WorldWideScience

Sample records for psa staff work

  1. Putting PSA to work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubler, R.; Gomez-Cobo, A.

    1998-01-01

    The IAEA has, during the last three years, been working intensively on PSA applications. The draft TECDOC prepared during these activities, ''PSA Applications'' is summarized in this paper. Actual events at nuclear facilities provide an important basis to compare PSAs with reality. PSA based operational event analysis therefore can be used to evaluate the importance of operational events from a risk perspective but also can contribute to validating and enhancing PSAs and to continuously check whether or not the PSA models are adequate, appropriate and complete. The work of the IAEA in this area is therefore summarized as well. In a companion paper, titled ''Towards a credible PSA fit for applications'', two specific aspects regarding the quality of the PSA to be used are discussed in detail, namely the Living PSA concept, which ensures that the PSA reflects actual design and operational features and Quality Assurance for PSA. (author)

  2. IAEA work with guides for PSA quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, Per

    2004-09-01

    IAEA has a project on development of a TECDOC 'PSA Quality for Various Applications'. The project develops the guidance document in stages with intermediate meetings with exchange of ideas, thoughts and experience. Draft versions are being produced successively. The objective with the project is to use attributes to describe the quality of different elements of a PSA (Analysis of initiating events, accident progression, system, data, human reliability, etc) making the PSA suitable for application in various risk informed activities. Two of the meetings in this project took place in February 2004 and in July 2004. The February meeting discussed different aspects of PSA quality in relation to applications and a draft of the TECDOC was reviewed. The meeting made recommendations for preparation of a final document and set priorities for further work in the area. The July meeting elaborated the document further in a small working group and a new draft version was prepared. A final version is expected to be published during 2005. The project has come to the conclusion that it is a limited number of PSA element attributes that are specific for a certain application. Most of the attributes concern plant specificity, realism and level of detail in a general manner, how plant specific is the model, how realistic and how detailed? Many attributes have the characteristic that they are good to have, but not necessarily needed to do the job. This last statement is valid both for a baseline PSA and a PSA application. The IAEA project has identified a limited number of attributes that are necessary to describe characteristics needed for specific applications. The PSA scope needed for a specific application is not covered by the project/document, even though it is obvious that different applications will need different scope or approaches to handle scope limitations. The guidance on performing a PSA available today is old. It is a need to review these guides and update with regard

  3. Flexible working motivates all staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    A recent survey has demolished the myth that work-life balance is only of interest to women with children. The survey, commissioned by Lloyds TSB on behalf of the Employers for Work Life Balance organisation, shows that young workers and men are equally interested in flexible working arrangements that allow them to pursue interests outside of work.

  4. Use of PSA in the regulatory process. Report of the specialist's meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this meeting was to focus on the role of the regulator in relation to PSA, to give a picture of the present status, and near term plans, of the requirements placed on licensees and of the uses, formal and informal, made of PSA in regulatory decision making. One such use, in which there is currently much interest, is known as Risk-Based Regulation. This term has various connotations but essentially refers to a more flexible and efficient application of Technical Specifications in the interests of gains in both economy and safety. The position in many countries is one of change in the use of PSA by regulators, and hence any report can only give a snapshot in time. It has to be noted that a number of countries, with important nuclear power programmes, were not represented at the meeting, and so the overall picture is not as comprehensive as might have been hoped. The field of the discussion in the meeting was divided into three areas, progressed in three working groups, namely: Regulatory requirements related to PSA, Regulatory uses of PSA, and Risk-Based Regulation. The outcomes are covered in the next three sections. The fifth section of this report gives the overall conclusions of the meeting and the final section makes some recommendations for future IAEA activities in these areas. Refs, figs, tabs

  5. Production, staff, working time and financial planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Boiteux

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregate planning can be a tool for coordinating the tactical decisions belonging to some functional areas of a company. This potential has been limited due to methodological and technical reasons, but nowadays it is possible to solve very sophisticated models integrating, with a high level of detail, a great number of decisions of several functional areas and that permit to include new management schemes. In this paper, a production, staff, working time and cash management model is introduced.

  6. [Quality of work life in nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klijn, Tatiana Maria Paravic

    2014-01-01

    This article deals with aspects that are related to work, quality of life, and its relationship with the nursing staff within the Mexican context. Professionals in health areas present alterations that are commonly overlooked and barely dealt with, especially when the person is a woman and, the care they give to patients, families, and/or friends, or community members, precede their own self care. In the case of institutions or work areas, even when the job provides human beings with several benefits, it usually lacks the proper conditions to perform the job, carries negatives aspects or pathological conditions, all which can relate to poor levels of Quality of Life at Work. Members of the nursing team need to perform their work in the best possible conditions in order to maintain their physical and mental health.

  7. Survey of how staff commute to work

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A survey was initiated by the Canton of Geneva (Direction Générale des Transports) and the Swiss Permanent Mission to the United Nations, and is aimed at better understanding how staff in International Organisations commute to/from work so as to better plan future works (road access, public transport, etc.). The ILO, WHO, UNAIDs, Global Fund, IFRC, CERN and UNOG are taking part in this important survey.   People living in Switzerland or France are invited to respond to this survey. The purpose of this survey is to better understand: - your commuting habits, - your willingness to explore alternative commuting options, - your expectations and needs. All data provided to this external company (www.mobilidee.ch) will be kept confidential and will only be used for this particular study. CERN has received all guarantees of confidentiality from this company. Many thanks for your collaboration! GS Department

  8. PSA Review Handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallman, Anders; Nyman, Ralph; Knochenhauer, Michael

    2004-05-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate (SKI) expresses requirements on the performance of PSAs as well as on PSA activities in general in the the regulatory document 'Regulations Concerning Safety in Certain Nuclear Facilities', SKlFS 1998:1. The follow-up of these activities is part of the inspection tasks of the SKI. In view or this, there is a need for documented guidelines on now to perform these inspections and reviews. The SKI PSA Review Handbook is intended to be a support in the SKI inspection and control of the PSA activities or the licensees. These PSA activities include both the organisation and working procedures of the licensee, the layout and contents of the PSA, and its areas of application. Using the regulation SKIFS 1998:1 as a starting point, the review handbook presents important aspects to be considered when judging whether a licensee fulfils the requirements on PSA activities, including the performance of PSA:s or PSA applications. The handbook shall also be a guidance for the review of PSA:s. However, the intention of the PSA Review Handbook is not to be a handbook for how a PSA is performed. The PSA Review Handbook is applicable to all types or initiating events and all operating conditions, and has been structured in a way, which stresses the integrated characteristics of PSA in the creation of the risk picture of a plant. The PSA Review Handbook has been based on the requirements for PSA of nuclear power plants, as this is the most extensive application. However, the relevant parts of it are also applicable when analysing other nuclear installations. The PSA Review Handbook is published as a research report as its contents are judged to be of general interest, and the SKI welcomes comments to the handbook. An update or the PSA Review Handbook may be required as experience with the use of the handbook is acquired and if general PSA requirements change

  9. Severe Accident Research Network (SARNET). Level 2 PSA work package: comparison of partners methods for uncertainties assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaumont, B.; Haesendonck, M.; Vidal, S.; Eyink, J.; Loeffler, H.; Radu, G.; Kopustinskas, V.; Ming, A.; Guntay, S.; Gustavsson, V.; Ivanov, I.; Dienstbier, J.; Bareith, A.; Hollo, E.; Lajtha, G.

    2007-01-01

    The PSA2 work package (PSA2 WP) is a part of the Joined Programme Activity of the European Severe Accident Network (SARNET) related to level 2 PSA methodologies. The general objectives of this work package is to provide a comparison of the different methodologies used or under development for level 2 PSA application by the partners involved in the work package and to promote their harmonization. The PSA2 WP is organized into three main topics: methodologies in general, methodologies for uncertainties assessment, and dynamic reliability methods. The different tasks initially defined for these three topics are shortly described and the partners involved identified. Attention is then paid on the methodologies used so far by the different partners to assess the uncertainties in their level 2 PSA. A review of partners approaches to assess - as far as possible - the different sources of possible uncertainties is done for the different following topics: - uncertainties propagated from the level 1 PSA, - uncertainties (in sense of approximation) due to the binning of the level 1 sequences in Plant Damage, - uncertainties related to the structure of the Accident Progression Event Tree, - uncertainties related to the probabilities of stochastic events (system failure or recovery, human actions, some physical phenomena such as ignition of hydrogen combustion or triggering of steam explosion), - uncertainties elated to the modelling of the different physical phenomena, - uncertainties related to the cut-off frequency used in the probabilistic quantification of the Accident Progression Event Tree; - uncertainties related to the binning of level 2 sequences in Release Categories (variables not considered, values of eventual continuous variables). First conclusions of the comparison are given in terms of improvement needs and then of perspectives of the work for the following period of work. (authors)

  10. Quality PSA for PSA applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carska, K.; Rybar, J.

    2012-03-01

    The safety guideline defines with more precision Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic requirements of the quality of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for PSA application. Term of quality of PSA is explained in detail. Procedure for determining the quality of PSA is provided. The categorization of PSA study according the quality of PSA is suggested. A comprehensive list of PSA applications for nuclear facilities is provided. What technical features of a PSA should be satisfied to support the PSA applications of interest is stated. (authors)

  11. Work-family conflict and job burnout among correctional staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Eric G; Hogan, Nancy L

    2010-02-01

    Work-family conflict and job burnout are both issues for 272 correctional staff (response rate of 68%). The two major forms of work-family conflict are work-on-family conflict and family-on-work conflict. Multivariate analysis of survey data from 272 correctional staff at a state prison indicated work-on-family conflict had a significant positive relation with job burnout, while family-on-work conflict did not.

  12. Improving PSA quality of KSNP PSA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joon Eon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2004-01-01

    In the RIR (Risk-informed Regulation), PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) plays a major role because it provides overall risk insights for the regulatory body and utility. Therefore, the scope, the level of details and the technical adequacy of PSA, i.e. the quality of PSA is to be ensured for the successful RIR. To improve the quality of Korean PSA, we evaluate the quality of the KSNP (Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant) internal full-power PSA model based on the 'ASME PRA Standard' and the 'NEI PRA Peer Review Process Guidance.' As a working group, PSA experts of the regulatory body and industry also participated in the evaluation process. It is finally judged that the overall quality of the KSNP PSA is between the ASME Standard Capability Category I and II. We also derive some items to be improved for upgrading the quality of the PSA up to the ASME Standard Capability Category II. In this paper, we show the result of quality evaluation, and the activities to improve the quality of the KSNP PSA model

  13. Living PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.G.K.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to gain an understanding of the requirements for a PSA to be considered a Living PSA. The presentation is divided into the following topics: Definition; Planning/Documentation; Task Performance; Maintenance; Management. 4 figs

  14. Review of APR+ Level 2 PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Mubayi, V.; Pratt, W.T.

    2012-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) assisted the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) in reviewing the Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) of the APR+ Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) prepared by the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd (KHNP) and KEPCO Engineering and Construction Co., Inc. (KEPCO-E and C). The work described in this report involves a review of the APR+ Level 2 PSA submittal (Ref. 1). The PSA and, therefore, the review is limited to consideration of accidents initiated by internal events. As part of the review process, the review team also developed three sets of Requests for Additional Information (RAIs). These RAIs were provided to KHNP and KEPCO-E and C for their evaluation and response. This final detailed report documents the review findings for each technical element of the PSA and includes consideration of all of the RAIs made by the reviewers as well as the associated responses. This final report was preceded by an interim report (Ref. 2) that focused on identifying important issues regarding the PSA. In addition, a final meeting on the project was held at BNL on November 21-22, 2011, where BNL and KINS reviewers discussed their preliminary review findings with KHNP and KEPCO-E and C staffs. Additional information obtained during this final meeting was also used to inform the review findings of this final report. The review focused not only on the robustness of the APR+ design to withstand severe accidents, but also on the capability and acceptability of the Level 2 PSA in terms of level of detail and completeness. The Korean nuclear regulatory authorities will decide whether the PSA is acceptable and the BNL review team is providing its comments for KINS consideration. Section 2.0 provides the basis for the BNL review. Section 3.0 presents the review of each technical element of the PSA. Conclusions and a summary are presented in Section 4.0. Section 5.0 contains the references.

  15. Nursing teamwork, staff characteristics, work schedules, and staffing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalisch, Beatrice J; Lee, Hyunhwa

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to explore whether and how staff characteristics, staffing, and scheduling variables are associated with the level of teamwork in nursing staff on acute care hospital patient units. This was a cross-sectional study with a sample of 1,758 nursing staff members from two different hospitals on 38 patient care units who completed the Nursing Teamwork Survey in 2008. This study focused on nursing teams who are stationed on a particular patient care unit (as opposed to visitors to the units). The return rate was 56.9%. The sample was made up of 77.4% nurses (registered nurses and licensed practical nurses), 11.9% assistive personnel, and 7.9% unit secretaries. Teamwork varied by unit and service type, with the highest scores occurring in pediatrics and maternity and the lowest scores on the medical-surgical and emergency units. Staff with less than 6 months of experience, those working 8- or 10-hour shifts (as opposed to 12 hours or a combination of 8 and 12 hours), part-time staff (as opposed to full time), and those working on night shift had higher teamwork scores. The higher teamwork scores were also associated with no or little overtime. The higher perception of the adequacy of staffing and the fewer patients cared for on a previous shift, the higher the teamwork scores. There is a relationship between selected staff characteristics, aspects of work schedules, staffing, and teamwork. Nursing staff want to work where teamwork is high, and perceptions of good staffing lead to higher teamwork. Higher teamwork scores correlated with those who worked less overtime.

  16. Burnout and Work Stress among Disability Centers Staff in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ahmed Hassan Hemdan

    2015-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made to maximize the potential of children with disabilities in Oman. The establishment of Al-Wafaa centers of disabilities served as a channel to help families secure a variety of services provided to children with different disabling conditions. The purpose of this study was to explore the burnout of staff working in…

  17. Staff relations and work-life balance: course outline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, A; Durrance, D; Couger, G

    2001-01-01

    Changes in the American workforce have intensified the need for veterinary medical education regarding staff relations and work-life balance. A 20-hour, one-week elective course was offered to junior veterinary students in order to provide a forum for lecture and discussion covering topics such as team building, conflict resolution, stress management, and work-life balance. Instructors are master's level counselors.

  18. Collaborating with Staff: Sharing a Common Philosophy, Working To Achieve Common Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Jeff

    1999-01-01

    A well-understood camp philosophy motivates the entire staff to work toward a common purpose, which is more meaningful than money. Camp administrators can ensure that staff members implement the camp philosophy by interviewing prospective staff members with the mission in mind, teaching staff the camp's vision, praising staff with specifics,…

  19. Transformational leadership and innovative work behavior among nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masood, Mariam; Afsar, Bilal

    2017-10-01

    The importance of innovation within organizations has been demonstrated on numerous occasions, which has subsequently led to the identification of effective leadership as a potential catalyst. Most of us would acknowledge that effective leadership plays a pivotal role to engender innovativeness among nursing staff. Although research has identified some leadership styles to foster a nurse's innovative work behavior, a comprehensive model explaining the effect of transformational leadership on nurses' innovative work behavior is still unclear. This research built and tested a theoretical model linking transformational leadership and innovative work behavior via several intervening variables. Data were collected from 587 nurses and 164 doctors (nursing supervisors) through structured questionnaires from public sector hospitals in Pakistan. Results of the study indicated that, as anticipated, transformational leadership positively affected psychological empowerment of nurses, which in turn influenced both intrinsic motivation and knowledge sharing behavior. These latter two variables then had a positive influence on innovative work behavior. Empowerment role identity moderated the link between transformational leadership and psychological empowerment, whereas willingness to rely on leader (reliance-based trust) and willingness to share sensitive information with leader (disclosure-based trust) moderated the connection between knowledge sharing behavior and innovative work behavior. These results imply that transformational leadership through psychological empowerment, knowledge sharing, and intrinsic motivation fosters nurse's innovative work behavior. The results also show that the relationship between transformational leadership and innovative work behavior is stronger among nurses who frequently share their knowledge about best practices and mistakes with co-workers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Work-related injuries of educational support staff in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Dong Hwan; Jeong, Byung Yong

    2018-02-15

    This study aims to describe the characteristics of occupational injuries to educational support staff (service worker) in schools. In this research, 803 injured workers registered in 2015 were analyzed in terms of their gender, age, work experience, school type, work type, accident type, agency of accident, nature of injury and injured part of the body for each occupation. The workers were classified into after-school instructor, custodian and cooking staff. Accidents occurred mainly due to slips (35.6%) on floor/stair or contact with high temperature (18.1%). Also, the workers mostly fractured (41.2%) or had burns (19.3%) on their leg/foot (37.1%) or arm/hand/finger (29.8%). The results showed the difference in characteristics and injury pattern of injured persons for each occupation type, addressing the need for customized preventative measures for each situation. The results of this study can be a baseline in devising policies and guidelines for preventing accidents of service workers in schools.

  1. PSA methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, L

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this text is first to ask a certain number of questions on the methods related to PSAs. Notably we will explore the positioning of the French methodological approach - as applied in the EPS 1300{sup 1} and EPS 900{sup 2} PSAs - compared to other approaches (Part One). This reflection leads to more general reflection: what contents, for what PSA? This is why, in Part Two, we will try to offer a framework for definition of the criteria a PSA should satisfy to meet the clearly identified needs. Finally, Part Three will quickly summarize the questions approached in the first two parts, as an introduction to the debate. 15 refs.

  2. PSA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magne, L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this text is first to ask a certain number of questions on the methods related to PSAs. Notably we will explore the positioning of the French methodological approach - as applied in the EPS 1300 1 and EPS 900 2 PSAs - compared to other approaches (Part One). This reflection leads to more general reflection: what contents, for what PSA? This is why, in Part Two, we will try to offer a framework for definition of the criteria a PSA should satisfy to meet the clearly identified needs. Finally, Part Three will quickly summarize the questions approached in the first two parts, as an introduction to the debate. 15 refs

  3. PSA applications. Good practices and documentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewailly, J.; Magne, L.

    1997-10-01

    In this paper, it is shown what the condensed documentation of the main strategic choices and technical assumptions related to a PSA could contain: how to select the internal and external initiating events, how the detail the plant configuration and the general organization of the plant and operating staff, how to highlight the assumptions related to physical models, etc. The proposals in this documentation are based on the R and D D's experience with PSA (construction of PSA models, use of PSA models for operation or maintenance, PSA tools). This document also presents different types of rules or recommendations related to PSA modelling for various applications involved in nuclear power plant operating. Finally, the paper stresses the main difficulties encountered (appropriate use of uncertainties, communication of PSA results to non-specialist users) and it also outlines some prospects for the future. (author)

  4. NRC regulatory uses of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murley, T.E.

    1991-01-01

    The publication in 1975 of WASH-1400, with its new probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology, had the effect of presenting a pair of eyeglasses to a man with poor eyesight. Suddenly, it gave us a view of nuclear safety with a new clarity, and it allowed us to sort out the important safety issues from the unimportant. In the intervening years, PSA insights have permeated the fabric of nearly all our safety judgments. This acceptance can be seen from the following list of broad areas where the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff uses PSA insights and methodology: evaluating the safety significance of operating events and recommending safety improvements where warranted; requesting licensees to systematically look for design vulnerabilities in each operating reactor; evaluating the safety significance of design weaknesses or non-compliances when judging the time frame for necessary improvements; conducting sensitivity analyses to judge where safety improvements are most effective; assessing the relative safety benefits of design features for future reactors. In judging where PSA methodology can be improved to give better safety insights, it is believed that the following areas need more attention: better modeling of cognitive errors; more comprehensive modeling of accident sequences initiated from conditions other than full power; more comprehensive modeling of inter-system loss of coolant accident (ISLOCA) sequences. Although PSA is widely used in the staff's regulatory activities, the NRC deliberately chooses not to include probabilistic prescriptions in regulations or guidance documents. The staff finds the bottom line risk estimates to be one of the least reliable products of a PSA. The reason for this view is that PSA cannot adequately address cognitive errors nor assess the effects of a pervasive poor safety attitude

  5. PSA applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubreuil Chambardel, A

    1997-12-31

    The IAEA now defines three types of PSA applications: Validation of design and of operation procedures; optimization of plant operation; and regulatory applications. The applications of PSA are manifold: only a few are dealt with here (precursor analysis is dealt with in session 3, topic 4). For each of them, we will do the utmost to demonstrate the main difficulties encountered, EDF`s viewpoint on the matter, and the points remaining to be solved. In what follows, unless explicitly stated otherwise, we have made every effort to represent the different applications as they are practiced by all concerned in the international community, and to describe the inherent difficulties the international community has encountered with these applications with all objectivity. It goes without saying that the comments below are simply those of the ESF department, and are submitted here for discussion by the experts. 13 refs.

  6. PSA applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubreuil Chambardel, A.

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA now defines three types of PSA applications: Validation of design and of operation procedures; optimization of plant operation; and regulatory applications. The applications of PSA are manifold: only a few are dealt with here (precursor analysis is dealt with in session 3, topic 4). For each of them, we will do the utmost to demonstrate the main difficulties encountered, EDF's viewpoint on the matter, and the points remaining to be solved. In what follows, unless explicitly stated otherwise, we have made every effort to represent the different applications as they are practiced by all concerned in the international community, and to describe the inherent difficulties the international community has encountered with these applications with all objectivity. It goes without saying that the comments below are simply those of the ESF department, and are submitted here for discussion by the experts. 13 refs

  7. Tools for PSA reviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, J. von

    1998-01-01

    It is desirable to have a uniform and competent procedure for the review of PSAs which are performed within the framework of the Periodic Safety Review of German Nuclear Power Plants. Guidelines for the review process should therefore be evaluated within task A. 1 of project SR 2096. The basis for this work is the experience and knowledge within GRS derived from PSA-related work and from several review projects as well as the German PSA Guide with its appendices. Furthermore, the review processes in the USA, Switzerland and Sweden and the Guidelines for the International Peer Review Service (IPERS Guidelines) were utilized. As a result, recommendations are given for the review process, with individual recommendations concerning the organization of the review, task allocation between the reviewers, interface problems, assessment criteria, the scope and depth of the review as well as the supporting documents. An additional result are checklists for the technical elements of the PSA, which are listed to facilicate the review work. It is not the intention of this report to work out complete review guidelines. Its aims is rather more to give recommondations and support for the review in addition to what can be derived from the existing documents that should be used for the review. The recommendations reflect the view of GRS and go beyond the statements given in the German PSA Guide (Leitfaden Probabilistische Sicherheitsanalyse /PSUe97/) in some points. (orig.) [de

  8. PSA - a tool for the nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himanen, R.

    1992-01-01

    The PSA-model for BWR-type reactors of Finnish power company, Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) was finished in year 1989. This basic PSA model included all safety systems, normal operating systems and auxiliary systems. Today TVO is working to enlarge the PSA to level 2 (environmental effects, for the fires, for the floodings and the outages). The TVO's experiences has been showed the PSA an useful tool for the developing the safety of BWR's (orig.)

  9. Staff Stress and Burnout in Intellectual Disability Services: Work Stress Theory and Its Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, Jason; Hastings, Richard; Noone, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Background: Staff in intellectual disability services can be at risk of stress and burnout at work. Given that staff well-being has implications for the quality of life of the staff themselves and people with intellectual disabilities themselves, this is an important research and practical topic. In this paper, we review work stress theories that…

  10. The Influence of Nurse Manager Leadership Style on Staff Nurse Work Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    Nursing literature supports the importance of an engaged nursing workforce as a means to positively influence performance. Nurse manager leadership style plays a critical role in engaging staff nurses. These relationships have been minimally studied in nurse managers and staff nurses. The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of nurse manager leadership style factors on staff nurse work engagement. Using a descriptive correlational research design, 441 staff nurses working in 3 acute care hospitals were surveyed. Survey instruments included the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale and the Multifactorial Leadership Questionnaire 5X short form. Transactional and transformational leadership styles in nurse managers positively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Passive-avoidant leadership style in nurse managers negatively influenced staff nurse work engagement. Nurse managers who provide support and communication through transformational and transactional leadership styles can have a positive impact on staff nurse work engagement and ultimately improve organizational outcomes.

  11. JOB SATISFACTION SURVEY OF STAFF NURSES WORKING IN THE HOSPITALS.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeja. C. V; K. Reddemma.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Satisfaction of the nurses are key component in delivering inviolable health care in the country. Multiple factors are responsible for nurses? job satisfaction. Satisfied nurses are able to provide quality nursing care for their patients. Staff Nurses? Job satisfaction are influenced by extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The staff nurses attitude towards their job can be measured through the job satisfaction scale. This study has been undertaken in an attempt to explore and descri...

  12. Development of a PSA information management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Seok; Dong Kyu, Kim; Sun Koo, Kang

    2007-01-01

    In general, Probabilistic Safety Agreement (PSA) is a very complicated work that uses and generates a lot of resources such as reports, procedures, drawings, assumptions, calculation sheets, PSA model, and so on. In many PSAs, however, the data, materials and knowledge considered and generated during performing PSA are scattered in many documents so that overall structure of PSA and information relationship between documents and models cannot easily be understood. To organize and manage all documents related to PSA, to capture knowledge of analysts, and finally to improve the quality of PSA, a PSA information management system (PIMS) was developed. The PIMS can manage all the documents of a PSA in a database and connect the causal relation between one information to another in the scattered documents via link. The PIMS can manage all the assumptions and technical basis used in PSA, and it can keep the record of the design changes the revision of PSA model. It can also control the review results of PSA models. The link of the PIMS can explicitly describe and reveal the expertise of the PSA analysts, and it enables the users to capture the knowledge and to understand the structure and contents of a PSA with ease. We are planning to apply the PIMS to the PSA of Shin Kori Units 1 and 2 as feasibility study and then to all the PSAs of the nuclear power plants in Korea. The PIMS is expected to contribute to enhancing the quality and confidence of PSA and reducing the efforts and costs of maintenance and update of PSA. (authors)

  13. Development of a PSA information management system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Seok; Dong Kyu, Kim; Sun Koo, Kang [Korea Power Engineering Company, Inc (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    In general, Probabilistic Safety Agreement (PSA) is a very complicated work that uses and generates a lot of resources such as reports, procedures, drawings, assumptions, calculation sheets, PSA model, and so on. In many PSAs, however, the data, materials and knowledge considered and generated during performing PSA are scattered in many documents so that overall structure of PSA and information relationship between documents and models cannot easily be understood. To organize and manage all documents related to PSA, to capture knowledge of analysts, and finally to improve the quality of PSA, a PSA information management system (PIMS) was developed. The PIMS can manage all the documents of a PSA in a database and connect the causal relation between one information to another in the scattered documents via link. The PIMS can manage all the assumptions and technical basis used in PSA, and it can keep the record of the design changes the revision of PSA model. It can also control the review results of PSA models. The link of the PIMS can explicitly describe and reveal the expertise of the PSA analysts, and it enables the users to capture the knowledge and to understand the structure and contents of a PSA with ease. We are planning to apply the PIMS to the PSA of Shin Kori Units 1 and 2 as feasibility study and then to all the PSAs of the nuclear power plants in Korea. The PIMS is expected to contribute to enhancing the quality and confidence of PSA and reducing the efforts and costs of maintenance and update of PSA. (authors)

  14. State of living PSA and further development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In October 1985 OECD-Principal Working Group (PWG 5) - Risk Assessment has initiated the Task Force 7 'Use of PSA in Nuclear Power Plant Management' to explore and report on the principles, characteristics, requirements and status of PSA oriented safety management. During this study, it became apparent that the utilisation of PSA techniques in nuclear plant safety management requires the development of supporting programmes to ensure that PSA models are being updated to reflect plant changes, and to direct their use towards the evaluation and determination of plant changes. These requirements also influence the software and hardware characteristics necessary to support the programme. This overall process is known as Living PSA. In this context OECD-PWG 5 has arranged international workshops on Living PSA application to support this development, to facilitate exchange of international experience and to summarise the state-of-the-art of L-PSA methodology. These activities were accompanied by following Task Groups of OECD-PWG 5 and the work results were published in state-of-the-art reports. According to the increasing development of Living PSA in the international field and its capacity to support plant safety management in a broad sense, OECD PWG 5 continues its work in setting up the Task Group 96-1 'State of Living PSA and Further Development' to clarify specific aspects of Living PSA. This report summarises the state of Living PSA in the international field based on the four Living PSA Workshops from 1988 to 1994 (Chapter 2) and the state of Reliability Data Collection based on the results of Task Group 12 'Reliability Data Collection and Analysis to Support PSA' and the two Data-Workshops from 1995 and 1998 (Chapter 3). The specific items of further development of Living PSA application as mentioned above are treated in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 gives a summary of the current state of Living PSA as well as outlook and recommendations of further development

  15. Implementing differentiated practice: personal values and work satisfaction among hospital staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prothero, M M; Marshall, E S; Fosbinder, D M

    1999-01-01

    This project was part of a collaborative model for nursing staff development and student education. Personal values and work satisfaction of 49 staff nurses working on three hospital units were compared. One of the units employed differentiated practice. Results revealed high similarity in personal values among all nurses. Work satisfaction was significantly higher among nurses working on the unit employing differentiated practice. The importance of assessing personal values of nurses emerged as an important aspect of staff development, and differentiated practice appeared to be related to staff nurse satisfaction.

  16. PSA in operator training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nos, V.; Faig, J.; Plesa, P.; Delgado, J. L.

    2000-01-01

    The systematic approach to training is internationally accepted as the best method to achieve and maintain the qualification and competence of power plant personnel and to guarantee the quality of their training. Following the recommendations and guidelines of international organisations competent in the field, TECNATOM SA has developed projects based on the systematic approach to training for all Spanish nuclear power plants. One of the latest projects was the systematic approach to training developed for the operation personnel of ASCO Nuclear Power Plant. In this case, certain results of the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) which complement the systematic safety and reliability criteria of the systematic approach to training process have been incorporated in the traditional processes of work and task analysis and training plan design. This incorporation provides the training manager with additional criteria based not only on safety aspects obtained through the statistical treatment of considerations of skilled technical personnel (operators, operation chief supervisors, etc), but also on the independent criterion of the PSA. The inclusion of this approach basically affects all systematics in two of its stages: During the selection process of operating practices in SMR or SGI, the possible scenarios have been associated with all those situations where human actions which lead to an initiating event or human actions to mitigate an initiating event, may take place, as defined in the PSA. During the scenario development process, the instruments involved in the performance of human actions which originate or mitigate an event taking place have been identified. This pakes it possible to reconcile the scenario event sequence with the sequence considered in the PSA study, as the most likely to provoke a more serious accident. The incorporation of these PSA results contributes to the strengthening of safety aspects in training in an objective way, and confirms that

  17. Safety at work due to staff qualification and selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, W.

    1980-01-01

    An outline of basic requirements enabling the selection of employees for responsible staff in nuclear power stations. Illustrated further by the example of a model development from skilled worker to head of shift. A short reference will be made to the maintenance of high standards of training. (orig.) [de

  18. Working with Staff Using Baumrind's Parenting Styles Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, Hollace Anne

    2012-01-01

    The author's presentation at the staff meeting centered on Diana Baumrind's parenting styles framework (Baumrind, 1967). Baumrind believed that there were four requirements for effective guidance: nurturing, communication, maturity demands, and control. She rated parents on these four dimensions and identified the pattern of parenting that…

  19. Preventing work-related stress among staff working in children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres in the UK: a brief survey of staff support systems and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, B; Gibson, F; Bayliss, J; Mukherjee, S

    2018-03-01

    Growing evidence of the association between health professionals' well-being and patient and organisational outcomes points to the need for effective staff support. This paper reports a brief survey of the UK's children's cancer Principal Treatment Centres (PTCs) regarding staff support systems and practices. A short on-line questionnaire, administered in 2012-2013, collected information about the availability of staff support interventions which seek to prevent work-related stress among different members of the multi-disciplinary team (MDT). It was completed by a member of staff with, where required, assistance from colleagues. All PTCs (n = 19) participated. Debriefs following a patient death was the most frequently reported staff support practice. Support groups were infrequently mentioned. There was wide variability between PTCs, and between professional groups, regarding the number and type of interventions available. Doctors appear to be least likely to have access to support. A few Centres routinely addressed work-related stress in wider staff management strategies. Two Centres had developed a bespoke intervention. Very few Centres were reported to actively raise awareness of support available from their hospital's Occupational Health department. A minority of PTCs had expert input regarding staff support from clinical psychology/liaison psychiatry. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Cancer Care Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Regulatory requirements on PSA level 2: Review, aspects and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husarcek, J.

    2003-01-01

    The general requirements concerning utility obligations, probabilistic safety criteria (CDF should not exceed 1.0E-4/reactor year and LERF should not exceed 1.0E-5/reactor year), documentation and results, living PSA requirements and major steps in level 2 PSA are presented. PSA developments in Slovakia, collection and assembly of information, plant damage states, containment performance and failure modes, severe accident progression analyses, containment failure modes and source terms as a part of performed level 2 PSA are discussed. The PSA applications in design and operation evaluation, support to plant upgrade and modifications are also described. At the end, the following conclusion is made: more extensive PSA application needs to foster the exchange of experience and communication between PSA specialists, non-PSA engineers, designers, and the regulatory body staff responsible for safety assessment, inspection and enforcement

  1. Working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers: a critical incident analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipeta, Effie; Bradley, Susan; Chimwaza-Manda, Wanangwa; McAuliffe, Eilish

    2016-08-26

    Malawi continues to experience critical shortages of key health technical cadres that can adequately respond to Malawi's disease burden. Difficult working conditions contribute to low morale and frustration among health care workers. We aimed to understand how obstetric care staff perceive their working relationships with managers. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in health facilities in Malawi between October and December 2008. Critical Incident Analysis interviews were done in government district hospitals, faith-based health facilities, and a sample of health centres' providing emergency obstetric care. A total of 84 service providers were interviewed. Data were analyzed using NVivo 8 software. Poor leadership styles affected working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers. Main concerns were managers' lack of support for staff welfare and staff performance, lack of mentorship for new staff and junior colleagues, as well as inadequate supportive supervision. All this led to frustrations, diminished motivation, lack of interest in their job and withdrawal from work, including staff seriously considering leaving their post. Positive working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers are essential for promoting staff motivation and positive work performance. However, this study revealed that staff were demotivated and undermined by transactional leadership styles and behavior, evidenced by management by exception and lack of feedback or recognition. A shift to transformational leadership in nurse-manager relationships is essential to establish good working relationships with staff. Improved providers' job satisfaction and staff retentionare crucial to the provision of high quality care and will also ensure efficiency in health care delivery in Malawi.

  2. Staff experience and understanding of working with abused women suffering from mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson-Tops, A; Saveman, B-I; Tops, D

    2009-09-01

    The phenomenon of abused women with mental illness is often unrecognised by staff working within welfare services. This may be explained by staff members' attitudes, insecurity or lack of awareness. Today, there are shortcomings in the knowledge of staff members' experiences and interpretations of abuse against women suffering from mental illness. The aim of this qualitative study was to describe how staff members experience and understand their work with abused women suffering from mental illness. Thematic interviews were conducted with 13 staff members from various welfare services. Data were subject to content analysis. The findings showed that working with abused women was experienced as ambiguous and painful and made the staff act pragmatically. Feelings of ambiguity were mainly related to the lack of theoretical frameworks for interpreting why women with mental illness are exposed to abuse. Painful experiences involved intertwined feelings of distress, frustration, worthlessness, ambivalence and powerlessness. These were all feelings that emerged in the direct encounters with the abused women. In response to the abused women's comprehensive needs, staff members acted pragmatically, implying networking without any sanction from the leaders of the organisation, compliance with routines and taking action in here-and-now situations. By acting pragmatically, staff members could achieve concrete results through their interventions. It is concluded that staff members, working with abused women with mental illness, are in a vulnerable situation and in need of formally accepted and implemented support and legitimacy as well as theoretical knowledge regarding causes and consequences of abuse in this particular group of women.

  3. Review article: Staff perception of the emergency department working environment: Integrative review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa; Greenslade, Jaimi; Thom, Ogilvie; Carlstrom, Eric; Wallis, Marianne; Crilly, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Employees in EDs report increasing role overload because of critical staff shortages, budgetary cuts and increased patient numbers and acuity. Such overload could compromise staff satisfaction with their working environment. This integrative review identifies, synthesises and evaluates current research around staff perceptions of the working conditions in EDs. A systematic search of relevant databases, using MeSH descriptors ED/EDs, Emergency room/s, ER/s, or A&E coupled with (and) working environment, working condition/s, staff perception/s, as well as reference chaining was conducted. We identified 31 key studies that were evaluated using the mixed methods assessment tool (MMAT). These comprised 24 quantitative‐descriptive studies, four mixed descriptive/comparative (non‐randomised controlled trial) studies and three qualitative studies. Studies included varied widely in quality with MMAT scores ranging from 0% to 100%. A key finding was that perceptions of working environment varied across clinical staff and study location, but that high levels of autonomy and teamwork offset stress around high pressure and high volume workloads. The large range of tools used to assess staff perception of working environment limits the comparability of the studies. A dearth of intervention studies around enhancing working environments in EDs limits the capacity to recommend evidence‐based interventions to improve staff morale. © 2016 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine PMID:26784282

  4. Qualification of calculation aids for PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetz, K.; Hennigs, W.; Kirstein, B.M.; Reinhardt, C.

    1998-01-01

    In Germany Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) are part of the evaluation of a nuclear power plants safety. The German PSA guide stipulates that the used software must enable a PSA according to the state of the art. This software must be qualified to assure that its features, mathematic methods and its performance enable a PSA like this. In this research work specifications and requirements are developed, which allow the testing of software. A procedure was developed to qualify PSA software according to the PSA guide and the experiences of users of PSA. Setting up a procedure, a tool for a systematic and uniform examination was crated. Additionally the options, mathematic fundamentals and performance of PSA-programs were analyzed. According to this all programs that were analyzed are capable to sovle their original task, that is the calculation of the safety of high available system based on high available components. Against that the requirements of modern PSA, e.g. to handle less available functions, HRA and fire analyses, based on the use of modern software and the implementation of new developments in the field of PSA are not supported adequately by all programs. (orig.) [de

  5. Development and perspectives of PSA in Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    During the last decade the GDA/PSA has carried out the pre-operational PSA task for the Juragua Nuclear Power Plant. Since 1991 the work has been accomplished in the frames of the IAEA Technical Assistance Project CUB/9/008. The paper describes the stages of this study, (concluding with the Final Report of the pre-operational Level 1 PSA Rev. O), its assumptions, limitations and the main results and concluding remarks

  6. Organizational culture and work-related attitudes among staff in assisted living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorska-Simmons, Elzbieta

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the author examines the relationship between staff perceptions of organizational culture and their work-related attitudes in assisted living. Data were collected from 317 staff in 61 facilities using self-administered questionnaires. Staff who had more favorable perceptions of organizational culture reported greater job satisfaction, coworker satisfaction, and organizational commitment. Among the dimensions of organizational culture, perceptions of teamwork had the strongest influence on satisfaction with coworkers, and perceptions of organizational morale had the strongest influence on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Those who want to improve staff attitudes should focus on creating organizational cultures that promote teamwork and high organizational morale.

  7. A note on some behavioral aspects of radiation protection staff working in hospitals around Delhi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    A questionnaire was used to collect information concerning radiation protection staff working in hospitals in and around Delhi. The information included the organization of the department, the status and involvement of the radiation protection staff and their performance and job satisfaction. Answers received from departments of Radiotherapy, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine were used to assess the relationship between involvement, performance and job satisfaction. (author)

  8. Examining the temporal relationship between psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bryan R.; Hunter, Brooke D.

    2012-01-01

    Relative to the broader industrial-organizational (I-O) psychology field, research on the turnover of substance use disorder (SUD) treatment staff is in its infancy. Despite its long and rich history, recent reviews of the turnover literature within I-O psychology have noted there remains considerable room for improvement. In particular, recommendations have been made for research that considers time in the turnover process and explores more distal causes of staff turnover. Addressing these gaps, this paper examined the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate, work attitude, and staff turnover. Using data from 95 SUD treatment staff clustered within 29 treatment organizations, multilevel discrete-time survival analyses revealed that a latent measure of work attitude (e.g., job satisfaction, pay satisfaction, turnover intentions) fully mediated the temporal relationship between latent measures of psychological climate (e.g., supervisor support, coworker support, role conflict) and subsequent staff turnover. PMID:22658290

  9. Influence of work-related characteristics and work ability on changing employer or leaving the profession among nursing staff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rongen, Anne; Robroek, Suzan; van der Heijden, Beatrice; Schouteten, Roel L.J.; Hasselhorn, Hans Martin; Burdorf, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Aim To investigate how work-related characteristics and work ability influence nursing staff decisions to change employer or leave the profession. Background Previous cross-sectional studies have indicated that decreased work ability and unfavourable work-related characteristics are important

  10. Role Stressors, Engagement and Work Behaviours: A Study of Higher Education Professional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Tara M.; Prottas, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The study used data provided by 349 professional staff employees from 17 different US higher education institutions to assess aspects of their working conditions that could influence their own work engagement and the work-related behaviours of their colleagues. Relationships among three role stressors (role ambiguity, role conflict and role…

  11. Examining Work Engagement and Job Satisfaction of Staff Members in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Jill; Rosser, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    Staff members are a large and growing set of employees within higher education. While their numbers are growing, they also are seeing a change in their salaries and working conditions. Given this situation, institutions are considering work engagement and job satisfaction research. The purpose of this article is to examine those work life…

  12. Work-Life: Policy and Practice Impacting LG Faculty and Staff in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Sunny L.; Hornsby, Eunice Ellen

    2008-01-01

    The work-life policies and benefits practices of public universities and the extent to which lesbian and gay (LG) faculty, staff and families receive different work-life benefits than their heterosexual married counterparts are examined. The analysis was conducted by searching university work-life benefits websites. Major benefits for domestic…

  13. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monzo, Hector J.; Coppieters, Natacha [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Park, Thomas I.H. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dieriks, Birger V.; Faull, Richard L.M. [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dragunow, Mike [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Curtis, Maurice A., E-mail: m.curtis@auckland.ac.nz [Centre for Brain Research, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Anatomy and Medical Imaging, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag, 92019, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2017-06-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. - Highlights: • Insulin modulates PSA-NCAM turnover through upregulation of p-FAK. • P-FAK modulates αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clustering. • αv-integrin acts as a carrier for PSA-NCAM endocytosis. • Cell migration is promoted by cell surface PSA. • Insulin promotes PSA-dependent migration in vitro.

  14. Insulin promotes cell migration by regulating PSA-NCAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzo, Hector J.; Coppieters, Natacha; Park, Thomas I.H.; Dieriks, Birger V.; Faull, Richard L.M.; Dragunow, Mike; Curtis, Maurice A.

    2017-01-01

    Cellular interactions with the extracellular environment are modulated by cell surface polysialic acid (PSA) carried by the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). PSA-NCAM is involved in cellular processes such as differentiation, plasticity, and migration, and is elevated in Alzheimer's disease as well as in metastatic tumour cells. Our previous work demonstrated that insulin enhances the abundance of cell surface PSA by inhibiting PSA-NCAM endocytosis. In the present study we have identified a mechanism for insulin-dependent inhibition of PSA-NCAM turnover affecting cell migration. Insulin enhanced the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase leading to dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters, and promoted cell migration. Our results show that αv-integrin plays a key role in the PSA-NCAM turnover process. αv-integrin knockdown stopped PSA-NCAM from being endocytosed, and αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters co-labelled intracellularly with Rab5, altogether indicating a role for αv-integrin as a carrier for PSA-NCAM during internalisation. Furthermore, inhibition of p-FAK caused dissociation of αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clusters and counteracted the insulin-induced accumulation of PSA at the cell surface and cell migration was impaired. Our data reveal a functional association between the insulin/p-FAK-dependent regulation of PSA-NCAM turnover and cell migration through the extracellular matrix. Most importantly, they identify a novel mechanism for insulin-stimulated cell migration. - Highlights: • Insulin modulates PSA-NCAM turnover through upregulation of p-FAK. • P-FAK modulates αv-integrin/PSA-NCAM clustering. • αv-integrin acts as a carrier for PSA-NCAM endocytosis. • Cell migration is promoted by cell surface PSA. • Insulin promotes PSA-dependent migration in vitro.

  15. Model engineering in a modular PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedlhuber, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    For the purpose of PSA (Probabilistic Safety Analysis) for complex industrial systems, often PSA models in the form of fault and event trees are developed to model the risk of unwanted situations (hazards). While the recent decades, PSA models have gained high acceptance and have been developed massively. This lead to an increase in model sizes and complexity. Today, PSA models are often difficult to understand and maintain. This manuscript presents the concept of a modular PSA. A modular PSA tries to cope with the increased complexity by the techniques of modularization and instantiation. Modularization targets to treat a model by smaller pieces (the 'modules') to regain control over models. Instantiation aims to configure a generic model to different contexts. Both try to reduce model complexity. A modular PSA proposes new functionality to manage PSA models. Current model management is rather limited and not efficient. This manuscript shows new methods to manage the evolutions (versions) and deviations (variants) of PSA models in a modular PSA. The concepts of version and variant management are presented in this thesis. In this context, a model comparison and fusion of PSA models is precised. Model comparison provides important feedback to model engineers and model fusion kind of combines the work from different model engineers (concurrent model engineering). Apart from model management, methods to understand the content of PSA models are presented. The methods focus to highlight the dependencies between modules rather than their contents. Dependencies are automatically derived from a model structure. They express relations between model objects (for example a fault tree may have dependencies to basic events). To visualize those dependencies (for example in form of a model cartography) can constitute a crucial aid to model engineers for understanding complex interrelations in PSA models. Within the scope of this thesis, a software named 'Andromeda' has been

  16. Factors impacting perceived safety among staff working on mental health wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Alina; Brown, Andrew; McCabe, Rhiannah; Rogerson, Michelle; Whittington, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Safety at work is a core issue for mental health staff working on in-patient units. At present, there is a limited theoretical base regarding which factors may affect staff perceptions of safety. This study attempted to identify which factors affect perceived staff safety working on in-patient mental health wards. A cross-sectional design was employed across 101 forensic and non-forensic mental health wards, over seven National Health Service trusts nationally. Measures included an online staff survey, Ward Features Checklist and recorded incident data. Data were analysed using categorical principal components analysis and ordinal regression. Perceptions of staff safety were increased by ward brightness, higher number of patient beds, lower staff to patient ratios, less dayroom space and more urban views. The findings from this study do not represent common-sense assumptions. Results are discussed in the context of the literature and may have implications for current initiatives aimed at managing in-patient violence and aggression. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license.

  17. Operational Work System Design and Staff Performance in the Nigerian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Ejikeme Isichei

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study investigated the impact of operational work system design on staff performance in selected construction firms in Nigeria. Research Design & Methods: The study used primary data gathered with the use of a 5-point Likert scale questionnaire format administered to 138 respondents. A hypothesis was postulated to test the significance of the research problem. Data analysis was carried out using correlation and multiple regression analysis which proved the significance of the alternative hypothesis as a result of testing the hypothesis. Findings: The findings show that there is a significant relationship between operational work system design and staff performance. The study concludes that operational job design can be advanced as a motivation tool, which is non-monetary in nature, to improve staff performance. Implications & Recommendations: A key drive to improve performance is the satisfaction of staff coupled with an outstanding operational job design which takes into consideration the total physical and mental well-being of staff and its interaction with other organisational factors. The study recommends, among others, that there should be active participation of staff in the design of work in the organisation. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides an empirical approach to enhancing performance in the construction industry and thereby developing an indigenous firm to compete favourably on a growing market.

  18. Positive well-being and work-life balance among UK railway staff

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Jialin; Smith, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Failure to manage the well-being and work-life balance of railway workers\\ud may result in an increased risk to train safety and employees’ health. This article\\ud reports the findings of a study that measured positive well-being and\\ud work-life balance, and identified the factors affecting these among UK railway\\ud staff. On the whole, staff who perceived high levels of control and support had\\ud a better work-life balance and an increased sense of well-being. A positive\\ud personality was ...

  19. Comparative evaluation of PSA-Density, percent free PSA and total PSA

    OpenAIRE

    Ströbel, Greta

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The objective of this study was to evaluate the prostate specific antigen (PSA) density (PSAD) (the quotient of PSA and prostate volume) compared with the percent free PSA (%fPSA) and total PSA (tPSA) in different total PSA (tPSA) ranges from 2 ng/mL to 20 ng/mL. Possible cut-off levels depending on the tPSA should be established. METHODS In total, 1809 men with no pretreatment of the prostate were enrolled between 1996 and 2004. Total and free PSA were measured with t...

  20. Relationships among leadership practices, work environments, staff communication and outcomes in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourangeau, Ann; Cranley, Lisa; Spence Laschinger, Heather K; Pachis, Jaime

    2010-11-01

    To examine the role that work relationships have on two long-term care outcomes: job satisfaction and turnover intention. It is easy to overlook the impact that human relations have in shaping work environments that are conducive to organizational effectiveness. Employee job satisfaction and retention are important organizational outcomes. Six hundred and seventy-five nursing and other staff from 26 long-term care facilities were surveyed about their work environments, work group relationships, observed leadership practices, organizational support, job satisfaction and turnover intention. Higher job satisfaction was associated with lower emotional exhaustion burnout, higher global empowerment, higher organizational support, higher psychological empowerment, stronger work group cohesion and higher personal accomplishment. Higher turnover intention was associated with lower job satisfaction, higher emotional exhaustion burnout, more outside job opportunities, weaker work group cohesion, lower personal accomplishment and higher depersonalization. No relationship was found between leadership practices and job satisfaction or turnover intention. Stronger work group relationships, stronger sense of personal accomplishment and lower emotional exhaustion have direct effects on increasing job satisfaction and lowering turnover intention. To retain long-term care staff, attention should be paid to fostering positive work group cohesion, supporting and acknowledging staff accomplishments and minimizing staff burnout. © 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Impact of School Staff Health on Work Productivity in Secondary Schools in Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alker, Heather J.; Wang, Monica L.; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school…

  2. Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Work-Life Balance among academic staff of the University of Lagos. ... Abstract. Work-life balance is associated with the maintenance of stability in both one's professional and personal life. It is key to the welfare and, subsequently, job satisfaction and productivity of employees. It is against this understanding that this study ...

  3. Subjective happiness levels of staff working in provincial organization of general directorate of sport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer YAZICI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this study was investigate to level of subjective happiness levels of staff who works in provincial organization of General Directorate of Sport. Material and Methods: The study group of the research consisted of 400 staff (164 female, 236 male who works in General Directorate of Sport’s İstanbul, Trabzon, Malatya and Tokat Youth Services and Sport provincial directorates. In the study as data collection tool; Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS which developed by Lyubomirsky & Lepper (1999 and adapted to Turkish by Akın and Satıcı (2011 was used. And also “personal data form” which created by the researchers was used. The data analyzed by descriptive statistics, T-test and Anova test. Also, Scheffe test was used to find out the significant differences of groups. Results: In accordance with t-test results obtained from the present study, there are significant differences with respect to variables such as marital status, income state and sport participation (p<0.05. Conclusion: As a result, it was determined that married staff is happier than single staff. Also, the staff who determined themselves in moderate income level is happier than the staff who determined themselves in lower income level.

  4. Institute of nuclear power operations perspectives on PSA applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, W.E.; Miller, W.J. Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The investment to develop a PSA is very substantial, and therefore, there is motivation to recover this investment through further use of the techniques used to develop it. It is not surprising that nuclear power plant staff are beginning to use PSA to make operational decisions. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations is interested in those factors that impact the conduct of plant operations and therefore is actively monitoring the increased usage of PSA techniques. The purpose of this paper is to provide some thoughts and perspectives on the use of PSA as a factor in operational decision making, including decision making in activities performed by engineering, maintenance and operation personnel. (author)

  5. Work motivation, task delegation and job satisfaction of general practice staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Søndergaard, Jens; Munch, Maria; Le, Jette V; Ledderer, Loni; Pedersen, Line B; Nexøe, Jørgen

    2017-04-01

    Recent research has shown that a high degree of task delegation is associated with the practise staff's overall job satisfaction, and this association is important to explore since job satisfaction is related to medical as well as patient-perceived quality of care. This study aimed: (1) to investigate associations between degrees of task delegation in the management of chronic disease in general practice, with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a case and the staff's work motivation, (2) to investigate associations between the work motivation of the staff and their job satisfaction. The study was based on a questionnaire to which 621 members of the practice staff responded. The questionnaire consisted of a part concerning degree of task delegation in the management of COPD in their respective practice and another part being about their job satisfaction and motivation to work. In the first analysis, we found that 'maximal degree' of task delegation was significantly associated with the staff perceiving themselves to have a large degree of variation in tasks, odds ratio (OR) = 4.26, confidence interval (CI) = 1.09, 16.62. In the second analysis, we found that this perceived large degree of variation in tasks was significantly associated with their overall job satisfaction, OR = 2.81, confidence interval = 1.71, 4.61. The results suggest that general practitioners could delegate highly complex tasks in the management of COPD to their staff without influencing the staff's work motivation, and thereby their job satisfaction, negatively, as long as they ensure sufficient variation in the tasks. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  6. PSA, PSA derivatives, proPSA and prostate health index in the diagnosis of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ayyıldız, Sema Nur; Ayyıldız, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Currently, prostate- specific antigen (PSA) is the most common oncological marker used for prostate cancer screening. However, high levels of PSA in benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis decrease the specificity of PSA as a cancer marker. To increase the specificity of PSA, PSA derivatives and PSA kinetics have been used. However, these new techniques were not able to increase the diagnostic specificity for prostate cancer. Therefore, the search for new molecules and derivatives of PSA...

  7. An Investigation of Iranian Pharmacists and Pharmacy Staff Work Motivation through Different Job Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armaghan Eslami

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: the Employees’ motivation is a very important part of management, both practically and theoretically. Motivation has been regarded as an indispensable part of performance, and structural element for management practice theories. The most important factor of the health care system is its workforce. They possess the highest impact on the input of health care system. Also they are one of the main determinant key of their efficacy and performance is their motivation. Although Motivated and qualified staff is the critical element for health care system performance, it is one of the hardest goal to reach due to health care complexity.Method: the Sample consisted of 326 men and women pharmacists and pharmacy staff, which are 155 women and 81 men. Wright (2004 work motivation 6-item scale were used to asses pharmacists and pharmacy staff work motivation. Data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA test method.Results: the results indicated that there is no significant difference in pharmacists and pharmacy staff work motivation according to their gender, education, job, job location and income.Conclusion: income, Location of job, Job, education might be considered as the hygiene factors. Other intrinsic or socio-cultural factor might be motivators for pharmacists and pharmacy staff.

  8. Gatekeepers as Care Providers: The Care Work of Patient-centered Medical Home Clerical Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Stewart, Kenda R; Lampman, Michelle A; Rosenthal, Gary E; Stewart, Greg L

    2017-03-01

    International implementation of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model for delivering primary care has dramatically increased in the last decade. A majority of research on PCMH's impact has emphasized the care provided by clinically trained staff. In this article, we report our ethnographic analysis of data collected from Department of Veterans Affairs staff implementing PACT, the VA version of PCMH. Teams were trained to use within-team delegation, largely accomplished through attention to clinical licensure, to differentiate staff in providing efficient, patient-centered care. In doing so, PACT may reinforce a clinically defined culture of care that countermands PCMH ideals. Such competing rubrics for care are brought into relief through a focus on the care work performed by clerks. Ethnographic analysis identifies clerks' care as a kind of emotional dirty work, signaling important areas for future anthropological study of the relationships among patient-centered care, stigma, and clinical authority. © 2016 by the American Anthropological Association.

  9. The Impact on Staff of Working with Personality Disordered Offenders: A Systematic Review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C Freestone

    Full Text Available Personality disordered offenders (PDOs are generally considered difficult to manage and to have a negative impact on staff working with them.This study aimed to provide an overview of studies examining the impact on staff of working with PDOs, identify impact areas associated with working with PDOs, identify gaps in existing research,and direct future research efforts.The authors conducted a systematic review of the English-language literature from 1964-2014 across 20 databases in the medical and social sciences.27 papers were included in the review. Studies identified negative impacts upon staff including: negative attitudes, burnout, stress, negative counter-transferential experiences; two studies found positive impacts of job excitement and satisfaction, and the evidence related to perceived risk of violence from PDOs was equivocal. Studies demonstrated considerable heterogeneity and meta-analysis was not possible. The overall level of identified evidence was low: 23 studies (85% were descriptive only, and only one adequately powered cohort study was found.The review identified a significant amount of descriptive literature, but only one cohort study and no trials or previous systematic reviews of literatures. Clinicians and managers working with PDOs should be aware of the potential impacts identified, but there is an urgent need for further research focusing on the robust evaluation of interventions to minimise harm to staff working with offenders who suffer from personality disorder.

