WorldWideScience

Sample records for ps15 school building

  1. Fungi isolated in school buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Ejdys

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the species composition of fungi occurring on wall surfaces and in the air in school buildings. Fungi isolated from the air using the sedimentation method and from the walls using the surface swab technique constituted the study material. Types of finish materials on wall surfaces were identified and used in the analysis. Samples were collected in selected areas in two schools: classrooms, corridors, men's toilets and women's toilets, cloakrooms, sports changing rooms and shower. Examinations were conducted in May 2005 after the heating season was over. Fungi were incubated on Czapek-Dox medium at three parallel temperatures: 25, 37 and 40°C, for at least three weeks. A total of 379 isolates of fungi belonging to 32 genera of moulds, yeasts and yeast-like fungi were obtained from 321 samples in the school environment. The following genera were isolated most frequently: Aspergillus, Penicillium and Cladosporium. Of the 72 determined species, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum occurred most frequently in the school buildings. Wall surfaces were characterised by an increased prevalence of mycobiota in comparison with the air in the buildings, with a slightly greater species diversity. A certain species specificity for rough and smooth wall surfaces was demonstrated. Fungi of the genera Cladosporium and Emericella with large spores adhered better to smooth surfaces while those of the genus Aspergillus with smaller conidia adhered better to rough surfaces. The application of three incubation temperatures helped provide a fuller picture of the mycobiota in the school environment.

  2. Code Compliant School Buildings Boost Student Achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Lumpkin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of the focus in the literature in raising student achievement has included parental involvement, principal leadership, quality of instruction, students’ socioeconomic status, curriculum, and use of technology. Limited empirical research relates the condition of the school building as a variable that affects student achievement. Furthermore, there is no research that has examined the impact of building codes on achievement outcomes in the state of Florida. This research determined whether academic achievement of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students as measured by the mathematics and reading subtests of the Florida Comprehensive Achievement Test (FCAT increased in new school buildings compliant to the 2000 Florida State Requirements for Educational Facilities. A causal-comparative design determined whether the independent variables, old and new school building influenced student achievement as measured by students’ FCAT mathematics and reading subtest scores. The control group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in old buildings. The experimental group was two cohorts of 4th-, 8th-, 9th-, and 10th-grade students who attended school in new buildings. Transition from an old school into a new school was the treatment. Two hypotheses were formulated for testing and the research question for the inquiry was whether the percentage of students passing the FCAT mathematics and reading subtests increases after transitioning from an old school building into a new 2000 UBC (Uniform Building Code compliant facility.

  3. Designing for health in school buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Inge Mette; Jensen, Bjarne Bruun; Larsen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the kinds of knowledge practitioners use when planning and designing for health in school buildings. Methods: Twelve semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with architects, teachers and officials to investigate use of knowledge in the making of school buildings...

  4. Life Cycle Costs of Dutch school buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, P.; Arkesteijn, M.H.

    2013-01-01

    There is a gap between investment and operating costs of public school buildings in the Netherlands. This gap is caused by separated responsibility for the financing of the accommodation for the primary and secondary schools. Municipalities finance the initial costs of construction of these schools

  5. Lectures on School Building, Furniture and Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geursen, Thijs J.; Kamp, Kees

    1978-01-01

    The Information Centre for School Building (ICS) in the Netherlands works on commissions of the central authorities, but also for local authorities, school boards, and sometimes commercial firms. This publication contains papers by Thijs J. Geursen, the managing director of the ICS and by Kees Kamp, the deputy director. In "School Building…

  6. Implications of Curriculum Reform for School Buildings in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott-Watson, W.

    2008-01-01

    Scotland's Building Excellence programme is exploring the implications of curriculum reform for school building design. It includes events which bring together teachers, designers, school managers and local authorities.

  7. Sustainability in School Building Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ece ŞAHİN

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable construction is important for the continuation of life in a healthy world for futuregenerations; many issues affecting the quality of life such as effective use of resources, take advantage ofrenewable energy, the choice of recyclable materials that do not harm the environment and waterconservation are considered in the context of sustainable design. Implementations carried out in thisframework are regarded as valuable due to providing the consciousness of sustainability to the society.Creating the awareness of sustainability is given a great importance by educators; thus, “education forsustainability” are included from the preschool program so that children can learn the gainings of suchperspective in their early ages. In support of this concept, it is believed that education structures should bea laboratory where children can practice theoretical knowledge learned at school. In that respect, studiesneed to be considered in the context of sustainable construction are studied in this research. In the study,after a description of the importance of sustainable design as a learning mean, significant subjects such asusing natural light, heating, cooling and air-conditioning methods, wind energy, water protection andmaterial selection are analyzed in terms of designing sustainable schools. It is criticized worldwide thatstructures ground on sustainable design principles are relatively few in numbers. Despite, there is anincreasing interest to the subject in Turkey later years; a lot more steps are required in terms ofimplementation and research of the issue. Thus, the purpose of the study is to provide a supplementaryreference for school designs.

  8. Material Connections: Steuart Building, St. Albans School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The addition to the St. Albans campus in Washington, D.C., relates both to the style and the siting of the older "collegiate gothic" school nearby. The mixed-use building contains five classrooms, art and music spaces, and a student lounge. (Author/MLF)

  9. Schools for the Future - Building to Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lisa Rosén; Bertelsen, Eva

    the pedagogical meaning of spaces and buildings and thus a displacement of where pedagogical ideas of schooling are produced: from teachers and other practitioners to the processes surrounding the construction of buildings, that is both the political and the architectural processes. In the paper, we explore...... the pupils’ bodies in specific ways. In this the belief in architecture as a driver of cultural change becomes legible. Theoretically, the project subscribes to a Lefebvrian understanding of space as a social production. It is framed by his tripartite analysis of space as perceived, conceived and lived...

  10. CO2 zero schools: school building renovation towards emissions neutrality

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Manuela Guedes de; Ferreira, Marco António Pedrosa Santos; Rodrigues, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Vila Nova de Gaia, a 300.000 inhabitants municipality in Portugal, has established the goal of transforming their schools into carbon emissions free buildings. The first pilot project shows a combination of cost effective energy efficiency measures with renewable energy harvesting allowing reducing nearly 90% final energy use and carbon emissions.

  11. Management and maintenance of school buildings in secondary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study is to investigate the strategies used in terms of managing and maintaining the school buildings in order to achieve the goals of the school system. The population of the study was the entire 665 secondary schools -374 public and 291 private secondary school buildings in Delta State. The sample for ...

  12. Team building in an Elementary School: A Descriptive Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Holleran, David J.

    1997-01-01

    TEAM BUILDING IN AN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL: A DESCRIPTIVE CASE STUDY David J. Holleran (ABSTRACT) The purpose of this study was to examine the team-building process implemented in an elementary school. Research questions were developed on what team-building activities took place, when the activities took place, what expenses were involved, what the outcomes were, and what the reactions of the staff were towards team building activities implemented at the school. Twen...

  13. Printable Version of Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document presents guidelines for the remediation/cleanup of mold and moisture problems in schools and commercial buildings; these guidelines include measures designed to protect the health of building occupants and remediators.

  14. Mixing Metaphors: Building Infrastructure for Large Scale School Turnaround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peurach, Donald J.; Neumerski, Christine M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to increase understanding of the possibilities and challenges of building educational infrastructure--the basic, foundational structures, systems, and resources--to support large-scale school turnaround. Building educational infrastructure often exceeds the capacity of schools, districts, and state education…

  15. Improving the Quality of School Facilities through Building Performance Assessment: Educational Reform and School Building Quality in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Sheila Walbe; Moreira, Nanci Saraiva; Ono, Rosaria; Limongi Franca, Ana J. G.; Nogueira, Roselene A. M. F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The paper describes the purpose of and strategies for conducting post-occupancy evaluations (POEs) as a method for assessing school building performance. Set within the larger context of global efforts to develop and apply common indicators of school building quality, the authors describe research conducted within the newest generation of…

  16. Law Governing School Property and School Building Construction. School Law Casebook Series No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Lee O.; Edwards, Newton

    Legal principles of the law governing school property and school building construction are considered in the first section of this casebook. From the legal principles mentioned, the most significant are selected and illustrated with appropriate court decisions in the second section. Many of the cases selected illustrate more than one legal…

  17. CASE STUDIES OF RADON REDUCTION RESEARCH IN 13 SCHOOL BUILDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report details 13 case studies covering radon mitigation research in school buildings from 1990 to 1992. The 13 schools are in Colorado, Maine, Minnesota, Ohio, South Dakota, Tennessee, and the State of Washington. Diagnostics were carried out in all of these schools, and s...

  18. Listening to school buildings. The performance of school buildings; Luisteren naar schoolgebouwen. Hoe presteren schoolgebouwen?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosfeld, G. [BNA Onderzoek, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Juricic, S.; Van Dijken, F.; Boerstra, A. [BBA Binnenmilieu, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Krist, R. [ICS adviseurs, Zwolle (Netherlands); Broekhuizen, D.; Verstegen, T.

    2011-06-15

    The aim of the multi-disciplinary research was to analyze user experiences for ten school buildings in the Netherlands: five in secondary education and five in primary education, all in use three to five years. An analysis was made of the indoor climate as well as of user experiences and costs for the period June 2010 - April 2011 [Dutch] Het doel van het multidisciplinaire onderzoek was om gebruikerservaringen te analyseren voor 10 schoolgebouwen in Nederland: vijf in het voortgezet onderwijs en vijf in het basisonderwijs, die 3-5 jaar in gebruik zijn. Er is een analyse gemaakt van het binnenmilieu, gebruikerservaringen en kosten in de periode juni 2010 - april 2011.

  19. Effective Urban Schools--Building Student Pride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beachum, Lock P.

    1985-01-01

    Principals in urban high schools can play an important role in improving school effectiveness by adopting an educational philosophy that focuses on development of the students' sense of self-worth. (PGD)

  20. How to Build Schools Where Adults Learn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Kevin; Ippolito, Jacy

    2014-01-01

    In the current, very complex, and even conflicted discourse about schools, one thing is clear: Schools need to be about student learning. Schools need to ensure that students are good readers, proficient writers, capable mathematicians, competent scientists, and knowledgeable historians. Students also need to learn to work together, be healthy, be…

  1. School Building Projects: Managing Insurance and Contracts during Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shands, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Managing the risks inherent in a building project presents a challenge and opportunities not often encountered in the ordinary affairs of a school district. A building project brings the district, its staff, and students, as well as the community, in close contact with architects and engineers and a number of contractors for a period of time often…

  2. Guidelines for indoor air hygiene in school buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriske, Heinz-Joern; Szewzyk, Regine (eds.)

    2008-08-15

    The new guidelines for indoor air hygiene in school buildings are intended as a response to current requirements in school practice. The recommendations aim to help to avoid mistakes in modernising school buildings and to provide hygiene-specific support in planning of new school buildings. The guidelines are laid out as follows: (a) In the general section the targets of the guidelines and the target groups are addressed. The current indoor hygiene situation in German schools is described, followed by the parameters with regard to peripheral issues which will not be dealt with further; (b) Part A deals with the hygiene requirements in the practical running of schools. Besides general requirements for maintenance and operation the important issues of cleaning and ventilation are considered, as well as minor building works; (c) Part B provides an overview of important chemical and biological contaminants in schools; (d) Part C looks at building and air conditioning requirements. The important issues of acoustic requirements is also addressed; (e) Part D shows how to deal practically with problem cases and list case studies with 'typical' procedures; (f) Part E provides a brief overview of existing renovation guidelines.

  3. Weaving Evidence, Inquiry and Standards to Build Better Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timperley, Helen, Ed.; Parr, Judy, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Every school leader and teacher knows that the challenges of change are constant and ongoing. Expectations have risen. The material for "Weaving Evidence, Inquiry and Standards to Build Better Schools" is based on the authors' involvement in research and development projects that have successfully accelerated students' learning and…

  4. Building school-wide capacity for improvement: the role of leadership, school organizational conditions and teacher factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thoonen, E.E.J.; Thoonen, E.E.J.; Sleegers, P.J.C.; Oort, F.J.; Peetsma, T.T.D.

    2012-01-01

    Education policies for greater accountability of schools assume that schools are capable of building their capacity for continuous improvement. While policy-makers, scholars, and practitioners acknowledge the importance of building school-wide capacity for continuous improvement, empirical evidence

  5. Building Networks of Disaster Preparedness Schools in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Tzu-chau; Lin, Weiru

    2012-01-01

    The aims of the education for natural disaster preparedness in Taiwan are to prepare every school disaster free and every student with disaster preparedness. The education for disaster preparedness has been through three stages since 2003: project for cultivating professionals for disaster preparedness education (2003-2006), project for disaster preparedness schools (2006- 2010), and building networks of disaster preparedness schools (2011-2014). The framework of the disaster preparedness edu...

  6. Democracy Project: Building Citizenship through Schools | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The results will inform the design of educational materials and teachers' training modules on citizenship education. The road to democracy The ... Participating schools will test a model for citizenship education as part of an effort to promote widespread citizenship education in Peru's public schools. A communications and ...

  7. Energy restoration of Primary school building 'Dobrila Stambolic' in Svrljig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Jasmina M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy efficiency has become an integral part of the projects by adoption of laws and regulations on energy efficiency in 2011. This paper presents energy rehabilitation of the primary school building 'Dobrila Stambolic' in Svrljig. Energy restoration of this building, in addition to replacement of the roof cladding and roof constructions, included the installation of thermal insulation on all facade walls of the building, replacement of windows and heating system. By applying the suggested refurbishments the building energy class rating transferred from F to D which is two classes improvement.

  8. Building High Participation in School Food Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rednak, Jon

    1987-01-01

    A Pennsylvania school district served meals to nearly 80 percent of the students this past year. Student participation was achieved by asking students' opinions, monitoring food quality, redesigning menus, increasing staff morale, providing a pleasant cafeteria atmosphere, and sponsoring nutrition programs. (MLF)

  9. School Leadership that Builds Teacher Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minckler, Cheri Hoff

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative study explores the relationship between school leadership and the development and sustenance of teacher social capital. The literature review discusses aspects of leadership theory to elucidate understanding of how leadership influences teachers' working relationships. Quantitative methodology and analyses ascertain the…

  10. Building a High School Math Research Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerver, Robert; Santucci, Lauren; Leventhal, Hanah

    2017-01-01

    For decades, all honors students at North Shore High School in New York were required to write a mathematics paper. In 1991, these papers were eliminated, and a new elective, "Investigations in Math Research," was added to the course catalog. Research is not an innate skill, and now, students of all ability levels who wanted the research…

  11. Factsheet on Energy Neutral School Buildings and Office Buildings; Infoblad Energieneutrale scholen en kantoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-15

    A brief overview is given of all aspects of energy-neutral building and renovating school and office buildings. Besides technique, also attention is given to process, financing, management and maintenance. This factsheet is part of a series of three factsheets on energy neutral construction of houses and buildings. The other two are: 'Factsheet on Energy Neutral Building : Definition and ambition' and 'Factsheet on Energy Neutral Building' [Dutch] Een kort overzicht wordt gegeven van alle aspecten van energieneutraal bouwen en renoveren van woningen. Naast techniek komen ook proces, financiering en beheer en onderhoud aan de orde. Dit Infoblad maakt deel uit van een serie van drie Infobladen over energieneutraal bouwen voor woningen en gebouwen. De andere twee zijn: 'Infoblad Energieneutraal bouwen: definitie en ambitie' en 'Infoblad Energieneutrale Woningbouw'.

  12. Natural ventilation systems to enhance sustainability in buildings: a review towards zero energy buildings in schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gil-Baez Maite

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available European regulations set the condition of Zero Energy Buildings for new buildings since 2020, with an intermediate milestone in 2018 for public buildings, in order to control greenhouse gases emissions control and climate change mitigation. Given that main fraction of energy consumption in buildings operation is due to HVAC systems, advances in its design and operation conditions are required. One key element for energy demand control is passive design of buildings. On this purpose, different recent studies and publications analyse natural ventilation systems potential to provide indoor air quality and comfort conditions minimizing electric power consumption. In these passive systems are of special relevance their capacities as passive cooling systems as well as air renovation systems, especially in high-density occupied spaces. With adequate designs, in warm/mild climates natural ventilation systems can be used along the whole year, maintaining indoor air quality and comfort conditions with small support of other heating/cooling systems. In this paper is analysed the state of the art of natural ventilation systems applied to high density occupied spaces with special focus on school buildings. The paper shows the potential and applicability of these systems for energy savings and discusses main criteria for their adequate integration in school building designs.

  13. Natural ventilation systems to enhance sustainability in buildings: a review towards zero energy buildings in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Baez, Maite; Barrios-Padura, Ángela; Molina-Huelva, Marta; Chacartegui, Ricardo

    2017-11-01

    European regulations set the condition of Zero Energy Buildings for new buildings since 2020, with an intermediate milestone in 2018 for public buildings, in order to control greenhouse gases emissions control and climate change mitigation. Given that main fraction of energy consumption in buildings operation is due to HVAC systems, advances in its design and operation conditions are required. One key element for energy demand control is passive design of buildings. On this purpose, different recent studies and publications analyse natural ventilation systems potential to provide indoor air quality and comfort conditions minimizing electric power consumption. In these passive systems are of special relevance their capacities as passive cooling systems as well as air renovation systems, especially in high-density occupied spaces. With adequate designs, in warm/mild climates natural ventilation systems can be used along the whole year, maintaining indoor air quality and comfort conditions with small support of other heating/cooling systems. In this paper is analysed the state of the art of natural ventilation systems applied to high density occupied spaces with special focus on school buildings. The paper shows the potential and applicability of these systems for energy savings and discusses main criteria for their adequate integration in school building designs.

  14. Building Infrastructure for Peace in Nigerian Schools | Irene | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dealing with violent menace however requires a cutting–edge approach which infrastructure for peace represents. This is important in view of the failure of the existing approaches in dealing with violence and promoting attitudinal cum social change in school. This paper therefore focuses on building infrastructures for ...

  15. Is Your School Suffering from Sick Building Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Margaret

    1993-01-01

    Three-fourths of American schools are in substandard condition. Health effects associated with indoor air/environmental quality are a major concern. Sick building syndrome, which causes illness in occupants, generally results from particulates, volatile organic compounds, biologicals, or radio-nucleotides. The article recommends how to deal with…

  16. Solar Heating System for Recreation Building at Scattergood School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scattergood School, West Branch, IA.

    This report describes the solar heating of two adjoining buildings, a gymnasium and a locker room, at a coeducational boarding school. Federal assistance was obtained from the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) as part of the Solar Heating and Cooling Demonstration Program. The system uses a 2,500-square-foot array of…

  17. Sustainable school infrastructure through effective innovative building technology selection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mphahlele, C

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to provide an overview of a model proposed for the selection Innovative Building Technologies (IBTs) and procurement of services supporting the erection of the IBTs that will ensure the construction of a sustainable school...

  18. Indoor Air Quality and Thermal Comfort in School Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhásová Šenitková, Ingrid

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents results to thermal comfort and environment quality questions in 21 school building rooms. Results show that about 80% of the occupants expressed satisfaction with their thermal comfort in only 11% of the buildings surveyed. Air quality scores were somewhat higher, with 26% of buildings having 80% or occupant satisfaction. With respect to thermal comfort and air quality performance goals set out by standards, most buildings appear to be falling far short. Occupant surveys offer a means to systematically measure this performance, and also to provide diagnostic information for building designers and operators. The odours from building materials as well as human odours were studied by field measurement. The odour intensity and indoor air acceptability were assessed by a sensory panel. The concentrations of total volatile organic compounds and carbon dioxide were measured. The odours from occupancy and building materials were studied under different air change rate. The case study of indoor air acceptability concerning to indoor odours and its effect on perceived air quality are also presented in this paper.

  19. Usability requirements for buildings: a case study on primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duca, Gabriella

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns an applied research aimed at applying the concept of usability, as derived form the standard ISO 9241/11, in the filed of building design, namely primary schools. Starting from the concept that space characteristics play a very relevant role in learning performances, the study presented here developed an original methodology for the assessment of effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction of buildings hosting primary schools, in order to create a school environment better supporting users in their tasks. Research core is the framework of usability requirements and their related markers, indicators and technical specification that has been formulated in order to check compliance of urban area, building, rooms and architectural details with users needs. Therefore, a detailed task analysis of pupils and teacher tasks has been carried out and two questionnaires addressed to a significant users panel have been formulated for satisfaction survey. Lastly, a matrix for an overall reading of gathered data has been set-up and criteria for usability assessment based on that data has been defined. The whole study has been developed within the case study of a primary school in the Naples city centre, whose contents and results are discussed.

  20. Building School Cultures in Achieving Urban Elementary Schools: The Leadership Behaviors of Principals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Barbara Nelson; Reid, Nancy Andrade

    Identification of principals' instructional leadership behaviors and the time they spend involved in the process of school improvement is the purpose of this study. A second focus is on the ways in which principals build school cultures. The Principals Instructional Management Rating Scale (PIMRS) (Hallinger 1983), the National Task-Time Survey…

  1. Relating Building and Classroom Conditions to Student Achievement in Virginia's Elementary Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Lanham III, James Warren

    1999-01-01

    The relationships between student achievement and a number of variables relating to building and classroom conditions in Virginia elementary schools were examined. A systematic random sample of 300 schools was selected from all elementary schools in Virginia with grades three and five. Data on building condition, classroom condition, and demographics were collected with "An Assessment of Building and Classroom Conditions in Elementary Schools in Virginia." Building prin...

  2. Plan To Reduce the Vulnerability of School Buildings to Natural Disasters: Dominica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organization of American States, Washington, DC.

    A workshop report provides the structure and content of a school building vulnerability reduction plan for schools in Dominica, determines roles and interactions between school stakeholders, and designs a natural hazard vulnerability reduction program. It provides a profile of the current stock of school buildings in Dominica while also addressing…

  3. Building School-Wide Capacity for Improvement: The Role of Leadership, School Organizational Conditions, and Teacher Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoonen, Erik E. J.; Sleegers, Peter J. C.; Oort, Frans J.; Peetsma, Thea T. D.

    2012-01-01

    Education policies for greater accountability of schools assume that schools are capable of building their capacity for continuous improvement. While policy-makers, scholars, and practitioners acknowledge the importance of building school-wide capacity for continuous improvement, empirical evidence to this effect remains thin. In this study, we…

  4. Leadership for Inclusion School leadership that motivates teachers to build inclusive classrooms.

    OpenAIRE

    Qeleni, Merelesita Tiadama

    2013-01-01

    The promotion of inclusive education and demand by governments for schools to become a School for All will demand school leadership that will help classroom teachers build inclusive classrooms. Using qualitative interviews, the study investigated how three Norwegian inclusive school leaders motivated their teachers to build inclusive classrooms. The research found that the extent to which school leaders perceived the importance of inclusive education through the promotion of teachers learning...

  5. A Study of the Relationship between Building Conditions and Student Academic Achievement in Pennsylvania's High School

    OpenAIRE

    O'Sullivan, Sean

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between school building conditions and student academic achievement in Pennsylvania's high schools. Research questions analyzed by step-wise multiple regression were: (a) Is there a relationship between overall school building conditions and student academic achievement in Pennsylvania's high schools when socio-economic status (SES) is held constant?; (b) Is there a relationship between the cosmetic conditions of school facilities and student academic ...

  6. [From health promoting school perspectives to discuss the building of school-community partnership].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chun; Huang, Song-Yuan; Wu, Fei-Lin

    2005-06-01

    In the wake of the WHO's health promotion campaign health promotion schools have gained currency in Europe and the United States. The Department of Education in Taiwan has proposed a "school health promotion program" and the Department of Health a "program to build healthy schools" The goal of these programs was to create a holistic environment for school health and put the concepts of "school-family-community partnership" into practice. Although difficulties, such as school-centered perspectives, ambiguous definitions of "community" and shortage of funding, human resources and long-term planning impeded the program, this article, based on literature and practical experience, presents the "school-community model" and the strategies that it applied to organize the school-community health promotion committee to plan long-term programs and to assess the needs and resources of schools and communities on a collaborative basis. It contends, furthermore, that integrating community services into curriculums in order to enable students to appreciate the meaning of partnership, and involving the community in the planning process, can achieve the goal of effectively promoting the health of both the school and the community.

  7. Building Relationships, Yielding Results: How Superintendents Can Work with School Boards to Create Productive Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Julie L.

    2015-01-01

    In "Building Relationships, Yielding Results," the seasoned superintendent of an urban school district provides a clear road map for effective collaboration with school boards and the type of relationship-building required to achieve long-term, sustainable reforms. Instead of keeping school board members at arm's length or inundating…

  8. Development of Program to Enhance Team Building Leadership Skills of Primary School Administrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sairam, Boonchauy; Sirisuthi, Chaiyuth; Wisetrinthong, Kanjana

    2017-01-01

    Team building leadership skills are important to understandings of how the primary school administrators might work towards creating more effective teamwork in the school. This research aimed 1) to study the components of team building leadership skills needed for primary school administrators, 2) to examine the current states and desirable…

  9. Identifying Low Cost Energy Improvements for School Buildings: An Energy Audit Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota State Dept. of Energy and Economic Development, St. Paul.

    This manual is a guide for performing energy audits in school buildings using low- and no-cost measures found effective in Minnesota. The manual helps school maintenance and administrative personnel conduct walk-through inspections of school buildings, focusing on the energy efficiency of their equipment and operations. The measures recommended…

  10. A Visual Information Tool for User Participation during the Lifecycle of School Building Design: BIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutamanis, Alexander; Heuer, Jos; Könings, Karen D.

    2017-01-01

    User participation is a key element in decision processes concerning the accommodation of dynamic organisations such as schools. This article addresses the discrepancy between the perspectives of the architects and engineers, as the makers of school buildings, and school management, teachers and students, as the users of the buildings, and…

  11. Building up STEM education professional learning community in school setting: Case of Khon Kaen Wittayayon School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thana, Aduldej; Siripun, Kulpatsorn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    The STEM education is new issue of teaching and learning in school setting. Building up STEM education professional learning community may provide some suggestions for further collaborative work of STEM Education from grounded up. This paper aimed to clarify the building up STEM education learning community in Khon Kaen Wittayayon (KKW) School setting. Participants included Khon Kaen University researchers, Khon Kaen Wittayayon School administrators and teachers. Methodology regarded interpretative paradigm. The tools of interpretation included participant observation, interview and document analysis. Data was analyzed to categories of condition for building up STEM education professional learning community. The findings revealed that the actions of developing STEM learning activities and research showed some issues of KKW STEM community of inquiry and improvement. The paper will discuss what and how the community learns about sharing vision of STEM Education, supportive physical and social conditions of KKW, sharing activities of STEM, and good things from some key STEM teachers' ambition. The paper may has implication of supporting STEM education in Thailand school setting.

  12. Community Building: A Positive Approach to Discipline in Schools. Sharing Ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Katherine A.

    This monograph proposes an approach to discipline that emphasizes school community building and offers examples from the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School (KDES) and the Model Secondary School for the Deaf (MSSD), both in Washington, DC. Following discussion of the problem of violence in today's schools, the paper addresses the importance of…

  13. Building and Leading a Learning Culture among Teachers: A Case Study of a Shanghai Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiyan, Qian; Walker, Allan; Xiaowei, Yang

    2017-01-01

    A positive teacher learning culture is important to effect meaningful changes in schools. Literature has established that successful school leaders can build and nurture learning cultures among teachers. However, less is known about how school leaders can shape the culture and make learning conditions happen at the schools in the Chinese education…

  14. A Model for Building School-Family-Community Partnerships: Principles and Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Julia; Henry, Lynette

    2012-01-01

    The extant literature documents the importance of school counselors' roles in school-family-community partnerships, yet no model exists to guide school counselors through the process of building partnerships. The authors propose a model to help school counselors navigate the process and principles of partnerships. They define partnerships; discuss…

  15. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, Spencer M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Fisk, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  16. Learning, knowledge building, and subject matter knowledge in school science

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Aalst, Jan Cornelis Wouterus

    Following a theoretical analysis of constructivist approaches to collaborative learning, a curriculum development model, the Learning to Knowledge Building Model, is proposed. Two empirical studies of student work with Computer Supported Intentional Learning Environment (CSILE) are then presented; these lend support to the model and explicate in detail the nature and extent of the knowledge developed by elementary school students. The first study is a content analysis of a database developed by a combined Grade 5/6 class as part of a unit on heat and matter, conducted after the children completed their work; the analysis assumes the point of view of a subject matter specialist in the field of the students' inquiry. The second study was conducted while the students' investigation was in progress, and takes the point of view of curriculum coverage; it involved a teacher who used a different model of database use, as well as different subject matter. The proposed LKB model is based on a distinction Bereiter and Scardamalia (1996a) have made between learning and knowledge building (i.e., progressive collaborative problem solving); its aim is to support the design and planning of curriculum units and classroom practices in which knowledge building is central. An important feature of the model is the attention given to ensuring that students learn to evaluate their knowledge and to ask the questions that can advance shared knowledge. Among the findings of the first study are: (a) students who wrote more notes that explicated their commonsense knowledge early in the unit, by means of mixed framework notes, tended to write more notes of high scientific merit later; (b) some of the students in this category tried out their ideas in diverse problem contexts; and (c) they tended to dominate the discussions they started. The second study provides additional insight into the role of the teacher, and the potential role of subject matter specialists, in knowledge building; it

  17. Leading the Small Rural School in Iceland and Australia: Building Leadership Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildy, Helen; Siguräardóttir, Sigríäur Margrét; Faulkner, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This study builds on a set of Australian case studies exploring the impact of Place on the work of principals and of the importance of Place in the preparation and development of principals. The project compares the ways that principals in Iceland and Australia build leadership capacity in small rural schools. Leaders of small schools in both…

  18. Effect of Corridor Design on Energy Consumption for School Buildings in the Cold Climate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, A.; Sun, Y.; Huang, Qiong; Bokel, R.M.J.; van den Dobbelsteen, A.A.J.F.

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the energy impact of corridor design for school buildings in the cold climate of China. Local school buildings were classified into three types in terms of the corridor design patterns. Architectural related parameters of corridors which could have a potential impact on the

  19. Cyclone-Resistant Rural Primary School Construction - A Design Guide. Educational Building Report 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnamon, Ian T.; Loo, G. A. van't

    One of a series of documents on design of disaster-resistant buildings, this publication treats construction of rural primary schools to resist destruction by wind and water from cyclones. Also appropriate for other buildings, material is aimed at rural primary schools because they are less likely to be professionally designed or supervised; the…

  20. An Elementary School with a Global Perspective: The Building as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Sean; Cuthbert, Marjorie; Cronin, Abbie; Urbieta, Melissa Nosal

    2011-01-01

    Just 19 months after the start of design, Stoddert Elementary School's modernized and expanded campus in northwest Washington, DC reopened, welcoming back the school and its community. Featuring spaces that had been missing since the school was founded in 1932, such as a gym, cafeteria, and library/media center and up-to-date building systems and…

  1. Fulfilling a Ten-Year Dream: Building a School Library Media Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millen, Jean; Millen, George

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process of building a new media center at Crestige South Elementary School in Centerview, Missouri. Discusses fund-raising efforts of the parent-teacher organization, the floor plan drawn up by the library media specialist, and the construction. Provides suggestions for rural school-library media specialists and school patrons for…

  2. A visual information tool for user participation during the lifecycle of school building design: BIM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutamanis, Alexandros; Heuer, Jos; Könings, Karen D.

    2017-01-01

    User participation is a key element in decision processes concerning the accommodation of dynamic organisations such as schools. This article addresses the discrepancy between the perspectives of the architects and engineers, as the makers of school buildings, and school management, teachers and

  3. The Australian Seismometers in Schools Project: Building relationships between scientists, schools and local enthusiasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfour, N.; Sambridge, M.; O'Neill, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Australian Seismometers in Schools (SIS) programme is a four-year project (2011-2014) funded by the Education component of AuScope Australian Geophysical Observing System (AGOS). Over the next four years SIS will build a network of 40 seismometers installed in high schools across the nation to provide real-time monitoring of the Australian continent and raise awareness of geoscience through observing our dynamic earth in motion. The Australian Seismometers in Schools project aims to: Raise community awareness of regional earthquakes; Raise awareness of seismology and, more generally geoscience, as a field of study; Promote science as a possible career choice; Provide a tool to teachers to assist in teaching physics and earth science to high school students. Due to the expanse of Australia and remoteness of many communities we require local experts and enthusiasts get involved in the program to provide support and share their knowledge with schools. Students are required to look after their very own seismometer and in doing so be a part of a national science experiment. The project involves e-infrastructure consisting of an online education portal allowing real time access by students to earthquake recordings in their own and other schools. The data schools collect will be useful to researchers and could complement networks run by government and state agencies due to the high quality of the instruments. Long-term storage of data for research purposes will be aligned with community standards at internationally accessible and supported data management centres, such as IRIS. A growing community of institutional and individual volunteers is forming to support the program within their local state or territory. Over the duration of the project this partner network will significantly enhance the project through provision of technical or management expertise as well as promotion within the education sector.

  4. The battle about the school building – the history behind the new wave of open plan schools in Norway

    OpenAIRE

    Erlend Vinje

    2013-01-01

    During the last years we have seen examples of hard battles regarding the architecture of new school buildings in Norway. In this article, I give voice to four central figures in this debate: the former Minister for Education and Research, Kristin Clemet; the leader of the teachers’ union Norsk Lektorlag, Gro Elisabeth Paulsen; the director of the Department for school buildings in Oslo, Harald Øvland; and the last voice belongs to the main safety representative for the teachers in Oslo, Knut...

  5. The Effectiveness of Full Day School System for Students’ Character Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benawa, A.; Peter, R.; Makmun, S.

    2018-01-01

    The study aims to put forward that full day school which was delivered in Marsudirini Elementary School in Bogor is effective for students’ character building. The study focused on the implementation of full day school system. The qualitative-based research method applied in the study is characteristic evaluation involving non-participant observation, interview, and documentation analysis. The result of this study concludes that the full day school system is significantly effective in education system for elementary students’ character building. The full day school system embraced the entire relevant processes based on the character building standard. The synergy of comprehensive components in instructional process at full day school has influenced the building of the students’ character effectively and efficiently. The relationship emerged between instructional development process in full day school system and the character building of the students. By developing instructional process through systemic and systematic process in full day school system, the support of stakeholders (leaders, human resources, students, parents’ role) and other components (learning resources, facilities, budget) provides a potent and expeditious contribution for character building among the students eventually.

  6. Building Energy-Efficient Schools in New Orleans: Lessons Learned (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-12-01

    This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricane Katrina was the largest natural disaster in the United States, striking the Gulf Coast on August 29, 2005, and flooding 80% of New Orleans; to make matters worse, the city was flooded again only three weeks later by the effects of Hurricane Rita. Many of the buildings, including schools, were heavily damaged. The devastation of schools in New Orleans from the hurricanes was exacerbated by many years of deferred school maintenance. This case study presents the lessons learned from incorporating energy efficiency in the rebuilding and renovating of New Orleans K-12 schools after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. The experiences of four new schools-Langston Hughes Elementary School, Andrew H. Wilson Elementary School (which was 50% new construction and 50% major renovation), L.B. Landry High School, and Lake Area High School-and one major renovation, Joseph A. Craig Elementary School-are described to help other school districts and design teams with their in-progress and future school building projects in hot-humid climates. Before Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans had 128 public schools. As part of the recovery planning, New Orleans Public Schools underwent an assessment and planning process to determine how many schools were needed and in what locations. Following a series of public town hall meetings and a district-wide comprehensive facility assessment, a Master Plan was developed, which outlined the renovation or construction of 85 schools throughout the city, which are expected to be completed by 2017. New Orleans Public Schools expects to build or renovate approximately eight schools each year over a 10-year period to achieve 21st century schools district-wide. Reconstruction costs are estimated at nearly $2 billion.

  7. Teaching Model Building to High School Students: Theory and Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nancy; Barclay, Tim

    1988-01-01

    Builds on a National Science Foundation (NSF) microcomputer based laboratory project to introduce system dynamics into the precollege setting. Focuses on providing students with powerful and investigatory theory building tools. Discusses developed hardware, software, and curriculum materials used to introduce model building and simulations into…

  8. MIDI Keyboards: Memory Skills and Building Values toward School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Henryk R.; And Others

    This document summarizes the results of a study which evaluated whether school instruction with Musical Instrument Digital Interface (MIDI) keyboards improves memory skill and whether school instruction with MIDI keyboards improves sentiments toward school and instructional media. Pupils in early elementary grades at five schools were evaluated…

  9. Building International Relations for Children through Sister Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Carolyn B.

    1992-01-01

    Inspired by Sister Cities International and the NASSP's school-to-school exchange program, "sister school" pairings have proved to be workable educational programs with long-range impact on participants. Some post-cold war efforts include U.S.-USSR High School Academic Partnerships, Project Harmony, and Center for U.S.-USSR Initiatives.…

  10. The Healthy School Handbook. Conquering the Sick Building Syndrome and Other Environmental Hazards In and Around Your School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Norma L., Ed.

    This book compiles 22 articles concerning sick building syndrome in educational facilities in following three areas: determining whether a school is sick; assessing causes and initiating treatment; and developing interventions. Articles address such topics as managing the psycho-social aspects of sick building syndrome; how indoor air quality…

  11. Capacity building in and for health promoting schools: results from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugglberger, Lisa; Dür, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Research has shown that schools have problems reaching the aim of becoming health promoting for many different reasons and that capacity building in and for schools is needed to develop necessary resources. We use the concept of capacity building as an analytical tool to answer the question of how the implementation of health promotion (HP) in schools can be supported. As part of a wider qualitative study concerning capacity building in the Austrian school system 11 school heads were interviewed about their needs regarding the success of HP in schools. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis. Schools can build several capacities themselves and are well informed about the requirements for implementing HP. The most important resource is institutionalisation of HP, which is not easy to reach. Concerning their environment, schools display a need for financial and human resources for HP, as well as knowledge management and quality control of HP service providers. Schools need support from their environment not only in building resources but also in taking the important step of institutionalising HP into their core and management processes. A concept of implementation, drawing attention to necessary but unforeseen capacities and resources, is needed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Competency Capacity Building Needs of Agricultural Science Teachers in Utilization of School Farm for Skill Acquisition among Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, O. I.; Onipede, Omoleye; Oketoobo, E. A.; Famiwole, Remigius O.

    2014-01-01

    This study sought to identify the competency capacity building needs of teachers of agricultural science in the utilization of school farm for skill acquisition among secondary school students in Ondo State, Nigeria). Four research questions guided the study. The study adopted the survey research design. The population used was 422, made up of…

  13. Making the Business Case for Energy Savings Plus Health: Indoor Air Quality Guidelines for School Building Upgrades

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Energy Savings Plus Health Guide equips school districts to integrate indoor air quality protections into school energy efficiency retrofits and other building upgrade projects. This page describes the business case for energy savings in schools.

