for improvement. In particular, recommendations have been made for research that considers time in the turnover process and explores more distal causes of staff turnover. Addressing these gaps, this article examined the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover. Using data from 95 SUD treatment staff clustered within 29 treatment organizations, multilevel discrete-time survival analyses revealed that a latent measure of work attitude (e.g., job satisfaction, pay satisfaction, turnover intentions) fully mediated the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate (e.g., supervisor support, coworker support, role conflict) and subsequent staff turnover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Determinant factors encouraging work motivation: a study of care staff working in health services facilities for elderly people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kazushi; Okuno, Junko; Tomura, Sigeo; Yanagi, Hisako

    2009-12-01

    Work motivation among care workers influences the quality of care for facility residents. The purpose of this study was to identify related factors in care staff. Sixty hundred and seven care staff working at 25 health services facilities for elderly people participated in this study. We applied a theoretically derived model of specific relationships among work motivation, jobsatisfaction, profession identity, job competence, interprofessional working and profession image. These factor relationships were then tested using a structural equation modeling technique. Profession identity, job competence and the profession image of caring were shown to have direct influences on work motivation. In addition, job satisfaction, inter professional working, profession images of nursing and rehabilitation responsibilities were shown to have indirect influences. These data suggest that improving profession identity, job competence and the profession image of caring are important to enhance work motivation of care staff.

  10. Working with others, building trust - a guide for staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; McCallum, H.; Leinster, P.

    2004-01-01

    This is a short, step-by-step guide to help you plan your workwith communities and others. We have put together this short, stepby-step guide to the skills and techniques you should be using when working with communities. This is part of a larger toolkit, which includes training, learning networks

  11. Path Analysis of Empowerment and Work Effectiveness among Staff Nurses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eo, Yong-Sook; Kim, Young-Hae; Lee, Nae-Young

    2014-01-01

    .... In practice, improving nursing work effectiveness directly relates to increasing a hospital's competitiveness. With regard to performance-based pay systems, factors found to affect organizational performance are perceived compensation justice (e.g., organizational justice & compensation equity; Kim & Park, 2006 ) and job characteristics (e.g....

  12. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzo, Hector J.; Coppieters, Natacha [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Park, Thomas I.H. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dieriks, Birger V.; Faull, Richard L.M. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dragunow, Mike [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Curtis, Maurice A., E-mail: m.curtis@auckland.ac.nz [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2017-06-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. - Highlights: • Insulin modulates PSA-NCAM turnover through upregulation of p-FAK. • P-FAK modulates αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clustering. • αv-integrin acts as a carrier for PSA-NCAM endocytosis. • Cell migration is promoted by cell surface PSA. • Insulin promotes PSA-dependent migration in vitro.

  13. Work Coordination as a Social Interaction Process in Nursing Staff Meetings

    OpenAIRE

    Eveliina Pennanen; Leena Mikkola

    2016-01-01

    Work coordination, which here refers to organizing, planning, discussing, and negotiating work, is done through social interaction. Because coordination is essential to work quality and well-being at work, it is important to understand the processes that construct work coordination. This study aims to understand work coordination as a social interaction process by analyzing social interaction in nursing staff meetings of a Finnish hospital. Observations and approaches of inductive...

  14. Examining Work Engagement and Job Satisfaction of Staff Members in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Jill; Rosser, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Staff members are a large and growing set of employees within higher education. While their numbers are growing, they also are seeing a change in their salaries and working conditions. Given this situation, institutions are considering work engagement and job satisfaction research. The purpose of this article is to examine those work life…

  15. Role Stressors, Engagement and Work Behaviours: A Study of Higher Education Professional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Tara M.; Prottas, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The study used data provided by 349 professional staff employees from 17 different US higher education institutions to assess aspects of their working conditions that could influence their own work engagement and the work-related behaviours of their colleagues. Relationships among three role stressors (role ambiguity, role conflict and role…

  16. Intentions to Quit Work among Care Staff Working in the Aged Care Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karantzas, Gery C.; Mellor, David; McCabe, Marita P.; Davison, Tanya E.; Beaton, Paul; Mrkic, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: The aged care industry experiences high rates of staff turnover. Staff turnover has significant implications for the quality of care provided to care recipients and the financial costs to care agencies. In this study, we applied a model of intention to quit to identify the contextual and personal factors that shape aged care…

  17. [Work values and perception of leadership style in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Luzón, Ma Del Carmen; Calvo-Salguero, Antonia; García-Hita, Miguel Angel

    2007-01-01

    To identify the profile of work values according to nursing professionals and analyze the relationship, if any, of such values with the perception of leadership styles. The EVAT-30 and the SDBQ questionnaires were used in this study. The sample comprised 160 nurses of an Almería public hospital, in the south of Spain. This study was carried out in October 2005. Values associated with authority/power, tradition, achievement and self-direction are deemed most important by nursing professionals. Perception of the task-oriented leaders behavior positively correlates with values of authority/power, confidence and achievement, and negatively correlates with values of benevolence and universalism. Perception of the relationship/consideration-oriented leaders behavior positively correlates with values of universalism, achievement, tradition and self-direction. These results suggest that the perception of leadership styles may influence the set of values held in high esteem by subordinates.

  18. Is staff well-being and communication enhanced by multidisciplinary work shift evaluations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluiter, Judith K; Bos, Albert P; Tol, Dirk; Calff, Mart; Krijnen, Margot; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2005-10-01

    To study the implementation of multidisciplinary structured work shift evaluations at a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) to enhance team communication. Prospective, repeated measurements design, comparison of pre/post measurements and process measures in a Dutch tertiary care, university-affiliated PICU. All 61 PICU staff members. Implementing multidisciplinary structured work shift evaluations. Before the implementation phase the PICU team received feedback training and eight participants (four physicians, four nurses) were trained as "work shift evaluation leader." Outcome measures covered: (a) quality and process of the implementation through prestructured checklists during the 3 months of implementation, (b) a subjective evaluation of a feedback training on team communication as anticipated action and on the level of communication (about patients and with colleagues), and (c) emotional exhaustion complaints and work-related fatigue. The interdisciplinary structured work shift evaluations were implemented successfully as planned during the work shift; all staff were trained ahead, and the process was followed almost completely. Almost two-thirds (62%) of the staff felt a positive influence on team communication. Almost all staff members (92%) were satisfied regarding communication with their colleagues after the intervention, compared to 76% before. Emotional exhaustion in the PICU team decreased significantly after the implementation, but no differences in work-related fatigue levels were found. As organizational change the implementation of a multidisciplinary structured work shift evaluation at a PICU was successful and team communication improved. Emotional exhaustion decreased during the study period.

  19. Impact of School Staff Health on Work Productivity in Secondary Schools in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alker, Heather J.; Wang, Monica L.; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school…

  20. The contribution of the Patient Support Assistant to direct patient care: an exploration of nursing and PSA role perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jane; Kearin, Mark

    2007-04-01

    Health care systems have seen the introduction of the unregulated worker into patient care areas to assist Registered Nurses (RNs) in the provision of health care. A study was undertaken to identify the perceptions of both nurses and unregulated workers of the unregulated worker role in direct patient care in a regional hospital in New South Wales, Australia. The nomenclature used for a non regulated worker in the workplace in which this study occurred is Patient Support Assistant (PSA). Separate surveys were designed for PSA and nursing staff. Twenty seven per cent of PSAs (n=21) and 36% of nursing staff surveyed (n=120) responded. Results identified that both groups identified the main role of PSAs were attending to general cleaning and providing physical assistance to nurses, medical and physiotherapy staff, primarily for manual handling of heavy or difficult patients. Some activities of the role identified in the job description, such as pre-operative shaves on male patients and assisting with the application of traction, appeared no longer to be relevant for current practices. Both groups identified a positive team working relationship between nurses and PSAs. However, there was evidence to suggest that not all RNs had a clear understanding of the role of the PSA and the PSAs believed that they did not receive adequate feedback about their work. There was a mixed view as to whom the PSA should report. A high percentage of RNs felt they should be responsible for the supervision of the PSA. This was in contrast to a high percentage also believing that RNs should not be accountable either for PSA work or for delegating tasks to PSAs. Challenges voiced by PSAs included being expected to achieve both allocated cleaning tasks and provide patient support, being requested to assist with aggressive patients and working with other PSAs. A major recommendation of the study is that employment of Assistants in Nursing may provide enhanced scope and role clarity for

  1. Work motivation, task delegation and job satisfaction of general practice staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Søndergaard, Jens; Munch, Maria; Le, Jette V; Ledderer, Loni; Pedersen, Line B; Nexøe, Jørgen

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a high degree of task delegation is associated with the practise staff's overall job satisfaction, and this association is important to explore since job satisfaction is related to medical as well as patient-perceived quality of care. This study aimed: (1) to investigate associations between degrees of task delegation in the management of chronic disease in general practice, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a case and the staff's work motivation, (2) to investigate associations between the work motivation of the staff and their job satisfaction. The study was based on a questionnaire to which 621 members of the practice staff responded. The questionnaire consisted of a part concerning degree of task delegation in the management of COPD in their respective practice and another part being about their job satisfaction and motivation to work. In the first analysis, we found that 'maximal degree' of task delegation was significantly associated with the staff perceiving themselves to have a large degree of variation in tasks, odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, confidence interval (CI) = 1.09, 16.62. In the second analysis, we found that this perceived large degree of variation in tasks was significantly associated with their overall job satisfaction, OR = 2.81, confidence interval = 1.71, 4.61. The results suggest that general practitioners could delegate highly complex tasks in the management of COPD to their staff without influencing the staff's work motivation, and thereby their job satisfaction, negatively, as long as they ensure sufficient variation in the tasks.

  2. Staff nurses' perceptions of the work environment in freestanding hemodialysis facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Hawkins, Charlotte; Denno, Mary; Currier, Helen; Wick, Gail

    2003-04-01

    While one suggested cause of the current nursing shortage is nurses' negative perceptions of the work environment, little is known of nephrology nurses' perceptions of the dialysis work environment. The purpose of this study was to assess the extent to which staff nurses who work in freestanding hemodialysis facilities rate the presence of organizational characteristics common to magnet hospitals in their current job. Study findings indicate that staff nurses in hemodialysis units identify several notable features of magnet hospitals in their work settings. However, a majority of nurses disagreed that many attributes of magnet hospitals are present in hemodialysis work environments. This study provides a preliminary description of some of the factors that affect nurses' perceptions of the work environment in freestanding dialysis facilities. Further work is needed in this area.

  3. An Investigation of Iranian Pharmacists and Pharmacy Staff Work Motivation through Different Job Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armaghan Eslami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: the Employees’ motivation is a very important part of management, both practically and theoretically. Motivation has been regarded as an indispensable part of performance, and structural element for management practice theories. The most important factor of the health care system is its workforce. They possess the highest impact on the input of health care system. Also they are one of the main determinant key of their efficacy and performance is their motivation. Although Motivated and qualified staff is the critical element for health care system performance, it is one of the hardest goal to reach due to health care complexity.Method: the Sample consisted of 326 men and women pharmacists and pharmacy staff, which are 155 women and 81 men. Wright (2004 work motivation 6-item scale were used to asses pharmacists and pharmacy staff work motivation. Data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA test method.Results: the results indicated that there is no significant difference in pharmacists and pharmacy staff work motivation according to their gender, education, job, job location and income.Conclusion: income, Location of job, Job, education might be considered as the hygiene factors. Other intrinsic or socio-cultural factor might be motivators for pharmacists and pharmacy staff.

  4. Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work-life balance is associated with the maintenance of stability in both one's professional and personal life. It is key to the welfare and, subsequently, job satisfaction and productivity of employees. It is against this understanding that this study surveyed the way academic staff of the University of Lagos perceive and pursue ...

  5. Part-Time Work and Advancement: A Study of Female Professional Staff in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janis; Troup, Carolyn; Strachan, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    One focus of gender equity policies in universities has been the creation of "retention" part-time work for professional staff, which allows employees to move between full-time and part-time hours at their request. This paper examines whether such "good" part-time jobs can contribute to or at least not impede women's career…

  6. Applying Equity Theory to Staff Working with Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disley, Philip; Hatton, Chris; Dagnan, Dave

    2009-01-01

    Background: This paper provides an overview of the empirical research on equity theory amongst staff working in services for individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID). Method: Relevant articles were identified by using the PsycINFO computerised database and by conducting manual searches of reference lists. Results: Six studies were…

  7. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  8. Quality of Care in the Nursing Home: Effects of Staff Assignment and Work Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Fairchild, J. Kaci; Scilley, Kay; Hardin, J. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a variety of resident and staff outcomes across two types of staffing patterns, permanent and rotating assignment, and work shift. Although studies have examined these staffing patterns as part of multicomponent intervention packages, few studies have examined the isolated effects of staffing…

  9. Communicating about Death and Dying: Developing Training for Staff Working in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Rose, Tracey; Grant, Robert; Wijne, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities are affected by death, yet conversations about death are often avoided by staff working with them. This study aimed to assess staff training needs and to develop, trial and evaluate a training course on communicating about death and dying. Method:(i) Semi-structured interviews with 20 staff in…

  10. Interpersonal strain at work: A new burnout facet relevant for the health of hospital staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Consiglio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Interpersonal strain was recently proposed as a new dimension related to burnout corresponding to the disengagement reaction in work relationships (Borgogni, Consiglio, Alessandri, & Schaufeli, 2012. The study, framed within the Conservation of Resources Model, investigates the potential mediating role of interpersonal strain (along with exhaustion and cynicism between emotional dissonance and health symptoms among hospital staff. Structural equation modeling on 347 hospital professionals (56% nurses, 16% physicians and 28% other staff revealed that interpersonal strain is strongly associated with emotional dissonance and health symptoms and that emotional dissonance is indirectly associated with health symptoms through interpersonal strain and exhaustion, but not through cynicism.

  11. Work-related basic need satisfaction as a predictor of work engagement among academic staff in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatos Silman

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the relationship between work-related basic need satisfaction and work engagement. Data were obtained from a total of 203 academics who are employed in various universities of Turkey. In this research Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale and The Turkish Form of Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were utilized. The data were analysed through multiple regression and Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient analysis methods. The findings revealed that the sub-dimensions of work-related basic need satisfaction significantly predicted work engagement. Upper management should improve work conditions of their personnel, which are related with competency, autonomy, and relatedness needs of academics. This way, academic staff will have better efficiency in terms of work engagement, which will also result in higher work adaptation and participation.

  12. Analysis of the Motivation and Work Climate of University Teaching Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    The scientific, social, economic and technological progress taking place in present-day advanced societies needs to be closely linked to the work of the university and to effectiveness, productivity and efficiency. Moreover, teaching staff play a predominant role and are the best point of reference for any changes to be introduced in teaching, in the way to manage classes, in the use of tools, changes in methodology or teaching strategies, and also in the ways students learn, etc. The teacher ceases to be a figure who only transmits knowledge and becomes a guide or facilitator of learning. The teacher, therefore, takes on a different commitment with the ways of learning, of approaching students, guiding tutorials, assessing student learning, etc. For these reasons staff motivationisone of the basic concerns. It would be expected that a demotivated staff with few incentives and a low opinion of their worth as teachers would be less committed to their teaching, research and management work, and as a result would achieve less success in their work with students. To put it another way, they would perform worse in all they do. But could it be that their vocation as teachers and the professionalism of university staff are sufficient motivating factors in themselves? The concepts of work climate, motivation and demotivation of teaching staff, feeling uneasy with teaching or academic work, conflicts of communication, a deterioration in relationships with colleagues, etc., are phrases that are heard more and more in the work environment. Most of these phrases would seem to be related to academic performance or the way of becoming involved in the centre's activities or to other variables which until proved are only supposition. It is for these reasons that we have wished to analyse the situation of teaching staff in universities in Madrid. In university organisations the teaching staff is one of the key elements that leads to work being done more or less effectively. Human

  13. Ergonomic relationship during work in nursing staff of intensive care unit with operating room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Mahmoudifar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: High prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, especially in jobs such as nursing which covers tasks like patients' repositioning, has attracted great attentions from occupational healthcare experts to necessitate the knowledge of ergonomic science. Therefore, this study was performed aiming at ergonomic relationship during work in nursing staff of Intensive Care Unit (ICU with operating room. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study (cohort, fifty personnel of ICU staff and fifty of operating room staff were selected through a census method and were assessed using tools such as Nordic questionnaire and Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA standards in terms of body posture ergonomics. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software and Chi-Square test after collection. Results: The most complaints were from the operating room group (68% and ICU staff (60% for the lumbar musculoskeletal system. There was a significant relationship between the total REBA scores of body, legs, neck, arm, force status, load fitting with hands and static or dynamic activities in the operating room and ICU staff groups (P < 0.05. In operating room and ICU groups, most subjects obtained score 11–15 and very high-risk level. Conclusion: Nurses working at operating room and ICU ward are subjected to high-risk levels and occupational injuries which is dramatically resulted from inappropriate body posture or particular conditions of their works. As a result, taking corrective actions along with planning and identifying ways will help prohibiting the prevalence of disorders in the future.

  14. Work Coordination as a Social Interaction Process in Nursing Staff Meetings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveliina Pennanen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Work coordination, which here refers to organizing, planning, discussing, and negotiating work, is done through social interaction. Because coordination is essential to work quality and well-being at work, it is important to understand the processes that construct work coordination. This study aims to understand work coordination as a social interaction process by analyzing social interaction in nursing staff meetings of a Finnish hospital. Observations and approaches of inductive and descriptive qualitative analysis were used to examine eight sequential nursing staff meetings that took place in 2012. The results indicate that work coordination consisted of sense-making information, sense-making action, managing emotions, and managing positions of employees. Work coordination constructs the social reality of the workplace both on the task level and the relational level. Understanding that work coordination is not only a task-oriented process that deals with organizing practical tasks and duties but is also a process of constructing positions and relationships in work communities helps to identify and understand the possibilities that social interaction and its practices, such as workplace meetings, offer. The findings can be applied in the organizational context to evaluate and develop workplace interactions.

  15. Partnership working by default: district nurses and care home staff providing care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Claire; Robb, Nadia; Drennan, Vari; Woolley, Rosemary

    2005-11-01

    Older people residents in care homes that only offer residential care rely on primary health care services for medical and nursing needs. Research has investigated the demands that care homes staff and residents make on general practice, but not the involvement of other members of the primary health care team. This paper describes two consecutive studies completed in 2001 and 2003 that involved focus groups and survey methods of enquiry conducted in two settings: an England shire and inner London. The research questions that both studies had in common were (1) What is the contribution of district nursing and other primary care services to care homes that do not have on-site nursing provision? (2) What strategies promote participation and collaboration between residents, care home staff and NHS primary care nursing staff? and (3) What are the current obstacles and aids to effective partnership working and learning? A total of 74 community-based nurses and care home managers and staff took part in 10 focus groups, while 124 care home managers (73% of the 171 surveyed) and 113 district nurse team leaders (80% of the 142 surveyed) participated in the surveys. Findings from both studies demonstrated that nurses were the most frequent NHS professional visiting care homes. Although care home managers and district nurses believed that they had a good working relationship, they had differing expectations of what the nursing contribution should be and how personal and nursing care were defined. This influenced the range of services that older people had access to and the amount of training and support care home staff received from district nurses and the extent to which they were able to develop collaborative and reciprocal patterns of working. Findings indicate that there is a need for community-based nursing services to adopt a more strategic approach that ensures older people in care homes can access the services they are entitled to and receive equivalent health care to

  16. Intermethod differences in results for total PSA, free PSA, and percentage of free PSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slev, Patricia R; La'ulu, Sonia L; Roberts, William L

    2008-06-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays differ in calibration and response to different PSA forms. We examined intermethod differences in total PSA (tPSA) and free PSA (fPSA) measurements. We tested 157 samples with tPSA concentrations of 2 to 10 ng/mL (2-10 microg/L) using 6 PSA/fPSA method pairs and 1 tPSA method: ADVIA Centaur (complexed and total; Siemens Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY), ARCHITECT i 2000(SR) (Abbott Diagnostics, Abbott Park, IL), AxSYM (Abbott Diagnostics), IMMULITE 2000 (Siemens Diagnostics), Modular E170 (Roche Diagnostics, Indianapolis, IN), UniCel DxI 800 (Beckman Coulter, Brea, CA), and VITROS ECi (tPSA only; Ortho-Clinical Diagnostics, Raritan, NJ). Regression analysis was performed for PSA, fPSA, and percentage of fPSA with the ARCHITECT i 2000(SR) comparison method. Differences between test and comparison methods were estimated at 2.5, 4.0, and 10.0 ng/mL (2.5, 4.0, and 10.0 microg/L) for tPSA and 15%, 20%, and 25% for percentage of fPSA. Relative differences were more than 10% at 4.0 ng/mL (4.0 microg/L) tPSA for the Centaur, IMMULITE, ECi, and DxI methods. At 20% fPSA, the relative difference was more than 10% for all methods except the AxSYM. Additional harmonization is needed for tPSA and fPSA methods.

  17. Impact of school staff health on work productivity in secondary schools in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alker, Heather J; Wang, Monica L; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C

    2015-06-01

    Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school employees. Employees of secondary schools in Massachusetts (N = 630) participated in a longitudinal weight gain prevention intervention study. Assessment completed at baseline, 1-year and 2-year follow-up included survey assessments of health risk factors as well as measurements for height, weight, and body mass index (BMI). The survey also included a depression inventory and Work Limitations Questionnaire. Data analysis included multivariate mixed effect models to identify productivity differences in relation to BMI, depressive symptoms, and smoking in this population stratified by position type (teacher and other school staff). The sample included 361 teachers and 269 other school staff. Obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking were significantly associated with work productivity, including workdays missed because of health concerns (absenteeism) and decreases in on-the-job productivity because of health concerns (presenteeism). Three common health conditions, namely obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking, adversely affect the productivity of high school employees. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  18. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    OpenAIRE

    de Vocht, Frank; Batistatou, Evridiki; Mölter, Anna; Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel; van Tongeren, Martie; Crozier, Stuart; Gowland, Penny; Keevil, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and other staff working with MRI in healthcare in the UK. METHODS: One hundred and four volunteer staff from eight sites completed a questionnaire and kept a diary to obtain information on subjective ...

  19. Making space work: Staff socio-spatial practices in a paediatric outpatient department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water, Tineke; Wrapson, Jill; Reay, Stephen; Ford, Katrina

    2018-02-14

    Studies of the characteristics of therapeutic landscapes have become common in medical geography. However, there is limited analysis of how therapeutic landscapes are produced. Based upon the qualitative theoretical thematic analysis of focus group data, this study examined the spatial work carried out by healthcare practitioners in a paediatric outpatients' department, turning unsatisfactory space into a therapeutic place. The study highlights the spatial strategies employed by staff to mitigate socio-spatial deficiencies in the healthcare environment. Staff perceived the task of making space work as an integral part of their duty of care to patients and an important facet of their professional identity. This study concludes that many of the spatial aspects of health care practice are often taken for granted. However this may hide the crucial role that health professionals have in producing places that heal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Understanding the working relationships between National Health Service clinicians and finance staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Virginia; McCaffry, Rebecca

    2017-03-13

    Purpose The Department of Health and the National Health Service (NHS) Future Focused Finance (FFF) programme promotes effective engagement between clinical and finance staff. Surveys undertaken by the Department of Health between 2013 and 2015 found few NHS Trusts reported high levels of engagement. The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of current working relationships between NHS clinical and finance professionals and how they might be supported to become more effective. Design/methodology/approach Ipsos MORI were commissioned by the NHS FFF programme to undertake an online survey of NHS clinical and finance staff between June and August 2015. Findings The majority of clinicians had a member of a finance team linked to their speciality or directorate. Clinical and finance professionals have a positive view of joint working preferring face-to-face contact. Clinician's confidence in their understanding of finance was generally good and finance staff felt they had a good understanding of clinical issues. Effective working relationships were facilitated by face-to-face contact, a professional relationship, and the availability of clear, well presented finance and activity data. Research limitations/implications Data protection issues limited the accessibility of the survey team to NHS staff resulting in a relatively low-response rate. Other forms of communication, including social media, were utilised to increase access to the survey. Originality/value The FFF programme is a unique programme aimed at making the NHS finance profession fit for the future. The close partnering work stream brings together the finance and clinical perspective to share knowledge, evidence, training, and to develop good practice and engagement.

  1. Emotional Intelligence and Occupational Stress among Rehabilitation Staffs working in Tehran’s Training Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khaniyan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress among rehabilitation staffs in Tehran’s training hospitals . Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on a sample of 169 staff members selected from a total of 300 rehabilitation staffs working in Tehran’s training hospitals, recruited by random cluster sampling. Two questionnaires were used: The emotional intelligence questionnaire designed by Petrides and Furnham and HSE occupational stress questionnaire. Data obtained from this study were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression tests. Results: An inverse significant relationship existed between occupational stress and emotional intelligence (P<0.001, r=-0.33. There are, also, significant relationships between subscales of emotional intelligence including self-awareness (P=0.031, r=-0.18, social skills (P<0.001, r=-0.302, empathy (P=0.006, r=-0.238 and occupational stress. The results of multiple regressions indicated that the two subscales of ‘understanding other’s emotions’ and ‘social skills’ can be used for predicting occupational stress. Discussion: This study confirmed the relationship between emotional intelligence and occupational stress. Promotion of emotional intelligence through implementing training courses may lower rehabilitation staffs occupational stress or prevent it.

  2. Reflections on Post-graduate education in Social Work in Brazil through the staff profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Maria Ribeiro Nogueira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses issues related to the staff of Post-Graduate programs in Social Work in Brazil. Initially, it traces a retrospective of Post-Graduate education in the country and describes the structure of Social Work in three moments: the initial period, through the 1970’s and 1980’s; the period of expansion, between 1990 and 2005; and the current period, between 2006 and 2016. It points out the impasses experienced by the first programs in relation to the lack of Doctors. Next, it presents the current profile of the professors who are part of Social Work programs. Data were obtained from CAPES, Geocapes and program reports, and analyzed through descriptive statistical analysis and content analysis. In conclusion, it evidences a growing tendency towards qualification and a marked expansion of the number of teaching staff after the year 2000. The growth of doctoral courses is noteworthy, however, the relation between teaching staff and students did not change significantly in percentage terms.

  3. Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders and Risk Factors among Chinese Medical Staff of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Cui, Ya; He, Lihua; Xu, Xiangrong; Yuan, Zhiwei; Jin, Xianning; Li, Zhimin

    2017-05-26

    Medical staff in the department of obstetrics and gynecology are a group of professionals reportedly at high risk of work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD), however, little is known about the current status of this problem in China. The aim of this study was to investigate prevalence and risk factors of work-related musculoskeletal disorders among this population in China. A self-developed questionnaire was distributed to 1017 obstetrics and gynecology practitioners to collect information on musculoskeletal symptoms and relevant factors. Prevalence and severity of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in different parts of the body were calculated and the relationship between personal and ergonomic factors and work-related musculoskeletal disorders was analyzed using Chi-square test and unconditional logistic regression models. The results indicated a high prevalence of 85.5% among the subjects, with the shoulder (n = 575, 62.0%), neck (n = 560, 60.3%) and lower back (n = 504, 54.3%) being the three most affected regions. Individual, postural, work-environmental as well as psychosocial factors were recognized to be associated with WMSDs in different body parts. Therefore, attention must be given to the problem of musculoskeletal disorders among Chinese obstetrics and gynecology staff. It is recommended to develop good life habits, improve work environment, adjust work organization as well as train on proper postures in their daily operation.

  4. Investigating the relationship between musculoskeletal disorders and quality of work life in nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Mahmoudifar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders caused by work is a common problem in nurses. The quality of life is effective, job satisfaction, and everyday life of nurses. The study was conducted with the aim of determining the relationship of musculoskeletal disorders and the dimensions of the quality of nursing life in the hospitals in Southern regions of West Azarbaijan in 2017. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study, 100 nursing staff working in southern regions of West Azarbaijan hospitals was chosen randomly. The data gathering tool was a two-part tool using a Nordic questionnaire and a quality of life questionnaire. Data were analyzed using SPSS software, t-test, and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results: The results showed that the most musculoskeletal disorders in the nursing staff were in the lumbar (50%. In addition, individual factors such as age, work history, type of working system, body mass index, and sex are effective in the increase of musculoskeletal disorders (P < 0.05. The results of quality of life indicators showed that psychological problems with mean and standard deviation (32.3 ± 14.1 had the lowest and physical performance (58.2 ± 17.5 had the highest amount and dimensions and components of work-life quality have significant relationship with musculoskeletal disorders. Conclusion: Considering that there is a relationship between skeletal muscle-muscle disorders and living quality of life, nursing managers should establish a correct relationship with the staff and provide a suitable environment to reduce physical and psychological stresses caused by work and increase the quality of working life.

  5. Reflections on Post-graduate education in Social Work in Brazil through the staff profile

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Maria Ribeiro Nogueira; Maria Lúcia Teixeira Garcia

    2017-01-01

    This article addresses issues related to the staff of Post-Graduate programs in Social Work in Brazil. Initially, it traces a retrospective of Post-Graduate education in the country and describes the structure of Social Work in three moments: the initial period, through the 1970’s and 1980’s; the period of expansion, between 1990 and 2005; and the current period, between 2006 and 2016. It points out the impasses experienced by the first programs in relation to the lack of Doctors. Next, it pr...

  6. [The environment of the Intensive Care Center and the work of the nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavaglia, Suzel Regina Ribeiro; Borges, Cristiana Machado; do Amaral, Eliana Maria Scarelli; Iwamoto, Helena Hemiko; Ohl, Rosali Isabel Barduchi

    2011-12-01

    This is a descriptive exploratory study with a quantitative approach. It aims to characterize the environment of the Intensive Care Center (ICC) in regard to its physical area, material resources and equipments, and to identify factors concerned to the work of nurses. It investigates environmental factors that contribute to an aesthetically harmonious, functional and humanized space and that favor the performance of nursing work. The units that make up the ICC meet the recommendations of the National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) in the evaluated items. he following favorable work conditions were highlighted: thermal conditions, color of the ceiling, walls and floors, luminosity. The following unfavorable work conditions were highlighted: outdoor spaces, privacy and individuality of clients and noise. The conclusion is that the facilities of the units meet the minimum recommendations of ANVISA. Both favorable and unfavorable environmental work conditions were identified. The creation of better environmental conditions allows a better staff performance, influencing positively quality, safety, and job satisfaction.

  7. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzo, Hector J; Coppieters, Natacha; Park, Thomas I H; Dieriks, Birger V; Faull, Richard L M; Dragunow, Mike; Curtis, Maurice A

    2017-06-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Work-family issues and perceptions of stress among pediatric faculty and house staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, J A; Parsons, S K; Pizzo, P A; Newburger, J W; Homer, C J

    2001-01-01

    To examine work-family balance issues and predictors of stress related to work-family balance among pediatric house staff and faculty. Data were obtained through an anonymous mail survey. Univariate analyses assessed associations between work-family issues (work-related factors that affect work-family balance, perceived support, work-family--related stress, and proposed solutions) and the following variables: gender, parental status, working status of spouse, and academic rank. Multiple linear regression examined independent predictors of perceived stress. Fifty percent of the 327 respondents cared for dependent children, and 20% expected to care for an elderly person in the next 5 years. Only 5% strongly agreed that their division or department was concerned about supporting members' work-family balance, and 4% strongly agreed that existing programs supported their needs. Eighty-three percent reported feeling stressed as a result of efforts to balance work and family. Independent predictors of stress included perceived need to choose between career and family, increasing age, dependent children, less support from colleagues and supervisors, and female gender. Work-family balance issues are responsible for substantial perceived stress. Academic departments should consider a commitment to supporting faculty who are struggling with these issues, including creation of work-family policies and programs, development of mentoring systems, and reexamination of existing expectations for work practices.

  9. Work engagement, social support, and job satisfaction in Portuguese nursing staff: A winning combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgambídez-Ramos, Alejandro; de Almeida, Helena

    2017-08-01

    Job Demands-Resources model assumes the mediator role of work engagement between social support (job resource) and job satisfaction (organizational result). However, recent studies suggest that social support can be considered as a moderator variable in the relationship between engagement and job satisfaction in nursing staff. The aim of this study is to analyze the moderator role of social support, from supervisor and from co-workers, in the relationship between work engagement and job satisfaction in a Portuguese nursing sample. We conducted a cross-sectional and correlational study assessing a final sample of 215 participants (55.56% response rate, 77.21% women). Moderation analyses were carried out using multiple and hierarchical linear regression models. Job satisfaction was significantly predicted by work engagement and social support from supervisor and from co-workers. The significant interaction in predicting job satisfaction showed that social support from co-workers enhances the effects of work engagement on nurses' satisfaction. A climate of social support among co-workers and higher levels of work engagement have a positive effect on job satisfaction, improving quality care and reducing turnover intention in nursing staff. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of menstrual disorders in hospital nursing staff according to shift work pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert-Sabater, Josep Amílcar; Martínez, José Miguel; Baste, Valborg; Moen, Bente E; Ronda-Perez, Elena

    2016-11-01

    To assess the association between work in a rotating shift schedule and menstruation characteristics among nurse staff in a prospective study. Rotating shifts have been linked to alterations in the reproductive cycle. In the case of menstrual alterations, the conclusions are not clear. Prospective epidemiological study with follow-up over four months. All the female nurse staff (shifts and characteristics of their menstruation (duration, amount of blood, dysmenorrhoea). They had two types of shifts: (1) Rotating shift schedule (two mornings, two afternoons, one night and two days off) including morning shifts (8:00-15:00), afternoon/evening shifts (15:00-22:00) and night shifts (22:00-8:00), and (2) Day shift schedule including morning shifts (8:00-15:00) and/or afternoon/evening shifts (15:00-22:00). The crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were calculated using logistic generalised estimating equations (GEE) taking into account the correlations of multiple cycles per worker. One hundred and thirteen workers on the rotating shift and 75 on the day shift participated, and information from 730 menstrual cycles were obtained. There were no differences in prolonged duration, dysmenorrhoea, prolonged duration dysmenorrhoea and excessive bleeding among nurses on rotating shift compared to those on the day shift. For prolonged duration of menstruation, workers with more than five years on the rotating shift showed a slightly lower (nonsignificant) risk compared with those with shift did not show increased risk of having menstrual disorders comparing with day staff. Shifts with short rotation cycles and a progressive sequence do not appear to cause menstrual disorders in nurse staff who work rotating shifts. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Babesiosis PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This 60 second PSA describes babesiosis, a preventable and treatable tickborne disease, including the signs and symptoms of infection and ways to prevent it.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/26/2012.

  12. A regular yoga intervention for staff nurse sleep quality and work stress: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronghua; Li, Xia

    2015-12-01

    Although many studies have assessed the efficacy of yoga in older individuals, minimal research has focused on how nurses use yoga to improve sleep quality and to reduce work stress after work hours. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Chinese and the Questionnaire on Medical Worker's Stress in Chinese to determine the impact of yoga on the quality of sleep and work stress of staff nurses employed by a general hospital in China. Disturbances in the circadian rhythm interrupt an individual's pattern of sleep. Convenient sampling method. One hundred and twenty nurses were randomised into two groups: a yoga group and a non-yoga group. The yoga group performed yoga more than two times every week for 50-60 minutes each time after work hours. The NG group did not participate in yoga. After six months, self-reported sleep quality and work stress were compared between the two groups, and then we used linear regression to confirm the independent factors related to sleep quality. Nurses in the yoga group had better sleep quality and lower work stress compared with nurses in the non-yoga group. The linear regression model indicated that nursing experience, age and yoga intervention were significantly related to sleep quality. Regular yoga can improve sleep quality and reduce work stress in staff nurses. This study provides evidence that hospital management should pay attention to nurse sleep quality and work stress, thereby taking corresponding measures to reduce work pressure and improve health outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, S A M; El-Sallamy, R M; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Kabbash, I A

    2016-03-15

    Little is known about professional burnout among health-care workers in Egypt. The current study aimed to reveal the extent of burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University and to identify some of its determinants. A cross-sectional study was carried out on all physicians (n = 266) and a systematic random sample of nurses (n = 284). Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and its subscales. Most of the participants (66.0%)had a moderate level of burnout and 24.9% of them had high burnout. Multivariate analysis of variables affecting burnout showed that age, sex, frequency of exposure to work-related violence, years of experience, work burden, supervision and work activities were significant predictors of burnout among the respondents. The authors recommend health education interventions during pre-employment training programmes for prevention of burnout syndrome and periodic screening for early detection and management of burnout.

  14. Job demands, job resources and work engagement of academic staff in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rothmann

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the work engagement of academics in selected South African higher education institutions as well as the impact of job demands and job resources on their work engagement. Stratified random samples (N = 471 were drawn from academic staff in three higher education institutions in South Africa. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS were administered. The results confirmed a two-factor structure of work engagement, consisting of vigour and dedication. Six reliable factors were extracted on the JDRS, namely organisational support, growth opportunities, social support, overload, advancement and job insecurity. Job resources (including organisational support and growth opportunities predicted 26% of the variance in vigour and 38% of the variance in dedication. Job demands (overload impacted on dedication of academics at low and moderate levels of organisational support.

  15. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings of support staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior : An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Working with clients who show challenging behavior can be emotionally demanding and stressful for support staff, because this behavior may cause a range of negative emotional reactions and feelings. These reactions are of negative influence on staff wellbeing and behavior. Research has focused on

  16. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings of support staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior: An exploratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2013-01-01

    Working with clients who show challenging behavior can be emotionally demanding and stressful for support staff, because this behavior may cause a range of negative emotional reactions and feelings. These reactions are of negative influence on staff wellbeing and behavior. Research has focused on

  17. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; de Veer, A.J.E.; van der Hoek, L.S.; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff's ability to remain working until retirement age has

  18. Training Emotional Intelligence Related to Treatment Skills of Staff Working with Clients with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display challenging behaviour may contribute to the continuation of this behaviour, because it causes emotional reactions such as anxiety, anger and annoyance, which may prohibit adequate response behaviour. To enhance staff behaviour and treatment skills a training…

  19. Institutional Ethnography as Materialist Framework for Writing Program Research and the Faculty-Staff Work Standpoints Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Michelle; Nicolas, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Institutional ethnography seeks to uncover how things happen--how institutional discourse compels and shapes practice(s) and how norms of practice speak to, for, and over individuals. The Faculty and Staff Standpoints project is shaped by this methodology, as it explores writing center staff and faculty relationships to their work. (Contains 10…

  20. "It is a thin line to walk on": challenges of staff working at Swedish immigration detention centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthoopparambil, Soorej J; Ahlberg, Beth M; Bjerneld, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Detention of irregular migrants awaiting deportation is widely practiced in many countries and has been shown to have profound negative impact on health and well-being of detainees. Detention staff, an integral part of the detention environment, affect and are affected by detainees' health and well-being. The objective of the study was to explore experiences of staff working at Swedish immigration detention centres. Fifteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff in three Swedish detention centres and were analysed using thematic analysis. The results indicate that the main challenge for the staff was to manage the emotional dilemma entailed in working as migration officers and simultaneously fellow human beings whose task was to implement deportation decisions while being expected to provide humane service to detainees. They tried to manage their dilemma by balancing the two roles, but still found it challenging. Among the staff, there was a high perception of fear of physical threat from detainees that made detention a stressful environment. Limited interaction between the staff and detainees was a reason for this. There is thus a need to support detention staff to improve their interaction with detainees in order to decrease their fear, manage their emotional dilemma, and provide better service to detainees. It is important to address staff challenges in order to ensure better health and well-being for both staff and detainees.

  1. COMPOSITE PEDAGOGICAL STAFF-CLUSTERS AS A CONDITION OF DEPARTMENT EDUCATIONAL AND METHODICAL WORK DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Fedorov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation is to justify urgency and efficiency of teachers’ collective work of the chair on formation of integrated special professional competences of trainees.Methods. Teamwork is considered as a leading method of aim realisation; it is suggested to carry this method in practice on the basis of a situational technique of intra-chair structure formation – composite staff-clusters, whose activity is based on synergetic interaction of educational process participants.Results. Described innovations will give the chance to carry out necessary integration of educational processes content; will promote natural interaction of teachers on the basis of the generated complete integrated subsystem – composite staff-clusters. The innovation vector can be connected with more dimensional field of integration, i.e. generating not only special professional competences, but also general professional and common cultural ones.Scientific novelty. Activity of pedagogical composite staff-clusters is offered to consider in the complete block of scientific-theoretical and practice-pedagogical aspects: scientifically-organizational, academic, practice-organizational, educational, etc. Scientific novelty of article is connected with expansion of some content positions which are based on scientific-theoretical conclusions of researches pedagogic-collective (by V. A. Suhomlinsky, etc. and organizational-psychological (by K. Rogers, etc. processes, and also ideas of synergetics extrapolated into organizational-pedagogical processes. It is shown that efficiency of educational process can be reached under a condition of organizational and methodical work interrelatedness; synthesis of administrative and performing activity on the basis of the whole educational process interaction. Necessity of composite pedagogical creativity is proved by synergetic processes and motivation-emotional characteristics.Practical significance. Authors give specific

  2. Sleep Characteristics of the Staff Working in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Based on a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Puerta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to evaluate the sleep characteristics of the staff working in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. They were asked to complete an anonymous survey concerning the characteristics and quality of their sleep, as well as the impact of sleep disturbances on their work and social life, assessed by Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-10 questionnaire. The response rate was 84.6% (85% females: 17% were doctors, 57% nurses, 23% nursing assistants, and 3% porters. 83.8% of them worked on fix shifts and 16.2% did 24-h shifts. 39.8% of workers considered that they had a good sleep quality and 39.8% considered it to be poor or bad. The score was good in 18.2% of the staff and bad in 81.8%. Night shift workers showed significantly worse sleep quality on both the objective and subjective evaluation. There was a weak concordance (kappa 0.267; p = 0.004 between the perceived quality of sleep and the FOSQ-10 evaluation. Sleep disorders affected their emotional state (30.2% of workers and relationships or social life (22.6%. In conclusion, this study finds that a high percentage of health professionals from PICU suffer from sleep disorders that affect their personal and social life. This negative impact is significantly higher in night shift workers. Many health workers are not aware of their bad sleep quality.

  3. The value of life story work for staff, people with dementia and family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Aidín

    2017-05-31

    Dementia is a term used to describe a collection of symptoms that include problems with memory, self-care, reasoning and communication. Care interventions that focus on preserving people's dignity and identity are therefore essential. Using Driscoll's reflective model to guide critical thinking, this article reflects on the use of one intervention, namely life story work, to promote person-centred care for people with dementia. It explores the value or effect of life story work for healthcare staff, the person with dementia and family members. It also highlights best practice guidelines that are useful to consider to promote its optimal success as an intervention in dementia care, for example, instigating it early in the dementia journey and embedding it in a supportive culture. It is important to highlight to nursing students the many positive aspects of incorporating life story work into practice.

  4. Aromatherapy alleviates endothelial dysfunction of medical staff after night-shift work: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenei; Fukuda, Shota; Maeda, Kumiko; Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Kono, Yasushi; Jissho, Satoshi; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2011-02-01

    Night-shift work causes mental stress and lifestyle changes, and is recognized as a risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with impaired endothelial function. Aromatherapy is becoming popular as a complementary therapy that is beneficial for mental relaxation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on the endothelial function of medical staff after night-shift work. This study consisted of 19 healthy medical personnel (19 men, mean age 32 ± 7 years), including 11 physicians and 8 technicians. Aromatherapy was performed for 30 min by inhalation of the essential oil of lavender. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was measured three times in each subject: on a regular workday, and after night-shift work before and immediately after aromatherapy. A control study was performed to assess the effect of a 30-min rest without aromatherapy. The mean value of sleep time during night-shift work was 3.3 ± 1.3 h. FMD after night-shift work was lower than on a regular workday (10.4 ± 1.8 vs. 12.5 ± 1.7%, Paromatherapy (11.8 ± 2.5%, P=0.02 vs. before aromatherapy). FMD was stable in the control study (10.1 ± 1.9 vs. 10.1 ± 2.2%, P=0.9). This study demonstrated that night-shift work impaired endothelial function in medical staff, an effect that was alleviated by short-term aromatherapy.

  5. Leadership and Presenteeism among Scientific Staff: The Role of Accumulation of Work and Time Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Carolin; Scheel, Tabea

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines the joint roles of leadership and stressors for presenteeism of scientific staff. Leaders may have an impact on employees' health, both directly through interpersonal interactions and by shaping their working conditions. In the field of science, this impact could be special because of the mentoring relationships between the employees (e.g., PhD students) and their supervisors (e.g., professors). Based on the job demands-resources framework (JD-R), we hypothesized that the pressure to be present at the workplace induced by supervisors (supervisorial pressure) is directly related to employees' presenteeism as well as indirectly via perceptions of time pressure. The conservation of resources theory (COR) states that resource loss resulting from having to deal with job demands weakens the resource pool and therefore the capacity to deal with other job demands. Thus, we hypothesized that accumulation of work moderates the relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure, such that the relationship is stronger when accumulation of work is high compared to if accumulation of work is low. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 212 PhD students and postdocs of 30 scientific institutions in Germany. Analysis was performed using the SPSS macro PROCESS (Hayes, 2013). Supervisorial pressure was directly associated with higher presenteeism of employees and indirectly through increased time pressure. Moreover, supervisorial pressure and accumulation of work interacted to predict time pressure, but in an unexpected way. The positive relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure is stronger when accumulation is low compared to if accumulation of work is high. It seems possible that job stressors do not accumulate but substitute each other. Threshold models might explain the findings. Moreover, specific patterns of interacting job demands for scientific staff should be considered in absence management. PMID:29123497

  6. Leadership and Presenteeism among Scientific Staff: The Role of Accumulation of Work and Time Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Dietz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the joint roles of leadership and stressors for presenteeism of scientific staff. Leaders may have an impact on employees' health, both directly through interpersonal interactions and by shaping their working conditions. In the field of science, this impact could be special because of the mentoring relationships between the employees (e.g., PhD students and their supervisors (e.g., professors. Based on the job demands-resources framework (JD-R, we hypothesized that the pressure to be present at the workplace induced by supervisors (supervisorial pressure is directly related to employees' presenteeism as well as indirectly via perceptions of time pressure. The conservation of resources theory (COR states that resource loss resulting from having to deal with job demands weakens the resource pool and therefore the capacity to deal with other job demands. Thus, we hypothesized that accumulation of work moderates the relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure, such that the relationship is stronger when accumulation of work is high compared to if accumulation of work is low. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 212 PhD students and postdocs of 30 scientific institutions in Germany. Analysis was performed using the SPSS macro PROCESS (Hayes, 2013. Supervisorial pressure was directly associated with higher presenteeism of employees and indirectly through increased time pressure. Moreover, supervisorial pressure and accumulation of work interacted to predict time pressure, but in an unexpected way. The positive relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure is stronger when accumulation is low compared to if accumulation of work is high. It seems possible that job stressors do not accumulate but substitute each other. Threshold models might explain the findings. Moreover, specific patterns of interacting job demands for scientific staff should be considered in absence management.