  10. Organizational climate partially mediates the effect of culture on work attitudes and staff turnover in mental health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Gregory A; Sawitzky, Angelina C

    2006-05-01

    Staff turnover in mental health service organizations is an ongoing problem with implications for staff morale, productivity, organizational effectiveness, and implementation of innovation. Recent studies in public sector services have examined the impact of organizational culture and climate on work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment) and, ultimately, staff turnover. However, mediational models of the impact of culture and climate on work attitudes have not been examined. The present study examined full and partial mediation models of the effects of culture and climate on work attitudes and the subsequent impact of work attitudes on staff turnover. Multilevel structural equation models supported a partial mediation model in which organizational culture had both direct influence on work attitudes and indirect influence through organizational climate. Work attitudes significantly predicted one-year staff turnover rates. These findings support the contention that both culture and climate impact work attitudes and subsequent staff turnover.

  11. Performance indicators at Embalse NPP: PSA and safety system indicators based on PSA models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornero, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Several indicators have been implemented at Embalse NPP. The objective was selecting some representative parameters to evaluate the performance of both the plant and the personnel activities, important for safety. A first set of indicators was defined in accordance with plant technical staff criteria. A complementary set of them was addressed later based on WANO guidance. This report presents the set of indicators used at Embalse NPP, centering the description to related to safety systems performance indicators (SSPI). Some considerations are done about the calculation methods, the need for aligning and updating their values following Embalse Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) development, and some pros and cons of using the PSA model for getting systems indicators. Owing to the fact that PSA ownership by utilities is also a subject of the meeting, some characteristics of the organization of the PSA Project are described at the beginning of the report. At Embalse NPP a Level 1 PSA has been developed under the responsibility of its own plant and with an important contribution from the IAEA. PSA was developed at the site, conducting this to a study strongly interactive with the station staff. (author)

  12. Time utilization and perceived psychosocial work environment among staff in Swedish primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anskär, Eva; Lindberg, Malou; Falk, Magnus; Andersson, Agneta

    2018-03-07

    work-time spent on administrative tasks was associated with more role conflicts. Younger staff perceived more adverse working conditions than older staff. This study indicated that Swedish primary care staff spent a limited proportion of their work time directly with patients. PCPs seemed to perceive their work environment in negative terms to a greater extent than other staff members. This study showed that work task allocations influenced the perceived psychosocial work environment.

  13. Quality of Care in the Nursing Home: Effects of Staff Assignment and Work Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Louis D.; Fisher, Susan E.; Fairchild, J. Kaci; Scilley, Kay; Hardin, J. Michael

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare a variety of resident and staff outcomes across two types of staffing patterns, permanent and rotating assignment, and work shift. Although studies have examined these staffing patterns as part of multicomponent intervention packages, few studies have examined the isolated effects of staffing…

  14. Part-Time Work and Advancement: A Study of Female Professional Staff in Australian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Janis; Troup, Carolyn; Strachan, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    One focus of gender equity policies in universities has been the creation of "retention" part-time work for professional staff, which allows employees to move between full-time and part-time hours at their request. This paper examines whether such "good" part-time jobs can contribute to or at least not impede women's career…

  15. Stress and Burnout among Health-Care Staff Working with People Affected by HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David

    1995-01-01

    The nature, causes, consequences, and symptoms of stress and burnout among health-care staff working with people affected by HIV are identified. The extent to which these characteristics are specific to HIV/AIDS workers is discussed. Some options for prevention and management of burnout are presented. (Author)

  16. Personalized Learning Instructional Staff Survey Results (Spring 2014). Working Paper WR-1062-BMGF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler-Evans, Kyle; Steiner, Elizabeth D.; Hamilton, Laura S.; Pane, John F.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to descriptively summarize instructional staff responses to a survey administered by RAND in 23 personalized learning (PL) schools in Spring 2014. This work was performed at the request of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), as part of a multi-year evaluation contract. The 23 schools were selected from a…

  17. Communicating about Death and Dying: Developing Training for Staff Working in Services for People with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuffrey-Wijne, Irene; Rose, Tracey; Grant, Robert; Wijne, Astrid

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many people with intellectual disabilities are affected by death, yet conversations about death are often avoided by staff working with them. This study aimed to assess staff training needs and to develop, trial and evaluate a training course on communicating about death and dying. Method:(i) Semi-structured interviews with 20 staff in…

  18. Ameliorating Patient Stigma Amongst Staff Working With Personality Disorder: Randomized Controlled Trial of Self-Management Versus Skills Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Sue; Taylor, Georgina; Bolderston, Helen; Lancaster, Joanna; Remington, Bob

    2015-11-01

    Patients diagnosed with a personality disorder (PD) are often stigmatized by the healthcare staff who treat them. This study aimed to compare the impact on front-line staff of a self-management Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based training intervention (ACTr) with a knowledge- and skills-based Dialectical Behaviour Training intervention (DBTr). A service-based randomized controlled trial was conducted comparing the effects of 2-day ACTr (N = 53) and DBTr (N = 47) staff workshops over 6 months. Primary outcome measures were staff attitudes towards patients and staff-patient relationships. For both interventions, staff attitudes, therapeutic relationship, and social distancing all improved pre- to postintervention, and these changes were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Although offering different resources to staff, both ACTr and DBTr were associated with an improved disposition towards PD patients. Future research could evaluate a combined approach, both for staff working with PD patients and those working with other stigmatized groups.

  19. A Joint Report on PSA for New and Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    This report addresses the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to new and advanced nuclear reactors. As far as advanced reactors are concerned, the objectives were to characterize the ability of current PSA technology to address key questions regarding the development, acceptance and licensing of advanced reactor designs, to characterize the potential value of advanced PSA methods and tools for application to advanced reactors, and to develop recommendations for any needed developments regarding PSA for these reactors. As far as the design and commissioning of new nuclear power plants is concerned, the objectives were to identify and characterize current practices regarding the role of PSA, to identify key technical issues regarding PSA, lessons learned and issues requiring further work; to develop recommendations regarding the use of PSA, and to identify future international cooperative work on the identified issues. In order to reach these objectives, questionnaires had been sent to participating countries and organisations

  20. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against prostate specific antigen (PSA) for the detection of PSA and its purification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo Castro, Boris Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    The prostate cancer in Cuba is a problem of health (2672 diagnosed cases and 2769 deaths in 2007). Various diagnostic methods have been implemented for the detection and management of this disease, emphasizing among them (PSA) prostate-specific antigen serological determination. At this work was generated and characterized a panel of 11 antibodies (AcMs) monoclonal IgG1 detected with high affinity described major epitopes of the PSA, both in solution and attached to the test plate. From the panel obtained AcMs was the standardization of an essay type ELISA for the detection of serum total PSA (associated and free) equimolar, based on antibody monoclonal CB-PSA.4 in the coating and the CB-PSA.9 coupled with biotin as liner, with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/mL. Similarly, standardized system for detection in serum free PSA, based on the AcMs CB-PSA.4 (coating) and CB-PSA.2 coupled with biotin (liner), with a detection limit of 0.5 ng/mL. Finally, with the purpose of using PSA as standard in trials type ELISA, developed a simple method of inmunopurificación based on the AcM, CB-PSA.2, which was obtained the PSA with a purity exceeding 90%. Immunoassay Centre on the basis of the AcMs panel and the results of this study, developed and recorded two diagnostic systems for the detection of PSA in human serum. (author)

  1. Analysis of the Motivation and Work Climate of University Teaching Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2012-04-01

    The scientific, social, economic and technological progress taking place in present-day advanced societies needs to be closely linked to the work of the university and to effectiveness, productivity and efficiency. Moreover, teaching staff play a predominant role and are the best point of reference for any changes to be introduced in teaching, in the way to manage classes, in the use of tools, changes in methodology or teaching strategies, and also in the ways students learn, etc. The teacher ceases to be a figure who only transmits knowledge and becomes a guide or facilitator of learning. The teacher, therefore, takes on a different commitment with the ways of learning, of approaching students, guiding tutorials, assessing student learning, etc. For these reasons staff motivationisone of the basic concerns. It would be expected that a demotivated staff with few incentives and a low opinion of their worth as teachers would be less committed to their teaching, research and management work, and as a result would achieve less success in their work with students. To put it another way, they would perform worse in all they do. But could it be that their vocation as teachers and the professionalism of university staff are sufficient motivating factors in themselves? The concepts of work climate, motivation and demotivation of teaching staff, feeling uneasy with teaching or academic work, conflicts of communication, a deterioration in relationships with colleagues, etc., are phrases that are heard more and more in the work environment. Most of these phrases would seem to be related to academic performance or the way of becoming involved in the centre's activities or to other variables which until proved are only supposition. It is for these reasons that we have wished to analyse the situation of teaching staff in universities in Madrid. In university organisations the teaching staff is one of the key elements that leads to work being done more or less effectively. Human

  2. Work-related accidents and occupational diseases in veterinarians and their staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nienhaus, Albert; Skudlik, Christoph; Seidler, Andreas

    2005-04-01

    We assessed the occupational hazards in veterinary practice by analysing accident insurance data in order to stimulate strategies to prevent occupational accidents and diseases in veterinarians and their staff. Approximately 10,000 veterinary practices comprising about 27,500 veterinarians and their staff are covered by the Institution of Statutory Accident Insurance of the Health and Welfare Service (BGW). Each year about 2,000 accident and occupational disease claims are filed by these veterinarians and their staff. The claims for the 5-year period from 1998 to 2002 are analysed in this paper. For 2002, the incidence rate for accidents in the workplace was 105.4 per 1,000 full-time workers, a rate 2.9-times higher than for general practitioners of human medicine. When only severe accidents resulting in a loss of work time of more than 3 days were analysed, the relative risk increased to 9.2. Approximately 66% of the reported accidents are due to scratches, bites, or kicks from animals. Claims of occupational disease are filed 2.7-times more often by veterinarians and their staff than by general practitioners and their staff. The occupational diseases filed most often concern the skin (39%), followed by allergic respiratory diseases (30.5%), and infectious diseases (19.1%). Prevention strategies for veterinarians should focus on accidents caused by animals. The prevention of occupational diseases should focus on skin diseases, respiratory disease, and infections.

  3. Effective utilization of maintenance staff in design and implementation of major project work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyman, D.; Dingle, J.; Brown, R.

    1995-01-01

    The reorganization of Pickering Nuclear Division some 2 years ago resulted in the formation of the Projects and Modifications department. This department takes an integrated approach to manage all aspects of large projects at Pickering. The integration of Design, Drafting, Procurement, Construction and Operations functions into project teams represents a fundamental change to project management at Pickering. The development of integrated teams has great potential for reducing both the time and cost associated with project implementation, while at the same time improving the quality, and maintainability of the commissioned in service project. The Pickering Rehab organization 1989-1993, established to perform the rehab / retube of Units 3 and 4 had proven that a team environment will produce effective results. The outcome was astounding, critical categories such as Safety, Quality of Work, and Timeliness, had proven the team's effectiveness. The integration of operations maintenance staff into the project work activities is still evolving, and has probably required the most adaptation to change for both the former Construction and Operations organizations. Maximizing the utilization of the maintenance staff in the design and implementation of major project work will prove to be a key to a long term operating success of these projects. This paper will focus in on the effective usage of Maintenance staff in the design and implementation phases of major project work at Pickering, and on the benefits realized using this approach. It will be divided into 5 sections as indicated. 1. Past Project Shortfalls. 2. Benefits of the inclusion of Maintenance staff in the Calandria Vault Rehab Project. 3. Maintenance involvement in the Pickering 'A' Shutdown System Enhancement (SDSE) Project. 4. Challenges resulting from the inclusion of Maintenance staff project teams. 5. Summary. (author)

  4. Ergonomic relationship during work in nursing staff of intensive care unit with operating room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Mahmoudifar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: High prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, especially in jobs such as nursing which covers tasks like patients' repositioning, has attracted great attentions from occupational healthcare experts to necessitate the knowledge of ergonomic science. Therefore, this study was performed aiming at ergonomic relationship during work in nursing staff of Intensive Care Unit (ICU with operating room. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive-analytical study (cohort, fifty personnel of ICU staff and fifty of operating room staff were selected through a census method and were assessed using tools such as Nordic questionnaire and Rapid Entire Body Assessment (REBA standards in terms of body posture ergonomics. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS software and Chi-Square test after collection. Results: The most complaints were from the operating room group (68% and ICU staff (60% for the lumbar musculoskeletal system. There was a significant relationship between the total REBA scores of body, legs, neck, arm, force status, load fitting with hands and static or dynamic activities in the operating room and ICU staff groups (P < 0.05. In operating room and ICU groups, most subjects obtained score 11–15 and very high-risk level. Conclusion: Nurses working at operating room and ICU ward are subjected to high-risk levels and occupational injuries which is dramatically resulted from inappropriate body posture or particular conditions of their works. As a result, taking corrective actions along with planning and identifying ways will help prohibiting the prevalence of disorders in the future.

  5. Partnership working and improved service delivery: views of staff providing sexual health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pow, Janette; Elliott, Lawrie; Raeside, Robert; Themessl-Huber, Markus; Claveirole, Anne

    2013-07-01

    Successful partnership working has theoretically been linked to improvements in service delivery and is dependent on the strength of the partnership, trust, communication, professional roles and resource sharing. Empirical evidence to confirm the relationships between these factors and improved service provision, however, is lacking. Our aim was to assess the views of staff as to the conditions required for partnership working. This study was a cross-sectional survey of 687 staff offering sexual health education, information or support to young people in the Healthy Respect intervention area in Scotland. Views of each variable were scored and structural equation modelling was used to assess the theoretical model. Responses were received from 284 (41%) staff. Greater strength of partnership was directly associated with increasing the number of referrals. Establishing professional roles between organizations was also associated with increasing the number of referrals. Strength of partnership was indirectly associated with working more effectively with young people and this relationship depended on clear communication, trust, established professional roles and shared resources. Effective partnership working depends on a number of interdependent relationships between organizations, which act synergistically to improve organizational outcomes. Effective partnership working leads to improved service delivery though there is a need for better controlled studies which demonstrate the effect on health outcomes.

  6. Work and health conditions of nursing staff in palliative care and hospices in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christina; Bänsch, Alexander; Schröder, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Aims of this representative study were to assess the relevant differences between the work and organisational characteristics as well as the subjective resources and health status of nurses occupied in hospice care, compared to nurses from palliative stations. Further, the assessment of the predictive correlations between the work situation of this nurses as a factor influencing their health and perceived strains was also a leading intention. Method: In a written survey conducted in Germany in 2001, 820 nursing staff of 113 palliative stations and stationary hospices were included. A qualified diagnostic procedure for the assessment of health promoting work was implemented. In order of obtaining a secure comparison, a sample of 320 nurses working in 12 homes for old people in Saxony was also considered. Results: The nurses referred generally to favourable working conditions, still they informed about deficiencies in the perceived participation, organizational benefits and experienced gratification. Hospice nurses experienced overall more favourable work conditions than palliative nurses or than the staff of homes for old people (regarding identification with the institution, organizational benefits, accurate gratification and little time pressure during work). Hospice personnel were psychologically and physically healthier than the staff of palliative stations. Important predictors for health stability that could be assessed by multiple regression analysis were: positively evaluated work contents, the identification with the institution, little time pressure and a positive working atmosphere. Conclusions: The assessed organisational framework is generally more favourable in the institutions of professional terminal care than in common hospitals and homes for old people. Therefore, the conditions in hospices could have a modelling function for the inner-institutional work organisation and for the anchorage of the intrinsic motivation of nurses in the health care

  7. The impact of night-shift work on platelet function in healthy medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Tomoko; Yasumoto, Atsushi; Tokuoka, Suzumi; Kita, Yoshihiro; Kawahara, Takuya; Daimon, Masao; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2018-04-18

    Rotating shift work has been reported to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Vascular endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation are among the leading causes of thrombus formation in patients with myocardial infarction or stroke. Endothelial function has been shown to be impaired immediately after night-shift work; however, it is not known whether platelets are also activated. The aim of this study was to investigate the acute impact of night-shift work on platelet function. This observational study included 11 healthy medical staff members (seven women, median age 32 years). We examined each subject's platelet aggregation rates and the serum concentrations of eicosanoid mediators after night-shift work and on day-shift work without preceding night-shift work (baseline). Platelet aggregation did not differ from baseline levels after night-shift work. However, serum cyclooxygenase (COX)-metabolized eicosanoid mediators, particularly thromboxane (Tx) B 2 (a stable metabolite of TxA 2 and the most important marker of platelet activation), were significantly higher after the night-shift than at baseline (median 65.3 vs 180.4 ng/ml). Although platelet aggregation did not increase, there was an increase in serum COX-metabolized eicosanoid mediators such as TxB 2 in healthy medical staff after night-shift work. This platelet hypersensitivity may be one of the mechanisms underlying the significant association between night-shift work and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  8. Impact of school staff health on work productivity in secondary schools in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alker, Heather J; Wang, Monica L; Pbert, Lori; Thorsen, Nancy; Lemon, Stephenie C

    2015-06-01

    Healthy, productive employees are an integral part of school health programs. There have been few assessments of work productivity among secondary school staff. This study describes the frequency of 3 common health risk factors--obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking--and their impact on work productivity in secondary school employees. Employees of secondary schools in Massachusetts (N = 630) participated in a longitudinal weight gain prevention intervention study. Assessment completed at baseline, 1-year and 2-year follow-up included survey assessments of health risk factors as well as measurements for height, weight, and body mass index (BMI). The survey also included a depression inventory and Work Limitations Questionnaire. Data analysis included multivariate mixed effect models to identify productivity differences in relation to BMI, depressive symptoms, and smoking in this population stratified by position type (teacher and other school staff). The sample included 361 teachers and 269 other school staff. Obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking were significantly associated with work productivity, including workdays missed because of health concerns (absenteeism) and decreases in on-the-job productivity because of health concerns (presenteeism). Three common health conditions, namely obesity, depressive symptoms, and smoking, adversely affect the productivity of high school employees. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  9. Replacing nuclear staff: The proactively work at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupak, M.O.; Rogero, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to bring the actual situation of Nuclear Education and Training in Brazil. Accordingly, this paper overviewed the situation of the educational matter on Latin America, especially in Brazil, in terms of efficiency and effectiveness of its superior education system. Mainly this paper pointed out for the replacing of nuclear staff and the proactive work of the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN) of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). (author)

  10. How Does Staff Working at University Think About and Experience Leisure? (A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Ghanbari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: University staff plays an important role in breeding a healthy and prosperous generation. Their right for attending to interests and selfactualization are noticeable. This qualitative research has been conducted in order to understand and explain the perspective and experience of staff working at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences (AJUMS about Leisure time. Methods: A qualitative study using purposeful sampling was performed among staff working in all parts of AJUMS about leisure time in 2012. The tool used for gathering data was a deep, semi-structured interview. Data saturation was achieved with 18 interviews. Findings from the interviews were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results: In this study, there were 5 themes for perspective and experience of staff, including meaningfulness and purposefulness of leisure time (physical, mental and social, leisure time activities (passing individual and in group, leisure time duration (more or less, and the same as the time of working, barriers for leisure time (personal, social, and environmental, and suggestions for how to spend leisure time (role of the person and community. The findings from participants’ views and experiences showed that they are not satisfied with their leisure pattern. With attention to working at university, they do not have efficient leisure time duration. Conclusion: Participants believed that leisure time is effective to improve their physical, psychological, and social performance. People spend their leisure time either individually or in groups. Personal, social, and environmental barriers highlight the role of an individual and society as a whole in increasing opportunities for better leisure.

  11. Understanding the working relationships between National Health Service clinicians and finance staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, Virginia; McCaffry, Rebecca

    2017-03-13

    Purpose The Department of Health and the National Health Service (NHS) Future Focused Finance (FFF) programme promotes effective engagement between clinical and finance staff. Surveys undertaken by the Department of Health between 2013 and 2015 found few NHS Trusts reported high levels of engagement. The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of current working relationships between NHS clinical and finance professionals and how they might be supported to become more effective. Design/methodology/approach Ipsos MORI were commissioned by the NHS FFF programme to undertake an online survey of NHS clinical and finance staff between June and August 2015. Findings The majority of clinicians had a member of a finance team linked to their speciality or directorate. Clinical and finance professionals have a positive view of joint working preferring face-to-face contact. Clinician's confidence in their understanding of finance was generally good and finance staff felt they had a good understanding of clinical issues. Effective working relationships were facilitated by face-to-face contact, a professional relationship, and the availability of clear, well presented finance and activity data. Research limitations/implications Data protection issues limited the accessibility of the survey team to NHS staff resulting in a relatively low-response rate. Other forms of communication, including social media, were utilised to increase access to the survey. Originality/value The FFF programme is a unique programme aimed at making the NHS finance profession fit for the future. The close partnering work stream brings together the finance and clinical perspective to share knowledge, evidence, training, and to develop good practice and engagement.

  12. Replacing nuclear staff: The proactive work at IPEN/CNEN-SP-Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupak, M.O.; Rogero, J.R.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to bring out the actual situation of Nuclear Education and Training in Brazil. Accordingly, this paper overviews the situation of educational matters in Latin America, especially in Brazil, in terms of efficiency and effectiveness of its superior education system. Mainly, this paper points out the replacing of nuclear staff and the proactive work of the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN) of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). (author)

  13. Coping With Staff Burnout and Work-Related Posttraumatic Stress in Intensive Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colville, Gillian A; Smith, Jared G; Brierley, Joe; Citron, Kim; Nguru, Noreen M; Shaunak, Priyanka D; Tam, Olivia; Perkins-Porras, Linda

    2017-07-01

    To examine the associations with symptoms of 1) burnout and 2) work-related posttraumatic stress, in adult and pediatric intensive care staff, focusing on the particular contributions of resilience and coping strategies. Point prevalence cross-sectional study. Three adult ICUs and four PICUs. Three hundred seventy-seven ICU staff. None. Brief Resilience Scale, abbreviated Maslach Burnout Inventory, Trauma Screening Questionnaire, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Prevalence of burnout (defined as high emotional exhaustion or high depersonalization) was 37%. Prevalence of clinically significant posttraumatic stress symptoms was 13%. There was a degree of overlap between burnout and other measures of distress, most notably for anxiety (odds ratio, 10.56; 95% CI, 4.12-27.02; p work-related distress (burnout: odds ratio, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.36-0.74; p stress: odds ratio, 0.28; 95% CI, 0.16-0.46; p stress were less if staff used talking to seniors (odds ratio, 0.43; 95% CI, 0.20-0.92; p = 0.029) or hobbies (odds ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.23-0.93; p = 0.030) to cope with stress at work. Venting emotion (odds ratio, 1.92; 95% CI, 1.12-3.31; p = 0.018) and using alcohol (odds ratio, 2.30; 95% CI, 1.26-4.20; p = 0.006) were associated with a doubling in risk of reporting burnout. The use of particular coping strategies was systematically associated with symptoms of burnout and work-related posttraumatic stress in this group of intensive care staff, even after controlling for resilience and other factors. More research on how best to promote adaptive coping is needed in these challenging settings.

  14. Shift work, emotional labour and psychological well-being of nursing staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Vermaak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the effect of emotional labour and the psychological experience of shift work on the psychological well-being at work (PWBW of long term care nursing staff (n = 206. The ‘psychological experience of shift work’ construct defines the perception of the negative effect that working shifts has on the employees’ daily life. Correlation and multiple regression analyses were conducted. Support was found for the negative relationships between the psychological experience of shift work and PWBW, as well as the emotional labour dimension of surface acting and PWBW. A hierarchical regression analysis suggested that, when controlling for the effect of emotional labour and certain demographic variables (including number of dependents, tenure and actual shift worked, a significant amount of unique variance in PWBW, could be accounted for by the psychological experience of shift work. These results indicate that the PWBW of nursing staff is not only influenced by which shift the individual is on (i.e. day or night shift, but more so by the individuals’ psychological experience of shift work.

  15. Whooping Cough PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 30 second PSA encourages pregnant women to get the whooping cough vaccine, called Tdap, during the third trimester of each pregnancy in order to pass antibodies to their babies so they are born with protection against this serious disease.

  16. 'Poppets and parcels': the links between staff experience of work and acutely ill older peoples' experience of hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jill; Adams, Mary; Peccei, Riccardo; Murrells, Trevor; Robert, Glenn

    2012-06-01

    Few empirical studies have directly examined the relationship between staff experiences of providing healthcare and patient experience. Present concerns over the care of older people in UK acute hospitals - and the reported attitudes of staff in such settings - highlight an important area of study. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES. To examine the links between staff experience of work and patient experience of care in a 'Medicine for Older People' (MfOP) service in England. A mixed methods case study undertaken over 8 months incorporating a 149-item staff survey (66/192 - 34% response rate), a 48-item patient survey (26/111 - 23%), 18 staff interviews, 18 patient and carer interviews and 41 hours of non-participant observation. Variation in patient experience is significantly influenced by staff work experiences. A high-demand/low-control work environment, poor staffing, ward leadership and co-worker relationships can each add to the inherent difficulties staff face when caring for acutely ill older people. Staff seek to alleviate the impact of such difficulties by finding personal satisfaction from caring for 'the poppets'; those patients they enjoy caring for and for whom they feel able to 'make a difference'. Other patients - noting dehumanising aspects of their care - felt like 'parcels'. Patients are aware of being seen by staff as 'difficult' or 'demanding' and seek to manage their relationships with nursing staff accordingly. The work experiences of staff in a MfOP service impacted directly on patient care experience. Poor ward and patient care climates often lead staff to seek job satisfaction through caring for 'poppets', leaving less favoured - and often more complex patients - to receive less personalised care. Implications for practice. Investment in staff well-being and ward climate is essential for the consistent delivery of high-quality care for older people in acute settings. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A survey of violence against staff working in the emergency department in ankara, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talas, Melek Serpil; Kocaöz, Semra; Akgüç, Selma

    2011-12-01

    Workplace violence in the emergency department is a significant problem world wide. The aims of this study were to identify the proportion of staff subjected to the types of violence, its sources, factors affecting violence experiences, reporting the incidence and the emotions of the victims after violence. This descriptive study was conducted between March and August 2009 in the the emergency department of six hospitals in Ankara, Turkey. Data were collected from 270 staff working in various emergency settings. The instrument was a 36-item questionnaire on types of violence, its sources, feelings, and ways to cope with violent behaviors. Descriptive statistics and chi-square tests were used for data analysis. The results showed 85.2% of participants had been subjected to at least one kind of violence: 41.1% to physical assault, 79.6% to verbal abuse, 55.5% to verbal threats and 15.9% to sexual harassment. Patients' companions (90.9%) were identified as the primary perpetrators of violence. The rates of violence types were highest towards security officers and housekeepers. The most common reactions to violence were sadness and anger. "Did nothing and keeping silent" was the coping method used most commonly by the staff. Participants exposed to physical assaults and verbal threat did not report the incidence of violence to managers were at 43.3% and 65.3% respectively. Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Aromatherapy alleviates endothelial dysfunction of medical staff after night-shift work: preliminary observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Kenei; Fukuda, Shota; Maeda, Kumiko; Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Kono, Yasushi; Jissho, Satoshi; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2011-02-01

    Night-shift work causes mental stress and lifestyle changes, and is recognized as a risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with impaired endothelial function. Aromatherapy is becoming popular as a complementary therapy that is beneficial for mental relaxation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on the endothelial function of medical staff after night-shift work. This study consisted of 19 healthy medical personnel (19 men, mean age 32 ± 7 years), including 11 physicians and 8 technicians. Aromatherapy was performed for 30 min by inhalation of the essential oil of lavender. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was measured three times in each subject: on a regular workday, and after night-shift work before and immediately after aromatherapy. A control study was performed to assess the effect of a 30-min rest without aromatherapy. The mean value of sleep time during night-shift work was 3.3 ± 1.3 h. FMD after night-shift work was lower than on a regular workday (10.4 ± 1.8 vs. 12.5 ± 1.7%, Pnight-shift work impaired endothelial function in medical staff, an effect that was alleviated by short-term aromatherapy.

  19. Staff perception of interprofessional working relationships after a work redesign intervention in a Danish orthopaedic hand unit outpatient clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beijer, Anke Elisabeth; Hansen, Torben Bæk; Stilling, Maiken; Jakobsen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that clinical pathways improve quality of care; however, knowledge is limited concerning the influence on and the benefits experienced by the interprofessional teams working with these pathways. Our working methods in a hand unit in an orthopaedic outpatient clinic in Denmark were redesigned to include, among other changes, the introduction of clinical pathways. Changes included standardising treatment and communication methods, delegating tasks from medical specialists to nurses, and providing nurses with their own consultation room. Using focus group interviews before and after the implementation of the new working methods, we investigated staff-perceived experiences of the effects on working relationships and the utilisation of professional skills and attitudes, resulting from the mentioned change in working methods. The results were changes in daily communication methods among healthcare staff and improvements in the actual communication and collaborative problem solving skills concerning standard patients with simple hand pathology; however, there are still challenges for patients with more complex hand pathology. Though this new interprofessional arrangement improves the use of nurse and medical specialist professional competencies, it also requires a high degree of trust among the team members.

  20. Work engagement, social support, and job satisfaction in Portuguese nursing staff: A winning combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgambídez-Ramos, Alejandro; de Almeida, Helena

    2017-08-01

    Job Demands-Resources model assumes the mediator role of work engagement between social support (job resource) and job satisfaction (organizational result). However, recent studies suggest that social support can be considered as a moderator variable in the relationship between engagement and job satisfaction in nursing staff. The aim of this study is to analyze the moderator role of social support, from supervisor and from co-workers, in the relationship between work engagement and job satisfaction in a Portuguese nursing sample. We conducted a cross-sectional and correlational study assessing a final sample of 215 participants (55.56% response rate, 77.21% women). Moderation analyses were carried out using multiple and hierarchical linear regression models. Job satisfaction was significantly predicted by work engagement and social support from supervisor and from co-workers. The significant interaction in predicting job satisfaction showed that social support from co-workers enhances the effects of work engagement on nurses' satisfaction. A climate of social support among co-workers and higher levels of work engagement have a positive effect on job satisfaction, improving quality care and reducing turnover intention in nursing staff. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of menstrual disorders in hospital nursing staff according to shift work pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert-Sabater, Josep Amílcar; Martínez, José Miguel; Baste, Valborg; Moen, Bente E; Ronda-Perez, Elena

    2016-11-01

    To assess the association between work in a rotating shift schedule and menstruation characteristics among nurse staff in a prospective study. Rotating shifts have been linked to alterations in the reproductive cycle. In the case of menstrual alterations, the conclusions are not clear. Prospective epidemiological study with follow-up over four months. All the female nurse staff (shifts and characteristics of their menstruation (duration, amount of blood, dysmenorrhoea). They had two types of shifts: (1) Rotating shift schedule (two mornings, two afternoons, one night and two days off) including morning shifts (8:00-15:00), afternoon/evening shifts (15:00-22:00) and night shifts (22:00-8:00), and (2) Day shift schedule including morning shifts (8:00-15:00) and/or afternoon/evening shifts (15:00-22:00). The crude and adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval were calculated using logistic generalised estimating equations (GEE) taking into account the correlations of multiple cycles per worker. One hundred and thirteen workers on the rotating shift and 75 on the day shift participated, and information from 730 menstrual cycles were obtained. There were no differences in prolonged duration, dysmenorrhoea, prolonged duration dysmenorrhoea and excessive bleeding among nurses on rotating shift compared to those on the day shift. For prolonged duration of menstruation, workers with more than five years on the rotating shift showed a slightly lower (nonsignificant) risk compared with those with shift did not show increased risk of having menstrual disorders comparing with day staff. Shifts with short rotation cycles and a progressive sequence do not appear to cause menstrual disorders in nurse staff who work rotating shifts. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A regular yoga intervention for staff nurse sleep quality and work stress: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ronghua; Li, Xia

    2015-12-01

    Although many studies have assessed the efficacy of yoga in older individuals, minimal research has focused on how nurses use yoga to improve sleep quality and to reduce work stress after work hours. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in Chinese and the Questionnaire on Medical Worker's Stress in Chinese to determine the impact of yoga on the quality of sleep and work stress of staff nurses employed by a general hospital in China. Disturbances in the circadian rhythm interrupt an individual's pattern of sleep. Convenient sampling method. One hundred and twenty nurses were randomised into two groups: a yoga group and a non-yoga group. The yoga group performed yoga more than two times every week for 50-60 minutes each time after work hours. The NG group did not participate in yoga. After six months, self-reported sleep quality and work stress were compared between the two groups, and then we used linear regression to confirm the independent factors related to sleep quality. Nurses in the yoga group had better sleep quality and lower work stress compared with nurses in the non-yoga group. The linear regression model indicated that nursing experience, age and yoga intervention were significantly related to sleep quality. Regular yoga can improve sleep quality and reduce work stress in staff nurses. This study provides evidence that hospital management should pay attention to nurse sleep quality and work stress, thereby taking corresponding measures to reduce work pressure and improve health outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dosimetric evaluation of the staff working in a PET/CT department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalianis, K.; Malamitsi, J.; Gogou, L.; Pagou, M.; Efthimiadou, R.; Andreou, J.; Louizi, A.; Georgiou, E.

    2006-01-01

    The dosimetric literature data concerning the medical personnel working in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) departments are limited. Therefore, we measured the radiation dose of the staff working in the first PET/CT department in Greece at the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens HYGEIA-Harvard Medical International. As, for the time being, only 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) PET studies are performed, radiation dose measurements concern those derived from dispensing of the radiopharmaceutical as well as from the patients undergoing FDG-PET imaging. Our aim is to develop more effective protective measures against radionuclide exposure. To estimate the effective dose from external exposure, all seven members of the staff (two nurses, two medical physicists, two technologists, one secretary) had TLD badges worn at the upper pocket of their overall, TLD rings on the right hand and digital dosimeters at their upper side pocket. In addition, isodose curves were measured with thermoluminescence detectors for distances of 20, 50, 70 and 100 cm away from patients who had been injected with 18 F-FDG. Dose values of the PET/CT staff were measured with digital detectors, TLD badges and TLD rings over the first 8 months for a total of 160 working days of the department's operation, consisting of a workload of about 10-15 patients/week who received 250-420 MBq of 18 F-FDG each. Whole - body collective doses and hand doses for the staff were the following: Nurse no. 1 received 1.6 mSv as a whole body dose and 2,1 as a hand dose, Nurse no. 2 received 1.9 and 2.4 mSv respectively. For medical physicist no. 1 the dose values were 1.45 mSv whole body and 1.7 mSv hand dose, for medical physicist no. 2 1.67 mSv wholebody dose and 1.55 mSv hand dose and for technologists no. 1 and no. 2 the whole body doses were 0.7 and 0.64 mSv respectively. Lastly, the secretary received 0.1 mSv whole body dose. These preliminary data have shown that the dose

  4. Dosimetric evaluation of the staff working in a PET/CT department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalianis, K. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: k.dalianis@hygeia.gr; Malamitsi, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Gogou, L. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Pagou, M. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Efthimiadou, R. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Andreou, J. [Department of PET/CT, Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens Hygeia-Harvard Medical International, Erythrau Stavrou 4, 5123 Athens (Greece); Louizi, A. [Department of Medical Physics Medical School University of Athens, Athens (Greece); Georgiou, E. [Department of Medical Physics Medical School University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2006-12-20

    The dosimetric literature data concerning the medical personnel working in positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) departments are limited. Therefore, we measured the radiation dose of the staff working in the first PET/CT department in Greece at the Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center of Athens HYGEIA-Harvard Medical International. As, for the time being, only 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) PET studies are performed, radiation dose measurements concern those derived from dispensing of the radiopharmaceutical as well as from the patients undergoing FDG-PET imaging. Our aim is to develop more effective protective measures against radionuclide exposure. To estimate the effective dose from external exposure, all seven members of the staff (two nurses, two medical physicists, two technologists, one secretary) had TLD badges worn at the upper pocket of their overall, TLD rings on the right hand and digital dosimeters at their upper side pocket. In addition, isodose curves were measured with thermoluminescence detectors for distances of 20, 50, 70 and 100 cm away from patients who had been injected with {sup 18}F-FDG. Dose values of the PET/CT staff were measured with digital detectors, TLD badges and TLD rings over the first 8 months for a total of 160 working days of the department's operation, consisting of a workload of about 10-15 patients/week who received 250-420 MBq of {sup 18}F-FDG each. Whole - body collective doses and hand doses for the staff were the following: Nurse no. 1 received 1.6 mSv as a whole body dose and 2,1 as a hand dose, Nurse no. 2 received 1.9 and 2.4 mSv respectively. For medical physicist no. 1 the dose values were 1.45 mSv whole body and 1.7 mSv hand dose, for medical physicist no. 2 1.67 mSv wholebody dose and 1.55 mSv hand dose and for technologists no. 1 and no. 2 the whole body doses were 0.7 and 0.64 mSv respectively. Lastly, the secretary received 0.1 mSv whole body dose. These preliminary data have

  5. Development of multipurpose regulatory PSA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Ju; Sung, Key Yong; Kim, Hho Jung; Yang, Joon Eon; Ha, Jae Joo

    2004-01-01

    Generally, risk information for nuclear facilities comes from the results of Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). PSA is a systematic tool to ensure the safety of nuclear facilities, since it is based on thorough and consistent application of probability models. In particular, the PSA has been widely utilized for risk-informed regulation (RIR), including various licensee-initiated risk-informed applications (RIA). In any regulatory decision, the main goal is to make a sound safety decision based on technically defensible information. Also, due to the increased public requests for giving a safety guarantee, the regulator should provide the visible means of safety. The use of PSA by the regulator can give the answer on this problem. Therefore, in order to study the applicability of risk information for regulatory safety management, it is a demanding task to prepare a well-established regulatory PSA model and tool. In 2002, KINS and KAERI together made a research cooperation to form a working group to develop the regulatory PSA model - so-called MPAS model. The MPAS stands for multipurpose probabilistic analysis of safety. For instance, a role of the MPAS model is to give some risk insights in the preparation of various regulatory programs. Another role of this model is to provide an independent risk information to the regulator during regulatory decision-making, not depending on the licensee's information

  6. Association between stress at work and primary headache among nursing staff in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kao-Chang; Huang, Chin-Chang; Wu, Chiou-Chuen

    2007-04-01

    Stress, one of the most commonly identified triggers for primary headache in the workplace, usually leads to inefficient work during attacks. Stress-related primary headaches in the nursing staff of hospitals have received little attention. To realize the association between stress and headache, and the means of coping with this kind of headache. A cross-sectional, hospital-based study using a semi-structured questionnaire was administered to 900 nursing staffers in a tertiary medical center in southern Taiwan. Thirty-two items, including basic information, headache- and stress-related questions, work satisfaction, and coping strategies were measured. Headache sufferers with either migraine or episodic tension headache (attacks Headache Society (IHS) criteria were enrolled for analysis. The Student's t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and chi-square test were used for statistical analysis. Three hundred eighty-six out of 779 responders (49.6%) had experienced primary headaches in the previous year, and 374 (48.1%) had had episodic-type headaches (headache, 37 (4.8%) had mixed migraine and tension headache, and 11 (1.4%) had other causes of headache. There were no demographic differences between the sufferers and nonsufferers, although a statistically significant difference was noted in self-reported sources of stress (individual P values ranged from .021 to Headache sufferers had more stress at work than non-headache sufferers (P stress. The methods used to deal with headaches were sleep, taking medicine, taking a rest, visiting the doctor, and seeking psychological help. Nurses commonly used acetaminophen (panadol--500 mg) to relieve their pain. These results indicate that stress at work is associated with primary headaches among nursing staff, and that nurses rarely seek help in the beginning. Therefore, nursing staff education aimed at ameliorating the stress and coping with the headaches, thus allowing the nurses to provide better patient care, may

  7. [Job demands and work-family conflict in a health care staff. The role of work shifts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zito, Margherita; Colombo, Lara; Mura, Gabriella

    2013-01-01

    Work-family conflict (wfc), that originates from an incompatibility between the job and the family demands, is a very relevant topic in health care context, as suggested by NEXT study. Work overload and schedule organization are dimensions that can affect wfc, and particularly, studies indicate work shifts as one of its main determinants, as they limit the work-family balance and represent one of the prime risk factors for workers' health. The aim of this study was to detect the role of some job demands (both general and specific) and of schedule organization in determining the wfc experience, with particular attention to work shifts. Respondents to our questionnaire are 207 nurses of a north Italian public health organization. They are mostly women (92.8%) and their average age is 42. Data analysis shows that wfc is mostly influenced by work shifts, but also by work overload, cognitive load and by on-call availability. Staff working on shifts and on-call availability perceive a higher wfc than their colleagues without work shifts and on-call availability. The central role of work shifts in determining wfc suggests the need to act on schedule organization and on training programs for supervisors and workers.

  8. Job demands, job resources and work engagement of academic staff in South African higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rothmann

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the work engagement of academics in selected South African higher education institutions as well as the impact of job demands and job resources on their work engagement. Stratified random samples (N = 471 were drawn from academic staff in three higher education institutions in South Africa. The Utrecht Work Engagement Scale (UWES and the Job Demands-Resources Scale (JDRS were administered. The results confirmed a two-factor structure of work engagement, consisting of vigour and dedication. Six reliable factors were extracted on the JDRS, namely organisational support, growth opportunities, social support, overload, advancement and job insecurity. Job resources (including organisational support and growth opportunities predicted 26% of the variance in vigour and 38% of the variance in dedication. Job demands (overload impacted on dedication of academics at low and moderate levels of organisational support.

  9. Burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, S A M; El-Sallamy, R M; El-Sherbiny, A A M; Kabbash, I A

    2016-03-15

    Little is known about professional burnout among health-care workers in Egypt. The current study aimed to reveal the extent of burnout among physicians and nursing staff working in the emergency hospital of Tanta University and to identify some of its determinants. A cross-sectional study was carried out on all physicians (n = 266) and a systematic random sample of nurses (n = 284). Burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory and its subscales. Most of the participants (66.0%)had a moderate level of burnout and 24.9% of them had high burnout. Multivariate analysis of variables affecting burnout showed that age, sex, frequency of exposure to work-related violence, years of experience, work burden, supervision and work activities were significant predictors of burnout among the respondents. The authors recommend health education interventions during pre-employment training programmes for prevention of burnout syndrome and periodic screening for early detection and management of burnout.

  10. UK guidance on the management of personal dosimetry systems for healthcare staff working at multiple organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Andy; Chapple, Claire-Louise; Murray, Maria; Platton, David; Saunderson, John

    2017-11-01

    There has been concern expressed by the UK regulator, the Health & Safety Executive, regarding the management of occupation dose for healthcare radiation workers who work across multiple organizations. In response to this concern, the British Institute of Radiology led a working group of relevant professional bodies to develop guidance in this area. The guidance addresses issues of general system management that would apply to all personal dosimetry systems, regardless of whether or not the workers within that system work across organizational boundaries, along with exploring efficient strategies to comply with legislation where those workers do indeed work across organizational boundaries. For those specific instances, the guidance discusses both system requirements to enable organizations to co-operate (Ionising Radiation Regulations 1999 Regulation 15), as well as specific instances of staff exposure. This is broken down into three categories-low, medium and high risk. A suggested approach to each is given to guide employers and their radiation advisers in adopting sensible strategies for the monitoring of their staff and the subsequent sharing of dosimetry data to ensure overall compliance with both dose limits and optimization requirements.

  11. Dementia training programmes for staff working in general hospital settings - a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Innes, Anthea; Scerri, Charles

    2017-08-01

    Although literature describing and evaluating training programmes in hospital settings increased in recent years, there are no reviews that summarise these programmes. This review sought to address this, by collecting the current evidence on dementia training programmes directed to staff working in general hospitals. Literature from five databases were searched, based on a number of inclusion criteria. The selected studies were summarised and data was extracted and compared using narrative synthesis based on a set of pre-defined categories. Methodological quality was assessed. Fourteen peer-reviewed studies were identified with the majority being pre-test post-test investigations. No randomised controlled trials were found. Methodological quality was variable with selection bias being the major limitation. There was a great variability in the development and mode of delivery although, interdisciplinary ward based, tailor-made, short sessions using experiential and active learning were the most utilised. The majority of the studies mainly evaluated learning, with few studies evaluating changes in staff behaviour/practices and patients' outcomes. This review indicates that high quality studies are needed that especially evaluate staff behaviours and patient outcomes and their sustainability over time. It also highlights measures that could be used to develop and deliver training programmes in hospital settings.

  12. Institutional Ethnography as Materialist Framework for Writing Program Research and the Faculty-Staff Work Standpoints Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFrance, Michelle; Nicolas, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Institutional ethnography seeks to uncover how things happen--how institutional discourse compels and shapes practice(s) and how norms of practice speak to, for, and over individuals. The Faculty and Staff Standpoints project is shaped by this methodology, as it explores writing center staff and faculty relationships to their work. (Contains 10…

  13. Innovative and Traditional Elements in the Work of Academic Staff: The Views of Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurgena, Inese; Cedere, Dagnija; Keviša, Ingrida

    2015-01-01

    The academic staff of the institutions of higher education plays a key role in the implementation of innovations in the study process. This article aims to analyze the views of students, pre-service teachers, on the role of innovations and traditions in the work of the academic staff at their institution of higher education. The survey data from…

  14. Training Emotional Intelligence Related to Treatment Skills of Staff Working with Clients with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display challenging behaviour may contribute to the continuation of this behaviour, because it causes emotional reactions such as anxiety, anger and annoyance, which may prohibit adequate response behaviour. To enhance staff behaviour and treatment skills a training…

  15. Can staff attitudes to team working in stroke care be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon, Bernard; Watkins, Caroline; Barer, David; Waters, Karen; Davies, Steve; Lightbody, Liz; Leathley, Michael

    2002-10-01

    Teamwork is regarded as the cornerstone of rehabilitation. It is recognized that the skills of a multiprofessional team are required to provide the care and interventions necessary to maximize the patient's potential to recover from his/her stroke. Critical evaluation of team working is lacking in the literature. Indeed, there is no consensus on a precise definition of teamwork or on the best way of implementing it, beyond a general exhortation to members to work to the same therapeutic plan in a cohesive manner. The literature has highlighted many problems in team working, including petty jealousies, ignorance and a perceived loss of autonomy and threat to professional status. To determine if the use of team co-ordinated approaches to stroke care and rehabilitation would improve staff attitudes to team working. A pre-post design was adopted using 'The Team Climate Inventory' to explore attitudes to team working before and after introducing the interventions. Local Research Ethics Committee approval was obtained. Improvements in attitudes towards team working suggest that the introduction of team co-ordinated approaches (integrated care pathways and team notes) did not result in greater team working. The introduction of an integrated care pathway and team notes is based on an assumption that they would enhance team working. The results suggest that the introduction of team co-ordinated approaches (team notes and care pathways) do not improve attitudes to team working, teams appear to take a long time to establish cohesion and develop shared values.

  16. Countertransference issues in staff caregivers who work to rehabilitate catastrophic-injury survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, M S

    1994-01-01

    Countertransference reactions experienced by caregivers who work to rehabilitate victims of catastrophic physical lesions arise from the fundamental characteristics of catastrophic lesions: they are life threatening, life altering, anatomy altering, and restoration to pre-illness normalcy virtually never occurs. No true preparation is possible: Major physical and psychological work is required to rebuild a traumatized personality and a damaged body so that a life of quality is possible. Countertransference refers to (therapist's) unconscious reaction to patient transference, i.e., to aspects of the patient's behavior that are the product of unconscious factors in the patient's personality, as well as the meanings attached by caregivers to patient's impairment and rehabilitation struggles. Countertransference reactions arise in caregivers from two sources: (1) Socially universal sources: the demands posed by patients' regression; patients' misplaced aggression; patients' thwarting of staff's (narcissistic) professionalism; the threat of obligatory identification; staff disgust at patient's body damage. (2) Individualized sources: individual residues of caregivers' own developmental experience (conscious and unconscious) with issues such as dependency, aggression, sexuality, self-esteem and autonomy. Solutions involve understanding and mastering the distinction between feelings and actions, and sparing patients from two actions: Assault or abandonment. Suggestions for management include better knowledge of basic psychodynamics; working toward continuous self-awareness; special group meetings; and selective use of educationally oriented psychiatric consultations. Three case examples are offered.

  17. Sleep Characteristics of the Staff Working in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Based on a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Puerta

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective is to evaluate the sleep characteristics of the staff working in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU. They were asked to complete an anonymous survey concerning the characteristics and quality of their sleep, as well as the impact of sleep disturbances on their work and social life, assessed by Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-10 questionnaire. The response rate was 84.6% (85% females: 17% were doctors, 57% nurses, 23% nursing assistants, and 3% porters. 83.8% of them worked on fix shifts and 16.2% did 24-h shifts. 39.8% of workers considered that they had a good sleep quality and 39.8% considered it to be poor or bad. The score was good in 18.2% of the staff and bad in 81.8%. Night shift workers showed significantly worse sleep quality on both the objective and subjective evaluation. There was a weak concordance (kappa 0.267; p = 0.004 between the perceived quality of sleep and the FOSQ-10 evaluation. Sleep disorders affected their emotional state (30.2% of workers and relationships or social life (22.6%. In conclusion, this study finds that a high percentage of health professionals from PICU suffer from sleep disorders that affect their personal and social life. This negative impact is significantly higher in night shift workers. Many health workers are not aware of their bad sleep quality.

  18. Sleep Characteristics of the Staff Working in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Based on a Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerta, Yolanda; García, Mirian; Heras, Elena; López-Herce, Jesús; Fernández, Sarah N; Mencía, Santiago

    2017-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate the sleep characteristics of the staff working in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). They were asked to complete an anonymous survey concerning the characteristics and quality of their sleep, as well as the impact of sleep disturbances on their work and social life, assessed by Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ)-10 questionnaire. The response rate was 84.6% (85% females): 17% were doctors, 57% nurses, 23% nursing assistants, and 3% porters. 83.8% of them worked on fix shifts and 16.2% did 24-h shifts. 39.8% of workers considered that they had a good sleep quality and 39.8% considered it to be poor or bad. The score was good in 18.2% of the staff and bad in 81.8%. Night shift workers showed significantly worse sleep quality on both the objective and subjective evaluation. There was a weak concordance (kappa 0.267; p  = 0.004) between the perceived quality of sleep and the FOSQ-10 evaluation. Sleep disorders affected their emotional state (30.2% of workers) and relationships or social life (22.6%). In conclusion, this study finds that a high percentage of health professionals from PICU suffer from sleep disorders that affect their personal and social life. This negative impact is significantly higher in night shift workers. Many health workers are not aware of their bad sleep quality.

  19. A STUDY ON WORK-LIFE BALANCE OF NURSING STAFF WORKING IN PRIVATE HOSPITALS IN PALAYAMKOTTAI

    OpenAIRE

    G.Suguna; C.Eugine Franco

    2017-01-01

    At present every successful employee has to pass through the dilemma of work life balance in personal and professional life. For the sake of leading a successful life, people do not hesitate to give extra time for achieving the objectives of life. In the process of getting extra mileage in their professional life they have to make a lot of compromise and sometimes mental piece also gets distorted. We have 24 hours at our disposal to deal with and it is up to us how to schedule and plan the sa...

  20. Workshop on PSA for New and Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This workshop was organized by the NEA Working Group on Risk Assessment (WGRISK). The key objective of the workshop was to share the current state-of-the art on the PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) applied for new reactors and advanced reactors. Fifty experts from 13 countries and one international organization (IAEA) participated in the present workshop, and 35 technical papers were presented. The main topics of interest, discussed during the workshop, included the followings: regulatory aspects, risk-informed methods, technical aspects of the PSA for new and advanced reactors, hazards of PSA (internal and external), severe accident/source term/Level 2 PSA, and consequence analysis/Level 3 PSA. Among the technical aspects of the PSA, the assessment of the reliability of passive safety systems appears to be a recurrent issue

  1. Leadership and Presenteeism among Scientific Staff: The Role of Accumulation of Work and Time Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Carolin; Scheel, Tabea

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines the joint roles of leadership and stressors for presenteeism of scientific staff. Leaders may have an impact on employees' health, both directly through interpersonal interactions and by shaping their working conditions. In the field of science, this impact could be special because of the mentoring relationships between the employees (e.g., PhD students) and their supervisors (e.g., professors). Based on the job demands-resources framework (JD-R), we hypothesized that the pressure to be present at the workplace induced by supervisors (supervisorial pressure) is directly related to employees' presenteeism as well as indirectly via perceptions of time pressure. The conservation of resources theory (COR) states that resource loss resulting from having to deal with job demands weakens the resource pool and therefore the capacity to deal with other job demands. Thus, we hypothesized that accumulation of work moderates the relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure, such that the relationship is stronger when accumulation of work is high compared to if accumulation of work is low. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 212 PhD students and postdocs of 30 scientific institutions in Germany. Analysis was performed using the SPSS macro PROCESS (Hayes, 2013). Supervisorial pressure was directly associated with higher presenteeism of employees and indirectly through increased time pressure. Moreover, supervisorial pressure and accumulation of work interacted to predict time pressure, but in an unexpected way. The positive relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure is stronger when accumulation is low compared to if accumulation of work is high. It seems possible that job stressors do not accumulate but substitute each other. Threshold models might explain the findings. Moreover, specific patterns of interacting job demands for scientific staff should be considered in absence management.

  2. Leadership and Presenteeism among Scientific Staff: The Role of Accumulation of Work and Time Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Dietz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines the joint roles of leadership and stressors for presenteeism of scientific staff. Leaders may have an impact on employees' health, both directly through interpersonal interactions and by shaping their working conditions. In the field of science, this impact could be special because of the mentoring relationships between the employees (e.g., PhD students and their supervisors (e.g., professors. Based on the job demands-resources framework (JD-R, we hypothesized that the pressure to be present at the workplace induced by supervisors (supervisorial pressure is directly related to employees' presenteeism as well as indirectly via perceptions of time pressure. The conservation of resources theory (COR states that resource loss resulting from having to deal with job demands weakens the resource pool and therefore the capacity to deal with other job demands. Thus, we hypothesized that accumulation of work moderates the relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure, such that the relationship is stronger when accumulation of work is high compared to if accumulation of work is low. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 212 PhD students and postdocs of 30 scientific institutions in Germany. Analysis was performed using the SPSS macro PROCESS (Hayes, 2013. Supervisorial pressure was directly associated with higher presenteeism of employees and indirectly through increased time pressure. Moreover, supervisorial pressure and accumulation of work interacted to predict time pressure, but in an unexpected way. The positive relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure is stronger when accumulation is low compared to if accumulation of work is high. It seems possible that job stressors do not accumulate but substitute each other. Threshold models might explain the findings. Moreover, specific patterns of interacting job demands for scientific staff should be considered in absence management.

  3. Leadership and Presenteeism among Scientific Staff: The Role of Accumulation of Work and Time Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Carolin; Scheel, Tabea

    2017-01-01

    The present study examines the joint roles of leadership and stressors for presenteeism of scientific staff. Leaders may have an impact on employees' health, both directly through interpersonal interactions and by shaping their working conditions. In the field of science, this impact could be special because of the mentoring relationships between the employees (e.g., PhD students) and their supervisors (e.g., professors). Based on the job demands-resources framework (JD-R), we hypothesized that the pressure to be present at the workplace induced by supervisors (supervisorial pressure) is directly related to employees' presenteeism as well as indirectly via perceptions of time pressure. The conservation of resources theory (COR) states that resource loss resulting from having to deal with job demands weakens the resource pool and therefore the capacity to deal with other job demands. Thus, we hypothesized that accumulation of work moderates the relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure, such that the relationship is stronger when accumulation of work is high compared to if accumulation of work is low. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 212 PhD students and postdocs of 30 scientific institutions in Germany. Analysis was performed using the SPSS macro PROCESS (Hayes, 2013). Supervisorial pressure was directly associated with higher presenteeism of employees and indirectly through increased time pressure. Moreover, supervisorial pressure and accumulation of work interacted to predict time pressure, but in an unexpected way. The positive relationship between supervisorial pressure and time pressure is stronger when accumulation is low compared to if accumulation of work is high. It seems possible that job stressors do not accumulate but substitute each other. Threshold models might explain the findings. Moreover, specific patterns of interacting job demands for scientific staff should be considered in absence management. PMID:29123497

  4. Self-transcendence and work engagement in acute care staff registered nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Beth; Quinn Griffin, Mary T; Reed, Pamela; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2010-01-01

    The ability of human beings to find meaning by being directed toward something, or someone, other than themselves is termed "self-transcendence." Previous research indicated that the ability of nurses to self-transcend and thus derive positive meaning from patient-caring experiences increased work commitment and fostered work engagement. However, the relationship between self-transcendence and work engagement had not been investigated. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels and relationships of self-transcendence and work engagement in acute care staff registered nurses (ACSRNs). This was a descriptive correlational study using Reed's theory of self-transcendence. The Self-transcendence Scale, the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale, and a demographic questionnaire were completed by a convenience sample of 84 ACSRNs who attended an annual acute care nursing conference in northern Illinois. ACSRNs level of self-transcendence was high, similar to that of other nurses, but higher than that of nonnurses. ACSRNs level of work engagement was at the high end of the "average" range. There was a significant positive correlation between self-transcendence and work engagement. Nurses with higher levels of self-transcendence had more energy toward and were more dedicated and absorbed in their work.