  14. Climate responsive and safe earthquake construction: a community building a school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Darshan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article outlines environment friendly features, climate responsive features and construction features of a prototype school building constructed using green building technology. The school building has other additional features such as earthquake resistant construction, use of local materials and local technology. The construction process not only establishes community ownership, but also facilitates dissemination of the technology to the communities. Schools are effective media for raising awareness, disseminating technology and up-scaling the innovative approach. The approach is cost effective and sustainable for long-term application of green building technology. Furthermore, this paper emphasizes that such construction technology will be instrumental to build culture of safety in communities and reduce disaster risk.

  15. The School Building Principal and Inventory Control: A Case for Computerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronge, James

    1987-01-01

    General and special purpose database programs are appropriate for inventory control at the school building level. A fixed asset equipment inventory example illustrates the feasibility of computerized inventory control. (MLF)

  16. National Best Practices Manual for Building High Performance Schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2007-10-01

    The Best Practices Manual was written as a part of the promotional effort for EnergySmart Schools, provided by the US Department of Energy, to educate school districts around the country about energy efficiency and renewable energy.

  17. Reducing School Mobility: A Randomized Trial of a Relationship-Building Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiel, Jeremy E; Haskins, Anna R; López Turley, Ruth N

    2013-12-01

    Student turnover has many negative consequences for students and schools, and the high mobility rates of disadvantaged students may exacerbate inequality. Scholars have advised schools to reduce mobility by building and improving relationships with and among families, but such efforts are rarely tested rigorously. A cluster-randomized field experiment in 52 predominantly Hispanic elementary schools in San Antonio, TX, and Phoenix, AZ, tested whether student mobility in early elementary school was reduced through Families and Schools Together (FAST), an intervention that builds social capital among families, children, and schools. FAST failed to reduce mobility overall but substantially reduced the mobility of Black students, who were especially likely to change schools. Improved relationships among families help explain this finding.

  18. Using Concept Mapping to Build Concept the Competence of School Principals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustamin Mustamin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available More and more the competence concept of school principals have an impact on two conditions, namely: (1 to develop the concept can complement and support each other; and (2 to develop the concept of possible contradict, giving rise to different interpretations. Therefore, this becomes the main issue researchers to identify the competence concept of school principals with adaptation of Jackson-Trochim method that is capable of illustrating the concept of competencies. Results of adaptation Jackson-Trochim method that school principals should have three types of competencies to lead the school effectively and efficiently. Kind of competencies are such as school leadership, instructional leadership, and operational leadership. Based on these results, the adaptationof Jackson-Trochim method to build the competence concept of school principals suggests this concept obtained may serve as a reference for school principals continue to build competencies in the future

  19. Every Step Counts: Building a School Choice Architecture. Practitioner Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Rekha; Condliffe, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    With the expansion of school choice systems, policymakers and researchers are increasingly focused on making the school choice process accessible and clear for families. Essentially, school district offices of enrollment and outreach are acting as "choice architects" for parents and students: those who design the environment or organize…

  20. Building Place: Students' Negotiation of Spaces and Citizenship in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupper, Jennifer A.; Carson, Terry; Johnson, Ingrid; Mangat, Jyoti

    2008-01-01

    This study explored how high school students negotiate school spaces beyond the classroom within a broader context of citizenship education and identity construction. Using visual hermeneutics, researchers worked over three years with students and staff in a large, diverse, urban, public high school. Through student-produced photographs of school…

  1. Building Supportive School Environments for Alternative Education Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar-Smith, Susan; Palmer, Ruth Baugher

    2015-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study of an alternative educational program for at-risk secondary students, comparing student perceptions of their public school environment, measured upon intake in the alternative school, with their perceptions of the alternative school environment after four and eight months of attendance in the program.…

  2. Power Sharing: Building Community School Relationships from Friendship to Marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Carol R.

    2011-01-01

    When the author accepted a job with the Bayview Hunters Point YMCA as the director of the Beacon Center on the campus of Burton High School in San Francisco, she found out that New Day for Learning (NDL), an initiative that helps schools implement the community schools model, had chosen Burton as a pilot site. The author had heard that community…

  3. Sustainability in Schools: Why Green Buildings Have Become a Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Stephanie; Dunbar, Brian; Schiller, Craig

    2012-01-01

    With the increase in both green school construction and research linking green schools to healthier students, higher performance and financial return on investment, it is no surprise that the green school design practices are quickly becoming standard practice. This is reason for celebration, yet there are still many mountains to climb to achieve…

  4. Building an Effective School-Based Mentoring Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy Ann; Stormont, Melissa A.

    2011-01-01

    Many youth are at risk for failure in school due to various school, family, and community characteristics. To provide more support for youth at risk, school-based mentoring programs have become increasingly popular. However, this seemingly simple intervention is actually quite complex and must be implemented with integrity and fidelity. Although…

  5. Building a Culture of Growth and Evaluation in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Catherine J.

    2013-01-01

    This author contends that there are four key ingredients to a growth mindset in schools: observation, dialog, feedback, and investment. In addition, teachers and supervisors need to be jointly invested in the growth mindset of the school. The author suggests that if a school is considering a new faculty evaluation system, it is crucial that…

  6. Building Family and Community Demand for Dramatic Change in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, Dana; Steiner, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    District-led, dramatic change efforts in failing schools--including turnarounds and school closures--often face strong resistance from families and communities. Resistance may be based on years of tension and distrust between districts and communities, failed past school improvement efforts, or a lack of understanding about the chasm between a…

  7. Alliance for Achievement: Building a School Community Focused on Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Sam

    This report describes the Alliance for Achievement project, a guide for constructing a school community that takes into account influences of the home on school performance. The project began in 1989 when 5 Illinois schools developed a plan to focus parental involvement on "the curriculum of the home" and integrate these efforts into a…

  8. Building of Environmental Literacy among Middle School Students: The Role of In-School, Out of School, and Psychological Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kathryn Tate

    Solving environmental challenges will require an environmentally literate citizenry, equipped with ecological knowledge, pro-environmental attitudes, problem-solving skills, and motivation toward environmentally responsible behaviors. This dissertation addresses three approaches to building environmental literacy (EL) among middle school students: through schools (Chapter 1), through activities outside of school (Chapter 2), and through understanding psychological factors that affect environmental perceptions (Chapter 3). Chapter 1. This study examined school-wide EE programs among middle schools in North Carolina, including the use of published EE curricula and time outdoors while controlling for teacher education level and experience, student demographics, and school attributes. Our sample included an EE group selected from schools with registered schoolwide EE programs, and a control group randomly selected from NC middle schools that were not registered as EE schools. Students were given an EL survey at the beginning and end of the spring 2012 semester. Use of published EE curricula, time outdoors, and having teachers with advanced degrees and mid-level teaching experience (between 3 and 5 years) were positively related with EL whereas minority status (Hispanic and black) was negatively related with EL. Results suggest that though school-wide EE programs may vary in effectiveness, the use of published EE curricula paired with time outdoors represents a promising strategy. Further, investments in both new and veteran teachers to build and maintain enthusiasm for EE may help to boost student EL levels. Middle school represents a pivotal time for influencing EL, as improvement was slower among older students. Differences in EL levels based on gender suggest boys and girls may possess complementary skills sets when approaching environmental issues. Our findings suggest ethnicity related disparities in EL levels may be mitigated by time spent in nature, especially

  9. Play-Building: Creating a Documentary Theatre Performance in a High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eyck, Philip

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a high school theatre program's project in which Anna Deavere Smith's documentary theatre work serves as the foundation for play-building for students. Research in theatre arts supports the use of play-building as a way to explore major themes of relevance to students. However, there is little research addressing documentary…

  10. Demonstration of Cooling Savings of Light Colored Roof Surfacing in Florida Commercial Buildings: Our Savior's School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Danny S.; Sherwin, John R.; Sonne, Jeffrey K.; Barkaszi, Stephen F., Jr.

    A 2-year Florida study attempted to quantify air conditioning cost savings when buildings have a white reflective roof. A 10,000 square foot elementary school with a gray modified bitumen roof over plywood decking that had a solar reflectance of 23 percent was monitored for an entire year. After one year of building thermal conditions and…

  11. Building

    OpenAIRE

    Seavy, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Building for concrete is temporary. The building of wood and steel stands against the concrete to give form and then gives way, leaving a trace of its existence behind. Concrete is not a building material. One does not build with concrete. One builds for concrete. MARCH

  12. Modeling of two-storey precast school building using Ruaumoko 2D program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, N. H.; Tarmizi, L. H.; Ghani, K. D.

    2015-05-01

    The long-distant earthquake loading from Sumatra and Java Island had caused some slight damages to precast and reinforced concrete buildings in West Malaysia such as cracks on wall panels, columns and beams. Subsequently, the safety of existing precast concrete building is needed to be analyzed because these buildings were designed using BS 8110 which did not include the seismic loading in the design. Thus, this paper emphasizes on the seismic performance and dynamic behavior of precast school building constructed in Malaysia under three selected past earthquakes excitations ; El Centro 1940 North-South, El Centro East-West components and San Fernando 1971 using RUAUMOKO 2D program. This program is fully utilized by using prototype precast school model and dynamic non-linear time history analysis. From the results, it can be concluded that two-storey precast school building has experienced severe damage and partial collapse especially at beam-column joint under San Fernando and El Centro North-South Earthquake as its exceeds the allowable inter-storey drift and displacement as specified in Eurocode 8. The San Fernando earthquake has produced a massive destruction to the precast building under viscous damping, ξ = 5% and this building has generated maximum building displacement of 435mm, maximum building drift of 0.68% and maximum bending moment at 8458kNm.

  13. Indoor air quality investigation according to age of the school buildings in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jongryeul; Yang, Wonho; Kim, Jihwan; Son, Busoon; Park, Jinchul

    2009-01-01

    Since the majority of schools are housed in buildings dating from the 1960s and 1970s, a comprehensive construction and renovation program of school buildings has been carried out to improve the educational conditions in Korea. However, classrooms and computer rooms, with pressed wood desks, chairs and furnishings, as well as construction materials, might have negative effects on the indoor air quality. Furthermore, most schools have naturally ventilated classrooms. The purpose of this study was to characterize the concentrations of different indoor air pollutants within Korean schools and to compare their indoor levels within schools according to the age of school buildings. Indoor and outdoor air samples of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO(2)), particulate matter (PM(10)), total microbial count (TBC), total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) and formaldehyde (HCHO) were obtained during summer, autumn and winter from three sites; a classroom, a laboratory and a computer classroom at 55 different schools. The selection of the schools was based on the number of years since the schools had been constructed. The problems causing indoor air pollution at the schools were chemicals emitted by building materials or furnishings, and insufficient ventilation rates. The I/O ratio for HCHO was 6.32 during the autumn, and the indoor HCHO concentrations (mean = 0.16 ppm) in schools constructed within 1 year were significantly higher than the Korean Indoor Air Standard, indicating that schools have indoor sources of HCHO. Therefore, increasing the ventilation rate by means of a mechanical system and the use of low-emission furnishings can play key roles in improving the indoor air quality within schools.

  14. A Middle School's Response-to-Intervention Journey: Building Systematic Processes of Facilitation, Collaboration, and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulaney, Shannon K.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a qualitative case study examining one middle school's response to intervention (RtI) efforts. Study participants included the principal, assistant principal, and members of the school's leadership team. A description of the RtI consensus and infrastructure-building processes, consideration of the RtI facilitators, and a…

  15. Implicit Knowledge of General Upper Secondary School in a Bridge-Building Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Andreasen, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Bridge-building activities are practiced widely in the education systems of Europe. They are meant to bridge transitions between lower and upper secondary school and form a mandatory part of the youth guidance system in Denmark. By giving pupils the opportunity to experience the different educational context of upper secondary school,…

  16. National Plan To Reduce the Vulnerability of School Buildings to Natural Disasters: Antigua and Barbuda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organization of American States, Washington, DC.

    This document outlines the existing conditions of school buildings and their vulnerability to natural hazards on the islands of Antigua and Barbuda, and makes recommendations on how to better protect them from these hazards. Profiles of the schools are detailed and the roles and responsibilities of the various organizations concerning…

  17. Plan To Reduce the Vulnerability of School Building to Natural Hazards in St. Kitts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organization of American States, Washington, DC.

    This document outlines the existing conditions of school buildings and their vulnerability to natural hazards on the island of St. Kitts, and makes recommendations on how to better protect them from these hazards. Profiles of the schools are detailed and the roles and responsibilities of the various organizations concerning construction,…

  18. Polychlorinated Biphenyl Sources, Emissions, and Environmental Levels in school Buildings (PCB Workshop presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Measure PCB emission rates from primary sources in laboratory chambersMeasure transport and sorption by materials and dust in laboratory chambersCharacterize PCBs in school building materialsEstimate PCB emission rates from sources in schoolsExamine congener patterns in sources a...

  19. School buildings and indoor air quality: diagnostic procedures and criteria for intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Teresa Lucarelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The research - referred in this report - comes from a doctoral thesis entitled Indoor air quality control. Intervention criteria for environmental and technological restoration of school buildings; research that has shown the actual relationship between the degradation of school buildings, the levels of indoor air pollution and the effects on the health of the occupants. This study path is subsequently directed to the analysis of unavoidable dependencies that exist between the aspects of the healthiness of the indoor air and the energy performance of buildings in order to provide, through the use of a diagnostic protocol, useful information for the definition of redevelopment interventions.

  20. National Best Practices Manual for Building High Performance Schools (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-10-01

    The Best Practices Manual was written as a part of the promotional effort for EnergySmart Schools, provided by the US Department of Energy, to educate school districts around the country about energy efficiency and renewable energy. Written specifically for architects and engineers, The Best Practices Manual is designed to help those who are responsible for designing or retrofitting schools, as well as their project managers. This manual will help design staff make informed decisions about energy and environmental issues important to the school systems and communities.

  1. Construction Management: Building Schools Faster in the International Marketplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarano, Joseph J.

    1976-01-01

    Construction management accelerates school construction, increases quality and labor productivity, lowers costs, and offers developing nations an opportunity to improve their own management capabilities. (MLF)

  2. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexuan Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for “green” buildings and the use of “environmentally friendly” products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m3, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates.

  3. Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Conventional and High Performance School Buildings in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Lexuan; Su, Feng-Chiao; Batterman, Stuart

    2017-01-21

    Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been an indoor environmental quality (IEQ) concern in schools and other buildings for many years. Newer designs, construction practices and building materials for "green" buildings and the use of "environmentally friendly" products have the promise of lowering chemical exposure. This study examines VOCs and IEQ parameters in 144 classrooms in 37 conventional and high performance elementary schools in the U.S. with the objectives of providing a comprehensive analysis and updating the literature. Tested schools were built or renovated in the past 15 years, and included comparable numbers of conventional, Energy Star, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)-certified buildings. Indoor and outdoor VOC samples were collected and analyzed by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy for 94 compounds. Aromatics, alkanes and terpenes were the major compound groups detected. Most VOCs had mean concentrations below 5 µg/m³, and most indoor/outdoor concentration ratios ranged from one to 10. For 16 VOCs, the within-school variance of concentrations exceeded that between schools and, overall, no major differences in VOC concentrations were found between conventional and high performance buildings. While VOC concentrations have declined from levels measured in earlier decades, opportunities remain to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) by limiting emissions from building-related sources and by increasing ventilation rates.

  4. Building Rural Communities through School-Based Agriculture Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Michael J.; Henry, Anna

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory for community development by school-based agriculture programs through grounded theory methodology. Data for the study included in-depth interviews and field observations from three school-based agriculture programs in three non-metropolitan counties across a Midwestern state. The…

  5. High Performance School Buildings in Portugal: A Life Cycle Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Graca Fonseca; da Costa, Marta Marques

    2011-01-01

    In 2007 the Portuguese government launched a major school modernisation programme, and has taken steps to ensure the long-term sustainability of facilities. A specially created state-owned company, Parque Escolar (PE) has already completed 104 schools; 70 are work-in-progress and an additional 39 are under design or tender. Parque Escolar is…

  6. Principal Leadership for Professional Development To Build School Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Peter; King, M. Bruce

    2002-01-01

    Examines extent to which principal leadership for professional development at four urban elementary schools addressed three aspects of school organizational capacity: teachers' knowledge, skills, and disposition; professional community; and program coherence. Finds, for example, that effective principals can sustain high levels of capacity by…

  7. Building Better Discipline Strategies for Schools by Fuzzy Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dian-Fu; Juan, Ya-Yun; Chou, Wen-Ching

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to realize better discipline strategies for applying in high schools. We invited 400 teachers to participate the survey and collected their perceptions on the discipline strategies in terms of the acceptance of strategies and their effectiveness in schools. Based on the idea of fuzzy statistics, this study transformed the fuzzy…

  8. Building and Sustaining Successful School Leadership in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notman, Ross; Henry, D. Annie

    2011-01-01

    This article outlines success factors of six New Zealand primary and secondary school principals. These factors are grouped under principals' personal characteristics, leadership skills that connect with their teachers, leadership strategies that impact positively on school stakeholder needs, and factors that sustain leadership success. Emerging…

  9. Building Inclusive Processes for School Improvement: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Pilar; Escarbajal, Andrés; Guirao, José Manuel; Martínez, Rogelio

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study carried out in a nursery and primary school in order to ascertain the level of self-assessment undertaken by teachers with respect to their educational processes using the "ACADI" instrument, "School-based self-assessment of diversity awareness from an inclusive approach." The objective was to…

  10. Building Paradigms: Major Transformations in School Architecture (1798-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gislason, Neil

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an historical overview of significant trends in school architecture from 1798 to the present. I divide the history of school architecture into two major phases. The first period falls between 1798 and 1921: the modern graded classroom emerged as a standard architectural feature during this period. The second period, which…

  11. Leverage Leadership: A Practical Guide to Building Exceptional Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambrick-Santoyo, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Paul Bambrick-Santoyo (Managing Director of Uncommon Schools) shows leaders how they can raise their schools to greatness by following a core set of principles. These seven principles, or "levers," allow for consistent, transformational, and replicable growth. With intentional focus on these areas, leaders will leverage much more…

  12. Building a city by building schools: school festivals in Nova Iguaçu (1916–1947

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amália Dias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of doctoral research in which the social function of the school was investigated with regard to the ways in which educational institutions mobilize and participate in the public scene of the city. The analysis of ceremonies and festivals held by schools or in which they participated, based on the local press and notes in school attendance charts, reveals a productive area that represents the intertwining between school and city and the school’s function with regard to the organization of spaces and people. These events, particularly school festivals and public celebrations, point to the construction of a role of the school for instruction not only in aspects of literacy but also in behavioral habits, moral values, and rights of citizenship. The investigation focused on Nova Iguaçu, a city in the state of Rio de Janeiro. In addition to examining the interplay between city and school, the following were also considered relevant: the collaborative process in which school and city are mutually constructed and how educational practices exercised in schools by students and teachers can also be educational for the city’s population, thereby establishing schooling as a way of socializing.

  13. The battle about the school building – the history behind the new wave of open plan schools in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlend Vinje

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last years we have seen examples of hard battles regarding the architecture of new school buildings in Norway. In this article, I give voice to four central figures in this debate: the former Minister for Education and Research, Kristin Clemet; the leader of the teachers’ union Norsk Lektorlag, Gro Elisabeth Paulsen; the director of the Department for school buildings in Oslo, Harald Øvland; and the last voice belongs to the main safety representative for the teachers in Oslo, Knut Myhrer. These voices will shed light on questions like: who wanted the open plan schools (baseskoler, why the open plan schools were welcomed, who opposed the open plan schools, and why there was opposition. The quartet will also shed light on the eventual relation between the new curriculum reform Knowledge Promotion (Kunnskapsløftet and the new open plan schools, and also to what degree the teachers have participated in the process of developing these new school buildings.

  14. Efficient Solutions and Cost-Optimal Analysis for Existing School Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Maria Congedo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The recast of the energy performance of buildings directive (EPBD describes a comparative methodological framework to promote energy efficiency and establish minimum energy performance requirements in buildings at the lowest costs. The aim of the cost-optimal methodology is to foster the achievement of nearly zero energy buildings (nZEBs, the new target for all new buildings by 2020, characterized by a high performance with a low energy requirement almost covered by renewable sources. The paper presents the results of the application of the cost-optimal methodology in two existing buildings located in the Mediterranean area. These buildings are a kindergarten and a nursery school that differ in construction period, materials and systems. Several combinations of measures have been applied to derive cost-effective efficient solutions for retrofitting. The cost-optimal level has been identified for each building and the best performing solutions have been selected considering both a financial and a macroeconomic analysis. The results illustrate the suitability of the methodology to assess cost-optimality and energy efficiency in school building refurbishment. The research shows the variants providing the most cost-effective balance between costs and energy saving. The cost-optimal solution reduces primary energy consumption by 85% and gas emissions by 82%–83% in each reference building.

  15. Greenhouse Schools: How Schools Can Build Cultures Where Teachers and Students Thrive

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNTP, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Successful teachers make successful schools. Yet some schools are better than others at accelerating student learning by developing and keeping great teachers, even compared to schools that serve the same population of students and have access to the same resources. These schools are called "greenhouse schools"--schools with carefully…

  16. Greenhouse Schools: How Schools Can Build Cultures Where Teachers and Students Thrive. Executive Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    TNTP, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Successful teachers make successful schools. Yet some schools are better than others at accelerating student learning by developing and keeping great teachers, even compared to schools that serve the same population of students and have access to the same resources. These schools are called "greenhouse schools"--schools with carefully fostered…

  17. School food research: building the evidence base for policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Michael; Breda, João

    2013-06-01

    Following an international workshop on developing the evidence base for policy relating to school food held in London, UK, in January 2012, the objectives of the present paper were (i) to outline a rationale for school food research, monitoring and evaluation in relation to policy and (ii) to identify ways forward for future working. The authors analysed presentations, summaries of evidence, and notes from discussions held at the international workshop in London in 2012 to distil common themes and make recommendations for the development of coherent research programmes relating to food and nutrition in schools. International, with an emphasis on middle- and high-income countries. Overviews of existing school food and nutrition programmes from the UK, Hungary, Sweden, the USA, Australia, Brazil, China, Mexico and other countries were presented, along with information on monitoring, evaluation and other research to demonstrate the impact of school feeding on health, attainment, food sourcing, procurement and finances, in the context of interactions between the evidence base and policy decisions. This provided the material which, together with summaries and notes of discussions, was used to develop recommendations for the development and dissemination of robust approaches to sustainable and effective school food and nutrition programmes in middle- and high-income countries, including policy guidelines, standards, cost-effectiveness measures and the terms of political engagement. School food and nutrition can provide a cohesive core for health, education and agricultural improvement provided: (i) policy is appropriately framed and includes robust monitoring and evaluation; and (ii) all stakeholders are adequately engaged in the process. International exchange of information will be used to develop a comprehensive guide to the assessment of the impact of school food and nutrition policy and supporting infrastructure.

  18. EU Project “School of the Future”— Refurbishment of School Buildings Toward Zero Emission with High-Performance Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erhorn-Kluttig, Heike; Erhorn, Hans; Kempe, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    systems, and the integration of renewables and building management systems. It is anticipated that the results of the project and the associated research and dissemination efforts will support others dealing with building retrofits, and will thereby have a multiple impact on other schools......The aim of the “School of the Future” project (www.school-of-the-future.eu), which receives funding within the EU’s 7th Framework Program, is to design, demonstrate, evaluate, and communicate shining examples of how to reach the future high-performance building level. School buildings, their owners...... industry and research partners of the project. Highlights of the retrofit technologies applied in the four schools include: strongly improved thermal quality of the opaque building envelope components, triple-glazed windows (also in a listed building, i.e., a historic, heritage protected building...

  19. Building Ecoliteracy Through Adiwiyata Program (Study at Adiwiyata School in Banda Aceh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Desfandi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study is back grounded by importance of ecoliteracy for each individual. One of comprehensive efforts to build ecoliteracy in community is through Adiwiyata Program. This study is aimed to find out how the effectiveness of Adiwiyata Program in the effort to build students’ ecoliteracy in Banda Aceh. The method which is used is survey. The study is conducted in ten schools, with respondents are principal, teachers, administrative staff and students. Data analysis is done descriptively toward five variable and hypothesis test use nonparametric statistic test. The result of study showed that there is significant influence of school policy, curriculum implementation, school culture and school infrastructure management toward students’ ecoliteracy. The findings of study is the more effective four components of Adiwiyata is implemented, the higher of students’ecoliteracy. Therefore, four components of Adiwiyata should be implemented maximally, among other by strengthening Adiwiyata school team.

  20. Study on Maintenance Practices for School Buildings in Terengganu and Kedah, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ropi R.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia initiated talks on building maintenance in 1971 during the Second Malaysia Plan of 1971-1975. Later, the government introduced the Building and Common Property (Maintenance and Management Act, 2007 to provide proper maintenance and management of buildings. School buildings are one of the important facilities for basic knowledge in everyday life. Accordingly, the maintenance of school buildings, which serve staff and students, needs considerable attention as effective maintenance protects capital investment, ensures the health and safety of the children, and supports educational performance. Based on a combination of literature survey and questionnaire appraisal, this study evaluates the maintenance practices in designated schools in Malaysia. Overall, the study showed that most of the school buildings do not possess their own maintenance management practices. Moreover, no preventive or planned maintenance was observed, and only emergency maintenance was applied when necessary. The study recommends the implementation of planned maintenance practices, which will be more effective than unplanned maintenance, mostly because of the reduction in repair costs.

  1. Robotics Intrigue Middle School Students and Build STEM Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Michael

    2013-01-01

    As science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education demands greater integration across all subject areas, technology teachers can showcase many of the cross-curricular projects already occurring inside their classrooms that intrigue students and build their STEM skills. Robotics, just one of those projects, has become an excellent…

  2. Promising Practices: Building the Next Generation of School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Jennifer Edic; Escalante, Karen; Selva, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    This study applies transformational leadership theory practices to examine the purposeful ways in which principals work to build the next generation of teacher leaders in response to the shortage of K-12 principals. Given the impact principals have on student development and the shortage of those applying for the principalship, the purpose of this…

  3. Towards passive house standards in school buildings. Maela smart building - final report; Mot passivhusstandard i undervisningsbygg. Maela smartbygg - sluttrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachenfeldt, Bjoern Jenssen; Dokka, Tor Helge

    2008-07-01

    SINTEF has in cooperation with the projecting group for Maela School, worked towards smart and general concepts to achieve good comfort with low energy consumption, low environmental impact and low investments. The project is called 'Maela smart building'. Based on conceptual solutions chosen for Maela School, this might be one of the leading school buildings in concern of energy efficiency. To be sure of achieving the target of needed energy to be less than 80 kWh/m{sub 2}, this assumes that the solutions satisfies the demands elaborated with basis in the energy target for the building together with heating and ventilation technical outfit run optimally. If the real consumption shall decrease towards calculated energy needs, the users have to be conscious not to contribute in wasting energy. Further the management of heat and ventilation has to function optimally, the setpoint for heating and ventilation has to be precise. In addition the operators have to have insight in how a building like this functions and the right skills to run it correct. Emphasis on alternatives contributing positively to architecture and good indoor environment in addition to focus on energy efficiency were considered for technical designing of the conceptual heat and ventilation solutions. Generally the need for ventilation channels is reduced to a minimum and the mechanical ventilation is dimensioned considering air quality. Thermic comfort is secured by means of passive attempt such as natural ventilation, sun screening and exploitation of thermic substance in ceiling, walls and floor. Choice of windows and walls with translucent isolation implied some increased risk for overheated teaching wings in second floor in warm and sunny periods. Since these premises because of school vacation in summer, normally is not in use in the summer, the attempts such as sun screening, natural ventilation and night cooling (ventilation of surplus heat during nights),were considered sufficient

  4. Analysis of a school building damaged by the 2015 Ranau earthquake Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shugo; Saito, Taiki

    2017-10-01

    On June 5th, 2015 a severe earthquake with a moment Magnitude of 6.0 occurred in Ranau, Malaysia. Depth of the epicenter is 10 km. Due to the earthquake, many facilities were damaged and 18 people were killed due to rockfalls [1]. Because the British Standard (BS) is adopted as a regulation for built buildings in Malaysia, the seismic force is not considered in the structural design. Therefore, the seismic resistance of Malaysian buildings is unclear. To secure the human life and building safety, it is important to grasp seismic resistance of the building. The objective of this study is to evaluate the seismic resistance of the existing buildings in Malaysia built by the British Standard. A school building that was damaged at the Ranau earthquake is selected as the target building. The building is a four story building and the ground floor is designed to be a parking space for the staff. The structural types are infill masonries where main frame is configured by reinforced concrete columns and beams and brick is installed inside the frame as walls. Analysis is performed using the STERA_3D software that is the software to analyze the seismic performance of buildings developed by one of the authors. Firstly, the natural period of the building is calculated and compared with the result of micro-tremor measurement. Secondly, the nonlinear push-over analysis was conducted to evaluate the horizontal load bearing capacity of the building. Thirdly, the earthquake response analysis was conducted using the time history acceleration data measured at the Ranau earthquake by the seismograph installed at Kota Kinabalu. By comparing the results of earthquake response analysis and the actual damage of the building, the reason that caused damage to the building is clarified.

  5. How can schools build learning organisations in difficult education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results showed that teacher commitment to personal learning enhanced student achievement. This study contributes to the understanding of theories on learning organisations from the experiences of these teachers working in disadvantaged townships schools. Keywords: change; collaboration; collective intelligence; ...

  6. Self-Determination Interventions: Building a Foundation for School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, Laura T.

    2007-01-01

    This brief synthesis of theory, research, and practice examines the role of self-determination as a factor in school completion and considers the importance of teaching self-determination skills for all youth. Self-determination interventions can help students to develop the internal motivational architecture they need to achieve success in school…

  7. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Suzette; Buffum, Austin G.; Barth, Roland S.

    2007-01-01

    Today's workforce comprises distinct generational cohorts-Veterans, Baby Boomers, Gen-Xers, and Millennials. "Generations at School" provides educators with the knowledge and tools to create and sustain true collaboration, teamwork, and consensus. Suzette Lovely and Austin G. Buffum introduce the traits and tipping points of these diverse age…

  8. Re-Thinking Intelligence: Schools That Build the Mind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Lauren B.; Schantz, Faith

    2015-01-01

    We now understand that human intelligence, once thought to be determined almost solely by heredity, is malleable. In developed countries, average intelligence test scores have increased substantially since the tests began to be administered 100 years ago. In school settings, however, intelligence is often still treated as a fixed attribute that…

  9. Building Critical Community in Middle School Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdy, Josh; Dore, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Research pertaining to institutions of public education reveals that curricular structures often function to produce and reproduce systemic inequalities. The following personal statement outlines a middle school teacher's attempt to address social reproduction in public education. By situating issues of inequity within a local context of…

  10. Teachers and Counselors: Building Math Confidence in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furner, Joseph M.

    2017-01-01

    Mathematics teachers need to take on the role of counselors in addressing the math anxious in today's math classrooms. This paper looks at the impact math anxiety has on the future of young adults in our high-tech society. Teachers and professional school counselors are encouraged to work together to prevent and reduce math anxiety. It is…

  11. Dignity: The missing building block in South African schools ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unfortunately, education is currently in an unacceptable state, with, inter alia, escalating school-based violence, deteriorating matriculation results and standards, high absenteeism rates among educators, strikes, and a lack of proper facilities and infrastructure. Lack of respect for the right to dignity of stakeholders will be ...

  12. Generations at School: Building an Age-Friendly Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovely, Suzette

    2010-01-01

    In schools around the country, Gen Xers, Millennials, Baby Boomers, and even a Veteran or two are working side by side. While anyone holding a job in this shaky economy is grateful, gratitude does not make generational clashes less difficult. Adding to the mix, many Baby Boomers initially poised for a mass exodus by 2010 are holding on for dear…

  13. How can schools build learning organisations in difficult education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    stand the meaning of a learning organisation from their perspectives. These teachers ... knowledge management to improve teaching and learning in schools (Weldy .... tions as a prerequisite for coping with difficult, complex global competition, ..... other disciplines and settings such as the human resource management and.

  14. Abstract Algebra to Secondary School Algebra: Building Bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, Donna; Sparks, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The authors have experience with secondary mathematics teacher candidates struggling to make connections between the theoretical abstract algebra course they take as college students and the algebra they will be teaching in secondary schools. As a mathematician and a mathematics educator, the authors collaborated to create and implement a…

  15. Microbial secondary metabolites in school buildings inspected for moisture damage in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Mirko; Sulyok, Michael; Täubel, Martin; Vishwanath, Vinay; Krop, Esmeralda; Borràs-Santos, Alicia; Hyvärinen, Anne; Nevalainen, Aino; Krska, Rudolf; Larsson, Lennart

    2012-08-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria are among the potential agents that contribute to adverse health effects observed in occupants of buildings affected by moisture damage, dampness and associated microbial growth. However, few attempts have been made to assess the occurrence of these compounds in relation to moisture damage and dampness in buildings. This study conducted in the context of the HITEA project (Health Effects of Indoor Pollutants: Integrating microbial, toxicological and epidemiological approaches) aimed at providing systematic information on the prevalence of microbial secondary metabolites in a large number of school buildings in three European countries, considering both buildings with and without moisture damage and/or dampness observations. In order to address the multitude and diversity of secondary metabolites a large number of more than 180 analytes was targeted in settled dust and surface swab samples using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) based methodology. While 42%, 58% and 44% of all samples collected in Spanish, Dutch and Finnish schools, respectively, were positive for at least one of the metabolites analyzed, frequency of detection for the individual microbial secondary metabolites - with the exceptions of emodin, certain enniatins and physcion - was low, typically in the range of and below 10% of positive samples. In total, 30 different fungal and bacterial secondary metabolites were found in the samples. Some differences in the metabolite profiles were observed between countries and between index and reference school buildings. A major finding in this study was that settled dust derived from moisture damaged, damp schools contained larger numbers of microbial secondary metabolites at higher levels compared to respective dust samples from schools not affected by moisture damage and dampness. This observation was true for schools in each of the three countries, but became statistically significant only

  16. Four Lessons Learned From School Nurses in New Jersey About Building a Culture of Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Building a Culture of Health will give all members of our society the opportunity to lead healthier lives. To achieve this aim, more stakeholders in the community-residents, elected officials, community-based nonprofits, law enforcement, and schools-need to be engaged in addressing the health challenges in our communities. Moreover, all community stakeholders have to think and act "upstream" by addressing the social determinants of health in their communities. Discussed in this article are some of the lessons that are being learned from the "upstream" actions of school nurses in New Jersey about building a Culture of Health.

  17. Building school health partnerships to improve pediatric asthma care: the School-based Asthma Management Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakumanu, Sujani; Antos, Nicholas; Szefler, Stanley J; Lemanske, Robert F

    2017-04-01

    Children with asthma require care that is seamlessly coordinated so that asthma symptoms are recognized and managed at home and at school. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent consensus recommendations in school-based asthma care. The School-based Asthma Management Program (SAMPRO) provides a widely endorsed framework to coordinate care with schools and consists of four components: establishing a circle of support around the child with asthma; facilitating bidirectional communication between clinicians and schools; comprehensive asthma education for schools; and assessment and remediation of environmental asthma triggers at school. SAMPRO standardizes recommendations for school-based asthma care coordination and provides a toolkit with websites and resources useful for the care of children with asthma in the school setting. The review will discuss the need for coordinated school asthma partnerships, the inception and development of SAMPRO, and its vision to improve pediatric asthma care coordination within the circle of support, comprising clinicians, school nurses, families, and communities.

  18. The Reconstruction of the Historical Building of the Latin School in Malbork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Zenon; Kryzia, Katarzyna

    2013-03-01

    The paper summarizes the reconstruction of the historical building erected in the 14th century, during the times of the residence of Grand Master of the Teutonic Order Winrich von Kniprode, currently referred to as the Latin School. It characterizes the location of the Latin School in the urban conservation area of the town of Malbork. The building is situated in the stretch of the buttressed brick escarpment on the Nogat River in the line of the historic defensive walls of Malbork. The paper also outlines the history of this building, constructed and managed by the municipal authorities of Malbork, which for a long time was a seat of a Patronage of Saint George and the Merchant Guild, and next, from the 16th century until 1864, the building housed a school where basic Latin was taught. Next, the situation of this historical monument in the 20th century is discussed. In the next part of the paper, the geological conditions of the site where the building was erected are discussed. The conducted archeological and architectural exploratory research related to the historical building with a particular emphasis on historic preservation and restoration works focusing on the building and its surroundings is presented and analyzed. Currently carried out design, construction and adaptation works allowing new functions to be embedded into this building are also discussed. The paper shows the benefits due to the realization of the reconstruction program of the degraded building of the Latin school in the historic quarter of the town. These activities are aimed at the conversion of the currently derelict building by means of embedding new functions into it. There are being designed, among others, an interactive educational center modern library, astronomical observatory, craft museum and multifunctional hall, allowing proper conditions to be created for the development of educational, artistic and tourism related activities in the reconstructed building. The reconstruction of

  19. How can schools build learning organisations in difficult education contexts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kholeka Constance Moloi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is paucity in the study of learning organisations within the education sector and particularly in schools working in difficult socio-economic contexts, such as those studied in this investigation. In this qualitative study I therefore sought evidence from teachers, in one of the districts of Gauteng province, through in-depth, semi-structured focus group interviews to establish what a learning organisation is. Using data obtained through two in-depth, semi-structured focus group interviews with 16 teachers, themes were constructed to theorise their experiences on what a learning organisation is. The results showed that teacher commitment to personal learning enhanced student achievement. This study contributes to the understanding of theories on learning organisations from the experiences of these teachers working in disadvantaged townships schools.

  20. The role of schools of public health in capacity building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulchinsky, Theodore H; Goodman, Julien

    2012-08-01

    Public health has been an enormously effective instrument for improving life expectancy and quality of life. Historically a sphere of governmental activity led by physicians and staffed by sanitarians and nurses, public health has evolved to become a multi-facetted field of societal activity. It engages many agencies and community action in reducing infectious and non-communicable diseases as well as many aspects of lifestyle and health equity. Education for an adequate professional workforce is one of its key functions. Schools of public health have fulfilled this role only partly even in developed countries, but in countries in transition and in low-income countries the problem is much more acute. We discuss the role of mentoring of new schools calling for strong public and private donor support for this as a key issue in global health.