  7. Leadership and Presenteeism among Scientific Staff: The Role of Accumulation of Work and Time Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Carolin; Scheel, Tabea

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines the joint roles of leadership and stressors for presenteeism of scientific staff. Leaders may have an impact on employees' health, both directly through interpersonal interactions and by shaping their working conditions. In the field of science, this impact could be special because of the mentoring relationships between the employees (e.g., PhD students) and their supervisors (e.g., professors). Based on the job demands-resources framework (JD-R), we hypothesized that the pressure to be present at the workplace induced by supervisors (supervisorial pressure) is directly related to employees' presenteeism as well as indirectly via perceptions of time pressure. The conservation of resources theory (COR) states that resource loss resulting from having to deal with job demands weakens the resource pool and therefore the capacity to deal with other job demands. Thus, we hypothesized that accumulation of work moderates the relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure, such that the relationship is stronger when accumulation of work is high compared to if accumulation of work is low. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 212 PhD students and postdocs of 30 scientific institutions in Germany. Analysis was performed using the SPSS macro PROCESS (Hayes, 2013). Supervisorial pressure was directly associated with higher presenteeism of employees and indirectly through increased time pressure. Moreover, supervisorial pressure and accumulation of work interacted to predict time pressure, but in an unexpected way. The positive relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure is stronger when accumulation is low compared to if accumulation of work is high. It seems possible that job stressors do not accumulate but substitute each other. Threshold models might explain the findings. Moreover, specific patterns of interacting job demands for scientific staff should be considered in absence management.

  8. Self-transcendence and work engagement in acute care staff registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Beth; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Reed, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-01-01

    The ability of human beings to find meaning by being directed toward something, or someone, other than themselves is termed "self-transcendence." Previous research indicated that the ability of nurses to self-transcend and thus derive positive meaning from patient-caring experiences increased work commitment and fostered work engagement. However, the relationship between self-transcendence and work engagement had not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels and relationships of self-transcendence and work engagement in acute care staff registered nurses (ACSRNs). This was a descriptive correlational study using Reed's theory of self-transcendence. The Self-transcendence Scale, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were completed by a convenience sample of 84 ACSRNs who attended an annual acute care nursing conference in northern Illinois. ACSRNs level of self-transcendence was high, similar to that of other nurses, but higher than that of nonnurses. ACSRNs level of work engagement was at the high end of the "average" range. There was a significant positive correlation between self-transcendence and work engagement. Nurses with higher levels of self-transcendence had more energy toward and were more dedicated and absorbed in their work.

  9. Nurse coordinator leadership and work environment conflicts: consequences for physical and work-related health of nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sili, Alessandro; Fida, Roberta; Trezza, T; Vellone, E; Alvaro, Rosaria

    2014-05-28

    Research has amply demonstrated that positive leadership counters the onset of burnout and conflicting situations between colleagues that in turn create favourable conditions for a healthy organization and consequently for good quality of care. To investigate if more positive leadership is associated with lower levels of conflict in the work environment that in turn are associated with lower levels of burnout, psychosomatic disorders and negative indicators of work environment (feeling not being adequately appreciated, lack of clarity about tasks and roles, gossip, resentment towards the organization), and with higher levels of work satisfaction. Five scales of QISO (Nursing Organizational Health Questionnaire) and the Maslach Inventory (Burnout scale), were administered to a total of 192 nurses working in medical and surgical departments of two different Italian hospitals. The study design was cross-sectional. To test the hypothesis a structural equation model (SEM) was used. The results of this study demonstrate the crucial role played by positive leadership of nursing coordinators that, directly and indirectly, promotes a healthy work environment with lower conflicts, burnout, and psychosomatic disorders among nurses and limits the presence of negative indicators in workplace. This study demonstrates the key role of the nursing coordinator in creating a healthy work environment that contributes to physical and work-related health of the nursing staff.

  10. Coping With Staff Burnout and Work-Related Posttraumatic Stress in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colville, Gillian A; Smith, Jared G; Brierley, Joe; Citron, Kim; Nguru, Noreen M; Shaunak, Priyanka D; Tam, Olivia; Perkins-Porras, Linda

    2017-07-01

    To examine the associations with symptoms of 1) burnout and 2) work-related posttraumatic stress, in adult and pediatric intensive care staff, focusing on the particular contributions of resilience and coping strategies. Point prevalence cross-sectional study. Three adult ICUs and four PICUs. Three hundred seventy-seven ICU staff. None. Brief Resilience Scale, abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, Trauma Screening Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Prevalence of burnout (defined as high emotional exhaustion or high depersonalization) was 37%. Prevalence of clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms was 13%. There was a degree of overlap between burnout and other measures of distress, most notably for anxiety (odds ratio, 10.56; 95% CI, 4.12-27.02; p burnout: odds ratio, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36-0.74; p nurses to be at risk of reporting burnout (odds ratio, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.18-3.78; p = 0.012). After controlling for resilience, profession, and setting, the following coping strategies were independently associated with outcomes: attending debriefing reduced risk of burnout (odds ratio, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.21-0.95; p = 0.036), whereas the odds of posttraumatic stress were less if staff used talking to seniors (odds ratio, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.20-0.92; p = 0.029) or hobbies (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.23-0.93; p = 0.030) to cope with stress at work. Venting emotion (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.12-3.31; p = 0.018) and using alcohol (odds ratio, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.26-4.20; p = 0.006) were associated with a doubling in risk of reporting burnout. The use of particular coping strategies was systematically associated with symptoms of burnout and work-related posttraumatic stress in this group of intensive care staff, even after controlling for resilience and other factors. More research on how best to promote adaptive coping is needed in these challenging settings.

  11. Descriptive study of stress and satisfaction at work in the Saragossa university services and administration staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucha Lopez Ana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The notion of stress in connection with the work environment became an important topic during the 1970's, when the first studies on the subject were published and the term of work stress was first coined. In 1974, Freudenberger proposed the term burnout to refer to the condition of physical and emotional exhaustion, as well as the associated negative attitudes, resulting from the intense interaction in working with people. The aim of our study is to examine burnout and job satisfaction in Saragossa University Services and Administration Staff (SAS and detect the main factors which could contribute to too much stress, because job stress has emerged as a major psychosocial influence on mental health, associated with burnout. Methods 24 people from the Services and Administration Staff in the University of Saragossa participated in the study. The research was carried out during the implementation of a module on Stress Management organised by the University of Saragossa and commissioned to the Unit for Research in Physical Therapy (University School of Health Sciences from that University. This research is an exploratory research to improve the stress management program. A personal interview was carried out and additionally, participants were given the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Scale of Satisfaction at Work of Warr, Cook & Wall. Results However using small sample this is worth to state that participants present most of them low burnout levels in the burnout scale. Only in one person high exhaustion level was reflected, even though other seven showed mean levels; in the professional self-esteem section, most of them showed high self-esteem, with two cases of low self-esteem and five with mean level. With regard to satisfaction people participating in the study show mean levels in intrinsic as much as in extrinsic factors and general satisfaction. Conclusions Services and Administration Staff from the University of

  12. Binge Drinking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-05

    This PSA is based on the October, 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates that drinking too much, including binge drinking, causes more than 79,000 deaths in the U.S. each year and is the third leading preventable cause of death.  Created: 10/5/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/5/2010.

  13. Whooping Cough PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-22

    This 30 second PSA encourages pregnant women to get the whooping cough vaccine, called Tdap, during the third trimester of each pregnancy in order to pass antibodies to their babies so they are born with protection against this serious disease.  Created: 1/22/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch (MVPDB).   Date Released: 1/22/2015.

  14. Psychosocial work environment and burnout among emergency medical and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribà-Agüir, V; Martín-Baena, D; Pérez-Hoyos, S

    2006-11-01

    The prevalence of burnout syndrome is increasing among doctors and nurses. The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between the psychosocial work environment and burnout syndrome among emergency medical and nursing staff in Spain. A secondary aim was to determine if the effect of this psychosocial work environment on burnout was different for doctors and nurses. A cross-sectional survey was carried out by means of a mail questionnaire among 945 emergency doctors and nursing staff of Spain. The outcome variable was three dimensions of burnout syndrome [emotional exhaustion (EE), personal accomplishment (PA), depersonalisation (DP)]. The explanatory variable was that psychosocial work environment evaluated according to Karasek and Johnson's demand-control model. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated by logistical regression. The probability of high EE was greater among those exposed to high psychological demands, OR 4.66 (2.75-7.90), low job control, OR 1.65 (1.04-2.63), and low supervisors' social support, OR 1.64 (1.01-2.59). Emotional exhaustion dimension was negatively influenced by low control only among doctors. Those exposed to low job control had a higher risk of low PA, OR 2.55 (1.66-3.94). There was no evidence of negative effect of psychosocial risk factors on the DP. Prevalence of EE and PA was higher among doctors and nurses. The presence of risk factors derived from work organisation within the work place (psychosocial risk factors) increases the probability of presenting burnout syndrome and, above all, EE.

  15. Work hours regulations for house staff in psychiatry: bad or good for residency training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasminsky, Sonya; Lomonaco, Allison; Auchincloss, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    The movement to limit work hours for house staff has gained momentum in recent years. The authors set out to review the literature on work hours reform, particularly as it applies to psychiatric residency training, and to provide two different viewpoints on the controversy. The authors present the historical background of work hours reform in the United States and review recent literature about resident work hours limitations. Using a debate format, the authors discuss whether the new regulations are having a positive or negative impact on residency training in psychiatry. Drs. Lomonaco and Auchincloss argue that currently-existing work hours restrictions may have unintended consequences for the health of patients and an untoward impact on residents' professional development and academic medicine's overall structure. Dr. Rasminsky argues that work hours restrictions do not go far enough in protecting residents and patients from the harmful effects of fatigue, and that our definition of professionalism needs to be reexamined in light of emerging scientific literature. There should be some limitation on resident work hours, with exact numbers to be determined by growing scientific knowledge about the effects of prolonged wakefulness. More study is needed, particularly in the area of psychiatric residency training.

  16. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vocht, Frank; Batistatou, Evridiki; Mölter, Anna; Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel; van Tongeren, Martie; Crozier, Stuart; Gowland, Penny; Keevil, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and

  17. Factors and symptoms associated with work stress and health-promoting lifestyles among hospital staff: a pilot study in Taiwan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsai, Yueh-Chi; Liu, Chieh-Hsing

    2012-01-01

    ... and time-related pressure. The aims of this study were to investigate factors associated with work stress among hospital staff members and to evaluate their health-promoting lifestyle behaviors...

  18. Improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction following the move to single-family room NICU design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Jo; DeLand, Marion; Gibbins, Sharyn; MacMillan York, Elizabeth; Robson, Kate

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in staff quality of work life and parent satisfaction when a neonatal intensive care unit moved from an open-bay design to a single-room model of care. This descriptive study measured staff quality of work life and family satisfaction before and at 2 time periods after the relocation of a perinatal centre and the introduction of single-family room care. Differences in work life quality and satisfaction were determined using 2-sample t-tests. There were improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction at both time periods following the move. Lessons learned may be of value to other units considering such a move. A neonatal intensive care unit designed to contribute to parental and staff well-being is a model to be considered for future neonatal designs.

  19. Training emotional intelligence related to treatment skills of staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Background - Staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display challenging behaviour may contribute to the continuation of this behaviour, because it causes emotional reactions such as anxiety, anger and annoyance, which may prohibit adequate response behaviour. To enhance

  20. OCCUPATIONAL RISK SITUATION OF HEALTH STAFF THAT IS WORKING AT THE EMERGENCY HEALTH STATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinc Kant Sokel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the risks of occupational hazards in Emergency Medical Care Staff, a research has been planned. The universe of the descriptive research consists of Ambulance Chief Physician staff. The speed of the application is 79.84% (210/263. The questionnaire which consists of questions about sociodemographic attributes, occupational hazard and protective application has been applied face to face between the dates 01-31 January in 2014. The analysis of the data is made on the SPSS 19,0 program. Specifications have been evaluated by percentage and occupational hazards have been evaluated by chi-square test. In the statistical analysises was utilized 0.05 threshold limit value as significance level. 55.7% of participants are men, 63.8% of participants are married, 52.4 % of participants are emergency medical technician and 59,0% of them are working in A2 station and 5.2% of them are working in operation center. The youngest group paramedics (25,1+/-4,5 years are ATTs (25,4+/-4,7 years. The participants occupational hazards has been observed for the last one year and having occupational accidents risk is 9,0%, 44.3% in musculoskeletal discomfort, 22.9% of the risk of contact with blood and body fluids were determined. 11.0 % of traffic accident in the ambulance is 15.7% psychological self as often / very often stated that you feel bad . When we examine the factors that affect the participants occupational risk, the incidence of work-related accidents in the under-30 group was higher ( p = 0.044 . Physicians and other health care professional or work-related illness in more risky (p = 0.009. Review status of musculoskeletal disorders were more frequent in women (p < 0.001. Paramedic ( 18.2 % and drivers ( 16.3 % in the ambulance traffic accident was determined to be at risk for. As determined above in emergency health station staff for the prevention of occupational risks and factors that affect the work to be done. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5

  1. Job satisfaction among hospital staff working in a Government teaching hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Jaiswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a resource-limited and high burden disease setting, satisfied human resource is an asset in terms of high productivity, efficiency and quality care. Aim: To assess job satisfaction among permanent employees working in a government hospital. Materials and Methods: A sample of 200 staff members was interviewed using 34-item, Likert response based, modified job satisfaction scale. Key factors for job satisfaction were identified after subjecting data to principal component analysis, varimax rotation and multivariate analysis using step-wise regression procedure. Results: The mean job satisfaction index was computed to be in a similar range, but was found to be highest for nurses (0.68, followed by doctors (0.66, support staff (0.63 and technicians (0.62. Nine uncorrelated and critical factors related to job satisfaction that explained 68.09% of the variability was identified, that is, communication, pay/salary, working conditions, organization supervision system, co-workers, workload, benefits, career aspects and rewards. A positive association was reported between job satisfaction score and factor scores (units of communication (0.133, benefits (0.110, working condition (0.027 and co-workers (0.032 and a negative relation with organizational supervision system (0.118, workload (0.093, rewards (0.035, pay/salary (0.034 and career prospects (0.017 respectively for all categories of respondents. However in case of doctors, co-workers (0.023 units showed a negative relation. Conclusion: There is scope for interventions to enhance job satisfaction and concomitant continuous monitoring can be useful in determining various service aspects that necessitate improvement. By enhancing job satisfaction, hospital administrator can improve not only the mental, psychological and social well-being of work-force, but also the financial health of an organization.

  2. PSA kinetics after prostate brachytherapy: PSA bounce phenomenon and its implications for PSA doubling time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciezki, Jay P; Reddy, Chandana A; Garcia, Jorge; Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James; Mahadevan, Arul; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Klein, Eric A

    2006-02-01

    To analyze prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics in patients treated with prostate brachytherapy (PI) with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up. The records of 162 patients treated with PI for localized prostate cancer with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up were reviewed. A variety of pretreatment and posttreatment variables were examined. Patients were coded as having a PSA bounce if their PSA achieved a nadir, elevated at least 0.2 ng/mL greater than that nadir, and decreased to, or below, the initial nadir. Two definitions of biochemical failure (bF) or biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) were used: the classic American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition of three consecutive rises (bF3) and the nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition (bFn+2). Associations between a PSA bounce and the various pre- and posttreatment factors were assessed with logistic regression analysis, and the association between a PSA bounce and bF was examined with the log-rank test. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for differences in the PSA doubling time (PSADT) and the time to a PSA rise between the PSA bounce patients and the bF patients. PSADT was calculated from the nadir to the time of the first PSA rise, because this point is known first in the clinical setting. The 5-year overall bRFS rate was 87% for the bF3 definition and 96% for the bFn+2 definition. A PSA bounce was experienced by 75 patients (46.3%). Patients who experienced a PSA bounce were less likely to have a bF, regardless of the bRFS definition used (bF3: p=0.0015; bFn+2: p=0.0040). Among the pre- and posttreatment factors, only younger age predicted for a PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (p=0.0018). The use of androgen deprivation had no effect on PSA bounce. No difference was found in the PSADT between patients who had a PSA bounce and those with bF. The median PSADT for those with a PSA bounce was 8.3 months vs. 10.3 months using the bF3 definition and 8.8 months using

  3. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  4. The construction and evaluation of a generic Work Performance Questionnaire for use with administrative and operational staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann M. Schepers

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The principal objective of the study was the construction and evaluation of a work performance questionnaire for use with administrative and operational staff. Work performance is a multidimensional construct that indicates how well a worker performs in his/her work, the degree of initiative he/she takes, the ingenuity he/she shows in the fnding of solutions for problems, and the manner in which he/she uses the human resources at his/her disposal. Two questionnaires were constructed – one for staff performing managerial functions (the full scale and one for staff in non-managerial positions (the shortened scale. The sample consisted of 278 staff at a South African university. The full scale yielded a reliability of 0,983 and the shortened scale a reliability of 0,978. The implications of the fndings are discussed.

  5. A Survey of Violence Against Staff Working in the Emergency Department in Ankara, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas, RN, PhD

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted.

  6. Job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention of staff in a higher education institution: An exploratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ndayiziveyi Takawira

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The world economy is becoming increasingly knowledge driven, and intellectual capital is now considered as a human resource that affords organisations a competitive advantage. A high turnover rate in higher education and the importance of retaining staff are concerns that have resulted in increased interest in psychological variables, such as job embeddedness and work engagement that may influence employee retention.Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention of staff in a higher education institution.Motivation for the study: Research on how employees’ job embeddedness and work engagement influence their turnover intention is important in the light of organisational concerns about retaining knowledgeable staff in the current higher education environment.Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional quantitative survey was conducted on a non-probability purposive sample (N = 153 of academic and non-academic staff in a South African higher education institution.Main findings: Correlational analyses revealed significant relationships between job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention. Multiple regression analyses showed that organisational links and dedication significantly and negatively predict turnover intention.Practical/managerial implications: When designing retention strategies, management and human resource practitioners need to recognise how job embeddedness and work engagement influence the turnover intention of higher education staff.Contribution: These findings contribute valuable new knowledge that can be applied in the retention of staff in the higher education environment.

  7. The Psychological Impact of Violence on Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ruth; Rose, John; Levenson, Victor

    2009-01-01

    Background: Staff in intellectual disability services can experience high levels of violence, which may lead to burnout. Staff burnout may result in poorer quality services. Previous research has suggested that factors such as fear of violence, self-efficacy and staff support moderate the impact of violence on burnout. Aims: The research explores…

  8. Perceptions of Undergraduate University Students about Working Conditions of Women Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice YALÇIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Women constitute nearly 41%of academic staff in our country. Among all academic staff, the ratio of female academicians is increasing as it is approached to rural areas from suburbs. This study aims to reveal the perceptions of undergraduate education students about female academicians’ working life conditions. Considering available time and facilities, the universe of research was limited within a university; as it was primarily intended to reveal students’ individual perceptions on the conditions of women academics, the students’ being at the undergraduate level was at the fore front of study rather than the academic departments of the university. The survey data form were applied to 157 female and 104 male undergraduate students (N = 261 studying at faculties and schools of the university where the survey was applied excluding freshmen classes.. Descriptive tests were used to evaluate the data. The findings were evaluated by x ² test, which were formerly tested according to the desires of students on what to get on their education and whether they were willing to be academicians. 54%of female students involved in the research stated that they were “partially” satisfied with the female academics. While 74,3%of the students agreed on the question “Should women work as academicians?”, only 2.2%percent stated that women should not work as academicians. 47,8%consider that there is a partial discrimination between the male and female members of academic life. 47,1%mentioned that working as an academician was a barrier to being a good mother or a good wife and 69,7%stated that working as a female academician was a tough work. 23,7%of the students think that being an academician is mostly beneficial in terms of personal development for a woman. 79,6%stated that the biggest challenge for female academics is to sustain the academic studies as well as being a mother and a wife. The best advantage of being female academician was revealed

  9. Collaborative working empowers staff to cut the number of cardiac arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Emma; Murphy, Peter

    At Salford Royal Foundation Trust, 179 patients suffered a cardiac arrest between March 2007 and April 2008. MAINE MEASURES FOR MPROVEMENT: Our primary outcome measure was the number of cardiac arrests per 1,000 admissions. Eleven wards were invited to participate in a Breakthrough Series collaborative from April 2008 to January 2009. It is a short term (6-15 months) learning system thatbrings together several teams to s eekimprovement, focusing on one topic. Frontline teams worked to develop changes in their clinical areas with the aim of reducing cardiac arrests by 50% in one year. April-December 2008 saw a reduction of 32% in the cardiac arrest rate, resulting in an average arrest rate of 0.79 per 1,000 admissions. Since the project began to upscale its work in January 2009, a further reduction has been noted. However,another 4 months' data is required to assess whether this equates to a sustained change. Preliminary data suggests that a Breakthrough Series collaborative is an effective method of engaging frontline staff in developing and implementing change, with improvements in patient care.

  10. Job demand-control and job stress at work: A cross-sectional study among prison staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Jafar; Akbari, Rouhollah; Shakerian, Mahnaz; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Job stress can impose significant costs to the workplaces and organizations due to some issues such as absenteeism, less productivity, and medical costs. Job overload and lack of decision latitude can lead to job stress. The current study aimed to investigate the job demands and control as predictor of job stress and its relationship, with some of the demographic characteristics of Iranian prison staff. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 171 male employees working in four prisons located in Ilam, Iran. The sampling method was census and all four prisons’ staff were selected to respond the Job Content Questionnaires. Finally, the data were analyzed using t-test or independent samples test as well as SPSS 20. Results: The highest amount of job demand (mean = 21.28) and the lowest amount of job control on average (9.76) were reported by those staff working in Darehshahr prison. There was also a significant relationship between job post and job control among the prison staff (β = −0.375, P = 0.001). Conclusion: The level of job stress reported by prison staff was high in this study mainly caused by high job demand and low job control, especially in Darehshahr prison staff. PMID:28546980

  11. Job demand-control and job stress at work: A cross-sectional study among prison staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Jafar; Akbari, Rouhollah; Shakerian, Mahnaz; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Job stress can impose significant costs to the workplaces and organizations due to some issues such as absenteeism, less productivity, and medical costs. Job overload and lack of decision latitude can lead to job stress. The current study aimed to investigate the job demands and control as predictor of job stress and its relationship, with some of the demographic characteristics of Iranian prison staff. This study was performed on 171 male employees working in four prisons located in Ilam, Iran. The sampling method was census and all four prisons' staff were selected to respond the Job Content Questionnaires. Finally, the data were analyzed using t-test or independent samples test as well as SPSS 20. The highest amount of job demand (mean = 21.28) and the lowest amount of job control on average (9.76) were reported by those staff working in Darehshahr prison. There was also a significant relationship between job post and job control among the prison staff (β = -0.375, P = 0.001). The level of job stress reported by prison staff was high in this study mainly caused by high job demand and low job control, especially in Darehshahr prison staff.

  12. Happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment of support staff at a tertiary education institution in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndsay K. Field

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Support staff members play a vital role in tertiary education institutions. With this in mind, the institutions must address their particular needs. In the context of positive psychology, issues of happiness and work engagement could lead to increased positive organisational outcomes like the commitment of support staff.Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to determine the relationship between happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to determine whether happiness and work engagement hold predictive value for the organisational commitment of support staff.Motivation for the study: This study aims to enable the identification of a link between happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to identify a predictive value of the model.Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a cross-sectional survey design. They used a sample of 123 (N = 123 support staff members from a tertiary education institution in South Africa. The researchers used four demographic questionnaires for the research. These were the ‘Satisfaction with Life Scale’ (SWLS, the ‘Well-Being Questionnaire’ (WBQ, the ‘Utrecht Work Engagement Scale’ (UWES and the ‘Organisational Commitment Questionnaire’ (OCQ.Main findings: The researchers found a significant positive relationship between affective organisational commitment and work engagement, as well as between affective organisational commitment and happiness (as the SWLS and WBQ measure. They found a significant positive relationship between work engagement and happiness. Finally, the results showed that happiness and work engagement have predictive value for affective organisational commitment.Practical/managerial implications: Happiness and work engagement have predictive value for affective organisational commitment. Therefore, institutions should carefully tailor any implementation programme or initiative to address this relationship

  13. The oppressive nature of work in healthcare: predictors of aggression against nurses and administrative staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwell, John; Demir, Defne; Flower, Rebecca L

    2013-09-01

    To assess the antecedents of workplace aggression (bullying and violence) among nurses and administration staff. As a result of power structures within the healthcare industry, nurses and administration staff may be more vulnerable to workplace aggression. Environmental and individual characteristics have been linked to the occurrence of such aggression among other groups. However, most research focuses on bullying, rarely extending these ideas to violence or nurses and administration staff specifically. Surveys were distributed to nurses and administration staff employed by an Australian healthcare organisation. Aggression types (bullying and violence), as well as environmental (demands, control and support) and individual (negative affectivity, NA) characteristics were measured. External emotional abuse was most frequently reported for nurses (29%) and bullying for administration staff (27%). Demands, support and NA were associated with different aggression types in nurses, whereas for administration staff, control, support and NA were linked. Low support and high NA are particularly important to nurses and administration staff and their experiences of aggression. Appropriate training for managers in providing support and acknowledging individual factors associated with aggression is essential. Further, managers should monitor aggression risk from patients and their associations towards staff in busy times. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Work-family conflict and job burnout among correctional staff: a comment on Lambert and Hogan (2010)1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kenneth J

    2011-02-01

    Lambert and Hogan (2010) examined the relations between work-family conflict, role stress, and other noted predictors, on reported emotional exhaustion among a sample of 272 correctional staff at a maximum security prison. Using an ordinary least squares (OLS) regression model, the authors found work-on-family conflict, perceived dangerousness of the job, and role strain to have positive relations with emotional exhaustion. However, contrary to expectation they found that custody officers reported lower exhaustion than did their noncustody staff counterparts. Suggestions are provided for follow-up efforts designed to extend this line of research and correct methodological issues.

  15. 'Investing in the future': residential aged care staff experiences of working with nursing students in a 'community of practice'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grealish, Laurie; Bail, Kasia; Ranse, Kristen

    2010-08-01

    This paper aims to discuss the implementation of a 'community of practice' model of clinical teaching into four residential aged care facilities. There is increasing international evidence that aged care is a burgeoning health issue, particularly in developed countries. Recruitment and retention of nurses is problematic in residential aged care. Nursing students maintain negative perceptions of aged care and dislike clinical placements in that area. Additionally, supporting students in residential aged care is difficult considering the staffing mix of skilled/unskilled staff. Innovative educational strategies are needed to manage the increasing shortages of clinical placements for nursing students in all clinical areas. Staff experiences were elicited through four focus groups onsite at the residential aged care facility where students had been placed, one year after implementation of a 'communities of practice' clinical model. Data analysis used a qualitative, thematic approach. The staff in the residential aged care facilities expressed that work was involved in supporting students in the workplace, but that the additional workload was a valuable investment. Staff in residential aged care see working with students as a local investment, where students' fresh eyes, recent knowledge and questioning behaviours are a worthy investment of staff time and effort. Staff also valued the investment in the future, where working with students now creates future nurses sensitive to aged care issues. In a 'communities of practice' model of clinical experience for students, there are benefits for staff as well as students. The implementation of this clinical model in residential aged care was relatively low in cost, a benefit in this sector and has the potential to address the critical issues of recruitment and retention.

  16. Pedagogical Staff in Children's Day Care Centres in Germany--Links between Working Conditions, Job Satisfaction, Commitment and Work-Related Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Inge; Krause, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates links between staff working conditions in children's day care centres ("Kindertageseinrichtungen"--known as "Kitas" in Germany), job satisfaction, commitment and perceived stress at work. Data are based on the nationwide, representative questionnaire survey AQUA ("Arbeitsplatz und Qualität in…

  17. [Interdisciplinary working teams--better for both the patients and the staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Siri Vedeld; Snorrason, Finnur; Langeland, Norvald

    2002-03-20

    Patients in Norwegian hospitals often feel that they do not know which specialist is responsible for their treatment. We report on a reorganisation carried out in the orthopaedic department at Buskerud county hospital in 1997-98. Staff members are allocated to five groups, each responsible for 12-15 beds and including one or two specialists, one or two residents, nurses, physiotherapists and secretaries. Patients are treated by the same group throughout their stay in hospital; the group's specialist is responsible for each patient's treatment. A study established that patient satisfaction with the organisation of the department was higher in 1998 and 2000 than in 1996, and more patients felt that one specialist was responsible for their treatment. A high percentage of staff members were satisfied with the reorganisation. The system may, however, be vulnerable, as it demands exact planning and a high degree of staff loyalty. The results indicate that this mode of organisation benefits patients as well as staff.

  18. Communication Can Save Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-04

    This 60 second public service announcement (PSA) is based on the August 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotic-resistant germs cause at least 23,000 deaths each year. Learn how public health authorities and health care facilities can work together to save lives.  Created: 8/4/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/4/2015.

  19. An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Work Environment Variables on Job Satisfaction Among Chinese Prison Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanhe; Lambert, Eric G; Liu, Jianhong; Zhang, Jinwu

    2017-02-01

    Job satisfaction has been linked to many positive outcomes, such as greater work performance, increased organizational commitment, reduced job burnout, decreased absenteeism, and lower turnover intent/turnover. A substantial body of research has examined how work environment variables are linked to job satisfaction among U.S. correctional staff; far less research has examined prison staff in non-Western nations, especially China. Using survey data collected from two prisons in Guangzhou, China, this study investigated the level of job satisfaction among prison staff and how personal characteristics (i.e., gender, tenure, age, and educational level) and work environment variables (i.e., perceived dangerousness of the job, job variety, supervision, instrumental communication, and input into decision making) affect job satisfaction. The findings from ordinary least squares regression equations indicated that the work environment variables explained a greater proportion of the variance in the job satisfaction measure than the personal characteristics. In the full multivariate regression model, gender was the only personal characteristic to have a significant association with job satisfaction, with female staff reporting higher satisfaction. Input into decision making and job variety had significant positive associations, whereas dangerousness had a significant negative relationship with job satisfaction.

  20. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Hoek, L.S. van der; Francke, A.F.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff’s ability to remain working until retirement age has

  1. Computer Use Ethics among University Students and Staffs: The Influence of Gender, Religious Work Value and Organizational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Norshidah; Karim, Nor Shahriza Abdul; Hussein, Ramlah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which individual characteristics, which are gender, religious (Islamic) work value, and organization level (students and staff), are related to attitudes toward computer use ethics. This investigation is conducted in an academic setting in Malaysia, among those subscribing to the…

  2. The Impact of Ethnicity and Religious Affiliation on the Alienation of Staff from Their Work Environment in Nigerian Universities: A Comparative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnekwu, Duvie Adanma

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the comparative influence of ethnicity and religious affiliation on the alienation of Nigerian university staff from their work environment. The influence of certain moderator variables such as the location of the university, gender, age, educational qualification, staff category, official rank and staff communicative…

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A SIX SIGMA RATING SCALE FOR MEASURING THE QUALITY OF WORK LIFE OF TEACHING STAFF WORKING IN SAUDI UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Vijay Subbarayalu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education institutions in Saudi Arabia is currently performing several evaluations by both students and teaching staff as a measure to improve the quality by understanding the perception of its stakeholders. In order to retain the best and efficient work force to carry out the teaching roles in these universities, the Quality of Work Life (QoWL prevailing in these Educational institutions needs to be studied. Accordingly, this study was conducted among the teaching staff of the University of Dammam [UOD] to capture their experiences related to various aspects of the QoWL. The teaching staff opinion was captured through a pre-tested QoWL questionnaire and the data were analyzed through six sigma analytical tool using the Poisson distribution model. From the non-conformance level captured through the responses from the faculty/teaching staff about the various aspects of quality of work life prevailing in their respective colleges, the corresponding sigma rating for each component of QoWL was calculated. Subsequently, an innovative six point quality rating system was established for each sigma values. The overall opinion of teaching staff about the QoWL prevailing at UOD is rated as "Adaptable" signifying that there is room for further improvement and appropriate strategies need to be employed to improve it.

  4. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vocht, Frank [University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol (United Kingdom); Batistatou, Evridiki [University of Manchester, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Moelter, Anna [Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel [Utrecht University, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Tongeren, Martie [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Centre for Human Exposure Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Crozier, Stuart [University of Queensland, School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia); Gowland, Penny [University of Nottingham, Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Keevil, Stephen [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Physics, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and other staff working with MRI in healthcare in the UK. One hundred and four volunteer staff from eight sites completed a questionnaire and kept a diary to obtain information on subjective symptoms and work practices, and wore a magnetic field dosimeter during one to three randomly selected working days. Incidence of MRI-related symptoms was obtained for all shifts and prevalence of MRI-related and reference symptoms was associated to explanatory factors using ordinal regression. Incident symptoms related to working with MRI were reported in 4 % of shifts. Prevalence of MRI-related, but not reference symptoms were associated with number of hours per week working with MRI, shift length, and stress, but not with magnetic field strength (1.5 and 3 T) or measured magnetic field exposure. Reporting of prevalent symptoms was associated with longer duration of working in MRI departments, but not with measured field strength of exposure. Other factors related to organisation and stress seem to contribute to increased reporting of MRI-related symptoms. (orig.)

  5. The effect on the sensitivities of PSA and PSA-age volume score of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The PSA-age volume (PSA-AV) score was calculated by multiplying the age and prostate volume and then dividing the total by the prebiopsy PSA level. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on the sensitivities of PSA and PSA-AV score of International Prostate Symptom Score (I-PSS) and nocturia in ...

  6. [Fast test serum PSA determination (Sd Bioline PSA)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrijos, Francisco Serrano de la Cruz; Alcina, Emilio López; Escudero, Joaquín Ulises Juan; Deltoro, Milagros Fabuel; García, Ana Montoliu; Romaguera, Arcadio Real; de Campos, Macarena Ramos; Vidal, Emilio Marqués

    2008-01-01

    Over the last years numerous semiquantitative PSA tests have appeared, based on serum or plasma immunochromatography. We present our experience using the SD BIOLINE PSA test, which is performed with plasma or serum for fast qualitative determination of PSA; the cutpoint is 3 ng/ml. We analized 54 patients who were admitted in our hospital ward. Two blood samples were obtained from every patient, one for cuantitative PSA determination at the hospital laboratory and the other one for qualitative determination with the SD BIOLINE PSA test, and the results were compared.. Two urologists independently interpreted the test without knowing the PSA values from the lab. To calculate the effect of test reading time, readings were performed at 15, 20 and 25 minutes. Results were classified in a classic contingency table, which enabled us to calculate sensitivity and specificity of the test, as well as positive and negative predictive values. Mean age was 71. 1 years (range 43-96 yr). From 54 patients in the study 26 (48. 14%) had a PSA > 3 ng/ml (Mean 18.5 ng/ml, range 3.9-66.9 ng/ml) and 28 (51.86%) PSA < 3 ng/ml (mean 0.8 ng/mL, range 0-2.9 ng/mL), in the conventional test. Results for each interval and observer were: 15 min: Observer 1: Sensitivity (S) 76,92%, specificity (E) 100%, positive predictive value (PPV) 100%, negative predictive value (NPV) 82.35%; Observer 2: S 76.92%, E 100%, PPV 100%, NPV 82.35%. 20 minutes: Observer 1: S 100%, E 93.33%, PPV 92.30%, NPV 100%; Observer 2: S 100%, E 93.33%, PPV 92.30%, NPV 100%. 25 minutes: Observer 1: S 100%, E 85.71%, PPV 86.66%, NPV 100%; Observer 2: S 92.30%, E 92.85%, PPV 92.30%, NPV 92.85%. The SD Bioline PSA test complies with the characteristics required to be used as a test for prostate cancer detection, it is simple, fast, cheap, not much invasive, and has a good efficacy.

  7. A Frontline Decision Support System for Georgia Career Centers. Staff Working Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberts, Randall W.; OLeary, Christopher J.

    The Workforce Investment Act requires local areas receiving funding to establish one-stop centers where employment service providers in a local labor market are assembled in one location. Challenges facing center staff are the expected large volume of customers resulting from relaxed program eligibility rules and limited resources for assessment…

  8. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  9. Careers and retention of staff in the 21st century world of work: Introduction to the special edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Coetzee, M., & Gunz, H. (2012. Careers and retention of staff in the 21st century world of work: Introduction to the special edition. SA Journal of Human Resource Management/SA Tydskrif vir Menslikehulpbronbestuur, 10(2, Art. #505, 4 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/ sajhrm.v10i2.505

  10. Work-related fear and the threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Riitta; Huhtala, Heini; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-10-01

    To describe fear, the threats causing fear and the occurrence of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. The emergency department is a challenging workplace where the staff is often confronted by factors that cause fear. A cross-sectional study. A survey was conducted in 16 hospitals (n = 544). Nurses, practical nurses, orderlies and physicians from those hospitals participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was based on the analysis of interviews of 30 nurses from one university hospital and one central hospital. The results of the interviews were analysed using the inductive content analysis method. The analysis of the survey was performed using statistical methods, such as frequencies, cross-tabulation and principal component analysis. The results showed that nearly all of the emergency department personnel had experienced work-related fear. Generally, the fear had been momentary. According to the survey results, fear was most often caused by medication errors, the resuscitation of a child, a catastrophic accident, urgent or violent situations or patients armed with weapons. Threats that caused fear included insecurity, danger in the work environment, threat of loss of one's health and threat of the consequences of one's mistakes and actions. The staff of emergency departments often encountered factors or situations that caused fear. The main threats causing fear that were raised by the respondents were insecurity and danger in the work environment. The data obtained from this study can be utilised in identifying and describing work-related fear and threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. Based on the information herein, it will be possible to develop methods to prevent situations that cause fear in emergency departments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Case study - Implementing a plagiarism detection service: ways of working with staff and students

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Judy

    2012-01-01

    The session will outline how Turnitin was introduced to the University of Kent in 2006 and then implemented over the following academic year, including recent follow-up developments. The University Guidelines on Using Turnitin will be discussed, along with the use of specific Academic Integrity resources to support the use of Turnitin. There will be information about how staff are using Turnitin; how it has been received by students; the impact on reported instances of plagiarism (in specific...

  12. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings of support staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Linda J M; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-11-01

    Working with clients who show challenging behavior can be emotionally demanding and stressful for support staff, because this behavior may cause a range of negative emotional reactions and feelings. These reactions are of negative influence on staff wellbeing and behavior. Research has focused on negative emotions of staff. However, a distinction between emotions and feelings has never been made in the research field of intellectual disabilities. Negative emotions and feelings may be regulated by emotional intelligence, a psychological construct that takes into account personal style and individual differences. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence on the one hand and emotions and feelings on the other. Participants were 207 support staff serving clients with moderate to borderline intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings were measured with questionnaires. The results show that emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings are related. However, found relationships were weak. Most significant relations were found between feelings and stress management and adaptation elements of emotional intelligence. Because the explored variables can change over time they call for a longitudinal research approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. What works in Indigenous tobacco control? The perceptions of remote Indigenous community members and health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Vanessa; Thomas, David P

    2010-04-01

    To explore the perceptions of remote Indigenous community members and health staff regarding the acceptability and effectiveness of different tobacco control health promotion interventions. Qualitative methods were used for this exploratory study, including interviews with remote Indigenous community members and health staff, as well as observations of the delivery of different tobacco control activities in three remote communities in the Northern Territory (NT). Several tobacco control interventions for which there is strong evidence in other settings were generally perceived as acceptable and efficacious in the remote Indigenous setting. Primary care interventions, such as brief advice and pharmaceutical quitting aids, when available and accessible, were perceived as important and effective strategies to help people quit, as were the promotion of smokefree areas. By contrast unmodified Quit programs were perceived to have questionable application in this context and there were conflicting findings regarding taxation increases on tobacco and social marketing campaigns. Several evidence-based 'mainstream' activities are perceived to be acceptable to this population, but we may also need to address the concerns raised by health staff and community members about the acceptability of some unmodified activities. Additionally, organisational barriers within the health system may be contributing to the reduced effectiveness of tobacco control in this setting.

  14. Job Strain and Determinants in Staff Working in Institutions for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: A Test of the Job Demand-Control-Support Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the job strain of staff working in disability institutions. This study investigated the staff's job strain profile and its determinants which included the worker characteristics and the psychosocial working environments in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study survey was carried out among 1243 workers by means of a self-answered…

  15. Physical and Mental Health Status of Staff Working for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: Measurement with the 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Sheng-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Little explicit attention has been given to the generic health profile of staff working for people with intellectual disability in institutions. This study aimed to provide a profile of physical and mental health of staff working in disability welfare institutions, and to examine the possible demographic and organizational factors that explain an…

  16. Relationship between Family-Work and Work-Family Conflict with Organizational Commitment and Desertion Intention among Nurses and Paramedical Staff at Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Hatam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High turnover intention rate is one of the most common problems in healthcare organizations throughout the world. There are several factors that can potentially affect the individuals’ turnover intention; they include factors such as work-family conflict, family-work conflict, and organizational commitment. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between family-work and work-family conflicts and organizational commitment and turnover intention among nurses and paramedical staff at hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS and present a model using SEM. Methods: This is a questionnaire based cross-sectional study among 400 nurses and paramedical staff of hospitals affiliated to SUMS using a random-proportional (quota sampling method. Data collection was performed using four standard questionnaires. SPSS software was used for data analysis and SmartPLS software for modeling variables. Results: Mean scores of work-family conflict and desertion intention were 2.6 and 2.77, respectively. There was a significant relationship between gender and family-work conflict (P=0.02. Family-work conflict was significantly higher in married participants (P=0.001. Based on the findings of this study, there was a significant positive relationship between work-family and family-work conflict (P=0.001. Also, work-family conflict had a significant inverse relationship with organizational commitment (P=0.001. An inverse relationship was seen between organizational commitment and turnover intentions (P=0.001. Conclusion: Thus, regarding the prominent and preventative role of organizational commitment in employees’ desertion intentions, in order to prevent negative effects of staff desertion in health sector, attempts to make policies to increase people’s organizational commitment must be considered by health system managers more than ever.

  17. Relationship between Family-Work and Work-Family Conflict with Organizational Commitment and Desertion Intention among Nurses and Paramedical Staff at Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Nahid; Jalali, Marzie Tajik; Askarian, Mehrdad; Kharazmi, Erfan

    2016-04-01

    High turnover intention rate is one of the most common problems in healthcare organizations throughout the world. There are several factors that can potentially affect the individuals' turnover intention; they include factors such as work-family conflict, family-work conflict, and organizational commitment. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between family-work and work-family conflicts and organizational commitment and turnover intention among nurses and paramedical staff at hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) and present a model using SEM. This is a questionnaire based cross-sectional study among 400 nurses and paramedical staff of hospitals affiliated to SUMS using a random-proportional (quota) sampling method. Data collection was performed using four standard questionnaires. SPSS software was used for data analysis and SmartPLS software for modeling variables. Mean scores of work-family conflict and desertion intention were 2.6 and 2.77, respectively. There was a significant relationship between gender and family-work conflict (P=0.02). Family-work conflict was significantly higher in married participants (P=0.001). Based on the findings of this study, there was a significant positive relationship between work-family and family-work conflict (P=0.001). Also, work-family conflict had a significant inverse relationship with organizational commitment (P=0.001). An inverse relationship was seen between organizational commitment and turnover intentions (P=0.001). Thus, regarding the prominent and preventative role of organizational commitment in employees' desertion intentions, in order to prevent negative effects of staff desertion in health sector, attempts to make policies to increase people's organizational commitment must be considered by health system managers more than ever.

  18. Burnout and its related Demographic Factors among the Medical Staff working in Hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gashmard, Roqayeh; Bagherzadeh, Razieh; Pouladi, Shahnaz; Akaberian, Sherafat

    2015-12-01

    Burnout exerts a significant negative influence on job performance, especially in such difficult jobs as those to be found in the health care industry. This research aimed to evaluate the association between 3 dimensions of burnout and demographic factors among the medical staff working in all of the hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The research detailed herein was a descriptive, analytical cross-sectional study which was conducted on 461 medical staff working in all of the hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences, Iran, from April 2011 to February 2012. The data were collected using a self-response method and include demographic information as well as the Maslach Burnout Inventory. In this study, samples were selected using a stratified random sampling method. The scoring of the burnout questionnaire ranged from 0 (never) to 6 (every day), with the levels of each of the 3 dimensions of burnout (as well as burnout itself) then being categorized as being low, moderate, or high. The data were analyzed using an independent t-test, a chi-square test, ANOVA, and Pearson's correlation coefficient, all in SPSS 18. Most people had experienced moderate levels of burnout (53.6%). With regard to the 3 domains of burnout, 46.4% of the participants had experienced moderate levels of emotional exhaustion, more than half (56.4%) had experienced low levels of depersonalization, and more than half (52.5%), high levels of a diminished sense of accomplishment. Burnout was shown to be statistically significantly associated with gender, place of residence, the condition of that residence, educational level, and being or not being local (p>0.05). The research findings showed that the rate of burnout was moderate among the medical staff working in hospitals associated with Bushehr University of Medical Sciences. Probably, burnout can be reduced in the hospitals' different staff members through better and suitable planning and

  19. Blood Pressure Medicines Don’t Work If People Don’t Take Them PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-13

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Blood pressure medicines don’t work if people don’t take them. Learn how health care systems can work with patients to make taking medicines easier.  Created: 9/13/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/13/2016.

  20. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  1. Nursing staff's experiences of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room-An interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Fredrika; Olausson, Sepideh; Fridh, Isabell; Lindahl, Berit

    2017-12-01

    It has been known for centuries that environment in healthcare has an impact, but despite this, environment has been overshadowed by technological and medical progress, especially in intensive care. Evidence-based design is a concept concerning integrating knowledge from various research disciplines and its application to healing environments. The aim was to explore the experiences of nursing staff of working in an evidence-based designed ICU patient room. Interviews were carried out with eight critical care nurses and five assistant nurses and then subjected to qualitative content analysis. The experience of working in an evidence-based designed intensive care unit patient room was that the room stimulates alertness and promotes wellbeing in the nursing staff, fostering their caring activities but also that the interior design of the medical and technical equipment challenges nursing actions. The room explored in this study had been rebuilt in order to create and evaluate a healing environment. This study showed that the new environment had a great impact on the caring staffs' wellbeing and their caring behaviour. At a time when turnover in nurses is high and sick leave is increasing, these findings show the importance of interior design ofintensive care units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Resilience and Professional Quality of Life in Staff Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behavior in Community Based and Institutional Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndenaa, Erik; Lauvrud, Christian; Sandvik, Marita; Nonstad, Kåre; Whittington, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Staff in forensic services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) are expected to deal with a wide range of emotional challenges when providing care. The potential impact of this demanding work has not been systematically explored previously. This article explores the professional quality of life (QoL) and the resilience (hardiness) of the staff in this setting. The Professional QoL questionnaire and the Disposional Resilience Scale were completed by staff (n=85, 80% response rate) in the Norwegian forensic service for ID offenders. Responses from staff working in institutional settings were compared to those from staff in local community services. Staff in the local community services had higher resilience scores compared to the staff in the institutional setting, (t=2.19; P<0.05). However in the other QoL and resilience domains there were no differences between the staff in the two settings. The greater sense of resilient control among community staff may be a function of both the number of service users they work with and the institutional demands they face. Even though these participants worked with relatively high risk clients, they did not report significantly impaired quality of life compared to other occupations. PMID:26973892

  3. Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction as a Predictor of Work Engagement among Academic Staff in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, Fatos

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between work-related basic need satisfaction and work engagement. Data were obtained from a total of 203 academics who are employed in various universities of Turkey. In this research Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale and The Turkish Form of Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were utilized. The data were…

  4. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test On This Page What ... the PSA test for prostate cancer screening? Detecting prostate cancer early may not reduce the chance of ...

  5. Hepatitis Awareness Month PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-11

    May is National Hepatitis Awareness Month. This 30 second PSA discusses hepatitis and encourages listners to talk to their health care professional about getting tested.  Created: 5/11/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 5/11/2011.