  5. Seismic Level 2 PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dirksen, Gerben; Pellissetti, Manuel; Duncan-Whiteman, Paul

    2014-01-01

    For most external events, the calculation of the core damage frequency (CDF) in Level 1 PSA is sufficient to be able to show that the contribution of the event to the plant risk is negligible. However, it is not sufficient to compare the CDF due to the external event to the total plant CDF; instead the Level 1 PSA result for the event should be compared to the large early release frequency (LERF), or alternatively arguments should be given why the CDF from the external event will not contribute mostly to LERF. For seismic events in particular, it can often not be easily excluded that sequences leading to core damage would not also result in LERF. Since the confinement function is one of the most essential functions for Level 2 PSA, special care must be taken of the containment penetrations. For example systems with containment penetrations that are normally closed during operation or are designed to withstand more than the maximum containment pressure are normally screened out in the Level 2 PSA for the containment isolation function, however the possibility of LOCA in such systems due to an earthquake may nevertheless lead to containment bypass. Additionally, the functionality of passive features may be compromised in case of a beyond design earthquake. In the present paper, we present crucial ingredients of a methodology for a Level 2 seismic PSA. This methodology consists of the following steps: Extension of the seismic equipment list (SEL) to include Level 2 PSA relevant systems (e.g. containment isolation system, features for core melt stabilization, hydrogen mitigation systems), Determination of the systems within the existing SEL with increased demands in case of severe accidents, Determination of essential components for which a dedicated fragility analysis needs to be performed. (author)

  6. Psychosocial work environment and burnout among emergency medical and nursing staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escribà-Agüir, V; Martín-Baena, D; Pérez-Hoyos, S

    2006-11-01

    The prevalence of burnout syndrome is increasing among doctors and nurses. The aim of this study was to analyse the relationship between the psychosocial work environment and burnout syndrome among emergency medical and nursing staff in Spain. A secondary aim was to determine if the effect of this psychosocial work environment on burnout was different for doctors and nurses. A cross-sectional survey was carried out by means of a mail questionnaire among 945 emergency doctors and nursing staff of Spain. The outcome variable was three dimensions of burnout syndrome [emotional exhaustion (EE), personal accomplishment (PA), depersonalisation (DP)]. The explanatory variable was that psychosocial work environment evaluated according to Karasek and Johnson's demand-control model. The adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals were calculated by logistical regression. The probability of high EE was greater among those exposed to high psychological demands, OR 4.66 (2.75-7.90), low job control, OR 1.65 (1.04-2.63), and low supervisors' social support, OR 1.64 (1.01-2.59). Emotional exhaustion dimension was negatively influenced by low control only among doctors. Those exposed to low job control had a higher risk of low PA, OR 2.55 (1.66-3.94). There was no evidence of negative effect of psychosocial risk factors on the DP. Prevalence of EE and PA was higher among doctors and nurses. The presence of risk factors derived from work organisation within the work place (psychosocial risk factors) increases the probability of presenting burnout syndrome and, above all, EE.

  7. Factors associated with the self-perceived ability of nursing staff to remain working until retirement: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-09-02

    It is important to learn how employers in European countries can prevent nursing staff from changing occupation or taking early retirement in order to counteract expected nursing shortages. However, to date research on nursing staff's ability to remain working until retirement age has been limited. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the associations between different job and organisational characteristics, job satisfaction, occupational commitment and the self-perceived ability to continue working in the current line of work until the official retirement age. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study included 730 nursing staff members employed in Dutch hospitals, nursing homes, organisations for psychiatric care, homes for the elderly, care organisations for disabled people and home care organisations (mean age: 48; 89% female). Linear and logistic regression analyses and mediation analyses were applied to test hypothesised associations. Reducing work pressure and increasing appreciation by senior management in particular have positive consequences for nursing staff's self-perceived ability to continue working until the official retirement age. The job and organisational characteristics of autonomy, work pressure, supportive leadership, educational opportunities, communication within the organisation and appreciation of nursing staff by senior management together have substantial impact on nursing staff's job satisfaction. Job satisfaction in turn is related to the self-perceived ability to continue working until the retirement age. However, job satisfaction mainly summarises the joint effect of job and organisational characteristics and has no supplementary effect on the self-perceived ability to continue working. Employers should primarily focus on work pressure and the appreciation of nursing staff by senior management in order to retain nursing staff even as they get older.

  8. Early detection of prostate cancer in Syria using T.PSA and F.PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adel, M.; Abu Daher, D.

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the current study is performing an initial prostate cancer screening test using PSA and F PSA tumour markers. A total of 3000 men in 40-75 years of age were participated in this study. Demographic and clinical data for subjects were collected by the programme staff. Total PSA and free PSA assays were determined using the ImunoTech total and free PSA assay kits, based on IRMA technique (kindly provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency). Criteria for participating in this study included : 1) men of age 50-75 (men of age as low as 40 were included in case of positive family history). 2) No previous history of prostate cancer. The following parameters were followed to refer the suspicious cases to a specialized hospital specific tests: 1)PSA>3 ng/ml . 2)High PSA value according to the participant age group. 3) Low F/TPSA ratio. In the hospital the following tests were performed:1) Complete clinical exam including DRE.2)TRUS in some cases.3) Biopsy for highly suspicious cases. 4)The low suspicious cases were retested in six months. Out of 338 cases referred to a specialized hospital, 264 cases were shown prostatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH),while 36 cases proved to be prostatic cancer. However, the contact was lost in 36 cases because of changing the phone number or travelling outside the country . The detection rate of prostate cancer among all participating cases in this study was 1.2%, while this ratio was 10.7% among the referred cases. F/TPSA ratio has shown a good ability to discriminate between prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. (author)

  9. UV/EB curable psa's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glotfelter, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The author describe both water-based and 100% solids UV/EB curable PSA's (Pressure Sensitive Adhesives) and their properties. A new acrylate monomer, ethoxylated nonyl phenol acrylate, has great utility in the formulation of water-based PSA's

  10. Job satisfaction among hospital staff working in a Government teaching hospital of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Jaiswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In a resource-limited and high burden disease setting, satisfied human resource is an asset in terms of high productivity, efficiency and quality care. Aim: To assess job satisfaction among permanent employees working in a government hospital. Materials and Methods: A sample of 200 staff members was interviewed using 34-item, Likert response based, modified job satisfaction scale. Key factors for job satisfaction were identified after subjecting data to principal component analysis, varimax rotation and multivariate analysis using step-wise regression procedure. Results: The mean job satisfaction index was computed to be in a similar range, but was found to be highest for nurses (0.68, followed by doctors (0.66, support staff (0.63 and technicians (0.62. Nine uncorrelated and critical factors related to job satisfaction that explained 68.09% of the variability was identified, that is, communication, pay/salary, working conditions, organization supervision system, co-workers, workload, benefits, career aspects and rewards. A positive association was reported between job satisfaction score and factor scores (units of communication (0.133, benefits (0.110, working condition (0.027 and co-workers (0.032 and a negative relation with organizational supervision system (0.118, workload (0.093, rewards (0.035, pay/salary (0.034 and career prospects (0.017 respectively for all categories of respondents. However in case of doctors, co-workers (0.023 units showed a negative relation. Conclusion: There is scope for interventions to enhance job satisfaction and concomitant continuous monitoring can be useful in determining various service aspects that necessitate improvement. By enhancing job satisfaction, hospital administrator can improve not only the mental, psychological and social well-being of work-force, but also the financial health of an organization.

  11. Morale, stress and coping strategies of staff working in the emergency department: A comparison of two different-sized departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Louisa J; Thom, Ogilvie; Greenslade, Jaimi H; Wallis, Marianne; Johnston, Amy Nb; Carlström, Eric; Mills, Donna; Crilly, Julia

    2018-06-01

    Clinical staff in EDs are subject to a range of stressors. The objective of this study was to describe and compare clinical staff perceptions of their ED's working environment across two different Australian EDs. This was a cross-sectional, descriptive, research design that included distribution of three survey tools to clinical staff in two Australian EDs in 2016. Descriptive statistics were reported to characterise workplace stressors, coping styles and the ED environment. These data were compared by hospital and the employee's clinical role (nurse or physician). In total, 146 ED nurses and doctors completed the survey (response rate: 67%). Despite geographical variation, the staff at the two locations had similar demographic profiles in terms of age, sex and years of experience. Staff reported moderate levels of workload and self-realisation but low levels of conflict or nervousness in the workplace. Nurses and physicians reported similar perceptions of the work environment, although nurses reported slightly higher median levels of workload. Staff rated the death or sexual abuse of a child as most stressful, followed by workplace violence and heavy workload. Staff used a large range of coping strategies, and these were similar across both sites. These findings are the first multi-site and multidisciplinary examinations of Australian ED staff perceptions, improving our understanding of staff stressors and coping strategies and highlighting similarities across different EDs. These data support the development and implementation of strategies to improve ED working environments to help ensure professional longevity of ED staff. © 2018 The Authors. Emergency Medicine Australasia published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  12. Binge Drinking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This PSA is based on the October, 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates that drinking too much, including binge drinking, causes more than 79,000 deaths in the U.S. each year and is the third leading preventable cause of death.

  13. Introduction to PSA applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, M.G.K.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this presentation is to show how the PSA can be used to determine the risk impact of the various deterministic processes for plant design or operational changes, and the evaluation of off normal events that occurred at the plant. The presentation is divided into the following topics: Identification of issues; Tasks/element identification; Modelling changes; Data changes. 6 figs

  14. Guideline level-3 PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelofsen, P.M.; Van der Steen, J.

    1993-09-01

    For several applications of radioactive materials calculations must be executed to determine the radiation risk for the population. A guideline for the risk calculation method of two main sources: nuclear power plants, and other intended and unintended activities with radioactive materials, is given. The standards, recommendations and regulations in this report concern mainly the analysis of the radiological (external) consequences of nuclear power plant accidents, classified as level-3 PSA (Probabilistic Safety Analysis). Level-3 PSA falls within the scales 5-7 of the International Nuclear Event Scale (INES). The standards, etc., focus on the risks for groups of people and the so-called maximum individual risk. In chapter two the standards and regulations are formulated for each part of level-3 PSA: the source term spectrum, atmospheric distribution and deposition, exposure to radiation doses and calculation of radiation doses, dose-response relationships, measures to reduce the effect of radiation doses, design basis accidents, and finally uncertainty analysis. In chapter four, modelled descriptions are given of the standards and regulations, which could or should be used in a calculation program in case of level-3 PSA. In chapter three the practical execution of a probabilistic consequences analysis, the collection of input data and the presentation of the results are dealt with. 2 figs., 14 tabs., 64 refs

  15. Babesiosis PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-04-25

    This 60 second PSA describes babesiosis, a preventable and treatable tickborne disease, including the signs and symptoms of infection and ways to prevent it.  Created: 4/25/2012 by Center for Global Health, Division of Parasitic Diseases and Malaria.   Date Released: 4/26/2012.

  16. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvesson, Hanna; Wann-Hansson, Christine; Eklund, Mona

    2011-06-16

    The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  17. The ward atmosphere important for the psychosocial work environment of nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wann-Hansson Christine

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The nursing staff working in psychiatric care have a demanding work situation, which may be reflected in how they view their psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The aims of the present study were to investigate in what way different aspects of the ward atmosphere were related to the psychosocial work environment, as perceived by nursing staff working in psychiatric in-patient care, and possible differences between nurses and nurse assistants. Methods 93 nursing staff working at 12 general psychiatric in-patient wards in Sweden completed two questionnaires, the Ward Atmosphere Scale and the QPSNordic 34+. Data analyses included descriptive statistics, the Mann-Whitney U-test, Spearman rank correlations and forward stepwise conditional logistic regression analyses. Results The data revealed that there were no differences between nurses and nurse assistants concerning perceptions of the psychosocial work environment and the ward atmosphere. The ward atmosphere subscales Personal Problem Orientation and Program Clarity were associated with a psychosocial work environment characterized by Empowering Leadership. Program Clarity was related to the staff's perceived Role Clarity, and Practical Orientation and Order and Organization were positively related to staff perceptions of the Organizational Climate. Conclusions The results from the present study indicate that several ward atmosphere subscales were related to the nursing staff's perceptions of the psychosocial work environment in terms of Empowering Leadership, Role Clarity and Organizational Climate. Improvements in the ward atmosphere could be another way to accomplish improvements in the working conditions of the staff, and such improvements would affect nurses and nurse assistants in similar ways.

  18. Self-rostering can improve work-life balance and staff retention in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Renee; Holme, Annie

    2018-03-08

    Renee Barrett, Staff Nurse, ITU, Great Ormond Street Hospital NHS Trust, renee.barrett@gosh.nhs.uk , and Annie Holme, Lecturer, King's College London, look at how e-rostering can benefit health organisations and staff.

  19. A Survey of Violence Against Staff Working in the Emergency Department in Ankara, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melek Serpil Talas, RN, PhD

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on results of the study, it is suggested that every hospital institute reliable reporting procedures that staff members feel comfortable using, and also provide a comprehensive program of support services for staff that has been assaulted.

  20. Cytogenetic indices in blood lymphocytes of individuals from the staff working on new confinement constructing in Chornobyl NPP zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezdrobna, L.K.; Tarasenko, L.V.; Tsiganok, T.V.; Mel'nik, T.V.; Nosach, Yu.O.; Sushko, V.O.; Nechajev, S.Yu.; Shvajko, L.Yi.

    2014-01-01

    In contracting staff mean group frequency of aberrant lymphocytes, chromosome (dicentrics, acentrics, abnormal monocentrics) and chromatide type aberrations is significantly higher than such frequency in the comparison group. Three staff persons had individual frequency of specific markers of exposure - dicentric chromosomes with accompanying fragments significantly higher than their mean population level and the average frequency in the comparison group. It indicates the probability of their excess radiation when working in Chornobyl NPP local zone. Cells with two chromosome exchanges and one multiaberrant cell were registered in staff with the absence of such in control persons. The calculated estimated radiation doses of two staff persons were 87-123 mGy and and one person 210-240 mGy of acute exposure respectively. Calculated by frequency of dicentric chromosomes tentative 'biological' doses of three staff persons show a more significant radiation effect comparing to the data of physical dosimetry

  1. PSA in America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, M.A.; Cunningham, M.A.; Johnson, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    Although the concept of acceptable risk has always been the foundation of the nuclear industry design, the use of formal PSA (or PRA-probabilistic risk assessment) in the U.S. nuclear power industry has followed an unusual path in arriving at its current level of notability. Prior to 1975, probabilistic evaluations were limited to a few specific applications such as the evaluation of man-made (i.e., airplane crashes) and natural (i.e., earthquakes) hazards. In 1975, the industry was introduced to comprehensive PSA by the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). However, the study languished in relative obscurity until the accident at Three Mile Island 2 (TMI-2) in 1979. This event significantly altered the industry's view of severe accidents in the U.S. and worldwide. Investigative committees of TMI-2 recommended that PSA techniques be more widely used to augment the traditional deterministic methods of determining nuclear plant safety. This initiated an unprecedented effort by nuclear regulators and licensees worldwide to significantly improve the state of knowledge of severe accidents at nuclear power plants. In the U.S., use of PSA began to increase as evidenced by its application in the anticipated transient without scram and station blackout rulemakings, generic issue prioritization and resolution, risk-based inspection guidelines, backfit policy, and technical specification improvements. However, broad application of probabilistic techniques to the industry as a whole was initiated in 1986 with the publication of Safety Goals for the Operation of Nuclear Power Plant; Policy Statement. This put PSA front and center in the U.S. regulatory arena by open-quotes establish[ing] goals that broadly define an acceptable level of radiological risk that might be imposed on the public as a result of nuclear power plant operation.close quotes Both qualitative safety goals and quantitative objectives were articulated in this policy statement

  2. Experiences of mental health nursing staff working with voice hearers in an acute setting: An interpretive phenomenological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, E; Gupta, A; Collins, S C

    2018-04-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Community mental health staff and their service users have reported mixed views on the importance of talking about the content of voices. Community staff have reported feeling that they do not have the skills to explore voice content and worry about making things worse. Voice hearers experiencing extreme distress due to the content of their voices can access support through acute inpatient mental health services. No previous studies have focused on the experiences of staff who nurse voice hearers at a time of acute distress. WHAT DOES THIS STUDY ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: MHNs and HSWs working with voice hearers in acute distress report feeling powerless and helpless, as they feel that they cannot lessen the distress experienced by the voice hearer. Despite these difficult feelings, staff report finding ways of coping, including using structured tools to help make sense of their service users' voice-hearing experiences and accessing reflective practice forums. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Due to the current context of increased acuity and limited resources in acute services, there may be a need to further protect time for staff to access reflective practice groups and supervision forums to help them manage the difficult feelings arising from their work with voice hearers. Introduction Mental health nursing (MHN) staff in acute settings work with voice hearers at times of crises when they experience high levels of distress. Previous research has focused on community mental health staff's experiences and their service users views on exploring the content of voices. No studies have explored this from an acute mental health service perspective. Aim This study therefore sought to explore the experiences of staff working with voice hearers in an acute mental health service. Method Due to the exploratory nature of the research, a qualitative design was chosen. Three MHNs and five healthcare support workers (HSWs) were

  3. A methodology for PSA model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unwin, S.D.

    1995-09-01

    This document reports Phase 2 of work undertaken by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) in support of the Atomic Energy Control Board's Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) review. A methodology is presented for the systematic review and evaluation of a PSA model. These methods are intended to support consideration of the following question: To within the scope and depth of modeling resolution of a PSA study, is the resultant model a complete and accurate representation of the subject plant? This question was identified as a key PSA validation issue in SAIC's Phase 1 project. The validation methods are based on a model transformation process devised to enhance the transparency of the modeling assumptions. Through conversion to a 'success-oriented' framework, a closer correspondence to plant design and operational specifications is achieved. This can both enhance the scrutability of the model by plant personnel, and provide an alternative perspective on the model that may assist in the identification of deficiencies. The model transformation process is defined and applied to fault trees documented in the Darlington Probabilistic Safety Evaluation. A tentative real-time process is outlined for implementation and documentation of a PSA review based on the proposed methods. (author). 11 refs., 9 tabs., 30 refs

  4. Perceptions of Undergraduate University Students about Working Conditions of Women Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice YALÇIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Women constitute nearly 41%of academic staff in our country. Among all academic staff, the ratio of female academicians is increasing as it is approached to rural areas from suburbs. This study aims to reveal the perceptions of undergraduate education students about female academicians’ working life conditions. Considering available time and facilities, the universe of research was limited within a university; as it was primarily intended to reveal students’ individual perceptions on the conditions of women academics, the students’ being at the undergraduate level was at the fore front of study rather than the academic departments of the university. The survey data form were applied to 157 female and 104 male undergraduate students (N = 261 studying at faculties and schools of the university where the survey was applied excluding freshmen classes.. Descriptive tests were used to evaluate the data. The findings were evaluated by x ² test, which were formerly tested according to the desires of students on what to get on their education and whether they were willing to be academicians. 54%of female students involved in the research stated that they were “partially” satisfied with the female academics. While 74,3%of the students agreed on the question “Should women work as academicians?”, only 2.2%percent stated that women should not work as academicians. 47,8%consider that there is a partial discrimination between the male and female members of academic life. 47,1%mentioned that working as an academician was a barrier to being a good mother or a good wife and 69,7%stated that working as a female academician was a tough work. 23,7%of the students think that being an academician is mostly beneficial in terms of personal development for a woman. 79,6%stated that the biggest challenge for female academics is to sustain the academic studies as well as being a mother and a wife. The best advantage of being female academician was revealed

  5. Management and organisational factors in PSA; Organisations- und Management-Faktoren in der PSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balfanz, H.P. [TUEV Nord e.V., Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-04-01

    The constraints of PSA are increasingly considered with increasing application of PSA for the safety management of nuclear power plants (see US-NRC, 'Risk Informed Regulation', NRC-1). There is a vivid international discourse about the applicability of the variables of plant management and organisation in PSAs, which has lead to a great variety of research activities into this matter (see PSAM 4). This paper here summarizes the current state of progress of research work and discusses the applicability of results. The studies for comparative assessment of methodology and results were performed by the TUeV Nord under the roof of the BMU/BfS-sponsored project SR 2260, ''Further development of probabilistic methods for nuclear power plant safety assessment. (orig./CB) [German] Mit zunehmender Anwendung der PSA (Probabilistische Sicherheitsanalyse) im Sicherheitsmanagement von KKW (vergl. US-NRC, Einfuehrung des Konzepts 'Risk Informed Regulation' NRC-1) gewinnt die Beachtung der Grenzen der PSA zusaetzliche Bedeutung. International ist eine intensive Diskussion ueber die Moeglichkeiten einer Einbindung der Einflussgroesse von Organisation und Management in der PSA zu verzeichnen und wird belegt durch vielfaeltige Forschungs- und Entwicklungsarbeiten (vergl. PSAM 4). Dieser Beitrag setzt sich in erster Linie mit diesem Entwicklungsstand auseinander und diskutiert seinen Anwendungsstand fuer die PSA. Die hierzu vom TUeV Nord durchgefuehrten Arbeiten basieren auf dem BMU/BfS-Vorhaben SR 2260, 'Weiterentwicklung probabilistischer Methoden zur Sicherheitsbeurteilung von KKW'. (orig.)

  6. NPP Krsko Living PSA Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrbanic, I.; Spiler, J.

    2000-01-01

    NPP Krsko developed PSA model of internal and external initiators within the frame of the Individual Plant Examination (IPE) project. Within this project PSA model was used to examine the existing plant design features. In order to continue with use of this PSA model upon the completion of IPE in various risk-informed applications in support of plant operation and evaluations of design changes, an appropriate living PSA concept needed to be defined. The Living PSA concept is in NPP Krsko considered as being a set of activities pursued in order to update existing PSA model in a manner that it appropriately represents the plant design, operation practice and history. Only a PSA model which is being updated in this manner can serve as a platform for plant-specific risk informed applications. The NPP Krsko living PSA concept is based on the following major ponts. First, the baseline PSA model is defined, which is to be maintained and updated and which is to be reference point for any risk-informed application. Second, issues having a potential for impact on baseline PSA model are identified and procedure and responsibilities for their permanent monitoring and evaluation are established. Third, manner is defined in which consequential changes to baseline PSA model are implemented and controlled, together with associated responsibilities. Finally, the process is defined by which the existing version of baseline PSA model is superseded by a new one. Each time a new version of baseline PSA model is released, it would be re-quantified and the results evaluated and interpreted. By documenting these re-quantifications and evaluations of results in a sequence, the track is being kept of changes in long-term averaged risk perspective, represented by long-term averaged frequencies of core damage and pre-defined release categories. These major topics of NPP Krsko living PSA concept are presented and discussed in the paper. (author)

  7. Functional capacity associated with work ability in older university staff employed by the state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juleimar Soares Coelho de Amorim

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The increase in numbers of older adults in the workplace and in the number of years they spend in work prior to retiring has challenged health professionals to provide enable health conditions such that they may undertake occupational activity. Objective: To analyze the variables for functional ability, associated with work ability, in older adults who were government employees at a university. Methods: A cross-sectional design, with older workers aged 60 years old or over, located in different university centers and departments. A structured sociodemographic questionnaire was used to characterize the sample, and the Work Ability Index was used as an outcome variable for the associations, using the Timed Up and Go test, the handgrip strength test, the walking speed test and the chair sit to stand test. The Chi-squared test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used in the statistical analysis. The association of the factors of functional capacity was based on the odds ratio and 95% confidence interval, calculated using the Logistic Regression Model, as part of the SPSS statistical package for Windows. Results: A total of 258 staff participated in the investigation, with men (57.7% and a lower age range (60 to 62 years old predominating. Women differed in relation to falls after the age of 60 (p = 0.007 and in the last 12 months (p = 0.017. The mean Work Ability Index was 39.70 ± 5.64 points and a statistical association was ascertained between performance in the chair sit to stand test (OR = 2.26; p = 0.043. Muscle strength (r = 0.72; p < 0.000 and the chair sit to stand test (r = 0.73; p < 0.000 showed excellent correlation with work ability. Conclusion: The variables for functional capacity were associated with work ability.

  8. Communication Can Save Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement (PSA) is based on the August 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotic-resistant germs cause at least 23,000 deaths each year. Learn how public health authorities and health care facilities can work together to save lives.

  9. Level 2 PSA methodology and severe accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the work was to review current Level 2-PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) methodologies and practices and to investigate how Level 2-PSA can support severe accident management programmes, i.e. the development, implementation, training and optimisation of accident management strategies and measures. For the most part, the presented material reflects the state in 1996. Current Level 2 PSA results and methodologies are reviewed and evaluated with respect to plant type specific and generic insights. Approaches and practices for using PSA results in the regulatory context and for supporting severe accident management programmes by input from level 2 PSAs are examined. The work is based on information contained in: PSA procedure guides, PSA review guides and regulatory guides for the use of PSA results in risk informed decision making; plant specific PSAs and PSA related literature exemplifying specific procedures, methods, analytical models, relevant input data and important results, use of computer codes and results of code calculations. The PSAs are evaluated with respect to results and insights. In the conclusion section, the present state of risk informed decision making, in particular in the level 2 domain, is described and substantiated by relevant examples

  10. Whooping Cough PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-22

    This 30 second PSA encourages pregnant women to get the whooping cough vaccine, called Tdap, during the third trimester of each pregnancy in order to pass antibodies to their babies so they are born with protection against this serious disease.  Created: 1/22/2015 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Bacterial Diseases (DBD), Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Diseases Branch (MVPDB).   Date Released: 1/22/2015.

  11. Binge Drinking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-05

    This PSA is based on the October, 2010 CDC Vital Signs report which indicates that drinking too much, including binge drinking, causes more than 79,000 deaths in the U.S. each year and is the third leading preventable cause of death.  Created: 10/5/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/5/2010.

  12. PSA kinetics after prostate brachytherapy: PSA bounce phenomenon and its implications for PSA doubling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciezki, Jay P.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Garcia, Jorge; Angermeier, Kenneth; Ulchaker, James; Mahadevan, Arul; Chehade, Nabil; Altman, Andrew; Klein, Eric A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics in patients treated with prostate brachytherapy (PI) with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up. Methods and Materials: The records of 162 patients treated with PI for localized prostate cancer with a minimum of 5 years of PSA follow-up were reviewed. A variety of pretreatment and posttreatment variables were examined. Patients were coded as having a PSA bounce if their PSA achieved a nadir, elevated at least 0.2 ng/mL greater than that nadir, and decreased to, or below, the initial nadir. Two definitions of biochemical failure (bF) or biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) were used: the classic American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus definition of three consecutive rises (bF3) and the nadir plus 2 ng/mL definition (bFn+2). Associations between a PSA bounce and the various pre- and posttreatment factors were assessed with logistic regression analysis, and the association between a PSA bounce and bF was examined with the log-rank test. The Mann-Whitney U test was applied to test for differences in the PSA doubling time (PSADT) and the time to a PSA rise between the PSA bounce patients and the bF patients. PSADT was calculated from the nadir to the time of the first PSA rise, because this point is known first in the clinical setting. Results: The 5-year overall bRFS rate was 87% for the bF3 definition and 96% for the bFn+2 definition. A PSA bounce was experienced by 75 patients (46.3%). Patients who experienced a PSA bounce were less likely to have a bF, regardless of the bRFS definition used (bF3: p = 0.0015; bFn+2: p = 0.0040). Among the pre- and posttreatment factors, only younger age predicted for a PSA bounce on multivariate analysis (p = 0.0018). The use of androgen deprivation had no effect on PSA bounce. No difference was found in the PSADT between patients who had a PSA bounce and those with bF. The median PSADT for those with a PSA bounce was 8.3 months vs. 10.3 months

  13. Optimization of working conditions of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments. Optimizatsiya uslovij truda meditsinskogo personala radiodiagnosticheskikh otdelenij

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovsyannikov, A S [Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Gigieny Truda i Professional' nykh Zabolevanij

    1989-01-01

    The study was undertaken to analyze the characteristics of the work of medical staff of isotopic diagnostic departments during use of {sup 99m}Tc isotope generators. The data on the functional load of physicians and paramedical staff were given along with the description of radiation doses and dose rates at various stages of work. The measures on optimization of labour conditions by means of the appropriate department's design, improvement of the regime of nurses' work and adequate allocation and utilization of medical equipment were developed.

  14. Magazine Editors and the Writing Process: An Analysis of How Editors Work with Staff and Free-Lance Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schierhorn, Ann B.; Endres, Kathleen L.

    Editors of business and consumer magazines chosen by a random sample were asked in a mail survey what method they used in working with staff writers and free-lance writers. They were asked how they work with writers in the five stages of the writing process--idea, reporting, organizing, writing and rewriting. The first mailing to consumer…

  15. Work-related assaults on nursing staff in riyadh, saudi arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Ashry G

    2002-09-01

    To determine the extent of work-related violence against nurses in hospitals in Riyadh. Through a cross sectional approach, a self administered questionnaire was offered to 500 active-duty nurses selected randomly. In addition to the demographic characteristics, the questionnaire inquired about exposure to workplace violence, hospital and department of employment at the time of exposure, characteristics of the assailant and nurses' perception of the causes of violence. Out of 434 respondents, 93 (21.4%) were males, and 341 (78.6%) females. The mean age was 36.1 ± 7.97 years. Workplace violence was experienced by 235 (54.3%) nurses. Of these 93.2% were exposed to harsh insulting language, 32.8% to verbal threat, 28.1% to attempts of physical assault, 17.4% to sexual harassment and 16.2% to actual physical assault. Nurses working in psychiatry and emergency units had the highest rate of exposure to violence (84.3% & 62.1% respectively) Nurses perceived shortage in security personnel (82%), shortage in nursing staff (63%), language barrier (36.3%) and unrestricted movement of patients in hospitals (21.5%) as causes of their exposure to violence. improve security in hospitals by increasing the number of security officers on duty and increase the community's awareness of the problem.

  16. Job demand-control and job stress at work: A cross-sectional study among prison staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Jafar; Akbari, Rouhollah; Shakerian, Mahnaz; Mahaki, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Job stress can impose significant costs to the workplaces and organizations due to some issues such as absenteeism, less productivity, and medical costs. Job overload and lack of decision latitude can lead to job stress. The current study aimed to investigate the job demands and control as predictor of job stress and its relationship, with some of the demographic characteristics of Iranian prison staff. Materials and Methods: This study was performed on 171 male employees working in four prisons located in Ilam, Iran. The sampling method was census and all four prisons’ staff were selected to respond the Job Content Questionnaires. Finally, the data were analyzed using t-test or independent samples test as well as SPSS 20. Results: The highest amount of job demand (mean = 21.28) and the lowest amount of job control on average (9.76) were reported by those staff working in Darehshahr prison. There was also a significant relationship between job post and job control among the prison staff (β = −0.375, P = 0.001). Conclusion: The level of job stress reported by prison staff was high in this study mainly caused by high job demand and low job control, especially in Darehshahr prison staff. PMID:28546980

  17. Quality of the current low power and shutdown PSA practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Seung Cheol; Park, Jin Hee; Lim, Ho Gon; Kim, Tae Woon

    2004-01-01

    A probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for the low-power and shutdown (LPSD) modes in a Korea standard nuclear power plant (KSNP) has been performed for the purpose of estimating the LPSD risk and identifying the vulnerabilities of LPSD operations. Both the operational experience and PSA results indicate that the risks from LPSD operations could be comparable with those from power operations. However, the application of the LPSD risk insights to risk-informed decision making has been slow to be adopted in practice. It is largely due to the question of whether the current LPSD PSA practice is appropriate for application to risk-informed decision making or not. Such a question has to do with the quality of the current LPSD PSA practice. In this paper, we have performed self-assessment of the KSNP LPSD PSA quality based on the ANS Standard (draft as of 13 Sep. 2002). The aims of the work are to find the LPSD PSA technical areas insufficient for application to risk-informed decision making and to efficiently allocate the limited research resources to improve the LPSD PSA model quality. Many useful findings regarding the current LPSD PSA quality are presented in this paper

  18. PSA results and trends for Spain's NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carretero, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Spain regulatory authority CSN demanded performance of PSA for all Spain nuclear power plants. The specific data analysis carried out as a part of the PSA has contributed to the realistic view on the results which could be achieved by the PSA. The main characteristics of the PSA in Spain and PSA trends in the development are presented in the paper

  19. Implementation guidelines for seismic PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coman, Ovidiu; Samaddar, Sujit; Hibino, Kenta; )

    2014-01-01

    The presentation was devoted to development of guidelines for implementation of a seismic PSA. If successful, these guidelines can close an important gap. ASME/ANS PRA standards and the related IAEA Safety Guide (IAEA NS-G-2.13) describe capability requirements for seismic PSA in order to support risk-informed applications. However, practical guidance on how to meet these requirements is limited. Such guidelines could significantly contribute to improving risk-informed safety demonstration, safety management and decision making. Extensions of this effort to further PSA areas, particularly to PSA for other external hazards, can enhance risk-informed applications

  20. Pedagogical Staff in Children's Day Care Centres in Germany--Links between Working Conditions, Job Satisfaction, Commitment and Work-Related Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreyer, Inge; Krause, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates links between staff working conditions in children's day care centres ("Kindertageseinrichtungen"--known as "Kitas" in Germany), job satisfaction, commitment and perceived stress at work. Data are based on the nationwide, representative questionnaire survey AQUA ("Arbeitsplatz und Qualität in…

  1. Evaluation of an educational "toolbox" for improving nursing staff competence and psychosocial work environment in elderly care: results of a prospective, non-randomized controlled intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, J E; Hasson, H

    2007-07-01

    Lack of professional development opportunities among nursing staff is a major concern in elderly care and has been associated with work dissatisfaction and staff turnover. There is a lack of prospective, controlled studies evaluating the effects of educational interventions on nursing competence and work satisfaction. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible effects of an educational "toolbox" intervention on nursing staff ratings of their competence, psychosocial work environment and overall work satisfaction. The study was a prospective, non-randomized, controlled intervention. Nursing staff in two municipal elderly care organizations in western Sweden. In an initial questionnaire survey, nursing staff in the intervention municipality described several areas in which they felt a need for competence development. Measurement instruments and educational materials for improving staff knowledge and work practices were then collated by researchers and managers in a "toolbox." Nursing staff ratings of their competence and work were measured pre and post-intervention by questionnaire. Staff ratings in the intervention municipality were compared to staff ratings in the reference municipality, where no toolbox was introduced. Nursing staff ratings of their competence and psychosocial work environment, including overall work satisfaction, improved significantly over time in the intervention municipality, compared to the reference group. Both competence and work environment ratings were largely unchanged among reference municipality staff. Multivariate analysis revealed a significant interaction effect between municipalities over time for nursing staff ratings of participation, leadership, performance feedback and skills' development. Staff ratings for these four scales improved significantly in the intervention municipality as compared to the reference municipality. Compared to a reference municipality, nursing staff ratings of their competence and the

  2. PSA Update Procedures, an Ultimate Need for Living PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegedus, D.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear facilities by their complex nature, change with time. These changes can be both physical (plant modification, etc.), operational (enhanced procedures, etc.) and organizational. In addition, there are also changes in our understanding of the plant, due to operational experience, data collection, technology enhancements, etc. Therefore, it is imperative that PSA model must be frequently up-dated or modified to reflect these changes. Over the last ten years. these has been a remarkable growth of the use of Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs). The most rapidly growing area of the PSA Applications is their use to support operational decision-making. Many of these applications are characterized by the potential for not only improving the safety level but also for providing guidance on the optimal use of resources and reducing regulatory burden. To enable a wider use of the PSA model as a tool for safety activities it is essential to maintain the model in a controlled state. Moreover, to fulfill requirements for L iving PSA , the PSA model has to be constantly updated and/or monitored to reflect the current plant configuration. It should be noted that the PSA model should not only represent the plant design but should also represent the operational and emergency procedures. To keep the PSA model up-to-date several issues should be clearly defined including: - Responsibility should be divided among the PSA group, - Procedures for implementing changes should be established, and - QA requirements/program should be established to assure documentation and reporting. (author)

  3. Staff Nurse Perceptions of Open-Pod and Single Family Room NICU Designs on Work Environment and Patient Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winner-Stoltz, Regina; Lengerich, Alexander; Hench, Anna Jeanine; OʼMalley, Janet; Kjelland, Kimberly; Teal, Melissa

    2018-06-01

    Neonatal intensive care units have historically been constructed as open units or multiple-bed bays, but since the 1990s, the trend has been toward single family room (SFR) units. The SFR design has been found to promote family-centered care and to improve patient outcomes and safety. The impact of the SFR design NICU on staff, however, has been mixed. The purposes of this study were to compare staff nurse perceptions of their work environments in an open-pod versus an SFR NICU and to compare staff nurse perceptions of the impact of 2 NICU designs on the care they provide for patients/families. A prospective cohort study was conducted. Questionnaires were completed at 6 months premove and again at 3, 9, and 15 months postmove. A series of 1-way analyses of variance were conducted to compare each group in each of the 8 domains. Open-ended questions were evaluated using thematic analysis. The SFR design is favorable in relation to environmental quality and control of primary workspace, privacy and interruption, unit features supporting individual work, and unit features supporting teamwork; the open-pod design is preferable in relation to walking. Incorporating design features that decrease staff isolation and walking and ensuring both patient and staff safety and security are important considerations. Further study is needed on unit design at a microlevel including headwall design and human milk mixing areas, as well as on workflow processes.

  4. New Work Demands in Higher Education. A Study of the Relationship between Excessive Workload, Coping Strategies and Subsequent Health among Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melin, Marika; Astvik, Wanja; Bernhard-Oettel, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the work conditions in higher education work settings, the academic staff's strategies for handling excessive workload and impact on well-being and work-life balance. The results show that there is a risk that staff in academic work places will start using compensatory coping strategies to deal with…

  5. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against prostate specific antigen (PSA) for the detection of PSA and its purification; Generación de anticuerpos monoclonales contra el antígeno específico de próstata (PSA) para la detección del PSA y su purificación

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo Castro, Boris Ernesto [Centro de Ingeniería Genética y Biotecnología, CIGB, La Habana (Cuba)

    2012-07-01

    The prostate cancer in Cuba is a problem of health (2672 diagnosed cases and 2769 deaths in 2007). Various diagnostic methods have been implemented for the detection and management of this disease, emphasizing among them (PSA) prostate-specific antigen serological determination. At this work was generated and characterized a panel of 11 antibodies (AcMs) monoclonal IgG1 detected with high affinity described major epitopes of the PSA, both in solution and attached to the test plate. From the panel obtained AcMs was the standardization of an essay type ELISA for the detection of serum total PSA (associated and free) equimolar, based on antibody monoclonal CB-PSA.4 in the coating and the CB-PSA.9 coupled with biotin as liner, with a detection limit of 0.15 ng/mL. Similarly, standardized system for detection in serum free PSA, based on the AcMs CB-PSA.4 (coating) and CB-PSA.2 coupled with biotin (liner), with a detection limit of 0.5 ng/mL. Finally, with the purpose of using PSA as standard in trials type ELISA, developed a simple method of inmunopurificación based on the AcM, CB-PSA.2, which was obtained the PSA with a purity exceeding 90%. Immunoassay Centre on the basis of the AcMs panel and the results of this study, developed and recorded two diagnostic systems for the detection of PSA in human serum. (author)

  6. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test On This Page What is the PSA ... parts of the body before being detected. The PSA test may give false-positive or false-negative ...

  7. Expatriate Academic Staff in the United Arab Emirates: The Nature of Their Work Experiences in Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ann E.; Chapman, David W.; Farah, Samar; Wilson, Elisabeth; Ridge, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    As many countries expand their higher education systems, they must attract, support, and retain qualified academic staff. This paper focuses on the United Arab Emirates (UAE) as a case study of a nation drawing on large numbers of mostly expatriate faculty working in short-term academic appointments. The paper begins by considering the national…

  8. Computer Use Ethics among University Students and Staffs: The Influence of Gender, Religious Work Value and Organizational Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Norshidah; Karim, Nor Shahriza Abdul; Hussein, Ramlah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent to which individual characteristics, which are gender, religious (Islamic) work value, and organization level (students and staff), are related to attitudes toward computer use ethics. This investigation is conducted in an academic setting in Malaysia, among those subscribing to the…

  9. An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Work Environment Variables on Job Satisfaction Among Chinese Prison Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shanhe; Lambert, Eric G; Liu, Jianhong; Zhang, Jinwu

    2018-05-01

    Job satisfaction has been linked to many positive outcomes, such as greater work performance, increased organizational commitment, reduced job burnout, decreased absenteeism, and lower turnover intent/turnover. A substantial body of research has examined how work environment variables are linked to job satisfaction among U.S. correctional staff; far less research has examined prison staff in non-Western nations, especially China. Using survey data collected from two prisons in Guangzhou, China, this study investigated the level of job satisfaction among prison staff and how personal characteristics (i.e., gender, tenure, age, and educational level) and work environment variables (i.e., perceived dangerousness of the job, job variety, supervision, instrumental communication, and input into decision making) affect job satisfaction. The findings from ordinary least squares regression equations indicated that the work environment variables explained a greater proportion of the variance in the job satisfaction measure than the personal characteristics. In the full multivariate regression model, gender was the only personal characteristic to have a significant association with job satisfaction, with female staff reporting higher satisfaction. Input into decision making and job variety had significant positive associations, whereas dangerousness had a significant negative relationship with job satisfaction.

  10. The Impact of Ethnicity and Religious Affiliation on the Alienation of Staff from Their Work Environment in Nigerian Universities: A Comparative Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnekwu, Duvie Adanma

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the comparative influence of ethnicity and religious affiliation on the alienation of Nigerian university staff from their work environment. The influence of certain moderator variables such as the location of the university, gender, age, educational qualification, staff category, official rank and staff communicative…

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A SIX SIGMA RATING SCALE FOR MEASURING THE QUALITY OF WORK LIFE OF TEACHING STAFF WORKING IN SAUDI UNIVERSITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Vijay Subbarayalu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education institutions in Saudi Arabia is currently performing several evaluations by both students and teaching staff as a measure to improve the quality by understanding the perception of its stakeholders. In order to retain the best and efficient work force to carry out the teaching roles in these universities, the Quality of Work Life (QoWL prevailing in these Educational institutions needs to be studied. Accordingly, this study was conducted among the teaching staff of the University of Dammam [UOD] to capture their experiences related to various aspects of the QoWL. The teaching staff opinion was captured through a pre-tested QoWL questionnaire and the data were analyzed through six sigma analytical tool using the Poisson distribution model. From the non-conformance level captured through the responses from the faculty/teaching staff about the various aspects of quality of work life prevailing in their respective colleges, the corresponding sigma rating for each component of QoWL was calculated. Subsequently, an innovative six point quality rating system was established for each sigma values. The overall opinion of teaching staff about the QoWL prevailing at UOD is rated as "Adaptable" signifying that there is room for further improvement and appropriate strategies need to be employed to improve it.

  12. Development of PSA workstation KIRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae Un; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kil You; Yang, Jun Eon; Jeong, Won Dae; Chang, Seung Cheol; Sung, Tae Yong; Kang, Dae Il; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan; Hwang, Mi Jeong

    1997-01-01

    Advanced Research Group of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing the Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) workstation KIRAP from 1992. This report describes the recent development activities of PSA workstation KIRAP. The first is to develop and improve the methodologies for PSA quantification, that are the incorporation of fault tree modularization technique, the improvement of cut set generation method, the development of rule-based recovery, the development of methodology to solve a fault tree which has the logical loops and to handle a fault tree which has several initiators. These methodologies are incorporated in the PSA quantification software KIRAP-CUT. The second is to convert PSA modeling softwares for Windows, which have been used on the DOS environment since 1987. The developed softwares are the fault tree editor KWTREE, the event tree editor CONPAS, and Data manager KWDBMAN for event data and common cause failure (CCF) data. With the development of PSA workstation, it makes PSA modeling and PSA quantification and automation easier and faster. (author). 8 refs.

  13. Development of PSA workstation KIRAP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae Un; Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, Kil You; Yang, Jun Eon; Jeong, Won Dae; Chang, Seung Cheol; Sung, Tae Yong; Kang, Dae Il; Park, Jin Hee; Lee, Yoon Hwan; Hwang, Mi Jeong.

    1997-01-01

    Advanced Research Group of Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing the Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) workstation KIRAP from 1992. This report describes the recent development activities of PSA workstation KIRAP. The first is to develop and improve the methodologies for PSA quantification, that are the incorporation of fault tree modularization technique, the improvement of cut set generation method, the development of rule-based recovery, the development of methodology to solve a fault tree which has the logical loops and to handle a fault tree which has several initiators. These methodologies are incorporated in the PSA quantification software KIRAP-CUT. The second is to convert PSA modeling softwares for Windows, which have been used on the DOS environment since 1987. The developed softwares are the fault tree editor KWTREE, the event tree editor CONPAS, and Data manager KWDBMAN for event data and common cause failure (CCF) data. With the development of PSA workstation, it makes PSA modeling and PSA quantification and automation easier and faster. (author). 8 refs

  14. The contribution of nuclear training staff to human factors work in the CEGB and Nuclear Electric PLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, V.J.

    1990-01-01

    The staff and simulators of utility's nuclear training function are being utilized in support of a wide range of human factor related activities. In addition to work on man machines interface review, operating procedures, operator support system and VDU format design and validation for the Magnox and AGR series of nuclear power plants, support is also being provided to the PWR Project Team through staff who have undergone extensive and comprehensive overseas PWR training programs. This paper discusses how recent initiatives in connection with a survey on operator stress and the possible use of psychometric testing in support of the selection of reactor desk engineers are also being supported

  15. Detection of prostate cancer with complexed PSA and complexed/total PSA ratio - is there any advantage?

    OpenAIRE

    Strittmatter, F; Stieber, P; Nagel, D; Füllhase, C; Walther, S; Stief, CG; Waidelich, R

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the performance of total PSA (tPSA), the free/total PSA ratio (f/tPSA), complexed PSA (cPSA) and the complexed/total PSA ratio (c/tPSA) in prostate cancer detection. Methods Frozen sera of 442 patients have been analysed for tPSA, free PSA (fPSA) and cPSA. 131 patients had prostate cancer and 311 patients benign prostatic hyperplasia. Results Differences in the distribution of the biomarkers were seen as follows: tPSA, cPSA and c/tPSA were significantly higher i...

  16. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vocht, Frank [University of Bristol, School of Social and Community Medicine, Bristol (United Kingdom); Batistatou, Evridiki [University of Manchester, Centre for Occupational and Environmental Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Moelter, Anna [Colorado State University, Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, Fort Collins, CO (United States); Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel [Utrecht University, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht (Netherlands); Van Tongeren, Martie [Institute of Occupational Medicine, Centre for Human Exposure Science, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Crozier, Stuart [University of Queensland, School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, Brisbane (Australia); Gowland, Penny [University of Nottingham, Sir Peter Mansfield Magnetic Resonance Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Keevil, Stephen [Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Medical Physics, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Department of Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-15

    Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and other staff working with MRI in healthcare in the UK. One hundred and four volunteer staff from eight sites completed a questionnaire and kept a diary to obtain information on subjective symptoms and work practices, and wore a magnetic field dosimeter during one to three randomly selected working days. Incidence of MRI-related symptoms was obtained for all shifts and prevalence of MRI-related and reference symptoms was associated to explanatory factors using ordinal regression. Incident symptoms related to working with MRI were reported in 4 % of shifts. Prevalence of MRI-related, but not reference symptoms were associated with number of hours per week working with MRI, shift length, and stress, but not with magnetic field strength (1.5 and 3 T) or measured magnetic field exposure. Reporting of prevalent symptoms was associated with longer duration of working in MRI departments, but not with measured field strength of exposure. Other factors related to organisation and stress seem to contribute to increased reporting of MRI-related symptoms. (orig.)

  17. Transient health symptoms of MRI staff working with 1.5 and 3.0 Tesla scanners in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vocht, Frank; Batistatou, Evridiki; Moelter, Anna; Kromhout, Hans; Schaap, Kristel; Van Tongeren, Martie; Crozier, Stuart; Gowland, Penny; Keevil, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have consistently shown that amongst staff working with MRI, transient symptoms directly attributable to the MRI system including dizziness, nausea, tinnitus, and concentration problems are reported. This study assessed symptom prevalence and incidence in radiographers and other staff working with MRI in healthcare in the UK. One hundred and four volunteer staff from eight sites completed a questionnaire and kept a diary to obtain information on subjective symptoms and work practices, and wore a magnetic field dosimeter during one to three randomly selected working days. Incidence of MRI-related symptoms was obtained for all shifts and prevalence of MRI-related and reference symptoms was associated to explanatory factors using ordinal regression. Incident symptoms related to working with MRI were reported in 4 % of shifts. Prevalence of MRI-related, but not reference symptoms were associated with number of hours per week working with MRI, shift length, and stress, but not with magnetic field strength (1.5 and 3 T) or measured magnetic field exposure. Reporting of prevalent symptoms was associated with longer duration of working in MRI departments, but not with measured field strength of exposure. Other factors related to organisation and stress seem to contribute to increased reporting of MRI-related symptoms. (orig.)

  18. Development of Tsunami PSA method for Korean NPP site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In Kil; Park, Jin Hee

    2010-01-01

    A methodology of tsunami PSA was developed in this study. A tsunami PSA consists of tsunami hazard analysis, tsunami fragility analysis and system analysis. In the case of tsunami hazard analysis, evaluation of tsunami return period is major task. For the evaluation of tsunami return period, numerical analysis and empirical method can be applied. The application of this method was applied to a nuclear power plant, Ulchin 56 NPP, which is located in the east coast of Korean peninsula. Through this study, whole tsunami PSA working procedure was established and example calculation was performed for one of real nuclear power plant in Korea

  19. Regulatory review of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) Level 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    basis for risk informed decision making within a regulatory decision making process. They give advice on how to set about reviewing a PSA and on the technical issues that need to be addressed. It is intended that further work will be carried out in the future to extend the coverage of the report to accident sequences occurring at low power and shutdown states, and for Level 3 PSA

  20. Applications of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-02-01

    This report, which compiles information on a comprehensive set of PSA applications in the areas of NPP design, operation, and accident mitigation and management, is the culmination of an IAEA project on PSA Applications and Tools to Improve NPP Safety. In this regard, the Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) held in Madrid in February 1998 allowed participants to review and provide very valuable comments for this report. Several important facts related to PSA and its applications were highlighted during this TCM: living PSAs are the basis for the risk informed approach to decision making; development and use of safety/risk monitors as tools for configuration management is spreading fast; the different uses of PSA to support NPP testing and maintenance planning and optimization are amongst the most widespread PSA applications; plant specific PSAs are being used to support the safety upgrading programmes of plants built to earlier standards; not all countries have a regulatory framework for the use of the probabilistic approach in decision making. Some countries are still far from 'risk-informed' regulation, and this means that there is still considerable work ahead, both for regulators and utilities, to clarify approaches, to establish a framework and to reach a common understanding in relation to the use of PSA in decision making. This report is based on the premise that the use of PSA can provide useful information for the decision maker. This report is intended to provide an overview of current PSA applications. Section 2 addresses the PSA application process, outlines the general requirements for PSA tools and provides a discussion on PSA aspects such as PSA level, scope and level of detail, which have to be considered when planning/performing PSA applications. Section 3 discusses the technical aspects of individual applications and is divided into three parts. Section 3.1 is dedicated to the design related PSA applications. The second part of Section 3 considers

  1. Ascertaining the international state of the art of PSA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linden, J. von

    1998-01-01

    Plant-specific PSAs, to be performed within the framework of the Periodic Safety Review of German Nuclear Power Plants require further development of the methodology. For that purpose foreign PSA-guidelines and PSA-reviewes as well as relevant literature are examined and appropriate insights are adopted within task A.2 of project SR 2096. The main goal of these activities is to achieve a comparison of the state of the art of PSA-methodologies applied abroad and in Germany. The German state of the art refers to the extent as is documented in the German PSA Guide (Leitfaden Probabilistische Sicherheitsanalyse /PSUe97/) which has to be used for the Periodic Safety Review of German Nuclear Power Plants. The structure for the evaluation is based on the working steps of a PSA. In total, according to the objectives of the Periodic Safety Review the German approach for plant-specific PSAs based on the German PSA Guide is conform to the state of the art abroad. Identified deviations in some details are evaluated reflecting the view of GRS. Particular aspects resulting from the evaluation should be considered for further development of the German PSA Guide. (orig.) [de

  2. Nursing staff competence, work strain, stress and satisfaction in elderly care: a comparison of home-based care and nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Henna; Arnetz, Judith E

    2008-02-01

    The aims of this study were to: (1) compare older people care nursing staff's perceptions of their competence, work strain and work satisfaction in nursing homes and home-based care; and (2) to examine determinants of work satisfaction in both care settings. The shift in older people care from hospitals to community-based facilities and home care has had implications for nursing practice. Lack of competence development, high levels of work strain and low levels of work satisfaction among nursing staff in both care settings have been associated with high turnover. Few studies have compared staff perceptions of their competence and work in nursing homes as opposed to home-based care. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Nursing staff perceptions of their competence, work strain, stress and satisfaction were measured by questionnaire in 2003 in two older people care organizations in Sweden. Comparisons of all outcome variables were made between care settings both within and between the two organizations. Multiple regression analysis was used to determine predictors of work satisfaction in home care and nursing homes respectively. In general, staff in home-based care reported significantly less sufficient knowledge compared with staff in nursing homes. However, home care staff experienced significantly less physical and emotional strain compared with staff in nursing homes. Ratings of work-related exhaustion, mental energy and overall work satisfaction did not differ significantly between care settings. In both care settings, work-related exhaustion was the strongest (inverse) predictor of work satisfaction. Future interventions should focus on counteracting work-related exhaustion and improving competence development to improve work satisfaction among older people care nursing staff in both care settings. Relevance to clinical practice. Work-related exhaustion and lack of competence development may have significant negative implications for work satisfaction among

  3. [Participative ergonomics for adapting the working space to meet the needs of nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estryn-Behar, Madeleine; Bouvatier, Catherine; Milanini-Magny, Giuliana; Deslandes, Hélène; Ravache, Anne-Emile; Bernard, Chloé; Mendès, Cindy; Medous, Adeline

    2011-01-01

    Presst-Next, the European study carried out between 2004 and 2006, highlighted the importance of teamwork in reducing the frequency of professional exhaustion and the early departure of care staff. On the basis of these results, the Armand-Trousseau Hospital in Paris (AP-HP 75) has committed to a participative ergonomics approach at its paediatric emergency service.

  4. Communication Can Save Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-08-04

    This 60 second public service announcement (PSA) is based on the August 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Antibiotic-resistant germs cause at least 23,000 deaths each year. Learn how public health authorities and health care facilities can work together to save lives.  Created: 8/4/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/4/2015.

  5. Determining if pretreatment PSA doubling time predicts PSA trajectories after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soto, Daniel E.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Pan, Charlie C.; Williams, Scott G.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: To determine if pretreatment PSA doubling time (PSA-DT) can predict post-radiation therapy (RT) PSA trajectories for localized prostate cancer. Materials and methods: Three hundred and seventy-five prostate cancer patients treated with external beam RT without androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) were identified with an adequate number of PSA values. We utilized a linear mixed model (LMM) analysis to model longitudinal PSA data sets after definitive treatment. Post-treatment PSA trajectories were allowed to depend on the pre-RT PSA-DT, pre-RT PSA (iPSA), Gleason score (GS), and T-stage. Results: Pre-RT PSA-DT had a borderline impact on predicting the rate of PSA rise after nadir (p = 0.08). For a typical low risk patient (T1, GS ≤ 6, iPSA 10), the predicted PSA-DT post-nadir was 21% shorter for pre-RT PSA-DT 24 month (19 month vs. 24 month). Additional significant predictors of post-RT PSA rate of rise included GS (p < 0.0001), iPSA (p < 0.0001), and T-stage (p = 0.02). Conclusions: We observed a trend between rapidly rising pre-RT PSA and the post-RT post-nadir PSA rise. This effect appeared to be independent of iPSA, GS, or T-stage. The results presented suggest that pretreatment PSA-DT may help predict post-RT PSA trajectories

  6. Methodology - PSA Regulatory handbook. Comparisons to a modern PSA study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bostroem, Urban; Jung, Gunnar; Flodin, Yngve

    2003-03-01

    The regulatory handbook is applicable to all types of initiating events and all operating conditions. It should be noted that it does not make the traditional subdivision of PSA into internal and external events, level 1 and level 2 PSA, or power operation and shut-down. The reason for this is that this has given the regulatory handbook a more logical structure, and that this approach underlines the integrated character of PSA when it comes to creating the plan risk profile. The regulatory handbook has been structured following the requirements on a PSA for a nuclear power plant, as this is the most demanding application. However, it is applicable also to the analysis of other nuclear installations. The purpose of the comparative review presented in this report has been to, as part of a quality review establish the PSA Handbook, compare (parts of) the handbook and its criteria with a recent PSA analysis, and to identify major discrepancies. Considerable weight has also been allocated to a review of the plant model (Risk Spectrum event trees and fault trees). The results presented in the report are not based on a complete review of the PSA in question (or of the complete PSA Handbook). Following discussions between the SKI and SwedPower, and based on the experience of the SwedPower reviewers, the following issues were chosen to be the main parts of the project: 1) General comparison according to content and transparency - Levels of ambition in PSA Handbook, PSA method description and actual PSA report. 2) Detailed comparison of: Selected component failure data - Assumptions regarding room events - CCI frequencies, realism, identification, categorisation - Taking credit for non-safety classified systems - Event tree modelling - Presentation of results 3) Fault tree model, specifically - Time frame for crediting of battery capacity - Modelling of regulators - Modelling of dependencies for room events - general quality, like how the paper documentation and the logic

  7. Summary report for the second TUV-workshop proceedings on living PSA application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This workshop on living PSA Application was organized to support the OECD/NEA CSNI-Principal Working Group No.5 on Risk Assessment for an international exchange of experience on living PSA application. The first session was devoted to Living PSA Applications and the second session to Tools for Living PSA. Living PSA Applications: Reasons for performing PSA (regulatory requirement, targets; corporate requirement, targets; safety related activity prioritization; other); Logistic of Living PSA Management (Corporate management involvement, Decision making levels and guidance, Plant level involvement, Required personnel commitment, Frequency and extent of re-quantification of PSA, Types of safety/risk parameters to be monitored, Quality assurance on maintaining Living PSA); Examples of Application (Experiences of application, State of Living PSA/e.g. all accident sequences involved, Details of component level involvement). Tools for Living PSA: Data Collection Systems and Codes (Source and type of data collected, Probabilistic parameter quantification, Interface to basic event data, Data code systems). An executive summary of the workshop is given

  8. Happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment of support staff at a tertiary education institution in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyndsay K. Field

    2011-09-01

    Research purpose: The purpose of the research was to determine the relationship between happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to determine whether happiness and work engagement hold predictive value for the organisational commitment of support staff. Motivation for the study: This study aims to enable the identification of a link between happiness, work engagement and organisational commitment and to identify a predictive value of the model. Research design, approach and method: The researchers used a cross-sectional survey design. They used a sample of 123 (N = 123 support staff members from a tertiary education institution in South Africa. The researchers used four demographic questionnaires for the research. These were the ‘Satisfaction with Life Scale’ (SWLS, the ‘Well-Being Questionnaire’ (WBQ, the ‘Utrecht Work Engagement Scale’ (UWES and the ‘Organisational Commitment Questionnaire’ (OCQ. Main findings: The researchers found a significant positive relationship between affective organisational commitment and work engagement, as well as between affective organisational commitment and happiness (as the SWLS and WBQ measure. They found a significant positive relationship between work engagement and happiness. Finally, the results showed that happiness and work engagement have predictive value for affective organisational commitment. Practical/managerial implications: Happiness and work engagement have predictive value for affective organisational commitment. Therefore, institutions should carefully tailor any implementation programme or initiative to address this relationship. Contribution/value-add: The findings will benefit both managers and workers. Institutions should consider evaluating the levels of happiness and work engagement of their support staff to address the issue of the organisational commitment of their employees.