  1. Results of a study on solar collectors on primary school buildings; Resultaten onderzoek zonnepanelen op basisscholen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-11-15

    A survey has been carried out among a large number of primary schools in the Netherlands with the aim to map experiences and constraints with regard to the use of solar collectors on the school buildings [Dutch] Om bestaande (succes)ervaringen en belemmeringen met betrekking tot plaatsing en gebruik van zonnepanelen in kaart te brengen, is een enquete uitgezet onder een groot aantal basisscholen in Nederland.

  2. Building School Resilience in an Era of Multiple Threats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    reinventing the wheel . When looking at successful models in the U.S., fire prevention education is a successful paradigm shift that was ignored for...reports from hostages would conflict as to the cause. Some believe one of the bombs strung in the gym, fell from the basketball backboard and...paint color on the walls, new tables and chairs , thus changing the environment.208 Limiting ingress and adding school resource officers, or

  3. TOOLS TO INCLUDE BLIND STUDENTS IN SCHOOL BUILDING PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Pietzschke Abate

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the design of data collection instruments that include the opinions of blind students, in accordance with the principles of Universal Design (UD. The aim of this study is to understand the importance of adapting data collection instruments for the inclusion of disabled persons in field research in Architecture and Design, among other fields. The data collection instruments developed were a play interview with a tactile map and a 3D survey with the use of tactile models. These instruments sought to assess the school environment experienced by blind students. The study involved students from the early years of a school for the blind who had not yet mastered the Braille system. The participation of these students was evaluated. A multidisciplinary team consisting of architects, designers, educators, and psychologists lent support to the study. The results showed that the data collection instruments adapted to blind students were successful in making the group of authors examine questions regarding UD. An analysis of the participatory phase showed that the limitations resulting from blindness determine the specificities in the adaptation and implementation process of the instruments in schools. Practical recommendations for future studies related to instruments in the UD thematic are presented. This approach is in line with the global trend of including disabled persons in society based on these users’ opinions concerning what was designed by architects and designers.

  4. Building an educational seismic network in Romanian schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, Bogdan; Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Constantin; Bican-Brisan, Nicoleta; Neagoe, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects is an important step toward the education of population and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this sense, The Romanian Educational Seismic Network project represents an efficient communication tool, allowing teaching and learning about the earthquakes and seismic wave impact through experimental practices and educational activities. The seismic network consist of nine SEP seismometers installed in high-schools from the most important seismic areas (Vrancea, Banat, Făgăraş, Dobrogea), vulnerable cities (Bucharest, Iasi) or high populated places (Cluj, Sibiu, Timisoara, Zalău) and is coordinated by the National Institute of Earth Physics from Bucharest. Once installed, the seismic network is the starting point of activities for students through an e-learning platform. Some objectives are aimed: - To train students and teachers how to make analysis and interpretation of seismological data; - To make science more interesting for students; - To improve the participation rates in physical sciences for students; - To raise awareness of geoscience as a scientific discipline for pre-university students; - To promote the installation and effective use of educational seismographs and seismic data; - To reinforce and develop relationships between participating schools and research institutes; - To create an earthquake database this will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. Different types of practical activities using educational seismometer, designed by researchers for students, are described in educational materials and in the web platform project. Also we encourage the teachers from the participating schools to share their experiences and produce new didactic tools for the classroom. This collaborative work could illustrate the conjugated efforts of researchers and teachers for a better education and awareness of the risk culture

  5. Building expertise in glaciology through intense international summer schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, R.

    2016-12-01

    As the field of glaciology grows in response to recent rapid glacier changes and their potential socio-environmental consequences, the need for well-trained scientists possessing a high level expertise in physical glaciology has increased. Opportunities necessary to cultivate these efforts have not kept pace with the need for increased proficiency in this field. To our knowledge there is no academic degree in glaciology anywhere, but glaciology education, if offered at all, is generally restricted to one or a few individual classes. Glaciology graduate students tend to come from a wide range of background education and often pursue their degree at institutes without any glaciology classes. To cater to this demand we have organized four intense 11-day International Summer Schools in Glaciology which have provided an opportunity for a total of 119 students from around the world to obtain a comprehensive insight into a wide range of topics in glaciology and a more holistic view beyond the scope of their graduate thesis topic. The summer schools were held bi-annually (2010 - 2016) in the tiny village of McCarthy in central Alaska in the immediate vicinity of easily accessible glaciers. The unique setting facilitated close interaction among all participants. The courses included daily lectures, computational exercises, a poster-session and two glacier excursions. In addition, students worked in small teams on a glaciology computer project mentored by one of the 7-9 instructors from several US and foreign institutions, and presented their results in a `mini' student conference at the end of the course. All instructors were required to stay for the entire period. Thus the courses provided a valuable platform for international networking between students and instructors and among the students themselves, thereby fostering future collaborations. This was generally perceived as a major asset of our summer schools.

  6. Disordered eating and menstrual irregularity in high school athletes in lean-build and nonlean-build sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jeanne F; Rauh, Mitchell J; Barrack, Michelle T; Barkai, Hava-Shoshana; Pernick, Yael

    2007-08-01

    The authors' purpose was to determine the prevalence and compare associations of disordered eating (DE) and menstrual irregularity (MI) among high school athletes. The Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) and a menstrual-history questionnaire were administered to 423 athletes (15.7 +/- 1.2 y, 61.2 +/- 10.2 kg) categorized as lean build (LB; n = 146) or nonlean build (NLB; n = 277). Among all athletes, 20.0% met the criteria for DE and 20.1% for MI. Although the prevalence of MI was higher in LB (26.7%) than NLB (16.6%) athletes (P = 0.01), no differences were found for DE. For both sport types, oligo/amenorrheic athletes consistently reported higher EDE-Q scores than eumenorrheic athletes (P < 0.05). Athletes with DE were over 2 times as likely (OR = 2.3, 95%CI: 1.3, 4.2) to report oligo/amenorrhea than athletes without DE. These data establish an association between DE and MI among high school athletes and indicate that LB athletes have more MI but not DE than NLB athletes.

  7. Efficient ventilation in school buildings. Design guidebook; Ventilation performante dans les ecoles. Guide de conception

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This guidebook aims at giving practical advices for the design of ventilation systems for school buildings in order to maintain air quality levels and energy consumptions conformable with the real needs: 1 - the specific problem of schools (various types of rooms, particular indoor pollutions); 2 - main criteria to consider (air quality and hygiene, hygro-thermal comfort, ventilation efficiency, acoustic comfort, energy mastery); 3 - main existing solutions (simple-flux blow-off or blow-in mechanical ventilation systems, dual-flux systems, air conditioning systems); 4 - choice of an adapted solution (selection criteria, global solution for the school); setting-up and follow-up (rules, training, maintenance). (J.S.)

  8. Teachers and Counselors: Building Math Confidence in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Furner

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mathematics teachers need to take on the role of counselors in addressing the math anxious in today's math classrooms. This paper looks at the impact math anxiety has on the future of young adults in our high-tech society. Teachers and professional school counselors are encouraged to work together to prevent and reduce math anxiety. It is important that all students feel confident in their ability to do mathematics in an age that relies so heavily on problem solving, technology, science, and mathematics. It really is a school's obligation to see that their students value and feel confident in their ability to do math, because ultimately a child's life: all decisions they will make and careers choices may be determined based on their disposition toward mathematics. This paper raises some interesting questions and provides some strategies (See Appendix A for teachers and counselors for addressing the issue of math anxiety while discussing the importance of developing mathematically confident young people for a high-tech world of STEM.

  9. Induced Air Movement for Wide-Span Schools in Humid Asia. Educational Building Digest 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bangkok (Thailand). Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania.

    Schools in the hot and humid zones of the Asian region are narrow to ensure good ventilation. The purpose of this report is to show that it is possible, through appropriate design, to obtain sufficient breeze for thermal comfort in buildings as wide as 15 meters. Some of the conclusions of a study of the subject are summarized. The summary is…

  10. Asbestos-Containing Materials in School Buildings: A Guidance Document. Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Toxic Substances.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has worked with the states to develop a program for accurate information and guidance to deal with the problem of school buildings constructed with asbestos-containing materials. This is the first of two guidance manuals that are a major part of this program and are being mailed to all public school…

  11. RADON PREVENTION IN THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOLS AND OTHER LARGE BUILDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses radon prevention in the design and construction of schools and other large buildings. ased on studies in progress for the past 3 years, the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) has started incorporating radon control measures into the design and...

  12. Lead in Drinking Water in Schools and Non-Residential Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This manual demonstrates how drinking water in schools and non-residential buildings can be tested for lead and how contamination problems can be corrected when found. The manual also provides background information concerning the sources and health effects of lead, how lead gets into drinking water, how lead in drinking water is regulated, and…

  13. Using Concept Mapping to Build Concept the Competence of School Principals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustamin Mustamin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available More and more the competence concept of school principals have an impact on two conditions, namely: (1 to develop the concept can complement and support each other; and (2 to develop the concept of possible contradict, giving rise to different interpretations. Therefore, this becomes the main issue researchers to identify the competence concept of school principals with adaptation of Jackson-Trochim method that is capable of illustrating the concept of competencies. Results of adaptation Jackson-Trochim method that school principals should have three types of competencies to lead the school effectively and efficiently. Kind of competencies are such as school leadership, instructional leadership, and operational leadership. Based on these results, the adaptation of Jackson-Trochim method to build the competence concept of school principals suggests this concept obtained may serve as a reference for school principals continue to build competencies in the future

  14. Implicit Knowledge of General Upper Secondary School in a Bridge-building Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annette; Andreasen, Karen Egedal

    2016-01-01

    educational context of upper secondary school, bridge-building activities are meant to facilitate their decision-making on educational paths, but also to attract more and new groups of pupils. However, the premises of the inherent differences of educational contexts and of pupils’ lacking knowledge of upper...... secondary education can be questioned. In this ethnographic case study of a bridge-building project in a rural area in Denmark, we analyse the implicit knowledge of the general upper secondary school, as it is practiced in a bridge-building project, and how it is experienced by the pupils on the background...... of their prior knowledge. The analysis is theoretically informed by especially the code concepts of Basil Bernstein....

  15. Model of Management Capacity Building for Improving The Quality of School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djaman Satori

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to develop a Model of Management Capacity Building for Improving The Quality of Elementary School in Bandung, West Java. The research method used the  research and development  prosedure and the main stages were: a preliminary study, development of the design and the product model, expert analysis judgment, operational testing, validation testing through pre-experiment, and product dissemination. The model developed consisted of six components, i.e. vision, skills, resoures, insentive, action plan, and partnership. The study revealed that this model had a significant influence on improving the quality of education through capacity building school management in an integrative model of partnership between school, university and ministry of education.

  16. Building nurse leaders through the Institute for Healthcare Improvement Open School Student Quality Leadership Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Cattleya; Cutting, Katharine N

    2014-01-01

    The Institute for Healthcare Improvement is an independent not-for-profit organization based in Cambridge, Massachusetts. It is a leading innovator in health and health care improvement with a global following.One important part of the IHI is the development and evolution of the "Open School." Launched in September 2008, the online community currently includes hundreds of thousands of students worldwide. The goals of the Open School are consistent with the IHI initial concepts: to build will for change, seek out innovation, share expertise, and build leaders. Each year, the Open School awards scholarships to select students to attend a Leadership Academy.The Student Quality Leadership Academy allows students to network with other future nurses, physicians, and health care administrators and explores how they feel about leadership. This is important to nursing as we will need to replace many leadership positions in the future, but often new nurses are uncertain about leadership roles.

  17. Leadership to Build a Democratic Community within School: A Case Study of Two Korean High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Young Taek; Printy, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This article aims to explore how democratic community is manifest in schools in Korea. It also tries to examine how leadership, specifically transformational leadership, functions in shaping a democratic community within a school. Toward this aim, we have conducted a case study of two religious high schools in Korea. Based on the findings from the…

  18. Capacity Building through Geospatial Education in Planning and School Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P.; Siddiqui, A.; Gupta, K.; Jain, S.; Krishna Murthy, Y. V. N.

    2014-11-01

    Geospatial technology has widespread usage in development planning and resource management. It offers pragmatic tools to help urban and regional planners to realize their goals. On the request of Ministry of Urban Development, Govt. of India, the Indian Institute of Remote Sensing (IIRS), Dehradun has taken an initiative to study the model syllabi of All India Council for Technical Education for planning curricula of Bachelor and Master (five disciplines) programmes. It is inferred that geospatial content across the semesters in various planning fields needs revision. It is also realized that students pursuing planning curricula are invariably exposed to spatial mapping tools but the popular digital drafting software have limitations on geospatial analysis of planning phenomena. Therefore, students need exposure on geospatial technologies to understand various real world phenomena. Inputs were given to seamlessly merge and incorporate geospatial components throughout the semesters wherever seems relevant. Another initiative by IIRS was taken to enhance the understanding and essence of space and geospatial technologies amongst the young minds at 10+2 level. The content was proposed in a manner such that youngsters start realizing the innumerable contributions made by space and geospatial technologies in their day-to-day life. This effort both at school and college level would help in not only enhancing job opportunities for young generation but also utilizing the untapped human resource potential. In the era of smart cities, higher economic growth and aspirations for a better tomorrow, integration of Geospatial technologies with conventional wisdom can no longer be ignored.

  19. A Case Study of Geologic Hazards Affecting School Buildings: Evaluating Seismic Structural Vulnerability and Landslide Hazards at Schools in Aizawl, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perley, M. M.; Guo, J.

    2016-12-01

    India's National School Safety Program (NSSP) aims to assess all government schools in earthquake prone regions of the country. To supplement the Mizoram State Government's recent survey of 141 government schools, we screened an additional 16 private and 4 government schools for structural vulnerabilities due to earthquakes, as well as landslide hazards, in Mizoram's capital of Aizawl. We developed a geomorphologically derived landslide susceptibility matrix, which was cross-checked with Aizawl Municipal Corporation's landslide hazard map (provided by Lettis Consultants International), to determine the geologic hazards at each school. Our research indicates that only 7% of the 22 assessed school buildings are located within low landslide hazard zones; 64% of the school buildings, with approximately 9,500 students, are located within very high or high landslide hazard zones. Rapid Visual Screening (RVS) was used to determine the structural earthquake vulnerability of each school building. RVS is an initial vulnerability assessment procedure used to inventory and rank buildings that may be hazardous during an earthquake. Our study indicates that all of the 22 assessed school buildings have a damageability rating of Grade 3 or higher on the 5-grade EMS scale, suggesting a significant vulnerability and potential for damage in buildings, ranging from widespread cracking of columns and beam column joints to collapse. Additionally, 86% of the schools we visited had reinforced concrete buildings constructed before Aizawl's building regulations were passed in 2007, which can be assumed to lack appropriate seismic reinforcement. Using our findings, we will give recommendations to the Government of Mizoram to prevent unnecessary loss of life by minimizing each school's landslide risk and ensuring schools are earthquake-resistant.

  20. Utilizing the school health index to build collaboration between a university and an urban school district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, James; Fryer, Craig S; Reed, Ernestine A; Thomas, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Insufficient attention has been paid to the process of conducting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's School Health Index (SHI) to promote collaboration between universities and urban school districts when developing adolescent health promotion initiatives. This article provides an overview of the real-world contextual challenges and opportunities this type of collaboration can pose. The SHI and selected collaboration principles were used to facilitate partnership and increase stakeholder buy-in, which led to developing and implementing an 8-year health promotion campaign. The focus on planning brought together key stakeholders to allow for health promotion programming to take place, despite the competing demands on the schools. The SHI allowed for input from stakeholders to develop campaign activities and inform school- and district-wide policy. Universities and school districts desiring to develop and implement school-based, adolescent health promotion programs should (1) identify the hierarchical structure of the school district, (2) establish credibility for the program and the university staff, (3) emphasize the benefits to all partners, (4) maintain a cooperative partnership with teachers and administrators, (5) appreciate the need for planning, and (6) provide as many resources as possible to aid an already overburdened school system. Promoting healthy behaviors among students is an important part of the fundamental mission of schools. The significance of collaboration using the SHI, with direct input from students, teachers, administrators, and university partners, is critical in the development of institutional support for implementation of adolescent health promotion initiatives. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  1. Improvement of the Sustainability of Existing School Buildings According to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED)? Protocol: A Case Study in Italy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giuliano Dall'O'; Elisa Bruni; Angela Panza

    2013-01-01

      School-age students spend much of their time in school buildings. The sustainability of these buildings should be a priority as better comfort with a high indoor air quality contributes to an improvement in the conditions for learning...

  2. Evaluation of a School Building in Turkey According to the Basic Sustainable Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, H. D.

    2017-08-01

    In Turkey, as well as many other developing countries, the significance of sustainable education buildings has only recently become recognized and the issue of sustainability issue has not been sufficiently involved in laws and regulations. In this study, first of all architectural sustainability with basic design criteria has been explained. After that selected type primary school project in Turkey has been evaluated according to the sustainable design criteria. Type project of school buildings significantly limits the sustainability performance expected from buildings. It is clear that type projects shorten the planning time as they include a designing process that is independent of settlement and they are repeated in various places with different characteristics, indeed. On the other hand; abundance of disadvantages such as the overlook of the natural physical and structural properties of the location mostly restricts the sustainable design of the building. For sustainable buildings, several factors such as the environment, land, climate, insolation, direction etc. shall be taken into consideration at the beginning stage. Therefore; implementation of type projects can be deemed to be inappropriate for sustainability.

  3. Open source IoT meter devices for smart and energy-efficient school buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Pocero

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available One oft-cited strategy towards sustainability is improving energy efficiency inside public buildings. In this context, the educational buildings sector presents a very interesting and important case for the monitoring and management of buildings, since it addresses both energy and educational issues. In this work, we present and discuss the hardware IoT infrastructure substrate that provides real-time monitoring in multiple school buildings. We believe that such a system needs to follow an open design approach: rely on hardware-agnostic components that communicate over well-defined open interfaces. We present in detail the design of our hardware components, while also providing insights to the overall system design and a first set of results on their operation. The presented hardware components are utilized as the core hardware devices for GAIA, an EU research project aimed at the educational community. As our system has been deployed and tested in several public school buildings in Greece, we also report on its validation.

  4. Performance Evaluation and Improvement of a Newly-Renovated Danish School Building (Retro-commissioning)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Georgieva, Viktoriya Vasileva; Zabusova, Diana

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we analyse and evaluate the energy performance of a Danish school building 4 years after its renovation. The structure of the following paper follows four phases, which include Planning, Investigation, Implementation and Hand-off. In the Planning phase, the objectives of the retro ...... solutions and their impact on the energy consumption and indoor environmental quality in the building. Description of the final solution for optimization is included in the conclusion (Hand-off phase) of this paper....... commissioning are set based on the Owner’s Project Requirements. The Investigation phase aims to analyze how the building and its systems are performing in terms of energy use and indoor environmental quality. The Implementation phase includes dynamic building simulations, which target to analyze different......In this study, we analyse and evaluate the energy performance of a Danish school building 4 years after its renovation. The structure of the following paper follows four phases, which include Planning, Investigation, Implementation and Hand-off. In the Planning phase, the objectives of the retro...

  5. The Role of the Superintendent and School Board Chair in Building Relational Trust with Newly Elected Board Members in Small Rural Washington School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Thu H.

    2013-01-01

    Trust and trusting relationships appear to be critical resources for schools helping superintendents and their school board members build teamwork within their district's vision, mission, and goals. This study examined and analyzed data of the superintendents, board chairs, and newly-inducted board members of the three school districts in small…

  6. STORYLINE APPROACH AS ENHANCEMENT OF LEARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGE AND CHARACTER BUILDING AT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frimadhona Syafri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Using stories in teaching foreign language, it forces the teacher to be crative and innovative to encourage the young learners to enjoy reading stories. The teacher has to be smart to select which one approaches or methods which can enhance learning foreign language and character building in the teaching foreign language process.The storyline approach was specifically designed for the use at primary schools. The storyline method (Storyline for teaching children at primary schools was mainly developed in 1967 by a team of teachers from Jordanhill College of Education (now known as University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland. The primary schools in Scotland use a curriculum that involves integration of new topics, such as environmental studies and expressive arts, in their teaching foreign language process. This method could be one of alternative method that be applied in teaching foreign language to Elementary School or English Courses for Children in Indonesia.

  7. Size distributions of airborne microbes in moisture-damaged and reference school buildings of two construction types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meklin, T.; Reponen, T.; Toivola, M.; Koponen, V.; Husman, T.; Hyvärinen, A.; Nevalainen, A.

    Any risk assessment of moisture-damaged buildings requires an accurate characterization of the factors contributing to the human exposure. In this study, the size distributions of indoor air viable fungi and bacteria and average mean diameters of the most common fungi in school buildings were determined. One special focus was to analyze how the microbial size distributions are affected by the building frame (either wooden or concrete) and moisture damage in the building. The study was performed in 32 school buildings classified as moisture-damaged (index) and non-damaged (reference) schools according to technical building investigations. Sampling for indoor air microbes was carried out using a cascade impactor that collects particles on six stages (range from 0.65 to >7 μm) according to their aerodynamic diameters. Both wooden and concrete schools had their highest fungal levels in the size range of 1.1-4.7 μm. However, the concentrations of fungi in all size classes were higher in wooden schools than in concrete schools. Moisture damage-associated differences in size distribution, in the particle size range of 1.1-2.1 μm, were seen in concrete schools but not in wooden schools. In general, the average geometric mean diameter ( dg,ave) of total viable fungi was smaller in wooden schools than in concrete schools, and smaller in index schools of both construction types than in their reference schools. Variation in particle size, however, by genus was observed. No differences in particle size distributions of viable airborne bacteria were found. Our results on the dependency of the particle size on the building type and presence of moisture damage provide an interesting point to be considered in assessing the complex issue of indoor-related bioaerosol exposures.

  8. Sustainable Schools Program and Practice: Partnership Building with the Tempe Union High School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Auriane; Denker, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Arizona State University's (ASU) Global Institute of Sustainability (GIOS) was awarded a five-year National Science Foundation (NSF) GK-12 grant in 2009 entitled "Sustainability Science for Sustainable Schools." The general focus of the grant is on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in K-12 schools. The…

  9. Building the School Nutrition Program Brand Personality within the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushing, Keith; Asperin, Amelia Estepa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this project were to investigate the application of brand personality concepts in the school nutrition (SN) setting and to explore high school students' awareness and acceptance of these branding initiatives. Methods: An embedded, multiple-case replication design included structured interviews with SN…

  10. Venture Capital in Ohio Schools: Building Commitment and Capacity for School Renewal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus.

    This publication describes Venture Capital grants, which are awarded to Ohio schools for school-improvement efforts. Originating in the business sector, the concept of Venture Capital represented corporate earning or individual savings invested in a new or fresh enterprise. The grants are designed to be long-term, evolving efforts focused on a…

  11. Challenges and Opportunities: Building a Relationship Between a Department of Biomedical Engineering and a Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Steven C; Meyerand, M Elizabeth

    2017-03-01

    A department of biomedical engineering can significantly enhance the impact of their research and training programs if a productive relationship with a medical school can be established. In order to develop such a relationship, significant hurdles must be overcome. This editorial summarizes some of the major challenges and opportunities for a department of biomedical engineering as they seek to build or enhance a relationship with a medical school. The ideas were formulated by engaging the collective wisdom from the Council of Chairs of the biomedical engineering departments.

  12. Building Science-Relevant Literacy with Technical Writing in High School

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girill, T R

    2006-06-02

    By drawing on the in-class work of an on-going literacy outreach project, this paper explains how well-chosen technical writing activities can earn time in high-school science courses by enabling underperforming students (including ESL students) to learn science more effectively. We adapted basic research-based text-design and usability techniques into age-appropriate exercises and cases using the cognitive apprenticeship approach. This enabled high-school students, aided by explicit guidelines, to build their cognitive maturity, learn how to craft good instructions and descriptions, and apply those skills to better note taking and technical talks in their science classes.

  13. Building professional identity as computer science teachers: Supporting high school computer science teachers through reflection and community building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lijun

    Computing education requires qualified computing teachers. The reality is that too few high schools in the U.S. have computing/computer science teachers with formal computer science (CS) training, and many schools do not have CS teacher at all. Moreover, teacher retention rate is often low. Beginning teacher attrition rate is particularly high in secondary education. Therefore, in addition to the need for preparing new CS teachers, we also need to support those teachers we have recruited and trained to become better teachers and continue to teach CS. Teacher education literature, especially teacher identity theory, suggests that a strong sense of teacher identity is a major indicator or feature of committed, qualified teachers. However, under the current educational system in the U.S., it could be challenging to establish teacher identity for high school (HS) CS teachers, e.g., due to a lack of teacher certification for CS. This thesis work centers upon understanding the sense of identity HS CS teachers hold and exploring ways of supporting their identity development through a professional development program: the Disciplinary Commons for Computing Educators (DCCE). DCCE has a major focus on promoting reflection on teaching practice and community building. With scaffolded activities such as course portfolio creation, peer review and peer observation among a group of HS CS teachers, it offers opportunities for CS teachers to explicitly reflect on and narrate their teaching, which is a central process of identity building through their participation within the community. In this thesis research, I explore the development of CS teacher identity through professional development programs. I first conducted an interview study with local HS CS teachers to understand their sense of identity and factors influencing their identity formation. I designed and enacted the professional program (DCCE) and conducted case studies with DCCE participants to understand how their

  14. Effect of highly reflective roofing sheet on building thermal loads for a school in Osaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jihui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, urban heat island (UHI phenomenon and building energy consumptions are becoming serious. Strategies to mitigate UHI and reduce building energy consumptions are implemented worldwide. In Japan, as an effective means of mitigating UHI and saving energy of buildings, highly reflective (HR and green roofs are increasingly used. In order to evaluate the effect of roofs with high reflection and thermal insulation on the energy conservation of buildings, we investigated the roof solar reflectivity of the subject school in Osaka, in which the HR roofing sheet was installed on the roof from 2010. Thermal loads, including cooling and heating loads of the top floor of school, were calculated using the thermal load calculation software, New HASP/ACLD-β. Comparing the thermal loads after HR roofing sheet installation to previous, the annual thermal load decreased about 25 MJ/m2-year and the cooling load decreased about 112 MJ/m2-year. However, the heating load increased about 87 MJ/m2-year in winter. To minimize the annual thermal load, thermal insulation of the roof was also considered be used together with HR roofing sheet in this study. The results showed that the combination of HR roofing sheet and high thermal insulation is more effective to reduce the annual thermal load.

  15. Sick Building Syndrome Among Junior High School Students in Japan in Relation to the Home and School Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaoka, Motoko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Norbäck, Dan

    2015-06-12

    There is an increasing concern about sick building syndrome (SBS), especially in Asia. The aim of this study is to investigate associations between SBS and the home, school environment and personal factors among Japanese junior high school students. We investigated students in four junior high schools in Hyogo in Kansai area, Japan. A questionnaire study was performed among students (n=1056), 12-15 years old. Temperature and relative air humidity was measured in the classrooms and dust was collected from the classroom floors and air and was analysed for cat and dog allergens. Associations were analysed by multi-level logistic regression. Mucosal symptoms (45.4%), general symptoms (38.9%) and skin symptoms (22.6%) were common. Totally 8.8% reported cat allergy, 6.1% dog allergy, 6.0% mold allergy and 25.7% pollen allergy. Atopy, window pane condensation, floor dampness and odor at home and high relative air humidity in the classrooms were associated with SBS. The prevalence of SBS symptoms was high and associated with both home and school environment. Window pane condensation and floor dampness at home can increase the risk for SBS symptoms in students. Moreover high relative air humidity at school may increase the risk for SBS.

  16. Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Administrators and Board Members Are Improving Learning and Saving Money

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-08-06

    Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school administrators and board members, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.

  17. Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Facilities Managers and Business Officials Are Reducing Operating Costs and Saving Money

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-08-06

    Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school facilities managers and business officials, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.

  18. Right to Education, Principle of Solidarity and Inclusive School : Building a Society for All

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Izar Soares da Fonseca Segalla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to reflect the relationship between the fundamental right to educa- tion, the constitutional principle of solidarity and inclusive school, demonstrating that, as diversity is one of humanity’s features, a positive approach to the differences is condu- cive to human development, preparing for citizenship and professional qualification.  Ba- sed on Article 205 of the Brazilian Constitution that establishes priorities of the right to education, Brazilian education will be examined, including the necessary highlight to the importance of inclusive school to achieve constitutional objectives and to build a free, fair and solidary society. The constitutional principle of solidarity must also be taught and practiced in the school environment. Therefore, the educational institution that welcomes students with and without disabilities has naturally more chance to act in accordance with the Constitution.

  19. Get Smart About Energy: Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (OBT) EnergySmart Schools Program Folder (Revision)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2002-02-01

    While improving their energy use in buildings and bus fleets, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. Smart districts also realize benefits in student performance.

  20. Get Smart About Energy: Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (OBT) EnergySmart Schools Program Brochure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-10-11

    While improving their energy use in buildings and bus fleets, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. Smart districts also realize benefits in student performance.

  1. Learning at the plus energy school. New building of the primary school Hohen Neuendorf; Lernen an der Plusenergie-Schule. Grundschulneubau Hohen Neuendorf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rechenbach, Baerbel

    2012-07-01

    The Plus Energy House concept is considered to be trendsetting. Architects, engineers and scientists are working to develop buildings that generate more primary energy than it is consumed in heating, in ventilation (cooling), for hot water and lighting - including all necessary auxiliary energy - in the annual balance. A primary school in Berlin's commuter belt should show whether such a building stands up a normal school day.

  2. Analysis of the Dependence between Energy Demand Indicators in Buildings Based on Variants for Improving Energy Efficiency in a School Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiba, Marta; Rzeszowska, Natalia

    2017-09-01

    One of the five far-reaching goals of the European Union is climate change and sustainable energy use. The first step in the implementation of this task is to reduce energy demand in buildings to a minimum by 2021, and in the case of public buildings by 2019. This article analyses the possibility of improving energy efficiency in public buildings, the relationship between particular indicators of the demand for usable energy (UE), final energy (FE) and primary energy (PE) in buildings and the impact of these indicators on the assessment of energy efficiency in public buildings, based on 5 variants of extensive thermal renovation of a school building. The analysis of the abovementioned variants confirms that the thermal renovation of merely the outer envelope of the building is insufficient and requires the use of additional energy sources, for example RES. Moreover, each indicator of energy demand in the building plays a key role in assessing the energy efficiency of the building. For this reason it is important to analyze each of them individually, as well as the dependencies between them.

  3. Using Mindfulness to Build a Transformative School Culture: A Phenomenological Study of Elementary School Principals Who Create an Atmosphere of Academic Rigor and Teacher Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Susan

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the motivations and discernment leading to the transformational leadership approach and showed there is continuing momentum in the area towards mindful engagement to build trust in a school culture. The purpose of the study was to investigate how transformational leaders build a culture through trust and commitment within a…

  4. Building relationships between school, family and community to enhance students' school persistence and avoid Early School Leaving (ESL)

    OpenAIRE

    Poncelet, Débora; Billa, Jean; Schürnbrand, Carmen; Kerger, Sylvie; Dierendonck, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Dropout is a multidimensional phenomenon, resulting from a combination of personal, family and school factors that interact with each other. The combination of risk factors (or protective factors) is an event or a condition that increase (or reduce) the likelihood of an individual experience of emotional or behavioural problems, that may contribute to school dropout. The decision to stop school education is the result of a long evolutionary process that is characterized by an accumulation of ...

  5. Highly Reflective Roofing Sheets Installed on a School Building to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island Effect in Osaka

    OpenAIRE

    Jihui Yuan; Kazuo Emura; Craig Farnham

    2016-01-01

    Currently, strategies to mitigate urban heat island (UHI) effects and reduce building energy consumption are implemented worldwide. In Japan, as an effective means of mitigating UHI effects and saving energy of buildings, highly reflective (HR) roofs have increasingly been used. In this study, in order to evaluate the effect of HR roofs on building energy conservation, we investigated the solar reflectivity of a subject school roof in Osaka, Japan, in which HR roofing sheets were installed on...

  6. School Mental Health: The Impact of State and Local Capacity-Building Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite a growing number of collaborative partnerships between schools and community-based organizations to expand school mental health (SMH service capacity in the United States, there have been relatively few systematic initiatives focused on key strategies for large-scale SMH capacity building with state and local education systems. Based on a framework of ten critical factors for capacity building, as well as existing best practices, two case studies were utilized to develop a replicable capacity-building model to advance interagency SMH development. Seventy education and mental health stakeholders from two selected states participated in baseline assessments of skill com-petency and critical factor implementation followed by two-day trainings (one in each state; 29 (41% of the participants also completed a six month follow-up assessment. Targeted competencies increased significantly for participants from both states, with large effect sizes (d = 2.05 and 2.56, from pre- to post-training. Participant reports of critical factor implementation increased significantly for one of the two states (t[15] = -6.40, p < .001, d = 1.77. Results inform specific training recommendations for stakeholders and collaborative teams, as well as policy implications to support future development of SMH service capacity.

  7. Building a Foundation for Success: How Authorizers Can Help Schools with the Facilities Challenge. Authorizer Issue Brief. Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsband, Robin; Hassel, Bryan C.

    2004-01-01

    One of the single biggest challenges for a charter school is securing financing for an adequate facility. While a stellar building provides no guarantee that a school will be a success, having adequate facilities that at least meet the needs of an academic program without robbing the budget can go a long way toward creating an environment…

  8. Capacity Building: Data- and Research-Informed Development of Schools and Teaching Practices in Denmark and Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvortrup, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Based on experiences from a number of large scale data- and research-informed school development projects in Denmark and Norway, led by the author, three hypotheses are discussed: that an effective way of linking research and practice is achieved (1) using a capacity building approach, that is, to collaborate in the practical school context…

  9. Can Architects Help Transform Public Education? What the Sarasota County Civic School Building Program (1955-1960) Teaches Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paley, Nicholas B.

    2013-01-01

    The Sarasota County School Building Program 1955-1960 is revisited through a detailed examination of how architects and educators collaborated to design an innovative group of public schools that provided opportunities for the transformation of learning space. This multi-dimensioned examination is grounded in an historical contextualization of the…

  10. Assessing School Council Contribution to the Enabling Conditions for Instructional Capacity Building: "An Urban District in Kentucky"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, Wade Kenneth; Keedy, John L.

    2006-01-01

    This study identified the enabling conditions related to building instructional capacity created by the councils in three high-performance schools in an urban district. The authors collected the data through observation, interview, and document mining. School-level data were sorted inductively into themes through constant comparative analysis.…

  11. Developing Arizona Turnaround Leaders to Build High-Capacity Schools in the Midst of Accountability Pressures and Changing Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylimaki, Rose M.; Brunderman, Lynnette; Bennett, Jeffrey V.; Dugan, Thad

    2014-01-01

    Today's accountability policies and changing demographics have created conditions in which leaders must rapidly build school capacity and improve outcomes in culturally diverse schools. This article presents findings from a mixed-methods evaluation of an Arizona Turnaround Leadership Development Project. The project drew on studies of turnaround…

  12. CURRICULUM IN EDUCATION AND CHARACTER BUILDING PROGRAM IN NEW ZEALAND PRIMARY SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ella Masita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As one of the most leading country at the quality education, New Zealand’s students consistently achieve high rank at the Programme for International Students Assessment (PISA for years. The paper will explore what curriculum in education used at primary school level in New Zealand is about. The focus is on the children’s character building program of the curriculum as a fundamental basis in teaching. The discussion will be followed by examples of how those programs are implemented in primary high schools both inside and outside the classrooms. It is hoped that we can learn from this curriculum system for the better quality of Indonesian educational system. Reconstructions in every single part of education will give great contribution to achieve the aims of creating qualified Indonesian people; to able to compete in this global world and have responsibility of their morals and behaviors. Introduction

  13. [Approach to sick building problem in schools: a workshop "Saga Forum on Environment" project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiba, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Tatsuya; Yamashita, Zenkou; Takaishi, Keiko; Nishimura, Koichi; Kamachi, Masashi; Kondoh, Toshihiro; Matsumoto, Akiko; Ueno, Daisuke; Miyajima, Toru

    2009-01-01

    Saga University has the "Saga Forum of Environment" project conducted in collaboration with the Saga city local government. In this project, a workshop was held to study the sick building syndrome at schools. The purpose of this workshop was to evaluate indoor air pollution levels in elementary and junior high schools in Saga city. The levels of aldehydes and volatile organic compounds (VOC) were measured in 96 classrooms of the 49 schools in August. The sampling of these chemicals were performed by the passive sampler method and measured by high-performance liquid chromatograph or gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer by participants of the workshop. In 40% of all classrooms, formaldehyde levels were higher than that of the standard of Japanese Ministry of Education. Relatively high levels of formaldehyde were found in some music classrooms. The origin of formaldehyde was thought to be musical instruments, furniture or wooden floors. A significant correlation was found between formaldehyde level and room temperature. The classrooms with ventilators showed lower levels of formaldehyde than those without ventilators. The levels of most VOCs except that of alpha-pinene were low. There is still room for improvement of air pollution in elementary and junior high schools.

  14. CHARACTERIZATION OF FAILURES IN SCHOOL BUILDINGS EXPOSED IN AGRESSIVE ENVIRONMENT M4 OF FALCON STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alice Olavarrieta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation focused on establishing a characterization of public used reinforced concrete constructions such as school units in the coastal zone of Chichiriviche and Tucacas in Venezuela’s Falcon State, exposed to highly corrosive environments and built with inadequate construction techniques. The ultimate aim was to make recommendations to regional bodies so that they could make structural interventions more precisely and assertively. The study was carried out in seven educational units, in which planimetric surveys were carried out, the collection of fault symptoms, tests in some structural members and finally a general evaluation of damages that allowed identifying their durability and particular recommendations for each school building. As a result, these units of different construction ages were in a better state of conservation, when compared directly to the sample evaluated in 2006 in private multifamily buildings, which were even younger than this sample. It was recommended for all cases that they apply a programmed and technical continuous maintenance system, which goes beyond the systems of paints whose substrate is not properly prepared, resulting in a process of superficial repair and aesthetic ineffective.

  15. Optimal Decision Model for Sustainable Hospital Building Renovation-A Case Study of a Vacant School Building Converting into a Community Public Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Yi-Kai; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Perng, Yeng-Horng; Castro-Lacouture, Daniel

    2016-06-24

    Much attention has been paid to hospitals environments since modern pandemics have emerged. The building sector is considered to be the largest world energy consumer, so many global organizations are attempting to create a sustainable environment in building construction by reducing energy consumption. Therefore, maintaining high standards of hygiene while reducing energy consumption has become a major task for hospitals. This study develops a decision model based on genetic algorithms and A* graph search algorithms to evaluate existing hospital environmental conditions and to recommend an optimal scheme of sustainable renovation strategies, considering trade-offs among minimal renovation cost, maximum quality improvement, and low environmental impact. Reusing vacant buildings is a global and sustainable trend. In Taiwan, for example, more and more school space will be unoccupied due to a rapidly declining birth rate. Integrating medical care with local community elder-care efforts becomes important because of the aging population. This research introduces a model that converts a simulated vacant school building into a community public hospital renovation project in order to validate the solutions made by hospital managers and suggested by the system. The result reveals that the system performs well and its solutions are more successful than the actions undertaken by decision-makers. This system can improve traditional hospital building condition assessment while making it more effective and efficient.