  6. World AIDS Day PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    December 1 is World AIDS Day. In this PSA, communities are encouraged to get tested for HIV.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  7. Raccoon Roundworm Infection PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-27

    This 60 second PSA describes the signs and symptoms of and ways to prevent Baylisascaris infection, a parasitic roundworm infection that is spread through raccoon feces.  Created: 8/27/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  8. Transition to a New Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Positive Effects on Staff Working Environment and How the Physical Environment Facilitates Family-Centered Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Johannes; Bäck, Frida; Hed, Zara; Edvardsson, David

    To optimize family-centered care and the staff working environment, the physical care environment should be designed to meet the needs of the infants, their families, and staff. It is important to evaluate the effects of a purpose-built neonatal ward on staff perceptions of job strain, the psychosocial climate, and the appropriateness of the physical environment. This study collected information from staff at a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), before and after the ward was relocated to a new NICU. Effects were measured using the following variables: job strain, person-centered climate and appropriateness-of-the-physical-environment questionnaires. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures generalized estimating equations and factor analysis. After staff began to work in the new NICU, their job strain significantly increased. At the 2-year follow-up, staff stress levels had returned to preintervention levels. Participating staff perceived the purpose-built neonatal ward as being a significantly more appropriate physical environment for family-centered care of the infants and their families. The staff also perceived the psychosocial climate of the new NICU as significantly more person-centered in terms of having a more homey, comfortable, and everyday ambience and thus experienced as being more supportive. An NICU built according to recommended standards optimized the physical care environment for family-centered care and increased the staff working climate.

  9. Causal and emotional factors related to work stress in ICU nursing staff. The importance of accurate measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornés Vives, J; Gallego Caminero, G; Barceló Oliver, M; Crespi Capó, M; Guttierrez Casado, A

    1994-03-01

    This study was designed to determine the degree of intervention of causal and emotional factors in work stress in intensive care unit (ICU) nursing staff. A questionnaire to assess stress causes (27) and associated emotions (33) was given to 123 people (85 registered nurses and 38 auxiliary nurses) aged 22-56, working in ICUs in different hospitals in Palma de Mallorca. Descriptive and factorial analyses were carried out. Respondents gave most stress causes a medium score (3.5-6.5 points), the highest values corresponding to staff shortage (mean = 6.71), bad management organisation (mean = 6.65) and little free time (mean = 6.5). These causes are grouped in seven factors which account for 65.51% of variance and are particularly related to organisational problems, training and personal relationships, work demands and physical and emotional overload. The most important emotions for this sample are: responsibility (mean = 6.61), impotence (mean = 6.23) and desire to excel (mean = 6.080). Such emotions are divided into seven factors which explain 65.31% of the variance and define states of personal satisfaction, depersonalisation, anxiety, low self-esteem, helplessness and arrogance. Surprisingly, the main factor with the value 5.08 and a variance of 15.42%, corresponds to positive or pleasant emotions. The results corroborate previous research findings on work stress, provide a simplified tool for assessing this and show the need to quantify the degree of such manifestations in the assessments.

  10. Time to Nadir PSA: Of Popes and PSA--The Immortality Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Skyler B; Jackson, William C; Murgic, Jure; Feng, Felix Y; Hamstra, Daniel A

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir (nPSA) and time to nPSA (TnPSA) as prognostic variables for outcomes after definitive high-dose (>75 Gy) external beam radiation therapy (RT) without androgen deprivation therapy while correcting for immortal-time bias. nPSA and TnPSA were available for 410 patients. nPSA and TnPSA's impact on freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific survival was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards regression. Outcomes were also evaluated relative to the time since achieving nPSA and not relative to the time of RT, given the intrinsic time bias in TnPSA. Median nPSA was 0.7 ng/mL (interquartile range: 0.4 to 1.1), with a median TnPSA of 25.0 months (IQR: 15.0 to 40.0). On univariate analysis both nPSA and TnPSA were predictive of all endpoints: freedom from biochemical failure, freedom from metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific survival, as categorical (all Pimmortal-time bias the benefit of long TnPSA was mostly lost. On Cox proportional hazards, a TnPSA12 months from the time of RT the TnPSA was no longer prognostic. For dose-escalated RT a lower nPSA is prognostic, but the benefit of a long TnPSA is largely an immortal-time bias and that a longer TnPSA is not in and of itself a significant favorable factor except as compared with those with the shortest TnPSA of <12 months.

  11. Comparison of SKIFS 2004:1 and Tillsynshandbok PSA against the ASME PRA Standard and European requirements on PSA; Jaemfoerelse av SKIFS 2004:1 och Tillsynshandbok PSA mot ASME PRA Standard och Europeiska krav paa PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellstroem, Per

    2005-04-15

    Requirements on PSA for risk informed applications are expressed in different international documents. The ASME PRA standard published in spring 2002 is one such document, PSA requirements are also expressed in the European Utility Requirements (EUR) for new reactors. The Swedish PSA requirements are provided in the Swedish regulators (SKI) statutes SKIFS 2004:1. SKI also has a review handbook for PSA activities (SKI report 2003:48). The review handbook is a support during review of the utilities PSA activities and the PSAs themselves. The review handbook expresses SKIs expectations by providing so called important aspects for both the PSA work and the PSAs, A comparison of SKIFS requirements and the important aspects in the Review handbook, on one side, and the requirements on PSA in EUR and ASME on the other side, is presented. The comparison shows a large difference in the level of detail in the different documents, where ASME is most detailed and specific. This is expected since the SKI review handbook not is a 'PSA guide' in the same way as the ASME PRA standard. A direct comparison of the ASME PRA standard requirements with the important aspects in the review handbook cannot answer the question which ASME capacity level that is achieved by a PSA meeting all important aspects. The conclusion is that it is not likely to achieve capacity level 2 and 3, since very few ASME level 3 attributes are explicitly expressed as important aspects, though many are expressed in general terms. The review handbook important aspects that are most similar to the ASME capacity level 1 attributes are initiating events, sequence analysis, and system analysis while less similarity is found for analysis of operator actions data analysis, quantification and containment analysis (level 2). Less similarity is found for capacity level 2 and 3. However, the number of additional ASME attributes on capacity level 2 and 3 are few. There are also important aspects in the review

  12. Inputs and outcomes: what do staff in services for people with intellectual disabilities perceive they bring to and receive from their work-based relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disley, Philip; Hatton, Chris; Dagnan, Dave

    2012-12-01

    A number of studies involving staff working in services for people with intellectual disabilities have utilised equity theory as a theoretical framework. According to this theory, people evaluate social relationships through the comparison of inputs and outcomes, respectively, with what a person brings to and receives from a relationship. Little is known about what constitute inputs and outcomes for staff working in services for people with intellectual disabilities. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 staff to find out what constitute inputs and outcomes for staff who work with people with intellectual disabilities. The interviews were conducted in the first half of 2008 in the United Kingdom. Data were analysed using template analysis. A wide range of inputs and outcomes was identified by staff, which were grouped under high-level themes relating to relationships with their employers, their co-workers and the service users. The utility of the findings, in terms of informing future research, is discussed.

  13. Safety Considerations for Medical Staff and Patients Who Fly Over Water in a Helicopter for Work or Recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Christopher J; MacDonald, Conor V

    2017-04-01

    Around 25% of people involved in a helicopter accident in water do not survive. From time to time, physicians and their medical staff are required to fly over water in a helicopter to attend one or more seriously ill patients. Many will have had little or no experience of the issues involved if the helicopter has an accident in the water. Also as Family Practitioners, Aeromedical Examiners, and Flight Surgeons, they are asked to provide advice to patients, travel agents, and airline booking agents about whether an overwater helicopter flight is advisable or not. From 50 yr of helicopter accident evidence in the scientific literature, government agency reports, and statistics from the military safety centers and the offshore oil industry, the critical hazards involved and risks to medical staff and their patients have been identified. Patients most at risk are those who suffer from cardiovascular or respiratory disease, have physical disabilities, have a very large body size, and anyone who is a non-swimmer. Medical staff are at risk if they are not familiar with the procedure for escape from a flooded inverted cabin and difficulties after escape from the fuselage with life jackets, life rafts, and sometimes the necessity to swim ashore. With 50 yr of hindsight, many of the deaths were preventable, and many lives can be saved if a series of very simple mental and physical preventive actions are taken by anyone stepping on to a helicopter that flies over water.Brooks CJ, MacDonald CV. Safety considerations for medical staff and patients who fly over water in a helicopter for work or recreation. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):413-417.

  14. Perceived Stress among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric Inpatient Care: The Influence of Perceptions of the Ward Atmosphere and the Psychosocial Work Environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Eklund, Mona; Wann-Hansson, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate (1) perceived stress as felt by the nursing staff working in psychiatric inpatient care, (2) possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants, and (3) associations among individual characteristics, the ward atmosphere, the psychosocial work environment, and perceived stress. Ninety-three members of the nursing staff completed three instruments-one each measuring perceived stress, the ward atmosphere, and the psychosocial work environment. The...

  15. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-12-01

    The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is important to retain existing nursing staff in the healthcare sector to ensure a stable home-care workforce for the future. However, to date there has been little research about the job factors in home care that affect whether staff are considering leaving the healthcare sector. The main purpose of the study was to examine how home-care nursing staff's self-perceived autonomy relates to whether they have considered leaving the healthcare sector and to assess the possible mediating effect of work engagement. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study involved 262 registered nurses and certified nursing assistants employed in Dutch home-care organisations (mean age of 51; 97% female). The respondents were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide group of nursing staff members in various healthcare settings (67% response rate). The questionnaire included validated scales concerning self-perceived autonomy and work engagement and a measure for considering pursuing an occupation outside the healthcare sector. Logistic regression and mediation analyses were conducted to test associations between self-perceived autonomy, work engagement and considering leaving the healthcare sector. Nursing staff members in home care who perceive more autonomy are more engaged in their work and less likely to have considered leaving the healthcare sector. The positive association between self-perceived autonomy and considering leaving, found among nursing staff members regardless of their level of education, is mediated by work engagement. In developing strategies for retaining nursing staff in home care, employers and policy makers should target their efforts at enhancing nursing staff

  16. The influence of factors of work environment and burnout syndrome on self-efficacy of medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Iwona; Rasińska, Renata; Głowacka, Maria Danuta

    2016-06-02

    Conditions of a healthy, friendly and safe work environment and proper work organisation increase self-efficacy and decrease or eliminate the factors causing the occurrence of burnout symptoms, all of which have a decisive impact on increasing the quality of work. The aim of the study was to analyse and assess the influence of factors of work environment and burnout syndrome on the self-efficacy of medical staff. The study comprised randomly selected professionally-active nurses working on hospital wards (N=405) on the area of two provinces in Poland. The study used the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Copenhagen Burnout Inventory and a questionnaire concerning the factors that influence the process of work organisation at nursing positions in hospitals. Lower scores for self-efficacy resulted in a worse assessment of development opportunities and promotion prospects (r=-0.11), participation in the decision-making process (r=-0.11) and teamwork (r=-0.10). Lower self-efficacy contributed to the occurrence of burnout symptoms r∈[-0.19 - -0.17]. Properly shaped and used organisational factors are stimulating for professional efficiency and effectiveness, and consequently, for the quality of nursing work. Negative assessment of the factors in the work environment contributes to the occurrence of burnout symptoms and decrease in self-efficacy. Nurses with lower self-efficacy more often experienced symptoms of burnout.

  17. To what extent is the work environment of staff related to person-centred care? A cross-sectional study of residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2015-05-01

    To explore the relationship between staff characteristics, perceived work environment and person-centred care in residential aged care units. Person-centred care is often described as the model of choice in residential aged care and in the care of persons with dementia. Few empirical studies have reported on the relationship between how staff experience different aspects of their work and person-centred care. The study had a cross-sectional quantitative design. Staff in 151 residential aged care units in Sweden (n = 1169) completed surveys which included questions about staff characteristics, valid and reliable measures of person-centred care, satisfaction with work and care, job strain, stress of conscience and psychosocial unit climate. Statistical analyses of correlations, group differences and multiple linear regression analysis estimated with generalised estimating equation were conducted. Higher levels of staff satisfaction, lower levels of job strain, lower levels of stress of conscience, higher levels of a supportive psychosocial unit climate and a higher proportion of staff with continuing education in dementia care were associated with higher levels of person-centred care. Job strain and a supportive psychosocial climate, explained most of the variation in person-centred care. This study shows that the work environment as perceived by staff is associated with the extent to which staff perceive the care as being person-centred in residential aged care. These empirical findings support the theoretical postulation that the work environment is an important aspect of person-centred care. Promoting a positive and supportive psychosocial climate and a work environment where staff experience balance between demands and control in their work, to enable person-centred care practice, seems to be important implications for managers and leaders in residential aged care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. [Evaluation and intervention of psychological work climate among nursing staff : a review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillet, Stéphanie; Courcy, François; Leblanc, Jeannette

    2016-06-01

    This review of literature focuses on the influence of psychological work climate and job satisfaction on nurses’ turnover intentions. More specifically, this review aims to explain the influence of the primary dimensions of psychological work climate - job characteristics, role characteristics, leadership characteristics, teamwork characteristics and organizational characteristics - on nurses’ organizational and occupational turnover intentions. Furthermore, this review aims to explain the role of job satisfaction as a potential mediator in the relationship between psychological work climate dimensions and both organizational and occupational turnover intentions among nurses. More specifically, the mechanism by which an individual goes from having negative perceptions of psychological work climate to having turnover intentions is introduced. The review concludes by revealing evaluation and intervention practices that may facilitate the implementation of continuous improvement processes aimed to enhance nurses’ perceptions of the psychological work climate and job satisfaction.

  19. Knowledge on Hospital Waste Management among Senior Staff Nurses Working in a Selected Medical College Hospital of Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasir Uddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Healthcare wastes include all types of wastes generated by healthcare establishments. Waste disposal problem is growing with an ever-increasing number of hospitals, clinics, and diagnostic laboratories in Bangladesh and also in Faridpur town. Aim and Objective. The outcomes of this study will contribute to increase proper waste management practice among nurses in Bangladesh. Methods. A descriptive type of cross sectional study design was used to assess the level of knowledge regarding hospital waste management among senior staff nurses working in Faridpur Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh. All respondents (n=125 were selected by random sampling. Results. In the answer of knowledge about general waste only 4% (n=5 gave all correct answers. In the answer of knowledge about infectious waste 63.2% (n=79 gave one correct answer, of knowledge about pharmaceutical waste only 8% (n=10 gave all correct answers, and of knowledge about biomedical waste only 7.2% (n=9 gave all correct answers. In the answer of knowledge about color coded bins collecting waste 53.6% (n=67 cannot give any correct answer and only 46.4% (n=58 gave all correct answers and of knowledge about the safe disposal of hospital waste 16% (n=8 could not give any correct answer. However, against all questions were 5 options. Conclusion. Knowledge about hospital waste and its management is very poor among senior staff nurses. As a recommendation to improve this situation continuous training should be made compulsory for healthcare personnel specially staff nurses working in Bangladesh.

  20. What works in delivering dementia education or training to hospital staff? A critical synthesis of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, Claire A; Gates, Cara

    2017-10-01

    The quality of care delivered to people with dementia in hospital settings is of international concern. People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds, however, staff working in hospitals report lack of knowledge and skills in caring for this group. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to training hospital staff on dementia. The purpose of this literature review was to examine published evidence on the most effective approaches to dementia training and education for hospital staff. The review was conducted using critical synthesis and included qualitative, quantitative and mixed/multi- methods studies. Kirkpatrick's four level model for the evaluation of training interventions was adopted to structure the review. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AMED, British Education Index, Education Abstracts, ERIC (EbscoHost), The Cochrane Library-Cochrane reviews, Economic evaluations, CENTRAL (Wiley), HMIC (Ovid), ASSIA, IBSS (Proquest), Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes (Web of Science), using a combination of keyword for the following themes: Dementia/Alzheimer's, training/education, staff knowledge and patient outcomes. A total of 20 papers were included in the review, the majority of which were low or medium quality, impacting on generalisability. The 16 different training programmes evaluated in the studies varied in terms of duration and mode of delivery, although most employed face-to-face didactic techniques. Studies predominantly reported on reactions to training and knowledge, only one study evaluated outcomes across all of the levels of the Kirkpatrick model. Key features of training that appeared to be more acceptable and effective were identified related to training content, delivery methods, practicalities, duration and support for implementation. The review methodology enabled inclusion of a broad range of studies and permitted common features of successful programmes to be

  1. Awareness of stress-reduction interventions on work attitudes: the impact of tenure and staff group in Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pignata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees’ reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1 perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2 job satisfaction for employees with 0–19 years of tenure; (3 trust in senior management for employees with 6–19 years of tenure; and (4 affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6–10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20–38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual

  2. Awareness of Stress-Reduction Interventions on Work Attitudes: The Impact of Tenure and Staff Group in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H.; Provis, Chris; Boyd, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA) and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees' reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1) perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2) job satisfaction for employees with 0–19 years of tenure; (3) trust in senior management for employees with 6–19 years of tenure; and (4) affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6–10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20–38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual issues in

  3. Reflections on health staff working with elderly people in the public administration. Case studies /

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Nieto-Morales

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The speech of female health professionals who work in public residences is analyzed in this writing, a work which most of them choose as their vocation, from a perspective in public employment and personal cares. The crisis has destroyed positions, social rights, made precarious the employment done in all the environments and especially in the Administration, the outsourcing of work is started, the increasing of flexibility of the labor conditions, the instability… Everything worsens particularly the conditions of the public health professionals. The question arisen is: where are the labor stability, the vocation and working in a position each one has been trained for? The labor conditions worsen, making employment and positions more precarious. The statistics reflect there is less unemployment when there is more training; but there are many university people who work in a position different to the one they have been trained for. A group of discussion composed by six people with a university degree in Nursing and Auxiliary Nursing Care, who work in public residences for elderly people, has been created to focus on this work, out of the labor place.

  4. Quality of working life and burnout among nursing staff in Intensive Care Units

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmidt, Denise Rodrigues Costa; Paladini, Márcia; Biato, Cleonice; Pais, Juliana Domingues; Oliveira, Adelaine Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    ...) and the presence of burnout among nursing professionals working at Intensive Care Units. The sample was composed of 53 nursing professionals from a university hospital located in the city of Londrina-PR, Brazil...

  5. Wildlife refuge staff works to curb deadly disease [Monte Vista and Alamosa National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This magazine article is on the work to reduce losses from the waterfowl disease avian cholera, on the Alamosa National Wildlife Refuge and Monte Vista National...

  6. The Influence of Organizational Climate on Work Productivity Library Staff at CISRAL Padjadjaran University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Nurma Hastuti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak : Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui (1 Pengaruh iklim organisasi terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (2 Pengaruh struktur terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (3 Pengaruh standar-standar terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran (4 Pengaruh tanggung jawab terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran. Penelitian ini dilakukan pada 25 orang tenaga perpustakaan CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran. Metode penelitian ini menggunakan statistik deskriptif. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa (1 Iklim organisasi memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (2 Struktur memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (3 Standar memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, dan (4 Tanggung jawab memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran. Iklim organisasi pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran dikategorikan kondusif, namun sebaiknya perpustakaan dapat menciptakan iklim organisasi yang lebih kondusif dan nyaman agar produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan semakin meningkat.   Kata Kunci : Iklim Organisasi, Tenaga Perpustakaan, Produktivitas Kerja   Abstract: This study aims to find out (1 The influence of organizational climate on work productivity of librarian at Padjadjaran University, CISRAL (2 The Influences of structure on work productivity of librarian at CISRAL Padjadjaran University (3 The influence of standards on work productivity of librarian at CISRAL University of Padjadjaran (4 The influence of responsibility on work productivity librarian at CISRAL Padjadjaran University

  7. E-assessment of prior learning: a pilot study of interactive assessment of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Annika; Andrén, Marianne; Engström, Maria

    2014-04-18

    The current paper presents a pilot study of interactive assessment using information and communication technology (ICT) to evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care. Theoretical and practical assessment methods were developed and used with simulated patients and computer-based tests to identify strengths and areas for personal development among staff with no formal education. Of the 157 staff with no formal education, 87 began the practical and/or theoretical assessments, and 63 completed both assessments. Several of the staff passed the practical assessments, except the morning hygiene assessment, where several failed. Other areas for staff development, i.e. where several failed (>50%), were the theoretical assessment of the learning objectives: Health, Oral care, Ergonomics, hygiene, esthetic, environmental, Rehabilitation, Assistive technology, Basic healthcare and Laws and organization. None of the staff passed all assessments. Number of years working in elderly care and staff age were not statistically significantly related to the total score of grades on the various learning objectives. The interactive assessments were useful in assessing staff members' practical and theoretical knowledge, skills, and abilities and in identifying areas in need of development. It is important that personnel who lack formal qualifications be clearly identified and given a chance to develop their competence through training, both theoretical and practical. The interactive e-assessment approach analyzed in the present pilot study could serve as a starting point.

  8. Work and Life Balance Support of Female Midlevel Noninstructional Staff at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie J.; Taylor, Colette M.

    2013-01-01

    Two-year public institutions are known for their nurturing academic environments that support students from diverse backgrounds and experiences. One would assume that these nurturing and supportive environments would also go beyond the students to include employees. Family-friendly working environments support the needs of employees to balance…

  9. Scaffolded project work as staff development: Critical reflections on two capacity building programs in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Thijs, Annette

    2010-01-01

    This article reflects on the strengths and limitations of two capacity building programs framed around the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation phases of project work. It is based on experiences from two tailor-made programs, both of which aimed to strengthen institutional and individual

  10. Is staff well-being and communication enhanced by multidisciplinary work shift evaluations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, Judith K.; Bos, Albert P.; Tol, Dirk; Calff, Mart; Krijnen, Margot; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the implementation of multidisciplinary structured work shift evaluations at a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) to enhance team communication. Desogn and setting: Prospective, repeated measurements design, comparison of pre/post measurements and process measures in a Dutch

  11. We cannot staff for 'what ifs': the social organization of rural nurses' safeguarding work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Karen

    2012-09-01

    Rural nurses play an important role in the provision of maternity care for Canadian women. This care is an important part of how rural nurses safeguard the patients who receive care in small rural hospitals. This study utilized institutional ethnography as an approach for describing rural nursing work and for exploring how nurses' work experiences are socially organized. Rural nurses advocated for safe healthcare environments by ensuring that skilled nurses were available for every shift, day and night, at their local hospital. Rural nurses noted that this work was particularly difficult for the provision of maternity care. This article explores two threads or cues to institutional organization that were identified in our interviews and observations; namely staffing and safety standards, and the need for flexibility in staffing in small rural hospitals. Rural nurses' concerns about ensuring that skilled nurses are available in small rural hospitals do not enter into current management discourses that focus on efficiency and cost savings or find a home within current discourses of patient safety 'competencies'. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Uncovering the emotional aspects of working on a clinical trial: a qualitative study of the experiences and views of staff involved in a type 1 diabetes trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Julia; Kirkham, Jackie; White, David; Rankin, David; Cooper, Cindy; Heller, Simon

    2015-01-07

    The perspectives and experiences of trial staff are increasingly being investigated as these can be used to improve recruitment, adherence to trial protocols and support given to future staff. We interviewed staff working on a type 1 diabetes trial in order to aid interpretation of trial findings, inform recommendations for the rollout of the treatments investigated and provide recommendations for the conduct of future trials. However, our interviews uncovered aspects of trial work erstwhile unrecognised or underreported in the trials literature, and it is these which form the focus of this paper. In-depth interviews were conducted with (n = 18) staff, recruited from seven centres, who were involved in recruitment and trial delivery. Data were analysed thematically. Alongside logistical and practical issues which made trial work challenging, staff often talked spontaneously and at length about how trial work had affected them emotionally. Staff not only described the emotional stresses arising from having to meet recruitment targets and from balancing research roles with clinical responsibilities, they also discussed having to emotionally manage patients and their colleagues. The emotional aspects of trial work particularly came to the fore when staff notified patients about their treatment allocation. On such occasions, staff described having to employ emotional strategies to pre-empt and manage potential patient disappointment and anger. Staff also described having to manage their own emotions when patients withdrew from the trial or were not randomised to the treatment arm which, in their clinical judgment, would have been in their best interests. To help address the emotional challenges they encountered, staff highlighted a need for more practical, emotional and specialist psychological support. More attention should be paid to the emotional aspects of trial work to help ensure trial staff are adequately supported. Such support could comprise: increased

  13. Working in the public and private domains: staff management of community activities for and the identities of people with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, S

    2000-10-01

    In addition to describing how the concept of stigma continues to be a pervasive influence in encounters between people with intellectual disability and others, the present study suggests that the management of this situation has passed into the control of care staff. An ethnographic study of young adults and community relationships suggests that the activities of staff are crucial in shaping the social profile of people with intellectual disability. The views of care staff about the taken-for-granted rights which characterize presence and participation in the community domain encourage them to adopt a semi-insulation approach to their work. Staff extend this approach by adopting information control strategies to conceal important information from students. The present author argues that there is a need for on-going research into staff activity in the community domain.

  14. Incidence of Seminoma Cancer in Staffs that Worked in Electromagnetic Waves Station; Three Cases Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshyari, Mohammad; Jafari, Anya; Mostaar, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Physical agents such as ultraviolet or ionizing radiation and repetitive trauma have been related to the causation of cancer in humans. Much less clear is the association between exposure to radiofrequency, such as radar and microwave radiation to the development of cancer. Sporadic case reports and small series suggest that this type of radiation might lead to cancer or contribute to its evolution. The association between radiofrequency and testicular damage and cancer is unproved, but clinical and experimental data are suggestive of such possibility. In this paper we have reported three cases of seminoma in person who worked in the same place that exposed to radio frequency (RF) waves.

  15. Modelling Discrete Choice Variables in Assessment of Teaching Staff Work Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational) in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities. PMID:25849295

  16. Modelling discrete choice variables in assessment of teaching staff work satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieilă, Mihai; Popescu, Constanţa; Tudorache, Ana-Maria; Toplicianu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational) in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities.

  17. Modelling discrete choice variables in assessment of teaching staff work satisfaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Mieilă

    Full Text Available Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities.

  18. An analysis of stress, burnout, and work commitment among disability support staff in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Emmett; Healy, Olive; Lydon, Sinėad

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that challenging behaviour emitted by persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities negatively impacts upon the levels of stress and burnout of those who support and care for them. In the current study a sample of disability support workers in the UK (N=138) reported their levels of perceived stress, burnout, and commitment to their work. The relationship between the frequency and severity of aggressive/destructive behaviours to which they were exposed, and these three measures were examined. Results showed that participants scored lower on measures of burnout in the current study than has been reported by similar research studies in the UK and North America. The results revealed an association between challenging behaviours experienced and participants' perceived stress and emotional exhaustion. Perceived stress and burnout were also associated with participants' commitment to their work. Finally, a series of regression analyses identified a number of predictors of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment among disability support workers. The results and their implications for the consideration of disability support worker wellbeing and future research in this area are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Quality of working life and burnout among nursing staff in Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Denise Rodrigues Costa; Paladini, Márcia; Biato, Cleonice; Pais, Juliana Domingues; Oliveira, Adelaine Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the quality of working life (QWL) and the presence of burnout among nursing professionals working at Intensive Care Units. The sample was composed of 53 nursing professionals from a university hospital located in the city of Londrina-PR, Brazil. Three instruments were used for data collection: socio-demographic and professional characterization, Visual Analogue Scale for QWL and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data was collected from April to August, 2009. Among the participants, most were auxiliary nurses (52.8%), women (66.0%) and married (67.9%). The average age was of 42.4 years. Regarding assessment of QWL, the average score obtained for the total sample was 71.1 (SD=15.5), showing that workers were satisfied with their QWL. The average for Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization and Personal Accomplishment dimensions was 11.4 (SD=7.7), 4.6 (SD=4.1) and 25.0 (SD=5.9), respectively. The QWL for the total sample showed significant association only with Emotional Exhaustion (p=0.000).

  20. Healthy work environments and staff nurse retention: the relationship between communication, collaboration, and leadership in the pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Nancy; Leach, Linda Searle; Robbins, Wendy; Pike, Nancy; Needleman, Jack

    2013-01-01

    A healthy work environment can improve patient outcomes and registered nurse (RN) turnover. Creating cultures of retention and fostering healthy work environments are 2 major challenges facing nurse leaders today. Examine the effects of the healthy work environment (communication, collaboration, and leadership) on RN turnover from data collected from a research study. Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational design. Pediatric critical care RNs from 10 pediatric intensive care units (PICU) completed the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index Revised and a subscale of the Intensive Care Unit Nurse-Physician Communication Questionnaire. These staff nurses were asked whether they intend to leave their current job in the next 6 months. Statistical analysis included correlations, multiple linear regression, t tests (2-tailed), and 1-way analysis of variance. A total of 415 RNs completed the survey. There was a statistically significant relationship between leadership and the intent to leave (P leadership in the PICU is important to PICU RNs and significantly influences their decisions about staying in their current job.

  1. The Relationship between Quality of Work Life, Job Stress, Job Satisfaction and Citizenship Behavior in Oshnaviyeh Hospital’s Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasraie Sh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Organizational Citizenship Behavior (OCB is an important variable in the study of organization management. It is partly hard to build relationships and performance within the organization. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the quality of work life, job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior in Oshnaviyeh Hospital’s staff. Materials and Methods:To collect data, quality of work life by Walton, hospital job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior questionnaires were used. To determine the reliability of the questionnaires. To analyze data, Pearson Correlation Test,T test, Regression, Path analysis were used. Results: The results show that there is a significant positive relationship between the quality of work life, job stress, job satisfaction, and citizenship behavior. The quality of work life is the most important variable among the independent variables since it was able to identify approximately 18% of citizen behavior. Conclusion: Because OCB is completely voluntary, behaviors are more influenced by their interactions and organizational procedures. Hence, it  is  fair to organizations to know how to deal with employees' level of organizational citizenship behavior.

  2. Too Much Sodium PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-07

    This 60 second PSA is based on the February 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Ninety percent of Americans age two and older eat too much sodium which can increase your risk for high blood pressure and often leads to heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death in the US. Learn several small steps you can take to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet.  Created: 2/7/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/7/2012.

  3. E-assessment of prior learning: a pilot study of interactive assessment of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Annika; Andrén, Marianne; Engström, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The current paper presents a pilot study of interactive assessment using information and communication technology (ICT) to evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care. Methods Theoretical and practical assessment methods were developed and used with simulated patients and computer-based tests to identify strengths and areas for personal development among staff with no formal education. Results Of the 157 sta...

  4. E-assessment of prior learning : a pilot study of interactive assessment of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Annika; Andren, Marianne; Engström, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background The current paper presents a pilot study of interactive assessment using information and communication technology (ICT) to evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care. Methods Theoretical and practical assessment methods were developed and used with simulated patients and computer-based tests to identify strengths and areas for personal development among staff with no formal education. Results Of the 157 sta...

  5. Review of UCN 5,6 Fire PSA Model based on ANS Fire PRA Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Joon Eon; Lee, Yoon Hwan

    2006-12-15

    Recently, under the de-regulation environment, nuclear industry has attempted various approaches to improve the economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). This approach uses the fire risk and performance information to manage the resources effectively and efficiently that are used in the operation of NPP. In fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation, fire PSA quality is one of the most important things. The nuclear industry and regulatory body of U.S.A have developed a measure to evaluate the quality of fire PSA. ANS (American Nuclear Society) has developed a guidance called 'ANS Fire PRA Methodology Standard'. However, in Korea, there have been no attempts to evaluate the quality of fire PSA model itself. Therefore, we cannot be sure about the quality of fire PSA whether or not the present fire PSA model can be used for the risk-informed applications such as mentioned above. We can say that the evaluation of fire PSA model quality is the basis for the fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation. In this report, we have evaluated the quality of fire PSA model for Ulchin 5 and 6 units based on the ANS Fire PRA Standard. We, also, have derived what items are to be improved to upgrade the quality of fire PSA model and how it can be improved. This report can be used as the base of the fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation work in Korea.

  6. Work-related factors and violence among nursing staff in the European NEXT study: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camerino, Donatella; Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Conway, Paul Maurice; van Der Heijden, Beatrice Isabella Johanna Maria; Hasselhorn, Hans-Martin

    2008-01-01

    The occurrence of workplace violence is rather frequent within the nursing profession, with well-known consequences on the psychological health of victims. This study is aimed at assessing the relationships between relevant individual, organizational, and psychosocial factors, and the frequency of several types of workplace violence; the direct as well as the interactive impact of violence and psychosocial factors on organizational commitment and perceived health. Questionnaire-based cross-sectional and longitudinal survey designs were employed for the two study objectives, respectively. Five hundred and sixty-five healthcare institutions from eight European countries participated in the Nurses' Early Exit Study. The 34,107 participants were nursing staff holding different qualifications. The response rate was 55.1% in the cross-sectional part and 40.5% in the follow-up phase. At baseline, the respondents were mostly female (89.3%), in the age group 30-44 years (52.9%), registered or specialized nurses (67.0%), working mainly in medico-surgical wards (36.3%), and employed full-time (72.8%). In the cross-sectional analysis, the relationship between the predictor variables and frequency of violence was assessed by means of a hierarchical multiple linear regression. In the longitudinal analysis, main direct and interactive effects of violence and psychosocial factors on perceived health and organizational commitment were assessed by means of hierarchical multiple linear regression analyses with interaction terms. Higher levels of adverse work-related factors were significantly associated with higher frequency of the distinguished types of violence. Significant interactions were found between psychosocial factors and violence only in predicting organizational commitment, even if effect sizes were very low. No interactions were observed for perceived health. The prevalence of the distinguished types of violence varied across the participating countries according to the

  7. The relationship among attributions, emotions, and interpersonal styles of staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Linda J M; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T; Willems, Arno P A M

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have tested Weiner's model, which suggests a relationship among causal attributions regarding challenging behavior (CB), emotions, and helping behavior of staff. No studies have focused on interpersonal styles. The goals of this study were to investigate the influence of type of CB on attributions, emotions and interpersonal style of staff, the relationships among staff attributions, emotions, and interpersonal style, and the mediating function of emotions in the relation between attributions and interpersonal style. Participants were 99 staff members. CB aimed at the environment was related to higher levels of negative emotions, attributions and certain interpersonal styles such as controlling behavior. In addition, a relationship between emotions, attributions, and interpersonal style was found. However, there was no mediating function of emotions in the relationships between attributions and interpersonal style. Future research should take a more dynamic view of staff behavior and staff-client interaction into account. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Impact of Knowledge of Suicide Prevention and Work Experience among Clinical Staff on Attitudes towards Working with Suicidal Patients and Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Inga-Lill; Di Lucca, Maria Anna; Hadlaczky, Gergö

    2016-02-04

    Suicide-preventive training has shown to influence attitudes. This study aimed at investigating what impact other factors than knowledge might have on attitudes towards work with suicidal patients and suicide prevention. In 2007, 500 health-care staff working in a psychiatric clinic in Stockholm received a questionnaire with items concerning work with suicidal patients to which 358 (71.6%) responded. A set of attitude items were tested using structural equation modelling (LISREL). Three models were found to be satisfactory valid and reliable: Job clarity, Job confidence and Attitudes towards prevention. These were then used in regression analyses as dependent variables with predictors such as experience of work with suicidal patients, perceived sufficient training, age and gender. Perceived sufficient training was consistently the most important predictor for all three attitude concepts (p prevention). Age was another significant predictor for Job clarity (p suicide for Job confidence (p suicide preventive education is likely to improve attitudes towards the prevention of suicide, clarity and confidence regarding their role in the care for suicidal patients. These improvements may contribute to the prevention of suicide in health care settings.

  9. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set: A Report from the PsA Workshop at OMERACT 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Elmamoun, Musaab; Tillett, William; Campbell, Willemina; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna D; Goel, Niti; Gossec, Laure; Hoejgaard, Pil; Leung, Ying Ying; Lindsay, Chris; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Shea, Bev; Christensen, Robin; Coates, Laura; Eder, Lihi; McHugh, Neil; Kalyoncu, Umut; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Ogdie, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). At OMERACT 2016, research conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted 24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was endorsed at OMERACT 2016. Next steps for the PsA working group include evaluation of PsA outcome measures and development of a PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set.

  10. Mixed methods evaluation of an interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people who have an acquired physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Sharek, Danika; Nolan, Maeve; Sheerin, Barbara; Flanagan, Paul; Slaicuinaite, Sniguole; Mc Donnell, Sinead; Walsh, Heather

    2012-11-01

    .  To report a study evaluating the effectiveness of a 1-day interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people with acquired physical disability.   Changes associated with an acquired physical disability can diminish a person's self-esteem, sense of attractiveness, relationships, and sexual functioning. Research suggests that people are dissatisfied with the quality of information and support around sexuality during their rehabilitation.   A mixed methods design was used, involving pretest and posttest questionnaires and interviews. Questionnaire data were analysed using descriptive statistics and paired samples t-tests to evaluate the effects of the programme on knowledge, skills, and comfort. Interview data were analyzed thematically, with particular emphasis on participants' opinions about the application of the course within practice. Participants were working in the area of acquired disability and rehabilitation, and were drawn from a number of disciplines. Data were collected between 2008-2009.   Comparison of the pre- and postmeasures, based on paired samples t-tests, showed that the programme statistically significantly increased participants' knowledge, skills, and comfort. Participants felt positive and enthusiastic about the programme and reported numerous incidents where they were more willing to raise issues for discussion and create a supportive listening space for patients to talk about their concerns around sexuality.   Providing healthcare practitioners with a 1-day programme leads to positive changes in knowledge, skills, and comfort towards sexuality. Sexuality education may be an ideal topic for bringing practitioners together within an interdisciplinary education context. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... look at your PSA result and consider your age, ethnicity, medicines you are taking, and other things to ... things when deciding on the next step: Your age If you had a PSA test ... such as ethnicity and family history Men at high risk may ...

  12. A Pilot Investigation into the Efficacy of a Signing Training Strategy for Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane

    2009-01-01

    To contribute to increasing the quality and quantity of communication between staff and adults with intellectual disabilities, training was undertaken to enhance the awareness and knowledge of signing as a method of communication. Multidisciplinary team members, residential and day centre staff were trained to use 20 core signs. Training methods…

  13. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  14. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  15. Decision criteria in PSA applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, J.E.; Pulkkinen, U.; Rosqvist, T.; Simola, K. [VTT Automation (Finland)

    2001-11-01

    Along with the adoption of risk informed decision making principles, the need for formal probabilistic decision rule or criteria has been risen. However, there are many practical and theoretical problems in the application of probabilistic criteria. One has to think what is the proper way to apply probabilistic rules together with deterministic ones and how the criteria are weighted with respect to each other. In this report, we approach the above questions from the decision theoretic point of view. We give a short review of the most well known probabilistic criteria, and discuss examples of their use. We present a decision analytic framework for evaluating the criteria, and we analyse how the different criteria behave under incompleteness or uncertainty of the PSA model. As the conclusion of our analysis we give recommendations on the application of the criteria in different decision situations. (au)

  16. Impact of total PSA, PSA doubling time and PSA velocity on detection rates of 11C-Choline positron emission tomography in recurrent prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybalov, Maxim; Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Leliveld, Anna M.; Pruim, Jan; Dierckx, Rudi A.; de Jong, Igle J.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of total PSA (tPSA) and PSA kinetics on the detection rates of (11)C-Choline PET in patients with biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). METHODS: We included 185 patients with BCR after RP (PSA >0.2 ng/ml)

  17. Testing the variability of PSA expression by different human prostate cancer cell lines by means of a new potentiometric device employing molecularly antibody assembled on graphene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebelo, Tânia S.C.R. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Noronha, João P.; Galésio, Marco; Santos, Hugo; Diniz, Mário [LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Sales, M. Goreti F. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, Maria H. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Costa-Rodrigues, João, E-mail: jrodrigues@fmd.up.pt [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); ESTSP — Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde do Porto, Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal)

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is widely used as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Recently, an electrochemical biosensor for PSA detection by means of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed. This work evaluated the performance and the effectiveness of that PSA biosensor in screening the biomarker PSA in biological media with complex composition, collected from different human prostate cell line cultures. For that, the prostate cancer LNCaP and PC3 cells, and the non-cancerous prostate cell line PNT2 were cultured for 2, 7 and 14 days in either α-MEM or RPMI in the presence of 10% or 30% fetal bovine serum. Human gingival fibroblasts were used as a non-cancerous non-prostatic control. The different culture conditions modulated cellular proliferation and the expression of several prostate markers, including PSA. The electrochemical biosensor was able to specifically detect PSA in the culture media and values obtained were similar to those achieved by a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit, the most commonly used method for PSA quantification in prostate cancer diagnosis. Thus, the tested biosensor may represent a useful alternative as a diagnostic tool for PSA determination in biological samples. - Highlights: • PSA quantification was performed in prostate cancer cell culture media. • Culture media composition and culture period significantly affect PSA production. • The PSA biosensor detected a wide range of PSA levels in complex media. • A high data correlation was observed between the biosensor and the ELISA analysis.

  18. LEVEL OF AWARENESS AND ATTITUDE REGARDING EYE DONATION AMONGST NURSING AND PARAMEDICAL STAFF WORKING IN TERTIARY CARE CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Jenifa

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Corneal diseases constitute significant cause of visual impairment and blindness in the developing countries, it can be prevented through corneal transplantation. There is a large gap between demand and supply of corneal tissue due to lack of awareness about eye donation. Nurses and paramedical staff are potential source that is underutilised as they are in constant touch with the patients and their relatives and can be inspired to pledge their cornea for eye donation. Aim of the study is to assess the level of awareness among the nursing and paramedical staff regarding eye donation. METHODOLOGY A cross-sectional study was carried out to get the information from nursing and paramedical staff. RESULTS Total 66.16% nursing and 33.83% paramedical staff participated. Among the participants about 60% nurses and 68% paramedics did not know about any existing eye bank in Bhopal. Only 69% of nurses and 13.43% paramedical staff knew that eyes can be removed within 6 hours of death for effective use, 59.54% nurses knew that cornea is used for grafting, but among paramedical staff only 13.43% showed any awareness about the subject. Only 24.42% nurses and 13.43% paramedical staff had good knowledge about eye donation. Total 65% were not willing to donate their own eyes. CONCLUSION Result of this study indicates that there is lack of awareness and poor attitude related to eye donation amongst nurses and paramedical staff. This also indicates a high level of ignorance about eye donation in society in general.

  19. Multiparametric MRI in the PSA Screening Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvin K. George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer remains significant public health concern amid growing controversies regarding prostate specific antigen (PSA based screening. The utility of PSA has been brought into question, and alternative measures are investigated to remedy the overdetection of indolent disease and safeguard patients from the potential harms resulting from an elevated PSA. Multiparametric MRI of the prostate has shown promise in identifying patients at risk for clinically significant disease but its role within the current diagnostic and treatment paradigm remains in question. The current review focuses on recent applications of MRI in this pathway.

  20. The Occupational Well-Being of School Staff and Maintenance of Their Ability to Work in Finland and Estonia--Focus on the School Community and Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaranen, Terhi; Sormunen, Marjorita; Pertel, Tiia; Streimann, Karin; Hansen, Siivi; Varava, Liana; Lepp, Kadi; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the baseline results of a research and development project targeted to improve the occupational well-being of school staff and maintain their ability to work, in Finland and Estonia. It reveals the most problematic factors in the various aspects of the school community and professional competence and outlines…

  1. Extrinsic High-Effort and Low-Reward Conditions at Work among Institutional Staff Caring for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Nan; Lin, Jin-Ding; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Ling; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to determine whether extrinsic high-effort/low-reward conditions at work are associated with personal characteristics and the organizational environments. A cross-sectional survey was conducted (76.7% response rate, N = 1243) by recruiting the staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities of Taiwan…

  2. Attitudes of Academic Staff towards Their Own Work and towards External Evaluation, from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory: Estonian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema, Riin; Udam, Maiki; Mattisen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the attitudes of academic staff towards their own work as well as towards external evaluations. The study was based on (1) an analysis of assessment reports of institutional accreditations conducted by the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education and (2) self-determination theory on…

  3. An Analysis of the Relationship between the Organizational Culture and the Performance of Staff Work Groups in Schools and the Development of an Explanatory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Chris; Connolly, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the concept of organizational culture and the relationship between the organizational culture and the performance of staff work groups in schools. The article draws upon a study of 12 schools in Wales, UK, which despite being in disadvantaged settings have high levels of pupil attainment. A model is developed linking the…

  4. The Meaning of Recovery from Co-Occurring Disorder: Views from Consumers and Staff Members Living and Working in Housing First Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dennis P; Rollins, Angela L

    2015-10-01

    The current study seeks to understand the concept of recovery from the perspectives of consumers and staff living and working in a supportive housing model designed to serve those with co-occurring disorder. Interview and focus group data were collected from consumers and staff from four housing programs. Data analyzed using an approach that combined case study and grounded theory methodologies demonstrate that: consumers' and staff members' views of recovery were highly compatible and resistant to abstinence-based definitions of recovery; recovery is personal; stability is a foundation for recovery; recovery is a process; and the recovery process is not linear. These themes are more consistent with mental health-focused conceptions of recovery than those traditionally used within the substance abuse field, and they help demonstrate how recovery can be influenced by the organization of services in which consumers are embedded.