  9. Replacing nuclear staff: The proactive work at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupak, M.O.; Rogero, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    high level of education provided. To give an idea of the importance and size of the Post Graduation Programme at IPEN, in 2003, the staff, students, disciplines and other numbers were officially registered as following: 498 students for the MSc and PhD degrees; 166 thesis advisor's; 44 disciplines offered; 65 thesis and dissertation concluded; 147 scholarship given by the Brazilian Federal and State Governments for undergraduate and post graduate students; 400 students took entrance selection exams (about 50% were approved); Approximately 500 internship were provided; and Approximately 150 thesis advisors were invited to participate in the examining boards. The Post Graduation Programme of IPEN in association with the University of Sao Paulo - USP (the largest institution of higher education and research in Brazil, and the third in size in Latin America) is organized in three areas of concentration: TNA- Nuclear Technology and its Applications; TNM- Nuclear Technology on Materials; TNR - Nuclear Technology for Reactors. The replacement of nuclear personnel is shrinking is a fact and the problem requires immediate attention of the entire nuclear community (academia, government and industry). Aware to find ways to solve this problem, IPEN started to work more proactively by dealing closely with universities, industries, government and other relevant organizations. As result of this work, on 2001, IPEN in accordance with USP, started to offer graduation optional disciplines to all students at USP interested on nuclear field. This initiative was very successful. On 2003, IPEN started the most important project in association with Physics Institute of USP, this project so called: Programme of Graduation Course on Nuclear Science is willing to graduate Human Resources for the Nuclear Sector. Our proposal with this Programme is that the IAEA and also Brazilian Government Agency could allocate money for Brazilian fellowship in order to capture human resources for nuclear

  10. Is the amount of exposure to aggressive challenging behaviour related to staff work-related well-being in intellectual disability services? Evidence from a clustered research design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Samantha; Hastings, Richard P; Gillespie, David; McNamara, Rachel; Randell, Elizabeth

    2018-04-17

    Previous research has demonstrated an association between aggressive challenging behaviour (CB) and reductions in work-related well-being for intellectual disability (ID) support staff. Much of this research has used subjective measures of CB. To examine whether exposure to aggressive CB is associated with reduced work-related well-being in staff working in ID residential settings across the UK. A cross-sectional analysis was undertaken as part of a randomised trial; 186 staff from 100 settings completed questionnaires on their CB self-efficacy, empathy, positive work motivation, and burnout. Objective measures of aggressive CB in the preceding 16 weeks were collected from each setting. There was little association between staff exposure to aggressive CB and work-related well-being. Clustering effects were found for emotional exhaustion and positive work motivation, suggesting these variables are more likely to be influenced by the environment in which staff work. The level of clustering may be key to understanding how to support staff working in ID residential settings, and should be explored further. Longitudinal data, and studies including a comparison of staff working in ID services without aggressive CB exposure are needed to fully understand any association between aggressive CB and staff well-being. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Outcomes in knowledge, attitudes and confidence of nursing staff working in nursing and residential care homes following a dementia training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerri, Anthony; Scerri, Charles

    2017-11-08

    Dementia training programmes for staff working in long-term care settings have been found to be effective in improving staff outcomes. This study investigated the impact of a dementia training programme for all Maltese nursing staff working in public nursing/residential homes on their knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Additionally, we identified the predictors of these domains before and after the programme. A 14-hour training programme focusing on dementia management, care and policy was developed for all nursing staff working in public nursing and residential homes in Malta. A pretest-posttest design was used to evaluate the participants' knowledge of dementia, attitudes and confidence in working with residents with dementia using validated tools. Demographic variables were measured and compared with each staff domain. The majority of nursing staff attended the training programme with 261 fully completed questionnaires being collected pre-training and 214 post-training. The programme significantly improved nursing staff knowledge, attitudes and confidence. Stepwise regression analysis of each staff domain showed that the strongest predictor in all models at pre-training was the intensity of previous training programmes. Furthermore, staff who attended previous training continued to improve in their attitudes and confidence following programme completion. The study continues to shed further evidence on the impact of dementia training programs on staff outcomes. It also indicated that the intensity of previous participation in dementia training programmes was related to the participants' knowledge, attitudes and confidence and that continual exposure to training had a cumulative effect.

  12. [Parents and nursing staff's expectations regarding the nurse's work in a NICU].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Ivone; Rocha, Semíramis Melani Melo

    2006-09-01

    The general purpose of this investigation was to identify parent and nursing staff expectations regarding the nurse's role in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU). A descriptive study was carried out using a qualitative approach and interviews were conducted at a NICU in the interior of the State of São Paulo. Results showed new expectations on the part of parents and professionals regarding the role of NICU nurses. The knowledge identified as necessary were a family-centered approach, interpersonal relations techniques, and differentiation between technology and scientific knowledge. The conclusion is that NICU nurses need to play a more incisive role in the nursing care process, adjusting the use of technological advances to human knowledge, particularly in the area of interpersonal relationships between family members and staff, which includes activities of continuing education, such as specialization courses.

  13. Regulatory review of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) level 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    fault sequences occurring at full power only. It is intended that further work will be carried out in the future to extend the coverage of the document to fault sequences occurring at low power and shutdown states, and for Levels 2 and 3 PSA

  14. Training of health physics services staff at the Sellafield Works of British Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagg, B.

    This paper describes the qualifications required and the training of health physics non-industrial and industrial staff who provide a radiological protection service to the Sellafield site. The training offered may consist of formal group instruction, programmed learning using written texts, videotape lectures, and on-the-job training by line management. Experience has shown that formal oral and practical instruction to small groups is the most effective form of training when supplemented by on-the-job training

  15. Work-related fear and the threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Riitta; Huhtala, Heini; Paavilainen, Eija

    2017-10-01

    To describe fear, the threats causing fear and the occurrence of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. The emergency department is a challenging workplace where the staff is often confronted by factors that cause fear. A cross-sectional study. A survey was conducted in 16 hospitals (n = 544). Nurses, practical nurses, orderlies and physicians from those hospitals participated in the survey. The survey questionnaire was based on the analysis of interviews of 30 nurses from one university hospital and one central hospital. The results of the interviews were analysed using the inductive content analysis method. The analysis of the survey was performed using statistical methods, such as frequencies, cross-tabulation and principal component analysis. The results showed that nearly all of the emergency department personnel had experienced work-related fear. Generally, the fear had been momentary. According to the survey results, fear was most often caused by medication errors, the resuscitation of a child, a catastrophic accident, urgent or violent situations or patients armed with weapons. Threats that caused fear included insecurity, danger in the work environment, threat of loss of one's health and threat of the consequences of one's mistakes and actions. The staff of emergency departments often encountered factors or situations that caused fear. The main threats causing fear that were raised by the respondents were insecurity and danger in the work environment. The data obtained from this study can be utilised in identifying and describing work-related fear and threats of fear among emergency department nursing staff and physicians. Based on the information herein, it will be possible to develop methods to prevent situations that cause fear in emergency departments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Careers and retention of staff in the 21st century world of work: Introduction to the special edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinde Coetzee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Coetzee, M., & Gunz, H. (2012. Careers and retention of staff in the 21st century world of work: Introduction to the special edition. SA Journal of Human Resource Management/SA Tydskrif vir Menslikehulpbronbestuur, 10(2, Art. #505, 4 pages. http://dx.doi.org/10.4102/ sajhrm.v10i2.505

  17. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings of support staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, Linda J M; Embregts, Petri J C M; Bosman, Anna M T

    2013-11-01

    Working with clients who show challenging behavior can be emotionally demanding and stressful for support staff, because this behavior may cause a range of negative emotional reactions and feelings. These reactions are of negative influence on staff wellbeing and behavior. Research has focused on negative emotions of staff. However, a distinction between emotions and feelings has never been made in the research field of intellectual disabilities. Negative emotions and feelings may be regulated by emotional intelligence, a psychological construct that takes into account personal style and individual differences. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence on the one hand and emotions and feelings on the other. Participants were 207 support staff serving clients with moderate to borderline intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. Emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings were measured with questionnaires. The results show that emotional intelligence, emotions, and feelings are related. However, found relationships were weak. Most significant relations were found between feelings and stress management and adaptation elements of emotional intelligence. Because the explored variables can change over time they call for a longitudinal research approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. What works in Indigenous tobacco control? The perceptions of remote Indigenous community members and health staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Vanessa; Thomas, David P

    2010-04-01

    To explore the perceptions of remote Indigenous community members and health staff regarding the acceptability and effectiveness of different tobacco control health promotion interventions. Qualitative methods were used for this exploratory study, including interviews with remote Indigenous community members and health staff, as well as observations of the delivery of different tobacco control activities in three remote communities in the Northern Territory (NT). Several tobacco control interventions for which there is strong evidence in other settings were generally perceived as acceptable and efficacious in the remote Indigenous setting. Primary care interventions, such as brief advice and pharmaceutical quitting aids, when available and accessible, were perceived as important and effective strategies to help people quit, as were the promotion of smokefree areas. By contrast unmodified Quit programs were perceived to have questionable application in this context and there were conflicting findings regarding taxation increases on tobacco and social marketing campaigns. Several evidence-based 'mainstream' activities are perceived to be acceptable to this population, but we may also need to address the concerns raised by health staff and community members about the acceptability of some unmodified activities. Additionally, organisational barriers within the health system may be contributing to the reduced effectiveness of tobacco control in this setting.

  19. The impact of multiple care giving roles on fatigue, stress, and work performance among hospital staff nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Linda D; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Rogers, Ann E

    2006-02-01

    This study describes fatigue and stress among a random sample of full-time hospital staff nurses (n=393) who provide care for aging family members, compares the results to nurses with and without children younger than 18 years living at home, examines differences in sleep duration, and explores the effects on work performance by care giving status during a 4-week period. Little attention has been given to the effects of care giver well-being when individuals assume dual roles as family and professional care givers. Hospital staff nurses recorded daily information concerning their work hours, errors, sleep/wake patterns, perceptions of fatigue, alertness, and stress and periods of drowsiness and sleep episodes while on duty for 28 days. Fatigue and stress levels were significantly higher among nurses caring for both children and elders. However, nurses providing elder care at home were more fatigued, sleep-deprived, and likely to make errors at work. These findings underscore the importance of restorative sleep interventions and fatigue countermeasures for hospital staff nurses involved in dual care giving roles. Limiting overtime and applying circadian principles to hospital scheduling processes would ensure a more alert workforce, minimize health risks for nurses, and maximize the safety of those in their care.

  20. Physical and Mental Health Status of Staff Working for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: Measurement with the 36-Item Short-Form (SF-36) Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Loh, Ching-Hui; Yen, Chia-Feng; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Lin, Lan-Ping; Chu, Cordia M.; Wu, Sheng-Ru

    2009-01-01

    Little explicit attention has been given to the generic health profile of staff working for people with intellectual disability in institutions. This study aimed to provide a profile of physical and mental health of staff working in disability welfare institutions, and to examine the possible demographic and organizational factors that explain an…

  1. Job Strain and Determinants in Staff Working in Institutions for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan: A Test of the Job Demand-Control-Support Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lee, Tzong-Nan; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Wu, Jia-Ling; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the job strain of staff working in disability institutions. This study investigated the staff's job strain profile and its determinants which included the worker characteristics and the psychosocial working environments in Taiwan. A cross-sectional study survey was carried out among 1243 workers by means of a self-answered…

  2. Management and organisational factors in PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfanz, H.P.

    1999-01-01

    The constraints of PSA are increasingly considered with increasing application of PSA for the safety management of nuclear power plants (see US-NRC, 'Risk Informed Regulation', NRC-1). There is a vivid international discourse about the applicability of the variables of plant management and organisation in PSAs, which has lead to a great variety of research activities into this matter (see PSAM 4). This paper here summarizes the current state of progress of research work and discusses the applicability of results. The studies for comparative assessment of methodology and results were performed by the TUeV Nord under the roof of the BMU/BfS-sponsored project SR 2260, ''Further development of probabilistic methods for nuclear power plant safety assessment. (orig./CB) [de

  3. Blackpool: More evidence on PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullingford, M.

    1985-01-01

    PSA is spreading widely throughout the world, with 30 IAEA Member States having active programmes in this area. The main reason for its popularity is that it offers insights critical in the safety decision-making process available from no other method. It allows power plant designers, regulators, and operators to discriminate between issues important to safety and those which are trivial. Although it is beneficial to perform a PSA to utilize the potential products available from such a study, it is especially important to realize that the PSA process itself is a valuable experience. The main points such as potential users of PSA, safety evaluations, treatment of uncertainties as well as future trends are briefly discussed in this paper

  4. Development of a PSA information database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Hwan

    2005-01-01

    The need to develop the PSA information database for performing a PSA has been growing rapidly. For example, performing a PSA requires a lot of data to analyze, to evaluate the risk, to trace the process of results and to verify the results. PSA information database is a system that stores all PSA related information into the database and file system with cross links to jump to the physical documents whenever they are needed. Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute is developing a PSA information database system, AIMS (Advanced Information Management System for PSA). The objective is to integrate and computerize all the distributed information of a PSA into a system and to enhance the accessibility to PSA information for all PSA related activities. This paper describes how we implemented such a database centered application in the view of two areas, database design and data (document) service

  5. Relationship between Family-Work and Work-Family Conflict with Organizational Commitment and Desertion Intention among Nurses and Paramedical Staff at Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Hatam

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: High turnover intention rate is one of the most common problems in healthcare organizations throughout the world. There are several factors that can potentially affect the individuals’ turnover intention; they include factors such as work-family conflict, family-work conflict, and organizational commitment. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between family-work and work-family conflicts and organizational commitment and turnover intention among nurses and paramedical staff at hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS and present a model using SEM. Methods: This is a questionnaire based cross-sectional study among 400 nurses and paramedical staff of hospitals affiliated to SUMS using a random-proportional (quota sampling method. Data collection was performed using four standard questionnaires. SPSS software was used for data analysis and SmartPLS software for modeling variables. Results: Mean scores of work-family conflict and desertion intention were 2.6 and 2.77, respectively. There was a significant relationship between gender and family-work conflict (P=0.02. Family-work conflict was significantly higher in married participants (P=0.001. Based on the findings of this study, there was a significant positive relationship between work-family and family-work conflict (P=0.001. Also, work-family conflict had a significant inverse relationship with organizational commitment (P=0.001. An inverse relationship was seen between organizational commitment and turnover intentions (P=0.001. Conclusion: Thus, regarding the prominent and preventative role of organizational commitment in employees’ desertion intentions, in order to prevent negative effects of staff desertion in health sector, attempts to make policies to increase people’s organizational commitment must be considered by health system managers more than ever.

  6. Relationship between Family-Work and Work-Family Conflict with Organizational Commitment and Desertion Intention among Nurses and Paramedical Staff at Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatam, Nahid; Jalali, Marzie Tajik; Askarian, Mehrdad; Kharazmi, Erfan

    2016-04-01

    High turnover intention rate is one of the most common problems in healthcare organizations throughout the world. There are several factors that can potentially affect the individuals' turnover intention; they include factors such as work-family conflict, family-work conflict, and organizational commitment. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between family-work and work-family conflicts and organizational commitment and turnover intention among nurses and paramedical staff at hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences (SUMS) and present a model using SEM. This is a questionnaire based cross-sectional study among 400 nurses and paramedical staff of hospitals affiliated to SUMS using a random-proportional (quota) sampling method. Data collection was performed using four standard questionnaires. SPSS software was used for data analysis and SmartPLS software for modeling variables. Mean scores of work-family conflict and desertion intention were 2.6 and 2.77, respectively. There was a significant relationship between gender and family-work conflict (P=0.02). Family-work conflict was significantly higher in married participants (P=0.001). Based on the findings of this study, there was a significant positive relationship between work-family and family-work conflict (P=0.001). Also, work-family conflict had a significant inverse relationship with organizational commitment (P=0.001). An inverse relationship was seen between organizational commitment and turnover intentions (P=0.001). Thus, regarding the prominent and preventative role of organizational commitment in employees' desertion intentions, in order to prevent negative effects of staff desertion in health sector, attempts to make policies to increase people's organizational commitment must be considered by health system managers more than ever.

  7. Human behaviour in PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schott, H.

    1999-01-01

    Based on the current international state of the art of methodology for evaluation of human errors for PSA, many research projects have been initiated by the competent departments of the BMU and the BfS (Federal Min. of the Environment and Reactor Safety, Federal Radiation Protection Office). Three major areas of the research activities are discussed: Database: - Specific investigations into the applicability of generic data (THERP) to other than the original cases, possibly elaboration of approaches for application-specific modification, further evaluation of operating results; - general enhancement of insight into human performance and errors, e.g. with respect to causes of error and application areas (influence of organisation, cognitive performance); interviews with experts as a supplementary approach for data verification and database enhancement. Sensitivity analysis: - Identification of information describing human errors essentially contributing to frequency of occurrence of incidents and system non-availability; - establishment of relevance rating system, methodology for uncertainty analysis. Further development of methodology: - Modelling of repair activities and knowledge-based behaviour. (orig./CB) [de

  8. Psychosocial Work Environment, Stress Factors and Individual Characteristics among Nursing Staff in Psychiatric In-Patient Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuvesson Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The psychosocial work environment is an important factor in psychiatric in-patient care, and knowing more of its correlates might open up new paths for future workplace interventions. Thus, the aims of the present study were to investigate perceptions of the psychosocial work environment among nursing staff in psychiatric in-patient care and how individual characteristics—Mastery, Moral Sensitivity, Perceived Stress, and Stress of Conscience—are related to different aspects of the psychosocial work environment. A total of 93 nursing staff members filled out five questionnaires: the QPSNordic 34+, Perceived Stress Scale, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire, and Mastery scale. Multivariate analysis showed that Perceived Stress was important for Organisational Climate perceptions. The Stress of Conscience subscale Internal Demands and Experience in current units were indicators of Role Clarity. The other Stress of Conscience subscale, External Demands and Restrictions, was related to Control at Work. Two types of stress, Perceived Stress and Stress of Conscience, were particularly important for the nursing staff’s perception of the psychosocial work environment. Efforts to prevent stress may also contribute to improvements in the psychosocial work environment.

  9. Relationship between stress-related psychosocial work factors and suboptimal health among Chinese medical staff: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying-Zhi; Chu, Xi; Meng, Shi-Jiao; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Li-Juan; Yan, Yu-Xiang

    2018-03-06

    The study aimed to develop and validate a model to measure psychosocial factors at work among medical staff in China based on confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The second aim of the current study was to clarify the association between stress-related psychosocial work factors and suboptimal health status. The cross-sectional study was conducted using clustered sampling method. Xuanwu Hospital, a 3A grade hospital in Beijing. Nine hundred and fourteen medical staff aged over 40 years were sampled. Seven hundred and ninety-seven valid questionnaires were collected and used for further analyses. The sample included 94% of the Han population. The Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ) and the Suboptimal Health Status Questionnaires-25 were used to assess the psychosocial factors at work and suboptimal health status, respectively. CFA was conducted to establish the evaluating method of COPSOQ. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to estimate the relationship between suboptimal health status and stress-related psychosocial work factors among Chinese medical staff. There was a strong correlation among the five dimensions of COPSOQ based on the first-order factor model. Then, we established two second-order factors including negative and positive psychosocial work stress factors to evaluate psychosocial factors at work, and the second-order factor model fit well. The high score in negative (OR (95% CI)=1.47 (1.34 to 1.62), Pwork factors increased and decreased the risk of suboptimal health, respectively. This relationship remained statistically significant after adjusting for confounders and when using different cut-offs of suboptimal health status. Among medical staff, the second-order factor model was a suitable method to evaluate the COPSOQ. The negative and positive psychosocial work stress factors might be the risk and protective factors of suboptimal health, respectively. Moreover, negative psychosocial work stress was the most associated

  10. Resilience and professional quality of life in staff working with people with intellectual disabilities and offending behavior in community based and institutional settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Søndenaa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Staff in forensic services for people with intellectual disabilities (ID are expected to deal with a wide range of emotional challenges when providing care. The potential impact of this demanding work has not been systematically explored previously. This article explores the professional quality of life (QoL and the resilience (hardiness of the staff in this setting. The Professional QoL questionnaire and the Disposional Resilience Scale were completed by staff (n=85, 80% response rate in the Norwegian forensic service for ID offenders. Responses from staff working in institutional settings were compared to those from staff in local community services. Staff in the local community services had higher resilience scores compared to the staff in the institutional setting, (t=2.19; P<0.05. However in the other QoL and resilience domains there were no differences between the staff in the two settings. The greater sense of resilient control among community staff may be a function of both the number of service users they work with and the institutional demands they face. Even though these participants worked with relatively high risk clients, they did not report significantly impaired quality of life compared to other occupations.

  11. Factors and symptoms associated with work stress and health-promoting lifestyles among hospital staff: a pilot study in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsai Yueh-Chi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Healthcare workers including physicians, nurses, medical technicians and administrative staff experience high levels of occupational stress as a result of heavy workloads, extended working hours and time-related pressure. The aims of this study were to investigate factors associated with work stress among hospital staff members and to evaluate their health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study from May 1, 2010 to July 30, 2010 and recruited 775 professional staff from two regional hospitals in Taiwan using purposive sampling. Demographic data and self-reported symptoms related to work-related stress were collected. Each subject completed the Chinese versions of the Job Content Questionnaire (C-JCQ and The Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLSP. Linear and binary regression analyses were applied to identify associations between these two measurements and subjects’ characteristics, and associations between the two measurements and stress symptoms. Results Self-reported symptoms of work-related stress included 64.4% of subjects reporting nervousness, 33.7% nightmares, 44.1% irritability, 40.8% headaches, 35.0% insomnia, and 41.4% gastrointestinal upset. C-JCQ scores for psychological demands of the job and discretion to utilize skills had a positive correlation with stress-related symptoms; however, the C-JCQ scores for decision-making authority and social support correlated negatively with stress-related symptoms except for nightmares and irritability. All items on the HPLSP correlated negatively with stress-related symptoms except for irritability, indicating an association between subjects’ symptoms and a poor quality of health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. Conclusions We found that high demands, little decision-making authority, and low levels of social support were associated with the development of stress-related symptoms. The results also suggested that better performance on

  12. Factors and symptoms associated with work stress and health-promoting lifestyles among hospital staff: a pilot study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yueh-Chi; Liu, Chieh-Hsing

    2012-07-16

    Healthcare workers including physicians, nurses, medical technicians and administrative staff experience high levels of occupational stress as a result of heavy workloads, extended working hours and time-related pressure. The aims of this study were to investigate factors associated with work stress among hospital staff members and to evaluate their health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. We conducted a cross-sectional study from May 1, 2010 to July 30, 2010 and recruited 775 professional staff from two regional hospitals in Taiwan using purposive sampling. Demographic data and self-reported symptoms related to work-related stress were collected. Each subject completed the Chinese versions of the Job Content Questionnaire (C-JCQ) and The Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile (HPLSP). Linear and binary regression analyses were applied to identify associations between these two measurements and subjects' characteristics, and associations between the two measurements and stress symptoms. Self-reported symptoms of work-related stress included 64.4% of subjects reporting nervousness, 33.7% nightmares, 44.1% irritability, 40.8% headaches, 35.0% insomnia, and 41.4% gastrointestinal upset. C-JCQ scores for psychological demands of the job and discretion to utilize skills had a positive correlation with stress-related symptoms; however, the C-JCQ scores for decision-making authority and social support correlated negatively with stress-related symptoms except for nightmares and irritability. All items on the HPLSP correlated negatively with stress-related symptoms except for irritability, indicating an association between subjects' symptoms and a poor quality of health-promoting lifestyle behaviors. We found that high demands, little decision-making authority, and low levels of social support were associated with the development of stress-related symptoms. The results also suggested that better performance on or a higher frequency of health-promoting life-style behaviors might

  13. Survey of Dynamic PSA Methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hansul; Kim, Hyeonmin; Heo, Gyunyoung; Kim, Taewan

    2015-01-01

    Event Tree(ET)/Fault Tree(FT) are significant methodology in Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) for Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs). ET/FT methodology has the advantage for users to be able to easily learn and model. It enables better communication between engineers engaged in the same field. However, conventional methodologies are difficult to cope with the dynamic behavior (e.g. operation mode changes or sequence-dependent failure) and integrated situation of mechanical failure and human errors. Meanwhile, new possibilities are coming for the improved PSA by virtue of the dramatic development on digital hardware, software, information technology, and data analysis.. More specifically, the computing environment has been greatly improved with being compared to the past, so we are able to conduct risk analysis with the large amount of data actually available. One method which can take the technological advantages aforementioned should be the dynamic PSA such that conventional ET/FT can have time- and condition-dependent behaviors in accident scenarios. In this paper, we investigated the various enabling techniques for the dynamic PSA. Even though its history and academic achievement was great, it seems less interesting from industrial and regulatory viewpoint. Authors expect this can contribute to better understanding of dynamic PSA in terms of algorithm, practice, and applicability. In paper, the overview for the dynamic PSA was conducted. Most of methodologies share similar concepts. Among them, DDET seems a backbone for most of methodologies since it can be applied to large problems. The common characteristics sharing the concept of DDET are as follows: • Both deterministic and stochastic approaches • Improves the identification of PSA success criteria • Helps to limit detrimental effects of sequence binning (normally adopted in PSA) • Helps to avoid defining non-optimal success criteria that may distort the risk • Framework for comprehensively considering

  14. Survey of Dynamic PSA Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hansul; Kim, Hyeonmin; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taewan [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Event Tree(ET)/Fault Tree(FT) are significant methodology in Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) for Nuclear Power Plants(NPPs). ET/FT methodology has the advantage for users to be able to easily learn and model. It enables better communication between engineers engaged in the same field. However, conventional methodologies are difficult to cope with the dynamic behavior (e.g. operation mode changes or sequence-dependent failure) and integrated situation of mechanical failure and human errors. Meanwhile, new possibilities are coming for the improved PSA by virtue of the dramatic development on digital hardware, software, information technology, and data analysis.. More specifically, the computing environment has been greatly improved with being compared to the past, so we are able to conduct risk analysis with the large amount of data actually available. One method which can take the technological advantages aforementioned should be the dynamic PSA such that conventional ET/FT can have time- and condition-dependent behaviors in accident scenarios. In this paper, we investigated the various enabling techniques for the dynamic PSA. Even though its history and academic achievement was great, it seems less interesting from industrial and regulatory viewpoint. Authors expect this can contribute to better understanding of dynamic PSA in terms of algorithm, practice, and applicability. In paper, the overview for the dynamic PSA was conducted. Most of methodologies share similar concepts. Among them, DDET seems a backbone for most of methodologies since it can be applied to large problems. The common characteristics sharing the concept of DDET are as follows: • Both deterministic and stochastic approaches • Improves the identification of PSA success criteria • Helps to limit detrimental effects of sequence binning (normally adopted in PSA) • Helps to avoid defining non-optimal success criteria that may distort the risk • Framework for comprehensively considering

  15. Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction as a Predictor of Work Engagement among Academic Staff in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silman, Fatos

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between work-related basic need satisfaction and work engagement. Data were obtained from a total of 203 academics who are employed in various universities of Turkey. In this research Work-Related Basic Need Satisfaction Scale and The Turkish Form of Utrecht Work Engagement Scale were utilized. The data were…

  16. Work-role transition: from staff nurse to clinical nurse educator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Liz; Neville, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    This article presents the findings of a study describing Clinical Nurse Educators' experiences, as they recall their transition from staff nurse to the Clinical Nurse Educator role, within a New Zealand District Health Board. Nurse Educator roles influence clinical practice and professional development of nurses, and although designated as a senior role nationally, the complexities and size of the role are poorly understood. A qualitative descriptive methodology utilising transition theory as a conceptual framework underpinned the study. A sample of eight Clinical Nurse Educators from a New Zealand District Health Board were interviewed about their transition from experienced staff nurse to inexperienced senior nurse. Data were analysed using a general inductive approach. Participants found the Clinical Nurse Educator role was more complex than anticipated, with no preparation for the role and sub-optimal orientation periods being provided by the District Health Board. As a result, signs of stress were evident as the enormity of the role became apparent. Consequently, employers need to ensure that appropriate orientation programmes and mentorship are inherent in health care organisations.

  17. Working draft regulatory guide on release criteria for decommissioning: NRC staff's draft for comment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daily, M.C.; Huffert, A.; Cardile, F.; Malaro, J.C.

    1994-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations in 10 CFR 20 are being amended to include radiological criteria for decommissioning of lands and structures at nuclear facilities. 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E establishes criteria for the remediation of contaminated sites or facilities that will allow their release for future use with or without restrictions. The criteria include a Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE) limit of 15 mrem/year (0.15 mSv/y) that should not be exceeded by an average individual among those who could potentially receive the greatest exposure from any residual activity within a facility or on a site. The criteria also require a licensee to reduce any residual radioactivity to as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) levels. This staff draft guide describes acceptable procedures for determining the predicted dose level (PDL) from any residual radioactivity at the site. It describes the basic features of the calculational models and the associated default assumptions and parameter values the NRC staff would find acceptable in calculating PDLs. Appendices A, B, and C provide numerical values that can be used to estimate the dose from residual radioactivity remaining at a site. Since 10 CFR Part 20, Subpart E introduces several new concepts, definitions and discussions are included in a regulatory position concepts section of the guide to assist licensees in understanding some of the philosophy underlying the rule

  18. Procedure for Application of Software Reliability Growth Models to NPP PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Han Seong; Kang, Hyun Gook; Chang, Seung Cheol

    2009-01-01

    As the use of software increases at nuclear power plants (NPPs), the necessity for including software reliability and/or safety into the NPP Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) rises. This work proposes an application procedure of software reliability growth models (RGMs), which are most widely used to quantify software reliability, to NPP PSA. Through the proposed procedure, it can be determined if a software reliability growth model can be applied to the NPP PSA before its real application. The procedure proposed in this work is expected to be very helpful for incorporating software into NPP PSA

  19. Analysis of urinary PSA glycosylation is not indicative of high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrabés, Sílvia; Llop, Esther; Ferrer-Batallé, Montserrat; Ramírez, Manel; Aleixandre, Rosa N; Perry, Antoinette S; de Llorens, Rafael; Peracaula, Rosa

    2017-07-01

    The levels of core fucosylation and α2,3-linked sialic acid in serum Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA), using the lectins Pholiota squarrosa lectin (PhoSL) and Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), can discriminate between Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) and indolent prostate cancer (PCa) from aggressive PCa. In the present work we evaluated whether these glycosylation determinants could also be altered in urinary PSA obtained after digital rectal examination (DRE) and could also be useful for diagnosis determinations. For this purpose, α2,6-sialic acid and α1,6-fucose levels of urinary PSA from 53 patients, 18 biopsy-negative and 35 PCa patients of different aggressiveness degree, were analyzed by sandwich ELLA (Enzyme Linked Lectin Assay) using PhoSL and SNA. Changes in the levels of specific glycosylation determinants, that in serum PSA samples were indicative of PCa aggressiveness, were not found in PSA from DRE urine samples. Although urine is a simpler matrix for analyzing PSA glycosylation compared to serum, an immunopurification step was necessary to specifically detect the glycans on the PSA molecule. Those specific glycosylation determinants on urinary PSA were however not useful to improve PCa diagnosis. This could be probably due to the low proportion of PSA from the tumor in urine samples, which precludes the identification of aberrantly glycosylated PSA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of regulatory guidance on safety reviews of nuclear power plants in Germany. A survey on accomplished and current PSA activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, H.-P.; Froehmel, T.; Goertz, R.; Rehs, B.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the key points of the accomplished and current regulatory activities in order to revise PSA guide and the corresponding technical documents in Germany. The regulatory German PSA guide covers the fundamental requirements concerning the performance of PSAs in the frame of comprehensive safety reviews. The technical details regarding the performance of PSA are set out in two technical documents (PSA Methods and PSA Data) that have been developed by a working group of PSA experts (FAK PSA). Based on the experiences from the first series of PSRs, international experiences and the fact that PSR is mandatory since April 2002 revisions of all guides are underway. The first guide to be updated is the PSA guide together with the corresponding technical documents. The working programme and the revision process of FAK PSA was finished at the end of 2004 and the technical documents have recently been republished. (author)

  1. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, A; Embregts, P; Hendriks, L; Bosman, A

    2016-02-01

    Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an interpersonal model. As in functional analysis, this study tests the influence of client interpersonal behaviour, three types of staff reactions to challenging behaviour, two types of staff psychological resources and staff team climate on four styles of staff interpersonal behaviour. A total of 318 support staff members completed a questionnaire on staff interpersonal behaviour for 44 clients with ID and challenging behaviour, as well as seven questionnaires on client interpersonal behaviour, staff emotions, attributions, self-efficacy, self-reflection, coping styles and team climate. The influence of these seven factors on four staff interpersonal behaviours was examined using multilevel multiple regression analysis. Friendly-warm and dominant client interpersonal behaviour had a significant positive impact on friendly and assertive control staff behaviour, respectively. Also, there was a strong influence of staff negative and positive emotions, as well as their self-efficacy, on most of the staff interpersonal behaviours. Staff self-reflection, insight and avoidance-focused coping style had an impact on some staff interpersonal behaviours. Staff team climate only predicted higher support-seeking staff behaviour. In conducting a functional analysis of staff interpersonal behaviour, the results of this study can be used both as a framework in staff-client interaction training and in clinical practice for treating challenging behaviour. The emphasis in training and practice should not only be on the bidirectional dynamics of control and affiliation between staff and clients, but also - in order of importance - on the impact of staff emotions, self-efficacy, self-reflection and insight

  2. Improving the wellbeing of staff who work in palliative care settings: A systematic review of psychosocial interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rebecca C; Dempster, Martin; Donnelly, Michael; McCorry, Noleen K

    2016-10-01

    Staff in palliative care settings perform emotionally demanding roles which may lead to psychological distress including stress and burnout. Therefore, interventions have been designed to address these occupational risks. To investigate quantitative studies exploring the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions that attempt to improve psychological wellbeing of palliative care staff. A systematic review was conducted according to methodological guidance from UK Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. A search strategy was developed based on the initial scans of palliative care studies. Potentially eligible research articles were identified by searching the following databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE (Ovid), PsycINFO and Web of Science. Two reviewers independently screened studies against pre-set eligibility criteria. To assess quality, both researchers separately assessed the remaining studies using the Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies. A total of 1786 potentially eligible articles were identified - nine remained following screening and quality assessment. Study types included two randomised controlled trials, two non-randomised controlled trial designs, four one-group pre-post evaluations and one process evaluation. Studies took place in the United States and Canada (5), Europe (3) and Hong Kong (1). Interventions comprised a mixture of relaxation, education, support and cognitive training and targeted stress, fatigue, burnout, depression and satisfaction. The randomised controlled trial evaluations did not improve psychological wellbeing of palliative care staff. Only two of the quasi-experimental studies appeared to show improved staff wellbeing although these studies were methodologically weak. There is an urgent need to address the lack of intervention development work and high-quality research in this area. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Investigating Burnout and Psychological Well-Being of Staff Working with People with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour: The Role of Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Man Cheung; Harding, Carly

    2009-01-01

    Background: The present research extended previous research by broadening the dimensions of personality traits, and focusing on burnout and psychological well-being among staff working with people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey in which 103 staff completed questionnaires…

  4. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurits, Erica E M; de Veer, Anke J E; van der Hoek, Lucas S; Francke, Anneke L

    2015-12-01

    The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is important to retain existing nursing staff in the healthcare sector to ensure a stable home-care workforce for the future. However, to date there has been little research about the job factors in home care that affect whether staff are considering leaving the healthcare sector. The main purpose of the study was to examine how home-care nursing staff's self-perceived autonomy relates to whether they have considered leaving the healthcare sector and to assess the possible mediating effect of work engagement. The questionnaire-based, cross-sectional study involved 262 registered nurses and certified nursing assistants employed in Dutch home-care organisations (mean age of 51; 97% female). The respondents were members of the Dutch Nursing Staff Panel, a nationwide group of nursing staff members in various healthcare settings (67% response rate). The questionnaire included validated scales concerning self-perceived autonomy and work engagement and a measure for considering pursuing an occupation outside the healthcare sector. Logistic regression and mediation analyses were conducted to test associations between self-perceived autonomy, work engagement and considering leaving the healthcare sector. Nursing staff members in home care who perceive more autonomy are more engaged in their work and less likely to have considered leaving the healthcare sector. The positive association between self-perceived autonomy and considering leaving, found among nursing staff members regardless of their level of education, is mediated by work engagement. In developing strategies for retaining nursing staff in home care, employers and policy makers should target their efforts at enhancing nursing staff

  5. Menopause and work--the experience of middle-aged female teaching staff in an Egyptian governmental faculty of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammam, Rehab A M; Abbas, Reem A; Hunter, Myra S

    2012-03-01

    There is a global trend of increasing numbers of older women in the workforce. However, limited information is available regarding the relationship between the menopause transition and work, especially in developing countries. The objectives of this study were to investigate the relationship between experience of the menopause transition and work and to examine the factors affecting how women cope, including the extent to which women disclosed their menopausal status. Using a cross-sectional single group design, 131 middle-aged female medical teaching staff working in Zagazig Faculty of Medicine completed questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. Participants, particularly those who were postmenopausal, reported high average scores on depressed mood, memory/concentration, sleep problems, vasomotor symptoms, and sexual behavior subscales of the Women's Health Questionnaire (WHQ). Women reported that poor working environment and work policies and conditions, functioning as sources of work stress, aggravated their menopausal symptoms. Disclosure of their menopausal status was uncommon; limited time and socio-cultural barriers were the most commonly reported reasons for non-disclosure. It could be concluded that the menopause transition is an important occupational health issue especially for women in developing countries. Implementing health promotion programs, improving working environment and work policies, and raising awareness of menopause are recommended to help women to cope with the menopause transition and to maintain well-being and productivity at work. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Engagement and avoidance in support staff working with people with intellectual disability and challenging behavior : A multiple-case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Gerits, L.; Derksen, J.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Challenging behaviour of clients influences emotional wellbeing of staff; this in turn affects levels of staff engagement and avoidance within interactions with clients. The main goal of this study was to investigate to what extent levels of staff engagement and staff avoidance are

  7. Regulatory aspects of the use of PSA to evaluate technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, J.

    1991-01-01

    Based on experiences gained in PSA activities the regulatory body of the GDR initiated a programme to investigate the feasibility of using PSA for the evaluation of technical specifications. This programme is just under work. In addition, to improve PSA, the GDR takes part in a programme which is aimed at performing plant specific level 1, PSA as well as and which enables operating organizations to carry out PSA on their own. The most important of some preliminary general findings presented in this paper are: - Technical specifications form a well established envelope of operational conditions and procedures. A total re-evaluation is not considered necessary; Probabilistic evaluation of technical specifications should be an integrated part of PSA activities (at least level 1). Single assessment is not considered reasonable; Probabilistic evaluation of technical specifications has to be based on plant specific information and realistic accident sequence calculations; Up to now no quantitative probabilistic criteria for technical specifications have been established. (author)

  8. Blood Pressure Medicines Don’t Work If People Don’t Take Them PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Blood pressure medicines don’t work if people don’t take them. Learn how health care systems can work with patients to make taking medicines easier.

  9. Occupational exposure of nursing staff working with radioiodine therapy during 11 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calegaro, Jose Ulisses Manzzini; Teixeira, Sandra Mara Pessano

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the occupational exposure of nursing staff in charge of inpatients undergoing 131 I therapy during 11 years. Materials and methods: The exposure situations were classified according to a questionnaire answered by three nursing attendants, correlating the procedures with activities, distances and amount of time in the iodotherapy room. Records of received doses by two types of dosimeters were evaluated over two subsequent periods. In both periods the nursing attendants received instructions about radiological protection. Results: In usual situations, their amount of time in the iodotherapy room was in compliance with the standard time established by the service. In unusual situations, where the patient needed assistance for mobility, the exposure period was above the standard. However, this exposure occurs casually (only one or two times a year). During the period between 1993 and 1999 (dosimetric films) there were ten dose records, all of them at record level. From 2000 to 2003 (thermoluminescent dosimeters) ten dose records were also obtained, with only one of them at the investigation level. During this study period, the mean 131 I activity was doubled. Conclusion: Despite the increased levels of activity there was no significant increase in dose to nursing attendants. (author)

  10. The influence of factors of work environment and burnout syndrome on self-efficacy of medical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowska, Iwona; Rasińska, Renata; Głowacka, Maria Danuta

    2016-06-02

    Conditions of a healthy, friendly and safe work environment and proper work organisation increase self-efficacy and decrease or eliminate the factors causing the occurrence of burnout symptoms, all of which have a decisive impact on increasing the quality of work. The aim of the study was to analyse and assess the influence of factors of work environment and burnout syndrome on the self-efficacy of medical staff. The study comprised randomly selected professionally-active nurses working on hospital wards (N=405) on the area of two provinces in Poland. The study used the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, Copenhagen Burnout Inventory and a questionnaire concerning the factors that influence the process of work organisation at nursing positions in hospitals. Lower scores for self-efficacy resulted in a worse assessment of development opportunities and promotion prospects (r=-0.11), participation in the decision-making process (r=-0.11) and teamwork (r=-0.10). Lower self-efficacy contributed to the occurrence of burnout symptoms r∈[-0.19 - -0.17]. Properly shaped and used organisational factors are stimulating for professional efficiency and effectiveness, and consequently, for the quality of nursing work. Negative assessment of the factors in the work environment contributes to the occurrence of burnout symptoms and decrease in self-efficacy. Nurses with lower self-efficacy more often experienced symptoms of burnout.

  11. Development of PSA module for computerized accident management support (CAMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iguchi, Yukihiro

    1996-10-01

    CAMS (Computerised Accident Management Support) is a system that will provide assistance in case of the accidents in a nuclear power plant. The PSA module was developed in order to give useful information in this situation applying the PSA method, which is a comprehensive source of safety knowledge. This module contains plant-specific PSA data, comprising event trees, failure probabilities etc. It has several event trees categorised according to the initiating events. Each event tree has an initiating event frequency and branching probabilities. The various support systems for branches are considered and their dependencies are calculated logically. This module can be activated by data from the state identification (SI) module of CAMS. If an initiating event occurs, the event tree is re-calculated and the PSA module shows which systems of the plant should be activated to bring the plant to a safe state. If the plant responds to the event in the normal way, the plant will be shut down and come to a safe state. However, if some functions do not work, the PSA module generates another path and gives information about the critical systems. If the state of the plant is changed, either by the operators or automatically by the control system, the PSA module follows the new path. Because the estimation of the core damage frequency should be very quick in the accident situation, a simplified model of the event tree and fault trees was adopted. It enabled the PSA module to calculates the CDF within 5 seconds on a standard type work station. The development of the module has been successful. However, further development of the functionality of the module is suggested like real connection to a plant and to the strategy generator module of CAMS, applications for operational support, low power operation optimisation, etc. (author)

  12. International network on incorporation of ageing effects into PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchsteiger, C.; Patrik, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the background and status of a new International Network on ''Incorporating Ageing Effects into Probabilistic Safety Assessment''. The Joint Research Centre (JRC) of the European Commission organized in September 2004 the kickoff meeting of this Network at JRC's Institute for Energy in Petten, Netherlands, with the aims to open the APSA Network, to start discussion of ageing issues in relation to incorporating ageing effects into PSA tools and to come to consensus on objectives and work packages of the Network, taking into account the specific expectations of potential Network partners. The presentations and discussions at the meeting confirmed the main conclusion from the previously organized PSAM 7 pre-conference workshop on ''Incorporating PSA into Ageing Management'', Budapest, June 2004, namely that incorporating ageing effects into PSA seems to be more and more a hot topic particularly for risk assessment and ageing management of nuclear power plants operating at advanced age (more than 25-30 years) and for the purpose of plant life extension. However, it also appeared that, especially regarding the situation in Europe, at present there are several on-going feasibility or full studies in this area, but not yet a completed Ageing PSA leading to applications. The project's working method is a NETWORK of operators, industry, research, academia and consultants with an active interest in the area (physical networking via a series of workshops and virtual networking via the Internet). The resulting knowledge should help PSA developers and users to incorporate the effects of equipment ageing into current PSA tools and models, to identify and/or develop most effective corresponding methods, to focus on dominant ageing contributors and components and to promote the use of PSA for ageing management of Nuclear Power Plants. (orig.)

  13. What works in delivering dementia education or training to hospital staff? A critical synthesis of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surr, Claire A; Gates, Cara

    2017-10-01

    The quality of care delivered to people with dementia in hospital settings is of international concern. People with dementia occupy up to one quarter of acute hospital beds, however, staff working in hospitals report lack of knowledge and skills in caring for this group. There is limited evidence about the most effective approaches to training hospital staff on dementia. The purpose of this literature review was to examine published evidence on the most effective approaches to dementia training and education for hospital staff. The review was conducted using critical synthesis and included qualitative, quantitative and mixed/multi- methods studies. Kirkpatrick's four level model for the evaluation of training interventions was adopted to structure the review. The following databases were searched: MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, AMED, British Education Index, Education Abstracts, ERIC (EbscoHost), The Cochrane Library-Cochrane reviews, Economic evaluations, CENTRAL (Wiley), HMIC (Ovid), ASSIA, IBSS (Proquest), Conference Proceedings Citation Indexes (Web of Science), using a combination of keyword for the following themes: Dementia/Alzheimer's, training/education, staff knowledge and patient outcomes. A total of 20 papers were included in the review, the majority of which were low or medium quality, impacting on generalisability. The 16 different training programmes evaluated in the studies varied in terms of duration and mode of delivery, although most employed face-to-face didactic techniques. Studies predominantly reported on reactions to training and knowledge, only one study evaluated outcomes across all of the levels of the Kirkpatrick model. Key features of training that appeared to be more acceptable and effective were identified related to training content, delivery methods, practicalities, duration and support for implementation. The review methodology enabled inclusion of a broad range of studies and permitted common features of successful programmes to be

  14. Blood Pressure Medicines Don’t Work If People Don’t Take Them PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-09-13

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Blood pressure medicines don’t work if people don’t take them. Learn how health care systems can work with patients to make taking medicines easier.  Created: 9/13/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/13/2016.

  15. Awareness of Stress-Reduction Interventions on Work Attitudes: The Impact of Tenure and Staff Group in Australian Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignata, Silvia; Winefield, Anthony H; Provis, Chris; Boyd, Carolyn M

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA) and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees' reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1) perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2) job satisfaction for employees with 0-19 years of tenure; (3) trust in senior management for employees with 6-19 years of tenure; and (4) affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6-10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20-38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual issues in organizational

  16. Awareness of stress-reduction interventions on work attitudes: the impact of tenure and staff group in Australian universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Pignata

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the impact of staff group role and length of organizational tenure in the relationship between the awareness of stress interventions (termed intervention awareness: IA and the work-related attitudinal outcomes of university employees. A two-wave longitudinal study of a sample of 869 employees from 13 universities completed a psychosocial work factors and health questionnaire. Hierarchical regression analyses examined the contribution of staff role and different lengths of organizational tenure with IA and employees’ reports of job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. Employees' length of tenure affected the relation between IA and work attitudes, and there were also differences between academic and non-academic staff groups. For non-academic employees, IA predicted job satisfaction, affective organizational commitment, trust in senior management, and perceived procedural justice. However, for academics, IA only predicted job satisfaction and trust which identifies a need to increase the visibility of organizational interventions. Across the tenure groups, IA predicted: (1 perceived procedural justice for employees with five or less years of tenure; (2 job satisfaction for employees with 0–19 years of tenure; (3 trust in senior management for employees with 6–19 years of tenure; and (4 affective organizational commitment for employees with a tenure length of 6–10 years. Employees working at the university for an intermediate period had the most positive perceptions of their organization in terms of IA, job satisfaction, trust in senior management, and affective organizational commitment, whereas employees with 20–38 years of tenure had the least positive perceptions. Results suggest that employees in the middle of their careers report the most positive perceptions of their university. The findings highlight the need to attend to contextual

  17. Reflections on health staff working with elderly people in the public administration. Case studies /

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concepción Nieto-Morales

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The speech of female health professionals who work in public residences is analyzed in this writing, a work which most of them choose as their vocation, from a perspective in public employment and personal cares. The crisis has destroyed positions, social rights, made precarious the employment done in all the environments and especially in the Administration, the outsourcing of work is started, the increasing of flexibility of the labor conditions, the instability… Everything worsens particularly the conditions of the public health professionals. The question arisen is: where are the labor stability, the vocation and working in a position each one has been trained for? The labor conditions worsen, making employment and positions more precarious. The statistics reflect there is less unemployment when there is more training; but there are many university people who work in a position different to the one they have been trained for. A group of discussion composed by six people with a university degree in Nursing and Auxiliary Nursing Care, who work in public residences for elderly people, has been created to focus on this work, out of the labor place.

  18. Work-based learning in health care organisations experienced by nursing staff: A systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Marja; Lunkka, Nina; Suhonen, Marjo

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this review is to systematically summarise qualitative evidence about work-based learning in health care organisations as experienced by nursing staff. Work-based learning is understood as informal learning that occurs inside the work community in the interaction between employees. Studies for this review were searched for in the CINAHL, PubMed, Scopus and ABI Inform ProQuest databases for the period 2000-2015. Nine original studies met the inclusion criteria. After the critical appraisal by two researchers, all nine studies were selected for the review. The findings of the original studies were aggregated, and four statements were prepared, to be utilised in clinical work and decision-making. The statements concerned the following issues: (1) the culture of the work community; (2) the physical structures, spaces and duties of the work unit; (3) management; and (4) interpersonal relations. Understanding the nurses' experiences of work-based learning and factors behind these experiences provides an opportunity to influence the challenges of learning in the demanding context of health care organisations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The role of PSA in safety management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szikszai, T.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discusses the following issues: defence in depth principle (the role of the barriers, how does PSA represents the barriers?); the safety management and nuclear power plants; the probabilistic and deterministic approaches; the PSA applications and safety management

  20. The Influence of Organizational Climate on Work Productivity Library Staff at CISRAL Padjadjaran University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Nurma Hastuti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak : Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui (1 Pengaruh iklim organisasi terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (2 Pengaruh struktur terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (3 Pengaruh standar-standar terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran (4 Pengaruh tanggung jawab terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran. Penelitian ini dilakukan pada 25 orang tenaga perpustakaan CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran. Metode penelitian ini menggunakan statistik deskriptif. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa (1 Iklim organisasi memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (2 Struktur memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, (3 Standar memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran, dan (4 Tanggung jawab memiliki pengaruh signifikan terhadap produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran. Iklim organisasi pada CISRAL Universitas Padjadjaran dikategorikan kondusif, namun sebaiknya perpustakaan dapat menciptakan iklim organisasi yang lebih kondusif dan nyaman agar produktivitas kerja tenaga perpustakaan semakin meningkat.   Kata Kunci : Iklim Organisasi, Tenaga Perpustakaan, Produktivitas Kerja   Abstract: This study aims to find out (1 The influence of organizational climate on work productivity of librarian at Padjadjaran University, CISRAL (2 The Influences of structure on work productivity of librarian at CISRAL Padjadjaran University (3 The influence of standards on work productivity of librarian at CISRAL University of Padjadjaran (4 The influence of responsibility on work productivity librarian at CISRAL Padjadjaran University

  1. E-assessment of prior learning: a pilot study of interactive assessment of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Annika; Andrén, Marianne; Engström, Maria

    2014-04-18

    The current paper presents a pilot study of interactive assessment using information and communication technology (ICT) to evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care. Theoretical and practical assessment methods were developed and used with simulated patients and computer-based tests to identify strengths and areas for personal development among staff with no formal education. Of the 157 staff with no formal education, 87 began the practical and/or theoretical assessments, and 63 completed both assessments. Several of the staff passed the practical assessments, except the morning hygiene assessment, where several failed. Other areas for staff development, i.e. where several failed (>50%), were the theoretical assessment of the learning objectives: Health, Oral care, Ergonomics, hygiene, esthetic, environmental, Rehabilitation, Assistive technology, Basic healthcare and Laws and organization. None of the staff passed all assessments. Number of years working in elderly care and staff age were not statistically significantly related to the total score of grades on the various learning objectives. The interactive assessments were useful in assessing staff members' practical and theoretical knowledge, skills, and abilities and in identifying areas in need of development. It is important that personnel who lack formal qualifications be clearly identified and given a chance to develop their competence through training, both theoretical and practical. The interactive e-assessment approach analyzed in the present pilot study could serve as a starting point.

  2. E-assessment of prior learning: a pilot study of interactive assessment of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The current paper presents a pilot study of interactive assessment using information and communication technology (ICT) to evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care. Methods Theoretical and practical assessment methods were developed and used with simulated patients and computer-based tests to identify strengths and areas for personal development among staff with no formal education. Results Of the 157 staff with no formal education, 87 began the practical and/or theoretical assessments, and 63 completed both assessments. Several of the staff passed the practical assessments, except the morning hygiene assessment, where several failed. Other areas for staff development, i.e. where several failed (>50%), were the theoretical assessment of the learning objectives: Health, Oral care, Ergonomics, hygiene, esthetic, environmental, Rehabilitation, Assistive technology, Basic healthcare and Laws and organization. None of the staff passed all assessments. Number of years working in elderly care and staff age were not statistically significantly related to the total score of grades on the various learning objectives. Conclusion The interactive assessments were useful in assessing staff members’ practical and theoretical knowledge, skills, and abilities and in identifying areas in need of development. It is important that personnel who lack formal qualifications be clearly identified and given a chance to develop their competence through training, both theoretical and practical. The interactive e-assessment approach analyzed in the present pilot study could serve as a starting point. PMID:24742168

  3. Hepatitis Awareness Month PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-05-11

    May is National Hepatitis Awareness Month. This 30 second PSA discusses hepatitis and encourages listners to talk to their health care professional about getting tested.  Created: 5/11/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention.   Date Released: 5/11/2011.

  4. World AIDS Day PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-11-16

    December 1 is World AIDS Day. In this PSA, communities are encouraged to get tested for HIV.  Created: 11/16/2011 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/16/2011.

  5. Raccoon Roundworm Infection PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-08-27

    This 60 second PSA describes the signs and symptoms of and ways to prevent Baylisascaris infection, a parasitic roundworm infection that is spread through raccoon feces.  Created: 8/27/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/28/2012.