  16. Building on the US Eclipse Experience in Schools, with the Public, and Beyond the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Mike; Chee, Zoe; Bartolone, Lindsay

    2018-01-01

    Astronomers Without Borders (AWB) organized several programs for the August 21, 2017 total solar eclipse, both before and after the event, to increase participation, build on the inspiration of the eclipse, share the eclipse experience, and prepare for the eclipse in 2024.AWB focused on preparing institutions that were least likely to receive resources despite extensive nationwide efforts. AWB distributed more than 100,000 donated glasses, to isolated schools, children's cancer hospitals, abused women’s shelters, and other institutions without access to other resource providers.AWB’s Building on the Eclipse Education Program builds on the inspiration of the eclipse for STEM education. The program uses a small, personal spectroscope kit to study sunlight in different scientific fields and includes free classroom activities that meet NGSS standards.A program to collect eclipse observing glasses for schools in developing countries for future eclipses was announced around the time of the eclipse and quickly went viral, with coverage by national and innumerable local media outlets. This effort builds on AWB’s earlier programs for schools in Africa and in South America for past eclipses. Well over one million pairs are expected, as compared to the tens of thousands AWB provided through crowdfunding for previous efforts. Nearly 1000 glasses collection centers were created spontaneously, without a public call. Factors leading to widespread and diverse public participation will be presented.A program calling for first-time eclipse observers to share their experiences addresses a major issue in encouraging people to travel to the path of totality. Expert and eclipse-enthusiast testimony often fails to convince people of the value of the experience of totality as “a few minutes of darkness.” This program will share the disconnect between expectation and experience from first-time “ordinary” observers to encourage others to travel to the path of totality for the

  17. Evaluating Different Green School Building Designs for Albania: Indoor Thermal Comfort, Energy Use Analysis with Solar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalvi, Ambalika Rajendra

    Improving the conditions of schools in many parts of the world is gradually acquiring importance. The Green School movement is an integral part of this effort since it aims at improving indoor environmental conditions. This would in turn, enhance student- learning while minimizing adverse environmental impact through energy efficiency of comfort-related HVAC and lighting systems. This research, which is a part of a larger research project, aims at evaluating different school building designs in Albania in terms of energy use and indoor thermal comfort, and identify energy efficient options of existing schools. We start by identifying three different climate zones in Albania; Coastal (Durres), Hill/Pre-mountainous (Tirana), mountainous (Korca). Next, two prototypical school building designs are identified from the existing stock. Numerous scenarios are then identified for analysis which consists of combinations of climate zone, building type, building orientation, building upgrade levels, presence of renewable energy systems (solar photovoltaic and solar water heater). The existing building layouts, initially outlined in CAD software and then imported into a detailed building energy software program (eQuest) to perform annual simulations for all scenarios. The research also predicted indoor thermal comfort conditions of the various scenarios on the premise that windows could be opened to provide natural ventilation cooling when appropriate. This study also estimated the energy generated from solar photovoltaic systems and solar water heater systems when placed on the available roof area to determine the extent to which they are able to meet the required electric loads (plug and lights) and building heating loads respectively. The results showed that there is adequate indoor comfort without the need for mechanical cooling for the three climate zones, and that only heating is needed during the winter months.

  18. BUILDING PLURALIST ATTITUDE IN DOING ISLAMIC EDUCATION AT HIGHT SCHOOL AND MADRASAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moh. Haitami Salim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The pluralist attitude is often associated with acknowledging and appreciating ethnic and religious differences which are, in fact, plural. The plurality of ethnicity is a natural process because no one can choose to be born into parents of a certain group. Meanwhile the plurality of religion is the result of someone’s choice of faith and is part of the human rights. A person cannot change their ethnicity but it is possible for them to change their religion. Nor can religious conversion change a person’s ethnicity, as in the case in West Kalimantan where a Christian ethnic Dayak converts to Islam to become a Malay, for example. It is why religion and ethnicity are plural, so appreciating and acknowledging the plurality as inevitability is known as a “pluralist” attitude. In Islam, especially in the instruction of Islamic education at school, or madrasah, pluralist attitude should be extended to include not only the attitude of acknowledging and appreciating ethnic and religious differences, but also the awareness of the existence of variants of the plurality in a religion, ethnicity and even in a family. Building a pluralist attitude among people with the same faith and ethnicity is often overlooked, that later led to an attitude of ambiguity, thus being friendly towards people of a different religion or ethnicity, but being hostile when dealing with fellow religious or ethnic members. The phenomenon is clearly visible in the dispute between the followers of Sunni and the Shi’ite in which the leaders are brothers. To ensure that the instruction of Islamic education is able to build a pluralist attitude on learners, we need to start building the ability of teachers to develop the curriculum, prepare the lesson plans, develop contextual learning materials and use varied learning strategies and methods. Keywords: Instruction of Islamic education, Pluralist attitude, School, Madrasah

  19. Tools for Prevention: Building Healthy Youths. A Training Program for: School Counselors, School Nurses, School Psychologists. Trainer Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Maxie P.; Collins, Charles B., Jr.

    This training program instructor's manual is designed to assist K-12 school counselors, nurses, and psychologists in offering aid to youths at risk for substance abuse. The training objectives for participants in the workshop are to be able to demonstrate: (1) competence in knowledge of basic substance abuse information to include age-appropriate…

  20. Tools for Prevention: Building Healthy Youths. A Training Program for: School Counselors, School Nurses, School Psychologists. Participant Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Maxie P.; Collins, Charles B., Jr.

    This training program participants' manual is designed to assist K-12 school counselors, nurses, and psychologists in offering aid to youths at risk for substance abuse. The training objectives for participants in the workshop are to be able to demonstrate: (1) competence in knowledge of basic substance abuse information to include age-appropriate…

  1. Building a Mien-American house: A case study in school-community relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Lorie A.

    2000-10-01

    Researchers and policymakers agree that schools and parents must work together if they are to provide the sustenance, services, and support which children need to be successful in our increasingly complex society. (Clark, 1983; Comer, 1980, 1996; Clinton, 1995; Epstein, 1995, 1996). Unfortunately, the social and academic success of language minority students is often adversely affected by the alienation of parents from school culture and by the "deficit" view which teachers hold of language minority parents' academic and parenting skills (Boggs, 1985; Delgado-Gaitan, 1990; Heath, 1983; Lareau, 1987, 1989; Philips, 1983). This case study describes the attempts of one school site to build academic and social bridges between immigrant families from a Southeast Asian Hill Tribe, the Iu Mien, and a mainstream elementary school. This effort is facilitated by a constructivist approach to curriculum in which parents, teachers, and children create an intercultural space---a school community garden---as a context in which academic dialogue can occur. Various strategies which enable inter-cultural learning are described, including the use of students as ethnographers, of parents as expert teachers, and of teachers as cultural brokers. The study also considers the cultural conflicts and understandings which occurred when American teachers and Mien parents built a Mien field-house together: a structure which became symbolic of their blended lives. Through both a descriptive narration and interviews with various participants, the study analyzes (a) community-based curriculum development, led by practitioner reformers, as a way to enable language minority students to be academically successful within their own life worlds, as well as (b) the political and bureaucratic forces which make community-based reforms difficult to sustain. This study employs qualitative research strategies within an action-research context in which the author plays the dual role of practitioner reformer

  2. Investigating the adaptive model of thermal comfort for naturally ventilated school buildings in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Kuo, Nai-Jung

    2009-03-01

    Divergence in the acceptability to people in different regions of naturally ventilated thermal environments raises a concern over the extent to which the ASHRAE Standard 55 may be applied as a universal criterion of thermal comfort. In this study, the ASHRAE 55 adaptive model of thermal comfort was investigated for its applicability to a hot and humid climate through a long-term field survey performed in central Taiwan among local students attending 14 elementary and high schools during September to January. Adaptive behaviors, thermal neutrality, and thermal comfort zones are explored. A probit analysis of thermal acceptability responses from students was performed in place of the conventional linear regression of thermal sensation votes against operative temperature to investigate the limits of comfort zones for 90% and 80% acceptability; the corresponding comfort zones were found to occur at 20.1-28.4 degrees C and 17.6-30.0 degrees C, respectively. In comparison with the yearly comfort zones recommended by the adaptive model for naturally ventilated spaces in the ASHRAE Standard 55, those observed in this study differ in the lower limit for 80% acceptability, with the observed level being 1.7 degrees C lower than the ASHRAE-recommended value. These findings can be generalized to the population of school children, thus providing information that can supplement ASHRAE Standard 55 in evaluating the thermal performance of naturally ventilated school buildings, particularly in hot-humid areas such as Taiwan.

  3. Investigating the adaptive model of thermal comfort for naturally ventilated school buildings in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ruey-Lung; Lin, Tzu-Ping; Chen, Chen-Peng; Kuo, Nai-Jung

    2009-03-01

    Divergence in the acceptability to people in different regions of naturally ventilated thermal environments raises a concern over the extent to which the ASHRAE Standard 55 may be applied as a universal criterion of thermal comfort. In this study, the ASHRAE 55 adaptive model of thermal comfort was investigated for its applicability to a hot and humid climate through a long-term field survey performed in central Taiwan among local students attending 14 elementary and high schools during September to January. Adaptive behaviors, thermal neutrality, and thermal comfort zones are explored. A probit analysis of thermal acceptability responses from students was performed in place of the conventional linear regression of thermal sensation votes against operative temperature to investigate the limits of comfort zones for 90% and 80% acceptability; the corresponding comfort zones were found to occur at 20.1-28.4°C and 17.6-30.0°C, respectively. In comparison with the yearly comfort zones recommended by the adaptive model for naturally ventilated spaces in the ASHRAE Standard 55, those observed in this study differ in the lower limit for 80% acceptability, with the observed level being 1.7°C lower than the ASHRAE-recommended value. These findings can be generalized to the population of school children, thus providing information that can supplement ASHRAE Standard 55 in evaluating the thermal performance of naturally ventilated school buildings, particularly in hot-humid areas such as Taiwan.

  4. If We Build It, We Will Come: Impacts of a Summer Robotics Program on Regular Year Attendance in Middle School. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mac Iver, Martha Abele; Mac Iver, Douglas J.

    2014-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of both keeping middle school students engaged and improving their math skills, Baltimore City Public Schools (City Schools) developed a summer school STEM program involving not only math and science instruction but also the experience of building a robot and competing with those robots in a city-wide tournament.…

  5. REVIEW OF RESEARCH AT VIRGINIA TECH ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SCHOOL BUILDING CONDITION AND STUDENT AND TEACHER PERFORMANCE AND ATTITUDES

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, James Scott

    2014-01-01

    The research study is a review of research at Virginia Tech on the relationship between school building condition and student and teacher performance and attitudes. There have been several reviews or synthesis studies of the research in the field of school facilities over the last 65 years. One institution, Virginia Tech has produced several research studies in this area of scholarly work over the past two decades. With this large corpus of research directly related to Cash's theoretical mod...

  6. Creating Places of Public Memory through the Naming of School Buildings. A Case Study of Urban School Spaces in Bologna in the 19th and 20th Centuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella D’Ascenzo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution sets out to analyse the official names of Italian schools in the 19th and 20th centuries, considering these schools as places of civil, political and scholastic memory. Studying national legislation and based on historical research into specific schools in Italy, the work focuses on the naming of the school buildings found today in the city of Bologna (Italy during the period from Unification until the Second World War. Examining as-yet unexplored archive sources, the study investigates the motivations underlying the school names, the contexts in which they were debated and decided, the inauguration ceremonies and the relative official speeches given by the authorities, the stones laid or busts displayed in or outside the schools and the complex scenography set up for the local people offering a «pedagogic» and yet political discourse, as an authentic educational heritage of «public memory» and political pedagogy for the generations of the time and those to come. This study also shows some interesting surprises concerning famous and less well-known figures and personalities pointed out in the local school memory but legible on many levels of historical and educational interpretation. This work has confirmed that officially named of Italian school buildings are authentic places of memory assigned from birth to play a civil and public function for national education and cultural memory, as well as the literacy of the new generations.

  7. Building learning communities: evolution of the colleges at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Amy; Cutrer, William; Moutsios, Sandi; Heavrin, Benjamin; Pilla, Michael; Eichbaum, Quentin; Rodgers, Scott

    2013-09-01

    Learning communities, which are an emerging trend in medical education, create a foundation for professional and academic development through the establishment of longitudinal relationships between students and faculty. In this article, the authors describe the robust learning community system at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, which encompasses wellness, career planning, professional development, and academics.The Vanderbilt Advisory Colleges Program introduced in 2006 initially focused on two goals: promoting wellness and providing career advising. In the 2011-2012 academic year, the focus of the colleges expanded to incorporate an enhanced level of personal career advising and an academic component. In the four-year College Colloquium course, faculty selected as college mentors teach the medical humanities and lead sessions dedicated to student professional development in the areas of leadership, research, and service-learning. This academic and professional development program builds on the existing strengths of the colleges and has transformed the colleges into learning communities.The authors reflect on lessons learned and discuss future plans. They report that internal data and data from the Association of American Medical Colleges Medical School Graduation Questionnaire support consistently high and increasing satisfaction among Vanderbilt medical students, across the metrics of personal counseling, faculty mentoring, and career planning.

  8. Speak up! Speak out! Building HIV and AIDS awareness among Jamaican school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissett, D; Griffiths-Irving, J

    2008-06-01

    The Government of Jamaica, through the Ministry of Health and other ministries, assisted by international funding agencies and members of non-governmental organizations, has diligently led the charge to reduce the incidence ofHIV and AIDS in Jamaica. Yet, the continued escalation in the infection rate attested to the need for education towards the reduction of stigma and discrimination, factors that fuel the spread of the virus. Significant efforts were made to woo corporations in Jamaica to redouble their efforts and provide resources to address the continued escalation of the AIDS epidemic in Jamaica. Scotiabank Jamaica responded with a unique educational initiative. The Scotiabank National Primary Schools HIV and AIDS Debating Competition in 2006-2007 was conducted over a seven-month period. It was opened to primary-level, government and private institutions islandwide. A total of91 institutions competed with each other debating 16 moots (i.e., topics) in 417 debates from the first preliminary rounds through to the final. Moots reflected curricular and extracurricular concerns, emphasized the values of compassion, healthy lifestyles, critical thinking and child rights; they also sent messages of anti-discrimination, and parental and community responsibilities. Whereas communication between the organizers and the schools was sometimes challenging, schools subscribed to the activity (debates) for the awareness it brought and for the potential for developing students. Attempts were also made to raise awareness among teachers, parents and the general community. Feedback at the end acclaimed the debates as a valuable strategy for building awareness as well as development of student potential and unity around a common cause.

  9. On the influence of the urban heat island on the cooling load of a school building in Athens, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagiorgas, H. S.; Mihalakakou, G.

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigates the effect of the urban heat island (UHI) phenomenon, measured in the Greater Athens Area (GAA), on the energy consumption of a typical modern school building. The energy performance of the selected building has been calculated using an accurate, extensively validated, transient simulation model for 17 different sites of the GAA, for the summer period. Calculations showed that the urban heat island phenomenon affects remarkably the thermal behavior of the school building, as suburban areas presented much lower cooling loads. The cooling load values fluctuated between 3304.3 kWh for the rural stations and 14,585.1 kWh for the central stations (for the year 2011) or between 3206.5 kWh and 14,208.3 kWh (for the year 2012), respectively. Moreover, the mean monthly cooling load values varied between 0.4-2 kWh/m2 for the rural stations and 4-6.9 kWh/m2 for the central stations, for the selected time period. Furthermore, a neural network model was designed and developed in order to quantify the contribution of various meteorological parameters (such as the mean daily air temperature values, the mean daily solar radiation values, the average wind speed and the urban heat island intensity) to the energy consumption of the building and it was found that the urban heat island intensity is the predominant parameter, influencing remarkably the energy consumption of the typical school building.

  10. Always Feed the Clowns and Other Tips for Building Better Partnerships between School Librarians and Providers of Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Jason Edwards travels to schools and libraries across the nation performing educational enrichment programs, such as his Monster Hunt Library Skills-Building Adventure Program, for librarians and students. In this article, he shares tips that he has gleaned that may help librarian/programmer partnerships function more smoothly. Three of the…

  11. Unity in the Elementary School Classroom: Building Community Through Increasing Positive Social Interactions Between and Among Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt-Jaeger, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Children's sense of a community is essential in elementary schools. This helps gives students a sense of belonging and control over their environment. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of several strategies from the Toolbox Project and their effect on building community in the classroom. Collin (2003b) discusses his Toolbox…

  12. Strengths-Based Programming for First Nations Youth in Schools: Building Engagement through Healthy Relationships and Leadership Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Claire V.; Chiodo, Debbie; Thomas, Darren; Hughes, Ray

    2010-01-01

    First Nations youth in Canada demonstrate disproportionately high rates of negative behaviors such as violence, substance abuse, and leaving school early. An understanding of historical context and current environment helps explain these patterns. Providing culturally relevant opportunities for youth to build healthy relationships and leadership…

  13. Supporting Education... Building Canada: Child Poverty and Schools. Federal Budget 2009. Summary/Implications for Teachers and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian Teachers' Federation (NJ1), 2009

    2009-01-01

    In November The Canadian Teachers' Federation (CTF), as part of the pre-budget consultation process, made a submission to the House of Commons Standing Committee on Finance. Entitled "Supporting Education... Building Canada: Child Poverty and Schools" the brief outlined why teachers saw child poverty as such an important issue to be…

  14. Wolves at the Schoolhouse Door: An Investigation of the Condition of Public School Buildings. A Report of the Education Writers Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Anne; And Others

    If the American schoolhouse symbolizes public concern for children, millions of today's youngsters are receiving a negative message. Based on available statistics and information, and using a representative sample of one-half of the country's public school buildings, this investigation found that 25 percent of the nation's school buildings are…

  15. Healthy Buildings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah

    Health problems related to school buildings can be categorized in five major areas: sick-building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and poor indoor air quality due to smoke, chemicals, and other pollutants. This paper provides an overview of these areas,…

  16. Energy Modelling and Automated Calibrations of Ancient Building Simulations: A Case Study of a School in the Northwest of Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ogando

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the energy performance of buildings forming a school centre in the northwest of Spain was analyzed using a transient simulation of the energy model of the school, which was developed with TRNSYS, a software of proven reliability in the field of thermal simulations. A deterministic calibration approach was applied to the initial building model to adjust the predictions to the actual performance of the school, data acquired during the temperature measurement campaign. The buildings under study were in deteriorated conditions due to poor maintenance over the years, presenting a big challenge for modelling and simulating it in a reliable way. The results showed that the proposed methodology is successful for obtaining calibrated thermal models of these types of damaged buildings, as the metrics employed to verify the final error showed a reduced normalized mean bias error (NMBE of 2.73%. It was verified that a decrease of approximately 60% in NMBE and 17% in the coefficient of variation of the root mean square error (CV(RMSE was achieved due to the calibration process. Subsequent steps were performed with the aid of new software, which was developed under a European project that enabled the automated calibration of the simulations.

  17. Reward School Leadership: Building a Good-to-Great Cycle of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadravec, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    For years, schools across the country have carried the label, and in many cases the reality, of being "schools in need of improvement." School improvement plans, deficit analyses, and theories for school organizational improvement have saturated the landscape of school communities. While much of this work has been focused on strategies…

  18. Solar Heating Proof-of-Concept Experiment for a Public School Building. Report for the Period 15 Jan. 1974 to 15 May 1974. No. ER-7934.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AAI Corp., Baltimore, MD.

    In the middle of January 1974, AAI Corporation received a contract to conduct a solar heating proof-of-concept experiment (POCE) for a public school building. On March 1, 1974, the experiment began as Timonium Elementary School, in Maryland, became the first school in the United States to be heated by solar energy. In this brief period, the…

  19. Voluntary After-School Alcohol and Drug Programs for Middle School Youth : If You Build It Right, They Will Come

    OpenAIRE

    D’Amico, Elizabeth J.; Green, Harold D.; Miles, Jeremy N.V.; Zhou, Annie J.; Tucker, Joan S.; Shih, Regina A.

    2012-01-01

    Few after-school programs target alcohol and other drug (AOD) use because it is difficult to encourage a diverse group of youth to voluntarily attend. The current study describes attendance at a voluntary after-school program called CHOICE, which targeted AOD use among middle school students. Over 4,000 students across eight schools completed surveys and 15% participated in CHOICE. Analyses indicated that there were some differences between CHOICE participants and non-participants. For exampl...

  20. Charting a Clear Course: A Resource Guide for Building Successful Partnerships between Charter Schools and School Management Organizations. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, Bryan; Lin, Margaret

    As the charter-school option has expanded across the country, contracting for educational management services is an increasingly available and attractive choice for charter-school governing boards and founding groups. To make contractual relationships work well, charter-school boards need to strike an effective balance between fulfilling their…

  1. RADON PREVENTION IN THE DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOLS & OTHER LARGE BUILDINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is typically easier and much less expensive to design and construct a new building with radon-resistant and/or easy-to-mitigate features, than to add these features after the building is completed and occupied. Therefore, when building in an area with the potential for elevate...

  2. Building Fossils in the Elementary School and Writing about Them Using Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenker, Richard M.; Yoshida, Sarah

    This material describes a fossil-building activity using sea shells, chicken bones, and plaster for grade one through three students. Related process skills, vocabulary, computer principles, time requirements, and materials are listed. Two methods of building the fossils are discussed. After building the fossils, classes may be divided into pairs…

  3. Achieving Results through Community School Partnerships: How District and Community Leaders Are Building Effective, Sustainable Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Martin J.; Jacobson, Reuben; Melaville, Atelia

    2012-01-01

    A community school is a place and a set of partnerships connecting a school, the families of students, and the surrounding community. A community school is distinguished by an integrated focus on academics, youth development, family support, health and social services, and community development. The community school strategy is central to efforts…

  4. Differentiated Instructional Strategies on Space Education for Sustained Capacity Building of Underprivileged School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sumit

    2016-07-01

    Although innovations in space education were introduced in many developing countries with good intentions, too many changes and challenges in the existing system have often penalized those who needed them the most. Consequently, the students and teachers in the underprivileged schools face isolation, neglect and coupled with inadequate pedagogic attention, poor infrastructure and insufficient resources, inadvertently suffer. Surprisingly, these deprived school students possess cognitive capabilities of comprehending nature. One of the most compelling situations in Indian school education is that the syllabus is often modified haphazardly without the necessary groundwork and infrastructure to implement it. Apparently, there has neither been teaching nor learning on applied knowledge. Despite the growth in communication and technology applications in space education, inequalities continue to exist in developing countries. In our present society many crucial services are provided by space and it becomes imperative that students have a comprehensive knowledge of space and space based technologies. To realize these objectives, we have adopted a comprehensive and holistic capacity building mechanism which incorporates differentiated instructional strategy on teaching space education in underprivileged schools. Because differentiation and scaffolding techniques yield similar instructional goals, we have blended together both the approaches to the point of being indistinguishable and this proved successful. Initiation was done through the setting up of an Astronomy Club in a backward area in Hyderabad and necessary infrastructure was provided by one of the authors. A state of the art audio-visual room with LCD Projector for ICT mode of presentations of various astronomy and space topics, having a seating capacity of 50 students is in place. A laptop, printer and Wi-Fi connection exists. In addition, visual charts on various celestial phenomena and objects, inspirational

  5. Examining statewide capacity for school health and mental health promotion: a post hoc application of a district capacity-building framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maras, Melissa A; Weston, Karen J; Blacksmith, Jennifer; Brophy, Chelsey

    2015-03-01

    Schools must possess a variety of capacities to effectively support comprehensive and coordinated school health promotion activities, and researchers have developed a district-level capacity-building framework specific to school health promotion. State-level school health coalitions often support such capacity-building efforts and should embed this work within a data-based, decision-making model. However, there is a lack of guidance for state school health coalitions on how they should collect and use data. This article uses a district-level capacity-building framework to interpret findings from a statewide coordinated school health needs/resource assessment in order to examine statewide capacity for school health promotion. Participants included school personnel (N = 643) from one state. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items, with further examination of subgroup differences among school administrators and nurses. Results were then interpreted via a post hoc application of a district-level capacity-building framework. Findings across districts revealed statewide strengths and gaps with regard to leadership and management capacities, internal and external supports, and an indicator of global capacity. Findings support the utility of using a common framework across local and state levels to align efforts and embed capacity-building activities within a data-driven, continuous improvement model. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  6. Pilot multimethod trial of a school-ethos intervention to reduce substance use: building hypotheses about upstream pathways to prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonell, Christopher P; Sorhaindo, Annik M; Allen, Elizabeth E; Strange, Vicki J; Wiggins, Meg; Fletcher, Adam; Oakley, Ann R A; Bond, Lyndal M; Flay, Brian R; Patton, George C; Rhodes, Tim

    2010-12-01

    Interventions to improve school ethos can reduce substance use but "upstream" causal pathways relating to implementation and school-level changes are uncertain. We use qualitative and quantitative data from a pilot trial to build hypotheses regarding these. The Healthy School Ethos intervention involved two schools being provided with facilitation, training, and funding to plan and implement actions (some mandatory and some locally determined) to improve school ethos over one year. The evaluation involved a pilot-trial with two intervention and two comparison schools; semi-structured interviews with facilitators, staff, and students; and baseline and follow-up surveys with students aged 11 to 12 years. Student accounts linked participation in planning or delivering intervention activities with improved self-regard and relationships with staff and other students. Some activities such as re-writing school rules involved broad participation. Students in receipt of actions such as peer-mediation or motivational sessions reported benefits such as improved safety and relationships. Some student accounts linked improved self-regard and relationships with increased engagement and aspirations, and reduced substance use. At 9-month follow-up, students in intervention schools reported less hurting and teasing of others and feeling unsafe at school. Other outcomes suggested intervention benefits but were not significant. School-ethos interventions may reduce substance use through upstream pathways involving the aforementioned factors. Future phase-III trials should quantitatively model the extent to which these mediate intervention effects. Copyright © 2010 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Highly Reflective Roofing Sheets Installed on a School Building to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island Effect in Osaka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui Yuan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, strategies to mitigate urban heat island (UHI effects and reduce building energy consumption are implemented worldwide. In Japan, as an effective means of mitigating UHI effects and saving energy of buildings, highly reflective (HR roofs have increasingly been used. In this study, in order to evaluate the effect of HR roofs on building energy conservation, we investigated the solar reflectivity of a subject school roof in Osaka, Japan, in which HR roofing sheets were installed on the roof from 2010. Additionally, monthly and annual thermal loads, including the cooling load and heating load of the top floor of the school, were calculated using the thermal load calculation software New HASP/ACLD-β. Comparing the calculated thermal loads of the school after HR roofing sheet installation to before, the annual thermal load decreased about 25 MJ/m2/year, and the cooling load decreased about 112 MJ/m2/year. However, the heating load increased about 87 MJ/m2/year in winter. To minimize the annual thermal load, thermal insulation of the roof was also considered to be used together with HR roofing sheets. Thermal load calculations showed that the combination of HR roofing sheets and thermal insulation can be effective in further reducing the annual thermal load.

  8. Improvement of the Sustainability of Existing School Buildings According to the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED® Protocol: A Case Study in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliano Dall'O'

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available School-age students spend much of their time in school buildings. The sustainability of these buildings should be a priority as better comfort with a high indoor air quality contributes to an improvement in the conditions for learning. Although new school buildings are often built with high standards of sustainability and energy efficiency, the existing school building stock is generally characterised by very poor quality. The energy retrofit of existing school buildings in recent years is part of the policies of the European Union and, consequently, of the Member States. However, rarely do these measures consider aspects other than energy. This paper proposes and discusses a feasibility study which provides a considerable improvement in the environmental quality of 14 school buildings located in northern Italy: the objective is to ensure the requirements for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED® certification. The analysis considers both the technical and economic aspects. The study shows that there is a technical feasibility: the credits are between 42 and 54, moreover the major cost (the cost of building envelope and heating systems retrofit is 82.9% of the total cost is due to the improvement of energy efficiency. The improvement of sustainability is therefore a reasonable strategy even if the application of the LEED Protocol in the Italian context involves some critical issues that are discussed in the paper.

  9. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauer, František; Lustig, František; Dvořák, Jiří; Ožvoldová, Miroslava

    2008-07-01

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system.

  10. An easy-to-build remote laboratory with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schauer, Frantisek; Ozvoldova, Miroslava [Trnava University, Faculty of Pedagogy, Department of Physics, Trnava (Slovakia); Lustig, Frantisek; Dvorak, JirI [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Department of Didactics of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: fschauer@ft.utb.cz

    2008-07-15

    The present state of information communication technology makes it possible to devise and run computer-based e-laboratories accessible to any user with a connection to the Internet, equipped with very simple technical means and making full use of web services. Thus, the way is open for a new strategy of physics education with strongly global features, based on experiment and experimentation. We name this strategy integrated e-learning, and remote experiments across the Internet are the foundation for this strategy. We present both pedagogical and technical reasoning for the remote experiments and outline a simple system based on a server-client approach, and on web services and Java applets. We give here an outline of the prospective remote laboratory system with data transfer using the Internet School Experimental System (ISES) as hardware and ISES WEB Control kit as software. This approach enables the simple construction of remote experiments without building any hardware and virtually no programming, using a paste and copy approach with typical prebuilt blocks such as a camera view, controls, graphs, displays, etc. We have set up and operate at present seven experiments, running round the clock, with more than 12 000 connections since 2005. The experiments are widely used in practical teaching of both university and secondary level physics. The recording of the detailed steps the experimentor takes during the measurement enables detailed study of the psychological aspects of running the experiments. The system is ready for a network of universities to start covering the basic set of physics experiments. In conclusion we summarize the results achieved and experiences of using remote experiments built on the ISES hardware system.

  11. Effective schools in inner-city communities : building self-efficacy in the Cristo Rey Schools (an interim report)

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This is an interim report of a study examining the effectiveness of the Cristo Rey Network of Schools. The schools in this network are effective in educating socio-economically disadvantaged students through a curriculum that incorporates a corporate internship program. The hypothesis of the study is : "the longer students stay at Cristo Rey Schools, the more their self-efficacy beliefs are increased, which leads them to pursue and persist in higher educational opportunities." This hypothesis...

  12. An intervention to promote physical activity in Mexican elementary school students: building public policy to prevent noncommunicable diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo-Oteyza, Ernestina; Ancira-Moreno, Mónica; Rosel-Pech, Cecilia; Sánchez-Mendoza, María Teresa; Salinas-Martínez, Vicente; Vadillo-Ortega, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is an important component of strategies for health promotion and prevention of noncommunicable diseases. It is also associated with decreased risk for cardiovascular disease in overweight and obese adults and children. This article addresses the initial description of a physical activity intervention for children attending public elementary schools in Mexico. The objective was to develop a replicable model based on a strategic public, private, academic, and social partnership that would have a short-term impact on the metabolic health of children and be useful for building effective public policy. Forty-nine schools (20 000 students) participated, and 5 schools were selected for evaluation. The intervention included a 30-minute supervised middle-effort interchangeable routine, 5 days a week for a complete school year, adapted for different school conditions and students of different ages. Evaluation included anthropometric measurements and biochemical markers. Actual prevalence of combined overweight and obesity in these children was 31.9%. The intervention was successfully implemented in all schools. No change in body mass index, waist circumference, or other anthropometric indicators was found. However, changes in biochemical markers showed a significant decrease in blood glucose, total cholesterol, and cholesterol-low-density lipoproteins, reflecting a positive effect on cardiovascular health indicators. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Twenty-first century skills for students: hands-on learning after school builds school and life success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Leide

    2006-01-01

    At the core of the movement for twenty-first century skills are students. The growing efforts to increase programs leveraging out-of-school time are focused on giving American youth everything they need to compete in this increasingly complex world. The author is one of many students who have been well served by initiatives imparting twenty-first century skills during after-school hours. Now a senior at Boston Latin School, the author has been helped along the way by Citizen Schools, an after-school education program focused on hands-on learning apprenticeships and homework help. While enrolled in the program as a middle school student, the author took part in projects that exemplified hands-on, inquiry-based learning that helped her develop twenty-first century skills. For example, along with dozens of other students, she advanced her data analysis skills by analyzing statistics about Boston Public high schools, which also helped her select and enroll in one of the city's premier exam schools. Also, she and her peers worked with corporate attorneys who served as writing coaches and whose expertise the author drew from in producing a published essay and greatly improving her writing skills. The author now finds that the public speaking, leadership, organizational, social, and management abilities she built through her participation in Citizen Schools are a great asset to her in high school. The confidence with which she tackles her responsibilities can also be traced back to her experiences in the program. As she looks toward college, the author reflects and realizes that being actively involved in a quality after-school program put her on track for a successful future.

  14. Talking Circles for Adolescent Girls in an Urban High School: A Restorative Practices Program for Building Friendships and Developing Emotional Literacy Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schumacher, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Restorative Practices (RP) in schools is a new and emerging field. Meeting in Circles to build friendships, develop emotional literacy skills, resolve conflict, or learn interactively are some of the core components of these programs...

  15. Strong One Lasting One: An Elementary School Principal's Ability to Establish a Positive School Culture by Building Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Goldy, III.

    2015-01-01

    Trust is a key element in improving learning and teaching. Reviewing research on the topic of establishing trust by school leaders illuminates actions needed to make a positive difference in the culture of a school. Using the concept of mindfulness, the instructional leader was able to regain the trust of the community, parents, faculty, and…

  16. Improving Low-Achieving Schools: Building State Capacity to Support School Improvement through Race to the Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, Joshua; Russell, Jennifer Lin

    2017-01-01

    Improving low-achieving schools is a critical challenge facing urban education. Recent national policy shifts have pressed states to take an expanded role in school improvement efforts. In 2009, a federal grant competition called Race to the Top (RttT) compelled states to improve their capacity to implement ambitious education reform agendas.…

  17. The Changing Roles of Science Specialists during a Capacity Building Program for Primary School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Sandra; Xu, Lihua; Kelly, Leissa

    2017-01-01

    Science education starts at primary school. Yet, recent research shows primary school teachers lack confidence and competence in teaching science (Prinsley & Johnston, 2015). A Victorian state government science specialist initiative responded to this concern by providing professional learning programs to schools across Victoria. Drawing on…

  18. Building Local Infrastructure for Coordinated School Health Programs: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Ann D.; Coburn, Sheri; Knickelbein, Ann

    2009-01-01

    Coordinated school health programs (CSHPs) provide an organizational framework for school health practice by combining health education, health promotion, disease prevention, and access to health services in an integrated, systemic manner. This project examined the effects of a regional 2-year training program to increase local school districts'…

  19. Co-Operative Schools: Building Communities in the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodin, Tom

    2012-01-01

    The recent progress of "co-operative schools" both confirms and disrupts many assumptions surrounding contemporary compulsory schooling. The term itself refers to an eclectic array of schools, both primary and secondary, of which there were, by June 2012, almost 300 in England that have adopted co-operative values, in terms of…

  20. Building Academic Resilience in Low-Performing Black Male Students: Understanding School Leader Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Tiffany T.

    2017-01-01

    There has been limited research on the process through which school leaders can implement school policies that contribute to the development of academic resilience in low-performing Black male students to aid them in navigating their educational experience. The purpose of this intrinsic case study was to understand how school leaders navigate…

  1. Building a School Leadership Programme: An American Paradox of Autonomy and Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Guerra, Daniel; Russo, Marianne R.; Bogotch, Ira E.; Vásquez-Colina, Maria D.

    2014-01-01

    School districts within the USA face ever-decreasing autonomy in rendering decisions regarding instruction, curriculum and the leading and managing of schools at the local level due to the ever-increasing accountability measures implemented by district, state and federal governments. This study investigates a joint university-school district…

  2. Building a method for researching attribution of meaning by children aged 5 to 6 in school.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tertoolen, A.; van Oers, B.; Geldens, J.; Popeijus, H.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on the first phase of a research project in which we looked for the voices of young children, aged 5 to 6, in school. What do children experience in school? What do they see as the meaning of school? What is their motivation? Children have the right to be listened to. The

  3. Capacity building by data team members to sustain schools' data use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hubers, Mireille Desirée

    2016-01-01

    Data-based decision making in education has been emphasized globally in recent years. To support schools in their use of data, the data team procedure was implemented in Dutch secondary schools. A data team consists of six to eight educators at the same school. Collaboratively, they learn how to use

  4. High school students' science academic achievement: The effect of the Lemov positive framing trust-building technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliette, Linda Marie

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effect of a trust-building technique called "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) on the level of student-teacher trust and students' science academic achievement. The existing literature was reviewed under the constructs of trust, types of trust, trust-building strategies, and student academic achievement. The identified problem is a lack of research into the effect of trust from the high school student perspective and the effect of trust on student academic achievement in science. In addition, there is no empirical evidence to support the effectiveness of the "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention. The study involved a volunteer, convenience sample of 9th-grade science students at one high school in Northern California (N=240). The study employed a quasi-experimental, pretest, posttest non-equivalent control group design to examine the level of student trust in the teacher, using the "Student trust in faculty scale" (Forsyth, Adams, & Hoy, 2011, p. 180), and the students' academic achievement, according to the Integrated Process Skills Test II (Okey, Wise, & Burns, 1982). The independent variable was the "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention; the two dependent variables were the level of student-teacher trust and student academic achievement. The composite data from the "Student trust in faculty scale" and the academic achievement test were evaluated by a multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA). Results of this study indicated that the null hypothesis was accepted. The "positive-framing" (Lemov, 2010, p. 204) trust-building intervention did not have a significant effect on either the student-teacher trust level or academic achievement in science.