  5. Stress as a mediator between work-family conflict and psychological health among the nursing staff: Moderating role of emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Dhar, Rajib Lochan; Tyagi, Akansha

    2016-05-01

    The study examined the extent to which work-family conflicts cause stress among nursing staff and its subsequent impact on their psychological health. It also examined if the emotional intelligence level of the nursing staff acted as a moderator between their level of stress and psychological health. A survey was carried out on 693 nursing staff associated with 33 healthcare institutions in Uttarakhand, India. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was carried out to understand the relationships shared by independent (work-family conflicts) and dependent (psychological health) constructs with the mediator (stress) as well as the moderator (emotional intelligence). The results revealed that stress acted as a mediator between work-family conflict of the nursing staff and their psychological health. However, their emotional intelligence level acted as a moderator between their stress level and psychological health. To conclude, the crucial roles of emotional intelligence in controlling the impact of stress on psychological health along with the practical as well as theoretical implications are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors prompting PSA-testing of asymptomatic men in a country with no guidelines: a national survey of general practitioners.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Drummond, Frances J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased use of prostate specific antigen (PSA) has been associated with increased prostate cancer incidence. Ireland is estimated to have one of the highest prostate cancer incidences in Europe and has no national guidelines for prostate cancer screening. GPs have a pivotal role in influencing PSA testing, therefore, our aim was to describe GP testing practices and to identify factors influencing these. METHODS: A postal survey, including questions on clinical practice and experience, knowledge and demographics was distributed to all GPs (n = 3,683). The main outcomes were (i) PSA testing asymptomatic men and (ii) "inappropriate" PSA testing, defined as testing asymptomatic men aged < 50 or > 75 years. Factors associated with these outcomes were identified using logistic regression. RESULTS: 1,625 GPs responded (response rate corrected for eligibility = 53%). Most respondents (79%) would PSA test asymptomatic men. Of these, 34% and 51% would test asymptomatic men < 50 and > 75 years, respectively. In multivariate analyses, GPs were more likely to test asymptomatic men if they were >or= 50 years, in practice >or= 10 years, female or less knowledgeable about PSA efficacy. Male GPs who would have a PSA test themselves were > 8-times more likely to PSA test asymptomatic men than GPs who would not have a test. GPs who had an asymptomatic patient diagnosed with prostate cancer following PSA testing, were > 3-times more likely to test asymptomatic men. Practice-related factors positively associated with testing included: running \\'well man\\' clinics, performing occupational health checks and performing other tests routinely with PSA. Factors positively associated with \\'inappropriate\\' testing included; being male and willing to have a PSA test, having worked\\/trained in the UK and supporting annual PSA testing. 91% of respondents supported the development of national PSA testing guidelines. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that widespread PSA testing

  7. A Multi-Center Study of [−2]Pro-Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) in Combination with PSA and Free PSA for Prostate Cancer Detection in the 2.0 to 10.0 ng/mL PSA Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalona, William J.; Partin, Alan W.; Sanda, Martin G.; Wei, John T.; Klee, George G.; Bangma, Chris H.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; Loeb, Stacy; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Roberts, William L.; van Schaik, Ron H.N.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose PSA and free PSA (fPSA) have limited specificity for detecting clinically significant, curable prostate cancer (PCa), leading to unnecessary biopsies and detection and treatment of some indolent tumors. [−2]proPSA (p2PSA) may improve specificity for detecting clinically significant PCa. Our objective was to evaluate p2PSA, fPSA, and PSA in a mathematical formula (prostate health index [phi] = [−2]proPSA / fPSA) × PSA1/2) to enhance specificity for detecting overall and high-grade PCa. Materials and Methods We enrolled 892 men in a prospective multi-institutional trial with no history of PCa, normal rectal examination, a PSA of 2–10 ng/mL, and ≥6- core prostate biopsy. We examined the relationship of serum PSA, %fPSA and phi with biopsy results. The primary endpoints were the specificity and AUC using phi to detect overall and Gleason ≥7 prostate cancer on biopsy compared with %fPSA. Results For the 2–10 ng/mL PSA range, at 80–95% sensitivity, the specificity and AUC (0.703) of phi exceeded those of PSA and %fPSA. Increasing phi was associated with a 4.7-fold increased risk of PCa and 1.61-fold increased risk of Gleason ≥7 disease on biopsy. The AUC for phi (0.724) exceeded that of %fPSA (0.670) in discriminating between PCa with Gleason ≥ 4+3 vs. lower grade disease or negative biopsies. Phi results were not associated with age and prostate volume. Conclusions Phi may be useful in PCa screening to reduce unnecessary biopsies in men age ≥50 years with PSA 2–10 ng/mL and negative DRE, with minimal loss in sensitivity. PMID:21419439

  8. Training community practitioners to work more effectively with parents to prevent childhood obesity: the impact of HENRY upon Children's Centres and their staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, T A; Potrata, B; Hunt, C; Rudolf, M C J

    2012-10-01

    One in four children in England is overweight/obese upon starting school. HENRY (Health Exercise Nutrition for the Really Young) offers a novel, preventive approach to this problem by training practitioners to work more effectively with the parents of preschool children around obesity and lifestyle issues. The programme is being delivered to all Sure Start Children's Centres (the UK government initiative providing family support and childcare in disadvantaged areas) in Leeds, UK. The evaluation covered the first 12 Centres to be trained (these had a reach of approximately 5000 families). A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with Centre managers, and 'drop boxes' were provided for all staff to leave their comments. Interviews took place up to 11 months post-training, allowing a consideration of any long-term impact. Data from 12 interviews and 106 comment slips indicated that HENRY training was associated with considerable changes to the Centre environment. Immediate effects included changes to Centre policy and practice, including the provision of age-appropriate portion sizes and the introduction of healthy snacks; a strengthening of team working and increased staff confidence around tackling lifestyle change; and enhanced skills when working with families. Training also induced changes within the staff's personal lives (e.g. increased physical activity and family mealtimes). The findings suggest that positive and lasting lifestyle effects can be achieved by brief training courses involving Children's Centre staff teams. Both staff and attendant families appear to benefit. The effect on levels of preschool obesity across the city once HENRY has extended to the remaining Centres is yet to be seen. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2012 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  9. The relationship among attributions, emotions, and interpersonal styles of staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Willems, A.P.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have tested Weiner's model, which suggests a relationship among causal attributions regarding challenging behavior (CB), emotions, and helping behavior of staff. No studies have focused on interpersonal styles. The goals of this study were to investigate the influence of type of CB

  10. Factorial Validity and Consistency of the Maslach Burnout Inventory among Staff Working with Persons with Intellectual Disability and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, S. F.; McCallion, P.; Nickle, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Burnout has been considered important to understanding the well-being of workers in the intellectual disabilities (ID) field and the quality of services delivered to clients/consumers. However, little research has examined the psychometric properties and applicability to staff in ID services of one of the most widely used burnout…

  11. Impact of Training on Cognitive Representation of Challenging Behaviour in Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Martin; Hogg, James

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cognitive representations of challenging behaviour among staff may influence therapeutic outcomes. This study looked at how cognitive dimensions of Identity, Cause, Consequences, Emotional Reaction and Treatment/Control are affected by training. Materials and Methods: A theoretically derived questionnaire was used to measure the impact…

  12. The Relationship among Attributions, Emotions, and Interpersonal Styles of Staff Working with Clients with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Linda J. M.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Willems, Arno P. A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have tested Weiner's model, which suggests a relationship among causal attributions regarding challenging behavior (CB), emotions, and helping behavior of staff. No studies have focused on interpersonal styles. The goals of this study were to investigate the influence of type of CB on attributions, emotions and interpersonal style…

  13. A profile of perceived stress factors among nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, Maria; Erwee, Danelle; Serfontein, Isabel; Visser, Maré; Calitz, Frikkie J W; Joubert, Gina

    2017-03-16

    Nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients experience unique stress factors that can influence their personal well-being and work performance. To compile a profile of stress factors experienced by nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC). This descriptive study included 89 nursing staff members from this environment. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic information and determine personal and occupational stressors. The data were summarised by frequencies and percentages (categorical variables) and means or percentiles (numerical variables). Most participants were aged between 46 and 55 (41.2%), female (93.2%) and black (93.2%), and 76.7% had children or dependant minors. The main stressors among participants were pressure providing financially for their children and dependant minors (71.2%), caring for them (39.4%) and fearing them moving away (25.8%). Occupational stressors included high workload (66.3%), lack of decision-making by superiors (58.1%), underpayment (53.5%), endangerment of physical health (52.3%) and safety (50.0%), working hours (51.2%), pressure of expectations from superiors (48.8%), uncertainty of employment (48.8%), work responsibilities (47.7%) and perceiving that skills and training were not appreciated. They experienced stress regarding health issues such as hyper- and hypotension (35.3%). Because of stress 34.5% of participants took leave, 34.5% developed depression and 14.3% had panic attacks. Most of the respondents experienced personal and occupational stress that influenced their health, which poses serious challenges for the management of the FSPC. Security should be upgraded, medical and psychological support for the staff and care facilities for their dependants should be provided, and financial problems experienced by these staff members should be addressed. The workload of the nursing staff at FSPC needs urgent attention. This

  14. A profile of perceived stress factors among nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conradie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients experience unique stress factors that can influence their personal well-being and work performance. Objectives: To compile a profile of stress factors experienced by nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC. Methods: This descriptive study included 89 nursing staff members from this environment. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic information and determine personal and occupational stressors. The data were summarised by frequencies and percentages (categorical variables and means or percentiles (numerical variables. Results: Most participants were aged between 46 and 55 (41.2%, female (93.2% and black (93.2%, and 76.7% had children or dependant minors. The main stressors among participants were pressure providing financially for their children and dependant minors (71.2%, caring for them (39.4% and fearing them moving away (25.8%. Occupational stressors included high workload (66.3%, lack of decision-making by superiors (58.1%, underpayment (53.5%, endangerment of physical health (52.3% and safety (50.0%, working hours (51.2%, pressure of expectations from superiors (48.8%, uncertainty of employment (48.8%, work responsibilities (47.7% and perceiving that skills and training were not appreciated. They experienced stress regarding health issues such as hyper- and hypotension (35.3%. Because of stress 34.5% of participants took leave, 34.5% developed depression and 14.3% had panic attacks. Conclusion: Most of the respondents experienced personal and occupational stress that influenced their health, which poses serious challenges for the management of the FSPC. Security should be upgraded, medical and psychological support for the staff and care facilities for their dependants should be provided, and financial problems experienced by these staff members should be addressed. The workload of

  15. [Total PSA, PSA density and biopsy Gleason score in predicting the pathologic stage of prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Lü, Jia-ju; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Hui; Gao, De-xuan; Liu, Zheng

    2010-05-01

    To evaluate the roles of total prostate specific antigen (tPSA), PSA density (PSAD) and biopsy Gleason score in predicting the pathologic stage of prostate cancer. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 124 cases of pathologically confirmed prostate adenocarcinoma, and divided them into Groups A (n=48) and B (n=76) based on the results of bone scanning, CT, MRI, tPSA, PSAD and postoperative biopsy Gleason score, the former with extraprostatic infiltration or distant metastasis, while the latter without. We compared the above parameters between the two groups, screened the main factors that influenced the pathologic staging of prostate cancer by multivariate logistic regression analysis, and appraised the value of each of the parameters in predicting the pathologic stage of prostate cancer with a relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The tPSA level and biopsy Gleason score were significantly higher in Group A than in B (P Gleason score had a better predicting value than other parameters (Gleason score + tPSA > tPSA > PSAD + tPSA + Gleason score). Total PSA remains a valuable predictor of the pathologic stage of prostate cancer, and its combination with Gleason score can further improve the predictive accuracy and contribute much to the treatment and prognosis of the disease.

  16. the discriminative ability of percent free psa in patients with psa > 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathology revealed by sextant biopsy under transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guidance using a 7.5 MHz probe (Panther®, B & K, Denmark). Indications for biopsy were: a PSA > 4 ng/ ml, a suspicious prostatic nodule on digital rectal examination (DRE) and a hypoechoic area on. TRUS. Total and free PSA were assessed us-.

  17. The effect on the sensitivities of PSA and PSA-age volume score of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    O. Üçer

    2017-04-27

    Apr 27, 2017 ... Conclusions: All our data shows that if we remove most of the factors which effect PSA such as age, prostate volume, prostatitis and BPH, we may increase the sensitivity of PSA for predicting positive prostate biopsy. ... Peer review under responsibility of Pan African Urological Surgeons' Association.

  18. The age-specific reference intervals for tPSA, fPSA, and %fPSA in healthy Han ethnic male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjing; Tang, Aiguo; Zhang, Shijie; Sun, Xiaoxu; Ming, Liang

    2017-07-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) is one of the most common malignancies in male, and has become the fastest growing malignancy in recent years. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) is widely used as a tumor marker to screen for PC. Many studies have been performed to define the reference intervals (RIs) for total circulating PSA (tPSA). The results were different among different nations and races, even in the same race. Few researches have been performed on the RIs of free PSA (fPSA) and the ratio of free to total PSA (%fPSA). In this study, we aimed to simultaneously determine the age-specific RIs for tPSA, fPSA, and %fPSA in the healthy Han ethnic male. A total of 1862 apparently healthy male aged from 21 to 94 years were included in our study. Nonparametric 95th percentile intervals were used to define the RIs. The reference limits in different age groups (21-50, 51-60, 61-70, 71-80, and ≥81 years) were 2.07, 3.59, 4.93, 6.83, and 7.73 ng/mL for tPSA, and 0.60, 0.76, 0.83, 1.30, and 2.41 ng/mL for fPSA. The RIs of %fPSA were ≥0.16 for 21-50 years and ≥0.13 for male over 50 years old. We established age-specific RIs for tPSA, fPSA and %fPSA. The newly established RIs should be more suitable for Chinese Han ethnic male. It will be valuable for physicians to make exact medical decision and appropriate medical intervention. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Does feeling respected influence return to work? Cross-sectional study on sick-listed patients' experiences of encounters with social insurance office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynöe, Niels; Wessel, Maja; Olsson, Daniel; Alexanderson, Kristina; Helgesson, Gert

    2013-03-23

    Previous research shows that how patients perceive encounters with healthcare staff may affect their health and self-estimated ability to return to work. The aim of the present study was to explore long-term sick-listed patients' encounters with social insurance office staff and the impact of these encounters on self-estimated ability to return to work. A random sample of long-term sick-listed patients (n = 10,042) received a questionnaire containing questions about their experiences of positive and negative encounters and item lists specifying such experiences. Respondents were also asked whether the encounters made them feel respected or wronged and how they estimated the effect of these encounters on their ability to return to work. Statistical analysis was conducted using 95% confidence intervals (CI) for proportions, and attributable risk (AR) with 95% CI. The response rate was 58%. Encounter items strongly associated with feeling respected were, among others: listened to me, believed me, and answered my questions. Encounter items strongly associated with feeling wronged were, among others: did not believe me, doubted my condition, and questioned my motivation to work. Positive encounters facilitated patients' self-estimated ability to return to work [26.9% (CI: 22.1-31.7)]. This effect was significantly increased if the patients also felt respected [49.3% (CI: 47.5-51.1)]. Negative encounters impeded self-estimated ability to return to work [29.1% (CI: 24.6-33.6)]; when also feeling wronged return to work was significantly further impeded [51.3% (CI: 47.1-55.5)]. Long-term sick-listed patients find that their self-reported ability to return to work is affected by positive and negative encounters with social insurance office staff. This effect is further enhanced by feeling respected or wronged, respectively.

  20. Does feeling respected influence return to work? Cross-sectional study on sick-listed patients’ experiences of encounters with social insurance office staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous research shows that how patients perceive encounters with healthcare staff may affect their health and self-estimated ability to return to work. The aim of the present study was to explore long-term sick-listed patients’ encounters with social insurance office staff and the impact of these encounters on self-estimated ability to return to work. Methods A random sample of long-term sick-listed patients (n = 10,042) received a questionnaire containing questions about their experiences of positive and negative encounters and item lists specifying such experiences. Respondents were also asked whether the encounters made them feel respected or wronged and how they estimated the effect of these encounters on their ability to return to work. Statistical analysis was conducted using 95% confidence intervals (CI) for proportions, and attributable risk (AR) with 95% CI. Results The response rate was 58%. Encounter items strongly associated with feeling respected were, among others: listened to me, believed me, and answered my questions. Encounter items strongly associated with feeling wronged were, among others: did not believe me, doubted my condition, and questioned my motivation to work. Positive encounters facilitated patients’ self-estimated ability to return to work [26.9% (CI: 22.1-31.7)]. This effect was significantly increased if the patients also felt respected [49.3% (CI: 47.5-51.1)]. Negative encounters impeded self-estimated ability to return to work [29.1% (CI: 24.6-33.6)]; when also feeling wronged return to work was significantly further impeded [51.3% (CI: 47.1-55.5)]. Conclusions Long-term sick-listed patients find that their self-reported ability to return to work is affected by positive and negative encounters with social insurance office staff. This effect is further enhanced by feeling respected or wronged, respectively. PMID:23522034

  1. Patient and work flow and costs associated with staff time and facility usage at a comprehensive cancer centre in Quebec, Canada – a time and motion study

    OpenAIRE

    Shinder Gayle A; Paradis Pierre; Posman Marianne; Mishagina Natalia; Guay Marie-Pascale; Linardos Dina; Batist Gerald

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Mapping patient and work flow and cost analysis studies can help determine the most efficient and cost effective way of providing health services while still maintaining the best standards of care. This study used both time and motion methodology and hospital data to assess the contribution of staff time and facility usage to the overall cost of cancer care during patient visits to a comprehensive cancer centre in Quebec, using metastatic colorectal cancer as a model. Meth...

  2. Job demand-control and job stress at work: A cross-sectional study among prison staff

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari, Jafar; Akbari, Rouhollah; Shakerian, Mahnaz; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Job stress can impose significant costs to the workplaces and organizations due to some issues such as absenteeism, less productivity, and medical costs. Job overload and lack of decision latitude can lead to job stress. The current study aimed to investigate the job demands and control as predictor of job stress and its relationship, with some of the demographic characteristics of Iranian prison staff. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 171 male employees workin...

  3. Organizational Leaders’ and Staff Members’ Appraisals of Their Work Environment Within a Children’s Social Service System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David A.; Dulmus, Catherine; Maguin, Eugene; Keesler, John; Powell, Byron

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the effect of an organization’s culture and climate on the delivery of services to clients and the success of clinical outcomes. Workers’ perceptions are integral components of organizational social context, and in order to create a positive organizational culture and climate, managers and frontline staff need to have a shared understanding of the social context. The existing literature does not adequately address that discrepancies in perceptions of culture and climate between frontline staff and managers impact the implementation of policies and services. The purpose of this study is to compare the workgroup-level culture and climate of a single, large child and family social services organization, based on the reported experiences of front-line workers and senior managers. The results showed that, as a group, senior managers rated the organization as having a culture that was much more proficient and much less rigid and a climate that was more engaged and more functional than the average frontline workgroup. The discrepancies between the perceptions of upper management and workgroup-level staff indicate the need for interventions that can improve communication and cohesiveness between these two groups. PMID:25101308

  4. Situational leadership styles, staff nurse job characteristics related to job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaraprasong, Bhusita; Potjanasitt, Sureporn; Pattaraarchachai, Junya; Meennuch, Chavalit

    2012-06-01

    To analyze the relationships between the situational leadership styles, staff nurse job characteristic with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army The cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 128 head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army. Data were collected by mailed questionnaires. A total of 117 completed questionnaires (91.4%) were received for analysis. Statistical analysis was done using Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. It was found that situational leadership styles were not correlated with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses. Staff nurse job characteristics had a low level of positive correlation with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses at 0.05 level of significance (r = 0.202 and 0.189 respectively). The hospital administrators should formulate policy to improve working system, human resource management and formulate policies and strategies based on situational leadership. In addition, they should improve the characteristics of staff nurse job by using surveys to obtain job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

  5. Explaining the Relationship between Empowerment and Work Life Quality: A Case Study on the Staff of Social Security Hospital of Zahedan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanyar Sheikhepoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of work life has an important role in increasing labor productivity and consequently the efficiency and effectiveness of large organizations. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between empowerment (as the independent variables and the quality of work life of employees (as the dependent variable. Method:This study was conducted in a descriptive correlated manner; the population consisted of the Zahedan city hospital’s nursing staff (n=132 selected using accessible sampling methods. They filled out the empowerment and quality of work life questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaires was confirmed through Cronbach’s alpha; furthermore, the questionnaires were prepared with a high content validity and construct validity. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression test. Results: The results showed that empowerment and its factors (sense of independence, sense of effectiveness, feeling of being meaningful and trusted among colleagues at 99% confidence level and feeling of competence at 95% confidence level had a significant positive correlation with the quality of their working life. Second, empowerment factors predicted 29% of the variance in employees’ quality of work life. Conclusion: Considering the obtained results, it is recommended that to empower their employees more than ever, the managers try more to promote them, have more skillful staff, and help employees experience working life quality .

  6. Construction of a Scale-Questionnaire on the Attitude of the Teaching Staff as Opposed to the Educative Innovation by Means of Techniques of Cooperative Work (CAPIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Andrés Traver Martí

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the construction process of a scale-questionnaire is described to measure the attitude of the teaching staff as opposed to the educational innovation by means of techniques of cooperative work (CAPIC.  In order to carry out its design and elaboration we need on the one hand a model of analysis of the attitudes and an instrument of measurement of the same ones capable of guiding its practical dynamics.  The Theory of the Reasoned Action of Fisbhein and Ajzen (1975, 1980 and the summative scales (Likert have fulfilled, in both cases, this paper.

  7. Psychological Well-Being, Spirituality at Work, and Self-Reported Health by Faculty and Staff from Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Ureña Bonilla, Pedro; Barrantes Brais, Kristy; Solís Bastos, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine and describe the relationship between psychological well-being, spirituality at work, and self-reported health by faculty and staff from Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica. Participants included 397 women and 258 men (n = 655). Data was collected using psychological well-being and spirituality at work scales and a self-reported health questionnaire.  High values were found in the purpose in life (6.08±1.08), self acceptance (5.96 ± 1.06), social func...

  8. Shift Work and Related Health Problems among Medical and Diagnostic Staff of the General Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sajjadnia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Today, shift work is considered as a necessity in many jobs and for some 24-hour services the use of shift-work is growing. However, shift work can lead to physiological and psycho-social problems for shift workers. This study aimed to determine the effects of shift work on the associated health problems, together with the demographic and job characteristics underlying the problems, among the medical and diagnostic staff of the general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Method:This study was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical one. The study employed a sample of 205 employees from the medical and diagnostic staff using stratified sampling proportional to the size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using the Survey of Shift workers (SOS questionnaire, validity and reliability of which have already been confirmed. Finally, the collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 software through ANOVA, Chi-square, Independent-Samples T-Test, as well as Pearson Correlation Coefficient. A P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed that among the demographic and job characteristics studied, the individual, family and social problems had significant associations with work schedules, shift work and job satisfaction. In addition, there were significant associations between musculoskeletal disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; cardiovascular disorders and marital status and occupation; digestive disorders and the work schedules; sleep disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular disorders and sleep disorders and age, job experience and shift work experience. And finally, there were significant associations among sleep disorders and age, job experience and the shift work experience. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, demographic characteristics such as age, marital

  9. The independence of international civil servants during the neoliberal decades: implications of the work stoppage involving 700 staff of the World Health Organization in November 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The independence of international civil servants is critical to the fulfillment of their organizations' mandates, but it has been seriously undermined during 25 years of neoliberal influence in U.N. agencies, including the World Health Organization. In November 2005, 700 staff at WHO headquarters participated in a one-hour work stoppage--the first industrial action in the organization's history. Hierarchical and arbitrary management, abuse of rules and procedures, nepotism and harassment, and undue influence of international financial institutions, powerful member states, and transnational corporations have exhausted morale and motivation, creating a conformist environment and interfering with technical health work. In the neoliberal era, WHO staff confront conflicting duties of loyalty to a handful of member states and their private interests and loyalty to WHO's constitutional mandate. International civil servants need support from governing bodies and from the world's people in finding the correct balance. A first essential step would be respect for international labor standards within the U.N. family and, in particular, negotiation status and collective bargaining--human rights in the workplace and prerequisites for staff independence, integrity, and competence, qualities required to serve the world's people.

  10. Does organizational climate impact upon burnout in staff who work with people with intellectual disabilities? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Lauren; Rose, John

    2011-09-01

    Staff stress and burnout is a prominent area of research in relation to services for people with intellectual disabilities. The aim of this article is to review the literature in relation to organizational climate in order to investigate whether there is a relationship between organizational variables and staff burnout. A systematic literature search yielded 21 articles which fell into two categories. Earlier studies tended to focus on deinstitutionalization, whereas later studies appeared to be influenced by work-stress theories, including 'person-environment fit' and demand control. Overall, it was found that an organizational climate that has a better 'person-environment' fit promotes greater job satisfaction and reduced burnout. Future research could focus upon the social or therapeutic aspects of the environment within services for people with intellectual disabilities to address an area of research which appears to have been overlooked.

  11. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of An Aged Care Specific Leadership and Management Program to Improve Work Environment, Staff Turnover, and Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Li, Zhicheng; Cunich, Michelle M; Thomas, Tamsin H; Chenoweth, Lynn; Kendig, Hal L

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership and management program in aged care. Double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial. Twelve residential and community-aged care sites in Australia. All care staff employed for 6 months or longer at the aged care sites were invited to participate in the surveys at 3 time points: baseline (time 1), 9 months from baseline (time 2), and 9 months after completion of time 2 (time 3) from 2011 to 2013. At each time point, at least 500 care staff completed a survey. At baseline (N = 503) the largest age group was 45 to 54 years (37%), and the majority of care staff were born in Australia (70%), spoke English (94%), and had at least completed secondary education (57%). A 12-month Clinical Leadership in Aged Care (CLiAC) program for middle managers, which aimed to further develop their leadership and management skills in creating positive workplace relationships and in enabling person-centered, evidence-based care. The primary outcomes were care staff ratings of the work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes were care staff's intention to leave their employer and profession, workplace stress, job satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of implementing the program. Absenteeism was excluded due to difficulty in obtaining reliable data. Managers' self-rated knowledge and skills in leadership and management are not included in this article, which focuses on care staff perceptions only. At 6 months after its completion, the CLiAC program was effective in improving care staff's perception of management support [mean difference 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-1.18; P = .04]. Compared with the control sites, care staff at the intervention sites perceived their managers' leadership styles as more transformational (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.51; P = .005), transactional (mean difference 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.39; P = .01), and less passive avoidant (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0

  12. Does transfer of work from a public sector organisation to a commercial enterprise without staff reductions increase risk of long-term sickness absence among the staff? A cohort study of laboratory and radiology employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinen, Lauri; Virtanen, Marianna; Pentti, Jaana; Vahtera, Jussi; Kivimäki, Mika

    2013-08-01

    Privatisations of public sector organisations are not uncommon, and some studies suggest that such organisational changes may adversely affect employee health. In this study, we examined whether transfer of work from public sector hospital units to commercial enterprises, without major staff reductions, was associated with an increased risk of long-term sickness absence among employees. A cohort study of 962 employees from four public hospital laboratory and radiology units in three hospitals which were privatised during the follow-up and 1832 employees from similar units without such organisational changes. Records of new long-term sick leaves (>90 days) were obtained from national health registers and were linked to the data. Mean follow-up was 9.2 years. Age- and sex-adjusted HR for long-term sickness absence after privatisation was 0.83 (95% CI 0.68 to 1.00) among employees whose work unit underwent a change from a public organisation to a commercial enterprise compared with employees in unchanged work units. Further adjustments for occupation, socioeconomic status, type of job contract, size of residence and sick leaves before privatisation had little impact on the observed association. A sensitivity analysis with harmonised occupations across the two groups replicated the finding (multivariable adjusted HR 0.92 (0.70-1.20)). In this study, transfer of work from public organisation to commercial enterprise did not increase the risk of long-term sickness absence among employees.

  13. Effectiveness of team nursing compared with total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allana; Long, Lesley; Lisy, Karolina

    2015-11-01

    The organization of the work of nurses, according to recognized models of care, can have a significant impact on the wellbeing and performance of nurses and nursing teams. This review focuses on two models of nursing care delivery, namely, team and total patient care, and their effect on nurses' wellbeing. To examine the effectiveness of team nursing compared to total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards. Participants were nurses working on wards in acute care hospitals.The intervention was the use of a team nursing model when organizing nursing work. The comparator was the use of a total patient care model.This review considered quantitative study designs for inclusion in the review.The outcome of interest was staff wellbeing which was measured by staff outcomes in relation to job satisfaction, turnover, absenteeism, stress levels and burnout. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies from 1995 to April 21, 2014. Quantitative papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute. The data extracted included specific details about the interventions, populations, study methods and outcomes of significance to the review question and its specific objectives. Due to the heterogeneity of the included quantitative studies, meta-analysis was not possible. Results have been presented in a narrative form. The database search returned 10,067 records. Forty-three full text titles were assessed, and of these 40 were excluded, resulting in three studies being included in the review. Two of the studies were quasi experimental designs and the other was considered an uncontrolled before and after experimental study

  14. Utilisation of strategic communication to create willingness to change work practices among primary care staff: a long-term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena; Fridlund, Bengt; Marklund, Bertil; Palm, Lars; Baigi, Amir

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the long-term utilisation of strategic communication as a factor of importance when changing work practices among primary care staff. In many health care organisations, there is a gap between theory and practice. This gap hinders the provision of optimal evidence-based practice and, in the long term, is unfavourable for patient care. One way of overcoming this barrier is systematically structured communication between the scientific theoretical platform and clinical practice. This longitudinal evaluative study was conducted among a primary care staff cohort. Strategic communication was considered to be the intervention platform and included a network of ambassadors who acted as a component of the implementation. Measurements occurred 7 and 12 years after formation of the cohort. A questionnaire was used to obtain information from participants. In total, 846 employees (70%) agreed to take part in the study. After 12 years, the 352 individuals (60%) who had remained in the organisation were identified and followed up. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis were used to analyse the data. Continuous information contributed to significant improvements over time with respect to new ideas and the intention to change work practices. There was a statistically significant synergistic effect on the new way of thinking, that is, willingness to change work practices. During the final two years, the network of ambassadors had created a distinctive image for itself in the sense that primary care staff members were aware of it and its activities. This awareness was associated with a positive change with regard to new ways of thinking. More years of practice was inversely associated with willingness to change work practices. Strategic communication may lead to a scientific platform that promotes high-quality patient care by means of new methods and research findings.

  15. Seminal plasma PSA in spinal cord injured men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Sønksen, J; Sommer, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration.......The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration....

  16. STD Awareness PSA - College 2 (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-22

    This PSA, targeted to college-aged youth and young adults, encourages listeners to get tested for STDs.  Created: 4/22/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/22/2010.

  17. STD Awareness PSA - College 1 (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-22

    This PSA, targeted to college-aged youth and young adults, encourages listeners to get tested for STDs.  Created: 4/22/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/22/2010.

  18. STD Awareness PSA - Male Announcer 2 (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-22

    This PSA encourages listeners to get tested for STDs. Target - Men who have sex with other men.  Created: 4/22/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/22/2010.

  19. Screen for Life: Meryl Streep PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-16

    In this 30 second PSA, Academy Award®-winning actress Meryl Streep urges viewers to get screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 5/16/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/16/2013.

  20. Screen for Life: Meryl Streep PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-16

    In this 60 second PSA, Academy Award®-winning actress Meryl Streep urges viewers to get screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 5/16/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/16/2013.

  1. Secundaire analyses organisatiebeleid psychosociale arbeidsbelasting (PSA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, K.O.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2016-01-01

    Hoe het organisatiebeleid rond psychosociale arbeidsbelasting (PSA) eruit ziet anno 2014 en welke samenhang er is met ander beleid en uitkomstmaten, zijn de centrale vragen in dit onderzoek. De resultaten van deze verdiepende analyses kunnen ten goede komen aan de lopende campagne ‘Check je

  2. Interoperability in the Planetary Science Archive (PSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Diaz, C.

    2017-09-01

    The protocols and standards currently being supported by the recently released new version of the Planetary Science Archive at this time are the Planetary Data Access Protocol (PDAP), the EuroPlanet- Table Access Protocol (EPN-TAP) and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. We explore these protocols in more detail providing scientifically useful examples of their usage within the PSA.

  3. Person--job match among frontline staff working in residential treatment centers: the impact of personality and child psychopathology on burnout experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Scott C; Visscher, Linn; Sugimura, Niwako; Lakin, Brittany L

    2008-04-01

    Prior research has shown that the personality variables extraversion and neuroticism predict burnout among frontline staff working in residential treatment centers. This study tested the hypothesis that the effect of personality on burnout would be moderated by the psychiatric characteristics of the youth served on the milieu. Two hundred and three frontline staff working in 21 residential treatment centers in Illinois serving troubled youth completed surveys regarding opinions about their jobs, the Big Five Inventory (BFI), a youth presenting problems scale for the entire milieu, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). Results indicated that the effect of neuroticism on burnout is moderated by psychosis and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); high and moderate milieu ratings of psychosis and PTSD showed a positive relationship between neurosis and burnout, while low ratings of these conditions showed no relationship. These findings suggest that the optimal work setting is a function of the interaction between specific personality characteristics and specific work environments, with implications for personnel selection and future research on person-environment fit. Copyright 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Influence of gender, working field and psychosocial factors on the vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff: results of an Austrian cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadenhofer, Petra; Kundi, Michael; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Stummer, Harald; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2017-08-14

    According to the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA), hospitals represent a work environment with high job strain. Prolonged perceived occupational stress may result in symptoms of burnout, such as emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (PA). Understanding which factors may reduce vulnerability for burnout is an important requirement for well-targeted occupational stress prevention in mental hospital staff. To identify the influence of gender, age, working field, family structure, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job on occupational stress perception. In a cross-sectional design, 491 employees (311 female, 180 male) of an Austrian mental health centre participated in the study. The extent of perceived occupational stress was assessed by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) with the scales for emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Participants were divided according to their working field in those working with/without patients. Prevalence of emotional exhaustion was higher in women working with patients compared to men working with patients (25% vs. 18%, p = 0.003). Age above 45 years was significantly associated with decreased vulnerability for burnout in men (EE p = 0.040, DP p = 0.010, PA p = 0.007), but not in women. A lower level of education had a significant impact on depersonalisation in both sexes (p = 0.001 for men, p = 0.048 for women). Length of stay on job showed a significant influence on emotional exhaustion. No significant relationship was found between family structure and vulnerability for burnout. Gender had a differential effect on perceived occupational stress indicating a need for gender-tailored preventive strategies. Age, working field, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job affect vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff.

  5. PSA testing anxiety, psychological morbidity, and PSA utility in the management of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Micsunescu, Anamaria Elia

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotal reports from urologists and medical oncologists have suggested that patients with prostate cancer (PCa) often present with anxiety related to ongoing monitoring of their PSA levels as part of their disease management. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence and severity of prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing anxiety in a population of patients with either localised or metastatic PCa living in Australia. Other aspects of psychological morbidit...

  6. The Relationship Between Burnout Syndrome Among the Medical Staff and Work Conditions in the Polish Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głębocka, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Psychologists emphasize that people employed in social service organizations are vulnerable to chronic stress and burnout syndrome caused by a close and unsatisfied interpersonal relationship. However, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of diminished personal accomplishment can be attributed to other external factors. One of them is poor living and occupational conditions. According to a report by OECD, the healthcare system in Poland is the worst among the member countries. The aim of the present study was to define the relationship between occupational burnout and the rating of the Polish healthcare system among the medical staff. The study included 224 participants. The Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Dehumanized Behavior and the Głębocka and Rużyczka scale of Behavioral Indicators of Patient's Dehumanization were applied. The evaluations of the healthcare system were also collected. The results demonstrate that physicians were the group of most emotionally exhausted and, simultaneously, most life-satisfied persons, while nurses presented the highest level of dehumanization and the lowest level of satisfaction from life achievements. Only did physicians evaluate the healthcare system as a relatively good one. They were also more tolerant of latent dehumanization. A relationship between the dimensions of burnout and the evaluation of healthcare system were observed. The emotionally exhausted or prone to dehumanization persons were more likely to evaluate the Polish healthcare system negatively.

  7. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  8. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  9. Soft authority: ecologies of infection management in the working lives of modern matrons and infection control staff

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crawford, Paul; Brown, Brian

    2008-01-01

    ... on in‐depth interviews with 10 matrons in a health care trust in the UK Midlands region, we explore how they construe their working lives and their view of the powers they have to enhance cleanliness and reduce infection...

  10. Take Charge. Take the Test. PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  11. More Adults Are Walking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  12. Safer Food Saves Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-03

    This 60 second PSA is based on the November 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Contaminated food sent to several states can cause multistate outbreaks of foodborne illness and make a lot of people seriously ill. Learn what can be done to prevent and stop outbreaks.  Created: 11/3/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/3/2015.

  13. Stop C. difficile Infections PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-06

    This 60 second PSA is based on the March 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. C. difficile is a germ that causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 deaths in the US each year. This podcast helps health care professionals learn how to prevent C. difficile infections.  Created: 3/6/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/6/2012.

  14. Experience from the comparison of two PSA-studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmberg, J.; Pulkkinen, U. [VTTAutomation (Finland)

    2001-03-01

    Two probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) made for nearly identical reactors units (Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3) have been compared. Two different analysis teams made the PSAs, and the analyses became quite different. The goal of the study is to identify, clarify and explain differences between PSA-studies. The purpose is to understand limitations and uncertainties in PSA, to explain reasons for differences between PSA-studies, and to give recommendations for comparison of PSA-studies and for improving the PSA-methodology. The reviews have been made by reading PSA-documentation, using the computer model and interviewing persons involved in the projects. The method and findings have been discussed within the project group. Both the PSA-project and various parts in the PSA-model have been reviewed. A major finding was that the two projects had different purpose and thus had different resources, scope and even methods in their study. The study shows that comparison of PSA results from different plants is normally not meaningful. It takes a very deep knowledge of the PSA studies to make a comparison of the results and usually one has to ensure that the compared studies have the same scope and are based on the same analysis methods. Harmonisation of the PSA-methodology is recommended in the presentation of results, presentation of methods, scope main limitation and assumption, and definitions for end states, initiating events and common cause failures. This would facilitate the comparison of the studies. Methods for validation of PSA for different application areas should be developed. The developed PSA review standards can be applied for a general validation of a study. The most important way to evaluate the real feasibility of PSA can take place only with practical applications. The PSA-documentation and models can be developed to facilitate the communication between PSA-experts and users. In any application consultation with the PSA-expert is however needed. Many

  15. The effect of quality circles on job satisfaction and quality of work-life of staff in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinabadi, Reza; Karampourian, Arezou; Beiranvand, Shoorangiz; Pournia, Yadollah

    2013-10-01

    Quality circles, as a participatory management technique, offer one alternative for dealing with frustration and discontent of today's workers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of implementation of quality circles on nurses' quality of work-life and job satisfaction. In this study, two emergency medical services (EMS) of Hamedan province were selected and randomly assigned as the experimental and control groups. After the experimental group was trained and quality circles were established in this group, the levels of quality of work-life and job satisfaction were measured in the two groups. Then, the statistical analyses were performed using t-test. After the intervention, the results showed significant differences between the scores of motivational factors (p=0.001), the total scores of job satisfaction (p=0.003), and the scores of some quality of work life (QWL) conceptual categories including the use and development of capacities (p=0.008), the total space of life (p=0.003), and the total scores of QWL (p=0.031) in the experimental group compared to those in the control group. This study confirms the effectiveness of quality circles in improving quality of work-life and job satisfaction of nurses working in EMS, and offers their application as a management method that can be used by EMS managers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Soft authority: ecologies of infection management in the working lives of modern matrons and infection control staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Paul; Brown, Brian

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses the role of modern matrons and their work in the reduction of health care acquired infections. Based on in-depth interviews with 10 matrons in a health care trust in the UK Midlands region, we explore how they construe their working lives and their view of the powers they have to enhance cleanliness and reduce infection. Despite claims in policy documents that modern matrons would have considerable authority, participants felt their control over the environment was limited, and could be accomplished only through reflecting, communicating and liaising. The lack of formal structures of accountability and personal authority meant that participants could be characterised as working in what Courpasson calls a 'soft bureaucracy'. Moreover, in the light of limited power to command cleanliness, participants described their role in terms of reflexive work upon themselves and their interpersonal environment, involving self-scrutiny of their activity, channelling information, empowering, facilitating and remodelling the emotional environment of care delivery. This aligns with accounts of the self in the workplace from Anthony Giddens and Nikolas Rose where it is seen as a reflexive project. We explore why the project of the self seems to have eclipsed the managerial role as the major focus of matrons' work.

  17. Staff working in hospital units with greater social capital experience less work-home conflict: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Anika; Kuntz, Ludwig; Miedaner, Felix

    2017-10-01

    When the interplay between work and private life does not function correctly (work-home conflict), this constitutes a well-known risk factor for poorer health, increased absenteeism and lower work performance. Information about influencing factors of work-home conflict is therefore indispensable in order to avoid it. In this study, we analyse whether a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity' (organizational social capital) can reduce an employee's conflict between work and private life. This study investigates the link between organizational social capital and work-home conflict in health professionals. This issue was investigated using a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. Data from questionnaires completed by physicians and nurses (n=1733) were linked with structural data from 66 neonatal intensive care units in Germany. Using multi-level analyses, we investigated associations between organizational social capital at the ward level and work-home conflict at the level of individual employees, taking into account additional structural and individual characteristics. Employees on wards with greater social capital reported significantly less work-home conflict. Our results support the hypothesis that organizational social capital is an important collective resource. As such, more attention should be given to establishing a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity', and this should be encouraged in a targeted fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Soft authority: ecologies of infection management in the working lives of modern matrons and infection control staff.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Brian J.; Crawford, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The version of the article attached to this record is the authors final peer reviewed version. The definitive version of this article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9566.2008.01086. This paper discusses the role of modern matrons and their work in the reduction of health care acquired infections. Based on in-depth interviews with 10 matrons in a health care trust in the UK Midlands region, we explore how they construe their working lives and their view of the powers they ...

  19. How are compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction affected by quality of working life? Findings from a survey of mental health staff in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetrano, Gaia; Tedeschi, Federico; Rabbi, Laura; Gosetti, Giorgio; Lora, Antonio; Lamonaca, Dario; Manthorpe, Jill; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2017-11-21

    Quality of working life includes elements such as autonomy, trust, ergonomics, participation, job complexity, and work-life balance. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate if and how quality of working life affects Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction among mental health practitioners. Staff working in three Italian Mental Health Departments completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale, measuring Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction, and the Quality of Working Life Questionnaire. The latter was used to collect socio-demographics, occupational characteristics and 13 indicators of quality of working life. Multiple regressions controlling for other variables were undertaken to predict Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction. Four hundred questionnaires were completed. In bivariate analyses, experiencing more ergonomic problems, perceiving risks for the future, a higher impact of work on life, and lower levels of trust and of perceived quality of meetings were associated with poorer outcomes. Multivariate analysis showed that (a) ergonomic problems and impact of work on life predicted higher levels of both Compassion Fatigue and Burnout; (b) impact of life on work was associated with Compassion Fatigue and lower levels of trust and perceiving more risks for the future with Burnout only; (c) perceived quality of meetings, need of training, and perceiving no risks for the future predicted higher levels of Compassion Satisfaction. In order to provide adequate mental health services, service providers need to give their employees adequate ergonomic conditions, giving special attention to time pressures. Building trustful relationships with management and within the teams is also crucial. Training and meetings are other important targets for potential improvement. Additionally, insecurity about the future should be addressed as it can affect both Burnout and Compassion Satisfaction. Finally

  20. Effect of Shift Work on the Frequency of Depression in Nursing Staff of Yazd University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Halvani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression as a disorder is relatively common in all societies; several factors are involved in depression development, that shift work is one of these factors. This study compared the frequency of depression in different shifts of nurses in hospitals of Yazd University of medical sciences. Materials & Methods: This study is a descriptive analytical study. Based on statistical methods, 150 nurses participated in this study. The research tool was a questionnaire that included 15 personal questions and 21 questions related to Beck test. The results were analysed by SPSS software. Results: 13.3% of all subjects were males and 86.7% were females. Results showed that, there is no significant relationship between gender, education, type of job, employment status and satisfaction levels of income with depression. Marital status (P-Value = 0.009 and F = 6.93, shift work (day working and shift work (P-Value = 0.032 and F = 1.11, job satisfaction (P-Value = 0.000 and F = 7.641 and the satisfaction of the employer (P-Value = 0.001 and F = 5.414 were significantly associated with depression. 3.49% of the nurses were in normal status, 7.26% had mild depression, 3.9% required consultation with the psychiatrist,% 7.8% suffered from moderate depression, 75.4% from severe depression and 3.1% from very severe depression. Conclusion: It seems that shift work can not cause depression alone, but depression is the result of the interaction of several factors.

  1. Arts as an ecological method to enhance quality of work experience of healthcare staff: a phenomenological-hermeneutic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojner Horwitz, Eva; Grape Viding, Christina; Rydwik, Elisabeth; Huss, Ephrat

    2017-12-01

    This paper explores the impact of self-chosen arts-based recreational activities, as opposed to the traditional arts therapy activities, on the well-being of healthcare providers. Three qualitative case studies of programs in which arts-based activities were used to work with healthcare providers, lasting for 10 weeks each, are phenomenological-hermeneutically evaluated using interviews and focus groups. The findings show what we refer to as an "ecological" ripple of effects: (1) the arts-based activities helped to reduce individual stress and to enhance mood over time, (2) the activities helped to transform workplace relationships within wards, and (3) the arts humanized the overall work climate in the healthcare setting. These effects go beyond those of using the art production as a strategy for stress reduction and imply potential for a more encompassing role for the arts within healthcare.

  2. An Observational Study to Evaluate the Medication Errors by Nursing Staff Working in Bushehr Medical Centers during one Year Interval (1385-1386

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Zahmatkeshan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication errors refer to inappropriate use of drugs, can lead to harmful and serious consequent. Many factors contribute to incidence of these errors. To investigate this factors a descriptive analytic study was done that assess clinical staff medication errors in Bushehr medical centers. Methods: The participants were 400 clinical staff, including nurses, midwives and nurse assistances to complete designed medication errors questionnaire. This questionnaire include 2 parts, part one was demographic data and part two, assess influencing factors of medication errors in six domain. Results: Results showed that the half of participants (49.9% had medication errors in acquaintance and the most error in dosage (37.7% and then type of drugs(27.7%. 73.3% of participants reported their errors and in unreported cases the most cause was fear of managers. According to participants attitude factors that interfering to medication errors were physicians factor, including illegible order in patient file (24.94%, nurses factors including, incorrect documentation (24.38%, interpersonal relationship (19.45%, inappropriate environment (15.3%, knowledge deficit and lack of experience (11.23% and stressful events (4.66%. No statistical significant correlation between situation of job and shift work. Conclusion: Results show that medication errors are common and human factors are the most factors in these errors.

  3. Total Order Reliability in PSA: Importance of Basic Events and Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Borgonovo; C. Smith

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this work is twofold. First, to formalize the properties of the total order reliability importance measure for PSA models. Second, to extend the definition of the total order importance measure to groups of basic events. This allows one to obtain the importance of systems and to address the relevance of interactions among systems.

  4. Serum Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Concentration, PSA Mass, and Obesity: A Mathematical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Robin T

    2018-02-17

    To provide a mathematical background for understanding the phenomenon of analyte hemodilution using a kinetic analysis. The first assumption for this analysis is that change in concentration of any analyte, such as prostate-specific antigen (PSA), is due to the flux of the analyte from an organ into the blood minus its flux from the blood. What results is a relatively simple differential equation that emphasizes the importance of plasma volume, organ mass, and two rate constants. The analyses demonstrate how serum PSA can be affected by plasma volume as well as body mass and how hemodilution due to obesity can be at least partly corrected for by expressing PSA in units of total mass or total mass density. At a time when obesity is prevalent, expressing analytes in units of total mass may make them relate more closely to disease status and prognosis.