  6. Methods and use of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaurio, J.

    2005-01-01

    The objective is to introduce possible methods and methodological issues for application of PSA for decision making at nuclear power plants based on risk and cost, to present a number of application examples, and to describe recommendations and regulatory guides for risk-informed applications. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of SKIFS 2004:1 and Tillsynshandbok PSA against the ASME PRA Standard and European requirements on PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellstroem, Per

    2005-04-01

    Requirements on PSA for risk informed applications are expressed in different international documents. The ASME PRA standard published in spring 2002 is one such document, PSA requirements are also expressed in the European Utility Requirements (EUR) for new reactors. The Swedish PSA requirements are provided in the Swedish regulators (SKI) statutes SKIFS 2004:1. SKI also has a review handbook for PSA activities (SKI report 2003:48). The review handbook is a support during review of the utilities PSA activities and the PSAs themselves. The review handbook expresses SKIs expectations by providing so called important aspects for both the PSA work and the PSAs, A comparison of SKIFS requirements and the important aspects in the Review handbook, on one side, and the requirements on PSA in EUR and ASME on the other side, is presented. The comparison shows a large difference in the level of detail in the different documents, where ASME is most detailed and specific. This is expected since the SKI review handbook not is a 'PSA guide' in the same way as the ASME PRA standard. A direct comparison of the ASME PRA standard requirements with the important aspects in the review handbook cannot answer the question which ASME capacity level that is achieved by a PSA meeting all important aspects. The conclusion is that it is not likely to achieve capacity level 2 and 3, since very few ASME level 3 attributes are explicitly expressed as important aspects, though many are expressed in general terms. The review handbook important aspects that are most similar to the ASME capacity level 1 attributes are initiating events, sequence analysis, and system analysis while less similarity is found for analysis of operator actions data analysis, quantification and containment analysis (level 2). Less similarity is found for capacity level 2 and 3. However, the number of additional ASME attributes on capacity level 2 and 3 are few. There are also important aspects in the review handbook that

  8. Is staff well-being and communication enhanced by multidisciplinary work shift evaluations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluiter, Judith K.; Bos, Albert P.; Tol, Dirk; Calff, Mart; Krijnen, Margot; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the implementation of multidisciplinary structured work shift evaluations at a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) to enhance team communication. Desogn and setting: Prospective, repeated measurements design, comparison of pre/post measurements and process measures in a Dutch

  9. Work and Life Balance Support of Female Midlevel Noninstructional Staff at Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Stephanie J.; Taylor, Colette M.

    2013-01-01

    Two-year public institutions are known for their nurturing academic environments that support students from diverse backgrounds and experiences. One would assume that these nurturing and supportive environments would also go beyond the students to include employees. Family-friendly working environments support the needs of employees to balance…

  10. Development of the IPRO-zone for fire PSA and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, D. I.; Han, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    A PSA analyst has been manually determining fire-induced component failure modes and modeling them into the PSA logics. These can be difficult and time-consuming tasks as they need much information and many events are to be modeled. KAERI has been developing the IPRO-ZONE (interface program for constructing zone effect table) to facilitate fire PSA works for identifying and modeling fire-induced component failure modes, and to construct a one top fire event PSA model. With the output of the IPRO-ZONE, the AIMS-PSA, and internal event one top PSA model, one top fire events PSA model is automatically constructed. The outputs of the IPRO-ZONE include information on fire zones/fire scenarios, fire propagation areas, equipment failure modes affected by a fire, internal PSA basic events corresponding to fire-induced equipment failure modes, and fire events to be modeled. This paper introduces the IPRO-ZONE, and its application results to fire PSA of Ulchin Unit 3 and SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). (authors)

  11. Development of the IPRO-zone for fire PSA and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, D. I.; Han, S. H. [Integrated Safety Assessment Div., Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. KAERI, 1045 Daedeokdaero (150 Deokjin-Dong), Yuseong-Gu, Daejon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01

    A PSA analyst has been manually determining fire-induced component failure modes and modeling them into the PSA logics. These can be difficult and time-consuming tasks as they need much information and many events are to be modeled. KAERI has been developing the IPRO-ZONE (interface program for constructing zone effect table) to facilitate fire PSA works for identifying and modeling fire-induced component failure modes, and to construct a one top fire event PSA model. With the output of the IPRO-ZONE, the AIMS-PSA, and internal event one top PSA model, one top fire events PSA model is automatically constructed. The outputs of the IPRO-ZONE include information on fire zones/fire scenarios, fire propagation areas, equipment failure modes affected by a fire, internal PSA basic events corresponding to fire-induced equipment failure modes, and fire events to be modeled. This paper introduces the IPRO-ZONE, and its application results to fire PSA of Ulchin Unit 3 and SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor). (authors)

  12. Short overview of PSA quantification methods, pitfalls on the road from approximate to exact results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banov, Reni; Simic, Zdenko; Sterc, Davor

    2014-01-01

    Over time the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) models have become an invaluable companion in the identification and understanding of key nuclear power plant (NPP) vulnerabilities. PSA is an effective tool for this purpose as it assists plant management to target resources where the largest benefit for plant safety can be obtained. PSA has quickly become an established technique to numerically quantify risk measures in nuclear power plants. As complexity of PSA models increases, the computational approaches become more or less feasible. The various computational approaches can be basically classified in two major groups: approximate and exact (BDD based) methods. In recent time modern commercially available PSA tools started to provide both methods for PSA model quantification. Besides availability of both methods in proven PSA tools the usage must still be taken carefully since there are many pitfalls which can drive to wrong conclusions and prevent efficient usage of PSA tool. For example, typical pitfalls involve the usage of higher precision approximation methods and getting a less precise result, or mixing minimal cuts and prime implicants in the exact computation method. The exact methods are sensitive to selected computational paths in which case a simple human assisted rearrangement may help and even switch from computationally non-feasible to feasible methods. Further improvements to exact method are possible and desirable which opens space for a new research. In this paper we will show how these pitfalls may be detected and how carefully actions must be done especially when working with large PSA models. (authors)

  13. Work wellness of academic staff in South African higher education institutions / Emmerentia Nicolene Barkhuizen

    OpenAIRE

    Barkhuizen, Emmerentia Nicolene

    2005-01-01

    Academia is a demanding profession, as evidenced by a body of research that documents the debilitating impact of occupational stress and burnout on the personal and professional welfare of academics. In particular, high levels of these pathological phenomena, left unchecked, undermine the quality, productivity and creativity of the academics' work in addition to their health, well-being and morale. Despite these indicators of "weaknesses" and "malfunctioning", academics know th...

  14. We cannot staff for 'what ifs': the social organization of rural nurses' safeguarding work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Karen

    2012-09-01

    Rural nurses play an important role in the provision of maternity care for Canadian women. This care is an important part of how rural nurses safeguard the patients who receive care in small rural hospitals. This study utilized institutional ethnography as an approach for describing rural nursing work and for exploring how nurses' work experiences are socially organized. Rural nurses advocated for safe healthcare environments by ensuring that skilled nurses were available for every shift, day and night, at their local hospital. Rural nurses noted that this work was particularly difficult for the provision of maternity care. This article explores two threads or cues to institutional organization that were identified in our interviews and observations; namely staffing and safety standards, and the need for flexibility in staffing in small rural hospitals. Rural nurses' concerns about ensuring that skilled nurses are available in small rural hospitals do not enter into current management discourses that focus on efficiency and cost savings or find a home within current discourses of patient safety 'competencies'. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Applicability of living PSA in NPP modernization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himanen, R.

    1999-01-01

    Recently the utility Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) has modernized the Olkiluoto 1 and 2 nuclear units and increased the net electric power by 18 per cent. Level 2 PSA was performed during the modernization project and the living level 1 PSA was used to support the design of the plant modifications. The plant specific living PSA model was a powerful tool when evaluating modernization alternatives. Successive support of safety management with the PSA model requires, that both the utility and the Regulatory Body understand capability and limitations of the model in details. TVO has prepared an internal procedure that presents in detail the practices and responsibilities concerning living PSA. The procedure is based on general guidelines and requirements on probabilistic safety analysis of nuclear power plants in Finland, released by the Regulatory Body. Living PSA requires that also the procedure for the use of living PSA is living. The recently published USNRC Regulatory Guides on PSA will be taken into account in the next version of the TVO PSA procedure. The PSA Peer Review Certification Process is one way to evaluate the quality of PSA in general, but also to detect the weaknesses of the PSA. However, the Certification Process cover only limited scope of PSA omitting e.g. all other external events except internal floods. This paper gives an overview on the scope of living PSA for Olkiluoto 1 and 2, and presents some examples on the real use of PSA concerning the modernization of the plant. Definition of quantitative dependability requirements for renovated systems is possible, but on the other hand, proving of these targets is in some cases extremely difficult, because of lacking dependability data. The problems are mainly concerned in systems with of programmable logic control. (au)

  16. Working in small-scale, homelike dementia care: effects on staff burnout symptoms and job characteristics. A quasi-experimental, longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwakhalen, Sandra Mg; Hamers, Jan Ph; van Rossum, Erik; Ambergen, Ton; Kempen, Gertrudis Ijm; Verbeek, Hilde

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports on a quasi-experimental, longitudinal study on the effects of working in a new type of dementia care facility (i.e. small-scale living facilities) on staff burnout symptoms and job characteristics (job autonomy, social support, physical demands and workload). It is hypothesised that nursing staff working in small-scale facilities experience fewer burnout symptoms, more autonomy and social support, and fewer symptoms of physical demands and workload compared with staff in regular wards. Two types of long-term institutional nursing care settings were included: 28 houses in small-scale living facilities and 21 regular psychogeriatric wards in nursing homes. At baseline and at follow-ups after 6 and 12 months nursing staff were assessed by means of self-report questionnaires. In total, 305 nursing staff members were included in the study, 114 working in small-scale living facilities (intervention group) and 191 in regular wards (control group). No overall effects on burnout symptoms were detected. Significantly fewer physical demands and lower workload were experienced by staff working in small-scale living facilities compared with staff in regular wards. They also experienced more job autonomy. No significant effect was found for overall social support in the total group. This study suggests positive effects of the work environment on several work characteristics. Organisational climate differs in the two conditions, which might account for our results. This may influence nursing staff well-being and has important implications for nursing home managers and policy makers. Future studies should enhance our understanding of the influence of job characteristics on outcomes.

  17. Modelling discrete choice variables in assessment of teaching staff work satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieilă, Mihai; Popescu, Constanţa; Tudorache, Ana-Maria; Toplicianu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational) in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities.

  18. Modelling discrete choice variables in assessment of teaching staff work satisfaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Mieilă

    Full Text Available Levels of self-reported job satisfaction and motivation were measured by survey in a sample of 286 teachers. Using the discrete choice framework, the paper tries to assess the relevance of the considered indicators (demographic, social, motivational in overall teaching work satisfaction. The findings provide evidence that job satisfaction is correlated significantly with level of university degree held by the teacher, type of secondary school where the teacher is enrolled, revenues, and salary-tasks adequacy. This is important for the Romanian economy, since the education system is expected to provide future human resources with enhanced skills and abilities.

  19. Impact of Pre-Initiators on PSA in Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochirbat, Chimedtseren [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sok Chul [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Most of nuclear power plants had already conducted PSA work to examine their plant safety for identifying vulnerability and preparing the mitigating strategies for severe accident. However, the PSA for research reactor has been conducted limitedly comparing with nuclear power plants due to lack of awareness and resources. Most of PSA results demonstrated that human failure events (HFEs) take a major role of risk contributor in terms of core damage frequency. HFEs are categorized as the following three types: pre-initiating event interaction (e.g., maintenance of errors, testing errors, calibration errors), initiating event related interactions (e.g., human error causing loss of power, human error causing system trip), and post-initiating event (e.g., all action actuating manual safety system backup of an automatic system). Lack of resources and utilization of research reactor calls a vicious circle in terms of safety degradation. The safety degradation poses the vulnerability of human failure during research reactor utilization process. Typically, evaluation of pre-initiators related to test and maintenance are not taking into account in PSA for research reactors. This paper aims to investigate the impact of pre-initiating events related to test and maintenance activities on PSA results in terms of core damage frequency for a research reactor.

  20. Impact of Pre-Initiators on PSA in Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochirbat, Chimedtseren; Kim, Sok Chul

    2014-01-01

    Most of nuclear power plants had already conducted PSA work to examine their plant safety for identifying vulnerability and preparing the mitigating strategies for severe accident. However, the PSA for research reactor has been conducted limitedly comparing with nuclear power plants due to lack of awareness and resources. Most of PSA results demonstrated that human failure events (HFEs) take a major role of risk contributor in terms of core damage frequency. HFEs are categorized as the following three types: pre-initiating event interaction (e.g., maintenance of errors, testing errors, calibration errors), initiating event related interactions (e.g., human error causing loss of power, human error causing system trip), and post-initiating event (e.g., all action actuating manual safety system backup of an automatic system). Lack of resources and utilization of research reactor calls a vicious circle in terms of safety degradation. The safety degradation poses the vulnerability of human failure during research reactor utilization process. Typically, evaluation of pre-initiators related to test and maintenance are not taking into account in PSA for research reactors. This paper aims to investigate the impact of pre-initiating events related to test and maintenance activities on PSA results in terms of core damage frequency for a research reactor

  1. [Quality of working life and burnout among nursing staff in Intensive Care Units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Denise Rodrigues Costa; Paladini, Márcia; Biato, Cleonice; Pais, Juliana Domingues; Oliveira, Adelaine Rodrigues

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive-correlational and cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the quality of working life (QWL) and the presence of burnout among nursing professionals working at Intensive Care Units. The sample was composed of 53 nursing professionals from a university hospital located in the city of Londrina-PR, Brazil. Three instruments were used for data collection: socio-demographic and professional characterization, Visual Analogue Scale for QWL and Maslach Burnout Inventory. Data was collected from April to August, 2009. Among the participants, most were auxiliary nurses (52.8%), women (66.0%) and married (67.9%). The average age was of 42.4 years. Regarding assessment of QWL, the average score obtained for the total sample was 71.1 (SD=15.5), showing that workers were satisfied with their QWL. The average for Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization and Personal Accomplishment dimensions was 11.4 (SD=7.7), 4.6 (SD=4.1) and 25.0 (SD=5.9), respectively. The QWL for the total sample showed significant association only with Emotional Exhaustion (p=0.000).

  2. Radiation exposure to the staff working in PET/CT and Cyclotron Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.D.

    2016-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been available in number of centers for more than 25 years, but its use was not wide spread until 10 years ago. In Bulgarian PET/CT was installed for the first time in 2009 and the dose on demand cyclotron also for the first time – in 2013 in Nuclear Medicine Department in University Hospital St. Marina in Varna, Bulgaria. Responsibility of every radiation protection officer is to educate the stuff how to protect their selves from radioactive exposure and to observe and calculate the dose to the people and the stuff. The purpose of this paper is to show how big the doses of the stuff working in Nuclear Medicine Center including PET/CT and Cyclotron facilities situated in University Hospital St. Marina in Varna, Bulgaria are. The Department is working now with about 15 patients every day. The dose rates measured with personal TLD’s and personal dose rate meters for the last 5 years for the stuff are under 3 mSv. As the average dose is under 1 mSv, and the doses over 1mSv are only for nurses who injected the FDG. Keywords: radiation exposure, effective dose, PET/CT, Cyclotron, FDGbf

  3. An analysis of stress, burnout, and work commitment among disability support staff in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Emmett; Healy, Olive; Lydon, Sinėad

    2015-12-01

    Previous research has suggested that challenging behaviour emitted by persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities negatively impacts upon the levels of stress and burnout of those who support and care for them. In the current study a sample of disability support workers in the UK (N=138) reported their levels of perceived stress, burnout, and commitment to their work. The relationship between the frequency and severity of aggressive/destructive behaviours to which they were exposed, and these three measures were examined. Results showed that participants scored lower on measures of burnout in the current study than has been reported by similar research studies in the UK and North America. The results revealed an association between challenging behaviours experienced and participants' perceived stress and emotional exhaustion. Perceived stress and burnout were also associated with participants' commitment to their work. Finally, a series of regression analyses identified a number of predictors of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment among disability support workers. The results and their implications for the consideration of disability support worker wellbeing and future research in this area are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Research Staff | Buildings | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Staff Research Staff Photo of Roderick Jackson Roderick Jackson Laboratory Program Manager -related research at NREL. He works closely with senior laboratory management to set the strategic agenda for NREL's buildings portfolio, including all research, development, and market implementation

  5. Prevalence and causes of abnormal PSA recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenbach, Noémie; Müntener, Michael; Zanoni, Paolo; Saleh, Lanja; Saba, Karim; Umbehr, Martin; Velagapudi, Srividya; Hof, Danielle; Sulser, Tullio; Wild, Peter J; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Poyet, Cédric

    2018-01-26

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test is of paramount importance as a diagnostic tool for the detection and monitoring of patients with prostate cancer. In the presence of interfering factors such as heterophilic antibodies or anti-PSA antibodies the PSA test can yield significantly falsified results. The prevalence of these factors is unknown. We determined the recovery of PSA concentrations diluting patient samples with a standard serum of known PSA concentration. Based on the frequency distribution of recoveries in a pre-study on 268 samples, samples with recoveries 120% were defined as suspect, re-tested and further characterized to identify the cause of interference. A total of 1158 consecutive serum samples were analyzed. Four samples (0.3%) showed reproducibly disturbed recoveries of 10%, 68%, 166% and 4441%. In three samples heterophilic antibodies were identified as the probable cause, in the fourth anti-PSA-autoantibodies. The very low recovery caused by the latter interference was confirmed in serum, as well as heparin- and EDTA plasma of blood samples obtained 6 months later. Analysis by eight different immunoassays showed recoveries ranging between PSA which however did not show any disturbed PSA recovery. About 0.3% of PSA determinations by the electrochemiluminescence assay (ECLIA) of Roche diagnostics are disturbed by heterophilic or anti-PSA autoantibodies. Although they are rare, these interferences can cause relevant misinterpretations of a PSA test result.

  6. Methodology for seismic PSA of NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirsa, P.

    1999-09-01

    A general methodology is outlined for seismic PSA (probabilistic safety assessment). The main objectives of seismic PSA include: description of the course of an event; understanding the most probable failure sequences; gaining insight into the overall probability of reactor core damage; identification of the main seismic risk contributors; identification of the range of peak ground accelerations contributing significantly to the plant risk; and comparison of the seismic risk with risks from other events. The results of seismic PSA are typically compared with those of internal PSA and of PSA of other external events. If the results of internal and external PSA are available, sensitivity studies and cost benefit analyses are performed prior to any decision regarding corrective actions. If the seismic PSA involves analysis of the containment, useful information can be gained regarding potential seismic damage of the containment. (P.A.)

  7. Re-examining Prostate-specific Antigen (PSA) Density: Defining the Optimal PSA Range and Patients for Using PSA Density to Predict Prostate Cancer Using Extended Template Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jue, Joshua S; Barboza, Marcelo Panizzutti; Prakash, Nachiketh S; Venkatramani, Vivek; Sinha, Varsha R; Pavan, Nicola; Nahar, Bruno; Kanabur, Pratik; Ahdoot, Michael; Dong, Yan; Satyanarayana, Ramgopal; Parekh, Dipen J; Punnen, Sanoj

    2017-07-01

    To compare the predictive accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) density vs PSA across different PSA ranges and by prior biopsy status in a prospective cohort undergoing prostate biopsy. Men from a prospective trial underwent an extended template biopsy to evaluate for prostate cancer at 26 sites throughout the United States. The area under the receiver operating curve assessed the predictive accuracy of PSA density vs PSA across 3 PSA ranges (10 ng/mL). We also investigated the effect of varying the PSA density cutoffs on the detection of cancer and assessed the performance of PSA density vs PSA in men with or without a prior negative biopsy. Among 1290 patients, 585 (45%) and 284 (22%) men had prostate cancer and significant prostate cancer, respectively. PSA density performed better than PSA in detecting any prostate cancer within a PSA of 4-10 ng/mL (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC]: 0.70 vs 0.53, P PSA >10 mg/mL (AUC: 0.84 vs 0.65, P PSA density was significantly more predictive than PSA in detecting any prostate cancer in men without (AUC: 0.73 vs 0.67, P PSA increases, PSA density becomes a better marker for predicting prostate cancer compared with PSA alone. Additionally, PSA density performed better than PSA in men with a prior negative biopsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Approach to development and use of PSA Level 2 analysis for the Cernavoda nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcu, I.; Deaconu, R.; Radu, G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper first describes the status of PSA activities for the Cernavoda NPP and the extension of the PSA work to include Level 2 PSA. Important characteristics of this reactor type for Level 2 PSA are outlined. Due to the specific layout of the CANDU reactor the evolution of severe accidents is considerably different to vessel type LWRs. Accidents can be roughly categorized into three categories, ''''severe accidents'''' which lead to the loss of core structural integrity, delayed loss of core structural integrity as a consequence of the loss of heat sinks, and fuel channel failures. The current work for modelling accident progression in the core region is described. The elements for the Level 2 PSA including definition of PDSs, probabilistic containment logic and source term calculation are outlined. It is pointed out that uncertainties have to be considered which are contained in the models to bridge knowledge gaps. For this purpose sensitivity studies will be carried out for key modelling assumptions. (author)

  9. Sleep interruption associated with house staff work schedules alters circadian gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Ohman-Strickland, Pamela; Kelly-McNeil, Kathie; Kipen, Howard; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Lew, Jenny Pan; Zarbl, Helmut

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that disruption of circadian rhythm by shift work increases the risk of breast and prostate cancer. Our studies demonstrated that carcinogens disrupt the circadian expression of circadian genes (CGs) and circadian-controlled genes (CCGs) during the early stages of rat mammary carcinogenesis. A chemopreventive regimen of methylselenocysteine (MSC) restored the circadian expression of CGs and CCGs, including PERIOD 2 (PER2) and estrogen receptor β (ERS2), to normal. The present study evaluated whether changes in CG and CCG expression in whole blood can serve as indicators of circadian disruption in shift workers. Fifteen shift workers were recruited to a crossover study. Blood samples were drawn before (6 PM) and after (8 AM) completing a night shift after at least seven days on floating night-shift rotation, and before (8 AM), during (1 PM), and after (6 PM) completing seven days on day shift. The plasma melatonin level and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of PER2, nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group d, member 1 (NR1D1), and ERS2 were measured, and the changes in levels of melatonin and gene expression were evaluated with statistical analyses. The mRNA expression of PER2 was affected by shift (p = 0.0079); the levels were higher in the evening for the night shift, but higher in the morning for the day shift. Increased PER2 expression (p = 0.034) was observed in the evening on the night versus day shifts. The melatonin level was higher in the morning for both day shifts (p = 0.013) and night shifts (p <0.0001). Changes in the level of PER2 gene expression can serve as a biomarker of disrupted circadian rhythm in blood cells. Therefore, they can be a useful intermediate indicator of efficacy in future MSC-mediated chemoprevention studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Differences in work environment for staff as an explanation for variation in central line bundle compliance in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuna S H; Stone, Patricia W; Pogorzelska-Maziarz, Monika; Nembhard, Ingrid M

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a common and costly quality problem, and their prevention is a national priority. A decade ago, researchers identified an evidence-based bundle of practices that reduce CLABSIs. Compliance with this bundle remains low in many hospitals. The aim of this study was to assess whether differences in core aspects of work environments-workload, quality of relationships, and prioritization of quality-are associated with variation in maximal CLABSI bundle compliance, that is, compliance 95%-100% of the time in intensive care units (ICUs). A cross-sectional study of hospital medical-surgical ICUs in the United States was done. Data on work environment and bundle compliance were obtained from the Prevention of Nosocomial Infections and Cost-Effectiveness Refined Survey completed in 2011 by infection prevention directors, and data on ICU and hospital characteristics were obtained from the National Healthcare Safety Network. Factor and multilevel regression analyses were conducted. Reasonable workload and prioritization of quality were positively associated with maximal CLABSI bundle compliance. High-quality relationships, although a significant predictor when evaluated apart from workload and prioritization of quality, had no significant effect after accounting for these two factors. Aspects of the staff work environment are associated with maximal CLABSI bundle compliance in ICUs. Our results suggest that hospitals can foster improvement in ensuring maximal CLABSI bundle compliance-a crucial precursor to reducing CLABSI infection rates-by establishing reasonable workloads and prioritizing quality.

  11. Too Much Sodium PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second PSA is based on the February 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Ninety percent of Americans age two and older eat too much sodium which can increase your risk for high blood pressure and often leads to heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death in the US. Learn several small steps you can take to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet.

  12. Programmable automation systems in PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulkkinen, U.

    1997-06-01

    The Finnish safety authority (STUK) requires plant specific PSAs, and quantitative safety goals are set on different levels. The reliability analysis is more problematic when critical safety functions are realized by applying programmable automation systems. Conventional modeling techniques do not necessarily apply to the analysis of these systems, and the quantification seems to be impossible. However, it is important to analyze contribution of programmable automation systems to the plant safety and PSA is the only method with system analytical view over the safety. This report discusses the applicability of PSA methodology (fault tree analyses, failure modes and effects analyses) in the analysis of programmable automation systems. The problem of how to decompose programmable automation systems for reliability modeling purposes is discussed. In addition to the qualitative analysis and structural reliability modeling issues, the possibility to evaluate failure probabilities of programmable automation systems is considered. One solution to the quantification issue is the use of expert judgements, and the principles to apply expert judgements is discussed in the paper. A framework to apply expert judgements is outlined. Further, the impacts of subjective estimates on the interpretation of PSA results are discussed. (orig.) (13 refs.)

  13. Absorbed dose estimation of gonads resulting from fault work of staff during injection of radiopharmaceuticals to the patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleki, M.; Karimian, A.

    2012-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and generally delivered to the patient via intravenous injection. 201 Tl and 99m Tc are the two most used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine. The maximum activity injected to the patient in nuclear medicine for 201 Tl and 99m Tc is 5 and 20-25 mCi respectively. In this research by using Monte Carlo method and MCNPX code the absorbed dose to Gonads due to drop of radiopharmaceutical on foot thigh during injection to the patient has been calculated. The activity of 201 Tl and 99m Tc has been considered 1 and 5mCi respectively. The amount of absorbed dose in gonads for 99m Tc for male and female during 8 hours of work has been measured 0.37 and 0.055 μSv respectively. Also the amount of absorbed dose for 201 Tl during working hours at first day, second day and third day after work fault for male has been measured 0.387, 0.308 and 0.246 μSv and for female 0.06, 0.048 and 0.038 μSv respectively. The total dose in these three working days for male and female has been 0.941 and 0.146 μSv respectively. Since absorbed dose of gonads was far enough from the limits of ICRP, so it can be concluded that if a fault work occurs and even staff does not be aware there is no need to treat him. (authors)

  14. Status of the PSA use in the Czech regulatory process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusek, J.

    1994-01-01

    A review of previous probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) activities initiated by regulatory body and preparation of the preliminary PSA study and final PSA study (released in January 1994) for the nuclear power plant Dukovany with WWER-440 type 213 reactor is described. A brief information about the NPP Temelin (with WWER-1000) PSA Study, shutdown and PSA risk monitor current activities for the NPP Dukovany, next PSA activities in 1994 and about planned PSA activities in future is attached. (author). 21 refs

  15. THE DISCRIMINATIVE ABILITY OF PERCENT FREE PSA IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood samples were collected from all patients, and total PSA, free PSA and % free PSA were calculated in all specimens. Total PSA was measured using the Imx ... Un prélèvement de sang a été réalisé chez tous les patients avec un dosage du PSA total et de la fraction libre de PSA. Le PSA total a été mesuré par un kit ...

  16. Use of PSA in a regulatory framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The paper will briefly describe the use of PSA in the licensing process for the Sizewell 'B' PWR Power Station currently under construction in the U.K. There are two distinct phases in the licensing process - (i) A PSA has been performed to support the application to construct Sizewell 'B'. At that stage the PSA was used as a design tool (along with deterministic design requirements) for Sizewell 'B' and as such lead to a number of significant design changes in the early design process. (ii) A PSA is currently being performed to support the application to operate Sizewell 'B'. The PSA is required to support the claim that the design has included all reasonably practical measures to prevent and mitigate accidents. The comprehensive PSA being produced for the second phase of the licensing process will be described. The way the regulators/designer/analysts have interacted over the years has affected the scope, complexity, detail and bias of the comprehensive PSA. The paper will discuss these issues and highlight some of the more significant ones. The benefits and drawbacks of providing a PSA in a regulatory framework will be discussed. One of the conclusions of the paper is that the use of true ''best-estimates'' in the PSA is difficult to achieve in a regulatory framework where persistent bias to the conservative side is apparent in the designers, analysts and regulators judgements. The usefulness of the PSA is therefore, potentially, compromised by giving misleading outputs or diverting resources to unnecessary areas. (author)

  17. The Impact of Knowledge of Suicide Prevention and Work Experience among Clinical Staff on Attitudes towards Working with Suicidal Patients and Suicide Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramberg, Inga-Lill; Di Lucca, Maria Anna; Hadlaczky, Gergö

    2016-02-04

    Suicide-preventive training has shown to influence attitudes. This study aimed at investigating what impact other factors than knowledge might have on attitudes towards work with suicidal patients and suicide prevention. In 2007, 500 health-care staff working in a psychiatric clinic in Stockholm received a questionnaire with items concerning work with suicidal patients to which 358 (71.6%) responded. A set of attitude items were tested using structural equation modelling (LISREL). Three models were found to be satisfactory valid and reliable: Job clarity, Job confidence and Attitudes towards prevention. These were then used in regression analyses as dependent variables with predictors such as experience of work with suicidal patients, perceived sufficient training, age and gender. Perceived sufficient training was consistently the most important predictor for all three attitude concepts (p prevention). Age was another significant predictor for Job clarity (p suicide for Job confidence (p suicide preventive education is likely to improve attitudes towards the prevention of suicide, clarity and confidence regarding their role in the care for suicidal patients. These improvements may contribute to the prevention of suicide in health care settings.

  18. Examining the Transition to a Four-Day School Week and Investigating Post-Change Faculty/Staff Work-Life Balance: A Community College Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Nelly

    2013-01-01

    This single descriptive embedded case study examined the process of implementing a four-day work/school week at a community college and investigated post-change faculty/staff work-life balance. All of the students attending this college live at home. The change was implemented due to state funding shortfalls, increasing college utility expenses…

  19. PSA modeling of long-term accident sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgescu, Gabriel; Corenwinder, Francois; Lanore, Jeanne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the extension of PSA scope to include external hazards, in France, both operator (EDF) and IRSN work for the improvement of methods to better take into account in the PSA the accident sequences induced by initiators which affect a whole site containing several nuclear units (reactors, fuel pools,...). These methodological improvements represent an essential prerequisite for the development of external hazards PSA. However, it has to be noted that in French PSA, even before Fukushima, long term accident sequences were taken into account: many insight were therefore used, as complementary information, to enhance the safety level of the plants. IRSN proposed an external events PSA development program. One of the first steps of the program is the development of methods to model in the PSA the long term accident sequences, based on the experience gained. At short term IRSN intends to enhance the modeling of the 'long term' accident sequences induced by the loss of the heat sink or/and the loss of external power supply. The experience gained by IRSN and EDF from the development of several probabilistic studies treating long term accident sequences shows that the simple extension of the mission time of the mitigation systems from 24 hours to longer times is not sufficient to realistically quantify the risk and to obtain a correct ranking of the risk contributions and that treatment of recoveries is also necessary. IRSN intends to develop a generic study which can be used as a general methodology for the assessment of the long term accident sequences, mainly generated by external hazards and their combinations. This first attempt to develop this generic study allowed identifying some aspects, which may be hazard (or combinations of hazards) or related to initial boundary conditions, which should be taken into account for further developments. (authors)

  20. Mixed methods evaluation of an interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people who have an acquired physical disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Agnes; Sharek, Danika; Nolan, Maeve; Sheerin, Barbara; Flanagan, Paul; Slaicuinaite, Sniguole; Mc Donnell, Sinead; Walsh, Heather

    2012-11-01

    .  To report a study evaluating the effectiveness of a 1-day interdisciplinary sexuality education programme for staff working with people with acquired physical disability.   Changes associated with an acquired physical disability can diminish a person's self-esteem, sense of attractiveness, relationships, and sexual functioning. Research suggests that people are dissatisfied with the quality of information and support around sexuality during their rehabilitation.   A mixed methods design was used, involving pretest and posttest questionnaires and interviews. Questionnaire data were analysed using descriptive statistics and paired samples t-tests to evaluate the effects of the programme on knowledge, skills, and comfort. Interview data were analyzed thematically, with particular emphasis on participants' opinions about the application of the course within practice. Participants were working in the area of acquired disability and rehabilitation, and were drawn from a number of disciplines. Data were collected between 2008-2009.   Comparison of the pre- and postmeasures, based on paired samples t-tests, showed that the programme statistically significantly increased participants' knowledge, skills, and comfort. Participants felt positive and enthusiastic about the programme and reported numerous incidents where they were more willing to raise issues for discussion and create a supportive listening space for patients to talk about their concerns around sexuality.   Providing healthcare practitioners with a 1-day programme leads to positive changes in knowledge, skills, and comfort towards sexuality. Sexuality education may be an ideal topic for bringing practitioners together within an interdisciplinary education context. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Incorporating Level-2 PSA Feature of CONPAS into AIMS-PSA Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Hoon; Lim, Hogon; Ahn, Kwang Il

    2014-01-01

    CONPAS (CONtainment Performance Analysis System) utilizes a methodology to treat containment phenomena in detail like APET but in simple way. In mid 2000's, KAERI has developed very fast cut set generator FTREX and PC's OS (Operating system) has changed into Windows 95. Thus, KAERI has developed new Level-1 PSA software, called AIMS-PSA (Advanced Information Management System for PSA) to replace KIRAP. Recently, KAERI has been developing an integrated PSA platform, called OCEANS (On-line Consolidator and Evaluator of All mode risk for Nuclear System), for the risk assessment of all power modes and all hazards. CONPAS for Level-2 PSA was developed in 1990's using the Visual Basic 6.0 compiler which is not supported any more. It needs to be updated for the integrated PSA software framework. This paper describes a study to incorporate the features of CONPAS into AIMS-PSA. The basic idea is to follow the approach of CONPAS, but in the integrated way. Various approaches for Level-2 PSA have been used since WASH-1400. APET approach of NUREG-1150 study would be most comprehensive and complex methodology for containment event tree analysis. CONPAS is the Level-2 PSA software to utilize an approach to treat containment phenomena in detail like APET but in simple way. But, new Level-2 PSA software is required to develop more integrated PSA framework. A modified approach of CONPAS is developed and incorporated in AIMS-PSA software that can handle Level-1 and Level-2 PSA in the integrated way (from the viewpoint of event tree and fault tree). AIMS-PSA combines whole Level-2 PSA model to produce a One Top fault tree and to generate cut sets in the same way as Level-1 PSA. Quantification results of Level-2 PSA such as frequency for each STC can be calculated from the minimal cut sets

  2. Supporting the role of community members employed as research staff: Perspectives of community researchers working in addiction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, Gala; Alexander, Leslie B; Fisher, Celia B

    2017-08-01

    Community researchers are laypersons who conduct research activities in their own communities. In addiction and HIV research, community researchers are valued for their insider status and knowledge. At the same time, their presence on the research team raises concerns about coercion and confidentiality when community researchers and participants know each other personally, and the work of navigating between the worlds of research and community leads to moral distress and burnout for some community researchers. In this paper, we draw upon the concept of 'moral experience' to explore the local moral worlds of community researchers in the context of addiction research. In February and March 2010, we conducted focus groups with 36 community researchers employed on community-based addiction studies in the United States to elicit perspectives on ethical and moral challenges they face in their work and insights on best practices to support their role in research. Community researchers described how their values were realized or thwarted in the context of research, and their strategies for coping with shifting identities and competing priorities. They delineated how their knowledge could be used to inform development of research protocols and help principal investigators build and maintain trust with the community researchers on their teams. Our findings contribute to current understandings of the moral experiences of community members employed in research, and inform policies and practices for the growing field of community-engaged research. Funders, research organizations, and research ethics boards should develop guidelines and standards to ensure studies have key resources in place to support community researchers and ensure quality and integrity of community-engaged work. Investigators who work with community researchers should ensure channels for frontline staff to provide input on research protocols and to create an atmosphere where challenges and concerns can be

  3. How are compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction affected by quality of working life? Findings from a survey of mental health staff in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Cetrano, Gaia; Tedeschi, Federico; Rabbi, Laura; Gosetti, Giorgio; Lora, Antonio; Lamonaca, Dario; Manthorpe, Jill; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quality of working life includes elements such as autonomy, trust, ergonomics, participation, job complexity, and work-life balance. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate if and how quality of working life affects Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction among mental health practitioners.METHODS: Staff working in three Italian Mental Health Departments completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale, measuring Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compas...

  4. Level 1 PSA study of Mochovce unit 1 NPP (SM AA 10 and 08)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cillik, I.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents genesis of Level 1 PSA project preparation for all operational modes of Mochovce NPP unit 1 including the description of its' main objectives, scope and working method. The PSA study which includes full power (FPSA) as well as shutdown and low power conditions (SPSA) Level 1 PSA has to support the nuclear safety improvements of the unit. They evaluate the basic design and the benefits of all improvements, which were found necessary to be incorporated before the start-up of the unit. The study includes internal events (transients and under-loss of coolant accident, LOCAs), internal hazards as fires and floods and selected external hazards as earthquake, influence of external industry, extreme meteorological conditions and aircraft crash.The PSA (both FPSA and SPSA) models is developed using the RISK SPECTRUM PSA code. (author)

  5. Antigenic determinants of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and development of assays specific for different forms of PSA.

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, O.; Peter, A.; Andersson, I.; Nilsson, K.; Grundstr?m, B.; Karlsson, B.

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were raised against prostate-specific antigen (PSA) by immunization with purified free PSA, i.e. not in complex with any protease inhibitor (F-PSA) and PSA in complex with alpha1-anti-chymotrypsin (PSA-ACT). Epitope mapping of PSA using the established monoclonal antibody revealed a complex pattern of independent and partly overlapping antigenic domains in the PSA molecule. Four independent antigenic domains and at least three partly overlapping domains were exposed both...

  6. [Subjective hardship and training by female staff working in direct contact with the elderly in nursing homes: a cross-sectional study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, Carole; Fontana, Luc; Fort, Emmanuel; Charbotel, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    To describe training given and training desired and to assess the relation between training and perceived hard working conditions as experienced by female staff working in direct contact with the elderly in nursing homes. A transverse descriptive study was conducted with the involvement of 78 occupational physicians, and included staff in 105 nursing homes in the Rhône-Alpes Region of France. Data on training received during the previous 5 years and on training needs were collected from staff by self-administered questionnaire. 1,446 nursing assistants, 667 housekeepers and 348 nurses were included. The most frequent form of training during the previous 5 years was in handling. Staff most frequently desired training in palliative care and psychological approaches to residents. Part-time workers had less frequently had training during the previous 5 years. Staff with daytime hours significantly more often had training in the reception of and activities for the elderly and in hygiene than did night-staff. Almost half of respondents reported very hard working conditions related to physical handling of residents or to the physical deterioration of elderly persons. More than two-thirds reported very hard working conditions related to death. In all occupational categories, respondents who had had training in palliative care less often reported experiencing very hard working conditions related to death. Better adaptation of the training offer to the needs expressed by employees could improve the experience of working conditions in nursing homes. A longitudinal study could assess the impact of training in palliative care on reported hard working conditions related to death.

  7. Opium consumption is negatively associated with serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), free PSA, and percentage of free PSA levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarinejad, Mohammad Reza; Asgari, Seyyed Alaeddin; Farshi, Alireza; Iravani, Shahrokh; Khoshdel, Alireza; Shekarchi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Addiction to opium continues to be a major worldwide medical and social problem. The study addressing the association between opium consumption and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level is lacking. We determined the effects of opium consumption on serum PSA levels in opium-addict men. Our study subjects comprised 438 opium-addict men with a mean age of 52.2 ± 6.4 years (group 1). We compared these men with 446 men who did not indicate current or past opium use (group 2). Serum total PSA (tPSA), free PSA (fPSA), % fPSA, and sex hormones were compared between the 2 groups. The mean serum tPSA level was significantly lower in group 1 (1.05 ng/mL) than in controls (1.45 ng/mL) (P = 0.001). Opium consumption was also associated with lower fPSA (P = 0.001) and % fPSA (P = 0.001). Serum free testosterone level in opium-addict patients (132.5 ± 42 pg/mL) was significantly lower than that in controls (156.2 ± 43 pg/mL) (P = 0.03). However, no significant correlation existed between tPSA and free testosterone levels (r = 0.28, 95% CI, -0.036 to 0.51, P = 0.34). Among the patients with cancer in group 1, 35% were found to have high-grade tumor (Gleason score ≥ 7) compared with 26.7% in group 2 (P = 0.02). Total PSA and fPSA were strongly correlated with duration of opium use (r = -0.06, 95% CI, -0.04 to -0.08, P = 0.0001; and r = -0.05, 95% CI, -0.03 to -0.07, P = 0.0001, respectively). Opium consumption is independently and negatively associated with serum tPSA, fPSA, and % fPSA levels.

  8. Review of UCN 5,6 Fire PSA Model based on ANS Fire PRA Standard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joon Eon; Lee, Yoon Hwan

    2006-12-01

    Recently, under the de-regulation environment, nuclear industry has attempted various approaches to improve the economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). This approach uses the fire risk and performance information to manage the resources effectively and efficiently that are used in the operation of NPP. In fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation, fire PSA quality is one of the most important things. The nuclear industry and regulatory body of U.S.A have developed a measure to evaluate the quality of fire PSA. ANS (American Nuclear Society) has developed a guidance called 'ANS Fire PRA Methodology Standard'. However, in Korea, there have been no attempts to evaluate the quality of fire PSA model itself. Therefore, we cannot be sure about the quality of fire PSA whether or not the present fire PSA model can be used for the risk-informed applications such as mentioned above. We can say that the evaluation of fire PSA model quality is the basis for the fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation. In this report, we have evaluated the quality of fire PSA model for Ulchin 5 and 6 units based on the ANS Fire PRA Standard. We, also, have derived what items are to be improved to upgrade the quality of fire PSA model and how it can be improved. This report can be used as the base of the fire risk informed/performance-based decision/operation work in Korea

  9. A Study on Work Ability Index and Physical Work Capacity on the Base of Fax Equation VO(2) Max in Male Nursing Hospital Staff in Isfahan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Ehsanollah; Dehghan, Habibollah; Zeinodini, Mohhamad; Yousefi, Hosseinali; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this research is to establish the ability of employees by work ability index (WAI), physical work capacity (PWC), and finding the correlation between them. Establishing the PWC index with attention to WAI values for the purpose of saving in costs and time of PWC measurements is another aim of this project. The present research is an analytic cross-sectional and one-trail study. The study population consists of 228 randomly selected registered nurses from hospitals in Isfahan (Iran). The WAI and PWC were established through WAI questionnaire and Fax equation and by using ergometer bicycle, respectively. The resulting data were analyzed using SPSS 16 software. Average WAI and PWC among the study population were 38.25±4.4 and 4.45±0.7, respectively. Pearson test results showed no significant correlation between PWC and WAI in different age groups (r=0.3 and P>0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that the variables of age and diagnosed diseases were the most effective factors of WAI (β=0.18 and P>0.05). Pearson test revealed a significant correlation between the number of diagnosed diseases and PWC index in age groups of 40-49 years. Average WAI in this research, like other studies on similar jobs is in the acceptable level of >36. Work ability index and PWC index in different age groups did not show a significant correlation and this suggests that there are essential discrepancies in work ability evaluations made by each index and it is not possible to predict PWC index using WAI values. Given the PWC results and the level of nursing staff's activity (low, medium) the WAI is a suitable instrument to establish the professionals' abilities. This study revealed that 27.6% of individuals were subject to medium-low work ability risk (WAIworking and increased working hours.

  10. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  11. Towards a Framework in Interaction Training for Staff Working with Clients with Intellectual Disabilities and Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, A.; Embregts, P.; Hendriks, L.; Bosman, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an interpersonal model. As in functional analysis,…

  12. Towards a framework in interaction training for staff working with clients with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, A.P.A.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Hendriks, A.H.C.; Bosman, A.M.T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Training support staff in dealing with challenging behaviour in clients with intellectual disabilities (ID) is needed. The goal of this study is to determine which elements need to be incorporated in a training on staff interactions with these clients, building upon a framework and an

  13. A Pilot Investigation into the Efficacy of a Signing Training Strategy for Staff Working with Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Jolliffe, Jane

    2009-01-01

    To contribute to increasing the quality and quantity of communication between staff and adults with intellectual disabilities, training was undertaken to enhance the awareness and knowledge of signing as a method of communication. Multidisciplinary team members, residential and day centre staff were trained to use 20 core signs. Training methods…

  14. PSA, subjective probability and decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarotti, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    PSA is the natural way to making decisions in face of uncertainty relative to potentially dangerous plants; subjective probability, subjective utility and Bayes statistics are the ideal tools for carrying out a PSA. This paper reports that in order to support this statement the various stages of the PSA procedure are examined in detail and step by step the superiority of Bayes techniques with respect to sampling theory machinery is proven

  15. Status and use of PSA in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knochenhauer, M.

    1996-05-01

    The performance and use of PSA:s in Sweden goes back about two decades. During all of this time, the field of PSA has been developing intensively, both internationally and within Sweden. The latest years have been characterised by an increased use of PSA models and results, and by major extensions of existing PSA models. The aim of this document is to describe PSA in Sweden with respect to development, scope and maturity, as well as to the contents of the analyses and the use of results. PSA activities will be described from the point of view of both the authorities and the utilities. The report gives an overview of the development within the area of PSA in Sweden both its history and current trends. The aim has been to include a reasonable amount of detail, both on the methods and results in PSA:s performed and on the numerous supporting research programs dealing with various aspects of PSA. 39 refs 39 refs

  16. Status and use of PSA in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knochenhauer, M

    1996-05-01

    The performance and use of PSA:s in Sweden goes back about two decades. During all of this time, the field of PSA has been developing intensively, both internationally and within Sweden. The latest years have been characterised by an increased use of PSA models and results, and by major extensions of existing PSA models. The aim of this document is to describe PSA in Sweden with respect to development, scope and maturity, as well as to the contents of the analyses and the use of results. PSA activities will be described from the point of view of both the authorities and the utilities. The report gives an overview of the development within the area of PSA in Sweden both its history and current trends. The aim has been to include a reasonable amount of detail, both on the methods and results in PSA:s performed and on the numerous supporting research programs dealing with various aspects of PSA. 39 refs 39 refs.

  17. Challenges and status of multi-unit PSA development in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalaoui, Smain

    2015-01-01

    Firstly, this paper discusses the issues and challenges related to the development of a Multi-Unit PSA (MU-PSA) and the general recommendations and conclusions from the MU-PSA Workshop organized by the CNSC in Ottawa, November 2014. This includes a discussion regarding the issue related to the methodological challenges in performing MU-PSA, the site-based risk metrics to be adopted, and the issue of risk aggregation across all hazards and all units. The paper also addresses the challenges for establishing site-based safety goals as the current safety goals were established on a per-unit basis. CNSC Staff efforts, both at the national and international level, on developing whole-site safety goals and guidance on MU-PSA and risk aggregation methodologies will also be discussed. Finally, the paper will provide a summary of the industry effort and road map for completing the pilot Whole-site PSA project for the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, as requested by the Commission following to the public hearing for licence renewal in February 20 and May 29-31, 2013. (author)

  18. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set: A Report from the PsA Workshop at OMERACT 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Elmamoun, Musaab; Tillett, William; Campbell, Willemina; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna D; Goel, Niti; Gossec, Laure; Hoejgaard, Pil; Leung, Ying Ying; Lindsay, Chris; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Shea, Bev; Christensen, Robin; Coates, Laura; Eder, Lihi; McHugh, Neil; Kalyoncu, Umut; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Ogdie, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). At OMERACT 2016, research conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted 24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was endorsed at OMERACT 2016. Next steps for the PsA working group include evaluation of PsA outcome measures and development of a PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set.

  19. Retaining nurses through conflict resolution. Training staff to confront problems and communicate openly can improve the work climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, A R; Bushardt, S C; Jones, M A

    1993-06-01

    The way nurses resolve conflict may be leading them to quit their jobs or leave the profession altogether. Conflict is inevitable in a dynamic organization. What is important is not to avoid conflict but to seek its resolution in a constructive manner. Organizational conflict is typically resolved through one of five strategies: withdrawal, force, conciliation, compromise, or confrontation. A recent study of nurses in three different hospitals showed that the approach they use most is withdrawal. This might manifest itself in a request to change shifts or assignments and may lead to a job change and, eventually, abandonment of the field altogether. Given this scenario, changing nurses' conflict resolution style may help administrators combat the nursing shortage. Healthcare organizations must examine themselves to determine why nurses so frequently use withdrawal; then they must restructure work relationships as needed. Next, organizations need to increase nurses' awareness of the problem and train them to use a resolution style more conducive to building stable relationships: confrontation. Staff should also be trained in effective communications skills to develop trust and openness in their relationships.

  20. Extrinsic high-effort and low-reward conditions at work among institutional staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Nan; Lin, Jin-Ding; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Ling; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chu, Cordia M

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to determine whether extrinsic high-effort/low-reward conditions at work are associated with personal characteristics and the organizational environments. A cross-sectional survey was conducted (76.7% response rate, N=1243) by recruiting the staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities of Taiwan in 2006. Conditions at work were measured using Siegrist's Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model, the questionnaire included 23 Likert scaled items and it divided into three scales: effort, reward and overcommitment. Multiple logistic regression modeling was conducted for extrinsic high-effort/low-reward status in relation to staff and working environmental factors. We found that 15.1% staff were in the low-effort/low-reward group, 35.9% was in the low-effort/high-reward group, 17.9% belonged to the high-effort/high-reward group and 31.1% was included in the high-effort/low-reward group. Controlling for many personal demographic and organizational characteristics, the factors of perceived job support (OR=0.91; 95% CI=0854-0.97), job control (OR=0.954, 95% CI=0.934-0.974), job demand (OR=1.155, 95% CI=1.109-1.203) and job stress (felt sometimes stressful compare to no stress at all, OR=2.305, 95% CI=1.161-4.575) of the staff were significantly correlated to the extrinsic high effort/low reward at work in the multiple logistic regression model. The present study highlights that the service providers need to be aware and understand the experiences that their staff encounters in the organizational, interpersonal and personal level regarding unfair working conditions such as high effort/low reward to improve the positive health of the staff.

  1. Too Much Sodium PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-07

    This 60 second PSA is based on the February 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Ninety percent of Americans age two and older eat too much sodium which can increase your risk for high blood pressure and often leads to heart disease and stroke, two leading causes of death in the US. Learn several small steps you can take to reduce the amount of sodium in your diet.  Created: 2/7/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 2/7/2012.

  2. Testing the variability of PSA expression by different human prostate cancer cell lines by means of a new potentiometric device employing molecularly antibody assembled on graphene surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebelo, Tânia S.C.R.; Noronha, João P.; Galésio, Marco; Santos, Hugo; Diniz, Mário; Sales, M. Goreti F.; Fernandes, Maria H.; Costa-Rodrigues, João

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is widely used as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Recently, an electrochemical biosensor for PSA detection by means of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed. This work evaluated the performance and the effectiveness of that PSA biosensor in screening the biomarker PSA in biological media with complex composition, collected from different human prostate cell line cultures. For that, the prostate cancer LNCaP and PC3 cells, and the non-cancerous prostate cell line PNT2 were cultured for 2, 7 and 14 days in either α-MEM or RPMI in the presence of 10% or 30% fetal bovine serum. Human gingival fibroblasts were used as a non-cancerous non-prostatic control. The different culture conditions modulated cellular proliferation and the expression of several prostate markers, including PSA. The electrochemical biosensor was able to specifically detect PSA in the culture media and values obtained were similar to those achieved by a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit, the most commonly used method for PSA quantification in prostate cancer diagnosis. Thus, the tested biosensor may represent a useful alternative as a diagnostic tool for PSA determination in biological samples. - Highlights: • PSA quantification was performed in prostate cancer cell culture media. • Culture media composition and culture period significantly affect PSA production. • The PSA biosensor detected a wide range of PSA levels in complex media. • A high data correlation was observed between the biosensor and the ELISA analysis.

  3. Testing the variability of PSA expression by different human prostate cancer cell lines by means of a new potentiometric device employing molecularly antibody assembled on graphene surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebelo, Tânia S.C.R. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Noronha, João P.; Galésio, Marco; Santos, Hugo; Diniz, Mário [LAQV, REQUIMTE, Departamento de Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Sales, M. Goreti F. [BioMark-CINTESIS/ISEP, Instituto Superior de Engenharia do Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, Maria H. [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Costa-Rodrigues, João, E-mail: jrodrigues@fmd.up.pt [Laboratory for Bone Metabolism and Regeneration, Faculdade de Medicina Dentária, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); ESTSP — Escola Superior de Tecnologia da Saúde do Porto, Instituto Politécnico do Porto (Portugal)

    2016-02-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) is widely used as a biomarker for prostate cancer. Recently, an electrochemical biosensor for PSA detection by means of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) was developed. This work evaluated the performance and the effectiveness of that PSA biosensor in screening the biomarker PSA in biological media with complex composition, collected from different human prostate cell line cultures. For that, the prostate cancer LNCaP and PC3 cells, and the non-cancerous prostate cell line PNT2 were cultured for 2, 7 and 14 days in either α-MEM or RPMI in the presence of 10% or 30% fetal bovine serum. Human gingival fibroblasts were used as a non-cancerous non-prostatic control. The different culture conditions modulated cellular proliferation and the expression of several prostate markers, including PSA. The electrochemical biosensor was able to specifically detect PSA in the culture media and values obtained were similar to those achieved by a commercial Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) kit, the most commonly used method for PSA quantification in prostate cancer diagnosis. Thus, the tested biosensor may represent a useful alternative as a diagnostic tool for PSA determination in biological samples. - Highlights: • PSA quantification was performed in prostate cancer cell culture media. • Culture media composition and culture period significantly affect PSA production. • The PSA biosensor detected a wide range of PSA levels in complex media. • A high data correlation was observed between the biosensor and the ELISA analysis.

  4. On-line maintenance PSA support at NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prosen, R.; Vrbanic, I.; Kastelan, M.

    2000-01-01

    In 1997 Krsko NPP initiated the on-line maintenance (OLM) practice. On-line maintenance constitutes of corrective activities, preventive activities, surveillance activities, tests and inspections, as well as calibrations and modifications, taking place during the normal power operations. The on-line maintenance is a multidisciplinary process consisting of activity specification, planning, and preparation and performing of the OLM activity of interest. The primary role of the PSA group is to assess from the r isk perspective , using the plant-specific NEK PSA model, system unavailability and the impact to the plant operational risk. The intent is to support planning of the on-line maintenance activities from the risk perspective. The risk evaluation of the OLM activities is based on the probability of core damage evaluation for the defined discrete plant configuration states, determined by the OLM activities. Within this application, the optimized, plant-specific PSA model is used on Risk Spectrum platform. To perform the risk assessment of the on-line maintenance activities, first the systems to be affected are defined based on the planned OLM activities. The next important step is the assessment of the planned work schedule. To define the final schedule, the co-ordination and optimizing the planned OLM activities needs activation of all participating departments, supported also from PSA group. The P3 (i.e. Primavera) planning tool system windows are defined for different systems and groups of systems, and the activities are sorted in particular weeks according to these windows. (author)

  5. PSA-based evaluation and rating of operational events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Cobo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discusses the PSA-based evaluation and rating of operational events, including the following: historical background, procedures for event evaluation using PSA, use of PSA for event rating, current activities

  6. PSA Level 2:Scope And Method Of PSA Level 2 For Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widodo, Surip; Antariksawan, Anhar R.

    2001-01-01

    A study of scope and method of PSA Level 2 had been conducted. The background of the study is the need to gain the capability to well perform PSA Level 2 for nuclear facilities. This study is a literature survey. The scope of PSA Level 2 consists of generating plant damage states, accident progression analysis, and grouping source terms. Concerning accident progression analysis, several methods are used, among others event tree method, named accident progression event tree (APET) or containment event tree (CET), and fault tree method. The end result of PSA Level 2 is release end states which is grouped into release bins. The results will be used for PSA Level 3

  7. Attitudes of Academic Staff towards Their Own Work and towards External Evaluation, from the Perspective of Self-Determination Theory: Estonian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seema, Riin; Udam, Maiki; Mattisen, Heli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the attitudes of academic staff towards their own work as well as towards external evaluations. The study was based on (1) an analysis of assessment reports of institutional accreditations conducted by the Estonian Quality Agency for Higher and Vocational Education and (2) self-determination theory on…

  8. An Analysis of the Relationship between the Organizational Culture and the Performance of Staff Work Groups in Schools and the Development of an Explanatory Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Chris; Connolly, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article analyses the concept of organizational culture and the relationship between the organizational culture and the performance of staff work groups in schools. The article draws upon a study of 12 schools in Wales, UK, which despite being in disadvantaged settings have high levels of pupil attainment. A model is developed linking the…

  9. The Occupational Well-Being of School Staff and Maintenance of Their Ability to Work in Finland and Estonia--Focus on the School Community and Professional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaranen, Terhi; Sormunen, Marjorita; Pertel, Tiia; Streimann, Karin; Hansen, Siivi; Varava, Liana; Lepp, Kadi; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the baseline results of a research and development project targeted to improve the occupational well-being of school staff and maintain their ability to work, in Finland and Estonia. It reveals the most problematic factors in the various aspects of the school community and professional competence and outlines…

  10. Extrinsic High-Effort and Low-Reward Conditions at Work among Institutional Staff Caring for People with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Nan; Lin, Jin-Ding; Yen, Chia-Feng; Loh, Ching-Hui; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Tang, Chi-Chieh; Wu, Jia-Ling; Fang, Wen-Hui; Chu, Cordia M.