  5. Energy efficient school buildings in central-western Argentina: an assessment of alternative typologies for the classroom tier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Rosa, C.; Basso, M.; Fernandez, J.C. [Laboratorio de Ambiente Humano y Vivienda, Mendoza (AR)] [and others

    2000-07-01

    Four energy-efficient demonstration school buildings were built in the western province of Mendoza, Argentina, in 1999, as part of a massive building program required to implement the new Federal Education Plan. The buildings should make medium use of bioclimatic strategies and daylighting. The aspects of typology of the classroom tiers became immediately apparent as one of the main conditioners of the overall scheme. Three different alternative schemes were designed and built. A deeper analysis of these and other possible alternatives were thought essential for future constructions of the type. Four typologies of the classroom tier, using the same, locally available technology, are being comparatively assessed in the aspects of energy efficiently, thermal and luminous comfort, construction and operation costs and environmental impact (LCA). The paper presents the provisional results of the two first items only: energy efficiency and thermal comfort. While all four schemes evaluated are believed to be ''workable'', differences will tend to favour some the other according to context situations. Volumetric Loss Coeff. range from 1.09 to 1.24 W/Km{sup 3}. Solar savings fractions for the school operation hours vary between: 82.83 and 91.58%. Work is being continued to cover all the analysis items in a combined way. (author)

  6. Voluntary After-School Alcohol and Drug Programs for Middle School Youth : If You Build It Right, They Will Come.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Elizabeth J; Green, Harold D; Miles, Jeremy N V; Zhou, Annie J; Tucker, Joan S; Shih, Regina A

    2012-09-01

    Few after-school programs target alcohol and other drug (AOD) use because it is difficult to encourage a diverse group of youth to voluntarily attend. The current study describes attendance at a voluntary after-school program called CHOICE, which targeted AOD use among middle school students. Over 4,000 students across eight schools completed surveys and 15% participated in CHOICE. Analyses indicated that there were some differences between CHOICE participants and non-participants. For example, African American and multiethnic students were more likely to attend. Past month alcohol users were more likely to initially attend, and marijuana users were more likely to continue attendance. Thus, CHOICE reached students of different racial/ethnic groups and attracted higher risk youth who may not typically obtain prevention services.

  7. Energy renovation of school building from the 1970'ies; Energirenovering af typeskolebygning fra 1970'erne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tommerup, H.

    2010-08-15

    The project has aimed to develop methods and examples related to the design of energy extensive renovations (low energy class 1), thereby stimulating energy conservation and increased use of renewable energy in existing buildings. This report is based on analysis of a specific type of school building from the 1970s on how it is technically and economically feasible to implement an extensive energy renovation. The survey shows that no single approach is able to bring the building's energy consumption down to BR08 (building code 2008) level. The study also shows that to achieve the BR08's low energy class one level, it is necessary to use a solar heating system. Economic calculations show that 12 out of 15 proposed energy-saving measures are economically viable. With longer lifetimes than specified in BR08 largely all actions are profitable. This profitability of most of the actions depends on some of the investment being considered as general maintenance or as a measure that also improves comfort and indoor climate. (ln)

  8. Energy-oriented modernisation of a school building at Stuttgart-Plieningen; Energiegerechte Sanierung eines Schulgebaeudes in Stuttgart-Plieningen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kienzlen, V. [Stadt Stuttgart (Germany). Amt fuer Umweltschutz; Erhorn, H. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Bauphysik, Stuttgart (Germany); Biegert, B. [Inst. fuer Kernenergie und Energiesysteme, Lehrstuhl fuer Heiz- und Raumlufttechnik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A typical school building serves to exemplify the opportunities connected with the modernization of the shell of a building and its technical equipment. By means of simultaneous, integrated planning and execution steps, positive interactions are to be obtained. The target set is to maximize energy conservation while optimizing overall economy. The following individual concepts are dealt with in detail: thermal protection, lighting, heating system, control of space heating. (MSK) [Deutsch] An einem typischen Schulgebaeude wird gezeigt, welche Moeglichkeiten eine Sanierung von Gebaeudehuelle und Anlagentechnik bietet. Durch zeitgleiche, integrierte Planung und Durchfuehrung der Sanierungsmassnahmen sollen positive Wechselwirkungen genutzt werden. Es wird die maximal moegliche Energieeinsparung bei optimierter Gesamtwirtschaftlichkeit angestrebt. Im Einzelnen werden die Konzeptionen fuer den Waermeschutz, fuer die Beleuchtung, fuer die Heizungsanlage sowie fuer die Regelung der Raumbeheizung naaeher erlaeutert.

  9. Building thermal loads: A case study for David Hellen Petta public secondary school

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kumirai, T

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This chapter assesses the impact of appropriate passive interventions on building thermal loads. The passive interventions investigated are ceiling insulation, wall insulation, attic ventilation, natural ventilation and roof absorptance and also...

  10. Inclusion of 'Green' Principles in the Design of Pre-School Buildings

    OpenAIRE

    Kostic, Aleksandra; Stankovic, Danica; Tanic, Milan

    2017-01-01

    The environmental influence of building fund is colossal. Traditional buildings exploit excessive amount of energy, water, land, and raw materials for construction and utilization. This conscienceless attitude towards the resources eventually causes the disruption of the natural balance, which brought into question the survival of human civilization. Current situation has triggered a huge response in the global community, woke her environmental awareness and prompted the man to turn around an...

  11. Development of Effective Teacher Program: Teamwork Building Program for Thailand's Municipal Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantathai, Pimpka; Tesaputa, Kowat; Somprach, Kanokorn

    2015-01-01

    This research is aimed to formulate the effective teacher teamwork program in municipal schools in Thailand. Primary survey on current situation and problem was conducted to develop the plan to suggest potential programs. Samples were randomly selected from municipal schools by using multi-stage sampling method in order to investigate their…

  12. Systemic Approach to Building 21st Century Schools: Experiences in the Aloha State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingler, Steven B.; Kaneko, William M.; Oshima, Alan M.

    2011-01-01

    School districts throughout the country are suffering from aging schools, repair and maintenance backlogs, and budget short-falls. The result is insufficient government resources to ensure that students are provided adequate classrooms and facilities to enhance learning and student achievement. In Hawaii, the repair and maintenance backlog for…

  13. Fulfilling the Compact: Building a Breakthrough, Results-Driven Public Charter School Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ableidinger, Joe; Steiner, Lucy; Spong, Angie; Hassel, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    In 2005, the Task Force on Charter School Quality and Accountability issued "Renewing the Compact," a position statement for the charter school sector that presented recommendations for achieving the goals of growth and quality. This report evaluates the sector's progress on those goals and recommends bold actions to capitalize on its…

  14. Building a Lattice for School Leadership: Lessons from England. Policy Brief #15-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supovitz, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The flat structure of American schools is ill-suited to meet today's increasing demands for educational improvement. Even with unprecedented pressure to raise performance, America's schools are still largely organized the way they were a century ago--with a single principal presiding over a largely egg-crated faculty. Is such a thin veneer of…

  15. Building Turnaround Capacity for Urban School Improvement: The Role of Adaptive Leadership and Defined Autonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Jill K.

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation examines the levels of and relationships between technical leadership, adaptive leadership, and defined autonomy among Denver school leaders along with their combined effects on school growth gains over time. Thirty principals provided complete responses to an online survey that included existing scales for technical leadership,…

  16. Opening Doors for Bilingual Students: Recommendations for Building Linguistically Responsive Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, Amy J.; Coleman, Elizabeth; Ferrell, Elizabeth; Kersemeier, Craig

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we outline the necessary action steps for schools to improve the achievement of bilingual students. We review, summarize, and utilize the pertinent scholarly literature to make suggestions for school-wide, collaborative efforts to support the achievement of bilingual learners through linguistically responsive pedagogy and…

  17. Teacher Leadership Capacity-Building: Developing Democratically Accountable Leaders in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Carol A.; Jones, Rahim J.

    2008-01-01

    Using a qualitative case study approach, the authors explore social justice implications of inservice principals' practices that affect attitudes and empower teachers. If a primary educational goal of progressive schooling is to create and sustain more democratic schools by enabling the growth of teachers as leaders who are responsible for their…

  18. Strengthening Partnerships and Building Public Will for Out-of-School Time Programs. Strategy Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgette, Heather Clapp; Deich, Sharon; Russell, Lane

    2010-01-01

    When the bell rings at the end of a school day, millions of children are left to their own devices while they wait for their families to return home at the end of the work day. Findings from a study conducted by the Afterschool Alliance, "America After 3PM," show that 15.1 million children are unsupervised when the school day ends. The…

  19. Focusing on Mental Health, Not Metal Detectors: Three Building Blocks of Safe and Effective Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Richard; Kline, Sue Ann; Barnhill, Gena; Griswold, Deborah

    2000-01-01

    Many measures schools are implementing in response to recent violence will protect students but do little to address the complex social interactions that support violence. This article describes an approach that includes five research-based steps for creating safe and effective schools. This approach contains ways to help the learning environment,…

  20. Promoting Family and School Success for Children with ADHD: Strengthening Relationships while Building Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautone, Jennifer A.; Lefler, Elizabeth K.; Power, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Children with ADHD typically experience significant impairment at home and school, and their relationships with parents, teachers, and peers often are strained. Psychosocial interventions for ADHD generally focus on behavior change in one environment at a time (i.e., either home or school); however, unisystemic interventions generally are not…

  1. Learning to Plan for and Implement Change: School Building Faculty Responds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andringa, Jane W.; Fustin, Michael

    1991-01-01

    Describes how elementary teachers identified school climate as a major concern and planned collaboratively for change. Using a change process model, teachers identified school-climate indicators that were used to develop a discrepancy measurement instrument. Using a consensus decision-making process, the teachers produced objectives and…

  2. Leadership Coaching: Building the Capacity of Urban Principals in Underperforming Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Susan R.; Kelsen, Virginia E.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation assesses the effects of leadership coaching on the knowledge, skills, and dispositions of urban public school administrators in P-12 underperforming schools. The study specifically examines leadership, management, and student achievement growth during the time of coaching. Utilizing a mixed-methods approach, three domains were…

  3. Building Background Knowledge for Academic Achievement: Research on What Works in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzano, Robert J.

    2004-01-01

    Everyone knows that students from disadvantaged backgrounds, who are not well prepared for school, have the toughest time making the grade. But what hasn't been so clear is what schools can do about it ... until now. Here at last is a book that spells out how to overcome the deficiencies that hamper the achievement of so many students. Learn why…

  4. Access to Equal Opportunities: Building of a Virtual Classroom within Two 'Conventional' Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husu, Jukka

    2000-01-01

    This Finnish study linked two secondary school classrooms to one virtual classroom to enhance the quality of education in small schools. Discusses advantages, including the rapid development of pragmatism and intellectual and social partnership; and disadvantages, including a lack of intimacy and students' difficulties with self discipline and…

  5. Electricity consumption in school buildings - benchmark and web tools; Elforbrug i skoler - benchmark og webvaerktoej

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this project has been to produce benchmarks for electricity consumption in Danish schools in order to encourage electricity conservation. An internet programme has been developed with the aim of facilitating schools' access to benchmarks and to evaluate energy consumption. The overall purpose is to create increased attention to the electricity consumption of each separate school by publishing benchmarks which take the schools' age and number of pupils as well as after school activities into account. Benchmarks can be used to make green accounts and work as markers in e.g. energy conservation campaigns, energy management and for educational purposes. The internet tool can be found on www.energiguiden.dk. (BA)

  6. Building-related health symptoms and classroom indoor air quality: a survey of school teachers in New York State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielb, C; Lin, S; Muscatiello, N; Hord, W; Rogers-Harrington, J; Healy, J

    2015-08-01

    Most previous research on indoor environments and health has studied school children or occupants in non-school settings. This investigation assessed building-related health symptoms and classroom characteristics via telephone survey of New York State school teachers. Participants were asked about 14 building-related symptoms and 23 classroom characteristics potentially related to poor indoor air quality (IAQ). Poisson regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between these symptoms and each classroom characteristic, controlling for potential confounders. About 500 teachers completed the survey. The most frequently reported classroom characteristics included open shelving (70.7%), food eaten in class (65.5%), dust (59.1%), and carpeting (46.9%). The most commonly reported symptoms included sinus problems (16.8%), headache (15.0%), allergies/congestion (14.8%), and throat irritation (14.6%). Experiencing one or more symptoms was associated most strongly with reported dust (relative risk (RR) = 3.67; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.62-5.13), dust reservoirs (RR = 2.13; 95% CI: 1.72-2.65), paint odors (RR = 1.73; 95% CI: 1.40-2.13), mold (RR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.39-2.11), and moldy odors (RR = 1.65 95% CI: 1.30-2.10). Stronger associations were found with increasing numbers of reported IAQ-related classroom characteristics. Similar results were found with having any building-related allergic/respiratory symptom. This research adds to the body of evidence underscoring the importance to occupant health of school IAQ. Teachers play an important role in educating children, and teacher well-being is important to this role. Health symptoms among New York teachers while at work are common and appear to be associated with numerous characteristics related to poor classroom IAQ. Improving school Indoor Air Quality may reduce sickness and absenteeism and improve teacher performance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Role of School Community Partnerships in Building Successful Transition Pathways for Young People: One School's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadbent, Robyn; Cacciattolo, Marcelle

    2013-01-01

    Western governments around the globe have become increasingly focused on the successful transition of young people from school to further education and/or training. It could be suggested that for many countries this is the key focus of their youth policies. Nevertheless, the divide between those young people who manage to successfully transition…

  8. RELEVANCE OF TEACHING VOICES BUILDING ON ETHICS CONVIVIALITY IN SCHOOL AS A SPACE FOR INTERCULTURAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belem Diosdado-Ramos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the progress of ongoing research we do for the Master of Education for Peace and Coexistence of Indigenous Autonomous University of Mexico School. Which has as its central thesis conviviality at school is built through an ethical and dialogical relationship between individual subjects who interact in high school as a space of multiculturalism. Interest in relationships and structures emanating from horizontality and the community is exposed. Additional argues the relevance of the documentation of the voices emanating from these practices to raise a profound reflection on the educational processes towards the formation of a different regulation stipulated by the curricular speech or educational organization.

  9. Building Resilience After School for Early Adolescents in Urban Poverty: Open Trial of Leaders @ Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Stacy L; Dinizulu, Sonya Mathies; Rusch, Dana; Boustani, Maya M; Mehta, Tara G; Reitz, Kristin

    2015-11-01

    Leaders @ Play is a park after-school program for urban middle school youth designed to leverage recreational activities for social emotional learning. Mental health and park staff co-facilitated sports and games to teach and practice problem solving, emotion regulation, and effective communication. Additional practice occurred during multi-family groups and summer internships as junior camp counselors. We examined feasibility and promise via an open trial (n = 3 parks, 46 youth, 100 % African American, 100 % low-income, 59 % female, M = 13.09 years old). Improvements in social skills and reductions in problem behaviors lend support to after school programs as a space for mental health promotion.

  10. The Geohazard Safety Classification: how resilience could play a role in the geo-hydrological hazards assessment of school buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, Veronica; Morelli, Stefano; Casagli, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    The impacts of adverse events related to geological hazards are unevenly distributed among communities and groups of individuals concentrated in restricted workplaces. Their consequent safety level is the result of differential exposures to these events and of diversified levels of preparation to them. Nowadays, the exposure and coping ability as co-determinants of people's safety are of particular interest for institutions managing the schools systems. According to the disaster risk reduction experts, the geo-hydrological processes can be mitigated with knowledge and planning, physical and environmental protection measures, and response preparedness. UNISDR is promoting a global culture of safety and resilience through the integration of disaster risk reduction in school curricula. The Comprehensive School Safety (CSS) framework is intended to advance the goals of the Worldwide Initiative for Safe Schools and the Global Alliance for Disaster Risk Reduction and Resilience in the Education Sector, and to promote school safety as a priority area of post-2015 frameworks for sustainable development, risk reduction and resilience. In Italy, according the latest ministerial survey (June 2010), there are 41,902 school buildings. Their alarming condition in terms of safety for their daily occupants is reflected by 39 fatalities ascribable to structural failures in the last 21 years. In 95% of these cases victims are a sad tribute due to natural phenomena. A rigorous evaluation of the total risk of a school building, as defined by the well known risk equation (R=HxVxE), would require a complete probability density function describing the exposure to specific types of events of all the pupils and personnel in the school. In addition, the probability that the inhabitants are present in the school during an event should be estimated depending on the time of day, day of week, or month of the year, as well as on local holiday schedules. The inclusion of resilience as a component

  11. Build a Creative Leadership Team: Take a Unified Approach to Fostering Arts Education in Your School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Becoming a champion of arts education means establishing a culture that embraces a team approach toward integrating the arts. This article offers some practical guidance for developing a creative leadership team--and cultivating creativity in the whole school.

  12. DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. PROCEEDINGS, ASSOCIATION OF SCHOOL BUSINESS OFFICIALS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA, ANNUAL MEETING AND EDUCATIONAL EXHIBIT, (50TH SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, OCTOBER 71-22, 1964).

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIEBESKIND, MORRIS

    PROBLEMS IN THE SCHEDULING AND COMPLETION OF SCHOOL BUILDING DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS ARE DISCUSSED WITH REFERENCE TO THE CRITICAL PATH METHOD OF PROGRAMING. THE DISCUSSION GIVES A BROAD OVERVIEW OF THE METHOD WITH DETAILED SUGGESTIONS FOR SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS. SPECIFIC SUBJECT AREAS INCLUDE--(1) CPM, A NEW MANAGEMENT TOOL, (2) CPM…

  13. Rediscovering Hope: Building School Cultures of Hope for Children of Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Kevin; Rall, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A chronicle of the success of a small Catholic school on Long Island, N.Y. in overcoming poverty, race, and language for the 65 male students it has served in grades 5-8 for eight years. The authors posit that the secret of the school's success resides in creating goals, agency and pathways for success in its students, creating a climate of hope…

  14. Describe the documents – Building the inventory – preserve the material culture of the school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Menezes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to present the construction of the inventory of documents from the historical archives of the old Campinas normal school, which conjugated the efforts of a research team from the State University of Campinas, Unicamp, within the framework of the project “Preservation of Historical Institutional Patrimony: State School Carlos Gomes” subsidized by the Foundation of Support to Research from the state of Sao Paulo, Fapesp, and with printed publication supported by Faepex/Unicamp.

  15. The Regionally-Oriented National Schools, an Innovative Tool for National and Regional Security Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    such as Niger with uranium and Gabon with oil, had actually efficient means of pressure over the former colonial power. Therefore, considering the...specific 23 Mathieu Kerekou, Benin; Moussa Traoré, Mali; André Kolingba, Central African Republic; Seyni Kountché, Niger ; Zerbo Saye, Burkina Faso...Paramedic Personnel School of Niamey, Niger . 53 Army Medical Corps School of Lomé, Togo. 54 Survey. 28 3.4 The assessment of the needs has

  16. A longitudinal study of sick building syndrome among pupils in relation to microbial components in dust in schools in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xin, E-mail: xinzhang0051@sxu.edu.cn [Research Center for Environmental Science and Engineering, Shanxi University, 030006 Taiyuan (China); Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University and University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala (Sweden); Zhao, Zhuohui [Department of Environmental Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety, Ministry of Education, Fudan University, 030002 Shanghai (China); Nordquist, Tobias [Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University and University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala (Sweden); Larsson, Lennart; Sebastian, Aleksandra [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Medial Microbiology, University of Lund, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Norback, Dan [Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University and University Hospital, 75185 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    There are few longitudinal studies on sick building syndrome (SBS), which include ocular, nasal, throat, and dermal symptoms, headache, and fatigue. We studied the associations between selected microbial components, fungal DNA, furry pet allergens, and incidence and remission of SBS symptoms in schools in Taiyuan, China. The study was based on a two-year prospective analysis in pupils (N = 1143) in a random sample of schools in China. Settled dust in the classrooms was collected by vacuum cleaning and analyzed for lipopolysaccharide (LPS), muramic acid (MuA), and ergosterol (Erg). Airborne dust was collected in Petri dishes and analyzed for cat and dog allergens and fungal DNA. The relationship between the concentration of allergens and microbial compounds and new onset of SBS was analyzed by multi-level logistic regression. The prevalence of mucosal and general symptoms was 33% and 28%, respectively, at baseline, and increased during follow-up. At baseline, 27% reported at least one symptom that improved when away from school (school-related symptoms). New onset of mucosal symptoms was negatively associated with concentration of MuA, total LPS, and shorter lengths of 3-hydroxy fatty acids from LPS, C14, C16, and C18. Onset of general symptoms was negatively associated with C18 LPS. Onset of school-related symptoms was negatively associated with C16 LPS, but positively associated with total fungal DNA. In general, bacterial compounds (LPS and MuA) seem to protect against the development of mucosal and general symptoms, but fungal exposure measured as fungal DNA could increase the incidence of school-related symptoms. - Highlights: {yields} SBS symptoms increased during the two-year follow-up period in school children in Taiyuan, China {yields} We studied the associations between selected microbial components and incidence and remission of SBS symptoms. {yields} Bacterial compounds (LPS and MuA) seem to protect against the development of mucosal and general symptoms

  17. Microbial secondary metabolites in school buildings inspected for moisture damage in Finland, The Netherlands and Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peitzsch, M.; Sulyok, M.; Täubel, M.; Vishwanath, V.; Krop, E.J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/30482383X; Borràs-Santos, A.; Hyvärinen, A.; Nevalainen, A.; Krska, R.; Larsson, L.

    2012-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by fungi and bacteria are among the potential agents that contribute to adverse health effects observed in occupants of buildings affected by moisture damage, dampness and associated microbial growth. However, few attempts have been made to assess the occurrence of

  18. Asbestos-Containing Materials in School Buildings: A Guidance Document. Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Robert N.; Spooner, Charles M.

    Part 2 of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidance manuals consists of more detailed information on asbestos identification and control methods. Available information on sprayed asbestos-containing materials in buildings is summarized. Guidelines are presented for the detection and monitoring, removal or encapsulation, and disposal of…

  19. Peace Education in Secondary Schools: A Strategic Tool for Peace Building and Peace Culture in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubogu, Rowell

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses Peace Education as Strategic Tool for Peace Building and Peace Culture in Nigeria. This was prompted by the inherent incompatibility between the objectives of individuals, ethnic/social groups in Nigeria. The research question addresses Normative and Ethical issues regarding peace, the absence of violence/hostility and its…

  20. Instructional Strategies Designed to Develop Trust and Team Building Skills in School Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Virgil

    2006-01-01

    This paper will provide readers with insight into "Team Building and Decision-Making" curriculum methods and strategies utilized in leadership for our administrators. The content is based on "The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable" by Lencioni (2002). The writer is working on developing a unique cascade of…

  1. Value of Coaching in Building Leadership Capacity of Principals in Urban Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farver, Anita R.; Holt, Carleton R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to understand how coaching support structures enabled and sustained leadership practices of urban principals. The study investigated how the intervention of coaching for academic leaders can serve as evidence-based professional development for building leadership capacity. The central focus was on…

  2. Collaboration and Community Building in Summer Undergraduate Research Programs in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevle, R. J.; Watson Nelson, T.; Harris, J. M.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    In 2012, the School of Earth Sciences (SES) at Stanford University sponsored two summer undergraduate research programs. Here we describe these programs and efforts to build a cohesive research cohort among the programs' diverse participants. The two programs, the Stanford School of Earth Sciences Undergraduate Research (SESUR) Program and Stanford School of Earth Sciences Summer Undergraduate Research in Geoscience and Engineering (SURGE) Program, serve different undergraduate populations and have somewhat different objectives, but both provide students with opportunities to work on strongly mentored yet individualized research projects. In addition to research, enrichment activities co-sponsored by both programs support the development of community within the combined SES summer undergraduate research cohort. Over the course of 6 to 9 months, the SESUR Program engages Stanford undergraduates, primarily rising sophomores and juniors, with opportunities to deeply explore Earth sciences research while learning about diverse areas of inquiry within SES. Now in its eleventh year, the SESUR experience incorporates the breadth of the scientific endeavor: finding an advisor, proposal writing, obtaining funding, conducting research, and presenting results. Goals of the SESUR program include (1) providing a challenging and rewarding research experience for undergraduates who wish to explore the Earth sciences; (2) fostering interdisciplinary study in the Earth sciences among the undergraduate population; and (3) encouraging students to major or minor in the Earth sciences and/or to complete advanced undergraduate research in one of the departments or programs within SES. The SURGE Program, now in its second year, draws high performing students, primarily rising juniors and seniors, from 14 colleges and universities nationwide, including Stanford. Seventy percent of SURGE students are from racial/ethnic backgrounds underrepresented in STEM fields, and approximately one

  3. Social Foundations in Exile: How Dare the School Build a New Social Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotts, Brian W.

    2015-01-01

    The idea of breaking free from outdated ideas and practices is nothing new. It is an idea advocated by individuals like Aristotle, Thomas Paine, and Thomas Jefferson. In 1935 Dewey asserted that he viewed education and schooling as the ideal setting for democracy's gestation. He believed that a democratic way of life could best be achieved by…

  4. There Is Another Way: Building a New Vision for Schools from the Bottom Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Alasdair; Reilly, Jemima; Worsley, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The last twenty years have seen continual change in the education system, much of which has been poorly planned, ideologically driven, lacking in coherence and without an evidence base. The key aspects of accountability, school governance and structure, curriculum and assessment and teacher training and development are critiqued (reviewed) from…

  5. Schools Reading Parents' Worlds: Mexican Immigrant Mothers Building Family Literacy Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miano, Alice A.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to make visible many ways in which a group of parents of marginalized status participate in their children's schooling and to reveal something of the societal machinery that can render invisible many admirable parental efforts. Adapting somewhat the analysis of Graue et al. (2001), the author outlines strands within the…

  6. The Successful High School Writing Center: Building the Best Program with Your Students. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Dawn, Ed.; Wells, Jennifer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book highlights the work of talented writing center teachers who share practices and lessons learned from today's most important high school writing centers. The authors offer innovative methods for secondary educators who deal with adolescent literacy, English language learners, new literacies, embedded professional development, and…

  7. Community building of (student) teachers and a teacher educator in a school-university partnership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandyck, I.J.J.; van Graaff, R.; Pilot, A.; Beishuizen, J.J.

    2012-01-01

    School-university partnerships (SUPs) are considered a way of improving teacher education. For the successful implementation of such partnerships, cooperation between the different stakeholders is of crucial importance. Therefore, most partnerships are organised in short- and long-term teams, which

  8. Community Capacity-Building in Schools: Parents' and Teachers' Reflections from an Eating Disorder Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell-Mayhew, Shelly; Arthur, Nancy; Ewashen, Carol

    2008-01-01

    A pilot research study to examine the effect of a wellness-based intervention on improving students' body image, personal attitudes, and eating behaviors highlighted the importance of a healthy school environment. Parent and teacher focus groups were conducted to explore the perceived influences of wellness-based interventions designed for…

  9. Building Self-Discipline to Promote Learning: Students' Volitional Strategies to Navigate the Demands of Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstad, Eyvind

    2008-01-01

    Volitional issues are important in today's classrooms where autonomous students are expected to manage school demands on their own. A new kind of challenge has appeared with the advent of free Internet access in the classroom. Motivational conflicts may therefore arise between (1) immediate rewards of electronic chatting, surfing, and games and…

  10. How To Manage Asbestos in School Buildings: AHERA Designated Person's Self-Study Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Seattle, WA.

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires schools to appoint an asbestos management coordinator called the "AHERA (Asbestos Hazardous Emergency Response Act) designated person" (DP) who is responsible for a number of asbestos-related activities. This manual presents some recommendations designed to help those persons appointed…

  11. Building Peace Poles: Inexpensive Woodworking Project Great for Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roccanova, John

    2013-01-01

    The World Peace Prayer Society (WPPS) has at its core the message: "May peace prevail on Earth." This axiom appears on the roughly 200,000 Peace Poles that are planted at private residences, schools, in parks, and at other public places worldwide including at the Pentagon, the Pyramids in Egypt, and on Mt. Kilimanjaro, the highest free-standing…

  12. Building an Understanding of the Role of Media Literacy for Latino/a High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boske, Christa; McCormack, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Popular media is a social phenomenon, especially for young audiences. This qualitative study examined how eleven Latino/a high school students and a Latino teacher understood the impact of media messages in an animated children's film. Findings suggest participants identified negative cultural messages embedded throughout the film regarding…

  13. Building Bridges between Knowledge and Practice: A University-School District Leadership Preparation Program Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzo, Karen L.; Myran, Steve; Clayton, Jennifer K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a Year 1 account of a partnership between a university and rural school district focusing specifically on how the project has helped to bridge the theory to practice divide and strengthen university-district ties. Design/methodology/approach: A design-based research paradigm was utilized to…

  14. Build Bridge Believe: Houston Independent School District 2012-2013 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston Independent School District, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This report provides standard facts and figures about the Houston Independent School District's (HISD) finances, student populations, achievements, and more. HISD has humanized that data, as well, with vignettes and profiles that typify the remarkable programs and individuals in the district. One of the three drivers to achieve the vision of…

  15. Building Healthier Children through Family-Style Service in School Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coborn, Jamie E.; Marquart, Len; Burgess-Champoux, Teri L.; Rosen, Renee A.

    2015-01-01

    Schools are recognized as ideal environments to promote and enhance the health of children. Previous research has shown a positive association exists between increased prevalence of family-style meals and children's health. Use of family-style service provides opportunities to improve children's overall health and well-being through increased…

  16. Bridging the Gap between Research and Practice: A Framework for Building Research Agendas in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.; Eckert, Tanya L.; Kelleher, Constance

    2005-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the history behind efforts to transfer school psychology research into practice and review the literature pertaining to treatment acceptability, participatory action research, organizational change, and generalization programming. We then present a model for the systematic programming of this transfer and propose a…

  17. Factors Affecting Pupils' Noise Annoyance in Schools: The Building and Testing of Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boman, Eva; Enmarker, Ingela

    2004-01-01

    This article reports two studies intended to develop and assess conceptual models of how different factors mediate and moderate the annoyance reaction in school environments. In the first, a survey of 207 pupils was conducted where assumptions about mediators and moderators were formulated and tested. In the best model, general sensitivity and…

  18. Bringing It to the Teachers: Building a Professional Network among Teachers in Isolated Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Fiona M.; Dixon, Roselyn M.; Verenikina, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Teachers in isolated schools are often under-resourced and overwhelmed with additional pressures. Teaching in an isolated community can sometimes challenge teachers' skills and knowledge, particularly when additional pressures such as behavioural issues associated with students with Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) like behaviours are present.…

  19. Building Leadership Skills in Middle School Girls through Interscholastic Athletics. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Lawrence; Gary, Juneau Mahan; Duhamel, Christie Creney; Homefield, Kimberly

    For the middle school-aged female athlete, self-esteem, empowerment, and self-confidence are often bolstered through participation in interscholastic competitive sports. These traits are also traits of leadership. This digest discusses how many contributing factors and people mold the student athlete into a leader but the process must be…

  20. A Step in the Right Direction: Learning Walks Build a Bridge between Central Office and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deane-Williams, Barbara; Nelms, Shaun; Robinson, Sheila B.

    2015-01-01

    What does an effective classroom look and sound like? What does it mean to have students engaged in learning? What is high-quality instruction? To answer these questions, the Greece Central School District in New York created a common language around teaching and learning as a way to support student achievement. The district developed a five-year…

  1. Computer Science Lesson Study: Building Computing Skills among Elementary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Thomas R.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of diversity in the technology workforce in the United States has proven to be a stubborn problem, resisting even the most well-funded reform efforts. With the absence of computer science education in the mainstream K-12 curriculum, only a narrow band of students in public schools go on to careers in technology. The problem persists…

  2. School-University-Community Collaboration: Building Bridges at the Water's Edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillon, Gwendolyn Thompson

    2017-01-01

    Students learn best when their out-of-school literacy experiences are incorporated into daily classroom instruction. Teachers who participate in community-based initiatives, develop relationships and acquire knowledge and skills needed for this type of instructional practice. They get to know students, families, and community cultural brokers who…

  3. The Continuity Framework: A Tool for Building Home, School, and Community Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. Glyn; Amwake, Carolynn; Speth, Tim; Scott-Little, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    In the face of today's challenging social and family issues, many new efforts are underway to help children and families. One solution that many communities have adopted is the establishment of a collaborative partnership that involves all the relevant partners--home, school, and community--in the planning and monitoring of services for children.…

  4. Parents as Collaborators: Building Partnerships with School- and Community-Based Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    deFur, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Parental involvement and parent-school-community partnerships receive wide acclaim for making a positive difference in the educational and transition outcomes for youth with and without disabilities. Although the impact of parental involvement in education remains undisputed, secondary education traditionally emphasizes the emerging adult…

  5. Dampness, food habits, and sick building syndrome symptoms in elementary school pupils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Yasuaki; Nakagi, Yoshihiko; Ito, Toshihiro; Sugioka, Yoshihiko; Endo, Hitoshi; Yoshida, Takahiko

    2010-09-01

    We investigated dampness/mold in schools and dwellings, and food habits and subjective symptoms in elementary school pupils, in order to clarify the effect of dampness and food habits on subjective symptoms in elementary school pupils. Questionnaires were used to investigate dampness in classrooms and dwellings in Hokkaido, Japan, and its effect on subjective symptoms in 1,077 pupils in 8 elementary schools. We used a dampness index for both the home and classroom; the index was the sum of the presence of four dampness indicators: (1) visible mold, (2) moldy odor, (3) water leakage, and (4) condensation on windowpanes. The questionnaire also contained queries about food habits, as follows: the frequency of eating breakfast, whether the energy provided by the school lunch was sufficient, and whether eating too many snacks and/or sweets were consumed. Adjusted logistic regression was used to determine whether dampness and food habits were related to the subjective symptoms. In fully adjusted models, the home dampness index was significantly related to cough, general symptoms, and having at least one symptom; the classroom dampness index was significantly related to nasal symptoms. In addition, usually not eating breakfast was significantly related to eye symptoms, and too many snacks and/or sweets was significantly related to eye, nasal, and general symptoms. Both home and classroom dampness can affect pupils' health. Home dampness, in particular, was significantly related to cough and general symptoms, and classroom dampness was significantly related to nasal symptoms. Furthermore, favorable food habits have a positive effect on pupils' subjective symptoms.

  6. Right to Education, Principle of Solidarity and Inclusive School : Building a Society for All

    OpenAIRE

    Juliana Izar Soares da Fonseca Segalla; Sandra Filomena Wagner Kiefer

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to reflect the relationship between the fundamental right to educa- tion, the constitutional principle of solidarity and inclusive school, demonstrating that, as diversity is one of humanity’s features, a positive approach to the differences is condu- cive to human development, preparing for citizenship and professional qualification.  Ba- sed on Article 205 of the Brazilian Constitution that establishes priorities of the right to education, Brazilian education will be examine...

  7. CHARACTERIZATION OF FAILURES IN SCHOOL BUILDINGS EXPOSED IN AGRESSIVE ENVIRONMENT M4 OF FALCON STATE

    OpenAIRE

    María Alice Olavarrieta; Francisco Chong; Karelia Ramones; Salvatore Garagozzo; Jesús Sánchez; Ernesto Álvarez; Ana Acero; Luis Reinoza

    2017-01-01

    The present investigation focused on establishing a characterization of public used reinforced concrete constructions such as school units in the coastal zone of Chichiriviche and Tucacas in Venezuela’s Falcon State, exposed to highly corrosive environments and built with inadequate construction techniques. The ultimate aim was to make recommendations to regional bodies so that they could make structural interventions more precisely and assertively. The study was carried out in seven educatio...

  8. The 2009 Space Science Component of UNH Project SMART and High School Students Building a High-Altitude Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C. W.; Broad, L.; Chen, L.; Farrugia, C. J.; Frederick-Frost, K.; Goelzer, S.; Kucharek, H.; Messeder, R.; Moebius, E.; Puhl-Quinn, P. A.; Torbert, R. B.

    2009-12-01

    For the past 19 years the University of New Hampshire has offered a unique research and education opportunity to motivated high-school students called Project SMART (Science and Mathematics Achievement through Research Training). The Space Science module is strongly research based. Students work in teams of two on real research projects carved from the research programs of the faculty. The projects are carefully chosen to match the abilities of the students. The students receive classes in basic physics as well as lectures in space science to help them with their work. This year the research included the analysis of magnetic reconnection observations and Crater FTE observation, both by the CLUSTER spacecraft, the building of Faraday cups for thermal ion measurements in our thermal vacuum facility, and analysis of the IBEX star sensor. In addition to this, the students work on one combined project and for the past several years this project has been the building of a payload for a high-altitude balloon. The students learn to integrate telemetry and GPS location hardware while they build several small experiments that they then fly to the upper reaches of the Earth's atmosphere. This year the payload included a small video camera and the payload flew to 96,000 feet, capturing images of weather patterns as well as the curvature of the Earth, thickness of the atmosphere, and black space. In addition to still photos, we will be showing 2- and 7-minute versions of the 90-minute flight video that include footage from peak altitude, the bursting of the balloon, and initial descent.

  9. Definition of a unique model for the improvement of the monitoring network and seismic risk reduction of the school buildings in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, M.; Console, R.; Colangelo, A.; Cioè, A.; Trivigno, L.

    2015-12-01

    In the latest decade the safety of the Italian schools against seismic risk is a crucial subject for the Italian legislation as well as to the UN Convention on the DRR and the more specific priorities adopted even within the OECD. Recently, the Italian Parliament approved a law (L98/2013) which launched the Commissioning Safety of School Buildings Plan and the Definition of a Unique Model, to be developed by the CGIAM, in order to improve monitoring network and seismic risk reduction (SRR). The objectives of such a law deals with increasing in the knowledge of public actions aimed to improve the effectiveness of the SRR policy on school buildings. The actions of the CGIAM will consist in the identification of a significant number of school buildings in Italy, mainly in terms of type of construction and material, on which calibrate specific synthetic parameters and test models. Furthermore, the activities are addressed to quantitatively evaluation of intervention efficacy, to set up simple systems of instrumental monitoring, even able to test the possibility of periodical checks of the state of general preservation. The main issues carried on by the CGIAM mainly concern the completion and enrichment of the existing data base of school buildings, even through the collaboration of the Ministries and other relevant Italian research institutions, the evaluation of seismic hazard and site condition analysis as well as the definition of other seismic risk factors. Nevertheless a cost-benefit analysis as well as application and dissemination of such tools are proposed too. At the same time, the CGIAM contributes to the definition of experimental installation and use of a Simplified Accelerometric Monitoring Network for school buildings comprehensive of testing phase on a limited number of structures. The work proposes a synthetic overview of the employed methodologies as well as the first results arising from the research and implementation activities.