  5. Patient and work flow and costs associated with staff time and facility usage at a comprehensive cancer centre in Quebec, Canada--a time and motion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinder, Gayle A; Paradis, Pierre Emmanuel; Posman, Marianne; Mishagina, Natalia; Guay, Marie-Pascale; Linardos, Dina; Batist, Gerald

    2012-10-29

    Mapping patient and work flow and cost analysis studies can help determine the most efficient and cost effective way of providing health services while still maintaining the best standards of care. This study used both time and motion methodology and hospital data to assess the contribution of staff time and facility usage to the overall cost of cancer care during patient visits to a comprehensive cancer centre in Quebec, using metastatic colorectal cancer as a model. A workflow diagram was created mapping direct and indirect steps involved during a patient's physician or treatment (FOLFOX/bevacizumab or XELOX/bevacizumab) visit. Staff were timed as they performed each task and this data together with compensation amounts were used to calculate personnel costs. Mean work times and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. Operation and maintenance (O&M) costs for the Centre were calculated using information from hospital databases. All costs were presented in constant Canadian dollars for the 2010-2011 fiscal year period. For physician visits, direct and indirect personnel costs were $9.25 (95%CI:$7.00-$11.51) and O&M costs were $60.21, for a total of $69.46 (95%CI:$67.21-$71.72). For treatment visits, personnel and O&M costs were $71.91 (95%CI:$45.53-$98.29) and $62.00 respectively for a total of $133.91 (95%CI:$107.53-$160.29). When calculated for treatment alone, the total cost was $136.06 (95%CI:$109.16-$162.95) for FOLFOX/bevacizumab and $119.94 (95%CI:$96.89-$142.99) for XELOX/bevacizumab. The highest cumulative personnel costs were for the pharmacists and nurses ($38.87 and $34.82 respectively). Regarding patient flow, total time in between steps was 77.6 and 49.5 minutes for a physician or treatment visit respectively. This study from a health care provider's perspective, demonstrated that in the context of increasingly expensive therapies, costs associated with staff time and facility usage do not contribute greatly to the overall cost of treating

  6. Patient and work flow and costs associated with staff time and facility usage at a comprehensive cancer centre in Quebec, Canada – a time and motion study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinder Gayle A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mapping patient and work flow and cost analysis studies can help determine the most efficient and cost effective way of providing health services while still maintaining the best standards of care. This study used both time and motion methodology and hospital data to assess the contribution of staff time and facility usage to the overall cost of cancer care during patient visits to a comprehensive cancer centre in Quebec, using metastatic colorectal cancer as a model. Methods A workflow diagram was created mapping direct and indirect steps involved during a patient’s physician or treatment (FOLFOX/bevacizumab or XELOX/bevacizumab visit. Staff were timed as they performed each task and this data together with compensation amounts were used to calculate personnel costs. Mean work times and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated. Operation and maintenance (O&M costs for the Centre were calculated using information from hospital databases. All costs were presented in constant Canadian dollars for the 2010–2011 fiscal year period. Results For physician visits, direct and indirect personnel costs were $9.25 (95%CI:$7.00-$11.51 and O&M costs were $60.21, for a total of $69.46 (95%CI:$67.21-$71.72. For treatment visits, personnel and O&M costs were $71.91 (95%CI:$45.53-$98.29 and $62.00 respectively for a total of $133.91 (95%CI:$107.53-$160.29. When calculated for treatment alone, the total cost was $136.06 (95%CI:$109.16-$162.95 for FOLFOX/bevacizumab and $119.94 (95%CI:$96.89-$142.99 for XELOX/bevacizumab. The highest cumulative personnel costs were for the pharmacists and nurses ($38.87 and $34.82 respectively. Regarding patient flow, total time in between steps was 77.6 and 49.5 minutes for a physician or treatment visit respectively. Conclusions This study from a health care provider’s perspective, demonstrated that in the context of increasingly expensive therapies, costs associated with staff time and facility

  7. Evaluating the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: a controlled pretest-post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Erin R; Chenery, Helen J

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of a communication skills training programme on community aged care staff's knowledge of communication support in dementia and on staff's care experience. Dementia can lead to impairments in communication. Therefore, quality community-based dementia care requires that staff be skilled communicators, equipped to facilitate interactions with people with dementia. The current investigation evaluated the effectiveness of the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia for Care Staff training programme with respect to knowledge of communication support and the staff/caregiver experience. A multi-centre controlled pretest/post-test design with randomised cohort allocation was used. Outcome measures were completed at baseline, immediately after training (training group only), and at three-month follow-up. Thirty-eight care staff working in community aged care participated and completed all outcome measures (training = 22; control = 16).Training and control groups completed the following outcome measures: knowledge of communication support strategies, self-efficacy, preparedness to provide care, strain in nursing care and attitude to dementia care. Staff in the training group provided written feedback on the training. A significant improvement in knowledge scores from baseline was found for the training group both immediately after training and at three-month follow-up. There was also a significant training effect for self-efficacy and preparedness to provide care. No significant difference was found for the control group for any measure. No significant training effects were found for measures of strain or attitudes to dementia care. Feedback from staff suggests that the training was well received. The MESSAGE training was positively received by staff and had a significant effect on care staff knowledge, and confidence to provide care for people with dementia. The easily accessible multimedia training programme is well received by

  8. Correlation between Health Correlates and Quality of Working Life in the Staff of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mafi mahvash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Quality of working life (QWL is an important issue and examination of the spects that can affect it causes promotion of individual and organizational productivity. This study was conducted to investigate correlation between health correlates and the QWL in the emloyees of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch. Methods: This descriptive-correlational study with regression analysis was conducted on 130 nonteaching employees of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch selected by convenience sampling with reference to the number of the studied variables (spiritual, physical, mental, social, and environmental health. The participants filled out demographic, health-promoting behaviors, and QWL questionnaires. Data were analyzed by SPSS using descriptive and inferential statistical tests especially multivariate regression. Results: Among health components, physical health (r=0.55 and mental health (r=0.50 had the highest correlation with total QWL score. The amount of explained variance in criterion variable (QWL by the regression model was 40%. Table of coefficients demonstrated that the scores for mental health and spiritual health had greater contribution in the model than other health aspects. Physical health, psychological health, spiritual health, and environmental health explained 29%, 45%, 37%, and 21% variance in QWL, respectively. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrated positive correlation between health aspects and QWL. Because the university employees spend a great deal of time at work and the quality of their work affects the entire organization, this finding can be useful to guide policy-makers and health experts in developing preventive and intervention programs in the future for promotion of the employees' health and organization.

  9. Staff evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, A J

    1979-02-01

    The necessity for evaluating hospital pharmacy department personnel, and the recognized methods for performing such evaluations, including their advantages and deficiencies, are reviewed. Performance appraisal systems using ranking, person-to-person comparison, grading, graphic scales, checklists, forced-choice description, selection of critical incidents and management by objectives (MBO) are detailed, with emphasis upon their use in hospital pharmacy departments. All of these systems, with the exception of MBO, place inappropriate emphasis upon various subjective personality trails while failing to include objective results attained by personnel. Most of these methods (again excepting MBO) deny the evaluate-manager the opportunity to coach staff members in an attempt to improve results achievement. Staff evaluation, when carried out under an MBO system, is more likely to provide the hospital pharmacy department and its director with improved staff performance and development.

  10. Cognitive and Other Strategies to Mitigate the Effects of Fatigue. Lessons from Staff Physicians Working in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Natalie; Ayas, Najib T; Stelfox, Henry T; Peets, Adam D

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue is common among physicians and adversely affects their performance. To identify strategies that attending physicians use when fatigued to maintain clinical performance in the intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a qualitative study using focus groups and structured interviews of attending ICU physicians working in academic centers in Canada. In three focus group meetings, we engaged a total of 11 physicians to identify strategies used to prevent and cope with fatigue. In the focus groups, 21 cognitive strategies were identified and classified into 9 categories (minimizing number of tasks, using techniques to improve retention of details, using a structured approach to patient care, asking for help, improving opportunities for focusing, planning ahead, double-checking, adjusting expectations, and modulating alertness). In addition, various lifestyle strategies were mentioned as important in preventing fatigue (e.g., protecting sleep before call, adequate exercise, and limiting alcohol). Telephone interviews were then conducted (n = 15 physicians) with another group of intensivists. Structured questions were asked about the strategies identified in the focus groups that were most useful during ICU activities. In the interviews, the most useful and frequently used strategies were prioritizing tasks that need to be done immediately and postponing tasks that can wait, working systematically, using a structured approach, and avoiding distractions. ICU physicians reported using a variety of deliberate cognitive and lifestyle strategies to prevent and cope with fatigue. Given the low cost and intuitive nature of the majority of these strategies, further investigations should be done to better characterize their effectiveness in improving performance.

  11. Impact evaluation of domains of learning on Universal Work Precautions (UWP amongst nursing staff in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Second key strategy of National AIDS Control Program (NACP IV is comprehensive care and support by providing quality services through zero stigma and discrimination. Quality of services can be improved by eliminating stigma and discrimination and making health care provider aware of associated occupational hazards. Nursing staff play crucial role and are more at risk therefore their understanding, perception and skill must be assessed in different domains of learning to improve the contents and methodology of trainings. Material and Methods: Total 85 nursing staff underwent 1 day training in 3 batches focusing on Universal Work Precautions (UWP, Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP and sensitization of the participants towards PLHA (People living with HIV/AIDS. Their learning was evaluated under different domains (cognitive, psychomotor and affective using structured questionnaire. Results: In pretest evaluation scores showed minor and statistically not significant variations in terms of participant′s gender, age, designation work experience and status of having received any similar training in the past. Impact of the training was visible as overall mean scores increased from 10.6 ± 2.7 to 13.8 ± 5.8; gain being statistically highly significant (P value < 0.001. Gain was highest in cognitive (from 58% to 77% followed by psychomotor (from 48% to 62% and minimal in affective domain (from 75% to 76%. Conclusions: After undergoing the training, participants were benefitted more in cognitive domain than psychomotor and affective domain. Acquired knowledge, skill and communication skill if evaluated as done in this study will improve the methodology of such trainings making them more effective.

  12. The impact of health promotion on trachoma knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) of staff in three work settings in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Fiona D; Jones, Kelly; Ritte, Rebecca; Brown, Haley E; Taylor, Hugh R

    2017-05-01

    Globally, trachoma is the leading cause of infectious blindness and Australia is the only developed country with endemic trachoma. It is found in remote Indigenous communities burdened with poverty, overcrowding and poor hygiene. Lack of culturally appropriate health promotion, a small trachoma workforce and lack of awareness and support for trachoma elimination in general, were early barriers. A cross-sectional pre-post study using a convenience sample, was conducted in clinics, schools and community work-settings from 63 of the 82 remote Aboriginal communities identified as being at risk of trachoma in the Northern Territory (NT). The study assessed the effect of a multi-component health promotion strategy aimed at increasing knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support settings staff. Data were collected between 2010 and 2012. The health promotion initiatives were introduced in communities in staggered delivery over a one-year period; 272 participants were surveyed at baseline and 261 at follow-up. Trachoma related knowledge, attitudes and practice increased across all settings and for all primary outcome measures. Across all settings, there was a significant increase in the proportion of participants reporting the most important thing to do if a child has a 'dirty' face is to 'wash it every time its dirty' (61.6% cf 69.7%; X2p = 0.047), a significant reduction in the proportion of respondents answering 'no' to the question "Is it normal for kids to have dirty faces in your community' (40.5% cf 29.6%; X2p = 0.009) and a significant increase in reported capacity to teach others about trachoma prevention (70.8% cf 83.3%; X2p community support staff working with children and in remote NT communities. In the early stages of the trachoma health promotion program, this increased trachoma awareness and improved local workforce capacity and support for trachoma elimination in three health promotion settings in remote communities in

  13. Impact Evaluation of Domains of Learning on Universal Work Precautions (UWP) Amongst Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rashmi; Kumar, Pradeep; Patel, Brijesh; Gajjar, Sanju

    2016-01-01

    Second key strategy of National AIDS Control Program (NACP IV) is comprehensive care and support by providing quality services through zero stigma and discrimination. Quality of services can be improved by eliminating stigma and discrimination and making health care provider aware of associated occupational hazards. Nursing staff play crucial role and are more at risk therefore their understanding, perception and skill must be assessed in different domains of learning to improve the contents and methodology of trainings. Total 85 nursing staff underwent 1 day training in 3 batches focusing on Universal Work Precautions (UWP), Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) and sensitization of the participants towards PLHA (People living with HIV/AIDS). Their learning was evaluated under different domains (cognitive, psychomotor and affective) using structured questionnaire. In pretest evaluation scores showed minor and statistically not significant variations in terms of participant's gender, age, designation work experience and status of having received any similar training in the past. Impact of the training was visible as overall mean scores increased from 10.6 ± 2.7 to 13.8 ± 5.8; gain being statistically highly significant (P value < 0.001). Gain was highest in cognitive (from 58% to 77%) followed by psychomotor (from 48% to 62%) and minimal in affective domain (from 75% to 76%). After undergoing the training, participants were benefitted more in cognitive domain than psychomotor and affective domain. Acquired knowledge, skill and communication skill if evaluated as done in this study will improve the methodology of such trainings making them more effective.

  14. Experiences and Perceptions of Nursing Staff Working With Long-Stay Patients in a High Secure Psychiatric Hospital Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Snigdha; Majid, Shazmin; Völlm, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Forensic psychiatric nursing is a demanding nursing specialty that deals with a highly complex group of patients who are detained in restrictive environments, often for lengthy periods. There is little information about the daily experiences of these nurses. This study sought to explore the roles and relationships of forensic psychiatric nurses with long-stay patients in a high secure hospital in England. The study obtained data via three focus groups, and thematic analysis was carried out using NVIVO 10 software. Five prominent themes emerged: First, nurses elaborated on their roles with patients and the kinds of interactions they had with them. The next two themes explored the reasons why some patients are long-stay patients and the challenges nurses face while working with this group. The fourth theme was the impact of external support, such as the patient's families, on length of stay. The final theme covered the changes that the nurses observed in these patients and in themselves over time. It was noticeable that those interviewed were committed professionals, eager to provide an optimistic and hopeful environment for the patients to help them progress through "the system". The study presents a number of pertinent issues regarding long-stay patients that provide a basis for further research and to inform policy, educational reforms, and clinical practice.

  15. Various Applications of Power Spectrum Analysis (PSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    ications: pro ckaging, and ower Spectru kage; Gamma analysis (P in responses d to dynam in the power s gnatures are fo IC. PSA ha rences betwee...on a d op plot in F re (top black connected to a shown in the m voltage is c rtion in the vo Applicat Paiboo Valid Sandia Na Analysis (P tion...tool. We cess monitor changes due m Analysis ; -ray Exposure SA) measures of an integrat ic stimuli. pectrum associ und to be sen s been an ef n

  16. The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The role of the percentage free PSA in the diagnosis of prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    K.H. Tijani

    2016-12-24

    Dec 24, 2016 ... Blood samples were collected from these selected patients for repeat tPSA and free PSA (fPSA) thereafter, analyzed within 24 h of sample collection. The analytical procedure used for determination of tPSA and fPSA assay was the Hybritech. Paramagnetic Particle Two-Site Immunoenzymatic (“Sandwich”).

  18. PSA and beyond: alternative prostate cancer biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of biomarkers for prostate cancer screening, diagnosis and prognosis has the potential to improve the clinical management of the patients. Owing to inherent limitations of the biomarker prostate-specific antigen (PSA), intensive efforts are currently directed towards a search for alternative prostate cancer biomarkers, particularly those that can predict disease aggressiveness and drive better treatment decisions. Methods A literature search of Medline articles focused on recent and emerging advances in prostate cancer biomarkers was performed. The most promising biomarkers that have the potential to meet the unmet clinical needs in prostate cancer patient management and/or that are clinically implemented were selected. Conclusions With the advent of advanced genomic and proteomic technologies, we have in recent years seen an enormous spurt in prostate cancer biomarker research with several promising alternative biomarkers being discovered that show an improved sensitivity and specificity over PSA. The new generation of biomarkers can be tested via serum, urine, or tissue-based assays that have either received regulatory approval by the US Food and Drug Administration or are available as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments-based laboratory developed tests. Additional emerging novel biomarkers for prostate cancer, including circulating tumor cells, microRNAs and exosomes, are still in their infancy. Together, these biomarkers provide actionable guidance for prostate cancer risk assessment, and are expected to lead to an era of personalized medicine. PMID:26790878

  19. Prostate cancer screening by prostate-specific antigen (PSA); a relevant approach for the small population of the Cayman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Shravana Kumar; Blacke, Camille; Patil, Pallavi; Amblihalli, Vibha P; Nicholson, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    investigations for PSA levels from year 2005 to 2015 were studied retrospectively. As a result of this research work, it can be concluded that a benign diagnosis can be given with a fair certainty when the PSA was below 4 ng/mL and a level of 100 ng/mL can be very unfavorable for the patients. This study helped to solidify the cancer screening protocols in Cayman Islands. The PSA level can reassure and educate the patients towards the diagnosis of cancer of prostate in Cayman Islands. Benign diagnosis can be given with a fair certainty when the PSA was below 4 ng/mL and a level of 100 ng/mL can be very unfavorable for the patients. This study helped to solidify the cancer screening protocols in Cayman.

  20. The impact of health promotion on trachoma knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP of staff in three work settings in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona D Lange

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Globally, trachoma is the leading cause of infectious blindness and Australia is the only developed country with endemic trachoma. It is found in remote Indigenous communities burdened with poverty, overcrowding and poor hygiene. Lack of culturally appropriate health promotion, a small trachoma workforce and lack of awareness and support for trachoma elimination in general, were early barriers.A cross-sectional pre-post study using a convenience sample, was conducted in clinics, schools and community work-settings from 63 of the 82 remote Aboriginal communities identified as being at risk of trachoma in the Northern Territory (NT. The study assessed the effect of a multi-component health promotion strategy aimed at increasing knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support settings staff. Data were collected between 2010 and 2012. The health promotion initiatives were introduced in communities in staggered delivery over a one-year period; 272 participants were surveyed at baseline and 261 at follow-up.Trachoma related knowledge, attitudes and practice increased across all settings and for all primary outcome measures. Across all settings, there was a significant increase in the proportion of participants reporting the most important thing to do if a child has a 'dirty' face is to 'wash it every time its dirty' (61.6% cf 69.7%; X2p = 0.047, a significant reduction in the proportion of respondents answering 'no' to the question "Is it normal for kids to have dirty faces in your community' (40.5% cf 29.6%; X2p = 0.009 and a significant increase in reported capacity to teach others about trachoma prevention (70.8% cf 83.3%; X2p <0.001.Health promotion was associated with increased trachoma knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support staff working with children and in remote NT communities. In the early stages of the trachoma health promotion program, this increased trachoma

  1. A Comparative Performance Analysis of Total PSA, Percentage Free PSA, PSA Velocity, and PSA Density versus the Detection of Primary Circulating Prostate Cells in Predicting Initial Prostate Biopsy Findings in Chilean Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel P. Murray

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. PSA parameters have been used in an attempt to improve the diagnostic yield of prostate screening tests; the detection of primary malignant circulating prostate cells (CPCs may improve the diagnostic yield of screening and therefore avoid unnecessary biopsies. Patients and Methods. Prospective study of all men undergoing initial prostate biopsy due to an elevated total serum PSA. Free percent PSA, PSA velocity, and PSA density were determined. Primary CPCs were detected using standard immunocytochemistry. A positive test for CPCs was defined as one cell PSA (+ P504S (+ in an 8 ml blood sample. Positive predictive and negative predictive values, specificity, and sensitivity were calculated for each test as well as the number of biopsies avoided and cancers missed. Results. 303 men participated in the study of whom 113/303 (37.3% men had prostate cancer. Of the three PSA based parameters, free percent PSA was superior, sensitivity 70.8%, and specificity 67.4%. Primary CPCs detection had a sensitivity of 88.5% and a specificity of 88.4% avoiding 181 (59.7% biopsies, detecting 93/95 (98% of clinically significant cancers, and missing 13 (11.5% low grade, small volume tumors. Conclusions. The use of primary CPCs as a sequential test could decrease the number of initial prostate biopsies missing those cancers which are treated by active observation.

  2. Comparison of mean prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All subjects were non-obese, had no prostatic symptoms and were not masturbating. Standard technique of specimen collection, processing and analysis of PSA values using Immunoassay technique were applied. The celibate group had a mean PSA value of 2.6±0.2ng/ml, while the sexually-active group had a mean PSA ...

  3. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    has a major role to play in achieving the objectives of the institution. ... Exceptionally, well motivated academic staff can, with appropriate ... significance attributed to the work. **To perform at their best, most individuals need to have financial or other extrinsic rewards tied to their performance. Rewards. Intrinsic*. Extrinsic**.

  4. IMPROVEMENT OF THE LOCA PSA MODEL USING A BEST-ESTIMATE THERMAL-HYDRAULIC ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DONG HYUN LEE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA has been widely used to estimate the overall safety of nuclear power plants (NPP and it provides base information for risk informed application (RIA and risk informed regulation (RIR. For the effective and correct use of PSA in RIA/RIR related decision making, the risk estimated by a PSA model should be as realistic as possible. In this work, a best-estimate thermal-hydraulic analysis of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs for the Hanul Nuclear Units 3&4 is first carried out in a systematic way. That is, the behaviors of peak cladding temperature (PCT were analyzed with various combinations of break sizes, the operating conditions of safety systems, and the operator's action time for aggressive secondary cooling. Thereafter, the results of the thermal-hydraulic analysis have been reflected in the improvement of the PSA model by changing both accident sequences and success criteria of the event trees for the LOCA scenarios.

  5. Policy and System Approach (PSA: A primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant Lahariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of public health challenges have emerged at global and national level in the last two decades. The response to these challenges has rarely been swift and often “knee-jerk.” The national and state level program officials responsible for the activities often apportion the blame on weak health systems or fragmented health service delivery mechanisms, amongst other. In India, the viral illnesses (including those due to dengue and chikungunya are becoming the increasing realities. The Public health response of early identification, disease surveillance, reporting and the preventive and curative measures, remains suboptimal. The health challenges which require multidimensional interventions are usuallyattempted to be resolved through piece meal solutions. This article proposes “policy and system approach (PSA,” combining concepts of “Health in all policies” for intersectoral coordination and “health system approach” for intra-sectoral tackling of the emerging and existing health challenges.

  6. Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-24

    This 60 second public service announcement (PSA) is based on the November 24, 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Preexposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a daily medicine that can be used to prevent getting HIV. PrEP is for people who don’t have HIV but who are at very high risk for getting it from sex or injection drug use. Unfortunately, many people who can benefit from PrEP aren’t taking it.  Created: 11/24/2015 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/24/2015.

  7. Staff Rostering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.E. Thompson

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available Staff rostering is a key factor in nursing management with potential to bring life to, or to paralyse the system. This places immense responsibility on those in charge of rostering, and an all but intolerable load if the task is incumbent upon any one person. Nurse administrators (managers who have handled such a task, are to be congratulated on the order they have created out of potential ‘chaos’. It would seem, however, that the time is surely ripe for regular appraisals of the situation with a resultant increased participation in the policy and decision-making process.

  8. Prognostic implications of immediate PSA response to early salvage radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner I I, Robert M; Yabes, Jonathan G; Woldemichael, Elen; Deutsch, Melvin M; Smith, Ryan P; Werner, Robert S; Jacobs, Bruce L; Nelson, Joel B

    2016-12-01

    Up to 25% of men with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy will recur. In this setting, salvage radiotherapy may cure patients with local recurrence, but is unable to cure those with occult metastatic disease. The objective of this study is to examine how prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response to radiotherapy predicts subsequent disease progression and survival. Using a prospectively populated database of 3089 men who underwent open radical prostatectomy, 212 patients (7%) were identified who received early salvage radiotherapy for biochemical recurrence. The main outcome was time to disease progression after salvage radiotherapy. Patients were stratified by PSA response after radiotherapy: 1) PSA radiotherapy at a median PSA of 0.20 ng/mL (IQR 0.10-0.30 ng/mL). At a median follow up of 47.3 months, a total of 52 (25%) patients experienced disease progression. On multivariable analysis, both persistent PSA (HR 5.12; 95% CI 1.98-13.23) and rising PSA (HR 16.55; 95% CI 6.61-41.48) were associated with increased risk of disease progression compared to those with PSA radiotherapy PSA, Gleason score, margin status, stage, and time to radiotherapy. Only rising PSA was associated with an increased risk of cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. PSA response is associated with the risk of disease progression following salvage radiotherapy. This information can be used to counsel patients on the potential need for additional therapy and identify those at greatest risk for progression and cancer-related mortality.

  9. How to support staff deploying on overseas humanitarian work: a qualitative analysis of responder views about the 2014/15 West African Ebola outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Gideon James; Harper, Sarah; Williams, Paolo Diaz; Öström, Sanna; Bredbere, Samantha; Amlôt, Richard; Greenberg, Neil

    2016-01-01

    Responding to health crises overseas can be both rewarding and distressing for staff involved. We interviewed UK staff involved in the 2014/15 Ebola response to identify experiences that positively or negatively affected them. We conducted qualitative telephone interviews with 30 Public Health England (PHE) staff and 21 non-governmental organisation (NGO) staff who had deployed to West Africa. The main motivations for deploying were for moral reasons and personal development. Families were largely supportive of deployment, although family tension was apparent. Pre-deployment training was largely viewed positively. Common stressors included dealing with death and suffering as well as concerns about contagion, while uplifting aspects included seeing patients improve and receiving thanks from community members. Communications with home were largely satisfactory, although participants commonly self-censored their communication. Inter-organisational tensions caused stress, particularly for PHE staff hosted by NGOs. After deployment, loss of motivation and being avoided by friends and family were common. Highlighting the personal benefits arising from deployments, as well as their moral value, may help to increase volunteering. Efforts to improve the support given to responders should focus on identifying how to better support families, preparing all staff members for dealing with death and the risk of contagion, providing opportunities for staff to more frequently experience the uplifting aspects of deployment, resolving inter-organisational difficulties, and educating others about the low risk posed by responders on their return.

  10. Working together – Using social media tools / enterprise tools (Sharepoint, Blogs, Wikis, Google Docs/Drive) to enhance staff collaboration – The KAUST library experience

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the tools implemented by KAUST library to enhance collaboration among library staff. Highlights the features / functionalities of the implemented tools and their related success / constraints in achieving the desired targets.

  11. Building workforce capacity to detect and respond to child abuse and neglect cases: A training intervention for staff working in emergency settings in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemington, Tara; Fraser, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Too many children are brought to hospital emergency departments on numerous occasions before they are recognised as victims of child abuse and neglect. For this reason, improving knowledge and response behaviors of emergency staff at all levels is likely to have a significant impact on better outcomes. An Australian based training programme was the first of its kind to address this issue in a Vietnamese Emergency Department. Titled 'Safe Children Vietnam', the programme aimed to improve knowledge, attitudes and reporting behaviors concerning child abuse in the emergency setting. A pre-post test design was used to evaluate the impact of 'Safe Children Vietnam' on emergency staff knowledge, attitudes and intentions to report child abuse and neglect. Emergency staff including doctors, nurses and healthcare staff (n=116) participated in the clinical training programme. Linear Mixed Model analyses showed that on programme completion, they were more likely to recognise serious cases of all types of abuse. The 'Safe Children Vietnam' programme was effective at improving emergency staff knowledge of child abuse and neglect. A systems wide approach may be necessary to impact on emergency staff attitudes towards reporting cases of abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Association of Polymorphisms in the Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Gene Promoter with Serum PSA Level and PSA Changes after Dutasteride Treatment in Korean Men with Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung Woon; Kim, Chul Sung; Lee, Gilho

    2010-12-01

    Studies of genetic variation in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) gene have improved the diagnostic accuracy of PSA for diagnosing prostate diseases in Caucasians. However, the reference ranges and pharmacokinetics of PSA differ significantly according to race. Therefore, we evaluated the association between genetic variations in the PSA promoter area and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) phenotypes in Korean BPH patients. One hundred twenty-one men were enrolled. The initial serum PSA level, prostate size, and PSA changes at 3 months after treatment with dutasteride were determined. We amplified the promoter region of the PSA gene (nucleotide positions -158 to -356 and -5217 to -5429) and sequenced the products. Three relatively well characterized single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs3760722, rs266867, and rs266868), six uncharacterized SNPs (rs17554958, rs266882, rs4802754, rs2739448, rs2569733, and rs17526278), and one novel SNP (nucleotide position -5402) were found. There were no statistically significant correlations between any of the SNPs of the PSA promoter area and age-adjusted prostate sizes, initial PSA levels, or PSA variations after 3 months of dutasteride treatment. SNPs in the PSA promoter area were not associated with BPH phenotypes. We could not predict serum PSA changes after dutasteride treatment on the basis of PSA promoter genotype in Korean patients with BPH.

  13. Being perceived as a 'visitor' in the nursing staff's working arena--the involvement of relatives in daily caring activities in nursing homes in an urban community in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Jessica; Emami, Azita; Eriksson, Lars E; Eriksson, Henrik

    2013-09-01

    It is both complex and difficult for relatives when a loved one moves into a nursing home and many relatives are not prepared for the realities these new situations entail. Little attention has been paid to scrutinising the involvement of relatives in patient care, particularly in relation to the structures and routines of nursing homes or to the staff's reasoning concerning their involvement. To describe, from a gender perspective, how nursing staff's routines and reasoning act to condition the involvement of relatives in nursing homes. Focused ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in a medium-sized urban community in central Sweden in three different nursing homes. The nursing staff assigns a certain code of conduct to all relatives they perceived as 'visitors' in their working arena. This code of conduct was related to the routines and subcultures existing among the nursing staff and stemmed from a division of labour; the underlying concept of 'visitor' predetermined the potential for relatives' involvement. This involvement is explicitly related to the general gendered characteristics that exist in the nursing staff's perception of the relatives. The study's limitations are primarily concerned with shortcomings associated with a research presence during the fieldwork. The discussion focuses on the dimensions of power structures observed in the nursing home routines and the staff's reasoning based on their gendered assumptions. We argue that it is important to develop mechanisms that provide opportunities for nursing staff in elderly care to reflect on these structures without downplaying the excellent care they provide. We stress the importance of further exploring these issues concerning relatives and their involvement in nursing homes to facilitate the transition from informal caregiver to 'visitor'. © 2012 The Authors Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences © 2012 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  14. Prostate Cancer Screening: Should You Get a PSA Test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PSA test result turns out to have prostate cancer. Some prostate cancers, particularly those that grow quickly, may not ... and prevention. Cancer.Net. http://www.cancer.net/cancer-types/prostate-cancer/risk-factors-and-prevention. Accessed Aug. 2, ...

  15. PSA Velocity Does Not Improve Prostate Cancer Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is not grounds for automatically recommending a prostate biopsy, according to a study published online February 24, 2011, in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

  16. PSA LEVEL 3 DAN IMPLEMENTASINYA PADA KAJIAN KESELAMATAN PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pande Made Udiyani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kajian keselamatan PLTN menggunakan metodologi kajian probabilistik sangat penting selain kajian deterministik. Metodologi kajian menggunakan Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA Level 3 diperlukan terutama untuk estimasi kecelakaan parah atau kecelakaan luar dasar desain PLTN. Metode ini banyak dilakukan setelah kejadian kecelakaan Fukushima. Dalam penelitian ini dilakukan implementasi PSA Level 3 pada kajian keselamatan PWR, postulasi kecelakan luar dasar desain PWR AP-1000 dan disimulasikan di contoh tapak Bangka Barat. Rangkaian perhitungan yang dilakukan adalah: menghitung suku sumber dari kegagalan teras yang terjadi, pemodelan kondisi meteorologi tapak dan lingkungan, pemodelan jalur paparan, analisis dispersi radionuklida dan transportasi fenomena di lingkungan, analisis deposisi radionuklida, analisis dosis radiasi, analisis perlindungan & mitigasi, dan analisis risiko. Kajian menggunakan rangkaian subsistem pada perangkat lunak PC Cosyma. Hasil penelitian membuktikan bahwa implementasi metode kajian keselamatan PSA Level 3 sangat efektif dan komprehensif terhadap estimasi dampak, konsekuensi, risiko, kesiapsiagaan kedaruratan nuklir (nuclear emergency preparedness, dan manajemen kecelakaan reaktor terutama untuk kecelakaan parah atau kecelakaan luar dasar desain PLTN. Hasil kajian dapat digunakan sebagai umpan balik untuk kajian keselamatan PSA Level 1 dan PSA Level 2. Kata kunci: PSA level 3, kecelakaan, PWR   Reactor safety assessment of nuclear power plants using probabilistic assessment methodology is most important in addition to the deterministic assessment. The methodology of Level 3 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA is especially required to estimate severe accident or beyond design basis accidents of nuclear power plants. This method is carried out after the Fukushima accident. In this research, the postulations beyond design basis accidentsof PWR AP - 1000 would be taken, and simulated at West Bangka sample site. The

  17. Child Injury: What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-16

    This 60 second PSA is based on the April 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Many childhood deaths and injuries are preventable, including those caused by crashes, suffocation, poisoning, drowning, fires, and falls. The PSA discusses ways to help prevent these deaths and injuries.  Created: 4/16/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/16/2012.

  18. THE DISCRIMINATIVE ABILITY OF PERCENT FREE PSA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective To study the discriminative role of % free PSA in patients with a total PSA > 10 ng/ml. Patients and Methods Our patient cohort con-sisted of 90 males aged between 45 and 81 years (mean age: 67 ± 9 years). All patients had a biopsy-proven prostate pathology. Fifty-six patients had BPH (Group I) while 34 had ...

  19. Incidence of histological prostatitis and its correlation with PSA density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affonso Celso Piovesan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of asymptomatic, histologically proven prostatitis in men with symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia and to observe the correlation between asymptomatic prostatitis and prostate specific antigen (PSA density. INTRODUCTION: The incidence of type IV prostatitis is unknown. There is a tendency to correlate the presence of inflammatory prostatitis with an elevation of PSA. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From August 2000 to January 2006, 183 patients who underwent surgical treatment for benign prostate hyperplasia as a result of obstructive or irritative symptoms were prospectively studied. In accordance with the histology findings, these patients were divided into two groups: group I included patients with the presence of histological prostatitis and group II included patients with the absence of histological prostatitis. The mean PSA densities were compared. RESULTS: Histological evidence of prostatitis was observed in 145 patients. In this group, the mean PSA density was 0.136 ± 0.095. In 38 cases, there was no evidence of inflammation upon histological examination of the surgical samples. In these 38 cases, the mean PSA density was 0.126 ± 0.129. No statistically significant differences were detected between the two groups; the p-value is 0.124. CONCLUSION: Abnormal PSA density should not be attributed to the inflammatory prostatitis process.

  20. Working with an Adult Male with Down's Syndrome, Autism and Challenging Behaviour: Evaluation of a Programme of Staff Support and Organizational Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, David W.; Summerhill, Lisa; Mosley, Ellis; Tooth, Claire

    2003-01-01

    This article examines the case of a male with Down syndrome who has been referred to a clinical psychology service due to challenging behaviors. It provides a case history and rationale for the assessment of autism, and describes the positive effects of an intervention for increasing staff awareness of autism. (Contains references.) (CR)

  1. Examination of the Relationship between Organizational Stress and Employee Performance: A Research on Staff Working on Provincial Directorate of Youth and Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksel, Ali Gurel; Caz, Cagdas; Yazici, Omer Faruk; Ikizler, Huseyin Can

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the relation between the level of organizational stress at the staff of the Youth Services and Sports Provincial Directorate and their performance. The study group of research, Istanbul province in the Uskudar district officials operating in the Youth Services and Sports Provincial Directorate constitute a…

  2. Guidelines for reliability analysis of digital systems in PSA context - Phase 2 Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authen, S. (Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Gustafsson, J. (Royal Institute of Technology (Sweden)); Holmberg, J.-E. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland (Finland))

    2012-02-15

    The OECD/NEA CSNI Working Group on Risk Assessment (WGRisk) has set up a task group called DIGREL to develop a taxonomy of failure modes of digital components for the purposes of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). A parallel Nordic activity carried out a pre-study where a comparison of Nordic experiences and a literature review were performed. The study showed a wide range of approaches and solutions to the challenges given by digital I and C. In 2011, a proposal for the failure modes taxonomy was defined. This is based on a set of requirements agreed on the purpose of the taxonomy. The following levels of details can be distinguished from the hardware point of view: (1) the entire system, (2) a division, (3) processing units (and cabinets), (4) modules, i.e. subcomponents of processing units and (5) generic components, i.e. subcomponents of modules. Module level seems to be the most appropriate from the PSA modelling point of view. The software failure modes taxonomy is still an open issue. An existing simplified PSA model has been complemented with fault tree models for a four-redundant distributed protection system in order to study and demonstrate the effect of design features and modelling approaches. The example shows that even rather simple I and C design leads to rather complex model despite of the fact that many things have been simplified and only a few protection signals are considered. One lesson from the example is that the Alpha factor model should be used to model common cause failures instead of the Beta factor model. Two options were developed to the comparison of different fail-safe principles. The role of detectable and undetectable failure modes with respect to the failed versus spurious actuations can be clearly seen in the results, showing the importance to model these features in PSA. (Author)

  3. Impact Evaluation of Domains of Learning on Universal Work Precautions (UWP) Amongst Nursing Staff in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Western India

    OpenAIRE

    Rashmi Sharma; Pradeep Kumar; Brijesh Patel; Sanju Gajjar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Second key strategy of National AIDS Control Program (NACP IV) is comprehensive care and support by providing quality services through zero stigma and discrimination. Quality of services can be improved by eliminating stigma and discrimination and making health care provider aware of associated occupational hazards. Nursing staff play crucial role and are more at risk therefore their understanding, perception and skill must be assessed in different domains of learning to improve...

  4. Decreased fucosylated PSA as a urinary marker for high Gleason score prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Kazutoshi; Hayashi, Takuji; Matsuzaki, Kyosuke; Nakata, Wataru; Masuda, Mika; Kawashima, Atsunari; Ujike, Takeshi; Nagahara, Akira; Tsuchiya, Mutsumi; Kobayashi, Yuka; Nojima, Satoshi; Uemura, Motohide; Morii, Eiichi; Miyoshi, Eiji; Nonomura, Norio

    2016-08-30

    Fucosylation is an important oligosaccharide modification associated with cancer and inflammation. We investigated whether urinary fucosylated PSA (Fuc-PSA) levels could be used for the detection of high Gleason score prostate cancer. Urine samples were collected from men with abnormal digital rectal examination findings or elevated serum PSA levels, before prostate biopsy. Lectin-antibody ELISA was used to quantify the Lewis-type or core-type fucosylated PSA (PSA-AAL) and core-type fucosylated PSA (PSA-PhoSL) in the urine samples. Both types of urinary Fuc-PSA were significantly decreased in the men with prostate cancer compared with the men whose biopsies were negative for cancer (P = 0.026 and P Gleason scores of the biopsy specimens (P = 0.001 and P Gleason score prostate cancer. The area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC) value for the prediction of cancers of Gleason score ≥ 7 was 0.69 for urinary PSA-AAL and 0.72 for urinary PSA-PhoSL. In contrast, the AUC value was 0.59 for serum PSA, 0.63 for PSA density, and 0.58 for urinary PSA. In conclusion, a decreased urinary Fuc-PSA level is a potential marker for the detection of high Gleason score prostate cancer.

  5. A simple computer program for calculating PSA recurrence in prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liao Zhongyue

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the most common tumor in men. The most commonly used diagnostic and tumor recurrence marker is Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA. After surgical removal or radiation treatment, PSA levels drop (PSA nadir and subsequent elevated or increased PSA levels are indicative of recurrent disease (PSA recurrence. For clinical follow-up and local care PSA nadir and recurrence is often hand calculated for patients, which can result in the application of heterogeneous criteria. For large datasets of prostate cancer patients used in clinical studies PSA measurements are used as surrogate measures of disease progression. In these datasets a method to measure PSA recurrence is needed for the subsequent analysis of outcomes data and as such need to be applied in a uniform and reproducible manner. This method needs to be simple and reproducible, and based on known aspects of PSA biology. Methods We have created a simple Perl-based algorithm for the calculation of post-treatment PSA outcomes results based on the initial PSA and multiple PSA values obtained after treatment. The algorithm tracks the post-surgical PSA nadir and if present, subsequent PSA recurrence. Times to PSA recurrence or recurrence free intervals are supplied in months. Results Use of the algorithm is demonstrated with a sample dataset from prostate cancer patients. The results are compared with hand-annotated PSA recurrence analysis. The strengths and limitations are discussed. Conclusions The use of this simple PSA algorithm allows for the standardized analysis of PSA recurrence in large datasets of patients who have undergone treatment for prostate cancer. The script is freely available, and easily modifiable for desired user parameters and improvements.

  6. Simulation and optimization of an industrial PSA unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barg C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA units have been used as a low cost alternative to the usual gas separation processes. Its largest commercial application is for hydrogen purification systems. Several studies have been made about the simulation of pressure swing adsorption units, but there are only few reports on the optimization of such processes. The objective of this study is to simulate and optimize an industrial PSA unit for hydrogen purification. This unit consists of six beds, each of them have three layers of different kinds of adsorbents. The main impurities are methane, carbon monoxide and sulfidric gas. The product stream has 99.99% purity in hydrogen, and the recovery is around 90%. A mathematical model for a commercial PSA unit is developed. The cycle time and the pressure swing steps are optimized. All the features concerning with complex commercial processes are considered.

  7. PSA testing in Austria: induced morbidity and saved mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutuc, Christian; Waldhoer, Thomas; Lunglmayr, Gerhard; Hoeltl, Wolfgang; Haidinger, Gerald

    2009-09-01

    Opportunistic screening of healthy men by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing led to a steep increase of prostate cancer incidence in Austria. The objective of this study was to quantify how many additional men are diagnosed with prostate cancer by PSA testing, to save one man from prostate cancer death. Regression models for incidence and mortality for the time periods 1983-1991 and 1992-2003 by age groups 50-59 and 60-69 years were estimated. For 1992-2003, expected numbers of incidence and mortality were calculated. The first estimates for the years 1992-2003 were calculated using the regression model including the years 1983-1991. The second estimates were also calculated using the regression model, but including only the years 1992-2003. The difference between estimates was then summed up for 1992-2003. The corresponding sums of incidence and mortality were compared to provide estimates for the effect of the introduction of PSA screening on incidence/mortality ratio. According to our calculation for the time period 1992-2003, in age group 50-69 years, a total of 512 expected prostate cancer deaths were prevented because of opportunistic PSA screening, whereas PSA testing identified a total of 9648 additional men with asymptomatic prostate cancer. In conclusion, to save one man in the age group 50-69 years in the time period 1992-2003 from prostate cancer death by PSA testing, a total of 18.8 men with asymptomatic prostate cancer had to be identified. Although this study probably underestimates the benefit (reduced mortality) and overestimates excess incidence of prostate cancer, it is far from sure that in all of these additionally identified men prostate cancer would ever have surfaced as a clinical disease, if not screened for.

  8. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Document Server

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/ Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  9. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...

  10. Identifying and addressing sexual health in serious mental illness: Views of mental health staff working in two National Health Service organizations in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Elizabeth; Edmondson, Amanda J; Onyekwe, Ijeoma; Quinn, Chris; Nolan, Fiona

    2017-11-18

    People with serious mental illness (service users) have needs related to sexual health and sexuality, yet these have been poorly addressed in mental health services. In the present study, we report the current practice of mental health professionals in relation to sexual health. Focus groups conducted in two mental health trusts explored routine practice in relation to discussing, assessing, and planning care in relation to sexual health. A thematic analysis identified seven themes: (i) sexual health provision is a complex issue; (ii) mental health staff are aware of sexual health needs; (iii) current provision regarding sexual health is 'neglected'; (iv) barriers to sexual health provision; (v) enabling a discussion around sexual health; (vi) sexual health provision is a role for mental health professionals; and (vii) training needs. Mental health staff are aware of complex issues related to sexual health for service users, but this is mainly seen through the lens of risk management and safeguarding. We need to develop the mental health workforce to be able to incorporate sexual health into routine health care. © 2017 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  11. Reducing the Risk of Methadone Overdose PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-03

    This 60 second PSA is based on the July 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Approximately 14 people die every day of overdoses related to methadone. Listen to learn how to reduce your risk of an overdose.  Created: 7/3/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/3/2012.

  12. Prognostic Significance of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To investigate the prognostic significance of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) rate of change in patients with advanced prostate cancer . Patients and Methods: A total of forty-nine male patients aged between 42 and 84 years with advanced prostate cancer receiving therapy of maximum androgen bloackade were ...

  13. Association between steroid hormone receptors and PSA gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with presence of steroid hormone receptors. The aim of this research was to show differential expression and association between steroid hormone receptors and PSA gene expression in breast cancer cell lines. The cell lines investigated were steroid receptor-negative breast carcinoma cell lines BT-20 and ...

  14. Asian and Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-12

    In this PSA, Asians and Pacific Islanders are encouraged to talk about HIV and get tested for HIV.  Created: 5/12/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/12/2010.

  15. Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings 1 PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-19

    This 30 second PSA encourages people to wash their hands often while in the hospital or visiting someone in the hospital. It also encourages them to remind their healthcare providers to wash their hands, too.  Created: 8/19/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/19/2010.

  16. Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings 2 PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-19

    This 30 second PSA encourages people to wash their hands often while in the hospital or visiting someone in the hospital. It also encourages them to remind their healthcare providers to wash their hands, too.  Created: 8/19/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/19/2010.

  17. Lifestyle and Clinical Health Behaviors and PSA Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Cynthia; McFall, Stephanie

    2006-01-01

    This study assessed the association of lifestyle and clinical health behaviors with prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests. The study used cross-sectional data from the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). We used Stata 8.0 to take into account the complex sample design in analyses. Both lifestyle and clinical health behaviors…

  18. System analysis procedures for conducting PSA of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Hwan; Jeong, Won Dae; Kim, Tae Un; Kim, Kil You; Han, Sang Hoon; Chang, Seung Chul; Sung, Tae Yong; Yang, Jun Eon; Kang, Dae Il; Park, Jin Hee; Hwang, Mi Jeong; Jin, Young Ho

    1997-03-01

    This document, the Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) procedures guide for system analysis, is intended to provide the guidelines to analyze the target of system consistently and technically in the performance of PSA for nuclear power plants(NPPs). The guide has been prepared in accordance with the procedures and techniques for fault tree analysis(FTA) used in system analysis. Normally the main objective of system analysis is to assess the reliability of system modeled by Event Tree Analysis(ETA). A variety of analytical techniques can be used for the system analysis, however, FTA method is used in this procedures guide. FTA is the method used for representing the failure logic of plant systems deductively using AND, OR or NOT gates. The fault tree should reflect all possible failure modes that may contribute to the system unavailability. This should include contributions due to the mechanical failures of the components, Common Cause Failures (CCFs), human errors and outages for testing and maintenance. After the construction of fault tree is completed, system unavailability is calculated with the CUT module of KIRAP, and the qualitative and quantitative analysis is performed through the process as above stated. As above mentioned, the procedures for system analysis is based on PSA procedures and methods which has been applied to the safety assessments of constructing NPPs in the country. Accordingly, the method of FTA stated in this procedures guide will be applicable to PSA for the NPPs to be constructed in the future. (author). 6 tabs., 11 figs., 7 refs.

  19. Improving staff selection processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerinus, Marie; Shannon, Marina

    2014-11-11

    This article, the second in a series of articles on Leading Better Care, describes the actions undertaken in recent years in NHS Lanarkshire to improve selection processes for nursing, midwifery and allied health professional (NMAHP) posts. This is an area of significant interest to these professions, management colleagues and patients given the pivotal importance of NMAHPs to patient care and experience. In recent times the importance of selecting staff not only with the right qualifications but also with the right attributes has been highlighted to ensure patients are well cared for in a safe, effective and compassionate manner. The article focuses on NMAHP selection processes, tracking local, collaborative development work undertaken to date. It presents an overview of some of the work being implemented, highlights a range of important factors, outlines how evaluation is progressing and concludes by recommending further empirical research.

  20. Rapid elimination kinetics of free PSA or human kallikrein-related peptidase 2 after initiation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-antagonist treatment of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulmert, David; Vickers, Andrew J; Scher, Howard I

    2012-01-01

    The utility of conventional prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurements in blood for monitoring rapid responses to treatment for prostate cancer is limited because of its slow elimination rate. Prior studies have shown that free PSA (fPSA), intact PSA (iPSA) and human kallikrein-related peptidase...... of tPSA, fPSA, iPSA and hK2 after rapid induction of castration with degarelix (Firmagon(®)), a novel GnRH antagonist....