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of the present study were to determine whether extrinsic high-effort/low-reward conditions at work are associated with personal characteristics and the organizational environments. A cross-sectional survey was conducted (76.7% response rate, N = 1243) by recruiting the staff caring for people with intellectual disabilities of Taiwan…

  11. [PSA interest and prostatitis: literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyère, F; Amine Lakmichi, M

    2013-12-01

    Prostatitis is easily diagnosed but sometimes associated with PSA measurement. An increased PSA in an asymptomatic patient may be associated with antibiotic use to eliminate the inflammatory part and to confirm prostate biopsy. It seems interesting to confirm or infirm these attitudes with a systematic review of the literature We performed a literature review using the words [prostatitis], [acute prostatitis], [prostate specific antigen], [PSA], in the MEDLINE, Pubmed and AMBASE database searching for articles in French or English published in the past 20 years. PSA is not always increased during an acute prostatitis episode. An increased PSA in an asymptomatic man does not seem to be systematically correlated to prostate inflammation. Analyzing the studies, it seems inaccurate to measure PSA value during a febrile urinary infection episode in men. Systematic use of antibiotic to decrease PSA and not performing prostate biopsy is not relevant and may induce resistance to antibiotic and doesn't induce a reduction risk of having prostate biopsy. PSA is unnecessary in case of febrile urinary tract infection in men. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Impact of total PSA, PSA doubling time and PSA velocity on detection rates of 11C-Choline positron emission tomography in recurrent prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rybalov, Maxim; Breeuwsma, Anthonius J.; Leliveld, Anna M.; Pruim, Jan; Dierckx, Rudi A.; de Jong, Igle J.

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of total PSA (tPSA) and PSA kinetics on the detection rates of (11)C-Choline PET in patients with biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP) or external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). METHODS: We included 185 patients with BCR after RP (PSA >0.2 ng/ml)

  13. The impact of a single 24 h working day on cognitive and psychomotor performance in staff anaesthesiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanovic, Nenad; Carev, Mladen; Kardum, Goran; Pecotic, Renata; Valic, Maja; Karanovic, Sandra; Ujevic, Ante; Dogas, Zoran

    2009-10-01

    The profession of anaesthesiologist is demanding and potentially hazardous. Extended work shifts combined with intensive work load may adversely affect physicians' performance. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of a single in-hospital 24 h shift on the cognitive and psychomotor performance of anaesthesiologists in a surgical emergency department. Following ethical and institutional approval, 11 staff anaesthesiologists [six men, five women, age 48 (35-50), years of experience 17 (7-20), median (range)] successfully completed the study protocol. Four computer-generated psychological tests (CRD, Complex Reactionmeter Drenovac, Croatia) consisting of light signal position discrimination (CRD 311), simple visual orientation (CRD 21), simple arithmetic operations (CRD 11), and complex psychomotor coordination (CRD 411) were used to measure objective parameters of cognitive and psychomotor performance at four time points (D1 = 8:00 a.m., D2 = 3:00 p.m., D3 = 11:00 p.m.; and D4 = 7:00-8:00 a.m. next day) during the 24 h working day. The control testing on an ordinary working day was performed at two time points (C1 = 8:00 a.m., C2 = 3:00 p.m.). Three parameters were recorded: total test solving time (TTST), total variability, and total number of errors for all four tests. TTST was significantly impaired during the 24 h shift in all tests, and TTST was prolonged in CRD 21 test at different time points from 1.6 +/- 1.4 to 5.5 +/- 1.6 s compared with the control (F = 6.39, P = 0.001). The reaction times were prolonged from 1.3 +/- 1.8 to 5.4 +/- 1.2 s (F = 3.49, P = 0.009) in CRD 311, from 3.8 +/- 9.0 to 34.3 +/- 5.8 s (F = 5.05, P = 0.002) in CRD 11 TTST, and from 0.8 +/- 3.0 to 16.3 +/- 8.6 s (F = 2.67, P = 0.034) in CRD 411. Total variability was significantly altered during the 24 h shift only in CRD 411 (F = 2.63, P = 0.036). There was no difference in the total number of errors between the 24 h shift and the ordinary working day. Anaesthesiologists' 24 h

  14. Insights of PSA studies made for operating nuclear power stations in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laaksonen, J.; Virolainen, R.

    1991-01-01

    In 1984 the Finnish regulatory authority (STUK) required the utilities to make plant specific probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) studies for each plant. It was also strongly recommended that most of the work be made by plant personnel. This advice was well observed by both utilities. Results of level 1 PSA studies were submitted for regulatory review in June 1989. Only internal initiating events, including loss-of-offsite power and human errors, were considered at this stage. Each study took an effort of 12 to 20 man years. A thorough regulatory review, about two man years per plant, is currently underway, and will cause some changes in the initial results of the studies. The utilities are continuing their PSA work with the fire and flood analysis, and then with the analysis of risks during start-up and shutdown conditions. As soon as a level 1 PSA study has been reviewed, and a common understanding of the models and data has been reached between the utility and the STUK, this basic PSA version will be the first element of a living PSA. The second element is a user friendly PSA code that can rapidly run through the quantitative part of the study and thus easily indicate the influence of any deviation from the basic version. The third element is plant specific data collection and processing system. The living PSA for the first plant is expected to be fully operational sometime next year. The first use of the living PSA will be the safety assessment of proposed plant modifications and a systematic re-evaluation of technical specifications

  15. Stress as a mediator between work-family conflict and psychological health among the nursing staff: Moderating role of emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Dhar, Rajib Lochan; Tyagi, Akansha

    2016-05-01

    The study examined the extent to which work-family conflicts cause stress among nursing staff and its subsequent impact on their psychological health. It also examined if the emotional intelligence level of the nursing staff acted as a moderator between their level of stress and psychological health. A survey was carried out on 693 nursing staff associated with 33 healthcare institutions in Uttarakhand, India. A hierarchical multiple regression analysis was carried out to understand the relationships shared by independent (work-family conflicts) and dependent (psychological health) constructs with the mediator (stress) as well as the moderator (emotional intelligence). The results revealed that stress acted as a mediator between work-family conflict of the nursing staff and their psychological health. However, their emotional intelligence level acted as a moderator between their stress level and psychological health. To conclude, the crucial roles of emotional intelligence in controlling the impact of stress on psychological health along with the practical as well as theoretical implications are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. How primary health care staff working in rural and remote areas access skill development and expertise to support health promotion practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Kathryn A; Judd, Jenni; Wapau, Hylda; Nichols, Nina; Watt, Kerrianne; Devine, Sue

    2018-05-01

    Health promotion is a key component of comprehensive primary health care. Health promotion approaches complement healthcare management by enabling individuals to increase control over their health. Many primary healthcare staff have a role to play in health promotion practice, but their ability to integrate health promotion into practice is influenced by their previous training and experience. For primary healthcare staff working in rural and remote locations, access to professional development can be limited by what is locally available and prohibitive in terms of cost for travel and accommodation. This study provides insight into how staff at a large north Queensland Aboriginal community controlled health service access skill development and health promotion expertise to support their work. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted. Small group and individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff at Apunipima Cape York Health Council (n=9). A purposive sampling method was used to recruit participants from a number of primary healthcare teams that were more likely to be involved in health promotion work. Both on-the-ground staff and managers were interviewed. All participants were asked how they access skill development and expertise in health promotion practice and what approaches they prefer for ongoing health promotion support. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. All participants valued access to skill development, advice and support that would assist their health promotion practice. Skill development and expertise in health promotion was accessed from a variety of sources: conferences, workshops, mentoring or shared learning from internal and external colleagues, and access to online information and resources. With limited funds and limited access to professional development locally, participants fostered external and internal organisational relationships to seek in-kind advice and support. Irrespective of

  17. Decision criteria in PSA applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, J.E.; Pulkkinen, U.; Rosqvist, T.; Simola, K.

    2001-11-01

    Along with the adoption of risk informed decision making principles, the need for formal probabilistic decision rule or criteria has been risen. However, there are many practical and theoretical problems in the application of probabilistic criteria. One has to think what is the proper way to apply probabilistic rules together with deterministic ones and how the criteria are weighted with respect to each other. In this report, we approach the above questions from the decision theoretic point of view. We give a short review of the most well known probabilistic criteria, and discuss examples of their use. We present a decision analytic framework for evaluating the criteria, and we analyse how the different criteria behave under incompleteness or uncertainty of the PSA model. As the conclusion of our analysis we give recommendations on the application of the criteria in different decision situations. (au)

  18. Risk evaluations of aging: Procedures guide for an age-dependent PSA with emphasis on prioritization and sensitivity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Based on the previous work which has been performed in the project, a procedures guide is being developed for carrying out an age-dependent probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) for evaluating the core damage frequency with aging effects explicitly treated. A PSA is basically a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). The emphasis of the guide is on prioritization and sensitivity studies. Focus is also on active components although consideration of aging effects in passive components is also treated. The guide is intended to become a NUREG/CR and is the first of three volumes which are being developed. The following topics with demonstrations and applications are described in the presentation: (1) the age-dependent PSA versus the standard PSA; (2) component reliability models used in an age-dependent PSA; (3) approaches for transforming a PSA into an age-dependent PSA; (4) application of an age-dependent PSA; (5) using a PSA to evaluate the risk effects from aging passive components; (6) evaluation of the risk importance of passive components; (7) prioritizations of aging contributors; (8) evaluations of test and maintenance effectiveness; and (9) sensitivity studies and uncertainty analyses of aging effects

  19. Ultrasonography and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechev, D.S.; Shcherbyina, O.V.; Yatsik, V.Yi.; Gladka, L.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the work is analysis of diagnostic possibilities of transrectal ultrasonography and PSA in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. 142 patients have been investigated by transrectal ultrasonography. he transrectal ultrasonography and PSA are sensible tests in diagnosis of prostate cancer and in differential diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

  20. Trust and Work Place Spirituality on Knowledge Sharing Behaviour: Perspective from Non-Academic Staff of Higher Learning Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Muhammad Sabbir; Osmangani, Aahad M; Daud, Nuraihan Mat; Chowdhury, Abdul Hannan; Hassan, Hasliza

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This empirical research aims to add value in the existing research on knowledge sharing, investigate the antecedents of knowledge-sharing behaviour by embedding trust and workplace spirituality variable on non-academic staff from higher learning institution in Malaysia. The role of trust, perceived risk and workplace spirituality towards…

  1. Best-practices guidelines for L2PSA development and applications. Volume 1 - General

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raimond, E.; Pichereau, F.; Durin, T.; Rahni, N.; Loeffler, H.; Roesch, O.; Lajtha, G.; Santamaria, C.S.; Dienstbier, J.; Rydl, A.; Holmberg, J.E.; Lindholm, I.; Maennistoe, I.; Pauli, E.M.; Dirksen, G.; Grindon, L.; Peers, K.; Bassi, C.; Hulqvist, G.; Parozzi, F.; Polidoro, F.; Cazzoli, E.; Vitazkova, J.; Burgazzi, L.; Brinkman, H.; Seidel, A.; Schubert, B.; Wohlstein, R.; Guentay, S.; Oury, L.; Ngatchou, C.; Siltanen, S.; Niemela, I.; Routamo, T.; Vincon, L.; Helstroem, P.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this coordinated action was to develop best practice guidelines for the performance and application of Level 2 PSA with a view to achieve harmonisation at EU level and to allow a meaningful and practical uncertainty evaluation in a Level 2 PSA. Specific relationships with communities in charge of nuclear reactor safety (utilities, safety authorities, vendors, and research or services companies) have been established in order to define the current needs in terms of guidelines for Level 2 PSA development and application. An international workshop was organised in Hamburg, with the support of VATTENFALL, in November 2008. The Level 2 PSA experts from ASAMPSA2 project partners have proposed some guidelines for the development and application of L2PSA based on their experience, open literature, and on information available from international cooperation (EC Severe Accident network of Excellence - SARNET, IAEA standards, OECD-NEA publications and workshop). There are a large number of technical issues addressed in the guideline which are not all covered with the same level of detail in the first version of the guideline. This version was submitted for external review in November 2010 by severe accident and PSA experts (especially from SARNET and OECD-NEA members). The feedback of the external review will be dis cussed during an international open works hop planned for March 2011 and all outcomes will be taken into consideration in the final version of this guideline (June 2011). The guideline includes 3 volumes: - Volume 1 - General considerations on L2PSA. - Volume 2 - Technical recommendations for Gen II and III reactors. - Volume 3 - Specific considerations for future reactors (Gen IV). The recommendations formulated in the guideline should not be considered as 'mandatory' but should help Level 2 PSA developers to achieve high quality studies with limited time and resources. It may also help Level 2 PSA reviewers by positioning one specific study in

  2. Radiometric assays for the measurement of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, M.

    1997-01-01

    Prostate Specific Antigen, a serine protease enzyme, of M.W. ∼ 26-33 kDa, is widely considered to be a very useful marker for prostate cancer. It satisfies nearly all the requirements of an ideal 'Tumour Marker' and has hence attracted a lot of attention in the past decade. PSA is present in multiple forms in serum, with an appreciable fraction bound to the protease inhibitor α-1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) and to a small extent to other proteins such as α-2-macroglobulin (AMG) leaving the rest in the free form. The total PSA levels have been reported to have 80% sensitivity and 60% specificity towards the detection of prostate cancer. The lack of specificity occurs mainly due to the high levels of t-PSA in benign prostatic hypertrophy(BPH) apart from the cancer. The concept of free PSA has been introduced in the recent past and the ratio of free/total PSA levels have been shown to be advantageous in the differential diagnosis of BPH from prostate cancer. The f/t ratio is considered to be particularly useful in the grey zones of decision making (t-PSA levels 4-20 ng/mL). The need for the development of assays for total and free PSA is felt due to: a. the high incidence of prostate cancers being detected currently; b. the high cost of tests (higher for free PSA assay, and the cost becomes an important parameter when a patient has to be regularly monitored after therapy) that is not affordable for many patients; c. the potential for research in the area of prostate cancer management where the PSA (total and free) assays will be of great help

  3. The clinical study of serum PSA and fPSA assayed by CLIA in diagnosing prostate disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Jiang; Qian Xiaoyu; Ji Hong; Yang Su; Ding Ying; Zhu Ruisen; Chen Zhong

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical value of PSA (prostate specific antigen) and fPSA(free prostate specific antigen) in differentiating prostate disease. CLIA was used to quantitatively assay PSA, fPSA and fPSA/PSA in 30 cases of normal controls, 32 cases of prostate cancer patients and 76 cases of BPH patients. The result showed that if liminal value of PSA was set at 4 ng/mL, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of prostate cancer were 100% and 50.6% respectively. Meanwhile, if liminal value of fPSA/PSA set at 16% was added, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of prostate cancer were 100% and 85.3% respectively. It was concluded that the combining assay of PSA and fPSA could increase the diagnostic specificity of prostate cancer in a certain degree

  4. Factors prompting PSA-testing of asymptomatic men in a country with no guidelines: a national survey of general practitioners.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Drummond, Frances J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Increased use of prostate specific antigen (PSA) has been associated with increased prostate cancer incidence. Ireland is estimated to have one of the highest prostate cancer incidences in Europe and has no national guidelines for prostate cancer screening. GPs have a pivotal role in influencing PSA testing, therefore, our aim was to describe GP testing practices and to identify factors influencing these. METHODS: A postal survey, including questions on clinical practice and experience, knowledge and demographics was distributed to all GPs (n = 3,683). The main outcomes were (i) PSA testing asymptomatic men and (ii) "inappropriate" PSA testing, defined as testing asymptomatic men aged < 50 or > 75 years. Factors associated with these outcomes were identified using logistic regression. RESULTS: 1,625 GPs responded (response rate corrected for eligibility = 53%). Most respondents (79%) would PSA test asymptomatic men. Of these, 34% and 51% would test asymptomatic men < 50 and > 75 years, respectively. In multivariate analyses, GPs were more likely to test asymptomatic men if they were >or= 50 years, in practice >or= 10 years, female or less knowledgeable about PSA efficacy. Male GPs who would have a PSA test themselves were > 8-times more likely to PSA test asymptomatic men than GPs who would not have a test. GPs who had an asymptomatic patient diagnosed with prostate cancer following PSA testing, were > 3-times more likely to test asymptomatic men. Practice-related factors positively associated with testing included: running \\'well man\\' clinics, performing occupational health checks and performing other tests routinely with PSA. Factors positively associated with \\'inappropriate\\' testing included; being male and willing to have a PSA test, having worked\\/trained in the UK and supporting annual PSA testing. 91% of respondents supported the development of national PSA testing guidelines. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that widespread PSA testing

  5. PSA as a tool for decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehaus, F.; Lederman, L.

    1986-01-01

    The question on ''How safe is safe enough'' is being responded presently by deterministic criteria. Probabilistic criteria in support to more rational and less emotional decisions in regulatory and licensing issues, rationalization of resource allocation and research prioritization, among others, have a potential which is only marginally being explored. This paper discussed PSA limitations and proposes three areas for the use of PSA in decision making, namely: preventing accidents, mitigating accidents, and defining regulatory requirements. Current activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in these areas are mentioned. PSA studies depict clearly the uncertainties and this is viewed as a positive aspect, which is unique to the use of probabilistic methods. (orig.)

  6. PSA as a tool for decision making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niehaus, F; Lederman, L

    1986-05-01

    The question on ''How safe is safe enough'' is being responded presently by deterministic criteria. Probabilistic criteria in support to more rational and less emotional decisions in regulatory and licensing issues, rationalization of resource allocation and research prioritization, among others, have a potential which is only marginally being explored. This paper discussed PSA limitations and proposes three areas for the use of PSA in decision making, namely: preventing accidents, mitigating accidents, and defining regulatory requirements. Current activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in these areas are mentioned. PSA studies depict clearly the uncertainties and this is viewed as a positive aspect, which is unique to the use of probabilistic methods.

  7. Effect of workload on quality of work life among staff of the teaching hospitals of Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marzban

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quality of work life is the reaction of employees to their work specially the individual results at work and mental health that affects their personal experience and work results. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of workload on quality of work life in staff of the teaching hospitals affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran. Methods: This analytical study was conducted in 530 staff of four hospitals affiliated to the Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences that were selected by Cochrane sampling method during 2014. The measurement tools were demographic questionnaire, Walton's quality of work life questionnaire (including 32 questions and eight dimensions, and the NASA TLX workload scale. Data were analyzed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Findings: The mean scores of quality of work life and workload were 48.21±13.34 and 64.70±11.44, respectively. There was negative significant correlation between workload and quality of work life (r= -0.0161. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that high workload is one of the most important factors of reduced quality of work life that can be reduced through proper organization and planning.

  8. The diagnostic value of PSA, cPSA and bone scintigraphy for early skeletal metastasis of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Zhongguang

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of prostate specific antigen (PSA), complexed prostate specific antigen (cPSA) and bone scintigraphic imaging in diagnosis of early skeletal metastasis of prostate cancer. Methods: 152 patients (74 with prostate cancer, 78 with benign prostate disease) and 90 controls were examined for the serum concentrations of PSA and cPSA. At the same time, the 74 patients with PCa were examined with bone scintigraphy. The cPSA/PSA ratio was calculated. Results: Serum PSA, cPSA levels and cPSA/PSA ratio of patients with prostate cancer were significantly higher than those in benign prostate patients and controls. In addition, the serum PSA, cPSA levels and cPSA/PSA ratio in prostate cancer patients with skeletal metastasis were remarkably higher than those in patients without skeletal metastasis, and the differences were significant (P 20 μg/L, cPSA>10 μg/L, cPSA/PSA>0.80, there is a high probability that skeletal metastasis of prostate cancer would be present and bone scintigraphy should be performed. (authors)

  9. A profile of perceived stress factors among nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Conradie

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients experience unique stress factors that can influence their personal well-being and work performance. Objectives: To compile a profile of stress factors experienced by nursing staff working with intellectually disabled in-patients at the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC. Methods: This descriptive study included 89 nursing staff members from this environment. A questionnaire was used to collect socio-demographic information and determine personal and occupational stressors. The data were summarised by frequencies and percentages (categorical variables and means or percentiles (numerical variables. Results: Most participants were aged between 46 and 55 (41.2%, female (93.2% and black (93.2%, and 76.7% had children or dependant minors. The main stressors among participants were pressure providing financially for their children and dependant minors (71.2%, caring for them (39.4% and fearing them moving away (25.8%. Occupational stressors included high workload (66.3%, lack of decision-making by superiors (58.1%, underpayment (53.5%, endangerment of physical health (52.3% and safety (50.0%, working hours (51.2%, pressure of expectations from superiors (48.8%, uncertainty of employment (48.8%, work responsibilities (47.7% and perceiving that skills and training were not appreciated. They experienced stress regarding health issues such as hyper- and hypotension (35.3%. Because of stress 34.5% of participants took leave, 34.5% developed depression and 14.3% had panic attacks. Conclusion: Most of the respondents experienced personal and occupational stress that influenced their health, which poses serious challenges for the management of the FSPC. Security should be upgraded, medical and psychological support for the staff and care facilities for their dependants should be provided, and financial problems experienced by these staff members should be addressed. The workload of

  10. Issues reporting PSA in prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, Paul H.

    1996-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute Prostate; Lung; Colon; Ovarian Cancer Screening (PLCO) project is a multi-center trial developed to investigate the effectiveness of DRE and PSA testing in the early detection and outcome of patients with prostate cancer. Accordingly, the Prostate Cancer Intervention versus Observation Trial (PIVOT) has been launched and is a randomized trial comparing radical prostatectomy versus expectant management for ALCaP. PSA: Initially PSA was thought to be of little value for diagnosis because 20% of men undergoing radical prostatectomy have 'normal' PSA and patients with apparently only symptomatic BPH have 'elevated' levels as follows: 4-10 ng/ml (Tandem-R) - 20%, >10 ng/ml -3%. Yet, PSA has looked attractive as a diagnostic tool in many studies; for example, when PSA was used in a screening approach as the first test which then drove further evaluation (Catalona, Brawer). It was shown that the positive predictive value for PSA's between 4 and 10 is approximately 20% and > 10 approximately 55%. The value of serial PSA's (velocity) is unknown but is under intense study: one major issue is determination of what represents a significant rise (details to be presented). Studies have also revealed that a DRE and PSA are important for optimal results. About 18% of clinically detectable cancers are only DRE positive while about 25 - 30% are only PSA positive. When both a DRE and PSA are used together, very few clinically apparent cancers are missed (3-5%). Recent ROC curves suggest that 4 ng/ml is reasonable. Recently, PSA values for men without apparent cancer were stratified by age, and taking the 2SD, age specific reference values were generated as follows: age 40-49 (0-2.5 ng/ml), 50-59 (0-3.5), 60-69 (0-4.5), 70-70 (0-6.5). Finally, there is the issue about different PSA assays regarding the compatabilities/reliability of the upper limit of normal and serial values. Much of the confusion is because there is no international PSA standard and

  11. Probability of an Abnormal Screening PSA Result Based on Age, Race, and PSA Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espaldon, Roxanne; Kirby, Katharine A.; Fung, Kathy Z.; Hoffman, Richard M.; Powell, Adam A.; Freedland, Stephen J.; Walter, Louise C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the distribution of screening PSA values in older men and how different PSA thresholds affect the proportion of white, black, and Latino men who would have an abnormal screening result across advancing age groups. Methods We used linked national VA and Medicare data to determine the value of the first screening PSA test (ng/mL) of 327,284 men age 65+ who underwent PSA screening in the VA healthcare system in 2003. We calculated the proportion of men with an abnormal PSA result based on age, race, and common PSA thresholds. Results Among men age 65+, 8.4% had a PSA >4.0ng/mL. The percentage of men with a PSA >4.0ng/mL increased with age and was highest in black men (13.8%) versus white (8.0%) or Latino men (10.0%) (PPSA >4.0ng/mL ranged from 5.1% of Latino men age 65–69 to 27.4% of black men age 85+. Raising the PSA threshold from >4.0ng/mL to >10.0ng/mL, reclassified the greatest percentage of black men age 85+ (18.3% absolute change) and the lowest percentage of Latino men age 65–69 (4.8% absolute change) as being under the biopsy threshold (PPSA threshold together affect the pre-test probability of an abnormal screening PSA result. Based on screening PSA distributions, stopping screening among men whose PSA 10ng/ml has the greatest effect on reducing the number of older black men who will face biopsy decisions after screening. PMID:24439009

  12. PSA for the shutdown mode for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-06-01

    The meeting, which was attended by more than 75 participants from 20 countries, provided a broad discussion forum where all the currently active major shutdown PSA programmes were reviewed. The meeting also addressed the issues related to actual performance of shutdown PSA studies as well as insight gained from the studies. This document, which was prepared during the TCM, contains the results of extensive discussions which were held in specific working groups. The papers presented at the meeting provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art of shutdown risk assessment and remedial measures taken to reduce the risk in outages. It is hoped that this document will be very useful to all individuals with interest in increasing safety during outages at NPPs. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Organizational Leaders’ and Staff Members’ Appraisals of Their Work Environment Within a Children’s Social Service System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David A.; Dulmus, Catherine; Maguin, Eugene; Keesler, John; Powell, Byron

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the effect of an organization’s culture and climate on the delivery of services to clients and the success of clinical outcomes. Workers’ perceptions are integral components of organizational social context, and in order to create a positive organizational culture and climate, managers and frontline staff need to have a shared understanding of the social context. The existing literature does not adequately address that discrepancies in perceptions of culture and climate between frontline staff and managers impact the implementation of policies and services. The purpose of this study is to compare the workgroup-level culture and climate of a single, large child and family social services organization, based on the reported experiences of front-line workers and senior managers. The results showed that, as a group, senior managers rated the organization as having a culture that was much more proficient and much less rigid and a climate that was more engaged and more functional than the average frontline workgroup. The discrepancies between the perceptions of upper management and workgroup-level staff indicate the need for interventions that can improve communication and cohesiveness between these two groups. PMID:25101308

  14. More Adults Are Walking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.

  15. Methodology for fire PSA during design process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kollasko, Heiko; Blombach, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Fire PSA is an essential part of a full scope level 1 PSA. Cable fires play an important role in fire PSA. Usually, cable routing is therefore modeled in detail. During the design of new nuclear power plants the information on cable routing is not yet available. However, for the use of probabilistic safety insights during the design and for licensing purposes a fire PSA may be requested. Therefore a methodology has been developed which makes use of the strictly divisional separation of redundancies in the design of modern nuclear power plants: cable routing is not needed within one division but replaced by the conservative assumption that all equipment fails due to a fire in the concerned division; critical fire areas are defined where components belonging to different divisions may be affected by a fire. For the determination of fire frequencies a component based approach is proposed. The resulting core damage frequencies due to fire are conservative. (orig.)

  16. A preliminary investigation of PSA validation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unwin, S D [Science Applications International Corp., (United States)

    1995-09-01

    This document has been prepared to support the initial phase of the Atomic Energy Control Board`s program to review and evaluate Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies conducted by nuclear generating station designers and licensees. The document provides (1) a review of current and prospective applications of PSA technology in the Canadian nuclear power industry; (2) an assessment of existing practices and techniques for the review or risk and hazard identification studies in the international nuclear power sector and other technological sectors; and (3) proposed analytical framework in which to develop systematic techniques for the scrutiny and evaluation of a PSA model. These frameworks are based on consideration of the mathematical structure of a PSA model and are intended to facilitate the development of methods to evaluate a model relative to intended end-uses. (author). 34 refs., 10 tabs., 3 figs.

  17. A preliminary investigation of PSA validation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unwin, S.D.

    1995-09-01

    This document has been prepared to support the initial phase of the Atomic Energy Control Board's program to review and evaluate Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies conducted by nuclear generating station designers and licensees. The document provides (1) a review of current and prospective applications of PSA technology in the Canadian nuclear power industry; (2) an assessment of existing practices and techniques for the review or risk and hazard identification studies in the international nuclear power sector and other technological sectors; and (3) proposed analytical framework in which to develop systematic techniques for the scrutiny and evaluation of a PSA model. These frameworks are based on consideration of the mathematical structure of a PSA model and are intended to facilitate the development of methods to evaluate a model relative to intended end-uses. (author). 34 refs., 10 tabs., 3 figs

  18. PDS4 Challenges in the PSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz, J.; Barbarisi, I.; Docasal, R.; Rios, C.; Montero, A.; Macfarlane, A.; Laantee, C.; Besse, S.; Vallat, C.; Marcos, J.; Arenas, J.; Osinde, J.; Arviset, C.

    2018-04-01

    The Planetary Science Archive (PSA) stores products from all planetary ESA missions. Adopting PDS4 as the standard for new missions, while being compatible with existing PDS3 products, has driven a design with several difficulties to overcome.

  19. Proceedings of the 10th Korea-Japan joint workshop on PSA. For Asian PSA network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joon-Eon; Homma, Toshimitsu

    2009-12-01

    The tenth Korea-Japan Joint Workshop on Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) was held in the Jeju island of Korea, on May 18-20, 2009 organized by Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for presentation and discussions on experiences and technical achievements related to PSA, risk-informed and performance-based approach, and other relevant issues in both countries. Since the first Korea-Japan Joint Workshop on PSA started in 1992, the workshops have provided an important and timely opportunity for exchange and discussion of the relevant information to all PSA practitioners and users of risk information in the industry, research, academia and regulatory arena. This was the tenth anniversary of the Joint Workshop with the main theme of 'For Asian PSA Network' and participants included those from China, Taiwan and the United States of America besides Korea and Japan. Two keynote speeches were presented by the former chairmen of this workshop, Prof. Chang-Sun Kang of Seoul National University and Prof. emeritus Shunsuke Kondo of Tokyo University. We had two special lectures, 70 papers presented by experts at 10 technical sessions related PSA, the special session on the status of PSA in Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan and panel discussion on their cooperation in PSA. This report provides the summary of each session, and all the presentation materials presented in the 10th Korea-Japan Joint Workshop on PSA. (author)

  20. Situational leadership styles, staff nurse job characteristics related to job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intaraprasong, Bhusita; Potjanasitt, Sureporn; Pattaraarchachai, Junya; Meennuch, Chavalit

    2012-06-01

    To analyze the relationships between the situational leadership styles, staff nurse job characteristic with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army The cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in 128 head nurses working in hospitals under the jurisdiction of the Royal Thai Army. Data were collected by mailed questionnaires. A total of 117 completed questionnaires (91.4%) were received for analysis. Statistical analysis was done using Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficient. It was found that situational leadership styles were not correlated with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses. Staff nurse job characteristics had a low level of positive correlation with job satisfaction and organizational commitment of head nurses at 0.05 level of significance (r = 0.202 and 0.189 respectively). The hospital administrators should formulate policy to improve working system, human resource management and formulate policies and strategies based on situational leadership. In addition, they should improve the characteristics of staff nurse job by using surveys to obtain job satisfaction and organizational commitment.

  1. Development of IRMA reagent and methodology for PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, R.

    1997-01-01

    The PSA test is a solid phase two-site immunoassay. Rabbit anti PSA is coated or bound on surface of solid phase and monoclonal anti PSA labeled with 1-125. The PSA molecules present in the standard solution or serum are 'Sandwiched' between the two antibodies. After formation of coated antibody-antigen-labeled antibody complex, the unbound labeled antibody will removed by washing. The complex is measured by gamma counter. The concentration of analyte is proportional to the counts of test sample. In order to develop kits for IRMA PSA, it should be prepared three essential reagents Antibody coated solid phase, labeled antibody, standards and finally optimizing them to obtain an standard curve fit to measure specimen PSA in desired range of concentration. The type of solid phase and procedure(s) to coat or bind to antibody, is still main debatable subject in development and setting up RIA/IRMA kits. In our experiments, polystyrene beads, because of their easy to coat with antibody as well as easy to use, can be considered as a desired solid phase. Most antibodies are passively adsorbed to a plastic surface (e.g. Polystyrene, Propylene, and Polyvinyl chloride) from a diluted buffer. The antibody coated plastic surface, then acts as solid phase reagent. Poor efficiency and time required to reach equilibrium and also lack of reproducibility especially batch-to-batch variation between materials, are disadvantages in this simple coating procedure. Improvements can be made by coating second antibody on surface of beads, and reaction between second and primary antibodies. There is also possible to enhance more coating efficiency of beads by using Staphylococcus ureus-Protein A. Protein A is a major component of staphylococcus aureus cell wall which has an affinity for FC segment of immunoglobulin G (IgG) of some species, including human; rabbit; and mice. This property of Staphylococcal Protein A has made it a very useful tool in the purification of classes and subclasses

  2. State of the art of probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) in the FRG, and principles of a PSA-guideline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balfanz, H.P.

    1987-01-01

    Contents of the articles: Survey of PSA performed during licensing procedures of an NPP; German Nuclear Standards' requirements on the reliability of safety systems; PSA-guideline for NPP: Principles and suggestions; Motivation and tasks of PSA; Aspects of the methodology of safety analyses; Structure of event tree and fault tree analyses; Extent of safety analyses; Performance and limits of PSA. (orig./HSCH)

  3. Development of seismic PSA methodology at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, K.; Ebisawa, K.; Matsumoto, K.; Oikawa, T.; Kondo, M.

    1995-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is developing a methodology for seismic probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) of nuclear power plants, aiming at providing a set of procedures, computer codes and data suitable for performing seismic PSA in Japan. In order to demonstrate the usefulness of JAERI's methodology and to obtain better understanding on the controlling factors of the results of seismic PSAs, a seismic PSA for a BWR is in progress. In the course of this PSA, various improvements were made on the methodology. In the area of the hazard analysis, the application of the current method to the model plant site is being carried out. In the area of response analysis, the response factor method was modified to consider the non-linear response effect of the building. As for the capacity evaluation of components, since capacity data for PSA in Japan are very scarce, capacities of selected components used in Japan were evaluated. In the systems analysis, the improvement of the SECOM2 code was made to perform importance analysis and sensitivity analysis for the effect of correlation of responses and correlation of capacities. This paper summarizes the recent progress of the seismic PSA research at JAERI with emphasis on the evaluation of component capacity and the methodology improvement of systems reliability analysis. (author)

  4. Staff nurse perceptions of the impact of mentalization-based therapy skills training when working with borderline personality disorder in acute mental health: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrender, D

    2015-10-01

    People diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD) are highly prevalent in acute mental health wards, with staff nurses identifying a challenge in working with people who can be significantly distressed. This has contributed to a negative stereotype verging on stigmatization. Mentalization-based therapy (MBT) is a psychological therapy which has been shown to be of benefit to people with a diagnosis of BPD, yet it has been utilized and evaluated only in partial hospitalization and outpatient settings. Despite this, most people diagnosed with BPD will continue to be treated in generic inpatient settings such as acute mental health. Mentalization-based therapy skills training (MBT-S) is a new and cost-effective 2-day workshop aiming to provide generalist practitioners with MBT skills for use in generic settings. This study aimed to capture staff perceptions of the impact of MBT-S on their practice when working with people with a diagnosis of BPD in acute mental health. Through two focus groups, this study assessed the perceptions of nine staff nurses. An interpretive phenomenological approach was utilized in data analysis. Participants found the approach easy to grasp, improving of consistency between staff and flexible in its use in planned or 'off the cuff' discussions. MBT-S promoted empathy and humane responses to self-harm, impacted on participants ability to tolerate risk and went some way to turning the negative perception of BPD through changing the notion of patients as 'deliberately difficult'. Staff felt empowered and more confident in working with people with a diagnosis of BPD. The positive implication for practice was the ease in which the approach was adopted and participants perception of MBT-S as an empowering skill set which also contributed to attitudinal change. In acute mental health environments, which may not have the resources to provide long-term structured treatments to patients, MBT-S could be viewed as ideal as participants

  5. Explaining the Relationship between Empowerment and Work Life Quality: A Case Study on the Staff of Social Security Hospital of Zahedan city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanyar Sheikhepoor

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The quality of work life has an important role in increasing labor productivity and consequently the efficiency and effectiveness of large organizations. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between empowerment (as the independent variables and the quality of work life of employees (as the dependent variable. Method:This study was conducted in a descriptive correlated manner; the population consisted of the Zahedan city hospital’s nursing staff (n=132 selected using accessible sampling methods. They filled out the empowerment and quality of work life questionnaire. The reliability of the questionnaires was confirmed through Cronbach’s alpha; furthermore, the questionnaires were prepared with a high content validity and construct validity. The obtained data were analyzed using SPSS statistical software and Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression test. Results: The results showed that empowerment and its factors (sense of independence, sense of effectiveness, feeling of being meaningful and trusted among colleagues at 99% confidence level and feeling of competence at 95% confidence level had a significant positive correlation with the quality of their working life. Second, empowerment factors predicted 29% of the variance in employees’ quality of work life. Conclusion: Considering the obtained results, it is recommended that to empower their employees more than ever, the managers try more to promote them, have more skillful staff, and help employees experience working life quality .

  6. Construction of a Scale-Questionnaire on the Attitude of the Teaching Staff as Opposed to the Educative Innovation by Means of Techniques of Cooperative Work (CAPIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Andrés Traver Martí

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the construction process of a scale-questionnaire is described to measure the attitude of the teaching staff as opposed to the educational innovation by means of techniques of cooperative work (CAPIC.  In order to carry out its design and elaboration we need on the one hand a model of analysis of the attitudes and an instrument of measurement of the same ones capable of guiding its practical dynamics.  The Theory of the Reasoned Action of Fisbhein and Ajzen (1975, 1980 and the summative scales (Likert have fulfilled, in both cases, this paper.

  7. External events analysis in PSA studies for Czech NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holy, J.; Hustak, S.; Kolar, L.; Jaros, M.; Hladky, M.; Mlady, O.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to summarize current status of natural external hazards analysis in the PSA projects maintained in Czech Republic for both Czech NPPs - Dukovany and Temelin. The focus of the presentation is put upon the basic milestones in external event analysis effort - identification of external hazards important for Czech NPPs sites, screening out of the irrelevant hazards, modeling of plant response to the initiating events, including the basic activities regarding vulnerability and fragility analysis (supported with on-site analysis), quantification of accident sequences, interpretation of results and development of measures decreasing external events risk. The following external hazards are discussed in the paper, which have been addressed during several last years in PSA projects for Czech NPPs: 1)seismicity, 2)extremely low temperature 3)extremely high temperature 4)extreme wind 5)extreme precipitation (water, snow) 6)transport of dangerous substances (as an example of man-made hazard with some differences identified in comparison with natural hazards) 7)other hazards, which are not considered as very important for Czech NPPs, were screened out in the initial phase of the analysis, but are known as potential problem areas abroad. The paper is a result of coordinated effort with participation of experts and staff from engineering support organization UJV Rez, a.s. and NPPs located in Czech Republic - Dukovany and Temelin. (authors)

  8. Shift Work and Related Health Problems among Medical and Diagnostic Staff of the General Teaching Hospitals Affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Sajjadnia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Today, shift work is considered as a necessity in many jobs and for some 24-hour services the use of shift-work is growing. However, shift work can lead to physiological and psycho-social problems for shift workers. This study aimed to determine the effects of shift work on the associated health problems, together with the demographic and job characteristics underlying the problems, among the medical and diagnostic staff of the general teaching hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences in 2012. Method:This study was an applied, cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical one. The study employed a sample of 205 employees from the medical and diagnostic staff using stratified sampling proportional to the size and simple random sampling methods. Data were collected using the Survey of Shift workers (SOS questionnaire, validity and reliability of which have already been confirmed. Finally, the collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16.0 software through ANOVA, Chi-square, Independent-Samples T-Test, as well as Pearson Correlation Coefficient. A P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: The results showed that among the demographic and job characteristics studied, the individual, family and social problems had significant associations with work schedules, shift work and job satisfaction. In addition, there were significant associations between musculoskeletal disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; cardiovascular disorders and marital status and occupation; digestive disorders and the work schedules; sleep disorders and the satisfaction of shift work; musculoskeletal disorders, cardiovascular disorders and sleep disorders and age, job experience and shift work experience. And finally, there were significant associations among sleep disorders and age, job experience and the shift work experience. Conclusion: Based on the findings of this study, demographic characteristics such as age, marital

  9. The independence of international civil servants during the neoliberal decades: implications of the work stoppage involving 700 staff of the World Health Organization in November 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The independence of international civil servants is critical to the fulfillment of their organizations' mandates, but it has been seriously undermined during 25 years of neoliberal influence in U.N. agencies, including the World Health Organization. In November 2005, 700 staff at WHO headquarters participated in a one-hour work stoppage--the first industrial action in the organization's history. Hierarchical and arbitrary management, abuse of rules and procedures, nepotism and harassment, and undue influence of international financial institutions, powerful member states, and transnational corporations have exhausted morale and motivation, creating a conformist environment and interfering with technical health work. In the neoliberal era, WHO staff confront conflicting duties of loyalty to a handful of member states and their private interests and loyalty to WHO's constitutional mandate. International civil servants need support from governing bodies and from the world's people in finding the correct balance. A first essential step would be respect for international labor standards within the U.N. family and, in particular, negotiation status and collective bargaining--human rights in the workplace and prerequisites for staff independence, integrity, and competence, qualities required to serve the world's people.

  10. Preventing the development of metabolic syndrome in people with psychotic disorders--difficult, but possible: experiences of staff working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Anette; Karlsson, Maria; Foldemo, Anniqa; Wärdig, Rikard; Hultsjö, Sally

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore mental health staffs' experiences of assisting people with psychotic disorders to implement lifestyle changes in an effort to prevent metabolic syndrome. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 health care professionals working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The results illustrate that implementation of lifestyle changes among people with psychotic disorders was experienced as difficult, but possible. The greatest obstacles experienced in this work were difficulties due to the reduction of cognitive functions associated with the disease. Guidelines available to staff in order to help them identify and prevent physical health problems in the group were not always followed and the content was not always relevant. Staff further described feelings of uncertainty about having to motivate people to take anti-psychotic medication while simultaneously being aware of the risks of metabolic deviations. Nursing interventions focusing on organising daily routines before conducting a more active prevention of metabolic syndrome, including information and practical support, were experienced as necessary. The importance of healthy eating and physical activity needs to be communicated in such a way that it is adjusted to the person's cognitive ability, and should be repeated over time, both verbally and in writing. Such efforts, in combination with empathic and seriously committed community-based social support, were experienced as having the best effect over time. Permanent lifestyle changes were experienced as having to be carried out on the patient's terms and in his or her home environment.

  11. Perceptions of work-time and leisure-time among managers and field staff in a UK primary health care trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Reva Berman; Adebayo, Shirley A

    2004-09-01

    The aims of the research were to explore the issues around the perception of District Nurses in an inner London Primary Health Care Trust of their use of work-time and leisure-time, and to reveal how the boundaries between these two aspects can become blurred and impinge on each other. Time use is helpful in considerations of wider issues such as satisfaction at work and work-life balance. The data were collected by a questionnaire to seek the views of managers and field staff on issues such as the impact on the quality of patient care of the nurses' perception of work-time and leisure-time. The research identified the different perception of "work-time" that employees have in relation to their place within the hierarchical structure. The findings answered the question of whether time is perceived differently, dependent on one's occupation within the Trust.

  12. Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial of An Aged Care Specific Leadership and Management Program to Improve Work Environment, Staff Turnover, and Care Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Yun-Hee; Simpson, Judy M; Li, Zhicheng; Cunich, Michelle M; Thomas, Tamsin H; Chenoweth, Lynn; Kendig, Hal L

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a leadership and management program in aged care. Double-blind cluster randomized controlled trial. Twelve residential and community-aged care sites in Australia. All care staff employed for 6 months or longer at the aged care sites were invited to participate in the surveys at 3 time points: baseline (time 1), 9 months from baseline (time 2), and 9 months after completion of time 2 (time 3) from 2011 to 2013. At each time point, at least 500 care staff completed a survey. At baseline (N = 503) the largest age group was 45 to 54 years (37%), and the majority of care staff were born in Australia (70%), spoke English (94%), and had at least completed secondary education (57%). A 12-month Clinical Leadership in Aged Care (CLiAC) program for middle managers, which aimed to further develop their leadership and management skills in creating positive workplace relationships and in enabling person-centered, evidence-based care. The primary outcomes were care staff ratings of the work environment, care quality and safety, and staff turnover rates. Secondary outcomes were care staff's intention to leave their employer and profession, workplace stress, job satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness of implementing the program. Absenteeism was excluded due to difficulty in obtaining reliable data. Managers' self-rated knowledge and skills in leadership and management are not included in this article, which focuses on care staff perceptions only. At 6 months after its completion, the CLiAC program was effective in improving care staff's perception of management support [mean difference 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04-1.18; P = .04]. Compared with the control sites, care staff at the intervention sites perceived their managers' leadership styles as more transformational (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0.09-0.51; P = .005), transactional (mean difference 0.22, 95% CI 0.05-0.39; P = .01), and less passive avoidant (mean difference 0.30, 95% CI 0

  13. SERIAL PERCENT-FREE PSA IN COMBINATION WITH PSA FOR POPULATION-BASED EARLY DETECTION OF PROSTATE CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankerst, Donna Pauler; Gelfond, Jonathan; Goros, Martin; Herrera, Jesus; Strobl, Andreas; Thompson, Ian M.; Hernandez, Javier; Leach, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To characterize the diagnostic properties of serial percent-free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in relation to PSA in a multi-ethnic, multi-racial cohort of healthy men. MATERIALS AND METHODS 6,982 percent-free PSA and PSA measures were obtained from participants in a 12 year+ Texas screening study comprising 1625 men who never underwent biopsy, 497 who underwent one or more biopsies negative for prostate cancer, and 61 diagnosed with prostate cancer. Area underneath the receiver-operating-characteristic-curve (AUC) for percent-free PSA, and the proportion of patients with fluctuating values across multiple visits were determined according to two thresholds (under 15% versus 25%) were evaluated. The proportion of cancer cases where percent-free PSA indicated a positive test before PSA > 4 ng/mL did and the number of negative biopsies that would have been spared by percent-free PSA testing negative were computed. RESULTS Percent-free PSA fluctuated around its threshold of PSA tested positive earlier than PSA in 71.4% (34.2%) of cancer cases, and among men with multiple negative biopsies and a PSA > 4 ng/mL, percent-free PSA would have tested negative in 31.6% (65.8%) instances. CONCLUSIONS Percent-free PSA should accompany PSA testing in order to potentially spare unnecessary biopsies or detect cancer earlier. When near the threshold, both tests should be repeated due to commonly observed fluctuation. PMID:26979652

  14. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...... depends on the actual stand allocation but also on the number of zones and the layout of these. A mathematical model of the problem is proposed, which integrates the stand allocation and the staff scheduling. A heuristic solution method is developed and applied on a real case from British Airways, London...

  15. Improvement of Prostate Cancer Diagnosis by Detecting PSA Glycosylation-Specific Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llop, Esther; Ferrer-Batallé, Montserrat; Barrabés, Sílvia; Guerrero, Pedro Enrique; Ramírez, Manel; Saldova, Radka; Rudd, Pauline M; Aleixandre, Rosa N; Comet, Josep; de Llorens, Rafael; Peracaula, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    New markers based on PSA isoforms have recently been developed to improve prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis. However, novel approaches are still required to differentiate aggressive from non-aggressive PCa to improve decision making for patients. PSA glycoforms have been shown to be differentially expressed in PCa. In particular, changes in the extent of core fucosylation and sialylation of PSA N-glycans in PCa patients compared to healthy controls or BPH patients have been reported. The objective of this study was to determine these specific glycan structures in serum PSA to analyze their potential value as markers for discriminating between BPH and PCa of different aggressiveness. In the present work, we have established two methodologies to analyze the core fucosylation and the sialic acid linkage of PSA N-glycans in serum samples from BPH (29) and PCa (44) patients with different degrees of aggressiveness. We detected a significant decrease in the core fucose and an increase in the α2,3-sialic acid percentage of PSA in high-risk PCa that differentiated BPH and low-risk PCa from high-risk PCa patients. In particular, a cut-off value of 0.86 of the PSA core fucose ratio, could distinguish high-risk PCa patients from BPH with 90% sensitivity and 95% specificity, with an AUC of 0.94. In the case of the α2,3-sialic acid percentage of PSA, the cut-off value of 30% discriminated between high-risk PCa and the group of BPH, low-, and intermediate-risk PCa with a sensitivity and specificity of 85.7% and 95.5%, respectively, with an AUC of 0.97. The latter marker exhibited high performance in differentiating between aggressive and non-aggressive PCa and has the potential for translational application in the clinic.

  16. Review of KSNP LPSD PSA model based of ANS LPSD PRA standard, rev.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, S. C.; Park, J. H.; Kim, T. W.; Lim, H. G.; Yang, J. E.; Ha, J. J.

    2004-02-01

    Recently, under the de-regulation environment, nuclear industry has attempted various approaches to improve the economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). One of these efforts is the Risk Informed/Performance-based Operation (RIPBO). This approach uses the risk and performance information to manage the resources effectively and efficiently that are used in the operation of NPP. In RIPBO, PSA quality is one of the most important things. The nuclear industry and regulatory body of U.S.A have developed a measure to evaluate the quality of PSA. NEI (Nuclear Energy Institute) has developed a guidance called 'NEI PRA Peer Review Guidance,' and NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Committee) and ASME have developed the 'PRA Standard.' In Korea, several projects are on going now, such as the extension of AOT/STI of RPS/ESFAS, Risk-informed In-service Inspection (RI-ISI). However, in Korea, there have been no attempts to evaluate the quality of PSA model itself. Therefore, we cannot be sure about the quality of PSA whether or not the present PSA model can be used for the risk-informed applications such as mentioned above. We can say that the evaluation of PSA model quality is the basis for the RIPBO. In this report, we have evaluated the quality of PSA model at Low power and Shutdown operation model for Yongkwang 5 and 6 units based on the ANS LPSD PRA Standard. We, also, have derived what items are to be improved to upgrade the quality of LPSD PSA model and how it can be improved. This report can be used as the base of RIPBO work in Korea

  17. Evaluation of total PSA assay on vitros ECi and correlation with Kryptor-PSA assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassinat, B; Wacquet, M; Toubert, M E; Rain, J D; Schlageter, M H

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of multiparametric immuno-analysers for PSA assays are available. As different immuno-assays may vary in their analytical quality and their accuracy for the follow-up of patients, expertise is necessary for each new assay. The PSA assay on the Vitros-ECi analyser has been evaluated and compared with the PSA assay from the Kryptor analyser. Variation coefficients were 0.91 to 1.98% for within-run assays, and 4.2% to 5.4% for interassay (PSA levels = 0.8 microgram/L to 33.6 micrograms/L). Dilution tests showed 93 to 136% recovery until 70 micrograms/L PSA. Functional sensitivity was estimated at 0.03 microgram/L. Equimolarity of the test was confirmed. Correlation of PSA levels measured with Vitros-ECi and Kryptor analysers displayed a correlation coefficient r2 of 0.9716. The half-lives and doubling times of PSA were similar using both methods. Vitros-ECi PSA assay meets the major criteria for the management of prostate cancer patients.

  18. Purification of PSA from human semen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: 1. Human seminal plasma collected from many volunteers are pooled and passed through a column of phenyl sepharose equilibrated with 1.25 M ammonium sulphate. Elution is carried out with 1.25 M ammonium sulphate initially, to remove the bulk non-adsorbing proteins. Gradient elution of the absorbed proteins with 0.01 M Tris-HCl, 0.25 M NaCl, pH 7.0 buffer gives a sharp peak containing PSA. At each stage, PSA has to be identified by an independent method such as immunodiffusion or an immunoassay. 2. The absorbed protein peak containing PSA is then lyophilised, redissolved in Tris-HCl buffer and chromatographed in a Superdex-75 or Sephadex-75 column. The absorbed proteins elute out as multiple peaks and PSA is eluted as a sharp peak.At each stage, PSA has to be identified by an independent method such as immunodiffusion or an immunoassay. 3. Step 2 is repeated for better purity. 4. The PSA peak is lyophilised, dissolved in Tris-HCl buffer without NaCl and further purified on an ion exchange column (either anion or cation exchange columns such as DEAE Sephadex or CM-Sephadex or Mono Q). Gradient elution using Tris-HCl buffer without NaCl and Tris-HCl buffer with 0.25 M NaCl resulted in a sharp pure PSA peak (homogenous, sharp single band on SDS-PAGE). This procedure is based on that reported by Wang et al., Oncology, 39,1,1982

  19. Perspectives of Living PSA in NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrbanic, I.; Kastelan, M.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power plant Krsko has completed the Level 1/Level 2 Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) for internal initiating events and is in the process of completing the same for the external initiators. The analysis completed up to now has provided a valuable insight into a plant risk profile. In NPP Krsko there is a plan to use the PSA model as a permanent tool for the risk based applications and incorporate it into a decision making process. In order to achieve this there is a need to permanently maintain the PSA model in a manner that it reflects both the plan configuration/design at a time point and the operational experience up to the time point. All the activities aimed toward keeping the PSA model up-to-dated in this sense are usually referred to as a Living PSA (LPSA) program. NPP Krsko is in the process of defining and proceduralizing a LPSA program that would be plant specific and based on known world practices. Further, in order to be suitable for risk based applications the PSA model must be flexible in a sense that modifications to the base case model may be done easily and requantifications performed quickly as to evaluate various conditions imposed by real or hypothetical situations. NPP Krsko PSA model has been based on licensing type software. The requirements specified above dictate the transfer of the overall model to an application oriented software of newer generation with larger capabilities. The transfer becomes a part of a mentioned ongoing effort aimed at establishing LPSA model and concept. The paper present this effort and the perspectives of LPSA concept and risk based applications in NPP Krsko. (author)

  20. Vergleichende Einschätzung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft der Kenngrößen freies PSA, Alpha1-Antichymotrypsin-PSA und komplexiertes PSA in der Diagnostik des Prostatakarzinoms

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgart E; Deger S; Jung K; Lein M; Loening SA; Schnorr D

    2001-01-01

    Ziel der Studie war die vergleichende Einschätzung der diagnostischen Aussagekraft von Gesamt-PSA (tPSA), freiem PSA (fPSA), alpha1-Antichymotrypsin-PSA (ACT-PSA) und komplexiertem PSA (cPSA) sowie der entsprechenden Quotienten zur Differenzierung zwischen einem Prostatakarzinom (PCa) und einer Benignen Prostatahyperplasie (BPH). Die Bestimmung erfolgte bei insgesamt 324 Männern (PCa: n = 144; BPH: n = 89; Kontrollen: n = 91). Die tPSA- und cPSA-Konzentrationen wurden mit dem Bayer Immuno 1 S...

  1. Correlative study of SPECT bone scan, serum tPSA and fPSA/tPSA ratio and the pathological grade of prostate cancer with bone metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Haiqing; Duan Jun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the rules and characteristics of SPECT bone scan, serum TPSA, fPSA/tPSA ratio and the pathological grade of prostate cancer with bone metastasis. Methods: Nuclear medicine SPECT bone scan as the gold standard, retrospective analysis of the in vitro radioimmunoassay in 107 patients with prostate cancer serum PSA (prostate specific antigen) levels, serum fPSA/tPSA ratio and whole body bone imaging studies and pathological classification. Results: 107 patients with prostate cancer : 49 patients had bone metastases, accounting for 45.8% (49/107), in which groups of different pathological comparison between the incidence of bone metastasis significantly, the lower the degree of differentiation, the more the incidence of bone metastases high; with elevated levels of tPSA, the incidence of bone metastasis increased significantly; serum tPSA 4 - 40 ng/ml, the use of fPSA/tPSA ratio may improve the diagnostic specificity of prostate cancer. Conclusion: Patients with bone metastases of prostate cancer incidence and degree of differentiation of prostate cancer, serum PSA levels and fPSA/tPSA ratio of a certain relationship. The lower degree of differentiation,the higher the incidence of bone metastasis. (authors)

  2. Effectiveness of team nursing compared with total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Allana; Long, Lesley; Lisy, Karolina

    2015-11-01

    The organization of the work of nurses, according to recognized models of care, can have a significant impact on the wellbeing and performance of nurses and nursing teams. This review focuses on two models of nursing care delivery, namely, team and total patient care, and their effect on nurses' wellbeing. To examine the effectiveness of team nursing compared to total patient care on staff wellbeing when organizing nursing work in acute care wards. Participants were nurses working on wards in acute care hospitals.The intervention was the use of a team nursing model when organizing nursing work. The comparator was the use of a total patient care model.This review considered quantitative study designs for inclusion in the review.The outcome of interest was staff wellbeing which was measured by staff outcomes in relation to job satisfaction, turnover, absenteeism, stress levels and burnout. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies from 1995 to April 21, 2014. Quantitative papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute. Data was extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute. The data extracted included specific details about the interventions, populations, study methods and outcomes of significance to the review question and its specific objectives. Due to the heterogeneity of the included quantitative studies, meta-analysis was not possible. Results have been presented in a narrative form. The database search returned 10,067 records. Forty-three full text titles were assessed, and of these 40 were excluded, resulting in three studies being included in the review. Two of the studies were quasi experimental designs and the other was considered an uncontrolled before and after experimental study

  3. A comparative Study of Aptasensor Vs Immunosensor for Label-Free PSA Cancer Detection on GQDs-AuNRs Modified Screen-Printed Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Monika; Nirala, Narsingh R; Srivastava, S K; Prakash, Rajiv

    2018-01-31

    Label-free and sensitive detection of PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) is still a big challenge in the arena of prostate cancer diagnosis in males. We present a comparative study for label-free PSA aptasensor and PSA immunosensor for the PSA-specific monoclonal antibody, based on graphene quantum dots-gold nanorods (GQDs-AuNRs) modified screen-printed electrodes. GQDs-AuNRs composite has been synthesized and used as an electro-active material, which shows fast electron transfer and catalytic property. Aptamer or anti-PSA has immobilized onto the surface of modified screen printed electrodes. Three techniques are used simultaneously, viz. cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and electrochemical impedence spectroscopy (EIS) to investigate the analytical performance of both PSA aptasensor and PSA immunosensor with its corresponding PSA antigen. Under optimum conditions, both sensors show comparable results with an almost same limit of detection (LOD) of 0.14 ng mL -1 . The results developed with aptasensor and anti-PSA is also checked through the detection of PSA in real samples with acceptable results. Our study suggests some advantages of aptasensor in terms of better stability, simplicity and cost effectiveness. Further our present work shows enormous potential of our developed sensors for real application using voltammetric and EIS techniques simultaneous to get reliable detection of the disease.