  10. Future secondary school teachers: beginning their professionalization and building their teaching identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Sánchez Asín

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Secondary school teacher’s initial training is at a standstill after three educational reforms, beginning with the LOGSE (1990 and sixteen years of permanent changes.This confusing situation has continued for too long. At the present moment the urge for a change in higher education to achieve the Bologna Convergence (2010 provides an excellent opportunity to conclude an obsolete phase and open new ways to professionalize upcoming secondary school teachers, who should be the protagonists in the construction of a more flexible and educated society, which guarantees equity in human development.This research is based on the emerging paradigm, a synthesis of all previous efforts. The methodology used has been participative and holistic; we have thus used different instruments such as self filled-in questionnaires, semi-structured interviews, discussion groups, life stories, DAFO and MAREA questionnaires.We first aimed at unveiling teachers’ needs at the beginning of their professional careers and at defining the development of the key competences for good teaching practices, which are necessary to acquire and exercise quality teaching in the future.The contributions from students enrolled in the CAP (Certificado de Aptitud Pedagógica – Certificate of Pedagogical Aptitude and CPP (Curso de Cualificación Pedagógica – Course on Pedagogical Qualification as well as from students at Secondary Education, teachers, members of trade unions, associations of parents, and teachers in several initial teacher training courses are the main sources of information to then reflect on the teaching identity and its professional development.No doubt there are many aspects in which we are interested as regards future teachers, such as:- Teaching trainee- Professional- Curriculum manager- Classroom mediator- Collaborator at school, with the families and the context- A professional capable of regulating the balance of his/her professional competence- Novel

  11. Physical Education and family: building approaches through the dance in the school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andresa Silveira Soares

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed relationships between physical education and family tends as field empiric existences in dance-improvisation. The experiences were conducted with families of pupils from 1st to 4th grades, weekly for four months. The data analysis indicated that the participants consider the family as the basis for human development and both physical education and dance receive their influences. The methodology of dance improvisation and the work with culture of the movement was named as one of the possible routes of connection between family, dance and physical education. It was emphasized the need for reciprocal approaches between family, physical education and school.

  12. School-Based Health Centers in an Era of Health Care Reform: Building on History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeton, Victoria; Soleimanpour, Samira; Brindis, Claire D.

    2013-01-01

    School-based health centers (SBHCs) provide a variety of health care services to youth in a convenient and accessible environment. Over the past 40 years, the growth of SBHCs evolved from various public health needs to the development of a specific collaborative model of care that is sensitive to the unique needs of children and youth, as well as to vulnerable populations facing significant barriers to access. The SBHC model of health care comprises of on-school site health care delivery by an interdisciplinary team of health professionals, which can include primary care and mental health clinicians. Research has demonstrated the SBHCs’ impacts on delivering preventive care, such as immunizations; managing chronic illnesses, such as asthma, obesity, and mental health conditions; providing reproductive health services for adolescents; and even improving youths’ academic performance. Although evaluation of the SBHC model of care has been complicated, results have thus far demonstrated increased access to care, improved health and education outcomes, and high levels of satisfaction. Despite their proven success, SBHCs have consistently faced challenges in securing adequate funding for operations and developing effective financial systems for billing and reimbursement. Implementation of health care reform (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act [P.L. 111-148]) will profoundly affect the health care access and outcomes of children and youth, particularly vulnerable populations. The inclusion of funding for SBHCs in this legislation is momentous, as there continues to be increased demand and limited funding for affordable services. To better understand how this model of care has and could further help promote the health of our nation’s youth, a review is presented of the history and growth of SBHCs and the literature demonstrating their impacts. It may not be feasible for SBHCs to be established in every school campus in the country. However, the lessons

  13. An Emerging Theory for Evidence Based Information Literacy Instruction in School Libraries, Part 2: Building a Culture of Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A. Gordon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – The purpose of this paper is to articulate a theory for the use of action research as a tool of evidence based practice for information literacy instruction in school libraries. The emerging theory is intended to capture the complex phenomenon of information skills teaching as it is embedded in school curricula. Such a theory is needed to support research on the integrated approach to teaching information skills and knowledge construction within the framework of inquiry learning. Part 1 of this paper, in the previous issue, built a foundation for emerging theory, which established user‐centric information behavior and constructivist learning theory as the substantive theory behind evidence based library instruction in schools. Part 2 continues to build on the Information Search Process and Guided Inquiry as foundational to studying the information‐to‐knowledge connection and the concepts of help and intervention characteristic of 21st century school library instruction.Methods – This paper examines the purpose and methodology of action research as a tool of evidence based instruction. This is accomplished through the explication of three components of theory‐building: paradigm, substantive research, and metatheory. Evidence based practice is identified as the paradigm that contributes values and assumptions about school library instruction. It establishes the role of evidence in teaching and learning, linking theory and practice. Action research, as a tool of evidence based practice is defined as the synthesis of authentic learning, or performance‐based assessment practices that continuously generate evidence throughout the inquiry unit of instruction and traditional data collection methods typically used in formal research. This paper adds social psychology theory from Lewin’s work, which contributes methodology from Gestalt psychology, field theory, group dynamics, and change theory. For Lewin the purpose of action

  14. Creating a school without walls and building a learning organization: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankl, S N; Gibbons-Carr, M

    2001-11-01

    Abstract: This article describes the genesis of a "school without walls" philosophy and the implementation of learning organization principles at Boston University School of Dental Medicine (BUSDM). In Peter Senge's five-discipline approach to organizational learning, a learning organization is defined as "an organization that is continually expanding its capacity to create its future." It is an organization that changes and innovates based on continuous learning, which in BUSDM's case constituted learning from industry trends, patients, students, staff, faculty, and other key stakeholders. Most important, such organizations successfully translate that learning into effective action. It is this capacity to innovate and create change that is critical to competitive advantage and success in a changing environment. This case study of organizational change provides a discussion of the conceptual framework guiding the design and implementation of the learning organization and the chronology of transformation that occurred in three phases over a period of twenty years. We also describe the lessons we learned and the lessons that are still emerging.

  15. Building an organized knowledge base: Concept mapping and achievement in secondary school physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankratius, William J.

    Direct teaching of problem-solving methods to high school physics students met with little success. Expert problem solving depended upon an organized knowledge base. Concept mapping was found to be a key to organizing an effective knowledge base. The investigation of the effect of the degree of concept mapping on achievement was the purpose of this study. Six intact high school physics classes, taught by this investigator, took part in the study. Two classes were control groups and received standard instruction. Four classes received six weeks of concept-mapping instruction prior to the unit under study. Two of these four classes were the low-level treatment group and were required to submit concept maps at the conclusion of the instruction. The other two classes were the high-level treatment group and were required to submit concept maps at the beginning and at the conclusion of the unit under study. One class from each treatment group took a pretest prior to instruction. An analysis of the posttest results revealed no pretest sensitization. A one-way analysis of covariance indicated a significant main effect for the treatment level at the p adjusted treatment means resulted in significant differences (p students) mapping concepts prior to, during, and subsequent to instruction led to greater achievement as measured by posttest scores.

  16. Building Teachers' Assessment Capacity for Supporting English Language Learners through the Implementation of the Step Language Assessment in Ontario K-12 Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Viegen Stille, Saskia; Jang, Eunice; Wagner, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    The Ontario Ministry of Education recently implemented the Steps to English Proficiency (STEP) language assessment framework to build educator capacity for addressing the needs of English language learners (ELLs) in K-12 schools. The STEP framework is a set of descriptors-based language proficiency scales that specify observable linguistic…

  17. Talking Circles for Adolescent Girls in an Urban High School: A Restorative Practices Program for Building Friendships and Developing Emotional Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Martha Ann

    2012-01-01

    Restorative Practices and Restorative Justice programs in schools are a new and emerging field. Meeting in Circles to build community, resolve conflict, and learn interactively are core components of these programs. This ethnographic study, which took place February 2010 to December 2011, evaluates 12 small, out-of-classroom Talking Circles for 60…

  18. Utilizing Response to Intervention (RtI) as a Means of Studying Capacity Building and Motivation of Staff by School Leadership Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    This research study explored the concept of capacity building and motivation of staff by school leadership teams in the successful development and implementation of educational initiatives, specifically Response to Intervention (RtI). A great deal of scholarship has addressed leadership and its effect on motivation, but few studies have…

  19. Building a socially accountable health professions school: towards unity for health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Charles

    2004-07-01

    In many countries, health systems suffer from fragmentation as different health activities conducted by different stakeholders are poorly coordinated, resulting in a mitigated performance to improve quality, equity, relevance and cost-effectiveness in health care. The impact on health would be enhanced if main stakeholders such as health professional schools, service organizations, professional associations, health policy bodies and the general public shared a common vision on how to best meet people's priority health needs. An approach initiated by WHO in 1999 and developed by The Network: Towards Unity for Health endeavours to create a unity of purpose and action among these stakeholders. This article comments on challenges and opportunities in implementing this approach whose pillars are integration and partnerships. The conditions for each stakeholder to become more socially accountable and the role of a teacher, researcher, manager or community representative in contributing to this process are discussed.

  20. Transparent thermal insulation for prefabricated school buildings; Einsatz transparenter Waermedaemmung an Schulgebaeuden in praefabrizierter Bauweise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, C. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Gruppe Solares Bauen; Buchmann, R. [Leipzigprojekt GmbH, Leipzig (Germany); Duesterhoeft, A. [Holz- und Leichtmetallbau GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The existing schools in the new federal states built from prefabricated elements need to be modernized in order to reduce their energy demand. Fitting some 300 square metres of transparent thermal insulation to the south side of a house front may lead to a cut in its thermal energy demand by 74 per cent. This energy consumption is by 12 kWh per square metre lower than the one obtained with opaque thermal insulation. The results of the first demonstration project are described. (MSK) [Deutsch] Die in den neuen Bundeslaendern vorhandenen Schulen in vorgefertigter Bauweise sind energetisch sanierungsbeduerftig. Werden im Rahmen einer Sanierung ca. 300qm transparente Waermedaemmung an der suedorientierten Fassade eingesetzt, so kann der Heizwaermebedarf um 74% herabgesetzt werden. Das sind 12 kWh/qm weniger als bei dem vergleichsweisen Einsatz einer opaken Waermedaemmung. Im Folgenden werden die Ergebnisse des ersten Demonstrationsprojekts beschrieben.

  1. Building Geophysics Talent and Opportunity in Africa: Experience from the AfricaArray/Wits Geophysics Field School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S. J.; Manzi, M.; Scheiber-Enslin, S. E.; Durrheim, R. J.; Jones, M. Q. W.; Nyblade, A.

    2015-12-01

    There are many challenges faced by geophysics students and academic staff in Africa that make it difficult to develop effective field and research programs. Challenges to conducting field work that have been identified, and that can be tackled are: lack of training on geophysical equipment and lack of exposure to field program design and implementation. To address these challenges, the AfricaArray/Wits Geophysics field school is designed to expose participants to a wide variety of geophysical instruments and the entire workflow of a geophysical project. The AA field school was initially developed for the geophysics students at the University of the Witwatersrand. However, by increasing the number of participants, we are able to make more effective use of a large pool of equipment, while addressing challenging geophysical problems at a remote field site. These additional participants are selected partially based on the likely hood of being able start a field school at their home institution. A good candidate would have access to geophysical equipment, but may not have knowledge of how to use it or how to effectively design surveys. These are frequently junior staff members or graduate students in leadership roles. The three week program introduces participants to the full geophysical field workflow. The first week is spent designing a geophysical survey, including determining the cost. The second week is spent collecting data to address a real geophysical challenge, such as determining overburden thickness, loss of ground features due to dykes in a mine, or finding water. The third week is spent interpreting and integrating the various data sets culminating in a final presentation. Participants are given all lecture material and much of the software is open access; this is done to encourage using the material at the home institution. One innovation has been to use graduate students as instructors, thus building a pool of talent that has developed the logistic and

  2. Building Character And Literacy Skills Of Primary School Students Through Puppet Contemplative Sukuraga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iis Nurasiah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Education is a process of enculturation, serves bequeath the values and achievements of the past to the future generations. Values and achievement that is the pride of the nation and the people make it known to other nations. In addition to bequeath, education also has a function to develop the cultural values and achievements of the past into the nation's cultural values corresponding to the life of the present and future, as well as developing new achievements into new character of the nation. Therefore, education, culture and national character is at the core of an educational process. literacy skills expected to provide supplies for children in reading, writing, and appreciating and responding to all types of communication. Creating literat generation requires a long process and means conducive. It begins with small and family environment, and are supported or developed in school, social environment, and the work environment. Puppet Sukuraga laden with enlightenment, education, reflection, invite people really keep up with both his body as a God-given mandate in accordance with the nature of their respective functions.

  3. PROVING EXPERIMENTS AND ANALYSIS OF ROOFTOP HEAT SHIELD EXPERIMENT WITH WATER CONTAIN CONCRETE BOAD THAT USES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL BUILDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akinori; 日根, 隆夫; Okuda, Yoshio; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hada, Yuuichi

    In this study, the reduction effect of the heat inflow on the rooftop and the indoor thermal environment was measured by using the elementary school building, the rooftop of the bilding was covered with the water contain concrete boards. And, conserve energy effect and effectiveness for the indoor thermal environment improvement were evaluated. The effect of the decrease of the surface temperature and the slab side temperature at water contain concrete boad plot remarkably from the measurement result during the July-September of 2010, the temperatures decrease 22°C at the surface, 15°C at the waterproof layer surface that was caused compared with the gravel covered roof. The water contain concrete boards plot always drove the ceiling side temperature and the indoor temperature low as a result of comparing with the indoor condition of the control plot. The temperature fluctuate was small at time that opened the window and ventilated, and ventilation was discontinued, it became big temperatures fluctuate. The effect of the decrease of 0.5°C in PMV and 0.5 in WBGT was caused while the room had sealed up, and the effect of the decrease of 0.3 in WBGT was caused while the ventilated state.

  4. Preliminary study of the influence of different modelling choices and materials properties uncertainties on the seismic assessment of an existing RC school building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maracchini, Gianluca; Clementi, Francesco; Quagliarini, Enrico; Lenci, Stefano; Monni, Francesco

    2017-07-01

    This paper studies the influence of some aleatory and epistemic uncertainties on the seismic behaviour of an existing RC school building through a codified sensitivity analysis that uses pushover analyses and a logic tree approach. The considered epistemic uncertainties, i.e. diaphragm stiffness and modelling of stairs, seem not influencing the final assessment in term of index of seismic risk. Vice versa, aleatory ones, i.e. concrete and steel mechanical properties, strongly affect the Index. For this reason, investigations and tests should focus on the study of the mechanical properties, and, in particular, on the study of columns' concrete mechanical properties, which have the largest impact on the building seismic response.

  5. The prevalence and incidence of sick building syndrome in Chinese pupils in relation to the school environment: a two-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Zhao, Z; Nordquist, T; Norback, D

    2011-12-01

    There are few incidence studies on sick building syndrome (SBS). We studied two-year change of SBS in Chinese pupils in relation to parental asthma/allergy (heredity), own atopy, classroom temperature, relative humidity (RH), absolute humidity (AH), crowdedness, CO₂, NO₂, and SO₂. A total of 1993 participated at baseline, and 1143 stayed in the same classrooms after two years. The prevalence of mucosal and general symptoms was 33% and 28% at baseline and increased during follow-up (P sick building syndrome (SBS) might not be conclusive for causal relationships, and more longitudinal studies on SBS are needed both in China and other parts of the world. The concept of mechanical ventilation and air filtration should be introduced in the schools, and when planning new schools, locations close to heavily trafficked roads should be avoided. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Building Inclusion from the Ground up: A Review of Whole School Re-Culturing Programmes for Sustaining Inclusive Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaster, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    This paper suggests that whole school re-culturing programmes can potentially assist in the creation of more inclusive value orientated schools. The relationship between school culture and successful inclusion has been demonstrated in the literature. Furthermore, the structure of whole school programmes in inculcating inclusive values and…

  7. Energy-oriented modernisation and energy-economic extension of prefabricated school buildings of type FKZ 0329224 C; Energetische Sanierung und energieoekonomische Erweiterung von Typenschulen FKZ 0329224 C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahn, S. [Landeshaupstadt Dresden (Germany). Schulverwaltungsamt; Petzold, K.; Roloff, J.; Meinhold, U.; Renner, E.; Eckarth, P. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Bauklimatik; Schreck, H.; Hillmann, G.; Jakobiak, R.A. [Institut fuer Bau-, Umwelt- und Solarforschung GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Erhorn, H.; Reiss, J. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Bauphysik, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The project aims at modernizing school buildings with atria in terms of their thermal energy consumption and, simultaneously, at the optimization of daylighting. The basic idea was to cover the atria with glass roofs to make a building more compact, so that the reduced thermal energy transmission area would drastically cut down specific thermal energy demand without imparing daylighting. The energetic and thermal characteristics of the building are analysed and experience gathered after its modernization, also regarding daylighting, is discussed. (MSK) [Deutsch] Ausser einer heiz-energetischen Sanierung von Schulgebaeuden in Atriumbauweise ist auch eine Optimierung der Tageslichtnutzung beabsichtigt. Der Grundgedanke war, die Innenhoefe mit Glas zu ueberdachen, um eine kompaktere Gebaeudeform zu bekommen und den spezifischen Heizenergiebedarf durch die sich daraus ergebende Verkleinerung der Transmissionsflaeche drastisch zu reduzieren, und dies ohne die Tageslichtbeleuchtung zu beeintraechtigen. Neben der energetischen und thermischen Untersuchung des Gebaeudes werden die Erfahrungen mit dem Schulgebaeude nach dem Umbau sowie die Beleuchtung mit Tageslicht erlaeutert.

  8. Building-related symptoms are linked to the in vitro toxicity of indoor dust and airborne microbial propagules in schools: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, J T; Salkinoja-Salonen, M; Salin, P J; Nelo, K; Holma, T; Ohtonen, P; Syrjälä, H

    2017-04-01

    Indoor microbial toxicity is suspected to cause some building-related symptoms, but supporting epidemiological data are lacking. We examined whether the in vitro toxicity of indoor samples from school buildings was associated with work-related health symptoms (building-related symptoms, BRS). Administrators of the Helsinki City Real Estate Department selected 15 schools for the study, and a questionnaire on symptoms connected to work was sent to the teachers in the selected schools for voluntary completion. The cellular toxicity of classroom samples was determined by testing substances extracted from wiped indoor dust and by testing microbial biomass that was cultured on fallout plates. Boar sperm cells were used as indicator cells, and motility loss was the indicator for toxic effects. The effects were expressed as the half maximal effective concentration (EC50) at which >50% of the exposed boar sperm cells were immobile compared to vehicle control. Completed symptom questionnaires were received from 232 teachers [median age, 43 years; 190 (82.3%) women] with a median time of 6 years working at their school. Samples from their classrooms were available and were assessed for cellular toxicity. The Poisson regression model showed that the impact of extracts of surface-wiped school classroom dust on teacher work-related BRS was 2.8-fold (95% CI: 1.6-4.9) higher in classrooms with a toxic threshold EC50 of 6µgml-1 versus classrooms with insignificant EC50 values (EC50 >50µgml-1); Pschool classrooms with high sperm toxicity compared to less toxic sites; the RR was 1.9 (95% CI: 1.1-3.3, P=0.03) for wiped dust extracts. Teachers working in classrooms where the samples showed high sperm toxicity had more BRS. The boar sperm cell motility inhibition assay appears promising as a tool for demonstrating the presence of indoor substances associated with BRS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Building Minds, Minding Buildings. School Infrastructure Funding Need: A State-by-State Assessment and an Analysis of Recent Court Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crampton, Faith E.; Thompson, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The quality of the physical environment in which children learn is a critical education capacity factor that contributes to their academic success and well-being. Adequate levels of fiscal investment in school infrastructure are essential to ensure that all students and staff have access to a physical environment conducive to learning; that is,…

  10. Pursuing STEM and related careers: The role of math self-efficacy and high school math and science courses in building momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramp, Laura K.

    Education policy over the past decade has often focused on increasing participation in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. A number of studies indicate that the STEM pipeline "leaks," as individuals who pursue STEM college majors do not follow through with occupations in these fields. Using data from the Education Longitudinal Study (ELS) of 2002 and from the General Social Surveys (GSS) for 2010, 2012, and 2014, I expand the concept of STEM momentum to explore how momentum builds in high school and carries into postsecondary enrollment and occupations. In addition, with the GSS data, participants are grouped by age to explore any patterns that may emerge in aligning outcomes with shifts in the labor market and in policy. Moreover, the occupations included as STEM and applied STEM are expanded to include occupations in these fields that require any level of education or certification above a high school diploma. I find that math self-efficacy and high school math and science coursework completed matter for building STEM momentum. This momentum carries into postsecondary enrollment and college major selection. The momentum built from math self-efficacy and high school math and science coursework completed carries indirectly into occupation through college major. In terms of labor market and policy shifts, I find that there appears to be increases in participation in STEM fields by females and different racial groups, although, gaps remain. I find that the STEM pipeline not only continues to "leak" for STEM fields, but it also "leaks" for applied STEM fields.

  11. Modeling, simulation and analysis of the evacuation process on stairs in a multi-floor classroom building of a primary school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhang; Li, Yi; Yu, Ping; Gong, Jianhua; Shen, Shen; Huang, Lin; Liang, Jianming

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have focused on the evacuation of multi-floor classroom buildings in a primary school, a process that differs from evacuations in other buildings. A stair-unit model was proposed to describe the spatial topology of twisting stairwells and to describe the spatial relationship between stairwells and floors. Based on the stair-unit model, a schedule-line model was proposed to calculate evacuation paths in stair-units; a modified algorithm to calculate pedestrian forces were proposed to describe the evacuee movements in stairwells; and a projection strategy was proposed to model the 3-dimensional evacuation process in multi-floor buildings. The simulated processes were compared with a real evacuation drill. The results showed that the simulated process achieved qualitative and quantitative consistencies with the real drill, proving the appropriateness of the proposed models and algorithms. Based on the validation, further simulations were conducted and a few rules for evacuations in stairwells were identified including rules governing the impact of the moment of entering a staircase, the number of students in a class, the stagger strategy, and the layout of grades on different floors on the time in stairwell and the total evacuation duration. The results can be used to mitigate the effects of a fire disaster, and the proposed models and algorithms can also be referenced by evacuation simulation for other multi-floor buildings such as residential buildings.

  12. Partnership-Ready Schools: Building Systems and Mindsets for the Achievement Schools to Receive and Utilize Community Organizations as Partners in Student Success

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Ansel

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, the call for schools to leverage partnerships with community organizations as a means to provide services that will mitigate the effects of poverty in the pursuit of achieving ambitious academic outcomes has gained momentum. The Achievement Schools, a network of five neighborhood schools serving students in Memphis’ Frayser community, has prioritized the development of partnerships as a lever to turn around the academic performance of its schools by ensuring students’ no...

  13. Teaching Macro Social Work through Experiential Learning: Student Reflections on Lessons Learned in Building School-Community Partnerships

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lisa V Blitz; Denise Yull; Martha G Solá; John E Jones

    2016-01-01

    .... As part of a grant-funded school-university partnership, MSW students were placed in school social work field placements, where their practice focused on individual and small group interventions with youth...

  14. Predicting the Weather and Building the Boats: Full Service Schools as One Avenue to School Success for All of America's Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronick, Robert F.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of full service schools. Full service schools stress prevention, collaboration and systems change. Prevention is geared toward corrections, mental health and welfare, all topics of keen interest to people working in and studying criminal justice. By providing mental health services at the school for both…

  15. The Effect of Passive Design Strategies on Thermal Performance of Female Secondary School Buildings during Warm Season in Hot Dry Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar eZahiri

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a series of field studies and simulation analysis to improve the thermal performance of school buildings in the city of Tehran in Iran during warm season. The field studies used on-site measurement and questionnaire-based survey in the warm spring season in a typical female secondary school building. The on-site monitoring assessed the indoor air temperature and humidity levels of six classrooms while the occupants completed questionnaires covering their thermal sensations and thermal preferences. Moreover, thermal simulation analysis was also carried out to evaluate and improve the thermal performance of the classrooms based on the students’ thermal requirements and passive design strategies. In this study, the environmental design guidelines for female secondary school buildings were introduced for the hot and dry climate of Tehran, using passive design strategies. The study shows that the application of passive design strategies including south and south-east orientation, 10cm thermal insulation in wall and 5cm in the roof, and the combination of 30cm side fins and overhangs as a solar shading devices, as well as all-day ventilation strategy and the use of thermal mass materials with 25cm-30cm thickness, has considerable impact on indoor air temperatures in warm season in Tehran and keeps the indoor environment in an acceptable thermal condition. The results of the field studies also indicated that most of the occupants found their thermal environment not to be comfortable and the simulation results showed that passive design techniques had a significant influence on the indoor air temperature and can keep it in an acceptable range based on the female students’ thermal requirement. Therefore, in order to enhance the indoor environment and to increase the learning performance of the students, it is necessary to use the appropriate passive design strategies, which also reduce the need for mechanical systems and

  16. Value-Added Clinical Systems Learning Roles for Medical Students That Transform Education and Health: A Guide for Building Partnerships Between Medical Schools and Health Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Lucey, Catherine; Wolpaw, Terry; Chang, Anna

    2017-05-01

    To ensure physician readiness for practice and leadership in changing health systems, an emerging three-pillar framework for undergraduate medical education integrates the biomedical and clinical sciences with health systems science, which includes population health, health care policy, and interprofessional teamwork. However, the partnerships between medical schools and health systems that are commonplace today use health systems as a substrate for learning. Educators need to transform the relationship between medical schools and health systems. One opportunity is the design of authentic workplace roles for medical students to add relevance to medical education and patient care. Based on the experiences at two U.S. medical schools, the authors describe principles and strategies for meaningful medical school-health system partnerships to engage students in value-added clinical systems learning roles. In 2013, the schools began large-scale efforts to develop novel required longitudinal, authentic health systems science curricula in classrooms and workplaces for all first-year students. In designing the new medical school-health system partnerships, the authors combined two models in an intersecting manner-Kotter's change management and Kern's curriculum development steps. Mapped to this framework, they recommend strategies for building mutually beneficial medical school-health system partnerships, including developing a shared vision and strategy and identifying learning goals and objectives; empowering broad-based action and overcoming barriers in implementation; and generating short-term wins in implementation. Applying this framework can lead to value-added clinical systems learning roles for students, meaningful medical school-health system partnerships, and a generation of future physicians prepared to lead health systems change.

  17. Primer to Design Safe School Projects in Case of Terrorist Attacks and School Shootings. Buildings and Infrastructure Protection Series. FEMA-428/BIPS-07/January 2012. Edition 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipley, Michael; Lyon, Wesley; Smilowitz, Robert; Williams, Pax; Arnold, Christopher; Blewett, William; Hazen, Lee; Krimgold, Fred

    2012-01-01

    This publication, part of the new Building and Infrastructure Protection Series (BIPS) published by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) Infrastructure Protection and Disaster Management Division (IDD), serves to advance high performance and integrated design for buildings and infrastructure. This…

  18. An Emerging Theory for Evidence Based Information Literacy Instruction in School Libraries, Part 1: Building a Foundation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol A. Gordon

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – Part I of this paper aims to create a framework for an emerging theory of evidence based information literacy instruction. In order to ground this framework in existing theory, a holistic perspective views inquiry as a learning process that synthesizes information searching and knowledge building. An interdisciplinary approach is taken to relate user-centric information behavior theory and constructivist learning theory that supports this synthesis. The substantive theories that emerge serve as a springboard for emerging theory. A second objective of this paper is to define evidence based information literacy instruction by assessing the suitability of performance based assessment and action research as tools of evidence based practice.Methods – An historical review of research grounded in user-centered information behavior theory and constructivist learning theory establishes a body of existing substantive theory that supports emerging theory for evidence based information literacy instruction within an information-to-knowledge approach. A focused review of the literature presents supporting research for an evidence based pedagogy that is performance assessment based, i.e., information users are immersed in real-world tasks that include formative assessments. An analysis of the meaning of action research in terms of its purpose and methodology establishes its suitability for structuring an evidence based pedagogy. Supporting research tests a training model for school librarians and educators which integrates performance based assessment, as well as action research. Results – Findings of an historical analysis of information behavior theory and constructivist teaching practices, and a literature review that explores teaching models for evidence based information literacy instruction, point to two elements of evidence based information literacy instruction: the micro level of information searching behavior and the macro level of

  19. THE EFFECT OF BODY BUILD AND BMI ON AEROBIC TEST PERFORMANCE IN SCHOOL CHILDREN (10-15 YEARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantine D. Slinger

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Body Mass Index (BMI has often questionably been used to define body build. In the present study body build was defined more specifically using fat free mass index (FFMI = fat free mass normalised to the stature and fat mass index (FMI = fat mass normalised to stature. The body build of an individual is 'solid' in individuals with a high FFMI for their FMI and is 'slender' in individuals with a low FFMI relative to their FMI. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between aerobic test performance and body build defined as solid, average or slender in 10 to 15 year old children. Five-hundred-and-two children (53% boys aged 10 to 15 years of age were included in the study. Aerobic test performance was estimated with an incremental cycle ergometer protocol and a shuttle run test. BMI and percentage fat (by skin folds were determined to calculate FMI and FFMI. After adjustment for differences in age, gender and body mass the solid group achieved a significantly higher maximal power output (W and power output relative to body mass (W/kg during the cycle test (p 0.05 between different body build groups. This study showed that body build is an important determinant of the aerobic test performance. In contrast, there were no differences in aerobic test performance per kilogramme FFM over the body build groups. This suggests that the body build may be determined by genetic predisposition

  20. Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-08-01

    This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

  1. To build an environmental quality building. Evaluation: the HQE secondary school of Pic Saint Loup realized by the region; Construire un batiment respectueux de l'environnement. Retour d'experience: le Lycee HQE du Pic Saint Loup realise par la Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denicourt, Ch.

    2004-07-01

    This document presents the action realized in Pic Saint Loup secondary school, concerning the program management of an environmental quality building (HQE). The 8 chapters details the realization of the HQE building, the project planing of a HQE building, the Pic Saint Loup project, the operation beginning, the planing implementing, the project feasibility evaluation, the program redaction and the time and cost evaluation. (A.L.B.)

  2. The effects of building-related factors on classroom relative humidity among North Carolina schools participating in the 'Free to Breathe, Free to Teach' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelon-Gaetz, K A; Richardson, D B; Lipton, D M; Marshall, S W; Lamb, B; LoFrese, T

    2015-12-01

    Both high and low indoor relative humidity (RH) directly impact Indoor Air Quality (IAQ), an important school health concern. Prior school studies reported a high prevalence of mold, roaches, and water damage; however, few examined associations between modifiable classroom factors and RH, a quantitative indicator of dampness. We recorded RH longitudinally in 134 North Carolina classrooms (n = 9066 classroom-days) to quantify the relationships between modifiable classroom factors and average daily RH below, within, or above levels recommended to improve school IAQ (30-50% or 30-60% RH). The odds of having high RH (>60%) were 5.8 [95% Confidence Interval (CI): 2.9, 11.3] times higher in classrooms with annual compared to quarterly heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system maintenance and 2.5 (95% CI: 1.5, 4.2) times higher in classrooms with HVAC economizers compared to those without economizers. Classrooms with direct-expansion split systems compared to chilled water systems had 2.7 (95% CI: 1.7, 4.4) times higher odds of low RH (60%) of those without setbacks. This research suggests actionable decision points for school design and maintenance to prevent high or low classroom RH. This study combines longitudinal measurements of classroom relative humidity with school inspection data from several schools to describe the problem of relative humidity control in schools. Our findings on how maintenance and mechanical factors affect classroom humidity provide suggestions on building operations policies and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) design considerations that may improve classroom relative humidity control. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. A Balanced Approach to Building STEM College and Career Readiness in High School: Combining STEM Intervention and Enrichment Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladjana S. Rakich

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Often STEM schools and STEM enrichment programs attract primarily high achieving students or those with strong motivation or interest. However, to ensure that more students pursue interest in STEM, steps must be taken to provide access for all students. For a balanced and integrated career development focus, schools must provide learning opportunities that are appropriate for all students. This paper outlines two approaches to the creation of a comprehensive STEM College and Career development pathway in high schools.

  4. Healthy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittelmeyer, Christian

    A survey of several hundred German students led to two theses on school environment and learning. First, students find school buildings attractive only if they conform to certain features of the human sensory system such as balance. Second, students consider school buildings attractive and inviting only if their architectural message meets such…

  5. Coal mine as buffer reservoir. Block of school building Arcus signs agreement for minewater heating; Kolenmijn als buffervat. Scholencomplex tekent overeenkomst voor mijnwaterverwarming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roestenberg, B.

    2012-11-15

    Since in 1974 the last coal mine was closed Heerlen, Netherlands, the shafts flooded with water. Therefore, they became a natural heat- and cold storage reservoir. The municipality of Heerlen established the company Minewater to explore this heat source. The company has made agreements with several customers, including a block of school buildings (Arcus) [Dutch] Sinds in 1974 de laatste kolenmijn van Heerlen werd gesloten zijn de schachten volgelopen met water. Daardoor vormen ze inmiddels een natuurlijk warmte/koude opslag. De gemeente Heerlen heeft het bedrijf Mijnwater opgericht om deze warmtebron te exploiteren. Het bedrijf heeft inmiddels overeenkomsten gesloten met verschillende afnemers, waaronder het ROC-scholencomplex Arcus.

  6. The Incredible Years Therapeutic Dinosaur Programme to build social and emotional competence in Welsh primary schools: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Tracey; Hutchings, Judy; Whitaker, Christopher; Evans, Ceri; Parry, Laura

    2011-02-11

    School interventions such as the Incredible Years Classroom Dinosaur Programme targets pupil behaviour across whole classrooms, yet for some children a more intense approach is needed. The Incredible Years Therapeutic Dinosaur Programme is effective for clinically referred children by enhancing social, problem-solving skills, and peer relationship-building skills when delivered in a clinical setting in small groups. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Therapeutic Programme, delivered with small groups of children at high-risk of developing conduct disorder, delivered in schools already implementing the Classroom Programme. This is a pragmatic, parallel, randomised controlled trial.Two hundred and forty children (aged 4-8 years) rated by their teacher as above the 'borderline cut-off' for concern on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and their parents, will be recruited. Randomisation is by individual within blocks (schools); 1:1 ratio, intervention to waiting list control. Twenty schools will participate in two phases. Two teachers per school will deliver the programme to six intervention children for 2-hours/week for 18 weeks between baseline and first follow-up. The control children will receive the intervention after first follow up. Phase 1 comprises three data collection points - baseline and two follow-ups eight months apart. Phase 2 includes baseline and first follow-up.The Therapeutic Programme includes elements on; Learning school rules; understanding, identifying, and articulating feelings; problem solving; anger management; how to be friendly; how to do your best in school. Primary outcomes are; change in child social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. Secondary outcomes are; teacher and parent mental wellbeing, child academic attainment, child and teacher school attendance. Intervention delivery will be assessed for fidelity. Intention to treat analyses will be conducted. ANCOVA, effect sizes, mediator and

  7. The incredible years therapeutic dinosaur programme to build social and emotional competence in welsh primary schools: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans Ceri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background School interventions such as the Incredible Years Classroom Dinosaur Programme targets pupil behaviour across whole classrooms, yet for some children a more intense approach is needed. The Incredible Years Therapeutic Dinosaur Programme is effective for clinically referred children by enhancing social, problem-solving skills, and peer relationship-building skills when delivered in a clinical setting in small groups. The aim of this trial is to evaluate the effectiveness of the Therapeutic Programme, delivered with small groups of children at high-risk of developing conduct disorder, delivered in schools already implementing the Classroom Programme. Methods/Design This is a pragmatic, parallel, randomised controlled trial. Two hundred and forty children (aged 4-8 years rated by their teacher as above the 'borderline cut-off' for concern on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, and their parents, will be recruited. Randomisation is by individual within blocks (schools; 1:1 ratio, intervention to waiting list control. Twenty schools will participate in two phases. Two teachers per school will deliver the programme to six intervention children for 2-hours/week for 18 weeks between baseline and first follow-up. The control children will receive the intervention after first follow up. Phase 1 comprises three data collection points - baseline and two follow-ups eight months apart. Phase 2 includes baseline and first follow-up. The Therapeutic Programme includes elements on; Learning school rules; understanding, identifying, and articulating feelings; problem solving; anger management; how to be friendly; how to do your best in school. Primary outcomes are; change in child social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. Secondary outcomes are; teacher and parent mental wellbeing, child academic attainment, child and teacher school attendance. Intervention delivery will be assessed for fidelity. Intention to treat analyses

  8. Early Stages in Building Hybrid Activity between School and Work: The Case of PénArt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barma, Sylvie; Laferrière, Thérèse; Lemieux, Bruno; Massé-Morneau, Julie; Vincent, Marie-Caroline

    2017-01-01

    This formative intervention documents the emergence of a hybrid activity aiming at student engagement and academic achievement. In this context-bound study, early stages of this activity consisted in establishing PénArt meant to enable high school students with difficulties to start up their own business at school. It involved reaching agreements…

  9. Legal Aspects of Asbestos Abatement. Responses to the Threat of Asbestos-Containing Materials in School Buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kristin

    Exposure to asbestos in the air poses serious health threats, particularly to children. The use of asbestos in schools after World War II may have exposed millions of persons before regulations controlling asbestos use began appearing in the 1970s. Federal efforts to reduce exposure to asbestos have included passage of the Asbestos School Hazard…

  10. Principals as Literacy Leaders with Indigenous Communities (PALLIC) Building Relationships: One School's Quest to Raise Indigenous Learners' Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Tasha; Webster, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 to 2012, 48 schools in the Northern Territory, South Australia and Queensland participated in the Principals as Literacy Leaders with Indigenous Communities (PALLIC) project. Central to this project was the establishment of positive working relationships between school principals and Indigenous community leaders in order to improve…

  11. Lessons in Early Learning: Building an Integrated Pre-K-12 System in Montgomery County Public Schools. Education Reform Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marietta, Geoff

    2010-01-01

    This 2010 report looked at how Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) used local and federal dollars to craft, implement and improve a system-wide education reform strategy built on a foundation of providing high-quality pre-k education. School officials, state and federal policymakers alike will benefit from learning about the trail that MCPS…

  12. Crossing Boundaries between Cultures and Disciplines: Using Geography and Creative Arts to Build Bridges with Community Groups in One School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Ruth; Lane, Sue

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to develop tolerance and acceptance of other cultural groups, teacher educators from the University of Newcastle worked with members of the local African community and teachers from a local school to develop a Creative Arts and Geography program for young school children (aged 7-9 years). The program developed put together the…

  13. Why Trust the Head? Key Practices for Transformational School Leaders to Build a Purposeful Relationship of Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Trust is widely recognized as one of the key qualities that a successful leader needs to bring about change within his/her organization. Literature has also shown that trust plays a pivotal role in effective school leadership. However, little research has been undertaken to identify specific actions of a transformational school leader enabling…

  14. New design concepts for energy-conserving buildings. Results of a national competition among students in schools of architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The National Student Competition in Energy Conscious Design held among professional schools of architecture in 1976 is documented. Fifty-five schools participated, submitting 115 entries; twelve were chosen as finalists. Details are presented on the twelve winning designs and excerpts from the remaining 103 entries are published. (MCW)

  15. There Is No "I" in Co-Teacher: Team-Building Professional Development to Support High School Co-Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhue, Denise S.