  1. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  2. Diagnostic Role of Serum Free-to-Total Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) Ratio in Prostate Cancer with Serum Total Concentration of PSA below 4 ng/mL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Chun; Lee, Yi-Chen; Tsai, Huang-Wen; Yii, Shyi-Chun; Yen, Tzung-Hai; Chu, Fang-Yeh

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of serum free-to-total prostate specific antigen ratio (%fPSA) for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) in men with different serum total PSA (tPSA) categories. From January 2010 to December 2013, a total of 225 patients with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) underwent tPSA and %fPSA measurements. Histological examination with calculation of Gleason score and whole body bone scans were performed in identified cases of PCa. PCa was diagnosed in 44 (19.6%) patients and the remaining 181 patients had benign prostate disease. PCa was detected in 5 (23.8%), 13 (8.7%) and 26 (47.3%) cases with tPSA level ranges≤4 ng/ml, 4 to 10 ng/ml and >10 ng/ml, respectively. The average Gleason score was 7.2±0.2. Some 6 (13.6%) out of 44 PCa patients had bone metastases. The sensitivity was 80% and specificity was 81.3% at the cut-off %fPSA of 15% in PCa patients with a tPSA level below 4 ng/ mL. A lower %fPSA was associated with PCa patients with Gleason score≥7 than those with Gleason score≤6 (11.7±0.98 vs. 16.5±2.25%, P=0.029). No obvious relation of %fPSA to the incidence of bone metastasis was apparent in this study. The clinical application of %fPSA could help to discriminate PCa from benign prostate disease in men with a tPSA concentration below 4 ng/mL.

  3. English for Airport Ground Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  4. PSA testing for men at average risk of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce K Armstrong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing of men at normal risk of prostate cancer is one of the most contested issues in cancer screening. There is no formal screening program, but testing is common – arguably a practice that ran ahead of the evidence. Public and professional communication about PSA screening has been highly varied and potentially confusing for practitioners and patients alike. There has been much research and policy activity relating to PSA testing in recent years. Landmark randomised controlled trials have been reported; authorities – including the 2013 Prostate Cancer World Congress, the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia, Cancer Council Australia, and the National Health and Medical Research Council – have made or endorsed public statements and/or issued clinical practice guidelines; and the US Preventive Services Task Force is revising its recommendations. But disagreement continues. The contention is partly over what the new evidence means. It is also a result of different valuing and prioritisation of outcomes that are hard to compare: prostate cancer deaths prevented (a small and disputed number; prevention of metastatic disease (somewhat more common; and side-effects of treatment such as incontinence, impotence and bowel trouble (more common again. A sizeable proportion of men diagnosed through PSA testing (somewhere between 20% and 50% would never have had prostate cancer symptoms sufficient to prompt investigation; many of these men are older, with competing comorbidities. It is a complex picture. Below are four viewpoints from expert participants in the evolving debate, commissioned for this cancer screening themed issue of Public Health Research & Practice. We asked the authors to respond to the challenge of PSA testing of asymptomatic, normal-risk men. They raise important considerations: uncertainty, harms, the trustworthiness and interpretation of the evidence, cost (e.g. of using multiparametric

  5. Guidelines for reliability analysis of digital systems in PSA context. Phase 3. Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authen, S. [Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Holmberg, J.-E. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    2013-03-15

    Digital protection and control systems appear as upgrades in older plants, and are commonplace in new nuclear power plants. To assess the risk of nuclear power plant operation and to determine the risk impact of digital systems, there is a need to quantitatively assess the reliability of the digital systems in a justifiable manner. In 2007, the OECD/NEA CSNI directed the Working Group on Risk Assessment (WGRisk) to set up a task group to coordinate an activity in this field. One of the recommendations was to develop a taxonomy of failure modes of digital components for the purposes of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), resulting in a follow-up task group called DIGREL. The taxonomy will be the basis of future modelling and quantification efforts. It will also help define a structure for data collection and to review PSA studies. This an interim report of the project. A draft guidelines document on the failure modes taxonomy has been developed. The taxonomy is rather complete covering all levels from the system level down to module and basic component level failure modes, including hardware and software aspects. There are still open issues to be resolved by the task group, especially related to I and C unit and module level taxonomy. In a parallel Nordic activity, a comparison of Nordic experiences and a literature review on main international references has been performed. The study showed a wide range of approaches and solutions to the challenges given by digital I and C, and also indicated that no state-of-the-art currently exists. An existing simplified PSA model has been complemented with fault tree models for a four-redundant distributed protection system in order to study and demonstrate the effect of design features and modelling approaches. The model has been used to test the effect of CCF modelling, fail-safe principle and voting logic. A comparison has been made between unit-level and module-level modelling. (Author)

  6. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  7. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cheryl K; Guo, Maggie; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Traditional screening and diagnostic methods include digital rectal examinations (DREs), biopsies and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, with the latter being the more popular. PSA is a biomarker for prostate cancer; however, it is highly sensitive to external factors as well as other prostate diseases. As such, the reliability of of the serum PSA level as a sole screening and diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is controversial. Recently, it has been shown that fasting extremes can affect concentrations of serum chemistry analytes, thus raising the question of whether or not fasting has an effect on the highly sensitive PSA biomarker. Patients testing for serum PSA levels are often concomitantly submitting to other tests that require fasting, subjecting certain patients to a fasting PSA level while others not. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this discrepancy in fasting state translates into an effect on serum PSA levels. Serum PSA levels and fasting time records for 157 276 men who underwent testing at Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS; Calgary, Alberta, Canada) between 01 January 2010 and 31 March 2013 were accessed. Linear regression models of mean PSA levels and fasting times revealed a statistically important relationship at certain fasting times. Applying a dynamic mathematical model to explore the clinical effect of fasting suggests minimal impact on serum PSA result interpretation. Thus, patients can be tested for serum PSA levels regardless of their fasting state. PMID:24994780

  8. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cheryl K; Guo, Maggie; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Traditional screening and diagnostic methods include digital rectal examinations (DREs), biopsies and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, with the latter being the more popular. PSA is a biomarker for prostate cancer; however, it is highly sensitive to external factors as well as other prostate diseases. As such, the reliability of of the serum PSA level as a sole screening and diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is controversial. Recently, it has been shown that fasting extremes can affect concentrations of serum chemistry analytes, thus raising the question of whether or not fasting has an effect on the highly sensitive PSA biomarker. Patients testing for serum PSA levels are often concomitantly submitting to other tests that require fasting, subjecting certain patients to a fasting PSA level while others not. The objective of this study was to investigate whether this discrepancy in fasting state translates into an effect on serum PSA levels. Serum PSA levels and fasting time records for 157 276 men who underwent testing at Calgary Laboratory Services (CLS; Calgary, Alberta, Canada) between 01 January 2010 and 31 March 2013 were accessed. Linear regression models of mean PSA levels and fasting times revealed a statistically important relationship at certain fasting times. Applying a dynamic mathematical model to explore the clinical effect of fasting suggests minimal impact on serum PSA result interpretation. Thus, patients can be tested for serum PSA levels regardless of their fasting state.

  9. Take Charge. Take the Test. "You Know" PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 60 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  10. Teen Pregnancy - What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-05

    This 60 second PSA is based on the April, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Having a child during the teen years comes at a high cost to the young mother, her child, and the community. Get tips to help break the cycle of teen pregnancy.  Created: 4/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/5/2011.

  11. Asthma - What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-03

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement (PSA) is based on the May, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Children and adults can have asthma and attacks can be frightening. To help control asthma, know the warning signs of an attack, stay away from asthma triggers, and follow your health care provider's advice.  Created: 5/3/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/3/2011.

  12. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  13. Staff Development for Teaching Slow Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Rhona

    2008-01-01

    If you have noticed that your teachers need more "tricks up their sleeves" for working with slow learners, you can initiate a staff-development plan for changing that. Here are some suggestions for using the time, resources, and staff that you already have to improve the teaching of slow learners.

  14. Training staff to manage challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  15. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  16. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  17. Developing Professional Learning for Staff Working with Children with Speech, Language and Communication Needs Combined with Moderate-Severe Learning Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    This article presents research undertaken as part of a PhD by Carolyn Anderson who is a senior lecturer on the BSc (Hons) in Speech and Language Pathology at the University of Strathclyde. The study explores the professional learning experiences of 49 teachers working in eight schools and units for children with additional support needs in…

  18. Burnout among County Extension Staff Involved in the Rural Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Robert

    1988-01-01

    Examines burnout, focusing on levels of burnout in rural Illinois extension service staff. Identifies work and conditions that create high risk of burnout. Indicates crisis staff working with distressed families experienced burnout as often as other staff. Makes recommendations for reducing burnout among rural social service providers. (Author/TES)

  19. Outcome and complications of radical prostatectomy in patients with PSA <10 ng/ml: comparison between the retropubic, perineal and laparoscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, L; Levrel, O; Anastasiadis, A G; Saint, F; de La Taille, A; Cicco, A; Vordos, D; Hoznek, A; Chopin, D; Abbou, C-C

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the oncological outcomes and complications of prostate cancer patients with prostate specific antigen (PSA)catetherization (12.1 days), and length of hospital stay (12.1 days) were higher in the retropubic group (P0.05). The actuarial 3-year recurrence-free survival rate was 89.3%, 89.2% and 86.2% (P>0.05) for retropubic, perineal and laparoscopic approach, respectively. It can be concluded that in patients with preoperative PSA<10 ng/ml, clinical outcome and complication rates were similar, regardless of the choice of surgical approach.

  20. Patient initiated aggression - prevalence and impact for general practice staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, Pushpani; Forrest, Laura; McRae, Ian; Parker, Rhian

    2011-06-01

    Patient initiated aggression toward general practice staff can cause distress among staff, however, it is unknown how frequently practice staff experience patient aggression in the workplace. The aim of this study is to determine the national prevalence of patient aggression toward general practice staff. A clustered cross sectional survey involving general practice staff working in Australia. A questionnaire was posted to 1109 general practices nationally and 217 questionnaires were completed and returned (19.6% response rate). It was found that verbal aggression is commonly experienced by practice staff, particularly receptionists, whereas physical aggression is infrequent. Staff working in larger practices experience more verbal aggression and property damage or theft and it was reported that verbal aggression has a greater impact on staff wellbeing than physical aggression. This study provides some national evidence of the prevalence of patient aggression toward general practice staff. This may inform the development of policy and procedures.

  1. Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy by Helical Tomotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Toxicity and Impact on Nadir PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvina Barra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the toxicity of a hypofractionated schedule for primary radiotherapy (RT of prostate cancer as well as the value of the nadir PSA (nPSA and time to nadir PSA (tnPSA as surrogate efficacy of treatment. Material and Methods. Eighty patients underwent hypofractionated schedule by Helical Tomotherapy (HT. A dose of 70.2 Gy was administered in 27 daily fractions of 2.6 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were graded on the RTOG/EORTC scales. The nPSA and the tnPSA for patients treated with exclusive RT were compared to an equal cohort of 20 patients treated with conventional fractionation and standard conformal radiotherapy. Results. Most of patients (83% did not develop acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicity and 50% did not present genitourinary (GU toxicity. After a median follow-up of 36 months only grade 1 of GU and GI was reported in 6 and 3 patients as late toxicity. Average tnPSA was 30 months. The median value of nPSA after exclusive RT with HT was 0.28 ng/mL and was significantly lower than the median nPSA (0.67 ng/mL of the conventionally treated cohort (P=0.02. Conclusions. Hypofractionated RT schedule with HT for prostate cancer treatment reports very low toxicity and reaches a low level of nPSA that might correlate with good outcomes.

  2. [Prostate specific antigen--PSA and histopathological findings of endometrium in women with fibrocystic breast disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radowicki, Stanisław; Kunicki, Michał

    2010-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between serum free and total PSA and histopathological findings in women with fibrocystic mastopathy. 176 women with fibrocystic breast disease, aged 18 to 45 years.--Group I: comprised 114 patients with cysts 10 mm in diameter. The control group consisted of 46 healthy women aged 18 - 45 years who had no breast pathology Total PSA (PSA-T) and free PSA (PSA-Free) were measured by an ultra-sensitive fluoroimmunometric DELFIA assay (Prostatus PSA Free/Total Wallac, Turku, Finland). The detection limit for PSA was 0.01 ng/ml. Endometrial samples have been obtained with Pipelle probe between 22 and 24 days of the menstrual cycle. In the control group secretory endometrium was more frequently detected than in the mastopathy group (chi2 = 11,15, p = 0.01). Proliferatory (chi2 = 8.27, p = 0.004) and presecretory endometrium (chi2 = 4.61, p = 0.03) were more frequently detected in the mastopathy group than in controls. We did not find statistically significant relationship between the mean PSA concentrations between the groups in relation to histopathological findings. No relationships between free and total PSA measured in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle and endometrial findings were detected in our study. Further research is required to evaluate the relationship between PSA and endometrial findings.

  3. Engaging Frontline Leaders and Staff in Real-Time Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jennifer; Hebish, Linda J; Mann, Sharon; Ching, Joan M; Blackmore, C Craig

    2016-04-01

    The relationship of staff satisfaction and engagement to organizational success, along with the integral influence of frontline managers on this dimension, is well established in health care and other industries. To specifically address staff engagement, Virginia Mason Medical Center, an integrated, single-hospital health system, developed an approach that involved leaders, through the daily use of standard work for leaders, as well as staff, through a Lean-inspired staff idea system. Kaizen Promotion Office (KPO) staff members established three guiding principles: (1) Staff engagement begins with leader engagement; (2) Integrate daily improve- ment (kaizen) as a habitual way of life not as an add-on; and (3) Create an environment in which staff feel psycho- logically safe and valued. Two design elements--Standard Work for Leaders (SWL) and Everyday Lean Ideas (ELIs) were implemented. For the emergency department (ED), an early adopter of the staff engagement work, the challenge was to apply the guiding principles to improve staff engagement while improving quality and patient and staff satisfaction, even as patient volumes were increasing. Daily huddles for the KPO staff members and weekly leader rounds are used to elicit staff ideas and foster ELIs in real time. Overall progress to date has been tracked in terms of staff satisfaction surveys, voluntary staff turnover, adoption of SWL, and testing and implementation of staff ideas. For example, voluntary turnover of ED staff decreased from 14.6% in 2011 to 7.5% in 2012, and 2.0% in 2013. Organizationwide, at least 800 staff ideas are in motion at any given time, with finished ones posted in an idea supermarket website. A leadership and staff engagement approach that focuses on SWL and on capturing staff ideas for daily problem solving and improvement can contribute to organization success and improve the quality of health care delivery.

  4. Co-introduction of a steroid with docetaxel chemotherapy for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer affects PSA flare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Yokomizo, Akira; Takeuchi, Ario; Kiyoshima, Keijiro; Inokuchi, Junichi; Tatsugami, Katsunori; Shiga, Ken-Ichiro; Koga, Hirofumi; Yamaguchi, Akito; Naito, Seiji; Eto, Masatoshi

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the potential relationship of steroid usage with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) flare as well as the prognostic impact of PSA flare, which is known to occur in 10-20% of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer during docetaxel chemotherapy. This study included 71 patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer treated by docetaxel chemotherapy with co-introduction of a steroid. PSA flare was defined as a transient PSA increase followed by a PSA decrease. PSA flare was recognized in 7.0-23.9% of patients according to the definition used. Intriguingly, men with steroid intake before the initiation of docetaxel chemotherapy experienced significantly fewer PSA flares. The progression-free survival rate in men with PSA flare was equivalent to that of PSA responders, but significantly better than men with PSA failure. Our results suggest that de novo steroid co-introduction with docetaxel chemotherapy induces the PSA flare phenomenon. This novel finding may account for the mechanism of PSA flare as well as being valuable for distinguishing PSA elevation attributable to PSA flare from that attributable to PSA failure. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Perceptions regarding the ease of use and usefulness of health information exchange systems among medical providers, case managers and non-clinical staff members working in HIV care and community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Janet J; Koester, Kimberly A; Chakravarty, Deepalika; Pearson, Charles; Maiorana, Andres; Shade, Starley B; Steward, Wayne T

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe how members of HIV patients' care teams perceived the usefulness and ease of use of newly implemented, innovative health information exchange systems (HIEs) in diverse HIV treatment settings. Five settings with existing electronic medical records (EMRs) received special funding to test enhancements to their systems. Participating clinics and community-based organizations added HIEs permitting bi-directional exchange of information across multiple provider sites serving the same HIV patient population. We conducted in-depth qualitative interviews and quantitative web-based surveys with case managers, medical providers, and non-clinical staff members to assess the systems' perceived usefulness and ease of use shortly after the HIEs were implemented. Our approach to data analysis was iterative. We first conducted a thematic analysis of the qualitative data and discovered that there were key differences in perceptions and actual use of HIEs across occupational groups. We used these results to guide our analysis of the quantitative survey data, stratifying by occupational group. We found differences in reports of how useful and how well-used HIEs were, by occupation. Medical providers were more likely to use HIEs if they provided easier access to clinical information than was present in existing EMRs. Case managers working inside medical clinics found HIEs to be less helpful because they already had access to the clinical data. In contrast, case managers working in community settings appreciated the new access to patient information that the HIEs provided. Non-clinical staff uniformly found the HIEs useful for a broad range of tasks including clinic administration, grant writing and generating reports for funders. Our study offers insights into the use and potential benefits of HIE in the context of HIV care across occupational groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Oncology staff reflections about a 52-year-old staff Christmas choir: constructivist research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare C; Hornby, Colin J; Pearson, Elizabeth J M; Ball, David L

    2010-12-01

    Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre has one of the world's most enduring staff Christmas choirs. Commencing in 1956, the choir performs in a cafeteria, patient wards, and outpatient waiting areas before each Christmas. With recent emphasis on oncology staff support needs the choir's relevance warranted investigation. This constructivist research examined what effect the staff Christmas choir had on the choir members and staff bystanders in 2008. Sampling was convenience and purposive. Staff choir members were invited to participate during rehearsals, and staff bystanders were invited at seven choir performances in the hospital. Respondents completed anonymous and semistructured questionnaires and the conductor (of 29 years) was interviewed. The inductive, comparative, and cyclic data analyses were informed by grounded theory and qualitative interrater reliability was performed. Questionnaires from 64 staff were returned. The choir elicited positive emotions, memories, Christmas spirit, hospital community and/or work-life effects for many staff, in a cancer context described as sometimes "overwhelming" and "stressful." Choir members' reactions included stress relief, friendship and feeling rewarded. Bystanders' reactions included feeling uplifted, inspired and moved. Suggestions for future performances were offered, including musical acknowledgement of other religious festivals. Two respondents were concerned about intrusive effects on patients and work practices. A staff Christmas choir supported most choir member and staff bystander respondents in an oncology hospital and is recommended in comparable contexts. Further investigation is warranted to extend understanding about Christmas music's effects in palliative care settings.

  7. 'I give staff time to care'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, Clare

    Flo Panel-Coates is working to improve care at a heavily criticised NHS trust. Since taking on the director of nursing post in October 2012, she has secured more support for ward leaders, giving them time to do their job, improved the skill mix of staff, and cut senior nurses' paperwork. Ensuring staff work consistently to the highest standard is the NHS's biggest challenge, she says.

  8. Association between PSA kinetics and cancer-specific mortality in patients with localised prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Frederik Birkebæk; Brasso, Klaus; Berg, Kasper Drimer

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prognostic value of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics in untreated prostate cancer (PCa) patients is debatable. We investigated the association between PSA doubling time (PSAdt), PSA velocity (PSAvel) and PSAvel risk count (PSAvRC) and PCa mortality in a cohort of patients...... were included of which 116, 76 and 71 had a PSA at consent ≤10, 10.1-25, and >25 ng/ml, respectively. Median follow-up was 13.6 years. For patients with PSA at consent between 10.1 and 25 ng/ml, the 13-year risks of PCa mortality were associated with PSA kinetics: PSAdt ≤3 years: 62.0% versus PSAdt >3...... years: 16.3% (Gray's test: P associated with changes of 13-year risks of PCa...

  9. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  10. Staff Specialist Survival Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The syllabus for this 4.5-day course addresses the challenges for today’s staff specialists and provides not only hands-on review of actual artifacts...but also case studies to enhance learners’ actual experiences. Background The course was designed to magnify the staff specialist’s skills in

  11. Academic staff reward

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    structures and management systems. As a result, many universities are rethinking their reward strategies to better align them with the new realities in order to improve teaching staff motivation and retention. This study was conducted to identify academic staff reward related problems and to examine the effectiveness of both ...

  12. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  13. Valores laborales y percepción del estilo de liderazgo en personal de enfermería Work values and perception of leadership style in nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma del Carmen Aguilar-Luzón

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar el perfil de los valores laborales de los profesionales de enfermería y analizar si se relacionan con el estilo de liderazgo percibido. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Se utilizaron las escalas de medida EVAT-30 y l SBDQ. Participaron 160 enfermeros/as de un hospital público de Almería, España. El estudio se realizó en octubre de 2005. RESULTADOS: Los valores más apreciados por estos profesionales son: autoridad/poder, tradición, logro y autodirección. La percepción del estilo de liderazgo orientado hacia la tarea, correlaciona positivamente con los valores autoridad/poder, seguridad y logro, y negativamente con los valores benevolencia y universalismo. La percepción del estilo de liderazgo orientado hacia la relación correlaciona positivamente con los valores universalismo, logro, tradición y autodirección. CONCLUSIONES: Los resultados sugieren que el estilo de liderazgo adoptado por el supervisor puede influir en el perfil de valores de los subordinados.OBJECTIVE: To identify the profile of work values according to nursing professionals and analyze the relationship, if any, of such values with the perception of leadership styles. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The EVAT-30 and the SDBQ questionnaires were used in this study. The sample comprised 160 nurses of an Almería public hospital, in the south of Spain. This study was carried out in October 2005. RESULTS: Values associated with authority/power, tradition, achievement and self-direction are deemed most important by nursing professionals. Perception of the task-oriented leader’s behavior positively correlates with values of authority/power, confidence and achievement, and negatively correlates with values of benevolence and universalism. Perception of the relationship/consideration-oriented leader’s behavior positively correlates with values of universalism, achievement, tradition and self-direction. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the perception of leadership

  14. Inhibition of pneumococcal adherence to human nasopharyngeal epithelial cells by anti-PsaA antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Steiner, Sandra; Pilishvili, Tamar; Sampson, Jacquelyn S; Johnson, Scott E; Stinson, Annie; Carlone, George M; Ades, Edwin W

    2003-03-01

    The role of pneumococcal (Pnc) surface adhesin A (PsaA) in the adherence of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) to host cells is not well defined. We examined the effect of anti-PsaA antibodies in an inhibition of adherence assay using Detroit 562 nasopharyngeal human epithelial cells. Rabbit polyclonal (Pab) anti-recombinant PsaA (rPsaA) sera, a purified mouse monoclonal antibody (MAb) (MAb 6F62G8E12), and 22 healthy adult sera with known anti-PsaA IgG levels (obtained by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) were evaluated for their abilities to inhibit Pnc adherence to confluent monolayers (measured as percent reduction in CFU counts compared to those of uninhibited controls). Pnc adherence was dependent on capsular phenotype (no or low adherence for opaque strains). With an inoculum of 10(4) to 10(5) bacteria/well, the mean +/- standard deviation count in controls was 163 +/- 32 CFU/well for transparent strains. Low adherence was observed for a PsaA-minus mutant even at higher inoculum doses. Mean percent inhibitions of adherence with Pab and MAb were 54 and 50%, respectively. Adult sera showed inhibition in a dose-response fashion with a range of 98 to 8%, depending on the serum anti-PsaA antibody concentration. Absorption of Pab with rPsaA restored Pnc adherence to control levels. Absorption of sera with a PsaA-minus mutant did not result in a significant decrease (P >0.05) of inhibition of adherence activity. Additionally, nearly 100% of Pnc adherence was inhibited by lipidated rPsaA at 2.5 micro g/ml. Our data support the argument that PsaA is an adhesin that mediates Pnc adherence to human nasopharyngeal cells. This functional assay may be useful in evaluating antibodies elicited in response to PsaA vaccination.

  15. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Cheryl K; Maggie Guo; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. Traditional screening and diagnostic methods include digital rectal examinations (DREs), biopsies and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests, with the latter being the more popular. PSA is a biomarker for prostate cancer; however, it is highly sensitive to external factors as well as other prostate diseases. As such, the reliability of of the serum PSA level as a sole screening and diagnostic tool for prostate cancer is controvers...

  16. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-05

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement (PSA) is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 7/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/5/2011.

  17. The Planetary Science Archive (PSA): Exploration and discovery of scientific datasets from ESA's planetary missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat, C.; Besse, S.; Barbarisi, I.; Arviset, C.; De Marchi, G.; Barthelemy, M.; Coia, D.; Costa, M.; Docasal, R.; Fraga, D.; Heather, D. J.; Lim, T.; Macfarlane, A.; Martinez, S.; Rios, C.; Vallejo, F.; Said, J.

    2017-09-01

    The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) is the European Space Agency's (ESA) repository of science data from all planetary science and exploration missions. The PSA provides access to scientific datasets through various interfaces at http://psa.esa.int. All datasets are scientifically peer-reviewed by independent scientists, and are compliant with the Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. The PSA has started to implement a number of significant improvements, mostly driven by the evolution of the PDS standards, and the growing need for better interfaces and advanced applications to support science exploitation.

  18. [Clinicopathologic and biological correlations (PSA-PAP) in pathology of the prostate. Apropos of 150 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiel, J; Chevallier, D; Peyrottes, A; Benoliel, J; Toubol, J

    1990-01-01

    On the basis of 150 patients (16 controls with no disease of the prostate, 96 cases of benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and 38 cases of carcinoma of the prostate (CP)), the authors intended to answer 3 questions: How can the borderline values of PSA in BPH be interpreted? Is there a correlation between the Gleason and PSA values in carcinomas? Should the simultaneous measurements of PSA and PAP be continued? All patients were examined with a rectal touch, transrectal echography (TRE) and PAS and PAP assays. All CP were examined with bone radionuclide scanning (BR). The correlation coefficient being 0.391 (p 0.001), the PSA value and prostatic weight can be regarded as linearly correlated in BPH (5 g BPH = 1 ng/ml PSA). This lower value of PSA is linked with the increase produced by TRE in the assessment of prostatic weight. On the other hand, the authors did no observe a correlation between the PSA and the Glisson grade in carcinomas with negative BR. Lastly, the sensitivity of PSA is noticeably higher than that of PAP (75% vs. 50%), and no false negative finding with PSA was corrected by PAP measurements.

  19. Analytic expressions for the construction of a fire event PSA model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dae Il; Kim, Kil Yoo; Kim, Dong San; Hwang, Mee Jeong; Yang, Joon Eon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the changing process of an internal event PSA model to a fire event PSA model is analytically presented and discussed. Many fire PSA models have fire induced initiating event fault trees not shown in an internal event PSA model. Fire-induced initiating fault tree models are developed for addressing multiple initiating event issues. A single fire event within a fire compartment or fire scenario can cause multiple initiating events. As an example, a fire in a turbine building area can cause a loss of the main feed-water and loss of off-site power initiating events. Up to now, there has been no analytic study on the construction of a fire event PSA model using an internal event PSA model with fault trees of initiating events. In this paper, the changing process of an internal event PSA model to a fire event PSA model was analytically presented and discussed. This study results show that additional cutsets can be obtained if the fault trees of initiating events for a fire event PSA model are not exactly developed.

  20. Development of a Base Model for the New Fire PSA Training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kilyoo; Kang, Daeil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Wee Kyong; Do, Kyu Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    US NRC/EPRI issued a new fire PSA method represented by NUREG/CR 6850, and have been training many operators and inspectors to widely spread the new method. However, there is a limitation in time and efficiency for many foreigners, who generally have communication problem, to participate in the EPRI/NRC training to learn the new method. Since it is about time to introduce the new fire PSA method as a regulatory requirement for the fire protection in Korea, a simple and easy-understandable base model for the fire PSA training is required, and KAERI-KINS is jointly preparing the base model for the new fire PSA training. This paper describes how the base model is developed. Using an imaginary simple NPP, a base model of fire PSA following the new fire PSA method was developed in two ways from the internal PSA model. Since we have the base model and know the process of making the fire PSA model, the training for the new fire PSA method can be in detail performed in Korea.

  1. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  2. Prevalence of pterygium among kitchen staff in Senior High Schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of pterygium and the risk factors prevailing at the work environments of the kitchen staff in some Senior High Schools (SHS) in the Kumasi Metropolis. A total of 290 kitchen staff and 120 administrative staff (control) were purposively sampled from the 13 SHSs in the ...

  3. Serum complexed and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for the diagnosis of the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandis, Eleftherios P; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Wheeler, Sarah; Mathew, Anu; Stengelin, Martin; Nikolenko, Galina; Glezer, Eli N; Brown, Marshall D; Zheng, Yingye; Chen, Yen-Hao; Wu, Hsiao-Li; Azziz, Ricardo

    2017-10-26

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a common cause of reproductive and metabolic dysfunction. We hypothesized that serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) may constitute a new biomarker for hyperandrogenism in PCOS. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 45 women with PCOS and 40 controls. Serum from these women was analyzed for androgenic steroids and for complexed PSA (cPSA) and free PSA (fPSA) with a novel fifth- generation assay with a sensitivity of ~10 fg/mL for cPSA and 140 fg/mL for fPSA. cPSA and fPSA levels were about three times higher in PCOS compared to controls. However, in PCOS, cPSA and fPSA did not differ according to waist-to-hip ratio, Ferriman-Gallwey score, or degree of hyperandrogenemia or oligo-ovulation. In PCOS and control women, serum cPSA and fPSA levels were highly correlated with each other, and with free and total testosterone levels, but not with other hormones. Adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI) and race, cPSA was significantly associated with PCOS, with an odds ratio (OR) of 5.67 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.86, 22.0). The OR of PCOS for fPSA was 7.04 (95% CI: 1.65, 40.4). A multivariate model that included age, BMI, race and cPSA yielded an area-under-the-receiver-operating-characteristic curve of 0.89. Serum cPSA and fPSA are novel biomarkers for hyperandrogenism in PCOS and may have value for disease diagnosis.

  4. Influence of trigger PSA and PSA kinetics on 11C-Choline PET/CT detection rate in patients with biochemical relapse after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellucci, Paolo; Fuccio, Chiara; Nanni, Cristina; Santi, Ivan; Rizzello, Anna; Lodi, Filippo; Franceschelli, Alessandro; Martorana, Giuseppe; Manferrari, Fabio; Fanti, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of total prostate-specific antigen (PSA) at the time of (11)C-choline PET/CT (trigger PSA), PSA velocity (PSAvel), and PSA doubling time (PSAdt) on (11)C-choline PET/CT detection rate in patients treated with radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer, who showed biochemical failure during follow-up. A total of 190 patients treated with radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer who showed an increase in PSA (mean, 4.2; median, 2.1; range, 0.2-25.4 ng/mL) were retrospectively enrolled. All patients were studied with (11)C-choline PET/CT. Patients were grouped according to trigger PSA (PSA 5 ng/mL). In 106 patients, data were available for calculation of PSAvel and PSAdt. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine whether there was a relationship between PSA levels and PSA kinetics and the rate of detection of relapse using PET. (11)C-choline PET/CT detected disease relapse in 74 of 190 patients (38.9%). The detection rate of (11)C-choline PET/CT was 19%, 25%, 41%, and 67% in the 4 subgroups-PSA 5 ng/mL (49 patients)-respectively. Trigger PSA values were statistically different between PET-positive patients (median PSA, 4.0 ng/mL) and PET-negative patients (median PSA, 1.4 ng/mL) (P = 0.0001). Receiver-operating-characteristic analysis showed an optimal cutoff point for trigger PSA of 2.43 ng/mL (area under the curve, 0.76). In 106 patients, PSAdt and PSAvel values were statistically different between patients with PET-positive and -negative scan findings (P = 0.04 and P = 0.03). The (11)C-choline PET/CT detection rate was 12%, 34%, 42%, and 70%, respectively, in patients with PSAvel 5 ng/mL/y (28 patients). The (11)C-choline PET/CT detection rate was 20%, 40%, 48%, and 60%, respectively, in patients with PSAdt > 6 mo (45 patients), 4 < PSAdt

  5. PSA screening for prostate cancer: why so much controversy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrie, Fernand

    2013-09-01

    Since prostate cancer reaches the advanced and non curable stage in the absence of any specific symptom or sign, it seems reasonable to diagnose this cancer at an early and curable stage. Screening by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been the common technology used. The last follow-up of the first two prospective and randomized screening studies for prostate cancer, namely the Quebec and ERSPC (European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer) clinical trials started in 1988 and 1991, respectively, have shown reductions of prostate cancer death of 62% (PProstate Lung Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer) screening trial reported no benefit. It has been estimated, however, that 85% of men in the planned 'non-screened' group of the US study have been screened. With such a serious flaw, the PLCO study does not have the statistical power to reach any valid conclusion. In the Quebec study, only 7.3% of men were screened in the control arm. The important benefit observed in the ERSPC study was achieved using a less than optimal 4-year PSA screening interval which misses a significant number of cancers while the Quebec study used the optimal 1-year interval. With proper information obtained from their physicians or otherwise using data collected only from the clinical trials having the required statistical power, men should be in a good position to decide about being or not being screened for prostate cancer.

  6. Histopathological findings in extended prostate biopsy with PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia R. Leite

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cancer detection has been reported in up to 27% of patients when lowering the PSA cutoff to 2.5 ng/mL. Although this practice could increase the number of biopsies performed, it also could lead to more frequent detection of significant prostate cancers at an organ-confined stage and/or a less aggressive state. This study describes the incidence of malignancy and tumor characteristics in extended prostate biopsies with PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prostate biopsies from 1081 patients where examined, 275 (25.4% patients had PSA level ≤ 4 ng/mL. RESULTS: Cancer was diagnosed in 32.0% and 35.7% of patients with PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL and > 4 ng/mL, respectively (p = 0.906. The median Gleason score was 7 independent of PSA > or ≤ 4 ng/mL (p = 0.078. The median number of cores positive for tumor was 4 and 3, respectively, for PSA > 4 ng/mL and PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL (p = 0.627. There was a difference in the total percent of tumors involving all cores, 11% and 7% for PSA > or ≤ 4 ng/mL (p = 0.042. Fifty-six patients underwent radical prostatectomy, 12 had PSA ≤ 4 ng/mL. In both groups, a diagnosis of cancer was accurate with no differences in Gleason score, tumor volume or staging for both groups. CONCLUSION: When PSA is below 4 ng/mL, cancer is detected in a proportion equal to the proportion diagnosed with a PSA > 4 ng/mL, and tumor characteristics are similar between the two groups. Only clinically significant tumors were diagnosed following radical prostatectomy.

  7. Motivating Your Development Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    1996-01-01

    Suggestions for motivating institutional advancement staff at colleges and universities include nonfinancial motivators (such as appreciation, team building, empowerment, professional development opportunities, flexibility, and formal recognition) and financial rewards (such as bonuses and merit pay). (DB)

  8. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  9. Staff Association Cocktail

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    The Staff Association has been organising for many years a cocktail with delegates of the Member States participating in Finance Committees of March and September. This cocktail is held at the end of the day, after the Finance Committee meeting. This direct and regular communication helps establish an ongoing contact between the Staff Association and CERN Member States and, more recently, the Associate Member States. Ambassadors of the CERN Staff Association, who are Members of the Personnel, have the opportunity to meet their national delegation in an informal and friendly atmosphere. These exchanges, facilitated by the use of the national language, allow the personnel via the Staff Association to express its ideas and positions on current affairs and fundamental issues, and also to hear about those of the delegations in return.

  10. Staff Association Information Meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Staff Association Information Meetings: - Thursday 29 September at 2 p.m., Meyrin, Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-017 (in French) - Friday 30 September at 10 a.m., Prévessin, BE Auditorium, 864-1-D02 (in French) - Monday 3 October at 2 p.m., Meyrin, IT Auditorium, 31-3-004 (in French) - Tuesday 4 October at 2 p.m., Meyrin, Filtration Plant, 222-R-001 (in English)   Staff Association

  11. PSA bounce after {sup 125}I-brachytherapy for prostate cancer as a favorable prognosticator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engeler, Daniel S.; Schwab, Christoph; Schmid, Hans-Peter [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Department of Urology, St. Gallen (Switzerland); Thoeni, Armin F. [Lindenhofspital Berne, Department of Radiation Oncology, Berne (Switzerland); Hochreiter, Werner [Hirslanden Klinik Aarau, Department of Urology, Aarau (Switzerland); Prikler, Ladislav [Klinik Uroviva Buelach, Department of Urology, Buelach (Switzerland); Suter, Stefan [Cantonal Hospital Zug, Department of Urology, Zug (Switzerland); Stucki, Patrick [Cantonal Hospital Lucerne, Department of Urology, Lucerne (Switzerland); Schiefer, Johann; Plasswilm, Ludwig; Putora, Paul Martin [Cantonal Hospital St. Gallen, Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Gallen (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    Permanent low-dose-rate brachytherapy (BT) with iodine 125 is an established curative treatment for localized prostate cancer. After treatment, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics may show a transient rise (PSA bounce). Our aim was to investigate the association of PSA bounce with biochemical control. Patients treated with BT in Switzerland were registered in a prospective database. Only patients with a follow-up of at least 2 years were included in our analysis. Clinical follow-up and PSA measurements were assessed after 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months, and annually thereafter. If PSA increased, additional follow-up visits were scheduled. Cases of PSA bounce were defined as a rise of at least 0.2 ng/ml above the initial PSA nadir with a subsequent decline to or below the initial nadir without treatment. Biochemical failure was defined as a rise to nadir + 2 ng/ml. Between March 2001 and November 2010, 713 patients with prostate cancer undergoing BT with at least 2 years of follow-up were registered. Median follow-up time was 41 months. Biochemical failure occurred in 28 patients (3.9 %). PSA bounce occurred in 173 (24.3 %) patients; only three (1.7 %) patients with PSA bounce developed biochemical failure, in contrast to 25 (4.6 %) patients without previous bounce (p < 0.05). The median time to bounce was 12 months, the median time to biochemical failure was 30 months. The median bounce increase was 0.78 ng/ml. Twenty-eight patients with bounce (16.5 %) had a transient PSA rise of + 2 ng/ml above the nadir. In most cases, an early increase in PSA after BT indicates PSA bounce and is associated with a lower risk of biochemical failure. (orig.) [German] Die permanente Low-dose-rate-Brachytherapie (BT) mit {sup 125}I ist ein etabliertes kuratives Verfahren bei lokalisiertem Prostatakarzinom. Posttherapeutisch koennen die PSA-Konzentrationen einen voruebergehenden Anstieg zeigen (Bounce-Phaenomen). Untersucht werden sollte ein moeglicher Zusammenhang mit der

  12. Supporting College and University Students with Invisible Disabilities: A Guide for Faculty and Staff Working with Students with Autism, AD/HD, Language Processing Disorders, Anxiety, and Mental Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oslund, Christy

    2013-01-01

    With increasing numbers of students with invisible disabilities attending college and university, faculty and staff find themselves faced with new challenges. This practical handbook provides lecturers, tutors, disability services, and administrative staff with an overview of the invisible disabilities they may encounter, dispelling common myths…

  13. Altered glycosylation pattern allows the distinction between prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from normal and tumor origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peracaula, Rosa; Tabarés, Glòria; Royle, Louise; Harvey, David J; Dwek, Raymond A; Rudd, Pauline M; de Llorens, Rafael

    2003-06-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a glycoprotein secreted by prostate epithelial cells. PSA is currently used as a marker of prostate carcinoma because high levels of PSA are indicative of a tumor situation. However, PSA tests still suffer from a lack of specificity to distinguish between benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer. To determine whether PSA glycosylation could provide a means of differentiating between PSA from normal and tumor origins, N-glycan characterization of PSA from seminal fluid and prostate cancer cells (LNCaP cell line) by sequencing analysis and mass spectrometry was carried out. Glycans from normal PSA (that correspond to low and high pI PSA fractions) were sialylated biantennary complex structures, half of them being disialylated in the low pI PSA fraction and mostly monosialylated in the high pI PSA. PSA from LNCaP cells was purified to homogeneity, and its glycan analysis showed a significantly different pattern, especially in the outer ends of the biantennary complex structures. In contrast to normal PSA glycans, which were sialylated, LNCaP PSA oligosaccharides were all neutral and contained a higher fucose content. In 10-15% of the structures fucose was linked alpha1-2 to galactose, forming the H2 epitope absent in normal PSA. GalNAc was increased in LNCaP glycans to 65%, whereas in normal PSA it was only present in 25% of the structures. These carbohydrate differences allow a distinction to be made between PSA from normal and tumor origins and suggest a valuable biochemical tool for diagnosis and follow-up purposes.

  14. The role of the percentage free PSA in the diagnosis of prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subjects and methods: A total 169 consecutive patients with tPSA of 4–10 ng/ml with non-suspicious findings on digital rectal examination (DRE) had a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided 10-core prostate biopsy. The technique of PSA analysis was the Access hybritech assay technique using the Beckman's Access ...

  15. A Study on the Risk Reduction Effect by MLCS (Mid-loop Level Control System) of EUAPR using the Low-Power and Shutdown PSA Result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Keunsung; Choi, Sunmi [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eden [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The EU-APR design has been developed in order to expand and diversify the global nuclear power market of APR1400. For the improvement of shutdown risk for the EUAPR, the mid-loop level control system (MLCS) is considered during mid-loop operation for the EU-APR, which is not incorporated into SKN 3 and 4 (APR1400 Type) in Korea. Commonly, the risk associated with the NPP can be identified through the PSA. Thus, this paper discusses the low power and shutdown (LPSD) risk reduction effect by MLCS using the Low-Power and Shutdown PSA Result. LPSD level 1 PSA models for EU-APR have been developed. The risk reduction effect by MLCS is discussed. Because the loss of shutdown cooling function during mid-loop is one of the most vulnerable events, the MLCS have a significant influence on CDF in LPSD PSA. The shutdown risk of domestic power plants would likely be reduced if the MLCS is adopted in all operating NPPs in Korea during the mid-loop operation. It is expected that this work will contribute to reduce shutdown risk of domestic power plants.

  16. Self-assembled particulate PsaA as vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majela González-Miro

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen responsible for the majority of childhood pneumonia and media otitis cases worldwide. The diversity of its capsular polysaccharides (CPS results in more than 91 serotypes of which at least 23 are virulent. Various CPS conjugated to immunogenic carrier proteins are currently licensed and provide protection against the infection caused by the respective serotypes but not against new and emerging virulent serotypes. In this study, we considered the conserved protein antigen PsaA, the pneumococcal surface adhesin A, in order to overcome the limitations of CPS antigens. The PsaA was translationally fused to a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB synthase which mediated production of PsaA displayed on PHB inclusions in recombinant Escherichia coli. This suggested that the PsaA fusion to the PHB synthase did not interfere with PHB synthase activity and its ability to mediate formation of nano-sized inclusions composed of a PHB core surrounded by the PHB synthase fused to PsaA. Isolated PHB beads showed a negative surface charge. Transmission electron microscopy analysis suggested that the PsaA fusion to the PHB synthase reduced the size of PHB beads from about 500 nm to 100 nm. The integrity and antigenicity of the fusion protein attached to isolated PHB beads was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, tryptic peptide fingerprinting analysis using MALDI-TOF-MS/MS and immunoblotting using a monoclonal anti-PsaA antibody. Mice immunized with PsaA displaying PHB beads produced high and specific IgG levels dominated by IgG1 isotype. While IgG1 titer were similar between soluble and insoluble PsaA, the IgG2 titers were strongly increased upon vaccination with insoluble PsaA i.e. PsaA displayed on PHB beads. Particulate PsaA-PHB beads elicited IgG antibodies recognizing PsaA in whole cell lysates of seven different serotypes of S. pneumoniae. This study suggested that PHB beads are suitable carriers for PsaA in order to induce a significant

  17. Multi-span transmission using phase and amplitude regeneration in PPLN-based PSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeki, T; Asobe, M; Takara, H; Miyamoto, Y; Takenouchi, H

    2013-07-29

    We demonstrated multi-span transmission using a periodically poled LiNbO(3) (PPLN) based phase sensitive amplifier (PSA). An in-line PSA with a carrier recovery and phase locking system is implemented as a repeater amplifier in a recirculating loop. We achieved a PSA gain as high as + 18 dB and a high external gain of + 12 dB for the in-line PSA as a black box. The impairments caused by phase noise resulting from fiber nonlinearity and intensity noise caused by the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) of an optical amplifier are largely suppressed using the phase and amplitude regeneration capabilities of the PSA. The ultra long-haul transmission of a 28-Gb/s binary phase shift keying (BPSK) signal over 5400 km was achieved with phase and amplitude regeneration.

  18. EOP Improvement Proposal for SGTR based on The OPR PSA Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Hee; Cho, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong San; Yang, Joon Eon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This updating process was also focused to enhance the PSA quality and to respect the as built and as operated conditions of target plants. For this purpose, the EOP(Emergency Operating Procedure) and AOP(Abnormal Operating Procedure) of target plant were reviewed in detail and various thermal hydraulic(T/H) analysis were also performed to analyze the realistic PSA accident sequence model. In this paper, the unreasonable point of SGTR (Steam Generator Tube Rupture) EOP based on PSA perspective was identified and the initial proposal for EOP change items from PSA insight was proposed. In this paper, the unreasonable point of SGTR EOP based on PSA perspective was identified and the EOP improvement items are proposed to enhance safety and operator's convenience for the target plant.

  19. Job satisfaction among emergency department staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, M; Asenjo, M; Sánchez, M

    2017-02-01

    To compare job satisfaction among nurses, physicians and administrative staff in an emergency department (ED). To analyse the relationship of job satisfaction with demographic and professional characteristics of these personnel. We performed a descriptive, cross-sectional study in an ED in Barcelona (Spain). Job satisfaction was evaluated by means of the Font-Roja questionnaire. Multivariate analysis determined relationship between the overall job satisfaction and the variables collected. Fifty-two nurses, 22 physicians and 30 administrative staff were included. Administrative staff were significantly more satisfied than physicians and nurses: 3.42±0.32 vs. 2.87±0.42 and 3.06±0.36, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed the following variables to be associated with job satisfaction: rotation among the different ED acuity levels (OR: 2.34; 95%CI: 0.93-5.89) and being an administrative staff (OR: 0.27; 95%CI: 0.09-0.80). Nurses and physicians reported greater stress and work pressure than administrative staff and described a worse physical working environment. Interpersonal relationships obtained the highest score among the three groups of professionals. Job satisfaction of nurses and physicians in an ED is lower than that of administrative staff with the former perceiving greater stress and work pressure. Conversely, interpersonal relationships are identified as strength. Being nurse or physician and not rotating among the different ED acuity levels increase dissatisfaction. Copyright © 2016 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lessons learnt from PSA for new and advanced reactors in Russia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokmachev, G.; Morozov, V. [JSC ' ' Atomenergoproekt' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15

    Customer requirements to probabilistic safety targets are usually stronger than existing Regulatory or IAEA ones. It appears that industry takes the lead over regulation in this case and forces the designer to find and implement appropriate means to enhance safety, which sometimes have no reference to practical experience. On the other hand, regulatory documents and the existing PSA methodology are mainly oriented to operating plants. This creates problems when developing a PSA as well as performing regulatory reviews. The scope of the PSA may be different depending on a design stage such as the development conceptual, basic or detailed design. In addition, the base case PSA is usually performed for NPP in design. However, a customer may require additional PSA applications to consider, for instance, risk monitoring. In this case the scope of the PSA should be extended to implement special attributes of the application needed that often requires specific information not available at the design stage. Lack of design information affecting PSA development may be associated with incompleteness of the design that is typical for interim design stages and communication problems caused by the involvement of many different companies in the deign activity. To deal with this issue bounding technologies and the iterative PSA development are used. However this sometimes contradicts to the ''best estimate'' approach recommended by regulatory guides. PSA development for advanced NPPs has raised some issues originated from unknown new components, processes and technologies incorporated into the design of an advanced plant. The paper addresses some issues resolved while carrying out PSAs for advanced NPPs. Some PSA results for new advanced VVER plants under construction and the first lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident are also discussed. (orig.)