  4. Can PSA Reflex Algorithm be a valid alternative to other PSA-based prostate cancer screening strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldarelli, G; Troiano, G; Rosadini, D; Nante, N

    2017-01-01

    The available laboratory tests for the differential diagnosis of prostate cancer, are represented by the total PSA, the free PSA, and the free/total PSA ratio. In Italy most of doctors tend to request both total and free PSA for their patients even in cases where the total PSA doesn't justify the further request of free PSA, with a consequent growth of the costs for the National Health System. The aim of our study was to predict the saving in Euro (due to reagents) and reduction in free PSA tests, applying the "PSA Reflex" algorithm. We calculated the number of total PSA and free PSA exams performed in 2014 in the Hospital of Grosseto and, simulating the application of the "PSA Reflex" algorithm in the same year, we calculated the decrease in the number of free PSA requests and we tried to predict the Euro savings in reagents, obtained from this reduction. In 2014 in the Hospital of Grosseto 25,955 total PSA tests have been performed: 3,631 (14%) resulted greater than 10 ng / ml; 7,686 (29.6%) between 2 and 10 ng / ml; 14,638 (56.4%) lower than 2 ng / ml. The performed free PSA tests were 16904. Simulating the use of "PSA Reflex" algorithm, the free PSA tests would be performed only in cases with total PSA values between 2 and 10 ng / mL with a saving of 54.5% of free PSA exams and of 8,971 euros, only for reagents. Our study showed that the "PSA Reflex" algorithm is a valid alternative leading to a reduction of the costs. The estimated intralaboratory savings, due to the reagents, seem to be modest, however, they are followed by the additional savings due to the other diagnostic processes for prostate cancers.

  5. Utilisation of strategic communication to create willingness to change work practices among primary care staff: a long-term follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morténius, Helena; Fridlund, Bengt; Marklund, Bertil; Palm, Lars; Baigi, Amir

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the long-term utilisation of strategic communication as a factor of importance when changing work practices among primary care staff. In many health care organisations, there is a gap between theory and practice. This gap hinders the provision of optimal evidence-based practice and, in the long term, is unfavourable for patient care. One way of overcoming this barrier is systematically structured communication between the scientific theoretical platform and clinical practice. This longitudinal evaluative study was conducted among a primary care staff cohort. Strategic communication was considered to be the intervention platform and included a network of ambassadors who acted as a component of the implementation. Measurements occurred 7 and 12 years after formation of the cohort. A questionnaire was used to obtain information from participants. In total, 846 employees (70%) agreed to take part in the study. After 12 years, the 352 individuals (60%) who had remained in the organisation were identified and followed up. Descriptive statistics and multivariate analysis were used to analyse the data. Continuous information contributed to significant improvements over time with respect to new ideas and the intention to change work practices. There was a statistically significant synergistic effect on the new way of thinking, that is, willingness to change work practices. During the final two years, the network of ambassadors had created a distinctive image for itself in the sense that primary care staff members were aware of it and its activities. This awareness was associated with a positive change with regard to new ways of thinking. More years of practice was inversely associated with willingness to change work practices. Strategic communication may lead to a scientific platform that promotes high-quality patient care by means of new methods and research findings.

  6. Influence of gender, working field and psychosocial factors on the vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff: results of an Austrian cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadenhofer, Petra; Kundi, Michael; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Stummer, Harald; Kautzky-Willer, Alexandra

    2018-03-01

    According to the European Agency for Safety and Health at Work (EU-OSHA), hospitals represent a work environment with high job strain. Prolonged perceived occupational stress may result in symptoms of burnout, such as emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalisation (DP) and reduced personal accomplishment (PA). Understanding which factors may reduce vulnerability for burnout is an important requirement for well-targeted occupational stress prevention in mental hospital staff. To identify the influence of gender, age, working field, family structure, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job on occupational stress perception. In a cross-sectional design, 491 employees (311 female, 180 male) of an Austrian mental health centre participated in the study. The extent of perceived occupational stress was assessed by the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) with the scales for emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment. Participants were divided according to their working field in those working with/without patients. Prevalence of emotional exhaustion was higher in women working with patients compared to men working with patients (25% vs. 18%, p = 0.003). Age above 45 years was significantly associated with decreased vulnerability for burnout in men (EE p = 0.040, DP p = 0.010, PA p = 0.007), but not in women. A lower level of education had a significant impact on depersonalisation in both sexes (p = 0.001 for men, p = 0.048 for women). Length of stay on job showed a significant influence on emotional exhaustion. No significant relationship was found between family structure and vulnerability for burnout. Gender had a differential effect on perceived occupational stress indicating a need for gender-tailored preventive strategies. Age, working field, education, voluntarily occupational training during holidays and length of stay on job affect vulnerability for burnout in mental hospital staff.

  7. Proteolytic activity of prostate-specific antigen (PSA towards protein substrates and effect of peptides stimulating PSA activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M Mattsson

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3 exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA.

  8. Proteolytic Activity of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) towards Protein Substrates and Effect of Peptides Stimulating PSA Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Johanna M.; Ravela, Suvi; Hekim, Can; Jonsson, Magnus; Malm, Johan; Närvänen, Ale; Stenman, Ulf-Håkan; Koistinen, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA or kallikrein-related peptidase-3, KLK3) exerts chymotrypsin-like proteolytic activity. The main biological function of PSA is the liquefaction of the clot formed after ejaculation by cleavage of semenogelins I and II in seminal fluid. PSA also cleaves several other substrates, which may explain its putative functions in prostate cancer and its antiangiogenic activity. We compared the proteolytic efficiency of PSA towards several protein and peptide substrates and studied the effect of peptides stimulating the activity of PSA with these substrates. An endothelial cell tube formation model was used to analyze the effect of PSA-degraded protein fragments on angiogenesis. We showed that PSA degrades semenogelins I and II much more efficiently than other previously identified protein substrates, e.g., fibronectin, galectin-3 and IGFBP-3. We identified nidogen-1 as a new substrate for PSA. Peptides B2 and C4 that stimulate the activity of PSA towards small peptide substrates also enhanced the proteolytic activity of PSA towards protein substrates. Nidogen-1, galectin-3 or their fragments produced by PSA did not have any effect on endothelial cell tube formation. Although PSA cleaves several other protein substrates, in addition to semenogelins, the physiological importance of this activity remains speculative. The PSA levels in prostate are very high, but several other highly active proteases, such as hK2 and trypsin, are also expressed in the prostate and may cleave protein substrates that are weakly cleaved by PSA. PMID:25237904

  9. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  10. 78 FR 48337 - Federal Employees Health Benefits Program: Members of Congress and Congressional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-08

    ... personal staffs, staffs of House and Senate leadership committees, other committee staff and administrative... percentage of work as committee or leadership committee staff. It also is [[Page 48338

  11. Design review of SPWR with PSA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Tetsukuni; Muramatsu, Ken; Iwamura, Takamichi; Tone, Tatsuzo; Kasahara, Takeo; Mizuno, Yoshio

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents the procedures and results of a PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) of the SPWR (System-Integrated PWR), which is being developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) as a medium sized innovative passive safe reactor, to assist in the design improvement of the SPWR by reviewing the design and identifying the design weaknesses. This PSA was performed in four steps: (1) identification of initiating events by the failure mode effect analysis and other methods, (2) delineation of accident sequences for three selected initiating events using accident progression flow charts and event trees, (3) quantification of event trees based on the review of past PSAs for LWRs, and (4) sensitivity analysis and interpretation of results. Qualitative and quantitative results of PSA provided very useful information for decision makings of design improvement and recommendations for further consideration in the process of detailed design

  12. A Preliminary Fire PSA on PGSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kilyoo; Han, Sanghoon; Lee, KwiLim

    2017-01-01

    A Prototype Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor (PGSFR) is under design with defense in depth concept with active, passive, and inherent safety features to acquire a design approval for PGSFR from Korean regulatory authority by around 2017. A preliminary fire PSA on PGSFR is done in 2016 and a final fire PSA of PGSFR will be done in 2017. The characteristics of the preliminary fire PSA on PGSFR are described in this paper. Since PGSFR is very safe reactor, it is not bad approach to use a conservative assumption in the preliminary PSA. In addition, several drawings including cable routing are not yet issued, a conservative calculation for CDF is performed. As shown in Table 2, the CDF caused by the fire in the control room takes 89% portion of total CDF. Thus, a detailed fire modeling for control room is necessary for the final fire PSA on PGSFR. Also, the increased ignition frequency due to sodium leak would be derived by considering the sodium piping complexity in the final fire PSA on PGSFR. The 4th column of Table 2 is derived the 3rd column by multiplying the factor (592/1177). The 5th column is the ignition frequency caused by the sodium leak. The 6th column is derived by summing the 4th column and the 5th column. The 7th column is the CDF portion of each fire area. The control room (fire area F-A404A) is the most important area since the control room fire takes 89% portion of total CDF.

  13. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  14. Use of simplified PSA studies in support of the ASTRID design process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthe, P.; Curnier, F.; Bertrand, F.; Vincon, L.; Jouve, S.; Balmain, M.; Rychkov, V.; Banchieri, Y.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the French Act of 28 June 2006 about nuclear materials and waste management, a GEN IV and actinides incineration demonstration prototype is to be commissioned in the 2020 decade. In this objective a prototype called ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) is proposed to demonstrate the progress made in SFR technology at an industrial scale by qualifying innovative options, some of which still remain open in the areas requiring improvements, especially safety and operability. More specifically, we aim for a level of safety that is at least equivalent to that of the EPR (third generation), with improvements made in SFR-specific fields. The integration of safety issues in the early phase of the design of ASTRID is necessarily expected. For this purpose, CEA and its partners AREVA and EDF have planned to perform a level-1 PSA to support and orientate the preliminary design of ASTRID reactor. This paper presents the PSA approach and current studies for the assessment of safety systems and the future work to be done for the 2012-2014 period. The preliminary preparation of PSA studies is presented: objectives and scope of the early design phase PSA, definition of core damage states, selection and grouping of initiating events, assessment of safety functions and related systems. Work under progress is also presented: modelling of event trees, construction of fault trees of safety systems, transient calculations of accident sequences with the CATHARE2 code and reliability data assessment. Main objectives of a level-1 PSA performed at conceptual design stage are an early assessment of the safety architecture of the reactor and findings about the most effective areas for improvement, but also the identification of dominant accident sequences and comparison with alternative designs. After the elaboration of a simplified level-1 PSA model for nominal state and main internal initiators, various design alternatives will be

  15. The Relationship Between Burnout Syndrome Among the Medical Staff and Work Conditions in the Polish Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głębocka, Alicja

    2017-01-01

    Psychologists emphasize that people employed in social service organizations are vulnerable to chronic stress and burnout syndrome caused by a close and unsatisfied interpersonal relationship. However, emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and a feeling of diminished personal accomplishment can be attributed to other external factors. One of them is poor living and occupational conditions. According to a report by OECD, the healthcare system in Poland is the worst among the member countries. The aim of the present study was to define the relationship between occupational burnout and the rating of the Polish healthcare system among the medical staff. The study included 224 participants. The Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Dehumanized Behavior and the Głębocka and Rużyczka scale of Behavioral Indicators of Patient's Dehumanization were applied. The evaluations of the healthcare system were also collected. The results demonstrate that physicians were the group of most emotionally exhausted and, simultaneously, most life-satisfied persons, while nurses presented the highest level of dehumanization and the lowest level of satisfaction from life achievements. Only did physicians evaluate the healthcare system as a relatively good one. They were also more tolerant of latent dehumanization. A relationship between the dimensions of burnout and the evaluation of healthcare system were observed. The emotionally exhausted or prone to dehumanization persons were more likely to evaluate the Polish healthcare system negatively.

  16. The influence of factors of work environment and burnout syndrome on self-efficacy of medical staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Nowakowska

    2016-06-01

    Properly shaped and used organisational factors are stimulating for professional efficiency and effectiveness, and consequently, for the quality of nursing work. Negative assessment of the factors in the work environment contributes to the occurrence of burnout symptoms and decrease in self-efficacy. Nurses with lower self-efficacy more often experienced symptoms of burnout.

  17. Effects of increasing the PSA cutoff to perform additional biomarker tests before prostate biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordström, Tobias; Adolfsson, Jan; Grönberg, Henrik; Eklund, Martin

    2017-10-03

    Multi-step testing might enhance performance of the prostate cancer diagnostic pipeline. Using PSA >1 ng/ml for first-line risk stratification and the Stockholm 3 Model (S3M) blood-test >10% risk of Gleason Score > 7 prostate cancer to inform biopsy decisions has been suggested. We aimed to determine the effects of changing the PSA cutoff to perform reflex testing with S3M and the subsequent S3M cutoff to recommend prostate biopsy while maintaining the sensitivity to detect Gleason Score ≥ 7 prostate cancer. We used data from the prospective, population-based, paired, diagnostic Stockholm 3 (STHLM3) study with participants invited by date of birth from the Swedish Population Register during 2012-2014. All participants underwent testing with PSA and S3M (a combination of plasma protein biomarkers [PSA, free PSA, intact PSA, hK2, MSMB, MIC1], genetic polymorphisms, and clinical variables [age, family, history, previous prostate biopsy, prostate exam]). Of 47,688 men in the STHLM3 main study, we used data from 3133 men with S3M >10% and prostate biopsy data. Logistic regression models were used to calculate prostate cancer detection rates and proportion saved biopsies. 44.2%, 62.5% and 67.9% of the participants had PSA PSA cut-off for additional work-up from 1 ng/ml to 1.5 ng/ml would thus save 18.3% of the performed tests, 4.9% of the biopsies and 1.3% (10/765) of Gleason Grade ≥ 7 cancers would be un-detected. By lowering the S3M cutoff to recommend biopsy, sensitivity to high-grade prostate cancer can be restored, to the cost of increasing the number of performed biopsies modestly. The sensitivity to detect prostate cancer can be maintained when using different PSA cutoffs to perform additional testing. Biomarker cut-offs have implications on number of tests and prostate biopsies performed. A PSA cutoff of 1.5 ng/ml to perform additional testing such as the S3M test might be considered. ISRCTN84445406 .

  18. Seminal plasma PSA in spinal cord injured men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Sønksen, J; Sommer, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration.......The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration....

  19. Use of PSA to support accident management at NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez Cobo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The presentation discusses the following: Overview of PSA level 2; Introduction: Framework; Accident Progression Phenomena in the Confinement/containment; Severe Accident Sequences; Examples; Results and Insights. Accident Management: Concepts; Process; Use of PSA to support Accident; Management

  20. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves. PMID:26911983

  1. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-02-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves.

  2. A qualitative study of the impact of the implementation of advanced access in primary healthcare on the working lives of general practice staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Offredy Maxine

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The North American model of 'advanced access' has been emulated by the National Primary Care Collaborative in the UK as a way of improving patients' access in primary care. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the implementation of advanced access on the working lives of general practice staff. Methods A qualitative study design, using semi-structured interviews, was conducted with 18 general practice staff: 6 GPs, 6 practice managers and 6 receptionists. Two neighbouring boroughs in southeast England were used as the study sites. NUD*IST computer software assisted in data management to identify concepts, categories and themes of the data. A framework approach was used to analyse the data. Results Whilst practice managers and receptionists saw advanced access as having a positive effect on their working lives, the responses of general practitioners (GPs were more ambivalent. Receptionists reported improvements in their working lives with a change in their role from gatekeepers for appointments to providing access to appointments, fewer confrontations with patients, and greater job satisfaction. Practice managers perceived reductions in work stress from fewer patient complaints, better use of time, and greater flexibility for contingency planning. GPs recognised benefits in terms of improved consultations, but had concerns about the impact on workload and continuity of care. Conclusion AA has improved working conditions for receptionists, converting their perceived role from gatekeeper to access facilitator, and for practice managers as patients were more satisfied. GP responses were more ambivalent, as they experienced both positive and negative effects.

  3. Relationship between Family-Work and Work-Family Conflict with Organizational Commitment and Desertion Intention among Nurses and Paramedical Staff at Hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Hatam, Nahid; Jalali, Marzie Tajik; Askarian, Mehrdad; Kharazmi, Erfan

    2016-01-01

    Background: High turnover intention rate is one of the most common problems in healthcare organizations throughout the world. There are several factors that can potentially affect the individuals’ turnover intention; they include factors such as work-family conflict, family-work conflict, and organizational commitment. The aim of this research was to determine the relationship between family-work and work-family conflicts and organizational commitment and turnover intention among nurses and p...

  4. Exploring staff willingness to attend work during a disaster: a study of nurses employed in four Australian emergency departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbon, Paul; Cusack, Lynette; Ranse, Jamie; Shaban, Ramon Z; Considine, Julie; Kako, Mayumi; Woodman, Richard J; Mitchell, Belinda; Bahnisch, Laura; Hammad, Karen

    2013-08-01

    Much of the literature about emergency nurses willingness to work during disasters has been from a non-Australian perspective. Despite the many recent disasters, little is known of Australian nurse's willingness to participate in disaster response. This paper presents findings from a study that explored nurses willingness to attend work during a disaster and the factors that influenced this decision. Data were collected consecutively using a combination of focus group and interview methods. Participants in this study, registered nurses from emergency departments, were recruited through convenience sampling from four hospitals in Australia. Participant narrative was electronically recorded, transcribed and thematically analysed. The participants for both the focus groups and interviews compromised a mix of ages, genders and years of experience as emergency nurses from across four jurisdictions within Australia. Three major themes that influenced willingness emerged with a number of subthemes. Theme one reflected the uncertainty of the situation such as the type of disaster. The second theme surrounded the preparedness of the workplace, emergency nurse and colleagues, and the third theme considered personal and professional choice based on home and work circumstances and responsibilities. The decision to attend work or not during a disaster, includes a number of complex personal, work-related and professional factors that can change, depending on the type of disaster, preparedness of the work environment and the emergency nurses' personal responsibilities at that time. Copyright © 2013 College of Emergency Nursing Australasia Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of quality circles on job satisfaction and quality of work-life of staff in emergency medical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinabadi, Reza; Karampourian, Arezou; Beiranvand, Shoorangiz; Pournia, Yadollah

    2013-10-01

    Quality circles, as a participatory management technique, offer one alternative for dealing with frustration and discontent of today's workers. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of implementation of quality circles on nurses' quality of work-life and job satisfaction. In this study, two emergency medical services (EMS) of Hamedan province were selected and randomly assigned as the experimental and control groups. After the experimental group was trained and quality circles were established in this group, the levels of quality of work-life and job satisfaction were measured in the two groups. Then, the statistical analyses were performed using t-test. After the intervention, the results showed significant differences between the scores of motivational factors (p=0.001), the total scores of job satisfaction (p=0.003), and the scores of some quality of work life (QWL) conceptual categories including the use and development of capacities (p=0.008), the total space of life (p=0.003), and the total scores of QWL (p=0.031) in the experimental group compared to those in the control group. This study confirms the effectiveness of quality circles in improving quality of work-life and job satisfaction of nurses working in EMS, and offers their application as a management method that can be used by EMS managers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The use of PSA in the French regulatory practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mennesiez, H.

    1994-01-01

    The presentation gives a description of fundamental documents (since 1977-1978) through which have been set up in France probabilistic objectives, and PSAs, including shutdown states, performed for 900-1300 MWe PWR-type nuclear power plants. PSA developments and use, including fire PSA, level 2 and PSA for the future French-German European Pressurized Reactor (EPR) are also discussed

  7. PSA methodology development and application in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazuo Sato; Toshiaki Tobioka; Kiyoharu Abe

    1987-01-01

    The outlines of Japanese activities on development and application of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodologies are described. First the activities on methodology development are described for system reliability analysis, operational data analysis, core melt accident analysis, environmental consequence analysis and seismic risk analysis. Then the methodoligy application examples by the regulatory side and the industry side are described. (author)

  8. Screen for Life: Meryl Streep PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-16

    In this 30 second PSA, Academy Award®-winning actress Meryl Streep urges viewers to get screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 5/16/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/16/2013.

  9. Screen for Life: Meryl Streep PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-05-16

    In this 60 second PSA, Academy Award®-winning actress Meryl Streep urges viewers to get screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 5/16/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 5/16/2013.

  10. French 900 MWe PWR PSA preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.M.; Brisbois, J.

    1988-10-01

    A PSA is performed by the Safety Assessment Department of CEA for a 900 MWe standardized plant. The paper presents the objectives, the scope of the study and the relative preliminary results. Some general insights are drawn, especially the benefit related to the implementation of emergency procedures

  11. Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill PSA (:24)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 24 second PSA from Dr. Regina Benjamin, U.S. Surgeon General, encourages people to get help if they are feeling sad, angry, depressed, or stressed as a result of the Gulf oil spill. It was recorded so that localities can add their own "For more information" at the end, as appropriate.

  12. Take Charge. Take the Test. PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).

  13. Safer Food Saves Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second PSA is based on the November 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Contaminated food sent to several states can cause multistate outbreaks of foodborne illness and make a lot of people seriously ill. Learn what can be done to prevent and stop outbreaks.

  14. Interoperability in the Planetary Science Archive (PSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Diaz, C.

    2017-09-01

    The protocols and standards currently being supported by the recently released new version of the Planetary Science Archive at this time are the Planetary Data Access Protocol (PDAP), the EuroPlanet- Table Access Protocol (EPN-TAP) and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. We explore these protocols in more detail providing scientifically useful examples of their usage within the PSA.

  15. Secundaire analyses organisatiebeleid psychosociale arbeidsbelasting (PSA)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan, K.O.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2016-01-01

    Hoe het organisatiebeleid rond psychosociale arbeidsbelasting (PSA) eruit ziet anno 2014 en welke samenhang er is met ander beleid en uitkomstmaten, zijn de centrale vragen in dit onderzoek. De resultaten van deze verdiepende analyses kunnen ten goede komen aan de lopende campagne ‘Check je

  16. STD Awareness PSA - College 2 (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-22

    This PSA, targeted to college-aged youth and young adults, encourages listeners to get tested for STDs.  Created: 4/22/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/22/2010.

  17. STD Awareness PSA - College 1 (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-22

    This PSA, targeted to college-aged youth and young adults, encourages listeners to get tested for STDs.  Created: 4/22/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/22/2010.

  18. STD Awareness PSA - Male Announcer 2 (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-22

    This PSA encourages listeners to get tested for STDs. Target - Men who have sex with other men.  Created: 4/22/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/22/2010.

  19. Stop C. difficile Infections PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second PSA is based on the March 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. C. difficile is a germ that causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 deaths in the US each year. This podcast helps health care professionals learn how to prevent C. difficile infections.

  20. [Working time and sleep in nursing staff employed in "3 x 8" and "2 x 12" fast rotating shift schedules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, G; Anelli, M M; Punzi, S; Boari, P; Camerino, D; Costa, G

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at assessing, in 200 nurses shift workers, the impact on sleep of two different working areas ("emergency" and "hospitalization") having the same "3 x 8" shift system, and of two different shift schedules at quick rotation ("2 x 12" and "3 x 8") in the same working area ("emergency"). Night and morning shifts prove to interfere to a greater extent with sleep in relation to both "2 x 12" and "3 x 8" shift systems as well as to the two operative areas. Hence the importance to consider in shift work planning, the direction of shift rotation and the length of the duty period according to the type of activity.

  1. [Work-to-family influence and social supports: job satisfaction in a north-Italy public health organization --differences between medical and administrative staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Lara; Zito, Margherita; Ghislieri, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in the well-being at work has grown considerably, also considering the latest law directives. Several scholars have devoted particular attention to the topic of the work-to-family influence and of social supports, as elements able to affect the perceived well-being. The well-being in health care has to consider the particular nature of work and the relevant relational dimensions that require special attention for the emotional side. The research was promoted by the Committee for Equal Opportunities of a public health organization in the North-West Italy. Referring to the job demands-resources theoretical model, this study investigated the role of organizational and family supports, work-to-family spillover (positive and negative) and family workload as possible determinants of job satisfaction, intended as an indicator of psychological well-being at work. Respondents to the questionnaire are 541 (55% of the total employees), their average age is 43 and they are mostly women (80%). Data analysis showed the central role of supervisors supports, of the co-workers supports and, to a lesser extent, the role of the work-to-family spillover in influencing job satisfaction. Moreover, significant differences between medical and administrative staff were detected. The centrality of supports, especially those of supervisors in determining job satisfaction, is in line with studies indicating that a supportive leadership and a family-friendly culture can facilitate the arise of positive outcomes for both workers and organizations.

  2. Time to PSA rise differentiates the PSA bounce after HDR and LDR brachytherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchardt, Wojciech; Skowronek, Janusz

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the differences in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce (PB) after high-dose-rate (HDR-BT) or low-dose-rate (LDR-BT) brachytherapy alone in prostate cancer patients. Ninety-four patients with localized prostate cancer (T1-T2cN0), age ranged 50-81 years, were treated with brachytherapy alone between 2008 and 2010. Patients were diagnosed with adenocarcinoma, Gleason score ≤ 7. The LDR-BT total dose was 144-145 Gy, in HDR-BT - 3 fractions of 10.5 or 15 Gy. The initial PSA level (iPSA) was assessed before treatment, then PSA was rated every 3 months over the first 2 years, and every 6 months during the next 3 years. Median follow-up was 3.0 years. Mean iPSA was 7.8 ng/ml. In 58 cases, PSA decreased gradually without PB or biochemical failure (BF). In 24% of patients, PB was observed. In 23 cases (24%), PB was observed using 0.2 ng/ml definition; in 10 cases (11%), BF was diagnosed using nadir + 2 ng/ml definition. The HDR-BT and LDR-BT techniques were not associated with higher level of PB (26 vs. 22%, p = 0.497). Time to the first PSA rise finished with PB was significantly shorter after HDR-BT then after LDR-BT (median, 10.5 vs. 18.0 months) during follow-up. Predictors for PB were observed only after HDR-BT. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and higher Gleason score decreased the risk of PB (HR = 0.11, p = 0.03; HR = 0.51, p = 0.01). The higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB (HR 3.46, p = 0.02; HR 1.04, p = 0.04). There was no predictors for PB after LDR-BT. HDR-BT and LDR-BT for low and intermediate risk prostate cancer had similar PB rate. The PB occurred earlier after HDR-BT than after LDR-BT. ADT and higher Gleason score decreased, and higher PSA nadir and longer time to PSA nadir increased the risk of PB after HDR-BT.

  3. Staff working in hospital units with greater social capital experience less work-home conflict: Secondary analysis of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitzsche, Anika; Kuntz, Ludwig; Miedaner, Felix

    2017-10-01

    When the interplay between work and private life does not function correctly (work-home conflict), this constitutes a well-known risk factor for poorer health, increased absenteeism and lower work performance. Information about influencing factors of work-home conflict is therefore indispensable in order to avoid it. In this study, we analyse whether a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity' (organizational social capital) can reduce an employee's conflict between work and private life. This study investigates the link between organizational social capital and work-home conflict in health professionals. This issue was investigated using a cross-sectional study conducted in 2013. Data from questionnaires completed by physicians and nurses (n=1733) were linked with structural data from 66 neonatal intensive care units in Germany. Using multi-level analyses, we investigated associations between organizational social capital at the ward level and work-home conflict at the level of individual employees, taking into account additional structural and individual characteristics. Employees on wards with greater social capital reported significantly less work-home conflict. Our results support the hypothesis that organizational social capital is an important collective resource. As such, more attention should be given to establishing a good working atmosphere that fosters mutual trust, support and a 'sense of unity', and this should be encouraged in a targeted fashion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. External Events PSA for the Paks NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bareith, Attila; Karsa, Zoltan; Siklossy, Tamas; Vida, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Initially, probabilistic safety assessment of external events was limited to the analysis of earthquakes for the Paks Nuclear Power Plant in Hungary. The level 1 seismic PSA was completed in 2002 showing a significant contribution of seismic failures to core damage risk. Although other external events of natural origin had previously been screened out from detailed plant PSA mostly on the basis of event frequencies, a review of recent experience on extreme weather phenomena made during the periodic safety review of the plant led to the initiation of PSA for external events other than earthquakes in 2009. In the meantime, the accident of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant confirmed further the importance of such an analysis. The external event PSA for the Paks plant followed the commonly known steps: selection and screening of external hazards, hazard assessment for screened-in external events, analysis of plant response and fragility, PSA model development, and risk quantification and interpretation of results. As a result of event selection and screening the following weather related external hazards were subject to detailed analysis: extreme wind, extreme rainfall (precipitation), extreme snow, extremely high and extremely low temperatures, lightning, frost and ice formation. The analysis proved to be a significant challenge due to scarcity of data, lack of knowledge, as well as limitations of existing PSA methodologies. This paper presents an overview of the external events PSA performed for the Paks NPP. Important methodological aspects are summarised. Key analysis findings and unresolved issues that need further elaboration are highlighted. Development of external events PSA for the Paks NPP was completed by the end of 2012. The analysis followed the commonly known steps: selection and screening of external hazards, hazard assessment for screened-in external events, analysis of plant response and fragility, PSA model development, and risk

  5. PSA testing anxiety, psychological morbidity, and PSA utility in the management of prostate cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Micsunescu, Anamaria Elia

    2017-01-01

    Anecdotal reports from urologists and medical oncologists have suggested that patients with prostate cancer (PCa) often present with anxiety related to ongoing monitoring of their PSA levels as part of their disease management. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to determine the prevalence and severity of prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing anxiety in a population of patients with either localised or metastatic PCa living in Australia. Other aspects of psychological morbidit...

  6. How are compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction affected by quality of working life? Findings from a survey of mental health staff in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetrano, Gaia; Tedeschi, Federico; Rabbi, Laura; Gosetti, Giorgio; Lora, Antonio; Lamonaca, Dario; Manthorpe, Jill; Amaddeo, Francesco

    2017-11-21

    Quality of working life includes elements such as autonomy, trust, ergonomics, participation, job complexity, and work-life balance. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate if and how quality of working life affects Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction among mental health practitioners. Staff working in three Italian Mental Health Departments completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale, measuring Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction, and the Quality of Working Life Questionnaire. The latter was used to collect socio-demographics, occupational characteristics and 13 indicators of quality of working life. Multiple regressions controlling for other variables were undertaken to predict Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction. Four hundred questionnaires were completed. In bivariate analyses, experiencing more ergonomic problems, perceiving risks for the future, a higher impact of work on life, and lower levels of trust and of perceived quality of meetings were associated with poorer outcomes. Multivariate analysis showed that (a) ergonomic problems and impact of work on life predicted higher levels of both Compassion Fatigue and Burnout; (b) impact of life on work was associated with Compassion Fatigue and lower levels of trust and perceiving more risks for the future with Burnout only; (c) perceived quality of meetings, need of training, and perceiving no risks for the future predicted higher levels of Compassion Satisfaction. In order to provide adequate mental health services, service providers need to give their employees adequate ergonomic conditions, giving special attention to time pressures. Building trustful relationships with management and within the teams is also crucial. Training and meetings are other important targets for potential improvement. Additionally, insecurity about the future should be addressed as it can affect both Burnout and Compassion Satisfaction. Finally

  7. How are compassion fatigue, burnout, and compassion satisfaction affected by quality of working life? Findings from a survey of mental health staff in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Cetrano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quality of working life includes elements such as autonomy, trust, ergonomics, participation, job complexity, and work-life balance. The overarching aim of this study was to investigate if and how quality of working life affects Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction among mental health practitioners. Methods Staff working in three Italian Mental Health Departments completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale, measuring Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction, and the Quality of Working Life Questionnaire. The latter was used to collect socio-demographics, occupational characteristics and 13 indicators of quality of working life. Multiple regressions controlling for other variables were undertaken to predict Compassion Fatigue, Burnout, and Compassion Satisfaction. Results Four hundred questionnaires were completed. In bivariate analyses, experiencing more ergonomic problems, perceiving risks for the future, a higher impact of work on life, and lower levels of trust and of perceived quality of meetings were associated with poorer outcomes. Multivariate analysis showed that (a ergonomic problems and impact of work on life predicted higher levels of both Compassion Fatigue and Burnout; (b impact of life on work was associated with Compassion Fatigue and lower levels of trust and perceiving more risks for the future with Burnout only; (c perceived quality of meetings, need of training, and perceiving no risks for the future predicted higher levels of Compassion Satisfaction. Conclusions In order to provide adequate mental health services, service providers need to give their employees adequate ergonomic conditions, giving special attention to time pressures. Building trustful relationships with management and within the teams is also crucial. Training and meetings are other important targets for potential improvement. Additionally, insecurity about the future should be addressed as it can

  8. The Implications of Flexible Staffing Arrangements for Job Stability. Upjohn Institute Staff Working Paper No. 99-056. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseman, Susan N.; Polivka, Anne E.

    A study examined the job stability of workers in the following flexible staffing arrangements: agency temporary, direct-hire temporary, on-call, contract company, independent contractor, and regular part-time work. Two data sources were used in the analysis. The first was a nationwide survey of employers on their use of flexible staffing…

  9. Effect of Shift Work on the Frequency of Depression in Nursing Staff of Yazd University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Halvani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression as a disorder is relatively common in all societies; several factors are involved in depression development, that shift work is one of these factors. This study compared the frequency of depression in different shifts of nurses in hospitals of Yazd University of medical sciences. Materials & Methods: This study is a descriptive analytical study. Based on statistical methods, 150 nurses participated in this study. The research tool was a questionnaire that included 15 personal questions and 21 questions related to Beck test. The results were analysed by SPSS software. Results: 13.3% of all subjects were males and 86.7% were females. Results showed that, there is no significant relationship between gender, education, type of job, employment status and satisfaction levels of income with depression. Marital status (P-Value = 0.009 and F = 6.93, shift work (day working and shift work (P-Value = 0.032 and F = 1.11, job satisfaction (P-Value = 0.000 and F = 7.641 and the satisfaction of the employer (P-Value = 0.001 and F = 5.414 were significantly associated with depression. 3.49% of the nurses were in normal status, 7.26% had mild depression, 3.9% required consultation with the psychiatrist,% 7.8% suffered from moderate depression, 75.4% from severe depression and 3.1% from very severe depression. Conclusion: It seems that shift work can not cause depression alone, but depression is the result of the interaction of several factors.

  10. Risk factors for work-related stress and subjective hardship in health-care staff in nursing homes for the elderly: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, Carole; Vohito, Michel; Fort, Emmanuel; Sellier, Brigitte; Agard, Jean Pierre; Fontana, Luc; Charbotel, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore potential risk factors for work-related stress by, detailing working conditions and subjective hardship according to occupational category in health-care staff working with elderly patients. A cross-sectional descriptive survey was conducted in 105 nursing homes for the elderly in France. Data on nursing home working conditions were collected by occupational physicians. The study population was limited to those in direct contact with the elderly, who were divided into 3 occupational groups defined by qualifications and tasks: housekeepers (HKs), nursing assistants (NAs) and nurses (Ns). Employees answered a questionnaire on their perceived working conditions and vocational training courses. Psychosocial stress was assessed with the Siegrist questionnaire. The subjects included 706 HKs, 1,565 NAs and 378 Ns, and the findings showed confusion of tasks and responsibilities in the study population. Verbal abuse by residents was reported by 60.9% of HKs (versus 76.2% of NAs and 76.7% of Ns, pstress related to insufficient ability, nursing home workers should be encouraged to attend job training courses, which should cover knowledge of the specific care needs of elderly patients and of the authority/responsibility required to do their job.

  11. The effect of aggression management training programmes for nursing staff and students working in an acute hospital setting. A narrative review of current literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckemann, B; Zeller, A; Hahn, S; Dassen, T; Schols, J M G A; Halfens, R J G

    2015-01-01

    Patient aggression is a longstanding problem in general hospital nursing. Staff training is recommended to tackle workplace aggression originating from patients or visitors, yet evidence on training effects is scarce. To review and collate current research evidence on the effect of aggression management training for nurses and nursing students working in general hospitals, and to derive recommendations for further research. Systematic, narrative review. Embase, MEDLINE, the Cochrane library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, pubmed, psycArticles, Psychology and Behavioural Sciences Collection were searched for articles evaluating training programs for staff and students in acute hospital adult nursing in a 'before/after' design. Studies published between January 2000 and September 2011 in English, French or German were eligible of inclusion. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed with the 'Quality Assessment Tool for Quantitative Studies'. Main outcomes i.e. attitudes, confidence, skills and knowledge were collated. Nine studies were included. Two had a weak, six a moderate, and one a strong study design. All studies reported increased confidence, improved attitude, skills, and knowledge about risk factors post training. There was no significant change in incidence of patient aggression. Our findings corroborate findings of reviews on training in mental health care, which point to a lack of high quality research. Training does not reduce the incidence of aggressive acts. Aggression needs to be tackled at an organizational level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical performance of serum [-2]proPSA derivatives, %p2PSA and PHI, in the detection and management of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ya-Qiang; Sun, Tong; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been widely used as a serum marker for prostate cancer (PCa) screening or progression monitoring, which dramatically increased rate of early detection while significantly reduced PCa-specific mortality. However, a number of limitations of PSA have been noticed. Low specificity of PSA may lead to overtreatment in men who presenting with a total PSA (tPSA) level of PHI) and %p2PSA, which were defined as [(p2PSA/fPSA) × √ tPSA] and [(p2PSA/fPSA) × 100] respectively, have been suggested to be increased in PCa and can better distinguish PCa from benign prostatic diseases than tPSA or fPSA. We performed a systematic review of the available scientific evidences to evaluate the potentials of %p2PSA and PHI in clinical application. Mounting evidences suggested that both %p2PSA and PHI possess higher area under the ROC curve (AUC) and better specificity at a high sensitivity for PCa detection when compare with tPSA and %fPSA. It indicated that measurements of %p2PSA and PHI significantly improved the accuracy of PCa detection and diminished unnecessary biopsies. Furthermore, elevations of %p2PSA and PHI are related to more aggressive diseases. %p2PSA and PHI might be helpful in reducing overtreatment on indolent cases or assessing the progression of PCa in men who undergo active surveillance. Further studies are needed before being applied in routine clinical practice.

  13. Evaluating the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia training for use with community-based aged care staff working with people with dementia: a controlled pretest-post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Erin R; Chenery, Helen J

    2016-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the effects of a communication skills training programme on community aged care staff's knowledge of communication support in dementia and on staff's care experience. Dementia can lead to impairments in communication. Therefore, quality community-based dementia care requires that staff be skilled communicators, equipped to facilitate interactions with people with dementia. The current investigation evaluated the effectiveness of the MESSAGE Communication Strategies in Dementia for Care Staff training programme with respect to knowledge of communication support and the staff/caregiver experience. A multi-centre controlled pretest/post-test design with randomised cohort allocation was used. Outcome measures were completed at baseline, immediately after training (training group only), and at three-month follow-up. Thirty-eight care staff working in community aged care participated and completed all outcome measures (training = 22; control = 16).Training and control groups completed the following outcome measures: knowledge of communication support strategies, self-efficacy, preparedness to provide care, strain in nursing care and attitude to dementia care. Staff in the training group provided written feedback on the training. A significant improvement in knowledge scores from baseline was found for the training group both immediately after training and at three-month follow-up. There was also a significant training effect for self-efficacy and preparedness to provide care. No significant difference was found for the control group for any measure. No significant training effects were found for measures of strain or attitudes to dementia care. Feedback from staff suggests that the training was well received. The MESSAGE training was positively received by staff and had a significant effect on care staff knowledge, and confidence to provide care for people with dementia. The easily accessible multimedia training programme is well received by

  14. Correlation between Health Correlates and Quality of Working Life in the Staff of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mafi mahvash

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Objectives: Quality of working life (QWL is an important issue and examination of the spects that can affect it causes promotion of individual and organizational productivity. This study was conducted to investigate correlation between health correlates and the QWL in the emloyees of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch. Methods: This descriptive-correlational study with regression analysis was conducted on 130 nonteaching employees of the Islamic Azad University, Lahijan Branch selected by convenience sampling with reference to the number of the studied variables (spiritual, physical, mental, social, and environmental health. The participants filled out demographic, health-promoting behaviors, and QWL questionnaires. Data were analyzed by SPSS using descriptive and inferential statistical tests especially multivariate regression. Results: Among health components, physical health (r=0.55 and mental health (r=0.50 had the highest correlation with total QWL score. The amount of explained variance in criterion variable (QWL by the regression model was 40%. Table of coefficients demonstrated that the scores for mental health and spiritual health had greater contribution in the model than other health aspects. Physical health, psychological health, spiritual health, and environmental health explained 29%, 45%, 37%, and 21% variance in QWL, respectively. Conclusion: The findings of this study demonstrated positive correlation between health aspects and QWL. Because the university employees spend a great deal of time at work and the quality of their work affects the entire organization, this finding can be useful to guide policy-makers and health experts in developing preventive and intervention programs in the future for promotion of the employees' health and organization.

  15. Emotions at work: what is the link to patient and staff safety? Implications for nurse managers in the NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Pam; Pearson, Pauline H; Ross, Fiona

    2009-03-01

    This paper sets the discussion of emotions at work within the modern NHS and the current prioritisation of creating a safety culture within the service. The paper focuses on the work of students, frontline nurses and their managers drawing on recent studies of patient safety in the curriculum, and governance and incentives in the care of patients with complex long term conditions. The primary research featured in the paper combined a case study design with focus groups, interviews and observation. In the patient safety research the importance of physical and emotional safety emerged as a key finding both for users and professionals. In the governance and incentives research, risk emerged as a key concern for managers, frontline workers and users. The recognition of emotions and the importance of emotional labour at an individual and organizational level managed by emotionally intelligent leaders played an important role in promoting worker and patient safety and reducing workplace risk. Nurse managers need to be aware of the emotional complexities of their organizations in order to set up systems to support the emotional wellbeing of professionals and users which in turn ensures safety and reduces risk.

  16. An approach to develop a PSA workstation in KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T. W.; Han, S. H.; Park, C. K.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes three kinds of efforts for the development of PSA workstation in KAERI; Development of a PSA tool, KIRAP, Reliability Database Development, Living PSA tool development. Korea has 9 nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation and 9 NPPs under design or construction. For the NPPs recently constructed or designed, the probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) have been performed by the Government requirements. For these PSAs, the MSDOS version of KIRAP has been used. For the consistent data management and the easiness of information handling needed in PSA, APSA workstation, KIRAP-Win is under development under Windows environment. For the reliability database on component failure rate, human error rate, and common cause failure rate, data used in international PSA or reliability data handbook are collected and processed to use in Korean new plants' PSAs. Finally, an effort for the development of a living PSA tool in KAERI based on dynamic PSA concept is described

  17. A PSA study for the SMART basic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Sang Hoon; Kim, H. C.; Yang, S. H.; Lee, D. J.

    2002-03-01

    SMART (System-Integrated Modular Advanced Reactor) is under development that is an advanced integral type small and medium category nuclear power reactor with the rated thermal power of 330 MW. A Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) for the SMART basic design has been performed to evaluate the safety and optimize the design. Currently, the basic design is done and the detailed design is not available for the SMART, we made several assumptions about the system design before performing the PSA. The scope of the PSA was limited to the Level-1 internal full power PSA. The level-2 and 3 PSA, the external PSA, and the low power/shutdown PSA will be performed in the final design stage

  18. General practice and specialist palliative care teams: an exploration of their working relationship from the perspective of clinical staff working in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Barry; Bellamy, Gary; Gott, Merryn

    2017-01-01

    With the future focus on palliative and end-of-life care provision in the community, the role of the general practice team and their relationship with specialist palliative care providers is key to responding effectively to the projected increase in palliative care need. Studies have highlighted the potential to improve co-ordination and minimise fragmentation of care for people living with palliative care need through a partnership between generalist services and specialist palliative care. However, to date, the exact nature of this partnership approach has not been well defined and debate exists about how to make such partnerships work successfully. The aim of this study was to explore how general practice and specialist palliative care team (SPCT) members view their relationship in terms of partnership working. Five focus group discussions with general practices and SPCT members (n = 35) were conducted in 2012 in two different regions of New Zealand and analysed using a general inductive approach. The findings indicate that participants' understanding of partnership working was informed by their identity as a generalist or specialist, their existing rules of engagement and the approach they took towards sustaining the partnership. Considerable commitment to partnership working was shown by all participating teams. However, their working relationship was based primarily on trust and personal liaison, with limited formal systems in place to enable partnership working. Tensions between the cultures of 'generalism' and 'specialism' also provided challenges for those endeavouring to meet palliative care need collaboratively in the community. Further research is required to better understand the factors associated with successful partnership working between general practices and specialist palliative care in order to develop robust strategies to support a more sustainable model of community palliative care. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Psa control for dose escalation with 3DCRT in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Sosa, Amarilys; Rodriguez, Yaima; Perez Velasquez, Reytel

    2009-01-01

    In the detection of prostate cancer PSA carry out checks on patients between 40-50 years or more. The present work has as objective to establish the procedure 'in vivo' and i n vitro , based on ISO 9000, for assessment changes in PSA levels in patients who underwent scaling the dose through the 3D-CRT. The procedure provides the steps to follow from diagnostic evaluation to the completion of treatment with 3D-CRT. Finally This document is a valuable tool in assessing the effectiveness of treatment for prostate cancer with 3D-CRT. (author)

  20. Cognitive and Other Strategies to Mitigate the Effects of Fatigue. Lessons from Staff Physicians Working in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Natalie; Ayas, Najib T; Stelfox, Henry T; Peets, Adam D

    2016-09-01

    Fatigue is common among physicians and adversely affects their performance. To identify strategies that attending physicians use when fatigued to maintain clinical performance in the intensive care unit (ICU). We conducted a qualitative study using focus groups and structured interviews of attending ICU physicians working in academic centers in Canada. In three focus group meetings, we engaged a total of 11 physicians to identify strategies used to prevent and cope with fatigue. In the focus groups, 21 cognitive strategies were identified and classified into 9 categories (minimizing number of tasks, using techniques to improve retention of details, using a structured approach to patient care, asking for help, improving opportunities for focusing, planning ahead, double-checking, adjusting expectations, and modulating alertness). In addition, various lifestyle strategies were mentioned as important in preventing fatigue (e.g., protecting sleep before call, adequate exercise, and limiting alcohol). Telephone interviews were then conducted (n = 15 physicians) with another group of intensivists. Structured questions were asked about the strategies identified in the focus groups that were most useful during ICU activities. In the interviews, the most useful and frequently used strategies were prioritizing tasks that need to be done immediately and postponing tasks that can wait, working systematically, using a structured approach, and avoiding distractions. ICU physicians reported using a variety of deliberate cognitive and lifestyle strategies to prevent and cope with fatigue. Given the low cost and intuitive nature of the majority of these strategies, further investigations should be done to better characterize their effectiveness in improving performance.

  1. Perceived sources of work stress and satisfaction among hospital and community mental health staff, and their relation to mental health, burnout and job satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, D; Johnson, S; Kuipers, E; Szmukler, G; Bebbington, P; Thornicroft, G

    1997-07-01

    This questionnaire study examined perceived sources of stress and satisfaction at work among 121 mental health staff members. Five factors were derived from principal component analysis of sources of work stress items (stress from: role, poor support, clients, future, and overload), and accounted for 70% of the total variance. Four factors were derived from the items related to sources of job satisfaction (satisfaction from: career, working with people, management, and money), accounting for 68% of the variance. The associations of these factors with sociodemographic and job characteristics were examined, and they were entered as explanatory variables into regression models predicting mental health, burnout, and job satisfaction. Stress from "overload" was associated with being based outside an in-patient ward, and with emotional exhaustion and worse mental health. Stress related to the "future" was associated with not being white. Stress from "clients" was associated with the "depersonalization" component of burnout. Higher job satisfaction was associated with "management" and "working with people" as sources of satisfaction, whereas emotional exhaustion and poorer mental health were associated with less "career" satisfaction.

  2. Impact evaluation of domains of learning on Universal Work Precautions (UWP amongst nursing staff in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Second key strategy of National AIDS Control Program (NACP IV is comprehensive care and support by providing quality services through zero stigma and discrimination. Quality of services can be improved by eliminating stigma and discrimination and making health care provider aware of associated occupational hazards. Nursing staff play crucial role and are more at risk therefore their understanding, perception and skill must be assessed in different domains of learning to improve the contents and methodology of trainings. Material and Methods: Total 85 nursing staff underwent 1 day training in 3 batches focusing on Universal Work Precautions (UWP, Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP and sensitization of the participants towards PLHA (People living with HIV/AIDS. Their learning was evaluated under different domains (cognitive, psychomotor and affective using structured questionnaire. Results: In pretest evaluation scores showed minor and statistically not significant variations in terms of participant′s gender, age, designation work experience and status of having received any similar training in the past. Impact of the training was visible as overall mean scores increased from 10.6 ± 2.7 to 13.8 ± 5.8; gain being statistically highly significant (P value < 0.001. Gain was highest in cognitive (from 58% to 77% followed by psychomotor (from 48% to 62% and minimal in affective domain (from 75% to 76%. Conclusions: After undergoing the training, participants were benefitted more in cognitive domain than psychomotor and affective domain. Acquired knowledge, skill and communication skill if evaluated as done in this study will improve the methodology of such trainings making them more effective.

  3. Experience from the comparison of two PSA-studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmberg, J.; Pulkkinen, U.

    2001-03-01

    Two probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) made for nearly identical reactors units (Forsmark 3 and Oskarshamn 3) have been compared. Two different analysis teams made the PSAs, and the analyses became quite different. The goal of the study is to identify, clarify and explain differences between PSA-studies. The purpose is to understand limitations and uncertainties in PSA, to explain reasons for differences between PSA-studies, and to give recommendations for comparison of PSA-studies and for improving the PSA-methodology. The reviews have been made by reading PSA-documentation, using the computer model and interviewing persons involved in the projects. The method and findings have been discussed within the project group. Both the PSA-project and various parts in the PSA-model have been reviewed. A major finding was that the two projects had different purpose and thus had different resources, scope and even methods in their study. The study shows that comparison of PSA results from different plants is normally not meaningful. It takes a very deep knowledge of the PSA studies to make a comparison of the results and usually one has to ensure that the compared studies have the same scope and are based on the same analysis methods. Harmonisation of the PSA-methodology is recommended in the presentation of results, presentation of methods, scope main limitation and assumption, and definitions for end states, initiating events and common cause failures. This would facilitate the comparison of the studies. Methods for validation of PSA for different application areas should be developed. The developed PSA review standards can be applied for a general validation of a study. The most important way to evaluate the real feasibility of PSA can take place only with practical applications. The PSA-documentation and models can be developed to facilitate the communication between PSA-experts and users. In any application consultation with the PSA-expert is however needed. Many

  4. Towards a PSA harmonization French-Belgian comparison of the level 1 PSA for two similar PWR types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupuy, P.; Corenwinder, F.; Lanore, J.M.; Gryffroy, D.; Gelder, P. de; Hulsmans, M.

    2002-06-01

    In the framework of the cooperation between French and Belgian regulatory authorities, a PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) comparison exercise has been carried out for several years. This comparison deals with two PSA level 1 studies for internal events, performed for both power and shutdown states: the French PSA of the 900 MWe-series PWR, and the Belgian PSA of the Tihange 1 PWR, which both concern PWRs with a similar Framatome design. The purpose of this paper is to describe the PSA comparison methodology and to present, in a qualitative way, an overview of the insights obtained up to now. It also shows that such an 'a posteriori' benchmark exercise turns out to be a step towards PSA harmonization, and gives more confidence in the results of plant specific PSA when used for applications like precursor analysis or evaluations of importance to safety. (authors)

  5. Safer Food Saves Lives PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-03

    This 60 second PSA is based on the November 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Contaminated food sent to several states can cause multistate outbreaks of foodborne illness and make a lot of people seriously ill. Learn what can be done to prevent and stop outbreaks.  Created: 11/3/2015 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/3/2015.

  6. Take Charge. Take the Test. PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-07

    As part of the Take Charge. Take the Test. campaign, this 30 second PSA encourages African American women to get tested for HIV. Locations for a free HIV test can be found by visiting hivtest.org/takecharge or calling 1-800-CDC-INFO (1-800-232-4636).  Created: 3/7/2012 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 3/7/2012.

  7. Prioritization of design changes based on PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajnc, B.; Mavko, B.

    1996-01-01

    Effective use of Probabilistic Safety Analyses (PSA) in the day to day plant operation is subject of intensive discussions among plant operators and regulators. There are several possible applications in which the PSA can be used, among those also to use the PSA approach for the quantification of influence of different proposed design changes to nuclear safety - influence on public safety - health. NPP Krsko is one of those plants that successfully completed its PSA project, with Level 1 and Level 2 analyses and effective know-how transfer. It also faces a number of regulatory and internally generated requirements for different design changes, mainly due to the fact that the plant is committed to continuous augmentation of nuclear safety. It is considered that the available tools and knowledge should be used and therefore applicable methodology should be developed for effective prioritization of proposed design changes by performing cost-benefit analyses for all major modifications - focusing on their influence on nuclear safety. Based on the above a new method for prioritization of design changes is proposed. The method uses Level 1 results (in the sense of plant damage states and their frequencies) directly as an input for further processing - first decision step to decide whether the proposed modification has or has no influence on nuclear safety. In Level 2 analyses the combination of probabilistic and deterministic approach was adopted. In fact the results of the deterministic analyses of severe accidents are treated in probabilistic manner due to large uncertainty of results. Finally to be able to perform plant specific cost benefit analyses so called partial Level 3 was defined. The proposed methods was preliminary tested and it gave favorable results. (author)

  8. More Adults Are Walking PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-07-31

    This 60 second PSA is based on the August 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. While more adults are walking, only half get the recommended amount of physical activity. Listen to learn how communities, employers, and individuals may help increase walking.  Created: 7/31/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 8/7/2012.

  9. Stop C. difficile Infections PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-06

    This 60 second PSA is based on the March 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. C. difficile is a germ that causes diarrhea linked to 14,000 deaths in the US each year. This podcast helps health care professionals learn how to prevent C. difficile infections.  Created: 3/6/2012 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 3/6/2012.

  10. PSA application on the Tokai Reprocessing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Michihiko; Nakano, Takafumi; Morimoto, Kazuyuki; Nojiri, Ichiro

    2003-01-01

    The Periodic Safety Review (PSR) of the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) has been carrying out to obtain an overall view of actual plant safety. As a part of the PSR, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) methodology has been applied to evaluate the relative importance of safety functions that prevent the progress of events causing to postulated accidents. Based on the results of the safety reassessments of the TRP that was carried out in 1999, event trees were developed to model sequences of postulated accidents. Event trees were quantified by using the results of fault tree analysis and human reliability analysis. In the quantification, the reliability data generally used in PSA of nuclear power plants were mainly used. Operating experiences of the TRP were also utilized to evaluated both component/system reliability and human reliability. The relative importance of safety functions was evaluated by using two major importance measures, Fussell-Vesely and Risk Achievement Worth both generally used in PSA of nuclear power plants. Through these evaluations, some useful insights into the safety of the TRP have been obtained. The results of the relative importance measures would be utilized to qualify TRP component/equipment important to the safety. (author)

  11. The organizational factor in PSA framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farcasiu, Mita, E-mail: mmfarcasiu@yahoo.com; Nitoi, Mirela

    2015-11-15

    The goals of the Man–Machine–Organization system analysis are to develop the suitable studies and techniques to identify, prevent and predict the cause of system unavailability. A descriptive concept of man–machine–organization system was developed. MMOS is defined in probability theory in the attempt to find ways for its qualitative and quantitative quantification in a PSA framework. The need for this study was demonstrated by analysis of variance of the complex system unavailability in relation to human error probability (HEP) and organizational error probability (OMP). The PSA model proposed in this paper assesses the organizational factor in MMOS by observing its influence on the human factor and equipment. Thus the influence of organizational factors is evaluated not only on component but also on the human performance. The study highlights the need to improve the understanding of the influence of organizational factors on the safe operation of nuclear installations. Using MMOS concept in PSA could identify any serious deficiencies of human and equipment performance which can sometime be corrected by improvement of the organizational factor.