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to meet the needs of special education students in inclusion classrooms co-teaching is typically utilized as a service delivery model. Research has identified a number of benefits to co-teaching however, a number of obstacles have been found to inhibit its effective implementation in secondary schools. High school special education…

  16. Building Bridges: Summary Report of the 1985-86 ACS Prehigh School Science Mini-Grant Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) sponsored a conference for educators and chemists to design strategies for implementing the recommendations made in the 1984 ACS publication, Priorities, Partnerships, and Plans: Chemistry Education in the Schools. Participants submitted proposals for mini-grant funding to the ACS Prehigh School Science Program…

  17. Analysis of potential energy saving strategies in a Bangkok school building. With CD-ROM; Analyse von Energieeinsparpotentialen am Beispiel einer Schule in Bangkok

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temming, H.V.

    2000-05-01

    In cooperation with the Gesellschaft fuer technische Zusammenarbeit GTZ, a school building in Thailand was selected for an analysis of potentials for energy saving. The selected school was the New International School of Thailand (NIST) in Bangkok. Energy-relevant data were acquired by measurements, and solutions for more efficient energy supply were developed. Recommendations were made on this basis. This dissertation is also available on CD-ROM. [German] In Zusammenarbeit mit der Gesellschaft fuer technische Zusammenarbeit GTZ wurde als Beispielobjekt eine thailaendische Schule, die New International School of Thailand (NIST) in Bangkok ausgewaehlt. An diesem Objekt wurden die verschiedenen energetischen Messungen durchgefuehrt. Diese wurden bedarfsgerecht ausgewertet. Auf der Basis der Ergebnisse wurden Loesungsmoeglichkeiten fuer eine effizientere Energieversorgung der Schule konstruiert und diese Alternativen wie oben beschrieben bewertet, woraus sich entsprechende Empfehlungen ergeben. Der Aufbau dieser Arbeit stellt sich nun folgendermassen dar: Nachdem in einem ersten Schritt die fuer diesen Kontext wichtigsten Parameter Thailands und des Untersuchungsobjektes dargestellt werden, schliesst sich hieran die Vorstellung verschiedener technische Alternativen zur Erzeugung von Kaelte an, da hier ein Fokus fuer moegliche Energieeinsparungen gesetzt wird. Anschliessend werden einige in der Arbeit verwandte Berechnungsverfahren fuer energetische oder wirtschaftliche Zuammenhaenge sowie eine ausfuehrliche Beschreibung der energetischen 1st-Situation des Untersuchungsobjektes dargestellt. Darauf aufbauend folgt nun die Vorstellung der verschiedenen Energieeinsparpotentiale durch technische und verhaltensinduzierte Optimierungsmassnahmen. Diese Arbeit endet mit der Bewertung aller aufgedeckten Potentiale und einem Gesamtfazit aus der Untersuchung. (Diese Diplomarbeit liegt auch in Form einer CD-ROM vor.) (orig./AKF)

  18. School-Based Multidisciplinary Teacher Team-Building Combining On-Line Professional Development (ESSEA) and Field-Based Environmental Monitoring (GLOBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, R.

    2003-12-01

    The multidisciplinary nature of Earth system science provides a strong foundation for integrated science teaching at the K-12 level. In a Minneapolis-St. Paul based project, urban middle school teaching teams composed of language arts and math specialists as well as physical, Earth, and biological science teachers participate in the NASA Earth system science course (ESSEA) and in the international GLOBE environmental monitoring project. For students, the goal is to integrate science throughout the curriculum as well as involve classes from different subjects in a high-interest school science project. For teachers, the project provides greatly-needed classroom support and teacher team building, as well as professional development. The on-line course provides continuity and communication between the different team members. Face-to-face meetings with the instructors on site are conducted every 4 weeks. The problem-based learning approach to environmental issues developed in the ESSEA course lends itself to application to local environmental issues. New ESSEA modules developed for the project highlight environmental problems associated with flooding, introduced species, and eutrofication of lakes and rivers located near the participating schools. In addition, ESSEA participants are certified as GLOBE teachers, and assist their students in monitoring water quality. The synergistic partnership of ESSEA and GLOBE provides an attractive package upon which long-term school-based environmental monitoring projects can be based.

  19. Indoor and Outdoor Monitoring of Volatile Organic Compounds in School Buildings: Indicators Based on Health Risk Assessment to Single out Critical Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluigi de Gennaro

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Children are more sensitive to pollutants than adults and yet they spend large amounts of time in school environments where they are exposed to unknown levels of indoor pollutants. This study investigated the concentrations of the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs in eight naturally ventilated school buildings in Italy. The schools were chosen to include areas with different urbanization and traffic density characteristics in order to gather a more diverse picture of exposure risks in the different areas of the city. VOCs were sampled for one week in the presence/absence of pupils using diffusive samplers suitable for thermal desorption inside three classrooms at each school. The samples were then analyzed with thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (TD-GC-MS. In addition, outdoor measurements were carried out in the yard at each school. VOC identification and quantification, and indoor/outdoor concentration plots were used to identify pollutant sources. While some classrooms were found to have very low VOC levels, others had a significant indoor contribution or a prevalent outdoor contribution. High concentrations of terpenes were found in all monitored classrooms: a-pinene and limonene were in the range of 6.55–34.18 µg/m3 and 11.11–25.42 µg/m3 respectively. Outdoor concentrations were lower than indoors for each monitored school. Indicators based on health risk assessment for chronic health effects associated with VOCs (either carcinogenic or non-carcinogenic were proposed to rank sites according to their hazard level.

  20. Environmental Impact Assessment of a School Building in Iceland Using LCA-Including the Effect of Long Distance Transport of Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargessadat Emami

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Buildings are the key components of urban areas and society as a complex system. A life cycle assessment was applied to estimate the environmental impacts of the resources applied in the building envelope, floor slabs, and interior walls of the Vættaskóli-Engi building in Reykjavik, Iceland. The scope of this study included four modules of extraction and transportation of raw material to the manufacturing site, production of the construction materials, and transport to the building site, as described in the standard EN 15804. The total environmental effects of the school building in terms of global warming potential, ozone depletion potential, human toxicity, acidification, and eutrophication were calculated. The total global warming potential impact was equal to 255 kg of CO2 eq/sqm, which was low compared to previous studies and was due to the limited system boundary of the current study. The effect of long-distance overseas transport of materials was noticeable in terms of acidification (25% and eutrophication (31% while it was negligible in other impact groups. The results also concluded that producing the cement in Iceland caused less environmental impact in all five impact categories compared to the case in which the cement was imported from Germany. The major contribution of this work is that the environmental impacts of different plans for domestic production or import of construction materials to Iceland can be precisely assessed in order to identify effective measures to move towards a sustainable built environment in Iceland, and also to provide consistent insights for stakeholders.

  1. Building Services Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zinzi, Michele; Romeo, Carlo; Thomsen, Kirsten Engelund

    2015-01-01

    This guideline on Building Services Systems is one of four guidelines produced by the School of the Future project. The other three guidelines cover: Building Construction Elements, Improved Indoor Environmental Quality and Concepts for Zero Emission Schools. This guideline consists of the descri......This guideline on Building Services Systems is one of four guidelines produced by the School of the Future project. The other three guidelines cover: Building Construction Elements, Improved Indoor Environmental Quality and Concepts for Zero Emission Schools. This guideline consists...... of the description of 5 main technologies: condensing boilers, heat pumps, ventilation systems, lighting and photovoltaic systems. For each technology chapter there is the same content list: an introduction, a brief technology description, some advantages and disadvantages, market penetration and utilisation, energy...

  2. The AIRMEX study - VOC measurements in public buildings and schools/kindergartens in eleven European cities: Statistical analysis of the data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Otmar; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Tirendi, Salvatore; Barrero-Moreno, Josefa; Larsen, Bo R.; Kotzias, Dimitrios

    2011-07-01

    Indoor and outdoor air concentrations as well as personal exposure concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been measured during 2003-2008 in public buildings, schools, kindergartens and private homes in eleven cities over Europe covering geographic areas in north, central and south Europe during different seasons within the frame of the AIRMEX (European Indoor Air Monitoring and Exposure assessment) study. A database is presented containing the results for 23 VOCs based upon approximately 1000 samples taken from 182 different working environments (offices, classrooms, waiting halls) in public buildings, schools and kindergartens, from 103 private homeplaces and from adult volunteers (148 samples). The statistical analysis of the data demonstrated that sources in the indoor environment are prevailing for most of the investigated VOCs with indoor/outdoor (I/O) concentration ratios following the order: hexanal ≈ D-limonene ≫ formaldehyde > acetone > 1-butoxy-2-propanol > acetaldehyde > propanal > 1-butanol > n-undecane > methylcyclohexane > n-dodecane. For aromatic hydrocarbons the main impact was shown to be penetration from outdoor air as indicated by I/O ratios near one and is characterised by significantly higher indoor as well as outdoor concentrations in the south of Europe with respect to the north. For the terpenes, the lowest indoor concentrations were measured during the warm season, which may be explained by higher ventilation rates and reactions with ozone penetrated from outdoor air.

  3. ‘Policy Build-Up’ in Implementation: The Case of School Meals Provision in Kodungallur, Kerala, India

    OpenAIRE

    Angelique Chettiparamb

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of the provision of school meals in Kodungallur in Kerala, India as a case of how vertical inter-governmental synergies and horizontal local linkages are brought together in programme design and implementation. The empirical data were collected for a larger cross-national study looking into homegrown school feeding undertaken by Morgan et al commissioned by the World Food Programme. The re-interpretation herein highlights aspects of subsidiarity and its...

  4. Building a Grad Nation: Progress and Challenge in Ending the High School Dropout Epidemic. Annual Update, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Robert; Bridgeland, John M.; Bruce, Mary; Fox, Joanna Hornig

    2013-01-01

    This fourth annual update on America's high school dropout crisis shows that for the first time the nation is on track to meet the goal of a 90 percent high school graduation rate by the Class of 2020--if the pace of improvement from 2006 to 2010 is sustained over the next 10 years. The greatest gains have occurred for the students of color and…

  5. A Balanced Approach to Building STEM College and Career Readiness in High School: Combining STEM Intervention and Enrichment Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Sladjana S. Rakich; Vinh Tran

    2016-01-01

    Often STEM schools and STEM enrichment programs attract primarily high achieving students or those with strong motivation or interest. However, to ensure that more students pursue interest in STEM, steps must be taken to provide access for all students. For a balanced and integrated career development focus, schools must provide learning opportunities that are appropriate for all students. This paper outlines two approaches to the creation of a comprehensive STEM College and Career developmen...

  6. Building a framework for global health learning: an analysis of global health concentrations in Canadian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watterson, Rita; Matthews, David; Bach, Paxton; Kherani, Irfan; Halpine, Mary; Meili, Ryan

    2015-04-01

    This study set out to explore the current state of global health concentrations in Canadian medical schools and to solicit feedback on the barriers and challenges to implementing rigorous global health concentration programs. A set of consensus guidelines for global health concentrations was drafted through consultation with student and faculty leaders across Canada between May 2011 and May 2012. Drawing on these guidelines, a formal survey was sent to prominent faculty at each of the 14 English-speaking Canadian medical schools. A thematic analysis of the results was then conducted. Overall, the guidelines were strongly endorsed. A majority of Canadian medical schools have programs in place to offer global health course work, extracurricular learning opportunities, local community service-learning, low-resource-setting clinical electives, predeparture training, and postreturn debriefing. Although student evaluation, global health mentorship, and knowledge translation projects were endorsed as important components, few schools had been successful in implementing them. Language training for global health remains contested. Other common critiques included a lack of time and resources, and difficulties in setting standards for student evaluation. The results suggest that these guidelines are appropriate and, at least for the major criteria, achievable. Although many Canadian schools offer individual components, the majority of schools have yet to develop formally structured concentration programs. By better articulating guidelines, a standardized framework can aid in the establishment and refinement of future programs.

  7. Perception of Educational Materials on Bio climatic Buildings: An Exploratory Study in the School Community; Percepcion de las Unidades Didacticas sobre Edificacion Bioclimatica en el Contexto Educativo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferri, S.; Sala, R.; Cornejo, J. M.

    2013-09-01

    In the framework of the ARFRISOL project on bio climatic architecture, a set of educational materials were developed to disseminate the technology in the school community. This report presents the results of an exploratory study on the effects of those educational materials in the classroom, analyzing areas such as satisfaction, level of interest, and knowledge in relation to bio climatic building. The sample consists of two groups: teachers (N = 27) and students (N 313). Two questionnaires were developed ad hoc in order to properly understand the experience with the educational materials by the students and the teachers. The results suggest that the educational materials are a good tool to spread zero emissions buildings advances in educational contexts. Both groups emphasize the need and usefulness of the topic, and the applicability of these innovations to everyday life. However, issues such as the difficulty in understanding some concepts, time dedicated or opportunity to conduct visits to project buildings appears as aspects to be adjusted and/or incorporated into the future versions. This work aims at improving communication strategies and scientific outreach of the project by raising awareness and promoting a better understanding of this topic. (Author)

  8. Exergetic analysis of the heat pump installed in the Limmat school building in Zurich; Exergieanalyse der Waermepumpe im Schulhaus Limmat - Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedl, M.

    2009-10-15

    In large buildings, heat pumps todays are only used in a small number of cases. In those rare cases, they are operated with synthetic working fluids and are mainly used for low temperature heating. Since January 2006, a heat pump with Propane as working fluid has been operating in a school building in Zuerich (Schulhaus Limmat), which provides space heating and hot water for the old building erected in 1909. As a heat source, a main channel of sewage is used, an ideal heat source, which is only rarely used nowadays. Hence, the installation has a pioneering role in many aspects and has been analysed in detail during the current project. During this project, the Propane heat pump in the Schulhaus Limmat as well as the hydraulic system have been analysed in respect to its exergetic losses. The heat pump has a seasonal performance factor of 2.7. The investigation has shown that the heat pump does not operate in an optimal way and that the hydraulic has room for improvement with respect to exergetic losses. In implementing the measures suggested in this report, the seasonal performance factor can be increased to about 4.4. (author)

  9. Building a Data Warehouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Elliott

    2002-01-01

    Describes how to build a data warehouse, using the Schools Interoperability Framework (www.sifinfo.org), that supports data-driven decision making and complies with the Freedom of Information Act. Provides several suggestions for building and maintaining a data warehouse. (PKP)

  10. A participatory and capacity-building approach to healthy eating and physical activity – SCIP-school: a 2-year controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elinder Liselotte Schäfer

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Schools can be effective settings for improving eating habits and physical activity, whereas it is more difficult to prevent obesity. A key challenge is the “implementation gap”. Trade-off must be made between expert-driven programmes on the one hand and contextual relevance, flexibility, participation and capacity building on the other. The aim of the Stockholm County Implementation Programme was to improve eating habits, physical activity, self-esteem, and promote a healthy body weight in children aged 6–16 years. We describe the programme, intervention fidelity, impacts and outcomes after two years of intervention. Methods Nine out of 18 schools in a middle-class municipality in Sweden agreed to participate whereas the other nine schools served as the comparison group (quasi-experimental study. Tailored action plans were developed by school health teams on the basis of a self-assessment questionnaire called KEY assessing strengths and weaknesses of each school’s health practices and environments. Process evaluation was carried out by the research staff. Impacts at school level were assessed yearly by the KEY. Outcome measures at student level were anthropometry (measured, and health behaviours assessed by a questionnaire, at baseline and after 2 years. All children in grade 2, 4 and 7 were invited to participate (n=1359 of which 59.8% consented. The effect of the intervention on health behaviours, self-esteem, weight status and BMIsds was evaluated by unilevel and multilevel regression analysis adjusted for gender and baseline values. Results Programme fidelity was high demonstrating feasibility, but fidelity to school action plans was only 48% after two years. Positive and significant (p Conclusions School staff has the capacity to create their own solutions and make changes at school level on the basis of self-assessment and facilitation by external agents. However these changes were challenging to sustain over

  11. The Influence of Building Block Play on Mathematics Achievement and Logical and Divergent Thinking in Italian Primary School Mathematics Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirrone, Concetta; Tienken, Christopher H.; Pagano, Tatiana; Di Nuovo, Santo

    2018-01-01

    In an experimental study to explain the effect of structured Building Block Play with LEGO™ bricks on 6-year-old student mathematics achievement and in the areas of logical thinking, divergent thinking, nonverbal reasoning, and mental imagery, students in the experimental group scored significantly higher (p = 0.05) in mathematics achievement and…

  12. Building a Math-Positive Culture: How to Support Great Math Teaching in Your School (ASCD Arias)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Cathy L.

    2016-01-01

    Cathy L. Seeley, former president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, turns the spotlight on administrative leaders who are seeking to improve their math programs, offering an overview of what an effective program looks like and examples of actions to take to achieve that goal. "Building a Math-Positive Culture" addresses…

  13. Adapting and Implementing a School-Based Resilience-Building Curriculum among Low-Income Racial and Ethnic Minority Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijadi-Maghsoodi, Roya; Marlotte, Lauren; Garcia, Ediza; Aralis, Hilary; Lester, Patricia; Escudero, Pia; Kataoka, Sheryl

    2017-01-01

    Although youth are at risk for exposure to adversity and trauma, many youth, especially ethnic and racial minorities, do not have access to mental health care. Resilience-building curriculums can teach important internal resilience skills and provide support to students who may not receive prevention or treatment services. We adapted a resilience…

  14. Character-Defining Features of Contributing Buildings and Structures in the Fort Gordon, Georgia, Signal School Campus Historic District

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    exposed concrete block walls, painted exposed waffle ceiling, and vinyl composition tiled floor in classroom building hallways (ERDC-CERL, 2015...90 Figure 129. Example of full-height blue sanitary tile in drinking fountain alcove and painted...drawing detail from 1966 [left] to the current condition of the acoustical doors [right] (ERDC- CERL, 2015

  15. A longitudinal study of sick building syndrome (SBS) among pupils in relation to SO2, NO2, O3 and PM10 in schools in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Zhao, Zhuohui; Norback, Dan

    2014-01-01

    There are fewer longitudinal studies from China on symptoms as described for the sick building syndrome (SBS). Here, we performed a two-year prospective study and investigated associations between environmental parameters such as room temperature, relative air humidity (RH), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ozone (O3), particulate matter (PM10), and health outcomes including prevalence, incidence and remission of SBS symptoms in junior high schools in Taiyuan, China. Totally 2134 pupils participated at baseline, and 1325 stayed in the same classrooms during the study period (2010-2012). The prevalence of mucosal symptoms, general symptoms and symptoms improved when away from school (school-related symptoms) was 22.7%, 20.4% and 39.2%, respectively, at baseline, and the prevalence increased during follow-up (P<0.001). At baseline, both indoor and outdoor SO2 were found positively associated with prevalence of school-related symptoms. Indoor O3 was shown to be positively associated with prevalence of skin symptoms. At follow-up, indoor PM10 was found to be positively associated with new onset of skin, mucosal and general symptoms. CO2 and RH were positively associated with new onset of mucosal, general and school-related symptoms. Outdoor SO2 was positively associated with new onset of skin symptoms, while outdoor NO2 was positively associated with new onset of skin, general and mucosal symptoms. Outdoor PM10 was found to be positively associated with new onset of skin, general and mucosal symptoms as well as school-related symptoms. In conclusion, symptoms as described for SBS were commonly found in school children in Taiyuan City, China, and increased during the two-year follow-up period. Environmental pollution, including PM10, SO2 and NO2, could increase the prevalence and incidence of SBS and decrease the remission rate. Moreover, parental asthma and allergy (heredity) and pollen or pet allergy (atopy) can be risk factors for

  16. A longitudinal study of sick building syndrome (SBS among pupils in relation to SO2, NO2, O3 and PM10 in schools in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhang

    Full Text Available There are fewer longitudinal studies from China on symptoms as described for the sick building syndrome (SBS. Here, we performed a two-year prospective study and investigated associations between environmental parameters such as room temperature, relative air humidity (RH, carbon dioxide (CO2, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, sulphur dioxide (SO2, ozone (O3, particulate matter (PM10, and health outcomes including prevalence, incidence and remission of SBS symptoms in junior high schools in Taiyuan, China. Totally 2134 pupils participated at baseline, and 1325 stayed in the same classrooms during the study period (2010-2012. The prevalence of mucosal symptoms, general symptoms and symptoms improved when away from school (school-related symptoms was 22.7%, 20.4% and 39.2%, respectively, at baseline, and the prevalence increased during follow-up (P<0.001. At baseline, both indoor and outdoor SO2 were found positively associated with prevalence of school-related symptoms. Indoor O3 was shown to be positively associated with prevalence of skin symptoms. At follow-up, indoor PM10 was found to be positively associated with new onset of skin, mucosal and general symptoms. CO2 and RH were positively associated with new onset of mucosal, general and school-related symptoms. Outdoor SO2 was positively associated with new onset of skin symptoms, while outdoor NO2 was positively associated with new onset of skin, general and mucosal symptoms. Outdoor PM10 was found to be positively associated with new onset of skin, general and mucosal symptoms as well as school-related symptoms. In conclusion, symptoms as described for SBS were commonly found in school children in Taiyuan City, China, and increased during the two-year follow-up period. Environmental pollution, including PM10, SO2 and NO2, could increase the prevalence and incidence of SBS and decrease the remission rate. Moreover, parental asthma and allergy (heredity and pollen or pet allergy (atopy can be risk

  17. A Case Study: Exploring How Elementary School Teachers Build Relationships and Interact with Homeless School-Age Students in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Valerie Ann

    2017-01-01

    In 2008-2009, nearly one million children experiencing homelessness were enrolled in school. In 2012, over 1.5 million children were identified as homeless. In a 2013 U. S. Census report, 2.5 million children were identified as homeless in America. The number of homeless children in America continues to increase every year. Homeless students are…

  18. An Emerging Theory for Evidence Based Information Literacy Instruction in School Libraries, Part 1: Building a Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Carol A. Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Objective – Part I of this paper aims to create a framework for an emerging theory of evidence based information literacy instruction. In order to ground this framework in existing theory, a holistic perspective views inquiry as a learning process that synthesizes information searching and knowledge building. An interdisciplinary approach is taken to relate user-centric information behavior theory and constructivist learning theory that supports this synthesis. The substantive theories that e...

  19. Can We Talk? Using Community-Based Participatory Action Research to Build Family and School Partnerships with Families of Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yull, Denise; Blitz, Lisa V.; Thompson, Tonia; Murray, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Research has demonstrated persistent, disproportionally negative educational outcomes for students of color, causing national concern in this area. School personnel increasingly understand the need to engage with parents as educational partners, but parents of color may feel marginalized in these efforts. This paper presents findings from a series…

  20. Quantitative Research Methods Training in Education Leadership and Administration Preparation Programs as Disciplined Inquiry for Building School Improvement Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Alex J.

    2017-01-01

    The quantitative research methods course is a staple of graduate programs in education leadership and administration. Historically, these courses serve to train aspiring district and school leaders in fundamental statistical research topics. This article argues for programs to focus as well in these courses on helping aspiring leaders develop…

  1. Developing students' worksheets applying soft skill-based scientific approach for improving building engineering students' competencies in vocational high schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparno, Sudomo, Rahardjo, Boedi

    2017-09-01

    Experts and practitioners agree that the quality of vocational high schools needs to be greatly improved. Many construction services have voiced their dissatisfaction with today's low-quality vocational high school graduates. The low quality of graduates is closely related to the quality of the teaching and learning process, particularly teaching materials. In their efforts to improve the quality of vocational high school education, the government have implemented Curriculum 2013 (K13) and supplied teaching materials. However, the results of monitoring and evaluation done by the Directorate of Vocational High School, Directorate General of Secondary Education (2014), the provision of tasks for students in the teaching materials was totally inadequate. Therefore, to enhance the quality and the result of the instructional process, there should be provided students' worksheets that can stimulate and improve students' problem-solving skills and soft skills. In order to develop worksheets that can meet the academic requirements, the development needs to be in accordance with an innovative learning approach, which is the soft skill-based scientific approach.

  2. Building a Nation: Religion and Values in the Public Schools of the USA, Australia, and South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawdsley, Ralph D.; Cumming, Jacqueline Joy; de Waal, Elda

    2008-01-01

    Although the systems of public schools differ among Australia, South Africa and the USA, all three countries recognize that religion plays a significant role in determining values. All three countries have written constitutions but only South Africa and the USA have a Bill of Rights that protects persons' exercise of religious beliefs. In…

  3. Parents as partners: Building collaborations to support the development of school readiness skills in under-resourced communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Pitt

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary, qualitative review of a therapeutic programme for preschool children and their parents in severely under-resourced contexts to aid the development of the underlying skills required to be ready for formal school. A team of two pairs, each comprising an occupational therapist and a community worker, responded to teachers' requests to assist struggling children in their classes. This led to the development of a programme focusing on Grade R classes, by firstly helping teachers to develop their capability and confidence in assessing and assisting children to develop the abilities underlying vital school-readiness skills during whole-class, therapeutic group sessions. Secondly, parent group sessions were added to empower parents to understand and support their children's development needs at home and so to complement the work done by teachers in the classroom. This second aspect, of working with the parents, developed owing to observations of the children's irregular school attendance, scant parent-school contact, and teachers' reports indicating that parents were not aware of, nor equipped to deal with, the challenges faced by their children. Implications for practice, for planning and for further research are discussed.

  4. Building Bridges between the School and the Home: Understanding the Literacy Practices of Children Living in Residential Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jennifer Poh Sim

    2015-01-01

    Research has consistently shown that children in residential care fall behind at school. This proves a great challenge for educators who have to cater to the students' needs to ensure no one is left behind. Studies investigating family literacy practices of different social classes show a positive implication if the home literacy practices are…

  5. Building Bridges in a Third Space: A Phenomenological Study of the Lived Experiences of Teaching Chinese in American Chinese Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Xuan; Lin, Jing

    2013-01-01

    This study explores the lived experiences of Chinese teachers in American Chinese Schools. Max van Manen's methodology for hermeneutic phenomenological research provides a framework for the study, and the philosophical writings of Heidegger, Gadamer, and Derrida guide the textual interpretations. Pedagogical voices of Aoki, Pinar, and Greene,…

  6. Indoor-outdoor concentrations of fine particulate matter in school building microenvironments near a mine tailing deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Martínez

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Indoor air quality in school classrooms is a major pediatric health concern because children are highly susceptible to adverse effects from xenobiotic exposure. Fine particulate matter (PM2.5 emitted from mining waste deposits within and near cities in northern Chile is a serious environmental problem. We measured PM2.5 in school microenvironments in urban areas of Chañaral, a coastal community whose bay is contaminated with mine tailings. PM2.5 levels were measured in six indoor and outdoor school environments during the summer and winter of 2012 and 2013. Measurements were taken during school hours on two consecutive days. Indoor PM2.5 concentrations were 12.53–72.38 μg/m3 in the summer and 21.85–100.53 μg/m3 in winter, while outdoor concentrations were 11.86–181.73 μg/m3 in the summer and 21.50–93.07 μg/m3 in winter. Indoor/outdoor ratios were 0.17–2.76 in the summer and 0.64–4.49 in winter. PM2.5 levels were higher in indoor microenvironments during the winter, at times exceeding national and international recommendations. Our results demonstrate that indoor air quality Chañaral school microenvironments is closely associated with outdoor air pollution attributable to the nearby mine tailings. Policymakers should enact environmental management strategies to minimize further environmental damage and mitigate the risks that this pollution poses for pediatric health.

  7. EU Project “School of the Future”— Refurbishment of School Buildings Toward Zero Emission with High-Performance Indoor Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erhorn-Kluttig, Heike; Erhorn, Hans; Kempe, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    and on the residential sector since the students will act as communicators to their families. Training sessions specifically tailored to their needs have improved user behavior and awareness of energy efficiency and indoor environment. The success is measured by how well the retrofits meet the following goals......-term measurements and questionnaires.The work of the local integrated planning teams responsible for retrofitting the demonstration buildings at each city (Stuttgart, Germany; Cesena, Italy; Ballerup, Denmark; and Drammen, Norway) was mirrored by the Design Advice and Evaluation Group, which is comprised of all...

  8. Modernisation of the energy supply and lighting systems of a school building at Erfurt; Energetische und lichttechnische Sanierung der Regelschule Erfurt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russ, C. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Solare Energiesysteme (ISE), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Gruppe Solares Bauen

    1997-12-31

    A complete energy-oriented modernization of an Erfurt type school building in large panel construction with the aid of intelligent control systems improves thermal and lighting conditions. Thermal insulation systems and efficient glazing reduce thermal energy demand by approximately 50 per cent. Equally, light-directing systems and daylight-controlled artificial lighting cut down electric energy consumption by about 50 per cent. The executed modernization, lighting system design, and ventilation requirements are discussed in detail. (MSK) [Deutsch] Anhand einer kompletten energetischen Sanierung wird der waerme und lichttechnische Zustand fuer eine Pschlattenbauschule vom Erfurter-Schultyp unter Einbeziehung intelligenter Steuersysteme verbessert. Waermedaemmung und effiziente Verglasung reduzieren den Heiwaermebedarf um ca. 50%. Lichtlenkende Systeme und eine tageslichtabhaengig gesteuerte Kunstlichtbeleuchtung minimieren die Elektroenergie ebenfalls um etwa 50%. Im Einzelnen wird auf die energetische Sanierung, auf die lichttechnische Gestaltung sowie auf den Lueftungsbedarf eingegangen.

  9. ¿Es posible construir una escuela sin exclusiones? Is it possible to build a school without exclusion?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel López Melero

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo plantea, fundamentalmente, que no se debe confundir integración educativa con escuela inclusiva y que, probablemente, esta confusión ha originado interpretaciones dispares que está originando una serie de barreras para la presencia, aprendizaje y participación de las personas y culturas diferentes en el aula. Se analizan solo las barreras didácticas y se propone como se pueden salvar las mismas para construir una escuela sin exclusiones.The main idea in this article is that we must not confuse the concept of "educational integration" with "inclusive schooling". Probably, such confusion has generated different interpretations of the above concepts resulting in barriers in learning and participation in the classroom for those who are different or who come from diverse cultural backgrounds. The article analyses mainly barriers in didactics and suggests how to overcome them in order to construct a school without exclusion.

  10. Clean air school buildings and governmental subsidy. Project ventiLation; Frisse scholen dankzij regeringssubsidie. Project VentiLeren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luigjes, B.; De Wit, J.W. [Rucon Ventilatoren, Harderwijk (Netherlands)

    2010-03-15

    The Dutch government has provided local authorities with 100 million euros to address the polluted air in class rooms of primary schools. However, this amount is not sufficient to solve the problem entirely. This problem has been solved by linking the implementation to a project dedicated to combating youth unemployment, named 'VentiLeren'. [Dutch] De Nederlandse overheid heeft 100 miljoen euro beschikbaar gesteld aan gemeenten om de vervuilde lucht in de lokalen van basisscholen aan te pakken. Dit bedrag is echter ontoereikend om het hele probleem op te lossen. Door de uitvoering ervan te koppelen aan een project ter bestrijding van jeugdwerkloosheid, ventiLeren genaamd, wordt dit opgelost.

  11. Developing learning community model with soft skill integration for the building engineering apprenticeship programme in vocational high school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Dardiri, Ahmad; Sugandi, R. Machmud

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to address the procedure, effectiveness, and problems in the implementation of learning model for Building Engineering Apprenticeship Training Programme. This study was carried out through survey method and experiment. The data were collected using questionnaire, test, and assessment sheet. The collected data were examined through description, t-test, and covariance analysis. The results of the study showed that (1) the model's procedure covered preparation course, readiness assessment, assignment distribution, handing over students to apprenticeship instructors, task completion, assisting, field assessment, report writing, and follow-up examination, (2) the Learning Community model could significantly improve students' active learning, but not improve students' hard skills and soft skills, and (3) the problems emerging in the implementation of the model were (1) students' difficulties in finding apprenticeship places and qualified instructors, and asking for relevant tasks, (2) teachers' difficulties in determining relevant tasks and monitoring students, and (3) apprenticeship instructors' difficulties in assigning, monitoring, and assessing students.

  12. History and Nature of Science in High School: Building Up Parameters to Guide Educational Materials and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forato, Thaís Cyrino de Mello; de Andrade Martins, Roberto; Pietrocola, Maurício

    2012-05-01

    This article presents the main results of a research examining the didactic transposition of history and philosophy of science in high school level. The adaptation of history of science to this particular level, addressing some aspects of the nature of science aiming at the students' critical engagement, was analyzed by examining both the historiographic requirements of history of science and the pedagogical recommendations of science teaching. The research included the elaboration of a pilot course on the history of optics, with historical texts and educational activities, and its application in a high school. We used three episodes of the history of optics, addressing some epistemological points, especially criticizing the naive empirical-inductive view of science. It was possible to identify a series of obstacles in using history of science and conveying philosophical views. Their analysis resulted in devising strategies to surmount or to circumvent them. We implemented those strategies in the classroom and analyzed the data that was obtained. As a result, we substantiated several of our proposals and found that some solutions require improvement. We suggest some generalizations, which can be understood as initial parameters for guiding the use of history and philosophy of science in science teaching. We used a qualitative methodology of educational research to plan, to collect and to analyze the data, examining the interaction between students, teacher and knowledge.

  13. Geology at Our Doorstep: Building a Partnership for Standards-Based Curriculum and Professional Development in Middle School Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, S.; Lester, A.; Cannon, E.; Forrest, A.; Bencivengo, B.; Hunter, K.

    2003-12-01

    Geology at Our Doorstep is a collaboration between a science outreach program (CIRES Outreach), students and faculty in a university geology department (U. Colorado at Boulder), and a local school district (St. Vrain Valley) to develop locally relevant geology classroom resources for use by the district's middle-school teachers. The project grew out of direct conversations with teachers about their ideas and needs and was explicitly based on district and state standards in Earth science and scientific thinking, drawing on close work with the district on standards implementation and assessment over the past two years. We intended to draw on existing curriculum resources and substitute local geologic examples to construct a "place-based" teaching resource. However, we found that generic, national-level curricula did not effectively match the rich geologic resources of our area, and instead developed a rather more substantial set of original materials, including classroom collections of regional rocks, reference materials on local geology, classroom activities, and media resources, all shared with teachers at a series of professional development workshops. While the original project was small in scale, a number of spin-off projects have evolved. This project models several important features in the development of university-K12 partnerships: consultation with districts, piloting of small projects, and the role of outreach programs in facilitating participation of university faculty and students.

  14. Energy consumptions in existing buildings; Les consommations d'energie des batiments existants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuss, St. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Arts et Industries de Strasbourg, 78 - Saint-Remy-Les-Chevreuse (France)]|[Costic, 78 - Sainte Remy les Chevreuses (France)

    2002-05-01

    This document presents a sectoral analysis of the energy consumptions in existing French buildings: 1) - residential sector: social buildings, private dwellings; 2) - tertiary sector: office buildings, hotels, commercial buildings, school buildings, hospitals; 3) - industry; 4) - general status. (J.S.)

  15. Building community partnerships to end interpersonal violence: a collaboration of the schools of social work, law, and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch-Armendariz, Noël Bridget; Johnson, Regina Jones; Buel, Sarah; Lungwitz, Jeana

    2011-09-01

    The article discusses the University of Texas at Austin's (UT Austin) Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault (IDVSA), an institution that was established in 2001. IDVSA is a collaboration of the Schools of Social Work, Law, and Nursing, and 150 community affiliates. Recognizing that interpersonal violence does not occur in a vacuum, the IDVSA operates within an ecological framework in which explanations for interpersonal violence acknowledge that individuals and families are nested in larger mezzo and macro systems, and factors such as gender, poverty, ethnicity, religion, disability, sexual orientation, and immigration status play influential roles in our understanding of these issues. The overarching goal is to advance knowledge and meaningful practice in the field through partnerships with survivors and community practitioners. Specifically, the mission is to advance the knowledge related to domestic violence and sexual assault in order to end interpersonal violence. IDVSA seeks to achieve its mission by focusing on three key areas: (1) rigorous research and scholarship on domestic violence and sexual assault; (2) comprehensive training, technical assistance, and information dissemination to the practitioner community and the community at large; and (3) substantial collaboration with our community partners. This article summarizes the authors' pursuit.

  16. School Property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piele, Philip K.; Forsberg, James R.

    The 1973 court cases relating to school property continued a trend toward litigating constitutional issues. For instance, a larger number of cases dealt with the relationship between the location and construction of school buildings and school desegregation plans. This chapter reviews the status and development of case law relating to school…

  17. Two Contrasting Approaches to Building High School Teacher Capacity to Teach About Local Climate Change Using Powerful Geospatial Data and Visualization Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalles, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The presentation will compare and contrast two different place-based approaches to helping high school science teachers use geospatial data visualization technology to teach about climate change in their local regions. The approaches are being used in the development, piloting, and dissemination of two projects for high school science led by the author: the NASA-funded Data-enhanced Investigations for Climate Change Education (DICCE) and the NSF funded Studying Topography, Orographic Rainfall, and Ecosystems with Geospatial Information Technology (STORE). DICCE is bringing an extensive portal of Earth observation data, the Goddard Interactive Online Visualization and Analysis Infrastructure, to high school classrooms. STORE is making available data for viewing results of a particular IPCC-sanctioned climate change model in relation to recent data about average temperatures, precipitation, and land cover for study areas in central California and western New York State. Across the two projects, partner teachers of academically and ethnically diverse students from five states are participating in professional development and pilot testing. Powerful geospatial data representation technologies are difficult to implement in high school science because of challenges that teachers and students encounter navigating data access and making sense of data characteristics and nomenclature. Hence, on DICCE, the researchers are testing the theory that by providing a scaffolded technology-supported process for instructional design, starting from fundamental questions about the content domain, teachers will make better instructional decisions. Conversely, the STORE approach is rooted in the perspective that co-design of curricular materials among researchers and teacher partners that work off of "starter" lessons covering focal skills and understandings will lead to the most effective utilizations of the technology in the classroom. The projects' goals and strategies for student

  18. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program: Using Goal-Oriented Applied Research as a Means of Building Comprehensive and Integrated Scientific Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostick, B. C.; Newton, R.; Vincent, S.; Peteet, D. M.; Sambrotto, R.; Schlosser, P.; Corbett, E.