  1. A national multicenter phase 2 study of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) pox virus vaccine with sequential androgen ablation therapy in patients with PSA progression: ECOG 9802.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Robert S; Chen, Yu-Hui; Bubley, Glenn J; Stein, Mark N; Hahn, Noah M; Carducci, Michael A; Lattime, Edmund C; Gulley, James L; Arlen, Philip M; Butterfield, Lisa H; Wilding, George

    2015-09-01

    E9802 was a phase 2 multi-institution study conducted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of vaccinia and fowlpox prostate-specific antigen (PSA) vaccine (step 1) followed by combination with androgen ablation therapy (step 2) in patients with PSA progression without visible metastasis. To test the hypothesis that vaccine therapy in this early disease setting will be safe and have a biochemical effect that would support future studies of immunotherapy in patients with minimal disease burden. Patients who had PSA progression following local therapy were treated with PROSTVAC-V (vaccinia)/TRICOM on cycle 1 followed by PROSTVAC-F (fowlpox)/TRICOM for subsequent cycles in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (step 1). Androgen ablation was added on progression (step 2). Step 1 primary end points included progression at 6 mo and characterization of change in PSA velocity pretreatment to post-treatment. Step 2 end points included PSA response with combined vaccine and androgen ablation. In step 1, 25 of 40 eligible patients (63%) were progression free at 6 mo after registration (90% confidence interval [CI], 48-75). The median pretreatment PSA velocity was 0.13 log(PSA)/mo, in contrast to median postregistration velocity of 0.09 log(PSA)/mo (p=0.02), which is an increase in median PSA doubling time from 5.3 mo to 7.7 mo. No grade ≥4 treatment-related toxicity was observed. In the 27 patients eligible and treated for step 2, 20 patients achieved a complete response (CR) at 7 mo (CR rate: 74%; 90% CI, 57-87). Although supportive of larger studies in the cooperative group setting, this study is limited by the small number of patients and the absence of a control group as in a phase 3 study. A viral PSA vaccine can be administered safely in the multi-institutional cooperative group setting to patients with minimal disease volume alone and combined with androgen ablation, supporting the feasibility of future phase 3 studies in this

  2. Riscos ocupacionais entre trabalhadores de enfermagem de uma unidade de terapia intensiva Riesgos ocupacionales entre trabajadores de enfermeria de una unidad de cuidados intensivos Occupational risks among a nursing staff working in an intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Médice Nishide

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo descritivo no qual foram identificados os principais riscos ocupacionais a que estão expostos os trabalhadores de enfermagem de uma unidade de terapia intensiva. Os dados foram coletados por meio de entrevista individual, utilizando-se roteiro estruturado. Constatou-se que os trabalhadores estão expostos a riscos de acidentes relacionados aos procedimentos de assistência aos pacientes e ao ambiente laboral. Foi observado que a maioria dos trabalhadores utilizavam luvas, máscaras e aventais como barreiras de proteção, e um baixo percentual, óculos de sobrepor como medida de segurança. Concluiu-se que são necessárias mudanças no ambiente de trabalho para minimizar os riscos em procedimentos de assistência e no ambiente laboral, além de treinamento, conscientização de práticas seguras e fornecimento de dispositivos de segurança aos trabalhadores.Estudio descriptivo en el cual fueron identificados los principales riesgos ocupacionales a los que están expuestos los trabajadores de enfermería de una unidad de cuidados intensivos. Los datos fueron recolectados por medio de una entrevista individual, utilizándose un esquema estructurado. Se constató que los trabajadores están expuestos a riesgos de accidentes relacionados a los procedimientos de asistencia a los pacientes y al ambiente laboral. Fue observado que la mayoría de los trabajadores usaban guantes, máscaras y delantales como barreras de protección y un bajo porcentaje usaban anteojos de protección como medida de seguridad. El estudio dejó como conclusión la necesidad de modificaciones en el ambiente de trabajo para minimizar los riesgos en procedimientos de asistencia y del ambiente laboral, aparte del entrenamiento, concientización de prácticas seguras y ofrecimiento de dispositivos de seguridad a los trabajadores.This is a descriptive study that detected the main occupational risks to which the nursing staff working in an intensive care unit are exposed

  3. Postoperative monitoring of prostate-specific antigen (PSA after treatment with high-intensive focused ultrasound (HIFU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blyumberg B.I.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Research objective: to estimate efficiency of treatment of prostate cancer using high-intensive focused ultrasound on the basis of laboratory analysis of postoperative level prostate-specific antigen (PSA. Objects of research. Objects of research consisted of 110 patients treated in urological clinic of Hospital n.a. S. R. Mirotvortsev (Saratov State Medical University during the period February, 2009 — March, 2012. Patients took 110 sessions of primary operative treatment of prostate cancer by HIFU therapy method. Technique and research methods. Concentration of PSA in blood changed in all patients every 1,5 month within 6 months after operation, irrespective of its kind (including after repeated HIFU, further — after every 3 month till one year, and later on after 6 months. We were guided by references of the International Consensus, which considers PSA level more than 0,5 ng/ml in blood after 3 months of treatment to be unsatisfactory result. We also headed for PSA level before treatment and oncological risk degree. Results. Median nadir formed 0,5 ng/ml PSA by 3 months after treatment. Patients demonstrated different indicators of PSA dynamics depending on oncological risk, stage and hormonal therapy management. Patients with low oncological risk had initially lower PSA concentration, further PSA concentration reached nadir level faster. At patients with widespread forms of prostate cancer accurate dependence of PSA concentration according to prevalence of process was traced. Time of PSA nadir amount did not differ and was marked as 12-14 weeks on average. At patients received hormonal therapy, lower value of PSA nadir was marked. The conclusion. Monitoring of PSA concentration (PSA nadir by 3 months, dynamics of PSA concentration change is of great importance in early revealing of relapse after prostate HIFU therapy. High level of PSA nadir and PSA growth according to time period are important prognostic factors.

  4. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  5. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L J M; Embregts, P J C M; Gerits, L; Bosman, A M T; Derksen, J J L

    2015-07-01

    Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions between staff and clients. The effects of the training on emotional intelligence, coping style and emotions of support staff were investigated. Participants were 214 support staff working within residential settings for individuals with ID and challenging behaviour. The experimental group consisted of 76 staff members, 138 staff members participated in two different control groups. A pre-test, post-test, follow-up control group design was used. Effectiveness was assessed using questionnaires addressing emotional intelligence, coping and emotions. Emotional intelligence of the experimental group changed significantly more than that of the two control groups. The experimental group showed an increase in task-oriented coping, whereas one control group did not. The results with regard to emotions were mixed. Follow-up data revealed that effects within the experimental group were still present four months after the training ended. A staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and staff-client interactions is effective in improving emotional intelligence and coping styles of support staff. However, the need for more research aiming at the relationship between staff characteristics, organisational factors and their mediating role in the effectiveness of staff training is emphasised. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Self-reported competence of home nursing staff in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönroos, Eija; Perälä, Marja-Leena

    2008-10-01

    This paper is a report of a study to investigate the self-reported competence of home nursing staff and whether this is associated with their education, job descriptions, access to help and support and with factors in their psychosocial work environment, such as opportunities for personal growth and development at work. Home nursing staff face increasing demands on their competence. Advances in information technology and working methods have increased the need for education. Thus, information on the factors associated with the competence of home nursing staff help us to support them in a way that improves the quality of care. The data were gathered via a questionnaire completed in 2003 by the home nursing staff of 24 municipalities in different regions of Finland. A total of 2366 home care staff (response rate 63%), of whom 790 were home nursing staff (response rate 65%), were sent questionnaires. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression were used as main statistical methods. The best predictors for self-reported competence of home nursing staff were their reading scientific or professional journals, opportunities for skill development, decision-making latitude and work demands. Simple and practical ways for updating the competence of home nursing staff should be created. These staff are a very important source of information for home care clients. Supporting the knowledge of home nursing staff is also an efficient way of keeping clients and their informal caregivers informed about care guidelines, health and social services and social benefits.

  7. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  8. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  9. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  10. Key Characteristics of Combined Accident including TLOFW accident for PSA Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-05-15

    The conventional PSA techniques cannot adequately evaluate all events. The conventional PSA models usually focus on single internal events such as DBAs, the external hazards such as fire, seismic. However, the Fukushima accident of Japan in 2011 reveals that very rare event is necessary to be considered in the PSA model to prevent the radioactive release to environment caused by poor treatment based on lack of the information, and to improve the emergency operation procedure. Especially, the results from PSA can be used to decision making for regulators. Moreover, designers can consider the weakness of plant safety based on the quantified results and understand accident sequence based on human actions and system availability. This study is for PSA modeling of combined accidents including total loss of feedwater (TLOFW) accident. The TLOFW accident is a representative accident involving the failure of cooling through secondary side. If the amount of heat transfer is not enough due to the failure of secondary side, the heat will be accumulated to the primary side by continuous core decay heat. Transients with loss of feedwater include total loss of feedwater accident, loss of condenser vacuum accident, and closure of all MSIVs. When residual heat removal by the secondary side is terminated, the safety injection into the RCS with direct primary depressurization would provide alternative heat removal. This operation is called feed and bleed (F and B) operation. Combined accidents including TLOFW accident are very rare event and partially considered in conventional PSA model. Since the necessity of F and B operation is related to plant conditions, the PSA modeling for combined accidents including TLOFW accident is necessary to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities.The PSA is significant to assess the risk of NPPs, and to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities. Even though the combined accident is very rare event, the consequence of combined

  11. BIOCARBURANTS PSA Peugeot Citroën et les biocarburants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurer Béatrice

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Les biocarburants représentent une filière essentielle pour PSA Peugeot Citroën dans le cadre de la protection de l’environnement, un axe stratégique majeur pour le groupe - de la production de ses véhicules au recyclage, de la qualité de l’air à l’effet de serre et au développement d’énergies renouvelables. Depuis plusieurs années, PSA a intégré la filière huiles végétales/biocarburants dans ses activités pour atteindre ses objectifs globaux d’innovation et de croissance. De nombreuses flottes de véhicules circulent en France avec du gazole contenant 30 % de biocarburant issu des oléagineux : une expérience réussie, qui dure depuis plus de dix ans. Le constructeur est favorable à l’utilisation de biocarburants en mélange dans les carburants pétroliers conventionnels, essence et gazole - une voie qui présente plusieurs avantages : * Un bilan CO2 global favorable (par absorption de CO2 lors de la photosynthèse de la plante-source, qui contribue à limiter « l’effet de serre ». * Une source complémentaire de carburant pour réduire les importations de pétrole (et de gazole. * Un soutien au secteur agricole (débouché supplémentaire, dans le cadre de la valorisation des terres en jachère. Issus de la transformation des céréales ou de la betterave à sucre, ou des plantes oléagineuses comme le colza, le tournesol ou le soja, les biocarburants sont par essence des énergies renouvelables. Outre leur bilan exceptionnellement favorable pour lutter contre l’effet de serre, ces carburants offrent de réelles performances environnementales, en particulier par la réduction des émissions de particules (cas des EMHV.

  12. Accuracy of PSA Self-Reports among Low-Income Men with Prostate Cancer after a Public Health Nursing Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, Mary Wassel; Yule, Arthur; Kwan, Lorna; Lambrechts, Sylvia; Maliski, Sally L; Litwin, Mark S

    2016-11-01

    To examine accuracy of patient-reported prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels among indigent, uninsured men in a state-funded prostate cancer treatment program that provides case management, care coordination, and health education. Program evaluation. About 114 men with matched self- and lab-reported PSA levels at program enrollment and another time point within 18 months. Abstraction of self- and lab-reported PSA levels to determine self-report as "accurate" or "inaccurate," and evaluate accuracy change over time, before and after nursing interventions. Chi-square tests compared patients with accurate versus inaccurate PSA values. Nonlinear multivariate analyses explored trends in self-reported accuracy over time. Program enrollees receive prostate cancer education from a Nurse Case Manager (NCM), including significance of PSA levels. Men self-report PSA results to their NCM following lab draws and appointments. The NCM provides ongoing education about PSA levels. Of the sample, 46% (n = 53) accurately reported PSA levels. Accuracy of PSA self-reports improved with increasing time since program enrollment. Compared with men at public facilities, those treated at private facilities showed increasing accuracy in self-reported PSA (p = .038). A targeted nursing intervention may increase specific knowledge of PSA levels. Additionally, the provider/treatment setting significantly impacts a patient's disease education and knowledge. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) for monitoring of antimony in samples of vegetation from a mining area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toro Gordillo, M.C.; Pinilla Gil, E. [Dept. de Quimica Analitica y Electroquimica, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain); Rodriguez Gonzalez, M.A.; Murciego Murciego, A. [Area de Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Universidad de Extremadura, Badajoz (Spain); Ostapczuk, P. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    A potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) method has been developed and checked for the fast and reliable determination of antimony in vegetation samples of Cistus ladanifer from a mining area in Badajoz, Southwest Spain. The method, modified from previous PSA methods for Sb in environmental samples, is based on dry ashing of the homogenized leaves, dissolution in hydrochloric acid, and PSA analysis on a mercury film plated on to a glassy carbon disk electrode. The influence of experimental variables such as the deposition potential, the deposition time, the signal stability and the calibration parameters, has been investigated. The method has been compared with an independent technique (instrumental neutron activation analysis) by analysis of standards and reference materials and comparison of the results. As a result of automation of the PSA equipment, the proposed method enables unattended analysis of 20 digested samples in a total time of 2 h, thus providing a useful tool for Sb monitoring of a large number of samples. (orig.)

  14. Potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) for monitoring of antimony in samples of vegetation from a mining area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Gordillo, M C; Pinilla Gil, E; Rodríguez González, M A; Murciego Murciego, A; Ostapczuk, P

    2001-06-01

    A potentiometric stripping analysis (PSA) method has been developed and checked for the fast and reliable determination of antimony in vegetation samples of Cistus ladanifer from a mining area in Badajoz, Southwest Spain. The method, modified from previous PSA methods for Sb in environmental samples, is based on dry ashing of the homogenized leaves, dissolution in hydrochloric acid, and PSA analysis on a mercury film plated on to a glassy carbon disk electrode. The influence of experimental variables such as the deposition potential, the deposition time, the signal stability and the calibration parameters, has been investigated. The method has been compared with an independent technique (instrumental neutron activation analysis) by analysis of standards and reference materials and comparison of the results. As a result of automation of the PSA equipment, the proposed method enables unattended analysis of 20 digested samples in a total time of 2 h, thus providing a useful tool for Sb monitoring of a large number of samples.

  15. A Diet, Physical Activity, and Meditation Intervention in Men With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hebert, James R

    2006-01-01

    ... physical activity and mindfulness-based stress reduction. This randomized trial will enroll 60 men with rising PSA levels along with a partner of their choice, half of whom will be randomized to the intervention and half to usual care...

  16. A Diet, Physical Activity, and Mediation Intervention in Men With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hebert, James

    2004-01-01

    ... physical activity and mindfulness-based stress reduction. This randomized trial will enroll 60 men with rising PSA levels along with a partner of their choice, half of whom will be randomized to the intervention and half to usual care...

  17. A Diet, Physical Activity, and Meditation Intervention in Men With Rising Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hebert, James R

    2007-01-01

    ... physical activity and mindfulness-based stress reduction. This randomized trial will enroll 60 men with rising PSA levels along with a partner of their choice, half of whom will be randomized to the intervention and half to usual care...

  18. Radiographic progression with nonrising PSA in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryce, A H; Alumkal, J J; Armstrong, A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Advanced prostate cancer is a phenotypically diverse disease that evolves through multiple clinical courses. PSA level is the most widely used parameter for disease monitoring, but it has well-recognized limitations. Unlike in clinical trials, in practice, clinicians may rely on PSA...... monitoring alone to determine disease status on therapy. This approach has not been adequately tested. METHODS: Chemotherapy-naive asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic men (n=872) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) who were treated with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide...... treated with enzalutamide. As restaging in advanced prostate cancer patients is often guided by increases in PSA levels, our results demonstrate that disease progression on enzalutamide can occur without rising PSA levels. Therefore, a disease monitoring strategy that includes imaging not entirely reliant...

  19. A population study of fasting time and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lau, Cheryl K; Guo, Maggie; Viczko, Jeannine A; Naugler, Christopher T

    2014-01-01

    .... Recently, it has been shown that fasting extremes can affect concentrations of serum chemistry analytes, thus raising the question of whether or not fasting has an effect on the highly sensitive PSA biomarker...

  20. Safety analyses: the importance of PSA and ZEDB. ZEDB: tool determining plant-specific reliability data; Sicherheitsanalysen, Bedeutung von PSA und ZEDB. ZEDB: Instrument zur Ermittlung anlagenspezifischer Zuverlaessigkeitsdaten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brahmstaedt, Kai-Uwe [E.ON Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk Brokdorf (Germany); Schubert, Bernd [Vattenfall Europe Nuclear Energy GmBH, Stoerfall- und Zuverlaessigkeitsanalysen, Anlagentechnik, Hamburg (Germany); Seidel, Andre [VGB Power Tech e.V., Essen (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Safety inspections of nuclear power plants under the Atomic Energy Act are regulated, inter alia, in the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) guideline. These analyses are performed in addition to the safety assessments based, on deterministic principles. In this way, the influence of components, systems, and structures, as well as actions by personnel, on plant behavior in terms of technical safety can be described in a holistic approach and the safety level thus can be assessed quantitatively. Conducting a PSA requires plant-specific reliability data which are determined in the plant in question, but are also collected and stored centrally in the central reliability and event database (ZEDB). (orig.)

  1. The association of general practitioners’ risk attitudes, level of empathy and burnout status with PSA testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette Fischer; Carlsen, Anders Helles; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Når alment praktiserende læger sammenlignes, finder man ofte stor variation i raten af PSA-tests foretaget på mandlige patienter. Dette studie viser, at lægens risikovillighed influerer på raten af PSA-tests. Således har patienter, som er registreret hos en læge, som har mange bekymringer for fej...

  2. utility of prostate specific antigen (psa) in the indigenous african man

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    categories of ≤4ng/ml and >4ng/ml in ratios of 3.3:1 and 1.5:1 respectively. It, however, had PSA levels between 2 and 15 ng/ml. The odd ratio for BPH to be in the normal range was 2.0 while cancer of the prostate had a 1.7 odd ratio for elevated PSA. Seven patients clinically diagnosed as BPH had histological findings of ...

  3. Midland Health Board staff and impact of cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, M P

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the 2,719 staff of the Midland Health Board at 31 December, 1988 was made, on the basis of work done. This showed that 7.4% of the staff were engaged on administrative work. The pay cost of the administrative staff was 5.2% of total remuneration and 3.3% of all direct payments made by the health board. Between January, 1986 and the end of 1988, staff numbers were reduced by 293 (9.7%). Of these, 189 (64.5%) were catering, housekeeping and maintenance staff. In the same period medical staff increased by 5 (3.3%), paramedicals increased by 11 (10.4%) and administrators were reduced by 12 (4.2%).

  4. The Hidden Burden of Outpatient Repeat PSA Testing in a Prospective Cohort

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Browne, E

    2017-05-01

    PSA testing is widespread throughout Europe for diagnostic purposes and follow up. We performed a prospective outpatient cohort study of 250 men (2013-2015) in two hospital sites. Included were those men being followed up by urology with PSA blood testing. First appointments and those men in whom non-PSA tests were ordered by urology were excluded. The median age was 67.2yrs (46-88). Eighty-one point two percent of samples had a combination of 21 different serology tests at an added cost of >€18,000. Abnormal serology resulted in 53 referrals. Twenty-six-six percentof correspondence referenced abnormal serology other than PSA. Follow up of non-PSA test results poses a challenge in an outpatient setting with failure to appropriately follow-up on abnormal results, increased costs, and medico-legal implications. There is currently no Irish legislature in place to safeguard hospital physicians. This study quantifies the levels of expenditure, resources and risk associated with ambulant PSA testing.

  5. Can the Free/Total PSA Ratio Predict the Gleason Score Before Prostate Biopsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceylan, Cavit; Gazel, Eymen; Keleş, İbrahim; Doluoğlu, Ömer; Yığman, Metin

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether there is a correlation between high Gleason score and free/total (f/t) prostate specific antigen (PSA) in patients newly diagnosed with prostate carcinoma. The study included 272 prostate biopsy patients whose total PSA value ranged from 4-10 ng/ml. The patients were divided into 2 groups according to the f/t PSA ratio: Group 1 ≤ 15% and Group 2 > 15%. Furthermore, the groups were also compared to each other in terms of mild (≤ 6), moderate (= 7), and high (≥ 8) Gleason score. Group 1 consisted of 135 (49.6%) patients and Group 2 consisted of 137 (50.4%) patients. While 27 (20%) patients had a high Gleason score in Group 1, only 10 (7.3%) patients had a high Gleason score in Group 2 (p = 0.008). Using Spearman's correlation test, we found that the f/t PSA ratios were observed to decrease significantly in all patients with increased Gleason scores (p = 0.002, r = -0.185). According to our study, there is a relationship between higher Gleason score and decreased f/t PSA ratio. Therefore, f/t PSA can be an indicator for predicting the Gleason score.

  6. Psychological Problems Among Nursing Staff in a Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Shakya, D. R.; S Lama; P M Shyangwa

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: A high prevalence of psychological/ mental disorders has frequently been reported among nursing staff. However, there is a scarcity of data about ‘psychological, mental and behavioural problems’ among Nepalese nurses. Current study aimed to measure the prevalence of psychiatric problems among nursing staff in a tertiary care hosital. Methods: All nursing staffs working in the hospital during one year were the subjects of this study. With the informed written consent...

  7. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Rosocha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem.Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a well-known method from statistical thermodynamics. We define hard constraints, which are linked to legal and working regulations, and minimize the violations of soft constraints, which are related to the quality of work, psychic, and work-life balance of staff.Findings: On a sample of 60 physicians and nurses from gynecology department we generated monthly schedules and optimized their preferences in terms of soft constraints. Our results indicate that the final value of objective function optimized by proposed algorithm is more than 18-times better in violations of soft constraints than initially generated random schedule that satisfied hard constraints.Research Limitation/implication: Even though the global optimality of final outcome is not guaranteed, desirable solutionwas obtained in reasonable time. Originality/Value of paper: We show that designed algorithm is able to successfully generate schedules regarding hard and soft constraints. Moreover, presented method is significantly faster than standard schedule generation and is able to effectively reschedule due to the local neighborhood search characteristics of simulated annealing.

  8. Multimodal Authentication Techniques For Staff Identification And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    West African Journal of Industrial & Academic Research Vol.12 No.1 December 2014 36. Multimodal ... use of Internet and, as a result, has exposed individuals and .... this work. 1. To provide a more accurate and reliable user authentication method for identification and tracking of staff. 2. To create a platform for an.

  9. Management problems of staff motivation

    OpenAIRE

    PUZYNYA T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Staff motivation is a major link in improving the competitiveness of any organization. One of the main problems of management of motivation of staff is the individuality of each employee, so the knowledge of psychology and individual needs will help organizations effectively manage staff.

  10. Development of computing code system for level 3 PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jong Tae; Yu, Dong Han; Kim, Seung Hwan

    1997-07-01

    Among the various research areas of the level 3 PSA, the effect of terrain on the transport of radioactive material was investigated through wind tunnel experiment. These results will give a physical insight in the development of a new dispersion model. Because there are some discrepancies between the results from Gaussian plume model and those from field test, the effect of terrain on the atmospheric dispersion was investigated by using CTDMPLUS code. Through this study we find that the model which can treat terrain effect is essential in the atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials and the CTDMPLUS model can be used as a useful tool. And it is suggested that modification of a model and experimental study should be made through the continuous effort. The health effect assessment near the Yonggwang site by using IPE (Individual plant examination) results and its site data was performed. The health effect assessment is an important part of consequence analysis of a nuclear power plant site. The MACCS was used in the assessment. Based on the calculation of CCDF for each risk measure, it is shown that CCDF has a slow slope and thus wide probability distribution in cases of early fatality, early injury, total early fatality risk, and total weighted early fatality risk. And in cases of cancer fatality and population dose within 48km and 80km, the CCDF curve have a steep slope and thus narrow probability distribution. The establishment of methodologies for necessary models for consequence analysis resulting form a server accident in the nuclear power plant was made and a program for consequence analysis was developed. The models include atmospheric transport and diffusion, calculation of exposure doses for various pathways, and assessment of health effects and associated risks. Finally, the economic impact resulting form an accident in a nuclear power plant was investigated. In this study, estimation models for each cost terms that considered in economic

  11. Evaluating the Impact of PSA as a Selection Criteria for Nerve Sparing Radical Prostatectomy in a Screened Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam K. Tanguturi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We investigated whether NS-RP increased risk of PSA failure and whether PSA should be included as a selection criterion for NS. Methods. We evaluated 357 consecutive men with screen-detected PC who underwent open RP without adjuvant radiotherapy between 9/11/2001 and 12/30/2008. Criteria for NS included Gleason score ≤3 + 4, percentage of positive biopsies (PPB ≤50%, percentage of core involvement ≤50%, nonapical location, no perineural invasion, and no palpable disease on pre- or intraoperative exam but did not include a PSA threshold. Cox multivariable regression assessed whether increasing PSA or unilateral- or bilateral-NS versus non-NS-RP was associated with PSA failure adjusting for prognostic factors. Results. After a median follow-up of 3.96 years, 34 men sustained PSA failure (9.5%. Increasing PSA was significantly associated with increased risk of PSA failure in the interaction model (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR: 1.09 [95% CI: 1.03–1.16]; P=0.005, whereas unilateral (AHR: 1.24 [95% CI: 0.36–4.34]; P=0.73 or bilateral NS (AHR: 0.41 [95% CI: 0.06–2.59]; P=0.34 versus non-NS RP was not. Conclusion. NS-RP in a screened cohort did not increase risk of PSA failure using NS criteria not including PSA.

  12. Using real-time, anonymous staff feedback to improve staff experience and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, Anne; Fox, Fiona; Hollowood, Andrew; Northstone, Kate; Margelyte, Ruta; Smith-Clarke, Stephanie; Redwood, Sabi

    2017-01-01

    Improving staff engagement has become a priority for NHS leaders, although efforts in this area vary between organisations. University Hospital Bristol NHS Foundation Trust (UH Bristol) is a tertiary teaching hospital where concerns about staff satisfaction and communication were reflected in the 2014 staff survey. To improve staff engagement, a real-time feedback mechanism to capture staff experience and to facilitate feedback from local leaders, was developed and piloted using the Model for Improvement. Initially piloted in two areas in January 2015, the Staff Participation Engagement and Communication application (SPEaC-app) was gradually rolled out to 23 areas within the trust by November 2016. The 2015 staff survey revealed significant improvements in staff motivation, satisfaction with level of responsibility and involvement, and perceived support from managers. These improvements cannot be attributed to this new mechanism in their entirety, but local surveys indicated satisfaction with SPEaC-app, the majority reporting that giving feedback about their shift was valuable while fewer staff had noticed changes in their work area as a result of the comments made via SPEaC-app. Between March 2015 and November 2016, 9259 entries were recorded, with an average of 15 entries per day across all areas. Of the entries, 45.7% were positive and nearly 40% were negative, and 'team working' was the most frequent theme. The project has identified the key factors associated with usability of the SPEaC-app, including, access, location, reliability and perceived privacy of the SPEaC-app. The SPEaC-app is valued and used most by staff in areas where feedback from local leaders is regular, rapid and comprehensive, and where staff comments are acted upon, leading to tangible change. This suggests that strong, consistent local management is required in order to embed it in new areas. SPEaC-app has the potential to support local engagement between managers and their service

  13. Guidance to risk-informed evaluation of technical specifications using PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeckstroem, O.; Haeggstroem, A. (Scandpower AB, Stockholm (Sweden)); Maennistoe, I. (VTT, Helsingfors (Finland))

    2010-04-15

    This report presents guidance for evaluation of Technical Specification conditions with PSA. It covers quality in PSA, how to verify that the PSA model is sufficiently robust and sufficiently complete and general requirements on methods. Acceptance criteria for evaluation of changes in the TS conditions are presented. As the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) has developed over the years, it has demonstrated to constitute a useful tool for evaluating many aspects of the TS from a risk point of view. and in that way making the PSAs as well as the decision tools better. This also means that it will be possible to take credit for safety system overcapacity as well as inherent safety features and strength of non-safety classed systems. However, PSA is only one of the tools that shall be used in an evaluation process of TS changes (strengthening/relaxation). PSA is an excellent tool to be used to verify the importance, and thereby possibly relaxation, of TS requirements. But, since PSA is only one tool in the evaluation, it is not sufficient in itself for defining which equipment that shall or shall not have TS requirements. The purpose of this guidance document is to provide general requirements, requirements on methods and acceptance criteria on risk-informed evaluation of TS changes based on PSA. The purpose is not to provide a single solution. As part of the review of the TS conditions this guidance specify requirements on: - Quality verification of the PSA model; - Verification that the PSA model is sufficiently robust with regard to SSCs for which requirements both are and are not defined by the TS; - Verification that the SSCs, for which TS demands are to be evaluated, are modelled in a sufficient manner; - Methods for performing the evaluation; - Which evaluation criteria that shall be used (and how that is verified to be correct); - Acceptance criteria: This guidance also briefly discusses the documentation of the analysis of the TS changes. This guidance

  14. Automated installation for gas separation and purification using the Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) process; Instalacao automatizada para separacao e purificacao de gases por PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, Celia F. Cordeiro; Schvartzman, Monica M.A.M. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Jordao, Elizabete [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Sistemas Quimicos e Informatica

    1999-11-01

    This paper describes the first laboratorial PSA (Pressure Swing Adsorption) unit designed and built in Brazil for gas separation by adsorption process. It consists of a stainless steel column, which was filled with zeolite 5A molecular sieve. Six solenoid valves located at the feed., product, countercurrent and high-pressure air lines were used to regulate the flow directions of different streams. Pressure and flowrate transducers and thermocouples were used to record respectively the pressure, flowrate of both feed and product stream and temperature history of the process. These instruments and the solenoid valves were joined to a programmable logic controller. By the use of a computer the unit can be automatically operated to simulate all steps in the PSA cycle and data can be easily acquired and recorded. The unit will be used to study basic parameters of PSA processes and to separate several gas mixtures. As a first goal the unit will be operated to produce oxygen-enriched air using synthetic zeolites. This PSA laboratory unit is an important step in CDTN`s objective of consolidating a research group in gas separation by adsorption processes. (author) 7 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Supported Conversation for hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Hysse B; Løvholt, Annelise P.; Mathiesen, Lone Lundbak

    Aims It is a challenge for health professionals to involve patients with aphasia (PWAs) in their own treatment, care and rehabilitation. Disrupted communication may also influence patient safety and lead to social isolation. In order to increase health care professionals’ ability to engage PWAs i...... hospital staff’s confidence and self-assessed ability to communicate with PWAs....... month period. Each course had 10-12 participants and lasted 6 hours, including instruction in the SCA principles, video analysis, interdisciplinary group work, and practice sessions with PWAs. Self-assessed learning outcomes were evaluated with a brief questionnaire filled out by staff members...... immediately before course attendance and 3-6 months afterwards. Results Self-rated knowledge of aphasia had significantly improved when assessed 3-6 months after the course and improvement was seen for all groups of health professionals. Comfort and ease in communicating with PWA and ability to solve problems...

  16. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  17. Staff Performance Evaluation in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drumea C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In public Organizations staff performance is difficult to measure in absence of overall quantitative performance indicators. There are also the qualitative indicators that give an overview on staff’s motivation, strive, ability, commitment to values, teamwork. These aspects are even less easy to illustrate, in private and public sectors equally. In both cases, measuring staff performance at work, as well as its input on the global performance of the organization is a difficult task which has in practice different approaches. Subsequently, this paper is discussing the system indicators and performance triggers used in International Organizations UN affiliated, in order to adjust staff classification and benefits to their staff’s performance.

  18. Scheduling IT Staff at a Bank: A Mathematical Programming Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Labidi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address a real-world optimization problem: the scheduling of a Bank Information Technologies (IT staff. This problem can be defined as the process of constructing optimized work schedules for staff. In a general sense, it requires the allocation of suitably qualified staff to specific shifts to meet the demands for services of an organization while observing workplace regulations and attempting to satisfy individual work preferences. A monthly shift schedule is prepared to determine the shift duties of each staff considering shift coverage requirements, seniority-based workload rules, and staff work preferences. Due to the large number of conflicting constraints, a multiobjective programming model has been proposed to automate the schedule generation process. The suggested mathematical model has been implemented using Lingo software. The results indicate that high quality solutions can be obtained within a few seconds compared to the manually prepared schedules.

  19. Influence of metformin use on PSA values, free-to-total PSA, prostate cancer incidence and grade and overall survival in a prospective screening trial (ERSPC Aarau).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, Marco; Beatrice, Josef; Huber, Andreas; Grobholz, Rainer; Manka, Lukas; Wyler, Stephen F; Chun, Felix F; Recker, Franz; Kwiatkowski, Maciej

    2015-08-01

    To analyze the effect of the oral antidiabetic drug metformin on PSA level, free-to-total PSA ratio (f/t-ratio), PCa incidence and grade as well as mortality in men participating in a population-based screening trial. Data from 4,314 men aged 55-70 years from a population-based PSA-screening trial (ERSPC Aarau) were analyzed. Information on metformin exposure was obtained by a self-administered questionnaire. Serum PSA threshold at ≥3 ng/ml triggered prostate biopsy. Data on PCa incidence and mortality were obtained through registry linkages. Median follow-up time was 7.6 years. Mean age at baseline was 65.5 years (±SD 4.4). In all, n = 150 (3.5 %) men used metformin [metf+]. Mean baseline PSA levels were comparable between both groups ([metf+] 1.6 ng/ml ± 2.4 vs. [metf-] 1.8ug/l ± 2.2, p = 0.4) while f/t-ratio was slightly higher in metformin users ([metf+] 30.7 % ± 10.9 vs. [metf-] 27.3 % ± 10.9, p = 0.01). Overall, n = 372 (8.6 %) PCa cases were detected. Neither cumulative PCa incidence (n = 11; 7.3 % [metf+] vs. n = 361 8.7 % [metf-]; p = 0.5) nor d`Amico risk groups were significantly different between both groups. One man in each group (metf+ 0.7 % and metf- 0.02 %) died from PCa (p incidence and grade were observed. The slightly higher f/t-ratio did not result in lower PCa detection rate. Metformin users were at significantly higher risk of all-cause mortality. The relatively small number of men on metformin is a main limitation of the study.

  20. Comparison of the Formula of PSA, Age, Prostate Volume and Race Versus PSA Density and the Detection of Primary Malignant Circulating Prostate Cells in Predicting a Positive Initial Prostate Biopsy in Chilean Men with Suspicion of Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Nigel P; Reyes, Eduardo; Fuentealba, Cynthia; Orellana, Nelson; Morales, Francisca; Jacob, Omar

    2015-01-01

    Combining risk factors for prostate cancer into a predictive tool may improve the detection of prostate cancer while decreasing the number of benign biopsies. We compare one such tool, age multiplied by prostate volume divided by total serum PSA (PSA-AV) with PSA density and detection of primary malignant circulating prostate cells (CPCs) in a Chilean prostate cancer screening program. The objectives were not only to determine the predictive values of each, but to determine the number of clinically significant cancers that would have been detected or missed. A prospective study was conducted of all men undergoing 12 core ultrasound guided prostate biopsy for suspicion of cancer attending the Hospital DIPRECA and Hospital de Carabineros de Chile. Total serum PSA was registered, prostate volumecalculated at the moment of biopsy, and an 8 ml blood simple taken immediately before the biopsy procedure. Mononuclear cells were obtained from the blood simple using differential gel centrifugation and CPCs identified using immunocytchemistry with anti- PSA and anti-P504S. Biopsy results were classed as positive or negative for cancer and if positive the Gleason score, number of positive cores and percent infiltration recorded. A total of 664 men participated, of whom 234 (35.2%) had cancer detected. They were older, had higher mean PSA, PSA density and lower PSA-AV. Detection of CPCs had high predictive score, sensitivity, sensibility and positive and negative predictive values, PSA-AV was not significantly different from PSA density in this population. The use of CPC detection avoided more biopsies and missed fewer significant cancers. In this screening population the use of CPC detection predicted the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer better than the other parameters. The high negative predictive value would allow men CPC negative to avoid biopsy but remain in follow up. The formula PSA-AV did not add to the predictive performance using PSA density.

  1. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  2. Sleep Quality among Female Hospital Staff Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Li Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate sleep quality of hospital staff nurses, both by subjective questionnaire and objective measures. Methods. Female staff nurses at a regional teaching hospital in Northern Taiwan were recruited. The Chinese version of the pittsburgh sleep quality index (C-PSQI was used to assess subjective sleep quality, and an electrocardiogram-based cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC technique was used to analyze objective sleep stability. Work stress was assessed using questionnaire on medical worker’s stress. Results. A total of 156 staff nurses completed the study. Among the staff nurses, 75.8% (117 had a PSQI score of ≥5 and 39.8% had an inadequate stable sleep ratio on subjective measures. Nurses with a high school or lower educational degree had a much higher risk of sleep disturbance when compared to nurses with a college or higher level degree. Conclusions. Both subjective and objective measures demonstrated that poor sleep quality is a common health problem among hospital staff nurses. More studies are warranted on this important issue to discover possible factors and therefore to develop a systemic strategy to cope with the problem.

  3. Serum PSA and cure perspective for prostate cancer in males with nonpalpable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Dall'Oglio

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Many studies have shown the association between PSA levels and the subsequent detection of prostate cancer. In the present trial, we have studied the relationship between preoperative PSA levels and clinical outcome following radical prostatectomy in men with clinical stage T1c. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 257 individuals with clinical stage T1c undergoing retropubic radical prostatectomy were selected in the period from 1991 to 2000. Following surgery, biochemical recurrence-free survival curves were constructed according to PSA levels between 0-4; 4.1-10; 10.1-20 and > 20 ng/mL. RESULTS: Of the total of 257 selected patients, 206 (80% had Gleason scores from 2 to 6 and 51 (20%, presented Gleason scores 7 and 8, as defined by the pathological report from prostate biopsy. There was no biochemical recurrence of disease when the PSA was lower than 4, regardless of Gleason score. Biochemical recurrence-free survival according to PSA between 0-4; 4.1-10; 10.1-20 and > 20 was 100%, 87.6%, 79% and 68.8% for Gleason scores 2-6 and 100%; 79.4%; 40% and 100% for Gleason scores 7-8 respectively. When all individuals were grouped, regardless of their Gleason scores, the probability of biochemical recurrence-free survival was 100%, 65.1%, 53.4% and 72.2% according to PSA between 0-4; 4.1-10; 10.1-20 and > 20 ng/mL respectively. CONCLUSION: Non-palpable prostate cancer presents higher chances of cure when the PSA is inferior to 4 ng/mL.

  4. Correlation Between MRS and Serum PSA in the Diagnosis of Local Recurrence After Radical Prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ghafuri

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multifocality, multicentricity and extension beyond the prostate capsule are all characteristics of prostatic adenocarcinoma that may escape diagnosis by conventional CT scanning or MRI. This study was designed to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS in prostatic carcinoma and its compatibility with prostatic specific antigen (PSA as the conventional method.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we recruited 139 patients with previous radical prostatectomy referring to Radiology department of Hazrate-e-Rasul Hospital during the first half of 2011 for the evaluation of local recurrence. Traditionally, local recurrence is defined as serum PSA concentration >0.2 ng/dl. We used 1.5-tesla Siemens Avanto MRI unit with endorectal coil and measured creatine, choline and citrate levels before calculating choline-creatine/citrate ratio. Correlation between MRS findings with PSA concentration was evaluated in regards to the multiple levels of the previously mentioned ratio.Results: Local recurrence was found in 107 (77% patients based on PSA levels. The mean values for serum PSA levels and creatine-choline/citrate ratio were significantly different in patients with and without local recurrence. Creatine-choline/citrate ratios greater than 50, 100 and 150 (as different cut-off points of recurrence were respectively seen in 104, 102 and 97 patients and agreement ratio between MRS and PSA in these levels were 94.1%, 94.4% and 85.1%, respectively. Correlation coefficient between these two methods was 0.481.Conclusion: MRS is a valuable tool for evaluating recurrence inpatients with prostate cancer treated by radical prostatectomy and it is in good agreement with serum PSA levels.

  5. Intestinal Parasites among Foreign Junior Staff of King Khalid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites among foreign junior staff working in the College of Medicine of King Khalid University, Abha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Stool analysis and Helicobacter pylori stool antigen test are offered freely to our staff as part of routine medical examination in our Department.

  6. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  7. Personal Sustainability: Listening to Extension Staff and Observing Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstadt, Leslie; Fortune, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Extension staff are increasingly challenged to do excellent work and balance their lives. University of Maine Cooperative Extension committed to a 2-year participatory action research project to support staff and to an organizational climate that encourages personal sustainability. With tools from ethnography and appreciative inquiry, staff…

  8. Staff talked loudly outside residents' rooms and woke them regularly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew, Thelma

    2008-06-01

    When the isolation of night staff was pointed out to managers they were surprised - but willing to act. By simply working nights on a regular basis, managers made staff feel more supported and less cut off from the daytime care culture.

  9. Beliefs and attitudes of paramedical college staff towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies in different countries have revealed a geographical difference in the knowledge about CAM therapies, especially among medical school staff and students. This study aimed to assess the extent of CAM use among staff working in paramedical colleges in the Riyadh region of Saudi Arabia and to examine their ...

  10. Training needs of recreation staff at recreation centres: Supervising ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results suggest that staff do not possess the basic recreation knowledge and that, in turn, may lead to unnecessary work pressure on the supervising area manager. In the local government, procedures are already in place that could help the staff if they needed funding for further training. Unfortunately, the available ...

  11. Biosafety practices and biomedical hazards among the support staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biosafety practices and biomedical hazards among the support staff of Kenyatta national hospital, Mbagathi district hospital and Kiambu district hospital in ... Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology ... A descriptive study design was employed for this study to sample the support staff working in the three hospitals.

  12. Percentage of free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a useful method in deciding to perform prostate biopsy with higher core numbers in patients with low PSA cut-off values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hasan; Ciftci, Seyfettin; Yavuz, Ufuk; Ustuner, Murat; Saribacak, Ali; Dillioglugil, Ozdal

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive role of percentage of free prostate-specific antigen (%fPSA) cut-points in prostate cancer (PCa) detection in patients with total PSA (tPSA) levels between 2.5 ng/mL and 10.0 ng/mL. In total, 1321 consecutive initial transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided 12-core biopsies performed between 2005 and 2011 were evaluated retrospectively. Benign pathologies, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and atypical small acinary proliferations were categorized as noncancerous (benign), and prostate adenocarcinomas were categorized as cancerous (malignant). The patients were categorized according to: Catalona's published %fPSA categories ( 25%); digital rectal examination (DRE) results [benign (negative) or suspicious of malignancy (positive)]. There was a significant relationship between the %fPSA cut-points and detection of PCa in DRE-negative patients. The presence of a 10% cut-point increased the probability of PCa threefold. The %fPSA was significantly more related to PCa than the tPSA value in receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses (p = 0.001). Based on our findings, a lower %fPSA, especially <10%, is an important parameter when deciding whether to perform a biopsy on patients with a tPSA between 2.5 ng/mL and 10 ng/mL. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  13. The New Planetary Science Archive (PSA): Exploration and Discovery of Scientific Datasets from ESA's Planetary Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather, David; Besse, Sebastien; Vallat, Claire; Barbarisi, Isa; Arviset, Christophe; De Marchi, Guido; Barthelemy, Maud; Coia, Daniela; Costa, Marc; Docasal, Ruben; Fraga, Diego; Grotheer, Emmanuel; Lim, Tanya; MacFarlane, Alan; Martinez, Santa; Rios, Carlos; Vallejo, Fran; Saiz, Jaime

    2017-04-01

    The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) is the European Space Agency's (ESA) repository of science data from all planetary science and exploration missions. The PSA provides access to scientific datasets through various interfaces at http://psa.esa.int. All datasets are scientifically peer-reviewed by independent scientists, and are compliant with the Planetary Data System (PDS) standards. The PSA is currently implementing a number of significant improvements, mostly driven by the evolution of the PDS standard, and the growing need for better interfaces and advanced applications to support science exploitation. As of the end of 2016, the PSA is hosting data from all of ESA's planetary missions. This includes ESA's first planetary mission Giotto that encountered comet 1P/Halley in 1986 with a flyby at 800km. Science data from Venus Express, Mars Express, Huygens and the SMART-1 mission are also all available at the PSA. The PSA also contains all science data from Rosetta, which explored comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and asteroids Steins and Lutetia. The year 2016 has seen the arrival of the ExoMars 2016 data in the archive. In the upcoming years, at least three new projects are foreseen to be fully archived at the PSA. The BepiColombo mission is scheduled for launch in 2018. Following that, the ExoMars Rover Surface Platform (RSP) in 2020, and then the JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE). All of these will archive their data in the PSA. In addition, a few ground-based support programmes are also available, especially for the Venus Express and Rosetta missions. The newly designed PSA will enhance the user experience and will significantly reduce the complexity for users to find their data promoting one-click access to the scientific datasets with more customized views when needed. This includes a better integration with Planetary GIS analysis tools and Planetary interoperability services (search and retrieve data, supporting e.g. PDAP, EPN-TAP). It will also be up

  14. Applying strategies from libertarian paternalism to decision making for prostate specific antigen (PSA screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Black Amanda

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the recent publication of results from two randomized clinical trials, prostate specific antigen (PSA screening for prostate cancer remains a controversial issue. There is lack of agreement across studies that PSA screening significantly reduces prostate cancer mortality. In spite of these facts, the widespread use of PSA testing in the United States leads to overdetection and overtreatment of clinically indolent prostate cancer, and its associated harms of incontinence and impotence. Discussion Given the inconclusive results from clinical trials and incongruent PSA screening guidelines, the decision to screen for prostate cancer with PSA testing is an uncertain one for patients and health care providers. Screening guidelines from some health organizations recommend an informed decision making (IDM or shared decision making (SDM approach for deciding on PSA screening. These approaches aim to empower patients to choose among the available options by making them active participants in the decision making process. By increasing involvement of patients in the clinical decision-making process, IDM/SDM places more of the responsibility for a complex decision on the patient. Research suggests, however, that patients are not well-informed of the harms and benefits associated with prostate cancer screening and are also subject to an assortment of biases, emotion, fears, and irrational thought that interferes with making an informed decision. In response, the IDM/SDM approaches can be augmented with strategies from the philosophy of libertarian paternalism (LP to improve decision making. LP uses the insights of behavioural economics to help people better make better choices. Some of the main strategies of LP applicable to PSA decision making are a default decision rule, framing of decision aids, and timing of the decision. In this paper, we propose that applying strategies from libertarian paternalism can help with PSA

  15. Office support staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choat, Dennis E

    2005-11-01

    The pace at which we live and practice in this new century leaves little time to manage many of the menial tasks of day-to-day survival. This is especially true in the field of medicine. With today's insurance policies and procedures, Health Information Privacy Protection Act (HIPPA) regulations, and the low return of payment for time invested, it is crucial to have a supportive group of people around you to help make your valuable time as meaningful as possible. This article will describe an arrangement of ancillary office staff for a colorectal practice. There will be detailed information on job descriptions, expectations, and level of training required for each. Upon completion of this article, one should be able to identify the personnel needed to establish and manage an efficient office from the front desk to the billing department and ultimately the practice manager.