  12. The organizational factor in PSA framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farcasiu, Mita; Nitoi, Mirela

    2015-01-01

    The goals of the Man–Machine–Organization system analysis are to develop the suitable studies and techniques to identify, prevent and predict the cause of system unavailability. A descriptive concept of man–machine–organization system was developed. MMOS is defined in probability theory in the attempt to find ways for its qualitative and quantitative quantification in a PSA framework. The need for this study was demonstrated by analysis of variance of the complex system unavailability in relation to human error probability (HEP) and organizational error probability (OMP). The PSA model proposed in this paper assesses the organizational factor in MMOS by observing its influence on the human factor and equipment. Thus the influence of organizational factors is evaluated not only on component but also on the human performance. The study highlights the need to improve the understanding of the influence of organizational factors on the safe operation of nuclear installations. Using MMOS concept in PSA could identify any serious deficiencies of human and equipment performance which can sometime be corrected by improvement of the organizational factor.

  13. PSA based plant modifications and back-fits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The mandate of Principal Working Group No. 5 - Risk Assessment states that 'The group should deal with the technology and methods for identifying contributors to risk and assessing their importance, and appropriate exchanges of information on current research'. Since being formulated in 1982, along with this mandate, the group has also endeavored to develop a common understanding of the different approaches taken in risk assessment. The focus of this report is to provide knowledge to experts on the role Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) has had in safety decision making. PSA is a powerful tool for improving Nuclear Power Plant safety by identifying weaknesses in design or operation and setting priorities for plant modifications and back-fits. While the use is well recognised, it is also true that any safety decision is generally based on several elements, both probabilistic and deterministic. This document provides a general overview of insights gained from the representative set of examples collected from Member countries (Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States). The report starts with basic types of plant modifications which were carried out (e.g. hardware or software, important or minor, etc.) and the characteristics of the PSAs used in the examples (e.g. level and scope, specific or generic, on-going or terminated, etc.). The insights gained from this small collection are then reviewed. The appendix gives a full text version of the Member country contributions

  14. The importance of leadership style and psychosocial work environment to staff-assessed quality of care: implications for home help services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Kristina; Tafvelin, Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Work in home help services is typically conducted by an assistant nurse or nursing aide in the home of an elderly person, and working conditions have been described as solitary with a high workload, little influence and lack of peer and leader support. Relations between leadership styles, psychosocial work environment and a number of positive and negative employee outcomes have been established in research, but the outcome in terms of quality of care has been addressed to a lesser extent. In the present study, we aimed to focus on working conditions in terms of leadership and the employee psychosocial work environment, and how these conditions are related to the quality of care. The hypothesis was that the relation between a transformational leadership style and quality of care is mediated through organisational and peer support, job control and workload. A cross-sectional survey design was used and a total of 469 questionnaires were distributed (March-April 2012) to assistant nurses in nine Swedish home help organisations, including six municipalities and one private organisation, representing both rural and urban areas (302 questionnaires were returned, yielding a 65% response rate). The results showed that our hypothesis was supported and, when indirect effects were also taken into consideration, there was no direct effect of leadership style on quality of care. The mediated model explained 51% of the variance in quality of care. These results indicate that leadership style is important not only to employee outcomes in home help services but is also indirectly related to quality of care as assessed by staff members. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Clinical performance of serum [-2]proPSA derivatives, %p2PSA and PHI, in the detection and management of prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Ya-Qiang; Sun, Tong; Zhong, Wei-De; Wu, Chin-Lee

    2014-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been widely used as a serum marker for prostate cancer (PCa) screening or progression monitoring, which dramatically increased rate of early detection while significantly reduced PCa-specific mortality. However, a number of limitations of PSA have been noticed. Low specificity of PSA may lead to overtreatment in men who presenting with a total PSA (tPSA) level of < 10 ng/mL. As a type of free PSA (fPSA), [-2]proPSA is differentially expressed in peripheral ...

  16. Safety R and D Needs in Multi-Unit PSA from a Regulatory Viewpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Gyunyoung; Yoon, Ji Woong [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Cheol [Chung-Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) NSSC’s recent approval of the construction permits and operation licenses of Shin Kori units 3 to 6 has brought attention to the multi-unit probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The disaster in Fukushima revealed the risks associated with the use of spent fuel pools (SFPs), and the linear (or non-linear) consequences of radiation leaks from multi-units in particular, has raised concerns. The number of nuclear power plants (NPPs) in operation will increase to ten at the Kori and Shin Kori sites when the construction of Units 5 and 6 is complete - the highest concentration of power reactors in one region in world history. Nuclear disasters do not happen frequently, but when one does happen, its cascading effects can inflict massive human and environmental loss. Proper safety measures are needed as more nuclear installations are put in place. Nuclear regulators are forced to promptly produce a sufficient degree of realistic and objective risk assessment results to meet the rapidly-increasing demand for multi-unit PSA, while striving to achieve matching levels of technological development. The issues with the technological aspects of PSA would still be inherent even after a few years of research, and ensuring the safety of multi-units would still prove challenging. Experts are however relieved that the general public is now much more familiar with the concept of PSA than in the past, which indicates a rise in the degree of public understanding of technology. More studies should be done on multi-unit regulation and safety so as to steer the government in the proper direction for enacting policies aimed to ensure the health of local residents. In conclusion, the technical problems associated with multi-unit PSA that were not mentioned in this paper are essentially similar to their single-unit counterparts, therefore, reinforcing the base infrastructure of PSAs in general will work towards resolving such technical

  17. Upgrade of internal events PSA model using the AESJ level-1 PSA standard for operating state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Teruyoshi; Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Hirokawa, Naoki; Sato, Chikahiro; Sato, Eisuke; Tomizawa, Shigeatsu

    2009-01-01

    In 2003, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) started to develop the Level-1 Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) standard of internal events for operating state (AESJ standard). The AESJ standard has been finished to be asked for public comment. Using the AESJ standard (draft version), the authors have upgraded the PSA model for Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) BWR-5 plant not only to reflect latest knowledge but also to ensure high quality of PSA model (not yet peer-reviewed) for the purpose of better operation and maintenance management of TEPCO BWR plants. For example, the categorization of structures, systems and components (SSCs) will be performed to improve nuclear reactor safety using information of risk importance. (author)

  18. Development of PSA audit guideline and regulatory PSA model for SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Namchul; Lee, Chang-Ju; Kim, I.S.

    2012-01-01

    SMART is under development for dual purposes of power generation and seawater desalination in Korea. It is an integral reactor type with a thermal power output of 330 MW and employs advanced design features such as a passive system for the removal of residual heat and also the setting of all the components of the primary system inside the reactor pressure vessel. It is essential to develop new probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) validation guidance for SMART. For the purpose of regulatory verification to the risk level of SMART, the insights and key issues on the PSA are identified with referring some worldwide safety guides as well as its design characteristics. Regulatory PSA model under the development for the design confirmation and its preliminary result are also described. (authors)

  19. PSA-operations synergism for the advanced test reactor shutdown operations PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for shutdown operations, cask handling, and canal draining is a successful example of the importance of good PSA-operations synergism for achieving a realistic and accepted assessment of the risks and for achieving desired risk reduction and safety improvement in a best and cost-effective manner. The implementation of the agreed-upon upgrades and improvements resulted in the reductions of the estimated mean frequency for core or canal irradiated fuel uncovery events, a total reduction in risk by a factor of nearly 1000 to a very low and acceptable risk level for potentially severe events

  20. The Staff of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  1. Experiences of Uncertainty in Men With an Elevated PSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biddle, Caitlin; Brasel, Alicia; Underwood, Willie; Orom, Heather

    2015-05-15

    A significant proportion of men, ages 50 to 70 years, have, and continue to receive prostate specific antigen (PSA) tests to screen for prostate cancer (PCa). Approximately 70% of men with an elevated PSA level will not subsequently be diagnosed with PCa. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 13 men with an elevated PSA level who had not been diagnosed with PCa. Uncertainty was prominent in men's reactions to the PSA results, stemming from unanswered questions about the PSA test, PCa risk, and confusion about their management plan. Uncertainty was exacerbated or reduced depending on whether health care providers communicated in lay and empathetic ways, and provided opportunities for question asking. To manage uncertainty, men engaged in information and health care seeking, self-monitoring, and defensive cognition. Results inform strategies for meeting informational needs of men with an elevated PSA and confirm the primary importance of physician communication behavior for open information exchange and uncertainty reduction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Lessons learned form IRSN review of Flamanville 3 Level PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgescu, G.; Corenwinder, F.

    2012-01-01

    In the frame of the construction and licensing of Flamanville 3 NPP the PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment)plays an important role for the EPR Project assessment. The PSA was used for early design verification of EPR Reactor, several design improvement being defined based on these PSA insights and following the discussions with the French and German safety authorities. IRSN, as the French Safety Authority (ASN) technical support organization, performs the review of the PSA developed by the plant operator (EDF). The paper presents the main issues regarding the using of 'design PSA', identified by IRSN following the review of the internal events Level 1 PSA transmitted by EDF in the frame of the anticipated instruction of the application for operating license of the Flamanville 3 reactor. (authors)

  3. Elevation of PSA after prostate radiotherapy: Rebound or biochemical recurrence?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledano, A.; Kanoui, A.; Chiche, R.; Lamallem, H.; Beley, S.; Thibault, F.; Sebe, P.

    2008-01-01

    The fact that external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy are now considered to be curative techniques has led to major review of the modalities of follow-up after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. The problem concerns both the diagnosis of recurrence, rapidly announced by elevation of prostatic-specific antigen (PSA), usually at a subclinical stage, and the validity of criteria of biochemical recurrence to allow comparison of various study. Physicians involved in follow-up should be aware of the potential of bounce in PSA follow-up after external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy. The PSA bounce phenomenon was defined by a rise of PSA values (+ 0.1 -0.8 ng/ml) with a subsequent fall. Biochemical failure after external beam radiotherapy or brachytherapy (with or without hormonotherapy) was defined by Phoenix criteria by a rise of 2 ng/ml above an initial PSA nadir. This definition was more correlated to PSA bounce phenomenon. (authors)

  4. Review of UCN 3,4 PSA model based on NEI PRA peer review process guidance, rev.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Joon Eon; Kang, D. I.; Kim, K. Y.; Lee, Y. H.; Jang, S. C.; Ha, J. J.; Han, S. H.; Han, S. J.; Hwang, M. J.

    2003-05-01

    Recently, under the de-regulation environment, nuclear industry has attempted various approaches to improve the economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). One of these efforts is the Risk Informed/Performance-Based Operation (RIPBO). This approach uses the risk and performance information to manage the resources effectively and efficiently that are used in the operation of NPP. In RIPBO, PSA quality is one of the most important things. The nuclear industry and regulatory body of U.S.A have developed a measure to evaluate the quality of PSA. NEI (Nuclear Energy Institute) has developed a guidance called 'NEI PRA Peer Review Guidance,' and NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Committee) and ASME have developed the 'PRA Standard.' In Korea, several projects are on going now, such as the extension of AOT/STI of RPS/ESFAS, Risk-Informed In-Service Inspection (RI-ISI). However, in Korea, there have been no attempts to evaluate the quality of PSA model itself. Therefore, we cannot be sure about the quality of PSA whether or not the present PSA model can be used for the risk-informed applications such as mentioned above. We can say that the evaluation of PSA model quality is the basis for the RIPBO. In this report, we have evaluated the quality of PSA model for Ulchin 3 and 4 units based on the NEI guidance. We, also, have derived what items are to be improved to upgrade the quality of PSA model and how it can be improved. This report can be used as the base of RIPBO work in Korea. The review result based on ASME Standard is published as the separated technical report of KAERI

  5. Evaluating the Phoenix definition of biochemical failure after (125)I prostate brachytherapy: Can PSA kinetics distinguish PSA failures from PSA bounces?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Anna; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom; Palma, David; Moravan, Veronika; Spadinger, Ingrid; Lapointe, Vincent; Morris, W James

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics of PSA failure (PSAf) and PSA bounce (PSAb) after permanent (125)I prostate brachytherapy (PB). The study included 1,006 consecutive low and "low tier" intermediate-risk patients treated with (125)I PB, with a potential minimum follow-up of 4 years. Patients who met the Phoenix definition of biochemical failure (nadir + 2 ng/mL(-1)) were identified. If the PSA subsequently fell to ≤0.5 ng/mL(-1)without intervention, this was considered a PSAb. All others were scored as true PSAf. Patient, tumor and dosimetric characteristics were compared between groups using the chi-square test and analysis of variance to evaluate factors associated with PSAf or PSAb. Median follow-up was 54 months. Of the 1,006 men, 57 patients triggered the Phoenix definition of PSA failure, 32 (56%) were true PSAf, and 25 PSAb (44%). The median time to trigger nadir + 2 was 20.6 months (range, 6-36) vs. 49 mo (range, 12-83) for PSAb vs. PSAf groups (p < 0.001). The PSAb patients were significantly younger (p < 0.0001), had shorter time to reach the nadir (median 6 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.001) and had a shorter PSA doubling time (p = 0.05). Men younger than age 70 who trigger nadir +2 PSA failure within 38 months of implant have an 80% likelihood of having PSAb and 20% chance of PSAf. With adequate follow-up, 44% of PSA failures by the Phoenix definition in our cohort were found to be benign PSA bounces. Our study reinforces the need for adequate follow-up when reporting PB PSA outcomes, to ensure accurate estimates of treatment efficacy and to avoid unnecessary secondary interventions. 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluating the Phoenix Definition of Biochemical Failure After 125I Prostate Brachytherapy: Can PSA Kinetics Distinguish PSA Failures From PSA Bounces?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Anna; Keyes, Mira; Pickles, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics of PSA failure (PSAf) and PSA bounce (PSAb) after permanent 125 I prostate brachytherapy (PB). Methods and Materials: The study included 1,006 consecutive low and 'low tier' intermediate-risk patients treated with 125 I PB, with a potential minimum follow-up of 4 years. Patients who met the Phoenix definition of biochemical failure (nadir + 2 ng/mL -1 ) were identified. If the PSA subsequently fell to ≤0.5 ng/mL -1 without intervention, this was considered a PSAb. All others were scored as true PSAf. Patient, tumor and dosimetric characteristics were compared between groups using the chi-square test and analysis of variance to evaluate factors associated with PSAf or PSAb. Results: Median follow-up was 54 months. Of the 1,006 men, 57 patients triggered the Phoenix definition of PSA failure, 32 (56%) were true PSAf, and 25 PSAb (44%). The median time to trigger nadir + 2 was 20.6 months (range, 6-36) vs. 49 mo (range, 12-83) for PSAb vs. PSAf groups (p < 0.001). The PSAb patients were significantly younger (p < 0.0001), had shorter time to reach the nadir (median 6 vs. 11.5 months, p = 0.001) and had a shorter PSA doubling time (p = 0.05). Men younger than age 70 who trigger nadir +2 PSA failure within 38 months of implant have an 80% likelihood of having PSAb and 20% chance of PSAf. Conclusions: With adequate follow-up, 44% of PSA failures by the Phoenix definition in our cohort were found to be benign PSA bounces. Our study reinforces the need for adequate follow-up when reporting PB PSA outcomes, to ensure accurate estimates of treatment efficacy and to avoid unnecessary secondary interventions.

  7. The impact of health promotion on trachoma knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP of staff in three work settings in remote Indigenous communities in the Northern Territory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona D Lange

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Globally, trachoma is the leading cause of infectious blindness and Australia is the only developed country with endemic trachoma. It is found in remote Indigenous communities burdened with poverty, overcrowding and poor hygiene. Lack of culturally appropriate health promotion, a small trachoma workforce and lack of awareness and support for trachoma elimination in general, were early barriers.A cross-sectional pre-post study using a convenience sample, was conducted in clinics, schools and community work-settings from 63 of the 82 remote Aboriginal communities identified as being at risk of trachoma in the Northern Territory (NT. The study assessed the effect of a multi-component health promotion strategy aimed at increasing knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support settings staff. Data were collected between 2010 and 2012. The health promotion initiatives were introduced in communities in staggered delivery over a one-year period; 272 participants were surveyed at baseline and 261 at follow-up.Trachoma related knowledge, attitudes and practice increased across all settings and for all primary outcome measures. Across all settings, there was a significant increase in the proportion of participants reporting the most important thing to do if a child has a 'dirty' face is to 'wash it every time its dirty' (61.6% cf 69.7%; X2p = 0.047, a significant reduction in the proportion of respondents answering 'no' to the question "Is it normal for kids to have dirty faces in your community' (40.5% cf 29.6%; X2p = 0.009 and a significant increase in reported capacity to teach others about trachoma prevention (70.8% cf 83.3%; X2p <0.001.Health promotion was associated with increased trachoma knowledge, attitude and practice amongst health, education and community support staff working with children and in remote NT communities. In the early stages of the trachoma health promotion program, this increased trachoma

  8. Prostate cancer screening by prostate-specific antigen (PSA); a relevant approach for the small population of the Cayman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti, Shravana Kumar; Blacke, Camille; Patil, Pallavi; Amblihalli, Vibha P; Nicholson, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    investigations for PSA levels from year 2005 to 2015 were studied retrospectively. As a result of this research work, it can be concluded that a benign diagnosis can be given with a fair certainty when the PSA was below 4 ng/mL and a level of 100 ng/mL can be very unfavorable for the patients. This study helped to solidify the cancer screening protocols in Cayman Islands. The PSA level can reassure and educate the patients towards the diagnosis of cancer of prostate in Cayman Islands. Benign diagnosis can be given with a fair certainty when the PSA was below 4 ng/mL and a level of 100 ng/mL can be very unfavorable for the patients. This study helped to solidify the cancer screening protocols in Cayman.

  9. State of the art on the probabilistic safety assessment (P.S.A.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devictor, N.; Bassi, A.; Saignes, P.; Bertrand, F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is internationally increasing as a means of assessing and improving the safety of nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. To support the development of a competence on Probabilistic Safety Assessment, a set of states of the art regarding these tools and their use has been made between 2001 and 2005, in particular on the following topics: - Definition of the PSA of level 1, 2 and 3; - Use of PSA in support to design and operation of nuclear plants (risk-informed applications); - Applications to Non Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The report compiled in a single document these states of the art in order to ensure a broader use; this work has been done in the frame of the Project 'Reliability and Safety of Nuclear Facility' of the Nuclear Development and Innovation Division of the Nuclear Energy Division. As some of these states of the art have been made in support to exchanges with international partners and were written in English, a section of this document is written in English. This work is now applied concretely in support to the design of 4. Generation nuclear systems as Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors and especially Gas-cooled Fast Reactor, that have been the subject of communications during the conferences ANS (Annual Meeting 2007), PSA'08, ICCAP'08 and in the journal Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations. (authors)

  10. SEPRA - shutdown PSA for the OLKILUOTO nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Himanen, R.

    1995-01-01

    The utility TVO has extended the PSA study to the analysis of refueling, shutdown and startup. The Shutdown Event PRA (SEPRA) was reported to the authority in September 1992. The study consists of the analysis of leaks and loss of decay heat removal in the planned shutdown conditions. Special studies were performed for the cold pressurization, for local criticality events, for heavy load transport and for the transients during startup and shutdown. A remarkable effort was put to identify risks, i.e. to the qualitative analysis. The regular preventive maintenance tasks in the refueling outages were analyzed and the important tasks were selected for further studies. Besides the severe core damage risk the utility was interested in less grave consequences, e.g. the economic risks, causing significant extension of outages. The plant specific screening of initiators consisted of a study on the incident history and of interviewing the plant personnel on selected tasks. A number of thermohydraulic calculations were carried out to support the analysis of accident sequences. The operator actions after an initiating event were verified with the operating staff. The annual core damage risk from the refueling outage is about one forth of the total annual risk. The modifications decreased significantly the core damage frequency. It is foreseen that the SEPRA will form a basis of the procedure enhancement for the low power states. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 10 refs

  11. Low Power Shutdown PSA for CANDU Type Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yeon Kyoung; Kim, Myung Su [KHNP CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    KHNP also have concentrated on full power PSA. Some recently constructed OPR1000 type plants and APR1400 type plants have performed the low power and shutdown (LPSD) PSA. The purpose of LPSD PSA is to identify the main contributors on the accident sequences of core damage and to find the measure of safety improvement. After the Fukushima accident, Korean regulatory agency required the shutdown severe accident management guidelines (SSAMG) development for safety enhancement. For the reliability of SSAMG, KHNP should develop the LPSD PSA. Especially, the LPSD PSA for CANDU type plant had developed for the first time in Korea. This paper illustrates how the LPSD PSA for CANDU type developed and the core damage frequency (CDF) is different with that of full power PSA. KHNP performed LPSD PSA to develop the SSAMG after the Fukushima accidents. The results show that risk at the specific operation mode during outage is higher than that of full power operation. Also, the results indicated that recovery failure of class 4 power at the POS 5A, 5B contribute dominantly to the total CDF from importances analysis. LPSD PSA results such as CDF with initiating events and POSs, risk results with plant damage state, and containment failure probability and frequency with POSs can be used by inputs for developing the SSAMG.

  12. PSA data base, comparison of the German and French approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreuser, A.; Tirira, J.

    2001-01-01

    The results of probabilistic safety assessments (PSA) of nuclear power plants strongly depend on the reliability data used. This report describes coarsely the general process to generate reliability data for components and resumes the differences between the German and French approaches. As has been shown in former studies which compared international PSA data, PSA data are closely related to the model definitions of the PSA. Therefore single PSA data cannot be compared directly without regard e.g. to the corresponding fault trees. These findings are confirmed by this study. The comparison of German and French methods shows a lot of differences concerning various details of the data generation process. Some differences between single reliability data should be eliminated when taking into account the complete fault tree analysis. But there are some other differences which have a direct impact on the obtained results of a PSA. In view of the all differences between both approaches concerning the definition of data and the data collection process, it is not possible to compare directly German and French PSA data. However, the database differences give no indication on the influence on the PSA results. Therefore, it is a need to perform a common IPSN/GRS assessment on how the different databases impact the PSA results. (orig.)

  13. Use of PSA for improving the safety of French PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanore, J.M.; Chambon, J.L.

    1994-06-01

    Two French PWR Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies were conducted for the standardized PWR series of 900 and 1300 MWe. Both PSA 900 and PSA 1300 are level 1 PSAs, that means their objective is the evaluation of core meltdown frequency. These studies have some specific features, in particular the treatment of shutdown conditions, the treatment of long term post-accidental situations, and a wide use of French experience feedback. The PSAs are used for safety improvements of the French PWRs. Following the PSA results, several modifications to plants concerning the dominant sequences were decided. (R.P.). 2 refs., 4 figs

  14. DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC UTILITY OF SERUM PSA IN BREAST CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张淑群; 强水云; 李妙羡; 纪宗正

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of total and free prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in breast cancer women. Methods Using the microparticle enzyme immunoassay system, we measured the concentrations of these markers in the sera of 85 women with breast cancer and in 30 healthy women.Results Free PSA levels were significantly higher in women with breast cancer than healthy women (P <0. 05 ).The percentage of free PSA predominant subjects was 37. 6% in breast cancer patients and 3. 3% in healthy women.In women with breast cancer,total PSA positivity was 23.5% and free PSA positivity was 27. 1%. When compared to negatives,total PSA positive patients had a higher percentage of lymph node involvement tamours ( P >0. 05).However, patients with predominant free PSA had a higher percentage of early stage than patients with predominant PSA-ACT. Conclusion This study indicate clinical significance of preoperative measurement of serum total and free PSA in diagnosis and prognosis of women with breast cancer. The expression of KLKs is correlated with carcinogenesis of breast cancer.

  15. Serum PSA levels in the Indian population: Is it different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Amit; Karan, Shailesh Chandra

    2017-04-01

    Serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is an important tumour, marker which is widely used to trigger trans-rectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided prostate biopsy. However, the PSA levels vary with race and ethnicity. Therefore, there is a need to have an Indian reference range. All adult male patients meeting the inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled in this study. They were subjected to assessment of serum total PSA, digital rectal examination and trans-abdominal ultrasound. If any one or more of these were found abnormal, then a TRUS-guided 12-core prostate biopsy was done. Patients who were detected to have prostatic cancer were excluded from the final analysis. The data so obtained was grouped among the following three age groups: 40-49, 50-59 and 60-70 years, and the age-specific PSA values, prostatic volume and PSA density were found. A total of 1772 patients were analysed. The mean serum total PSA was 1.76 ng/ml with a standard deviation of 2.566 ng/ml. Group-wise age distribution of the mean serum total PSA was 1.22, 1.97 and 2.08 ng/ml in 40-49, 50-59 and 60-70 years age groups. The mean total PSA and the age-specific PSA range tend to be lower in the Indians than the Western population.

  16. Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second public service announcement (PSA) is based on the November 24, 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Preexposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a daily medicine that can be used to prevent getting HIV. PrEP is for people who don’t have HIV but who are at very high risk for getting it from sex or injection drug use. Unfortunately, many people who can benefit from PrEP aren’t taking it.

  17. Development of kits for total PSA monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suprarop, P.

    1999-01-01

    The development of kits for Total PSA assay has shown promising results. All essential components of the assay were prepared with reproducibility and used to optimize the assay. By choosing two steps method, we could avoid the hook effect and obtain satisfactory Q.C. parameters of the standard curve i.e. blank = 0.8%, maximum binding = 65%. If reference material for calibration of the standard is agree upon, the validation could then be carried out with total confidence. Our final goal is to reduce the step of incubation to just one step with no interference from hook effect

  18. Flooding risk reduction for the ASCO NPP PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nos Llorens, V.; Faig Sureda, J.

    1993-01-01

    Developed within the framework of the UTE (INITEC-INYPSA-Empresarios Agrupados), the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) of the Asco Nuclear Power Plant has served both as a basic tool in reducing the risk of potential internal flooding at the plant, and as a guideline for studying the optimization and feasibility of necessary plant design modifications and changes to procedures. During execution of the work, and in view of the results, a series of improvements were proposed which gave rise to design modification studies. The paper seeks to describe the effect of these modifications on reducing core damage frequency, it also includes a general description of the methodology used. Finally, it compares the results obtained in the context of similar studies performed in other PSAs. (author)

  19. Detection of prostate specific antigen (PSA) in human saliva using an ultra-sensitive nanocomposite of graphene nanoplatelets with diblock-co-polymers and Au electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M S; Dighe, K; Wang, Z; Srivastava, I; Daza, E; Schwartz-Dual, A S; Ghannam, J; Misra, S K; Pan, D

    2018-02-26

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a commonly used biomarker for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) and there are numerous data available for its invasive detection in the serum and whole blood. In this work, an electrochemical sensing method was devised to detect traces of PSA in human saliva using a hybrid nanocomposite of graphene nanoplatelets with diblock co-polymers and Au electrodes (GRP-PS 67 -b-PAA 27 -Au). The pure graphitic composition on filter paper provides significantly high electrical and thermal conductivity while PS 67 -b-PAA 27 makes an amphiphilic bridge between GRP units. The sensor utilizes the binding of an anti-PSA antibody with an antigen-PSA to act as a resistor in a circuit providing an impedance change that in turn allows for the detection and quantification of PSA in saliva samples. A miniaturized electrical impedance analyzer was interfaced with a sensor chip and the data were recorded in real-time using a Bluetooth-enabled module. This fully integrated and optimized sensing device exhibited a wide PSA range of detection from 0.1 pg mL -1 to 100 ng mL -1 (R 2 = 0.963) with a lower limit of detection of 40 fg mL -1 . The performance of the biosensor chip was validated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique with a regression coefficient as high as 0.940. The advantages of the newly developed saliva-PSA electrical biosensor over previously reported serum-PSA electrochemical biosensors include a faster response time (3-5 min) to achieve a stable electrical signal for PSA detection, high selectivity, improved sensitivity, no additional requirement of a redox electrolyte for electron exchange and excellent shelf life. The presented sensor is aimed for clinical commercialization to detect PSA in human saliva.

  20. Controversies in using urine samples for prostate cancer detection: PSA and PCA3 expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fontenete

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Prostate cancer (PCa is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies in the world. Although PSA utilization as a serum marker has improved prostate cancer detection it still presents some limitations, mainly regarding its specificity. The expression of this marker, along with the detection of PCA3 mRNA in urine samples, has been suggested as a new approach for PCa detection. The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the urinary detection of PCA3 mRNA and PSA mRNA without performing the somewhat embarrassing prostate massage. It was also intended to optimize and implement a methodological protocol for this kind of sampling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Urine samples from 57 patients with suspected prostate disease were collected, without undergoing prostate massage. Increased serum PSA levels were confirmed by medical records review. RNA was extracted by different methods and a preamplification step was included in order to improve gene detection by Real-Time PCR. RESULTS: An increase in RNA concentration with the use of TriPure Isolation Reagent. Despite this optimization, only 15.8% of the cases showed expression of PSA mRNA and only 3.8% of prostate cancer patients presented detectable levels of PCA3 mRNA. The use of a preamplification step revealed no improvement in the results obtained. CONCLUSION: This work confirms that prostate massage is important before urine collection for gene expression analysis. Since PSA and PCA3 are prostate specific, it is necessary to promote the passage of cells from prostate to urinary tract, in order to detect these genetic markers in urine samples.

  1. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/labtests/prostatespecificantigenpsatest.html Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. What is a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test? A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test measures ...

  2. Working together – Using social media tools / enterprise tools (Sharepoint, Blogs, Wikis, Google Docs/Drive) to enhance staff collaboration – The KAUST library experience

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the tools implemented by KAUST library to enhance collaboration among library staff. Highlights the features / functionalities of the implemented tools and their related success / constraints in achieving the desired targets.

  3. Working together – Using social media tools / enterprise tools (Sharepoint, Blogs, Wikis, Google Docs/Drive) to enhance staff collaboration – The KAUST library experience

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the tools implemented by KAUST library to enhance collaboration among library staff. Highlights the features / functionalities of the implemented tools and their related success / constraints in achieving the desired targets.

  4. Automatic fault tree generation in the EPR PSA project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villatte, N; Nonclercq, P.; Taupy, S.

    2012-01-01

    improvements that should all the more facilitate the PSA analyst's work. (authors)

  5. Education and training of healthcare staff in the knowledge, attitudes and skills needed to work effectively with breastfeeding women: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavine, Anna; MacGillivray, Steve; Renfrew, Mary J; Siebelt, Lindsay; Haggi, Haggi; McFadden, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that women need effective support to breastfeed, but many healthcare staff lack the necessary knowledge, attitudes and skills. There is therefore a need for breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. The primary aim of this review is to determine whether education and training programs for healthcare staff have an effect on their knowledge and attitudes about supporting breastfeeding women. The secondary aim of this review was to identify whether any differences in type of training or discipline of staff mattered. A systematic search of the literature was conducted using the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's trial register. Randomised controlled trials comparing breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff with no or usual training and education were included if they measured the impact on staff knowledge, attitudes or compliance with the Baby Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI). From the 1192 reports identified, four distinct studies were included. Three studies were two-arm cluster-randomised trials and one was a two-arm individual randomised trial. Of these, three contributed quantitative data from a total of 250 participants. Due to heterogeneity of outcome measures meta-analysis was not possible. Knowledge was included as an outcome in two studies and demonstrated small but significant positive effects. Attitudes towards breastfeeding was included as an outcome in two studies, however, results were inconsistent both in terms of how they were measured and the intervention effects. One study reported a small but significant positive effect on BFHI compliance. Study quality was generally deemed low with the majority of domains being judged as high or unclear risk of bias. This review identified a lack of good evidence on breastfeeding education and training for healthcare staff. There is therefore a critical need for research to address breastfeeding education and training needs of multidisciplinary

  6. Building workforce capacity to detect and respond to child abuse and neglect cases: A training intervention for staff working in emergency settings in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemington, Tara; Fraser, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    Too many children are brought to hospital emergency departments on numerous occasions before they are recognised as victims of child abuse and neglect. For this reason, improving knowledge and response behaviors of emergency staff at all levels is likely to have a significant impact on better outcomes. An Australian based training programme was the first of its kind to address this issue in a Vietnamese Emergency Department. Titled 'Safe Children Vietnam', the programme aimed to improve knowledge, attitudes and reporting behaviors concerning child abuse in the emergency setting. A pre-post test design was used to evaluate the impact of 'Safe Children Vietnam' on emergency staff knowledge, attitudes and intentions to report child abuse and neglect. Emergency staff including doctors, nurses and healthcare staff (n=116) participated in the clinical training programme. Linear Mixed Model analyses showed that on programme completion, they were more likely to recognise serious cases of all types of abuse. The 'Safe Children Vietnam' programme was effective at improving emergency staff knowledge of child abuse and neglect. A systems wide approach may be necessary to impact on emergency staff attitudes towards reporting cases of abuse. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. PSA - A utility perspective from the United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides an outline of the three stages of PSA used for the Sizewell B PWR. These stages cover the use of PSA during design, licensing and (in future) operation of Sizewell B. The paper discusses each of these stages in some detail, highlighting the differences in approach and lessons learnt at each stage. (author)

  8. Use of PSA in the development of SMRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maioli, A.; Finnicum, D.J.; Lichtenstein, R.H.; Harsche, S.Y.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential new scenarios where PSA (probabilistic safety assessment) may be of significant support to design and operation of SMRs (Small Modular Reactors); it reviews Westinghouse's experience and lessons learned in this endeavour and will discuss related challenges and what the PSA community is currently developing to address them. (authors)

  9. Child Injury: What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 60 second PSA is based on the April 2012 CDC Vital Signs report. Many childhood deaths and injuries are preventable, including those caused by crashes, suffocation, poisoning, drowning, fires, and falls. The PSA discusses ways to help prevent these deaths and injuries.

  10. PSA in design of passive/active safety reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Tanabe, A.; Kondo, S.

    1995-01-01

    PSAs in the design of advanced reactors are applied mainly in level 1 PSA areas. However, even in level 1 PSA, there are certain areas where special care must be taken depending on plant design concepts. This paper identifies these areas both for passive and active safety reactor concepts. For example, 'long-term PSA' and shutdown PSA are very important for a passive safety reactor concept from the standpoint of effectiveness of a grace period and passive safety systems. External events are also important for an active safety reactor concept. These kinds of special PSAs are difficult to conduct precisely in a conceptual design stage. This paper shows methods of conducting these kinds of special PSAs simply and conveniently and the use of acquired insights for the design of advanced reactors. This paper also clarifies the meaning or definition of a grace period from the standpoint of PSA

  11. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). METHODS: At OMERACT 2016, research...... conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. RESULTS: We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted...... and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health...

  12. Flooding PSA with Plant Specific Operating Experiences of Korean PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Yeong; Yang, Joon Yull

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to update the flooding PSA with Korean plant specific operating experience data and the appropriate estimation method for the flooding frequency to improve the PSA quality. The existing flooding PSA used the NPE (Nuclear Power Experience) database up to 1985 for the flooding frequency. They are all USA plant operating experiences. So an upgraded flooding frequency with Korean specific plant operation experience is required. We also propose a method of only using the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) data for the flooding frequency estimation in the case of the flooding area in the primary building even though the existing flooding PSA used both PWR and BWR (Boiled Water Reactor) data for all kinds of plant areas. We evaluate the CDF (Core Damage Frequency) with the modified flooding frequency and compare the results with that of the existing flooding PSA method

  13. Applicability of PSA Issues for Risk Assessment during Optimisation of In-Service Inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolykhanov, V.; Skalozubov, V.; Kovrigkin, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The current codes determining periodicity of in-service inspection of the NPP equipment have been formed using deterministic approaches and have an unnecessary degree of conservatism. A perspective direction of perfection of normative base is decision making on a basis of risk-informed methodologies. It allows to increase safety of NPP equipment's operation and to optimise programs on inspection of the equipment subject to limited resources by focusing efforts on the most safety significant elements of the equipment. It is internationally accepted that methodology of the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) is the most universal and comprehensive tool focused on the general assessment of safety of NPP as a whole. By now, PSA Level 1 is fulfilled for all pilot units of the Ukrainian NPPs that is a valuable result, which should be taken into account at an assessment of reliability of the equipment. However, specificity of PSA methodology should be taken into account at the decision of the particular tasks aimed at optimisation of maintenance of the equipment within individual systems. The estimation of the contribution to core damage frequency (CDF) is a PSA issue usually used to assess the significance of consequences of failure of a system/equipment during risk-informed decision-making. This work shows that above factor is only a part of assessment of the significance of consequences as core damage can be expressed in different amount of the damaged fuel elements and, hence, severity of consequences. Besides CDF is directly affected only by active elements which failure can be an initiating event. PSA methodology uses averaged reliability factors of the equipment for all possible operating modes occurring at transitive accident process. Here, there are limited opportunities to account impact of periodicity of maintenance of the equipment on reliability and to predict impact of change of the inspection program. PSA methodology does not allow taking into account

  14. A tsunami PSA methodology and application for NPP site in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Choi, In-Kil

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A methodology of tsunami PSA was developed in this study. ► Tsunami return period was evaluated by empirical method using historical tsunami record and tidal gauge record. ► Procedure of tsunami fragility analysis was established and target equipments and structures for investigation of tsunami fragility assessment were selected. ► A sample fragility calculation was performed for the equipment in Nuclear Power Plant. ► Accident sequence of tsunami event is developed by according to the tsunami run-up and draw down, and tsunami induced core damage frequency (CDF) is determined. - Abstract: A methodology of tsunami PSA was developed in this study. A tsunami PSA consists of tsunami hazard analysis, tsunami fragility analysis and system analysis. In the case of tsunami hazard analysis, evaluation of tsunami return period is a major task. For the evaluation of tsunami return period, numerical analysis and empirical method can be applied. In this study, tsunami return period was evaluated by empirical method using historical tsunami record and tidal gauge record. For the performing a tsunami fragility analysis, procedure of tsunami fragility analysis was established and target equipments and structures for investigation of tsunami fragility assessment were selected. A sample fragility calculation was performed for the equipment in Nuclear Power Plant. In the case of system analysis, accident sequence of tsunami event is developed by according to the tsunami run-up and draw down, and tsunami induced core damage frequency (CDF) is determined. For the application to the real Nuclear Power Plant, the Ulchin 56 NPP which located in east coast of Korean peninsula was selected. Through this study, whole tsunami PSA working procedure was established and example calculation was performed for one of real Nuclear Power Plant in Korea. But for more accurate tsunami PSA result, there are many researches needed for evaluation of hydrodynamic force, effect of

  15. The open PSA standard as a framework for migration of probabilistic models. Experiences with the KKB PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Hussels, U.; Epstein, S.; Rauzy, A.; Schubert, B.

    2008-01-01

    In its present state, the open PSA standard is helpful to determine capabilities of PSA approaches, which have been taken into account by those who formulated it. As soon, as tools come up, which can automatically bring a given PSA into the standard form, the data will be accessible by other software tools, which either are supplementary to the original one, or they may act in the context of quality control. Taking into account, that a PSA model represents a value of some two to ten person years (dependent on level of completeness and level of detail), it is important to have the data in a transparent way, which does not depend on proprietary formats, and can thus be used for more purposes than those, which are implemented in given PSA codes. (orig.)

  16. OGA Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are a team of over 60 grants specialists, team leaders, and branch chiefs who work together to help financially support cancer research activities throughout the United States and around the world.

  17. Daily Pill Can Prevent HIV PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-24

    This 60 second public service announcement (PSA) is based on the November 24, 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Preexposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, is a daily medicine that can be used to prevent getting HIV. PrEP is for people who don’t have HIV but who are at very high risk for getting it from sex or injection drug use. Unfortunately, many people who can benefit from PrEP aren’t taking it.  Created: 11/24/2015 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 11/24/2015.

  18. Policy and System Approach (PSA: A primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakant Lahariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of public health challenges have emerged at global and national level in the last two decades. The response to these challenges has rarely been swift and often “knee-jerk.” The national and state level program officials responsible for the activities often apportion the blame on weak health systems or fragmented health service delivery mechanisms, amongst other. In India, the viral illnesses (including those due to dengue and chikungunya are becoming the increasing realities. The Public health response of early identification, disease surveillance, reporting and the preventive and curative measures, remains suboptimal. The health challenges which require multidimensional interventions are usuallyattempted to be resolved through piece meal solutions. This article proposes “policy and system approach (PSA,” combining concepts of “Health in all policies” for intersectoral coordination and “health system approach” for intra-sectoral tackling of the emerging and existing health challenges.

  19. Cancer of the prostate - role of PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shittu, O.B.

    1999-02-01

    Since 1979 when prostate specific antigen (PSA), found in the cytoplasm of benign and malignant prostatic cells, was first purified, it has attained world wide popularity in prostate cancer detection. It is also a sensitive test for skeletal meta states from carcinoma of the prostate. Prostate cancer has become the number one cancer in men and constitutes 11% of all cancers. Approximately 50% of men over 50 years have symptoms referable to the lower urinary tract. 50% or more of patients at Ibadan present an advanced stage of the disease and are therefore not curable. Thus, lacking the skill to manage advanced manifestations, early detection and screening programs are the best means to reduce mortality due to prostate cancer

  20. A study of the dose distribution in the region of the eye lens and extremities for staff working in interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domienik, J.; Brodecki, M.; Rusicka, D.

    2012-01-01

    The dose distributions at the region of eye lens and extremities of staff working in interventional cardiology were analyzed. The doses to physicians and nurses from three hospitals in Poland were measured with TL dosimeters (MCP-N) located on various places near eyebrows, on both fingers, wrists, knees and on the ankle. The procedures under investigation were coronary angiography (CA) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), peacemaker and defibrillator implantations (PM/ICDs), cardiac resynchronization therapy with or without defibrillator implantations (CRT-D or CRT) and radiofrequency ablations (RFA). The study aimed at analyzing the distribution of radiation in selected anatomic regions, determining the typical locations of highest doses and estimating the dose ranges for selected types of procedures. The maximum registered doses per procedure to eye lens and ankle were 1.21 mSv and 1.46 mSv for CA PCI procedures, 0.02 mSv and 0.05 mSv for RFA and 0.13 mSv and 0.51 mSv for PM/ICDs, respectively. The maximum doses to fingers, wrists and knees were, accordingly, 2.11 mSv, 1.07 mSv and 0.77 mSv for CA PCI procedures, 0.38 mSv, 0.20 mSv and 0.04 mSv for RFA ones, 0.50 mSv, 0.25 mSv and 0.01 mSv for PM/ICDs procedures and 2.25 mSv, 1.12 mSv and 0.58 mSv for CRT and CRT-D ones. The factors which might influence the dose like utilized radiation, availability of additional protective equipment and position of the staff with respect to X-ray source were also analyzed. The annual doses for eye lens and extremities were estimated on the basis of individual annual workloads of the physicians participating in the study. The highest annual doses were revealed for physicians performing CA PCI procedures. Annual eye lens doses range up to 247 mSv indicating that the occupational limit for eye lens 150 mSv has been surpassed. In case of extremities the maximal estimated annual doses were 355 mSv, 136 mSv, 55 mSv and 328 mSv, for fingers, wrists, knees and for ankle

  1. A framework for a quality assurance programme for PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    Reviews organized by the IAEA of probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) of nuclear facilities have, in the past years, shown significant progress in the technical methods and data used for these studies. The IAEA has made a considerable effort to support the development of technical capabilities for PSA in Member States and in writing technical procedures for carrying out PSAs. However, the reviews have also shown significant deficiencies in quality assurance (QA) for PSAs, ranging from no QA at all to inappropriate, inefficient or unbalanced QA. As a PSA represents a very complex model which describes the risk associated with a nuclear facility, an appropriate and efficient QA programme is crucial to obtain a quality PSA. Historically, in the first integral PSAs, many of the PSA elements were handled by independent groups. These elements were finally integrated and put together in the overall model. Many of the interfaces between the elements or tasks were handled as appropriate by exchanging information in oral or written form. Since WASH-1400, the first integral PSA, the process of constructing the PSA model has been further developed. PSA elements previously considered separately can now be handled together with the capable software developed in recent years. Software has made interface control and data transfer easier to perform, but also permits the development of more detailed and complex models. Previously, QA for PSA projects was organized in an ad hoc manner and was sometimes very limited. In recent years, increasingly comprehensive QA programmes have been developed and implemented for PSA projects. Today, a comprehensive, effective and performance-oriented QA is considered to be essential for a reliable and credible PSA. This report describes the framework for developing an adequate QA programme for PSA studies. The framework is based on and is in accordance with the related QA guidelines of the IAEA for safety in nuclear power plants and other nuclear

  2. 34 CFR 75.519 - Dual compensation of staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dual compensation of staff. 75.519 Section 75.519... by a Grantee? Project Staff § 75.519 Dual compensation of staff. A grantee may not use its grantee to pay a project staff member for time or work for which that staff member is compensated from some other...

  3. Use of PSA Level 2 analysis for improving containment performance. Report of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-03-01

    In order to discuss and exchange experience on different aspects of methods associated with Level 2 PSA and its applications for improving containment performance, the IAEA held a Technical Committee meeting in Vienna in December 1996. The meeting, which was attended by 26 participants from 20 Member States, provided a broad forum for discussion. The meeting addressed the issues related to the actual performance of Level 2 PSA studies as well as the insights gained from applications to improve containment performance. Particular attention was given to studies and applications for WWER type reactors, for which Level 2 work is still in its early stages, and for channel type reactors where modelling of accident progression is complex and significantly different from vessel type light water reactors. This TECDOC contains the papers presented at the meeting and the results of extensive discussions which were held in specific working groups

  4. Report 3: Guidance document on practices to model and implement Extreme Weather hazards in extended PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alzbutas, R.; Ostapchuk, S.; Borysiewicz, M.; Decker, K.; Kumar, Manorma; Haeggstroem, A.; Nitoi, M.; Groudev, P.; Parey, S.; Potempski, S.; Raimond, E.; Siklossy, T.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this report is to provide guidance on practices to model Extreme Weather hazards and implement them in extended level 1 PSA. This report is a joint deliverable of work package 21 (WP21) and work package 22 (WP22). The general objective of WP21 is to provide guidance on all of the individual hazards selected at the End Users Workshop. This guidance is focusing on extreme weather hazards, namely: extreme wind, extreme temperature and snow pack. Other hazards, however, are considered in cases where they are correlated/ associated with the hazard under discussion. Guidance developed refers to existing guidance whenever possible. As it was recommended by end users this guidance covers questions of developing integrated and/or separated extreme weathers PSA models. (authors)

  5. Results of level 1 PSA in Trillo 1 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, F.; Lopez, C.

    1998-01-01

    In July 1991, C. N. Trillo I was requested by the Spanish Regulatory Body (CSN) to perform a PSA that should include: - Level 1 PSA at power - Internal flooding analysis - Level 2 PSA including containment capacity analysis. - External event analyses (fires, external flooding, seismic events and other external events) - Risk analysis for off power conditions (shutdown and low power) - Risk analysis due to other sources of radioactivity In 1992 the Project Plan was issued and the PSA team for the performance of Level 1 PSA was established. Before finishing the Project, it was decided to develop a Phase B to take into account some important modifications that had been accomplished in the Plant and that, probably, could affect the results. Level 1 PSA was finished in March 1998. Both the results of the study and the main conclusions derived from the importance, uncertainty and sensibility analysis performed are presented in this paper. These results de not include the internal flooding analysis conclusions and correspond to PSA revision 0 that is currently being evaluated by the Spanish Regulatory Body. (Author)

  6. Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educator's Self Efficacy and Collective Educators' Self Efficacy among University Academic Staff: An Ethical Issue. ... staff on collective educators' self efficacy. The implication of the result in terms of collaborative work among academic staff was discussed in line with ethical principles and code of conduct of psychologists.

  7. Achievement of the level 1 PSA in support to the CEA 2400 MWth gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmain, M.; Bassi, C.; Azria, P.

    2012-01-01

    Within Generation IV International Forum, the CEA has developed since 2006 a Level 1 PSA to support the design of the 2400 MWth GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor). A first period, with insights published in 2008, consisted in a model with few initiators representative of medium and high pressure situations, those used for the deterministic design of the Decay Heat Removal (DHR) dedicated loops. In a second period, an iterative work reached the probabilistic targets used for generation III reactors, with prior use of normal loops, and increase of DHR reliability in high pressure conditions. The PSA team covered all the internal initiators, and supported the design of components with instrumentation and control and electrical supplies, and the shutdown operating modes of secondary, tertiary circuits, with possible re-alignment to dedicated DHR loops. Besides, the completed PSA integrated more realistic success criteria than the preliminary model and than the deterministic approach, thanks to CATHARE2 code. In case of loss of Forced Convection, the probability of success of the Natural Convection DHR was assessed by a reliability method for passive systems. The paper underlines the PSA methodology knowledge from the EDF expertise, the improvements co-developed with CEA, and the iteration design-PSA-design. (authors)

  8. Federal Prisons. Inmate and Staff Views on Education and Work Training Programs. Report to the Chairman, Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. General Government Div.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the uses and usefulness of prison literacy and vocational education programs to the 65,000 inmates of federal prisons. Data were collected in two ways: (1) a survey of prison staff and review of selected inmate case files and other data to determine if the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) had reliable…

  9. Examination of the Relationship between Organizational Stress and Employee Performance: A Research on Staff Working on Provincial Directorate of Youth and Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksel, Ali Gurel; Caz, Cagdas; Yazici, Omer Faruk; Ikizler, Huseyin Can

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the relation between the level of organizational stress at the staff of the Youth Services and Sports Provincial Directorate and their performance. The study group of research, Istanbul province in the Uskudar district officials operating in the Youth Services and Sports Provincial Directorate constitute a…

  10. Autonomous home-care nursing staff are more engaged in their work and less likely to consider leaving the healthcare sector: a questionnaire survey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maurits, E.E.M.; Veer, A.J.E. de; Hoek, L.S. van der; Francke, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The need for home care is rising in many Western European countries, due to the ageing population and governmental policies to substitute institutional care with home care. At the same time, a general shortage of qualified home-care staff exists or is expected in many countries. It is

  11. Application of PSA in risk informed decision making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Prasad, M.; Vinod, Gopika; Saraf, R.K.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) models have been successfully employed during design evaluation to assess weak links and carry out design modifications to improve system reliability and safety. Recently, studies are directed towards applying PSA in various decision making issues concerned with plant operations and safety regulations. This necessitates development of software tools like Living PSA, Risk Monitor etc. Risk Monitor is a PC based tool developed to assess the risk, based on the actual status of systems and components. Such tools find wide application with plant personnel and regulatory authorities since they can provide solutions to various plant issues and regulatory decision making issues respectively. (author)

  12. Quality assurance in the Juragua Nuclear Power Plant preoperational PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valhuerdi Debesa, C.

    1996-01-01

    Quality Assurance (QA) is nowadays an important requirement for the competence of any production or service, making possible to get the desired quality at the lowest cost In the case of PSA, which are multidisciplinary, very detailed and complex analysis, with many interfaces between analyst tasks, QA plays an important role as a tool for the analytical process management, and it is recognized as one of the PSA issues which require additional development In this paper the QA system developed for the Juragua NPP preoperational PSA, its antecedents and the experiences of its application are described

  13. Personal Staff - Joint Staff - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    the ARNG Deputy Director of the ARNG Chief of Staff of the ARNG Command Chief Warrant Officer of the Site Maintenance Battle Focused Training Strategy Battle Staff Training Resources News Publications March Today in Guard History Leadership CNGB VCNGB SEA DANG DARNG Joint Staff J-1 J-2 J-3 J-4 J-5 J-6 J

  14. Characteristics Studies of 125I- and total PSA antibody's Binding with prostate specific antigen (PSA) in Human Uterus Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mudaffar, S.; Al-Salihi, J.

    2005-01-01

    Two groups of uterus tumors (benign and malignant) postmenopausal patients were used to investigate the presence of prostate specific antigen (PSA). Preliminary experiments were performed to follow the binding of '1 25 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA in uterus tissues homogenates of the two groups with their corresponding antigen and found to be (8.8,7.1%) for benign and malignant tumors, respectively. An Immuno Radio Metric Assay (IRMA) procedure was developed for measuring PSA in benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates. The optimum conditions of the binding of 125 I-anti total PSA antibody with PSA were as follows: PSA concentration (150,200 μg protein),tracer antibody concentration (125,250 μg protein), p H (7.6,7.2), temp (15,25?C) and time (1.5 hrs) for postmenopausal benign and malignant uterus tumors tissue homogenates, respectively. The use of different concentrations of Na + and Mg 2+ ions were shown to cause an increase in the binding at concentration of (125,75 mΜ) of Na 1+ ions (75,225 mΜ) of Mg 2+ ions for benign and malignant uterus tumors homogenates, respectively, while the use of different concentrations of urea and polyethylene glycol (PEG) Caused a decrease in the binding with the increase in the concentration of each of urea and PEG in the both cases

  15. Level 1 and 2 PSA methodology taking into account new design, operating and safety factors. Rev. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirsa, P.; Patrik, M.

    2000-11-01

    The status of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is discussed (i) in relation to the expected nature of 'revolutionary' innovations and (ii) in the light of the EUR document, summarizing requirements put by European NPP operators on the future NPP design. The aims included: (1) analysis of limitations to the current PSA methodology; (2) specification of physical and operation processes the knowledge of which is necessary to ensure the safety criteria of advanced reactors; (3) summarisation of existing knowledge and description formats of the processes; (4) identification of theoretical and experimental work required to address the problem, preparation of data and computer codes, ensuring traceability to EU developmental programs. (P.A.)

  16. The use of living PSA in safety management, a procedure developed in the nordic project ''safety evaluation, NKS/SIK-1''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johanson, G.; Holmberg, J.

    1994-01-01

    The essential objective with the development of a living PSA concept is to bring the use of the plant specific PSA model out to the daily safety work to allow operational risk experience feedback and to increase the risk awareness of the intended users. This paper will present results of the Nordic project ''Safety Evaluation, NKS/SIK-1''. The SIK-1 project has defined and demonstrated the practical use of living PSA for safety evaluation and for identification of possible improvements in operational safety. Subjects discussed in this paper are dealing with the practical implementation and use of PSA to make proper safety related decisions and evaluation. (author). 24 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  17. Pattern of Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Failure Dictates the Probability of a Positive Bone Scan in Patients With an Increasing PSA After Radical Prostatectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotan, Zohar A.; Bianco, Fernando J.; Rabbani, Farhang; Eastham, James A.; Fearn, Paul; Scher, Howard I.; Kelly, Kevin W.; Chen, Hui-Ni; Schöder, Heiko; Hricak, Hedvig; Scardino, Peter T.; Kattan, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Physicians often order periodic bone scans (BS) to check for metastases in patients with an increasing prostate-specific antigen (PSA; biochemical recurrence [BCR]) after radical prostatectomy (RP), but most scans are negative. We studied patient characteristics to build a predictive model for a positive scan. Patients and Methods From our prostate cancer database we identified all patients with detectable PSA after RP. We analyzed the following features at the time of each bone scan for association with a positive BS: preoperative PSA, time to BCR, pathologic findings of the RP, PSA before the BS (trigger PSA), PSA kinetics (PSA doubling time, PSA slope, and PSA velocity), and time from BCR to BS. The results were incorporated into a predictive model. Results There were 414 BS performed in 239 patients with BCR and no history of androgen deprivation therapy. Only 60 (14.5%) were positive for metastases. In univariate analysis, preoperative PSA (P = .04), seminal vesicle invasion (P = .02), PSA velocity (P < .001), and trigger PSA (P < .001) predicted a positive BS. In multivariate analysis, only PSA slope (odds ratio [OR], 2.71; P = .03), PSA velocity (OR, 0.93; P = .003), and trigger PSA (OR, 1.022; P < .001) predicted a positive BS. A nomogram for predicting the bone scan result was constructed with an overfit-corrected concordance index of 0.93. Conclusion Trigger PSA, PSA velocity, and slope were associated with a positive BS. A highly discriminating nomogram can be used to select patients according to their risk for a positive scan. Omitting scans in low-risk patients could reduce substantially the number of scans ordered. PMID:15774789

  18. Application of PSA in Designing New Third-Generation NPPs Equipped with VVE Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuchumov, A. Yu.; Morozov, V.B., E-mail: morozov-sloboda@mail.ru [JSC Atomenergoproekt, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    The projects of new third-generation NPPs shall meet more stringent safety requirements. A proper balance between a high level of safety and modern requirements for power unit availability indicators cannot be achieved without applying a probabilistic approach in the course of designing, central to which is probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The report presents the main results from application of PSA in working out new projects of NPPs equipped with VVER reactors, as well as the obtained quantitative results reflecting the entire spectrum of operational states and initiating events. It is shown that by using an efficient combination of active and passive safety systems it is possible to achieve a safety level in the projects complying with the latest requirements, including those following from the lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident. (author)

  19. Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings 2 PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 30 second PSA encourages people to wash their hands often while in the hospital or visiting someone in the hospital. It also encourages them to remind their healthcare providers to wash their hands, too.

  20. Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings 1 PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    This 30 second PSA encourages people to wash their hands often while in the hospital or visiting someone in the hospital. It also encourages them to remind their healthcare providers to wash their hands, too.