  16. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'.

  17. Proteins Annexin A2 and PSA in Prostate Cancer Biopsies Do Not Predict Biochemical Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, David S; Sondhauss, Sven; Dunne, Jonathan C; Woods, Lisa; Delahunt, Brett; Ferguson, Peter; Murray, Judith; Nacey, John N; Denham, James W; Jordan, T William

    2017-12-01

    We previously reported the use of mass spectrometry and western blotting to identify proteins from tumour regions of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies from 16 men who presented with apparently localized prostate cancer, and found that annexin A2 (ANXA2) appeared to be a better predictor of subsequent biochemical failure than prostate-specific antigen (PSA). In this follow-up study, ANXA2 and PSA were measured using western blotting of proteins extracted from biopsies from 37 men from a subsequent prostate cancer trial. No significant differences in ANXA2 and PSA levels were observed between men with and without biochemical failure. The statistical effect sizes were small, d=0.116 for ANXA2, and 0.266 for PSA. ANXA2 and PSA proteins measured from biopsy tumour regions are unlikely to be good biomarkers for prediction of the clinical outcome of prostate cancer presenting with apparently localized disease. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  18. Long-term clinical impact of PSA surge in castration-resistant prostate cancer patients treated with abiraterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Caffo, Orazio; Lolli, Cristian; Aieta, Michele; Scarpi, Emanuela; Bianchi, Emanuela; Maines, Francesca; Schepisi, Giuseppe; Salvi, Samanta; Massari, Francesco; Carrozza, Francesco; Veccia, Antonello; Chiuri, Vincenzo E; Campadelli, Enrico; Facchini, Gaetano; De Giorgi, Ugo

    2017-06-01

    Early changes in PSA have been evaluated in association to treatment outcome. The aim of this study was to assess PSA surge phenomenon in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with abiraterone and to correlate those variations with long-term treatment outcome. We retrospectively evaluated 330 CRPC patients in 11 Italian hospitals, monitoring PSA levels at baseline and every 4 weeks. Other clinical, biochemical and molecular parameters were determined at baseline. We considered PSA surge as PSA increase within the first 8 weeks from starting abiraterone more than 1% from baseline followed by a PSA decline. The log-rank test was applied to compare survival between groups of patients according to PSA surge. The impact of PSA surge on survival was evaluated by Cox regression analyses. A total of 330 patients with CRPC, median age 74 years (range, 45-90), received abiraterone (281 chemotherapy-treated and 49 chemotherapy-naïve). PSA surge was observed in 20 (7%) post-chemotherapy and 2 (4%) chemotherapy-naïve patients. For overall patients presenting PSA surge, timing of PSA peak from baseline was 5 ± 1.8 weeks and PSA rise from baseline was 21 ± 18.4%. The overall median follow-up was 23 months (range 1-62). No significant differences in progression-free survival and overall survival were observed between patients with and without PSA surge (P = 0.16 and =0.86, respectively). In addition, uni- and multivariate analyses showed no baseline factors related to PSA surge. PSA surge occurs in both chemotherapy-treated and chemotherapy-naïve patients treated with abiraterone resulting, however, in no long-term impact on outcome. Physicians and patients should be aware of PSA surge challenge to prevent a premature discontinuation of potentially effective therapy with abiraterone. Further larger and prospective studies are warranted to investigate this not infrequent phenomenon. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Aerosol Characterization at PSA from Spectral and Broadband Measurements of Solar Radiation; Caracterizacion de los Aerosoles en la PSA a partir de Medidas Espectrales y de Banda Ancha de Radiacion Solar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, P.; Polo, J.; Campos, A.; Espinar, B.

    2006-07-01

    When passing through the atmosphere, the solar radiation suffers extinction processes with and intensity that depends on the atmosphere state. Some of the attenuation mechanisms, in particular those oflicht scattering, are spectrally selective, and thus, the solar spectrum at the earth's surface can change drastically from one place to another. This fact can be used on the determination of some of the Earth atmosphere components. The case of aerosol turbidity has a particular interest due to its high variability. In mis work different methodologies for aerosol characterization are presented, Aerosol optical depth, turbidity and Angstrom exponent are determined by them. Moreover, a comparison among the different methods is established and two heat haze events occurring during summer in PSA (Tabernas) are analyzed. (Author) 18 refs.

  20. State of the art on the probabilistic safety assessment (P.S.A.); Etat de l'art sur les etudes probabilistes de surete (E.P.S.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devictor, N.; Bassi, A.; Saignes, P.; Bertrand, F

    2008-07-01

    The use of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is internationally increasing as a means of assessing and improving the safety of nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. To support the development of a competence on Probabilistic Safety Assessment, a set of states of the art regarding these tools and their use has been made between 2001 and 2005, in particular on the following topics: - Definition of the PSA of level 1, 2 and 3; - Use of PSA in support to design and operation of nuclear plants (risk-informed applications); - Applications to Non Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The report compiled in a single document these states of the art in order to ensure a broader use; this work has been done in the frame of the Project 'Reliability and Safety of Nuclear Facility' of the Nuclear Development and Innovation Division of the Nuclear Energy Division. As some of these states of the art have been made in support to exchanges with international partners and were written in English, a section of this document is written in English. This work is now applied concretely in support to the design of 4. Generation nuclear systems as Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors and especially Gas-cooled Fast Reactor, that have been the subject of communications during the conferences ANS (Annual Meeting 2007), PSA'08, ICCAP'08 and in the journal Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations. (authors)

  1. The preoperative serum ratio of total prostate specific antigen (PSA to free testosterone (FT, PSA/FT index ratio, and prostate cancer. Results in 220 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio B. Porcaro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate associations of preoperative total prostate specific antigen (PSA to free testosterone (FT, the PSA/FT index ratio, with features of pathology prostate cancer (PCA and to investigate its prognostic potential in clustering the PCA population. Patients and methods: After excluding criteria, the records of 220 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP were retrospectively reviewed. Serum samples of PSA, total testosterone (TT and FT were collected at 8.00 A.M., one month after biopsies and before RP. The PSA/FT ratio was computed in the population of patients who were clustered in groups according to ranking intervals of the PSA/FT ratio which identified at least 4 clusters which were coded as A, B, C, and D. The independent associations of the PSA/FT index ratio were assessed by statistical methods and a two-sided P < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. Results: TT correlated to FT which was a significant predictor of PSA in the population of patients who were subsequently clustered, according to increasing interval values of the PSA/FT index ratio, in groups that showed a stronger linear association of FT with PSA. The PSA/FT index ratio significantly associated with pathology features of prostate cancer such as pathology Gleason score (pGS, invasion of the seminal vesicles (pT3b, proportion of positive cores (P+ and proportion of cancer involving the volume of the prostate. In the population of patients, TT, PSA/FT index ratio and P+ independently associated with pGS ≥ 7 and pT3b; moreover, the odds ratio (OR of the PSA/FT index ratio resulted 9.11 which was stronger than TT (OR = 1.11 and P+ (OR = 8.84. In the PCA population, TT, PSA/FT index ratio and P+ also independently associated with pT3b PCA; interestingly, the OR of PSA/FT index resulted 54.91 which was stronger than TT (OR = 1.31 and P+ (26.43. Conclusions: Preoperative PSA/FT index ratio is an independent strong factor which

  2. The preoperative serum ratio of total prostate specific antigen (PSA) to free testosterone (FT), PSA/FT index ratio, and prostate cancer. Results in 220 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcaro, Antonio B; Caruso, Beatrice; Terrin, Alessandro; De Luyk, Nicolò; Cacciamani, Giovanni; Corsi, Paolo; Inverardi, Davide; De Marchi, Davide; Baldassarre, Roberto; Cerruto, Mariangela; Ghimenton, Claudio; Brunelli, Matteo; Zecchini Antoniolli, Stefano; Petrozziello, Aldo; Artibani, Walter

    2016-03-31

    To evaluate associations of preoperative total prostate specific antigen (PSA) to free testosterone (FT), the PSA/FT index ratio, with features of pathology prostate cancer (PCA) and to investigate its prognostic potential in clustering the PCA population. After excluding criteria, the records of 220 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) were retrospectively reviewed. Serum samples of PSA, total testosterone (TT) and FT were collected at 8.00 A.M., one month after biopsies and before RP. The PSA/FT ratio was computed in the population of patients who were clustered in groups according to ranking intervals of the PSA/FT ratio which identified at least 4 clusters which were coded as A, B, C, and D. The independent associations of the PSA/FT index ratio were assessed by statistical methods and a two-sided P < 0.05 was considered to indicate statistical significance. TT correlated to FT which was a significant predictor of PSA in the population of patients who were subsequently clustered, according to increasing interval values of the PSA/FT index ratio, in groups that showed a stronger linear association of FT with PSA. The PSA/FT index ratio significantly associated with pathology features of prostate cancer such as pathology Gleason score (pGS), invasion of the seminal vesicles (pT3b), proportion of positive cores (P+) and proportion of cancer involving the volume of the prostate. In the population of patients, TT, PSA/FT index ratio and P+ independently associated with pGS ≥ 7 and pT3b; moreover, the odds ratio (OR) of the PSA/FT index ratio resulted 9.11 which was stronger than TT (OR = 1.11) and P+ (OR = 8.84). In the PCA population, TT, PSA/FT index ratio and P+ also independently associated with pT3b PCA; interestingly, the OR of PSA/FT index resulted 54.91 which was stronger than TT (OR = 1.31) and P+ (26.43). Preoperative PSA/FT index ratio is an independent strong factor which directly associates with aggressive features of pathology PCA

  3. Nosocomial infections and staff hygiene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Petroudi, Dimitra

    2009-01-01

    .... The most important defences against nosocomial transmission of viral, bacterial, and other infections are detailed and continuing education of staff and strict adherence to infection control policies...

  4. Study of possibility using LANL PSA-methodology for accident probability RBMK researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrin, S.V.; Yuferev, V.Y.; Zlobin, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    The reactor facility probabilistic safety analysis methodologies are considered which are used at U.S. LANL and RF NIKIET. The methodologies are compared in order to reveal their similarity and differences, determine possibilities of using the LANL technique for RBMK type reactor safety analysis. It is found that at the PSA-1 level the methodologies practically do not differ. At LANL the PHA, HAZOP hazards analysis methods are used for more complete specification of the accounted initial event list which can be also useful at performance of PSA for RBMK. Exchange of information regarding the methodology of detection of dependent faults and consideration of human factor impact on reactor safety is reasonable. It is accepted as useful to make a comparative study result analysis for test problems or PSA fragments using various computer programs employed at NIKIET and LANL.

  5. Polymorphisms in the AR and PSA genes as markers of susceptibility and aggressiveness in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuasne, Hellen; Rodrigues, Iara Sant'Ana; Fuganti, Paulo Emílio

    2010-01-01

    The study of genes involved in androgen pathway can contribute to a better knowledge of prostate cancer. Our aim was to examine if polymorphisms in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) genes were involved in prostate cancer risk and aggressiveness. Genotypes were determined...... by PCR-RFLP (PSA) or using a 377 ABI DNA Sequencer (AR). PSA(G/G) genotype (OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.06–2.99) and AR short CAG repeats (OR = 1.89, 95% CI = 1.21–2.96) increased risk for prostate cancer and were related with tumor aggressiveness. About 38.3% of tumors showed microsatellite instability...

  6. Staff accuse bosses of secrecy over British synchrotron plans

    CERN Multimedia

    Loder, N

    1999-01-01

    Scientific staff at Daresbury who have worked on the Diamond project for many years, believe senior management has kept them in the dark over discussions about the possible siting of the synchrotron at RAL (1 page).

  7. Positive surgical margins at radical prostatectomy: Population-based averages within PSA and Gleason strata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Jason P; Salazar, Marco A; Chatterjee, Suman; Lin, Daniel W; Wright, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Positive surgical margins (PSM) are an important determinant of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy (RP). We use a population-based cancer registry to evaluate PSM by stage, Gleason and prostate-specific antigen (PSA). We identified men undergoing RP from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database between 2004 and 2007. Differences between those with and without PSM were compared with chi-squared tests. The proportion of cases with PSM were stratified by PSA and Gleason sum for both pT2 and pT3a tumours. Factors associated with PSM were analyzed using chi square and multivariate logistic regression analysis. A composite variable was used in a second multivariate analysis to display the odds ratio (OR) for a PSM for each discrete combination of PSA, Gleason score and pT stage. In total, 28 461 RP patients were identified and a PSM was present in 19.5%. PSM were 42% in pT3a and 16% in pT2 cases. Higher PSAs (10) were associated with higher proportions of PSM (12%, 20% and 28%, p strata compared to those with pT2 tumours, reaching 63% for those with pT3a, Gleason 8-10, PSA >10 disease. On multivariate analysis, stage was the largest predictor for PSM (OR 3.05, 95% confidence interval 2.81-3.30), although Gleason score and PSA remained statistically significant. In this population-based study of PSM after RP, the proportion of PSM vary significantly within different PSA and Gleason strata for organ-confined and extracapsular disease. These data can be used as a reference for urologist self-assessment.

  8. Literature Survey on Technical Issues and Insights of Multi-Unit PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Sejin; Park, Soyoung; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The need consider the risk impact in case of multi-unit in a single site increased after the accident at Fukushima Daiichi in March 2011. This means that we have to consider the single-unit initiators impacting the other units and the simultaneous accidents of the multi-unit on the same site. Particularly, this kind of technical concern is serious in case of the Republic of Korea where multi-units had to be located in high-density population area due to geographical features. The Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) in the Republic of Korea has been trying to identify the state of the art of international and domestic regulations and techniques on multi-unit risk assessment and planning the road map for the safety researches. However, we have to say that finding a common accepted methodology along with safety criteria for multi-unit PSA was not an easy task up to now. This paper summarizes and analyzes related international and domestic journals' papers, conferences' papers and reports about the multi-unit PSA classifying categories with themes to understand the technical tendency of multi-unit PSA. In addition, some insights that were obtained from this classification have been arranged too. This paper investigated the technical trend of the multi-unit PSA as collecting of the international and domestic journals' papers, conferences papers and reports, and analyzing them. Upon the literature survey, a few statistics, technical issues, and insights were summarized. Both of the fundamental and practical researches need to find a globally accepted methodology to calculate and determine quantitative objectives for a multi-unit PSA. We want to expect that this paper can be shared to understand the current status of multi-unit PSA.

  9. Metastatic Prostate Cancer Diagnosed by Bone Marrow Aspiration in an Elderly Man Not Undergoing PSA Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridwan Alam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer screening by PSA testing remains controversial, particularly in the elderly. Practice guidelines from most clinical societies suggest discontinuing PSA screening at age 70 while the USPSTF recommends against screening at any age. Recent reports have demonstrated an increased incidence of metastatic prostate cancer, with men aged 75 or older accounting for roughly half of those newly diagnosed at an incurable stage. We herein describe the case of an elderly gentleman with no history of prostate cancer screening who presented with anorexia and back pain of unclear etiology. Evaluation with bone marrow aspiration revealed a diagnosis of metastatic prostate cancer.

  10. The relationship between managerial leadership behaviors and staff nurse retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe perceptions of managerial leadership behaviors associated with staff nurse turnover and to compare nurse manager leadership behaviors as perceived by managers and their staff nurses. Effective leadership styles among nurse managers have been associated with staff nurse job satisfaction and retention. Although both transformational and transactional leadership styles have been described as effective, it is unclear which nurse manager leadership behaviors contribute most to staff nurse retention. This descriptive, correlational study was conducted at a 465-bed community hospital in the northeastern United States. All staff nurses and nurse managers employed in both ambulatory and acute care nursing units were invited to participate in the study. The study sample comprised 79 staff nurses and 10 nurse managers, who completed demographic forms and the 45-item Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, which measures 12 dimensions of leadership style. Data were collected from July through September 2003. Active management by exception as perceived by staff nurses was the only managerial leadership style associated with staff nurse turnover (r = .26, p = .03). Compared with the perceptions among their staff nurses, nurse managers consistently perceived that they demonstrated a higher mean frequency of transformational leadership behaviors. The transactional leadership style of active management by exception not only appeared to be a deterrent to staff nurse retention but also reflected leadership perceptions among staff nurses who work evening and night shifts. This study also provides further evidence regarding a trend in which nurse managers and staff nurses do not concur on the frequency of transformational leadership behaviors but do demonstrate agreement on the frequency of transactional leadership behaviors.

  11. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  12. Efficient leadership and staff motivation in a chosen firm

    OpenAIRE

    VLÁŠKOVÁ, Dagmar

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor work deals with the leadership and staff motivation. The main object was a detection of the mistakes which the managers in a chosen firm make in this sphere. The alternate targets were to analyse the staff satisfaction with their leaders and to detect the managers´ style of leading. The close of my work contains my own suggestions and recommendations how to eliminate the detected mistakes and how to improve current situation in a firm.

  13. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  14. [Burnout syndrome among health staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel-García, José Angel; Rodríguez-Morán, Martha; Guerrero-Romero, Fernando

    2006-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of burnout syndrome components among the medical and nursing staff of the second care level hospitals of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social and Instituto de Seguridad Social al Servicio de los Trabajadores del Estado from Durango, Mexico. A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out among 73 physicians and 100 nurses randomly selected from both hospitals. The prevalence of burnout syndrome components was established by the Maslash Burnout Inventory, which determines the presence of physical/emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and labor performance. In addition, sociodemographic and labor information was collected. Prevalence was calculated with a reliability interval of 95% (CI 95%). 73 physicians and 100 nurses enrolled, corresponding to 22.8% and 14.5% of such personnel working in both institutions. Among the IMSS and ISSSTE workers respectively, the prevalence of depersonalization was 43.2% (34.4-52.9) and 14.5% (6.8-25.8), whereas the prevalence of physical/emotional exhaustion was 41.4% (32.7-51.1) and 19.4% (10.4-31.4). Pre-valence of labor performance was higher among the personnel of Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social: 99.1% (95.1-100) versus 96.8% (88.8-100). Severe depersonalization (p = 0.004), but not emotional exhaustion (p = 0.09) nor labor performance (p = 0.06) was significantly higher among personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social. Prevalence of depersonalization and physical/emotional exhaustion was higher among physicians and nurses of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social; nonetheless, their labor performance was high. Our finding suggests that personnel working at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social make a greater effort to maintain the high labor performance that medical care requires.

  15. PSA testing for prostate cancer: an online survey of the views and reported practice of General Practitioners in the UK.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brett, J.; Watson, E.; Hewitson, P.; Bukach, C.; Edwards, A.; Elwyn, G.; Austoker, J.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The role of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) testing in the early detection of prostate cancer is controversial. Current UK policy stipulates that any man who wishes to have a PSA test should have access to the test, provided he has been given full information about the benefits and

  16. Association of GPs' risk attitudes, level of empathy, and burnout status with PSA testing in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anette F; Carlsen, Anders H; Vedsted, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Denne artikel undersøger, om variationen i raten af PSA-tests mellem alment praktiserende læger kan forklares af psykologiske faktorer som f.eks. lægens risikovillighed. Resultaterne viser, at lægens risikovillighed influerer på raten af PSA-tests. Forfatterne finder blandt andet, at patienter, s...

  17. The low molecular weight protein PsaI stabilizes the light-harvesting complex II docking site of photosystem I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plöchinger, Magdalena; Torabi, Salar; Rantala, Marjaana

    2016-01-01

    PsaI represents one of three low molecular weight peptides of PSI. Targeted inactivation of the plastid PsaI gene in Nicotiana tabacum has no measurable effect on photosynthetic electron transport around PSI or on accumulation of proteins involved in photosynthesis. Instead, the lack of PsaI dest...... of mutant plants into state 2 in darkness represents a compensatory and/or protective metabolic mechanism. This involves an increased reduction and/or reduced oxidation of the PQ pool, presumably to sustain a balanced excitation of both photosystems upon the onset of light.......PsaI represents one of three low molecular weight peptides of PSI. Targeted inactivation of the plastid PsaI gene in Nicotiana tabacum has no measurable effect on photosynthetic electron transport around PSI or on accumulation of proteins involved in photosynthesis. Instead, the lack of Psa......I destabilizes the association of PsaL and PsaH to PSI, both forming the light-harvesting complex (LHC)II docking site of PSI. These alterations at the LHCII binding site surprisingly did not prevent state transition but led to an increased incidence of PSI-LHCII complexes, coinciding with an elevated...

  18. Reduction in uptake of PSA tests following decision aids: systematic review of current aids and their evaluations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evans, R.; Edwards, A.; Brett, J.; Bradburn, M.; Watson, E.; Austoker, J.; Elwyn, G.

    2005-01-01

    A man's decision to have a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test should be an informed one. We undertook a systematic review to identify and appraise PSA decision aids and evaluations. We searched 15 electronic databases and hand-searched key journals. We also contacted key authors and organisations.

  19. Immediate treatment with bicalutamide 150mg as adjuvant therapy significantly reduces the risk of PSA progression in early prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    See, W; Iversen, P; Wirth, M

    2003-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150mg (in addition to standard care), on the risk of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, in patients with early prostate cancer.......To evaluate the effect of bicalutamide ('Casodex') 150mg (in addition to standard care), on the risk of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) progression, in patients with early prostate cancer....

  20. PSA-based prostate cancer screening: The role of active surveillance and informed and shared decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.D.F. Venderbos (Lionne); M.J. Roobol-Bouts (Monique)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractSince the first publication describing the identification of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in the 1960s, much progress has been made. The PSA test changed from being initially a monitoring tool to being also used as a diagnostic tool. Over time, the test has been heavily debated due to

  1. Treatment for A2-B2 prostatic carcinoma: results of hormone-radiotherapy combination in PSA era; Traitement des cancers prostatiques A2-B2: resultats d`une association hormonoradiotherapique dans l`ere du PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, N.; Richaud, P.; Gaston, R.; Chacon, B.; Mauriac, L.; Bussieres, E. [Institut Bergonie, Centre Regional de Lutte Contre le Cancer, 33 - Bordeaux (France)

    1998-05-01

    Prospective analysis of results of combined neo-adjuvant hormonotherapy and external beam radiation therapy in A2-B2 prostate adenocarcinoma. Between 1986 and 1994, 36 patients with clinical stage A2 (five patients), B1 (12 patients) and B2 (19 patients) N0 adenocarcinoma of the prostate declined for radical surgery, underwent a brief neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy before external beam radiotherapy at our radiation therapy department. They all had a PSA determination before the combined treatment and no evidence of local extension or metastatic spread. They were followed clinically and with serial PSA levels for a median time of 58 months. Relapse was defined by a PSA level {>=}2.5 ng/mL. Median pre-treatment PSA level was 16.5 ng/mL; 16 patients had less than 15 ng/mL. Combined treatment was very well tolerated. After 3 months of neo-adjuvant hormonotherapy, digital rectal examination was normalized in 27 cases with a PSA value {<=} 1 ng/mL in 23. Only four tumors have relapsed (one local failure, two metastases and one PSA failure). The single factor that predicted biochemical relapse was pre-treatment PSA level: the 5-year actuarial rate of PSA failure when PSA level < 15 ng/ml was 0% and 27.5% if it was {>=} 15 ng/mL (p = 0.05). During follow- up only two patients suffered grade 2 rectitis and seven complained a total impotency. This limited study advocates hormonal neo-adjuvant therapy and radiotherapy association in intra-capsular prostatic carcinoma in patients declined for surgery or when pre-treatment PSA is above 15 ng/mL, with mild acute and late toxicity. (authors)

  2. Decisional involvement: staff nurse and nurse manager perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherb, Cindy A; Specht, Janet K P; Loes, Jean L; Reed, David

    2011-03-01

    Enhancing involvement in organizational decisions is one strategy to improve the work environment of registered nurses and to increase their recruitment and retention. Little is known about the type of decision making and the level of involvement nurses desire. This was a descriptive study exploring staff nurse and nurse manager ratings of actual and preferred decisional involvement and differences between staff nurses and nurse managers. A sample of 320 RNs from a Midwestern health care network was surveyed using the Decisional Involvement Scale. Nurse managers and staff nurses had statistically significant differences in their perceptions of who was involved in actual decision making in the areas of unit governance and leadership and collaboration or liaison activities. There were statistically significant differences in preferred decisional involvement between staff nurses and nurse managers in the overall DIS scale and the subscales of unit governance and leadership and quality of support staff practice.

  3. Study on communicating risk information obtained from PSA within nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunogane, Nobuaki; Onoue, Akira [Institute of Nuclear Technology, Institute of Nuclear Safety System, Inc., Mihama, Fukui (Japan); Kojima, Shigeo [Computer Software Development Corp., Tokyo(Japan)

    2000-09-01

    In this study, the communication of PSA information in nuclear power plants (NPPs), namely, how the risk information obtained from the probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) should be presented and communicated to plant personnel, was examined assuming that the safety management system based on the risk information was introduced to NPPs. This is called PSA communication. First, when risk-informed safety management is to be introduced into NPPs, plant personnel should have sufficient related knowledge. In order to provide such knowledge to the personnel through training, risk information is classified into three types: basic information, detailed information and task information. A hierarchical risk information summary for reporting, coordinating and communicating tasks is proposed. In this summary, the concerns of those who have received the information are placed at the top and the related risk information positioned below. At the same time, and by way of a trial, the risk information relating to on-line maintenance (OLM) is prepared. In order to enhance the safety-consciousness and the safety of the entire plant, specific plans such as 'risk tags' which indicate the safety significance of equipment is proposed. Finally, a guideline providing examination procedures for developing detailed PSA communication plans is introduced. (author)

  4. Cancer - What You Don't Know Can Kill You PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-07-22

    This 60 second PSA is based on the July 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which provides information on colorectal and breast cancer and the importance of getting screened.  Created: 7/22/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/22/2010.

  5. Tools Related to the Federal Tobacco Products Regulations: What Retailers Need to Know PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-09-16

    PSA to announce a new mobile text message program that will help raise retailers' awareness of the new federal tobacco regulations.  Created: 9/16/2010 by The CDC Division of News and Electronic Media and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products.   Date Released: 9/16/2010.

  6. Student-Designed Public Service Announcement (PSA) Videos to Enhance Motivation and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    Educators often focus on enhancing student motivation and engagement. This article describes an activity with these aims, in which undergraduates (a) learn about theories and research on means of persuasion and (b) in small groups design and record a public service announcement (PSA) video, write a brief paper that outlines the theories used to…

  7. Should baseline PSA testing be performed in men aged 40 to detect ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. We aimed to evaluate the presenting features and treatment outcome of prostate cancer in men aged <50 years, in a region where prostate specific antigen (PSA) screening is not readily available and most men present with symptoms. Methods. We analysed the data of 1 571 men with prostatic adenocarcinoma ...

  8. National STD Awareness Month and GYT: Get Yourself Tested PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-03-03

    April is National STD Awareness Month. In this PSA, native communities, especially adolescents and young adults, are encouraged to get educated, tested, and treated by visiting gytnow.org.  Created: 3/3/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 3/3/2011.

  9. PSA Velocity Does Not Improve Prostate Cancer Detection | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid increase in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels is not grounds for automatically recommending a prostate biopsy, according to a study published online February 24 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. |

  10. Unpackaged Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco: What Retailers Need to Know PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-28

    This PSA helps retailers understand new federal regulations surrounding the sale of unpackaged cigarettes and smokeless tobacco.  Created: 10/28/2010 by The CDC Division of News and Electronic Media and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products.   Date Released: 10/28/2010.

  11. Don't Sell Tobacco to Minors: What Retailers Need to Know PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-07-08

    PSA helps raise retailers awareness of the new federal tobacco regulations related to sale of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products to people under 18.  Created: 7/8/2010 by The CDC Division of News and Electronic Media and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products.   Date Released: 7/8/2010.

  12. Put Out the Myth: There Is No Such Thing as a Safe Cigarette PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-07-21

    PSA helps raise retailers' and manufacturers' awareness of the new federal tobacco regulations related to the production and sale of cigarettes labeled as "light," "low," or "mild.".  Created: 7/21/2010 by The CDC Division of News and Electronic Media and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products.   Date Released: 7/21/2010.

  13. CDC: Tips from Former Smokers – Cessation PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-04

    You can quit smoking! This inspiring 30 second PSA features three people who successfully quit smoking after many years. They share their practical tips on how to quit for good.  Created: 4/4/2012 by Office on Smoking and Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.   Date Released: 4/4/2012.

  14. The Obesity Epidemic – What Can Be Done? PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-08-03

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which provides information on obesity and what you can do to help fight the epidemic.  Created: 8/3/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/3/2010.

  15. Time from first detectable PSA following radical prostatectomy to biochemical recurrence: A competing risk analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. De Boo (Leonora); M. Pintilie (Melania); P. Yip (Paul); J. Baniel (Jack); N.E. Fleshner (Neil); D. Margel (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: In this study, we estimated the time from first detectable prostate-specific antigen (PSA) following radical prostatectomy (RP) to commonly used definitions of biochemical recurrence (BCR). We also identified the predictors of time to BCR. Methods: We identified subjects

  16. Patients with Central Lines - What You Need to Know to Avoid a Bloodstream Infection PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-03-01

    This 60 second PSA is based on the March, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates bloodstream infections in patients with central lines are largely preventable when healthcare providers use CDC-recommended infection control steps.  Created: 3/1/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/1/2011.

  17. Graphic Health Warnings for Cigarettes: What You Need to Know PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-11-18

    PSA about new graphic health warnings for cigarette packages and advertisements.  Created: 11/18/2010 by The CDC Division of News and Electronic Media and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products.   Date Released: 11/18/2010.

  18. New Hope for Stopping HIV - Testing and Medical Care Save Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-29

    This 60 second PSA is based on the December 2011 CDC Vital Signs report, "HIV Prevention through Care and Treatment" that shares new hope for preventing HIV and improving the health of people with HIV.  Created: 11/29/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/29/2011.

  19. Utility of Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in the Indigenous African Man

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To examine the great possibility that the indigenous black African man with prostate diseases requires a different diagnostic approach and strategies beyond the standard PSA reference levels generated in non-African study subjects. Design: A hospital based cross-sectional descriptive study. Setting: The ...

  20. Evaluating engrailed-2 and cytokines in urine with serum PSA as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluating engrailed-2 and cytokines in urine with serum PSA as potential biomarkers in patients with prostatism at Moi Teaching and Referral Hospital, Eldoret, Kenya. ... Conclusion: EN-2 expression in urine was not a predictive marker, however, IL-6 and TNF-α levels were elevated in urine of CaP patients. The potential ...

  1. Web Accessibility Knowledge and Skills for Non-Web Library Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Why do librarians and library staff other than Web librarians and developers need to know about accessibility? Web services staff do not--or should not--operate in isolation from the rest of the library staff. It is important to consider what areas of online accessibility are applicable to other areas of library work and to colleagues' regular job…

  2. Staff Behavior toward Children and Adolescents in a Residential Facility: A Self-Report Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huitink, C.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Veerman, J. W.; Verhoeven, L.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine psychometric properties of the Staff Behavior toward Clients questionnaire (SBC), a self-report measure for care staff working with children and adolescents with mild to borderline intellectual disabilities in residential care. Ninety-nine care staff completed the SBC and the Strengths and…

  3. A "Coach Approach" to Staff Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macmillan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The speed of change is challenging libraries to redevelop themselves in ways we have never seen before. Rising costs and changing customer expectations are forcing staff to continuously learn new skills, adapt to new technologies and work more closely in collaboration with others in response to this unpredictable environment. At the same time library leaders need to communicate regularly with staff and to motivate them to dialogue with each other about the value of the library service that they provide to the community. A creative approach to building flexibility, resilience and staff engagement has become essential for survival. Coaching is a creative, innovative and effective communications tool that is now considered to be one of the most important ways to encourage employees to continue to learn and develop. Its greatest impact is in building leadership and staff engagement. Communicating with “a coach approach” or coaching mindset is a powerful way for library leaders to connect with others where the flow and exchange is positive and there is a mutual benefit of contribution and collaboration, expanded knowledge and innovation. The basics of fostering “a coach approach” with library staff requires an understanding of the importance of “reframing” one’s personal attitudes and perspectives, appreciating the art of focused listening and the impact of positive acknowledgement, learning to ask the right questions and formulating action plans for continued success. It is a learned skill that requires a commitment to practice but is one that will ultimately demonstrate positive results.

  4. Staff empowerment in intensive care: nurses' and physicians' lived experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wåhlin, Ingrid; Ek, Anna-Christina; Idvall, Ewa

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe empowerment from the perspective of intensive care staff. What makes intensive care staff experience inner strength and power? Intensive care staff are repeatedly exposed to traumatic situations and demanding events, which could result in stress and burnout symptoms. A higher level of psychological empowerment at the workplace is associated with increased work satisfaction and mental health, fewer burnout symptoms and a decreased number of sick leave days. Open-ended interviews were conducted with 12 intensive care unit (ICU) staff (four registered nurses, four enrolled nurses and four physicians) in southern Sweden. Data were analysed using a phenomenological method. Intensive care staff were found to be empowered both by internal processes such as feelings of doing good, increased self-esteem/self-confidence and increased knowledge and skills, and by external processes such as nourishing meetings, well functioning teamwork and a good atmosphere. Findings show that not only personal knowledge and skills, but also a supporting atmosphere and a good teamwork, has to be focused and encouraged by supervisors in order to increase staff's experiences of empowerment. Staff also need a chance to feel that they do something good for patients, next of kin and other staff members. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Staff and advisers

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    He has worked extensively in. Latin America and Eastern and South- ern Africa with the Centro Internacio- ... source management in Latin America and the current. Rural Poverty and Environment Program. of our programming ... of Geography, Archaeology and En- vironmental Studies at the University of Witwatersrand in ...

  6. Deciding on PSA-screening - Quality of current consumer information on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korfage, Ida J; van den Bergh, Roderick C N; Essink-Bot, Marie-Louise

    2010-11-01

    Given that screening for prostate cancer has the potential to reduce prostate cancer mortality at the expense of considerable overdiagnosis and overtreatment, the availability of core consumer information - correct, balanced and supportive of autonomous decision-making - is a must. We assessed the quality of consumer information available through the Internet per November 2009 and its possible contribution to informed decision-making by potential screenees. Consumer information on PSA-screening was sought through the Internet in November 2009. Materials had to be targeted at potential consumers, offered by not-for-profit organisations, released in 2005 or after, in English or Dutch. Per material 2 of the authors assessed independently from each other whether standardised pre-defined topics were addressed, whether the content was correct and which approach was taken towards the decision-making process about uptake. Twenty-three materials were included, of which 11 were released (shortly) after the results of 2 large randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effectiveness of screening for prostate cancer had been published in March 2009. That a PSA-test result can be abnormal because of non-cancerous conditions (false positive) and that it may miss prostate cancer (false negative) was not addressed in 2/23 and 8/23 materials, respectively. The risk of overdiagnosis and overtreatment was not mentioned in 6 out of 23. PSA-screening was presented as a usual thing to do in some materials, whereas other materials emphasised the voluntary nature of PSA-screening ('it is your decision'). The content of 19/23 materials was considered sufficiently informative according to the pre-defined criteria, 12/23 materials were considered supportive of informed decision-making by men. Most materials of not-for-profit organizations supplied adequate information about PSA-screening, whilst the degree of persuasion towards uptake reflected variations in opinions on men

  7. Workplace aggression experienced by frontline staff in dementia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Anne-Marie; Squires, Janet E; Mitchell, Agnes; Sales, Anne E; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2012-05-01

    To describe the frequency of aggressive acts experienced by frontline staff working in two models of dementia care: Residential Alzheimer's Care Centers and Secured Dementia Units and to explore the associations between aggressive acts experienced by frontline staff and factors related to the work context and care providers. Aggression towards healthcare providers in residential long-term care settings is well documented. However, few studies have examined associations between aggressive behaviours towards care providers and organisational factors. A cross-sectional survey. The survey included demographic items and questions about aggressive acts experienced by staff and contextual factors. Analyses included: (1) descriptive statistics, (2) tests of difference (i.e. Student's t-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, chi-squared test and anova), (3) bivariate associations (i.e. Pearson and Spearman rank order correlations) and (4) multivariate linear regression. Ninety-one health care aides and licensed practical nurses working in four nursing units using two models of dementia care participated (response rate 81%). The most frequently reported types of aggression were physical assault (50% of staff, n = 45) and emotional abuse (48% of staff, n = 44). Aggressive acts were significantly associated with working in Secured Dementia Units rather than Residential Alzheimer's Care Centers. Frontline staff working in Secured Dementia Units were exposed to higher frequencies of various types of aggressive acts mainly initiated by residents. Future research needs to explore modifiable workplace factors associated with aggressive acts in a larger sample across a variety of long-term care settings. To prevent staff perceived aggressive acts, leaders and managers in dementia care need to acknowledge the complex topic of workplace aggression and encourage an open discussion among frontline staff without assigning blame. Care provider strategies for dealing with aggressive behaviour have to

  8. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  9. Managing Custodial and Maintenance Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Presents some basic maintenance management techniques that can help schools meet their budgets, preserve staffing levels, meet productivity needs, and sustain quality services. Tips for staff recruitment, training, and retention are explored. (GR)

  10. Extent of disease in recurrent prostate cancer determined by [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT in relation to PSA levels, PSA doubling time and Gleason score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Mottaghy, Felix M. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Pfister, David; Heidenreich, Axel [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Urology, Aachen (Germany); Vogg, Andreas; Drude, Natascha I.; Behrendt, Florian F. [RWTH University Hospital Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Voeoe, Stefan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2016-03-15

    To examine the relationship between the extent of disease determined by [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC-PET/CT and the important clinical measures prostate-specific antigen (PSA), PSA doubling time (PSAdt) and Gleason score. We retrospectively studied the first 155 patients with recurrent prostate cancer (PCA) referred to our university hospital for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. PET/CT was positive in 44 %, 79 % and 89 % of patients with PSA levels of ≤1, 1 - 2 and ≥2 ng/ml, respectively. Patients with high PSA levels showed higher rates of local prostate tumours (p < 0.001), and extrapelvic lymph node (p = 0.037) and bone metastases (p = 0.013). A shorter PSAdt was significantly associated with pelvic lymph node (p = 0.026), extrapelvic lymph node (p = 0.001), bone (p < 0.001) and visceral (p = 0.041) metastases. A high Gleason score was associated with more frequent pelvic lymph node metastases (p = 0.039). In multivariate analysis, both PSA and PSAdt were independent determinants of scan positivity and of extrapelvic lymph node metastases. PSAdt was the only independent marker of bone metastases (p = 0.001). Of 20 patients with a PSAdt <6 months and a PSA ≥2 ng/ml, 19 (95 %) had a positive scan and 12 (60 %) had M1a disease. Of 14 patients with PSA <1 ng/ml and PSAdt >6 months, only 5 (36 %) had a positive scan and 1 (7 %) had M1a disease. [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT will identify PCA lesions even in patients with very low PSA levels. Higher PSA levels and shorter PSAdt are independently associated with scan positivity and extrapelvic metastases, and can be used for patient selection for [{sup 68}Ga]PSMA-HBED-CC PET/CT. (orig.)

  11. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  12. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  13. PEL Staff Together for the First Time | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer John-Paul Denson and Troy Taylor of the Protein Expression Laboratory (PEL) used to pack liters of Escherichia coli lysates on ice, put them in the back of a microvan, and drive across campus to deliver the samples for protein purification. Now that all PEL staff members are working under the same roof at the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF), transferring samples is just a walk down the hall. Staff members were previously spread out in five buildings across the Fort Detrick campus.

  14. Porous silicon antibody microarrays for quantitative analysis: measurement of free and total PSA in clinical plasma samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järås, Kerstin; Adler, Belinda; Tojo, Axel; Malm, Johan; Marko-Varga, György; Lilja, Hans; Laurell, Thomas

    2012-12-24

    The antibody microarrays have become widespread, but their use for quantitative analyses in clinical samples has not yet been established. We investigated an immunoassay based on nanoporous silicon antibody microarrays for quantification of total prostate-specific-antigen (PSA) in 80 clinical plasma samples, and provide quantitative data from a duplex microarray assay that simultaneously quantifies free and total PSA in plasma. To further develop the assay the porous silicon chips was placed into a standard 96-well microtiter plate for higher throughput analysis. The samples analyzed by this quantitative microarray were 80 plasma samples obtained from men undergoing clinical PSA testing (dynamic range: 0.14-44 ng/ml, LOD: 0.14 ng/ml). The second dataset, measuring free PSA (dynamic range: 0.40-74.9 ng/ml, LOD: 0.47 ng/ml) and total PSA (dynamic range: 0.87-295 ng/ml, LOD: 0.76 ng/ml), was also obtained from the clinical routine. The reference for the quantification was a commercially available assay, the ProStatus PSA Free/Total DELFIA. In an analysis of 80 plasma samples the microarray platform performs well across the range of total PSA levels. This assay might have the potential to substitute for the large-scale microtiter plate format in diagnostic applications. The duplex assay paves the way for a future quantitative multiplex assay, which analyzes several prostate cancer biomarkers simultaneously. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate on growth and PSA secretion of human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, V; Di Carlo, A; De Luca, C; Mariano, A

    2001-05-01

    Prolonged increase of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) level in the culture medium of a well differentiated human prostatic cancer cell (LNCaP) inhibits cellular growth and stimulates PSA secretion. The differentiation of the cells tested was documented by their responsiveness to androgens and the ability to synthesize cellular markers of differentiation (PSA). The raise in cAMP level was produced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP) or by agents acting at distinct levels in the pathway of cAMP generation (forskolin) or degradation (IBMX). Each of these three agents in a range of concentrations between 10-4-10-6 M had an inhibitory effect on the growth which is dose and time-dependent. The inhibition was reversible as demonstrated by complete restoration of cell growth soon after the withdrawal of the substances from the culture medium. When cAMP levels in culture medium was raised, an increase in PSA content was observed. However, the effects of cAMP on PSA content was not due to increase in PSA synthesis, since simultaneous measurement of secreted and cellular PSA indicated that the principal effect of the cyclic nucleotide was to enhance the secretion of stored PSA. Furthermore the inhibition of cellular growth by cAMP suggests new approaches in prostatic carcinoma therapy.

  16. Making Health Easier: Active Living in Philadelphia, PA PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-06-07

    Making communities bike-friendly can help reduce traffic congestion and increase the physical activity of residents. Learn how one Philadelphia resident worked with his community to make Philadelphia a more bike-friendly city.  Created: 6/7/2013 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 6/7/2013.

  17. Staff perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and beneficial strategies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Joshua; Friedman, Susan Hatters; Collin, Marc; Martin, Richard J

    2018-01-01

    To characterise neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) staff perceptions regarding factors which may lead to more challenging staff-parent interactions, and beneficial strategies for working with families with whom such interactions occur. A survey of 168 physician and nursing staff at two NICUs in American teaching hospitals inquired about their perceptions of challenging parent-staff interactions and situations in which such interactions were likely to occur. From a medical perspective, staff perceptions of challenging interactions were noted when infants had recent decompensation, high medical complexity, malformations or long duration of stay in the NICU. From a psychological/social perspective, a high likelihood of challenging interactions was noted with parents who were suspicious, interfere with equipment, or parents who hover in the NICU, express paranoid or delusional thoughts, repeat questions, perceive the staff as inaccessible, are managing addictions, or who require child protective services involvement. Frequent family meetings, grieving opportunities, education of parents, social work referrals, clearly defined rules, partnering in daily care and support groups were perceived as the most beneficial strategies for improving difficult interactions. This study delineates what staff perceive as challenging interactions and provides support for an educational and interventional role that incorporates mental health professionals. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Increased PSA expression on prostate cancer exosomes in in vitro condition and in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logozzi, Mariantonia; Angelini, Daniela F; Iessi, Elisabetta; Mizzoni, Davide; Di Raimo, Rossella; Federici, Cristina; Lugini, Luana; Borsellino, Giovanna; Gentilucci, Alessandro; Pierella, Federico; Marzio, Vittorio; Sciarra, Alessandro; Battistini, Luca; Fais, Stefano

    2017-09-10

    Prostate specific antigen (PSA) test is the most common, clinically validated test for the diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). While neoplastic lesions of the prostate may cause aberrant levels of PSA in the blood, the quantitation of free or complexed PSA poorly discriminates cancer patients from those developing benign lesions, often leading to invasive and unnecessary surgical procedures. Microenvironmental acidity increases exosome release by cancer cells. In this study we evaluated whether acidity, a critical phenotype of malignancy, could influence exosome release and increase the PSA expression in nanovesicles released by PCa cells. To this aim, we exploited Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA), an immunocapture-based ELISA, and nanoscale flow-cytometry. The results show that microenvironmental acidity induces an increased release of nanovesicles expressing both PSA and the exosome marker CD81. In order to verify whether the changes induced by the local selective pressure of extracellular acidity may correspond to a clinical pathway we used the same approach to evaluate the levels of PSA-expressing exosomes in the plasma of PCa patients and controls, including subjects with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH). The results show that only PCa patients have high levels of nanovesicles expressing both CD81 and PSA. This study shows that tumor acidity exerts a selective pressure leading to the release of extracellular vesicles that express both PSA and exosome markers. A comparable scenario was shown in the plasma of prostate cancer patients as compared to both BPH and healthy controls. These results suggest that microenvironmental acidity may represent a key factor which determines qualitatively and quantitatively the release of extracellular vesicles by malignant tumors, including prostate cancer. This condition leads to the spill-over of nanovesicles into the peripheral blood of prostate cancer patients, where the levels of tumor biomarkers expressed by

  19. Mental hygiene as a burnout prevention of counseling staff

    OpenAIRE

    Šípová, Zuzana

    2015-01-01

    The thesis deals with the issue of mental hygiene as a burnout prevention of counselling staff working in counselling for family, marriage and human relations. It is focused on psychologists and social workers. The first part deals with the issues related to the counselling and requirements for counselling staff, as well as the specifics and risks associated with the profession, and the clientele that comes to counselling. Furthermore, the thesis deals with the issues of burnout syndrome and ...

  20. Effectiveness diagnostic of prostate specific antigen (P.S.A.) radioimmunoassay and the P.S.A. density to assess prostatic state of Ivorian patients; Efficacite diagnostique du dosage radio-isotopique et de la densite de l'antigene specifique de la prostate (P.S.A.) dans le bilan prostatique des sujets ivoiriens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboukoua-Kouassi, N.; Kouame-Koutouan, A.; Zunon-Kipre, E.; Achy, O.B.; Ndrin, N.K. [Cocody Univ., UFR sciences Medicales (SMA), Service de Biophysique et Medecine Nucleaire, Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire); Achy, O.B.; Gnagne, Y.M. [Cocody Univ., Service d' Urologie, UFR/SMA, Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire)

    2009-10-15

    By this first assay realized during two years, the authors wanted to assess the diagnostic performances of radioimmunoassay P.S.A., still unknown by Ivorian prescribers. It was about 78 patients who presented prostatic affections confirmed by histology. The dosages showed that, in prostate adenoma, a P.S.A. level was 9.5 ng/ml with P.S.A. density (P.S.A.D.) at 0.3. In prostate cancer, a P.S.A. level at 64.9 ng/ml with P.S.A.D. at 1.68. P.S.A. sensibility was good (91%) in spite of the value used, its specificity was about 94% for a level of 20 ng/ml. The predictive positive value was excellent with 20 ng/ml (95%). The risk to have prostate cancer with P.S.A. level of 10 ng/ml was 73.8% when rectal route (R.R.) was abnormal. The risk was low to 14.28% when the R.R. was normal. The radioimmunoassay of P.S.A. and P.S.A.D. rate improved significantly diagnostic indications in prostatic affections. Consequently, it must form part of first-line examination to the health assessment of old patients for a better prostatic lesions management. (authors)