    2015-12-01

    Conventional instruction in science often proceeds from the general to the specific and from text to action. Fundamental terminologies, concepts, and ideas that are often abstract are taught first and only after such introductory processes can a student engage in research. Many students struggle to find relevance when presented information without context specific to their own experiences. This challenge is exacerbated for students whose social circles do not include adults who can validate scientific learning from their own experiences. Lamont-Doherty's Secondary School Field Research Program inverts the standard paradigm and places small groups of students in research projects where they begin by performing manageable tasks on complex applied research projects. These tasks are supplemented with informal mentoring and relevant articles (~1 per week). Quantitative metrics suggest the approach is highly successful—most participants report a dramatic increase in their enthusiasm for science, 100% attend college, and approximately 50% declare majors in science or technology. We use one project, the construction of a microbial battery, to illustrate this novel model of science learning and argue that it should be considered a best practice for project-based science education. The goal of this project was to build a rechargeable battery for a mobile phone based on a geochemical cycle, to generate and store electricity. The students, mostly from ethnic groups under-represented in the STEM fields, combined concepts and laboratory methods from biology, chemistry and physics to isolate photosynthetic bacteria from a natural salt marsh, and made an in situ device capable of powering a light bulb. The younger participants had been exposed to neither high school chemistry nor physics at the start of the project, yet they were able to use the project as a platform to deepen their science knowledge and their desire for increased participation in formal science education.

  19. Learning in the passive house school makes fit for the future. First plus-energy school new building of Germany offers an enhanced user comfort; Lernen in einer Passivhaus-Schule macht fit fuer die Zukunft. Erster Plus-Energie-Schulneubau Deutschlands bietet hohen Nutzerkomfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetkemeyer, Ingo [School of Architecture Bremen (Germany); Krause, Jens [BLS Energieplan GmbH, Berlin (DE). Bereich TGA (HLS)

    2012-07-01

    Spatial quality, user comfort, energy efficiency and profitability are not incompatible, but form the basis for the interaction of a sustainable architecture. This is illustrated by the town Hohen Neuendorf (Federal Republic of Germany) using the new construction of the three class primary school in Niederheide. The 7,414 square meter great building meets the highest requirements in terms of sustainability in construction and operation. The school produces more energy than it is consumed, and is operated CO{sub 2} neutral.

  20. Implementation of project based learning on the Prakerin subject of vocational high school students of the building engineering to enhance employment skill readiness of graduates in the construction services field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugandi, Machmud

    2017-09-01

    Implementation of the Prakerin subject in the field of Building Engineering study program in vocational high school (VHS) are facing many issues associated to non-compliance unit of work in the industry and the expected competencies in learning at school. Project Based Learning (PBL) is an appropriate model learning used for Prakerin subject to increase student competence as the extension of the Prakerin implementation in the construction industry services. Assignments based on the selected project during their practical industry work were given to be completed by student. VHS students in particular field of Building Engineering study program who has been completed Prakerin subject will have a better job readiness, and therefore they will have an understanding on the knowledge, skills, and attitudes and good vision on the construction project in accordance with their experience during Prakerin work in the industry.

  1. From School of Rock to Building Core Knowledge: Teaching about Cenozoic climate change with data and case studies from the primary literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, R. M.; St John, K. K.; Jones, M. H.; Pound, K. S.; Krissek, L. A.; Peart, L. W.

    2011-12-01

    The School of Rock (SoR) began in 2005 as a pilot geoscience professional development program for K-12 teachers and informal educators aboard the JOIDES Resolution (JR). Since then, the highly successful SoR program, sponsored by the Consortium for Ocean Leadership's Deep Earth Academy, has conducted on-shore professional development at the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) core repository in College Station, TX, and on the JR. The success of the SoR program stems from the natural synergy that develops between research scientists and educators when their combined pedagogical skills and scientific knowledge are used to uncover a wealth of scientific ocean drilling discoveries and research findings. Educators are challenged with authentic inquiry based on sediment archives; these lessons from the past are then made transferable to the general public and to classrooms through the creation of age-appropriate student-active learning materials (http://www.oceanleadership.org/education/deep-earth-academy/educators/classroom-activities/). This science made accessible approach was the basis for a successful NSF Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) proposal to develop teaching materials for use at the college level. Our Building Core Knowledge project resulted in a series of 14 linked, yet independent, inquiry-based exercise modules around the theme of Reconstructing Earth's Climate History. All of the exercises build upon authentic data from peer reviewed scientific publications. These multiple part modules cover fundamental paleoclimate principles, tools and proxies, and Cenozoic case studies. It is important to teach students how we know what we know. For example, paleoclimate records must be systematically described, ages must be determined, and indirect evidence (i.e., proxies) of past climate must be analyzed. Much like the work of a detective, geoscientists and paleoclimatologists reconstruct what happened in the past, and when and how it

  2. Diagrams Showing Actions for Reducing Exposures to Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) in Indoor Building Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    This diagram compliments the document, PCBs in Building Materials: Q's & A's, on how exposure to PCBs can be assessed and reduced in school buildings. It describes actions for reducing exposures to PCBs in indoor school building environments.

  3. New scripts for old buildings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tineke van der Schoor

    2013-01-01

    STS and Energy, Lisbon 2013 Historical buildings are an important source of local identity and form a connection to our past. It is a EU policy objective to conserve and redesign heritage buildings like prisons, military barracks, factories, stations, and schools. Such redesign should also ensure

  4. Building calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bjarne Christian; Hansen, Svend Ole

    Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion......Textbook on design of large panel building including rules on robustness and a method for producing the Statical documentattion...

  5. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    IBACOS researched the constructability and viability issues of using high performance windows as one component of a larger approach to building houses that achieve the Building America 70% energy savings target.

  6. Solar building

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Luxin

    2014-01-01

    In my thesis I describe the utilization of solar energy and solar energy with building integration. In introduction it is also mentioned how the solar building works, trying to make more people understand and accept the solar building. The thesis introduces different types of solar heat collectors. I compared the difference two operation modes of solar water heating system and created examples of solar water system selection. I also introduced other solar building applications. It is conv...

  7. Is Your School Sick? Five Threats to Healthy Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubb, Deborah; Diamantes, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Examines the five major threats to healthy school buildings: sick building syndrome; health-threatening building materials; environmental hazards such as radon gas and asbestos; lead poisoning; and general indoor air quality. Discusses ways to assess and address them. (SR)

  8. Building envelope

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gibberd, Jeremy T

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This chapter describes the way building envelopes can contribute to developing green buildings and sets out some objectives that could be aimed for. It also proposes a number of approaches that can be used to help design green building envelopes...

  9. Small Schools, Great Expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergiovanni, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    Today's schools are too big. If smaller schools and classroom settings are beneficial and less costly, why do we continue to operate and build large schools? Perhaps committing to smaller schools would require us to rethink the leadership, management, and organization theories that dominate school administration. Authority should be vested in…

  10. Environmental Impact Assessment of a School Building in Iceland Using LCA-Including the Effect of Long Distance Transport of Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Nargessadat Emami; Björn Marteinsson; Jukka Heinonen

    2016-01-01

    Buildings are the key components of urban areas and society as a complex system. A life cycle assessment was applied to estimate the environmental impacts of the resources applied in the building envelope, floor slabs, and interior walls of the Vættaskóli-Engi building in Reykjavik, Iceland. The scope of this study included four modules of extraction and transportation of raw material to the manufacturing site, production of the construction materials, and transport to the buildin...

  11. Building a Foundation for School Leadership: An Evaluation of the Annenberg Distributed Leadership Project, 2006-2010. Research Report # RR-73

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supovitz, Jonathan; Riggan, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Leading school change is a challenging endeavor. Successful leadership requires strategic and sustained effort, particularly in the shifting and uncertain environment of urban public schools. The concept of distributed leadership--in which multiple actors tackle the challenges of school leadership in concert--is a promising way to strengthen…

  12. Modular Buildings Are Here To Stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Steven; Roman, Michael I.; Tiernan, Maury; Savage, Chuck; Airikka, Robert; Brosius, Jerry L.

    2000-01-01

    Presents several examples of modular building construction being used be school districts to support their need for more space, building flexibility, and enhancement of the learning environment. Comparisons with traditionally built school facilities are offered as are answers to commonly held myths concerning modular construction. (GR)

  13. The researchers have left the building: what contributes to sustaining school-based interventions following the conclusion of formal research support?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, Sarah; Flattum, Colleen F; Simpson, Danielle; Nederhoff, Dawn M; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the sustainability of New Moves, a school-based program aimed at decreasing weight-related problems in adolescent girls. The National Cancer Institute recognizes New Moves as a research-tested intervention program that produced positive behavioral and psychosocial outcomes. Ten schools participated in the sustainability study. Teachers completed a survey and interview, and research staff observed 1 physical education (PE) class within 2 years of the study's completion. Qualitative data were grouped by themes. Frequencies were calculated using quantitative data. All schools continued all-girls PE classes using New Moves components following the study period. Fewer schools continued the nutrition and social support classroom modules and individual coaching sessions while no schools continued lunch get-togethers. Program components were sustained in both New Moves intervention schools and control schools. Programs are most likely to be sustained if they (1) fit into the current school structure, (2) receive buy-in by teachers, and (3) require minimal additional funds or staff time. Providing control schools with minimal training and intervention resources was sufficient to continue program components if staff perceived the program was important for students' health and compatible within the school's existing infrastructure. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  14. The Perceived Effects of a Skill Building Course Upon the Educational and Social Survival of Black Students at a Suburban High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Richard Alvin

    The purpose of this study was to research the effectiveness of a skill building course upon the educational and social survival of black students at a predominantly white middle class suburgan high achool. The subjects involved were two groups of students (N=50) who volunteered for the skill building course. These subjects were identified from…

  15. Laboratory Building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Joshua M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  16. Technical and economical feasibility study for energy re-qualification of school buildings in Bertesina `M. Montessori`, Vicenza (Italy); Studio di fattibilita` tecnico ed economico per la riqualificazione energetica del centro scolastico di Bertesina `M. Montessori` (Vicenza)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelini, M.; Minischetti, M.; Parutto, R.; Porfiri, M.T. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energetica; Trevisan, F. [Azienda Municipalizzata Case Popolari e Servizi, Vicenza (Italy)

    1993-04-01

    Educational buildings have been object of several activities by ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technology, Energy and Environment), referring to the possibilities of energy saving in accordance with the comfort and the hygiene regulations provided by the law (see Acta of the seminar: `Interventi di miglioramento energetico nelle scuole`, Roma, 26-27 ottobre 1989). The present work is the first concrete experience of collaboration with a municipal enterprise (AMCPS) which manages the school buildings of the Municipality of Vicenza. In particular, we have analyzed the interventions on the building envelope (substitution of windows and doors, insulations by modern technics, elimination of old dampers for ventilation, installation of heat regenerator from exhausted air, improvements on lighting sources, etc. ) and on the heating plant and hot water production (substitution of old boilers with high efficiency boilers, reduction of thermal losses from piping, etc. ). These actions have been defined on the basis of an extensive acquisition data about the comfort within some schools whose heating plant is managed by AMCPS.

  17. Asbestos in Buildings: What You Should Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safe Buildings Alliance, Washington, DC.

    Thirty-one critical questions about asbestos, its use in school buildings, and the risks it poses to health are answered in this booklet. Issued by the Safe Buildings Alliance, an incorporated association of manufacturers that once supplied asbestos-containing materials for building construction, the booklet's purpose is to provide information…

  18. Building sustainability

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mass Media

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available proactive,” Van Wyk says. “Demand for greener buildings is slowly beginning to increase among tenants. If asset managers do not take action, the value of assets will depreciate rapidly, and this will make the building obsolete within five years...

  19. Socio-psychological characteristics of the leaders of today's schools: the role of emotional intelligence in building a model of an effective leader

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mironova S.G

    2017-01-01

    .... Emotional intelligence, as one of the socio-psychological characteristics of personality, showed the closest relationship with the components of attitude of heads of schools towards his subordinates...

  20. Supporting occupational therapists implementing a capacity-building model in schools: Appuyer les ergothérapeutes mettant en œuvre un modèle de renforcement des capacités dans les écoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Nancy A; Dix, Leah; Whalen, Sandra Sahagian; Campbell, Wenonah N; Missiuna, Cheryl A

    Adopting a new model of clinical practice is complex. Professional development programs based on best-practice principles may facilitate this process. This paper describes the development and evaluation of a multifaceted professional development program designed to support school-based occupational therapists to deliver a capacity-building model of service. Twenty-two therapists participated in the program; completed pre-post evaluations of knowledge, skills, and beliefs; evaluated specific components of the training program; and participated in focus groups. Quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Qualitative data were analyzed using a directed content analysis. Therapists' perceptions of their knowledge and skills showed statistically significant change. Both training and mentorship were highly valued; however, having opportunities to build peer networks was considered essential. Multifaceted professional development programs designed using best-practice principles are an important mechanism for facilitating practice change. Including a process for peer support is advised.

  1. Linking Regulation of Practitioner School Psychology and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child: The Need to Build a Bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Kevin; Bond, Caroline

    2014-01-01

    In 2014, the 25th anniversary of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child presents an opportunity for school psychology to evaluate its achievements relevant to the Convention, as well as its current and future strategic adherence to the Convention's principles. With analysis of key school psychology documentation from the UK, it…

  2. Invisible Walls: A Study of Racial Division and the Challenge of Building Bridges of Understanding in the St. Paul, MN Area Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    People for the American Way, Washington, DC.

    This is a report of a 6-month study of race relations in three public schools in the Saint Paul (Minnesota) metropolitan area. The study is intended to be the first phase of an attempt to improve intergroup relations and the social climate in Saint Paul, Roseville, and South St. Paul schools. Based on 154 interviews, 10 focus groups, and a written…

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF DIGITAL COMPETENCIES OF PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS THROUGH BUILDING KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS FOR WORKING WITH VISUAL PROGRAMMING ENVIRONMENT WITHIN MATH PROJECT WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumyana Y. Papancheva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a review of the contemporary school, the digital generation and the need of teachers equipped with new knowledge and skills, in particular – basic programming skills. The last change of educational system in Bulgaria after the adoption of the new pre-school and general school education act is analysed. New primary school curricula and new standards for teacher’s qualification were implemented. The new school subject “Computer modelling” is presented. Some experience of the authors from project-based work in mathematics with teachers and students is described. The aim is the formation of skills of programming by working within Scratch – visual environment for block-based coding. Some conclusions and ideas for future work are formulated.

  4. Prescriptions for Sick Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornstein, Allan C.

    1993-01-01

    Increasing insulation in schools as an energy-saving measure has given rise to the Sick Building Syndrome (SBS), which afflicts roughly one-third of the nation's schools. This article examines asbestos, radon, electromagnetic radiation, and chemical pollutants and describes steps to make schools environmentally safe for students. School officials…

  5. Modern Steel Framed Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Inst. of Steel Construction, Inc., New York, NY.

    In view of the cost of structural framing for school buildings, ten steel-framed schools are examined to review the economical advantages of steel for school construction. These schools do not resemble each other in size, shape, arrangement or unit cost; some are original in concept and architecture, and others are conservative. Cost and…

  6. Building Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Cary, North Carolina — Explore real estate information about buildings in the Town of Cary.This file is created by the Town of Cary GIS Group. It contains data from both the Wake, Chatham...

  7. Overcoming barriers to ‘flip’: building teacher’s capacity for the adoption of flipped classroom in Hong Kong secondary schools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tianchong Wang

    2017-01-01

    .... Through the lens of Ertmer’s first- and second-order barriers to change, this paper presents a study began with the need to understand barriers to the adoption of flipped classroom in Hong Kong public secondary schools...

  8. STAR Healthy Schools: Environmental Factors, Children’s Health and Performance, and Sustainable Building Practices Kick-off Meeting and Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    STAR grantees will describe their planned research and hear from EPA programs and a regional schools coordinator about EPA’s programs and resources. A guest speaker will provide a lunchtime seminar.

  9. Socio-psychological characteristics of the leaders of today's schools: the role of emotional intelligence in building a model of an effective leader

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mironova S.G.

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data of study of expression of emotional intelligence in school leaders. Emotional intelligence, as one of the socio-psychological characteristics of personality, showed the closest relationship with the components of attitude of heads of schools towards his subordinates. In turn, these components of the relationship, in our opinion, represent a modern model of the head of school. The study surveyed 101 head of school from the Moscow region in age from 26 to 65 years males - 8.9 per cent; the Director of schools is 57, the position of Deputy Director of school on teaching and educational work of 44 people, a complex of six methods. One of which is the Author's questionnaire, the study of socio-psychological personality characteristics and components of attitude of heads of schools to subordinates-teachers. The rest EMIN questionnaire D. V. Lyusina, allowing to identify the level of emotional intelligence, the scale of personal anxiety CH. D. Spielberger, L. Y. Hanin, diagnosis of Machiavellianism personality of V. V. Znakov, the scale measure the level of sociability of the individual L.N. Lutoshkina, diagnosis of the tendency to stress G. Jackson. On the basis of obtained results it is concluded that the most important socio-psychological characteristics of personality is the emotional intelligence that allows a supervisor not only to understand their own and others ' emotions, to manage them successfully, but also contribute to the ability to arouse certain feelings in the people around them. Model the relationship of the heads of educational institutions to the staff, includes three components: emotional, behavioral and cognitive. It is suggested that such socio-psychological characteristics of personality as emotional intelligence, manipulative, sociability, anxiety and stress have a close relationship with all components of the attitude of heads of schools for their employees.

  10. The Dutch CanSat competition : How 350 secondary school pupils compete to build the most innovative 'satellite' in a soda can

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eerkens, R.H.P.; Van Breukelen, E.; Verhoeven, C.J.M.; Vollebregt, S.; Fitié, A.

    2008-01-01

    The CanSat competition is intended to give pupils the chance to get practical experience in building complex systems in a multidisciplinary environment. Aerospace is the place where this specific combination of science and engineering emerges. It is not only interesting for scientists and

  11. The River Rock School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gereaux, Teresa Thomas

    1999-01-01

    In the early 1920s, the small Appalachian community of Damascus, Virginia, used private subscriptions and volunteer labor to build a 15-classroom school made of rocks from a nearby river and chestnut wood from nearby forests. The school building's history, uses for various community activities, and current condition are described. (SV)

  12. Sustainable Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Elle, Morten

    The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems that ...... that need urgent action. The built environment is an obvious area to put effort into because of the large and cost-effective energy saving potential and potential for Renewable Energy-based supply systems for buildings.......The scientific community agrees that: all countries must drastically and rapidly reduce their CO2 emissions and that energy efficient houses play a decisive role in this. The general attitude at the workshop on Sustainable Buildings was that we face large and serious climate change problems...

  13. Building Procurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2007-01-01

    ‘The procurement of construction work is complex, and a successful outcome frequently elusive’. With this opening phrase of the book, the authors take on the challenging job of explaining the complexity of building procurement. Even though building procurement systems are, and will remain, complex...... despite this excellent book, the knowledge, expertise, well-articulated argument and collection of recent research efforts that are provided by the three authors will help to make project success less elusive. The book constitutes a thorough and comprehensive investigation of building procurement, which...... evolves from a simple establishment of a contractual relationship to a central and strategic part of construction. The authors relate to cultural, ethical and social and behavioural sciences as the fundamental basis for analysis and understanding of the complexity and dynamics of the procurement system...

  14. Building Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The report Building Bridges adresses the questions why, how and for whom academic audience research has public value, from the different points of view of the four working groups in the COST Action IS0906 Transforming Audiences, Transforming Societies – “New Media Genres, Media Literacy and Trust...... in the Media”, “Audience Interactivity and Participation”, “The Role of Media and ICT Use for Evolving Social Relationships” and “Audience Transformations and Social Integration”. Building Bridges is the result of an ongoing dialogue between the Action and non-academic stakeholders in the field of audience...

  15. Competence Building

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana; Edquist, Charles

    on the one hand, and the real world of innovation policy-making on the other, typically not speaking to each other. With this purpose in mind, this paper discusses the role of competences and competence-building in the innovation process from a perspective of innovation systems; it examines how governments...... and public agencies in different countries and different times have actually approached the issue of building, maintaining and using competences in their innovation systems; it examines what are the critical and most important issues at stake from the point of view of innovation policy, looking particularly...

  16. Mold and Indoor Air Quality in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Respiratory Disease from Exposures Caused by Dampness in Office Buildings, Schools, and Other Nonindustrial Buildings . Exit The guidance includes a building inspection checklist and may be of interest to people working ...

  17. School Flooring Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, John

    2012-01-01

    With all of the hype that green building is receiving throughout the school facility-management industry, it's easy to overlook some elements that may not be right in front of a building manager's nose. It is helpful to examine the role floor covering plays in a green building project. Flooring is one of the most significant and important systems…

  18. Earthquakes and Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Earthquakes are low-probability, high-consequence events. Though they may occur only once in the life of a school, they can have devastating, irreversible consequences. Moderate earthquakes can cause serious damage to building contents and non-structural building systems, serious injury to students and staff, and disruption of building operations.…

  19. Hiring Effective Secondary School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, Jason M.; Miller, Lynne Guillot

    2008-01-01

    Today's effective school counselors are integral in education reform, school leadership, and student achievement. It is typically the responsibility of building principals to hire effective school counselors. This article builds on previous literature and provides principals with questions to ask and information to gather that may be helpful in…

  20. 校長道德發展及其品德校園營造之質性探究 Qualitative Inquiry on Principals’ Moral Development and Their Building of Morality and Character in Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    李琪明 Chi-Ming Angela Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available 本研究結合品德教育與校長領導理念,聚焦中小學校長之道德發展及其校園營造關鍵角色,希冀達致具體研究目的有三:一為瞭解中小學校長的道德發展意涵;二為瞭解中小學校長營造品德校園的策略;三為對於校長道德發展及其品德校園營造提出反省與建議。研究者透過親訪19 所中小學校園,以半結構式深度訪談其校長,並以質性探究之詮釋學方法進行訪談內容的剖析,歸納出研究結果的四個主軸:校長對於品德教育的觀點、校長面臨的道德兩難議題及其考量因素、校長的德育信念與道德核心價值,以及校長的品德校園營造策略等面向的特點。藉由理念基礎與實徵文獻對於研究結果的辯證與批判,提出對於校長領導、品德教育及進一步研究之建議。 This study focuses on the moral development of principals and their central role in school culture building based on connections between moral dimension and principal leadership in this study. The three purposes of this study are as follows: (1 Understanding principals’ moral development; (2 understanding principals’ strategies for building morality and character in schools; and (3 providing a reflection and suggestions regarding principals’ moral development and the building of morality and character in schools. We held a semistructured interview with 19 elementary and high school principals in Taiwan and visited each of their campuses. Using hermeneutics as a methodological approach in qualitative research, we reached four aspects of findings: perspectives on morality and character education, moral dilemma and influential factors, moral belief and core ethical values, and strategies for building morality and character in schools from principals’ self-reflections. This study offers implications and suggestions on morality and character education, and principal leadership through a

  1. Structure Building

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, J.E.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    I argue that structure building (e.g. Chomsky’s Merge) is not part of the narrow language faculty (FLN, contra Hauser, Chomsky & Fitch 2002). FLN is not empty, though: it consists of a lexico-grammatical component that defines grammatical objects, (non- recursive) combinatory rules/principles,

  2. Existing buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram-Hanssen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    their homes. These policy measures include building regulations, energy tax and different types of incentives and information dissemination. The conclusion calls for new and innovative policy measures to cope with the realities of renovations of owner-occupied houses and how energy efficiency improvement...

  3. Building Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambler, Marjane

    1994-01-01

    Describes how an initial $1,500 grant helped build a desperately needed health clinic on the Pine Ridge Reservation. Provides the history of the clinic, from its beginning as a small grant to its ultimate development into a $400,000 solar-heated health clinic with a staff of 9 people, including a full-time physician. (MAB)

  4. EMS Activations for School-Aged Children From Public Buildings, Places of Recreation or Sport, and Health Care Facilities in Pennsylvania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catherine, Andrew T; Olympia, Robert P

    2016-06-01

    To determine the etiology of emergency medical services (EMS) activations in 2011 to public buildings, places of recreation or sport, and health care facilities involving children aged 5 to 18 years in Pennsylvania. Electronic records documenting 2011 EMS activations as provided by the Pennsylvania Department of Health's Bureau of EMS were reviewed. Data elements (demographics, dispatch complaint, mechanism of injury, primary assessment) from patients aged 5 to 18 years involved in an EMS response call originating from either a public building, a place of recreation and sport, or health care facility were analyzed. A total of 12,289 records were available for analysis. The most common primary assessments from public buildings were traumatic injury, behavioral/psychiatric disorder, syncope/fainting, seizure, and poisoning. The most common primary assessments from places of recreation or sport were traumatic injury, syncope/fainting, altered level of consciousness, respiratory distress, and abdominal pain. The most common primary assessments from health care facilities were behavioral/psychiatric disorder, traumatic injury, abdominal pain, respiratory distress, and syncope/fainting. When examining the mechanism of injury for trauma-related primary assessments, falls were the most common mechanism at all 3 locations, followed by being struck by an object. Of the 1335 serious-incident calls (11% of the total EMS activations meeting inclusion criteria), 61.2% were from public buildings, 14.1% from places of recreation or sport, and 24.7% from health care facilities. Our identification of common EMS dispatch complaints, mechanisms of injury, and primary assessments can be used in the education of staff and preparation of facilities for medical emergencies and injuries where children spend time.

  5. "Canteiro Escola"--Uma Resposta da Industria da Construcao no Contexto Produtivo Atual (The "Building Site" School--A Construction Industry Answer in the Actual Productive Context).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Rosa Elisa; Letelier, Maria Eugenia

    1995-01-01

    Presents examples of the discourse of construction industry personnel involved in workplace basic education in Brazil. Reports on the perspective of the workers/students and on the experiences and the vision of those who implement the educational programs. Identifies the limits of the schooling process and the difficulties inherent in the present…

  6. Classroom Temperature, Clothing and Thermal Comfort -- A Study of Secondary School Children in Summertime. Building Research Establishment Current Paper 22/74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, M. A.

    1974-01-01

    This article describes a study of summertime classroom temperature and its relationship to the clothing worn by English secondary school children. Data on classroom temperatures and children's clothing were recorded during one summer for a total of 987 lessons. Analysis of the data showed that the strong clothing-temperature correlation could be…

  7. Introducing Values of Peace Education in Quranic Schools in Western Africa: Advantages and Challenges of the Islamic Peace-Building Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nimer, Mohammed; Nasser, Ilham; Ouboulahcen, Seddik

    2016-01-01

    Quranic schools (QS) play a central role in the education system in the Islamic world. Despite their relatively small numbers, QS teachers play a major role in introducing Islamic values to the public. Thus, working with QS becomes a key strategy in influencing local Islamic discourse. This article introduces a case study of a program integrating…

  8. Teaching Energy Science as Inquiry: Reflections on Professional Development as a Tool to Build Inquiry Teaching Skills for Middle and High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraphin, Kanesa Duncan; Philippoff, Joanna; Parisky, Alex; Degnan, Katherine; Warren, Diana Papini

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid (face-to-face and online) professional development (PD) course focused on energy science for middle and high school teachers (N = 47) was conducted using the teaching science as inquiry (TSI) framework. Data from the PD indicates that online opportunities enhanced participation and that the TSI structure improved teachers' inquiry…

  9. Building District Capacity for System-Wide Instructional Improvement in Jefferson County Public Schools. Working Paper. GE Foundation "Developing Futures"™ in Education Evaluation Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darfler, Anne; Riggan, Matt

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes findings from one component of the Consortium for Policy Research in Education's (CPRE) evaluation of the General Electric Foundation's (GEF) "Developing Futures"™ in Education program in Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS). As described in the CPRE proposal and research design, the purpose was to closely…

  10. FUNCTION Follows FORM: Building the Foundations for Student Achievement Employing "School as a Teaching Tool" Protocol a Place-Based Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Joseph; Alvarado, Manuel Cordero

    2011-01-01

    The experience of observing students actively engaged in the learning process is precious. There is no better way to celebrate "Children's Health and Energy Awareness Month" than assembling in a world class high performance green school with gifted and talented students learning how to take an integrated approach to sustainable school…

  11. Building the Interest of High School Students for Science--A PACT Ambassador Program to Investigate Soap Manufacturing and Industrial Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Matthew; Geary, Nicholas; Hagaman, Karen; Munson, Anne; Sabo, Mark

    1999-01-01

    Describes a program for bringing industrial applications of technology into high schools to enhance students' perceptions of the chemical industry and industrial careers in chemistry. Ambassadors from the Proctor and Gamble Company and Miami University--Middletown helped students work through a typical product-development cycle for fabricating…

  12. Sustainable schools. Better than traditional schools?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiler, W. [Kropman Installatietechniek, Rijswijk (Netherlands); Boxem, G. [TU/e Building Services, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2008-10-15

    In the United Kingdom several educational buildings were built in the last decades with a strong environmental ethos, real icons of a new generation of low-energy sustainable buildings. For some of the buildings the performance was assessed. Also in the Netherlands several new concepts were developed for sustainable schools during the last years. This is an interesting topic as many of those schools had problems concerning energy efficiency, indoor air quality and thermal comfort. In the case of sustainable schools much effort was put into the design process of the schools to try to find better solutions to face the problems of the traditional designs. This resulted in different solution concepts, which raises the question which are better school concepts. From the literature three evaluations from the UK and one overview of five sustainable educational buildings from the Netherlands are given, which show that sustainable educational buildings are not always without flaws. In the paper two of the first Dutch sustainable elementary schools are compared with nine more traditional schools of the Netherlands to conclude whether the sustainable schools perform better than traditional schools.

  13. Court Buildings, LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including the locations and building footprints of schools, churches, government buildings, law enforcement and emergency response offices, pha, Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Court Buildings dataset current as of 2011. LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including...

  14. Building a Culinary Arts Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert L.

    2005-01-01

    When Judy Karen Brown (the 2004 Alabama Family and Consumer Sciences Teacher of the Year) arrived at Bob Jones High School (BJHS) in Madison, Alabama, in the summer of 1999, she immediately identified a need to build both student and community interests in family and consumer sciences (FACS). She noticed the student and faculty interest in the…

  15. Building economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, D.O.(red.)

    Publikationen er på engelsk. Den omfatter alle indlæg på det fjerde internationale symposium om byggeøkonomi, der blev arrangeret af SBI for det internationale byggeforskningsråd CIB. De fem bind omhandler: Methods of Economic Evaluation, Design Optimization, Ressource Utilization, The Building...... Market og Economics and Technological Forecasting in Construction. Et indledende bind bringer statusrapporter for de fem forskningsområder, og det sidste bind sammenfatter debatten på symposiet....

  16. Changing How Schools and the Profession Are Organized: Building a Foundation for a National System of Teacher Career Ladders at the National Center on Education and the Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Keo, Seng-Dao

    2016-01-01

    This capstone examines the National Center on Education and the Economy’s (NCEE) efforts in its initial planning stage to lead the design of and build support for a proposed national system of teacher career ladders. In this career ladder system, teachers can voluntarily seek advanced certification leading up to the role of Master Teacher, and states can volunteer to use the system and determine how to use it. I describe my role in strengthening NCEE’s relationship with the National Board for...

  17. Optimization of Design and Planing VHS Building Using Chronolux

    OpenAIRE

    Beta Paramita; Ismahnida Kamilia; Muhammad Iqbal Nurhidayat; Resty Ocktaviyane

    2016-01-01

    Gedebage integrated vocational high school (SMK) is a school which accommodates the concept of technopolis. The school has four programs: building engineering, family welfare education (PKK/food service), mechanical engineering, and tourism - which produce skilled and ready-to-work graduates. This article aims to recommend the sun exposure toward the building of the school, which is related to site planning and design strategies based on the duration of solar radiation on vegetation, and buil...

  18. Building Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbotham, Julie S.

    1997-01-01

    A Texas school district near El Paso and the Mexican border has established the Student Entrepreneur Center: a K-12 program stressing hands-on application of basic business principles. The district is transforming a 16-acre site into a combination learning center and tourist destination. (MLF)

  19. Nursery school

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Nursery school was founded in 1961 in Meyrin, before it found a new home on the CERN site in 1965. It expanded from a “garderie” in the morning-only with 30 children, to the Crèche/Kindergarten/School with 147 children and 42 staff we have today. Every year the Nursery school makes an art exhibition in the main building. In 2000 the theme was “Monet’s garden” and it was complete, not even the little bridge was missing! This year, the theme of the exhibition was transport. We could see a garbage truck, a train, and much more.

  20. East Timor: Building on the Early Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, Berenice

    2004-01-01

    When the East Timorese voted for Independence in 1999 they at least expected to have infrastructure, such as school buildings, available as they started the task of building a new nation. The post-Independence destruction also meant that unexpected priority decisions about what should be built, or rebuilt, first had to be made. In a country…

  1. Four Essential Practices for Building Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Julie Peterson; Harris, Sandra; Edmonson, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    The presence of trust can enhance an organization's efforts to fulfill its mission, and the lack of trust can constrict those efforts. The authors offer four essential guidelines to help school leaders communicate in a way that builds trust. Build trust by understanding trust. Trusted leaders demonstrate care, character, and competence in their…

  2. Designing an Earthquake-Resistant Building

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Lyn D.; King, Donna T.

    2016-01-01

    How do cross-bracing, geometry, and base isolation help buildings withstand earthquakes? These important structural design features involve fundamental geometry that elementary school students can readily model and understand. The problem activity, Designing an Earthquake-Resistant Building, was undertaken by several classes of sixth- grade…

  3. 'Buildings in Use' Study. Functional Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ., Milwaukee. School of Architecture and Urban Planning.

    The third report of the 'Buildings in Use' study specifically addresses those aspects of a building that directly support user activity. These are areas of 'activity support' exclusive of furniture that include studies of specialized areas and functions within the school as well as storage, classroom display, window usage, and some activity…

  4. Cultivating an Ethical School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starratt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Often the school is left as an institution seemingly ethically neutral, leaving untouched questions about whether the school itself is a site of injustice toward both educators and children. Springing from his well-known "Building an Ethical School", Robert J. Starratt now looks more closely at the educational leader's responsibility to ensure…

  5. Sustainable building versus ecological building

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available and Grosskopf posit that in the future three basic contemporary approaches will be synthesised into an integrated process and that ecological design will become a part of a new design process. The three contemporary processes are: vernacular design..., the technological approach, and the biomimetic approach. Vernacular architecture is the embodiment of cultural wisdom, memory, tradition and intimate knowledge of place into the design and operation of buildings. Vernacular architecture speaks directly...

  6. “BANCA DEL FARE” SUMMER SCHOOL IN ALTA LANGA: «THE RUINS TO BE REBUILT WILL BE OUR CLASSROOMS». KNOWLEDGE FROM ARTISANS TO NEW GENERATIONS, FROM ANCIENT SKILLS TO NEW BUILDING TECHNIQUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Villata

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available “Banca del fare” is an ambitious project proposed by “Cultural Park Alta Langa”. It is born to hand ancient knowledges down to young people, as meeting place useful to exchange the development of new construction techniques and at the same time the traditional ones. A program of educational workshops, which constitute the summer school, was organized for increasing communication among different generations. Indeed, the last local craftsmen or artisans are coming out from their employment and there is no training process to ensure the migration of knowledge to young architects. The activities of the school took place for the first time during summer of 2016 in Alta Langa, the southern part of Langhe in Piedmont. The landscape of this area is marked by small rural architectures called “ciabòts” shed all over the countryside. Artisans and students work together to recover these buildings every year. The aim of this landscape heritage’s valorization is to relate the restored ciabòt into a network, in order to create a widespread hotels system. Therefore, the essay wants to present the results of “Banca del fare” and to suggest a GIS project that can gather information about numerous “ciabòt” widespread in this territory. The interaction between land development and networking process can ensure the optimal reuse of these rural architectures.

  7. "banca del Fare" Summer School in Alta Langa: «THE Ruins to BE Rebuilt Will BE Our CLASSROOMS». Knowledge from Artisans to New Generations, from Ancient Skills to New Building Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villata, M.

    2017-05-01

    "Banca del fare" is an ambitious project proposed by "Cultural Park Alta Langa". It is born to hand ancient knowledges down to young people, as meeting place useful to exchange the development of new construction techniques and at the same time the traditional ones. A program of educational workshops, which constitute the summer school, was organized for increasing communication among different generations. Indeed, the last local craftsmen or artisans are coming out from their employment and there is no training process to ensure the migration of knowledge to young architects. The activities of the school took place for the first time during summer of 2016 in Alta Langa, the southern part of Langhe in Piedmont. The landscape of this area is marked by small rural architectures called "ciabòts" shed all over the countryside. Artisans and students work together to recover these buildings every year. The aim of this landscape heritage's valorization is to relate the restored ciabòt into a network, in order to create a widespread hotels system. Therefore, the essay wants to present the results of "Banca del fare" and to suggest a GIS project that can gather information about numerous "ciabòt" widespread in this territory. The interaction between land development and networking process can ensure the optimal reuse of these rural architectures.

  8. Wilbert Snow School, Middletown, Connecticut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathersby, William, Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Connecticut elementary school design that integrates the natural outdoor environment with the school, unites several buildings into a unified whole, and preserves forest pathways for public use. Photos and a floor plan are included. (GR)

  9. Sofrimento escolar como impedimento da construção de conhecimento/subjetividade School suffering as an obstacle to knowledge/subjectivity building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nize Maria Campos Pellanda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A partir de reflexões sobre as conseqüências da modernidade em termos de uma profunda fragmentação das dimensões da realidade como gênese de sofrimento dos alunos através de práticas pedagógicas contrárias às necessidades dos seres humanos, elaboramos a questão central de pesquisa: As práticas formalistas e fragmentadoras das dimensões do fazer, do ser e do conhecer podem redundar em dor e sofrimento comprometendo o desenvolvimento integral dos alunos? Descrevemos os pressupostos teóricos oriundos do paradigma da complexidade e como eles sustentam o arcabouço lógico-teórico da investigação. Os referenciais teóricos mais importantes foram buscados na Teoria da Biologia da Cognição, desenvolvida por H. Maturana e F. Varela, cujo eixo central é a questão da inseparabilidade entre construção do conhecimento e construção de sujeito.Reflections on the consequences of modernity, seen as a deep fragmentation of reality dimensions that makes students suffer because of pedagogical practices contrary to human needs, led us to main question of this research: can the formalist and fragmentizing practices of the dimensions of making, being and knowing cause pain and suffering that jeopardize the full development of students? We describe the theoretical assumptions derived from the complexity paradigm and how they support the logical-theoretical structure of investigation. The most import theoretical frameworks were drawn from the theory of the Biology of Cognition developed by H. Maturana and F. Verela, whose main thrust is the issue of the inseparability knowledge building and subject building.

  10. Energy efficient and healthy buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gullberg, Monica [AaF Process (Sweden); Oefverholm, Egil [Swedish Energy Agency, Eskilstuna (Sweden); Bengtsson, Magnus; Tolstoy, Nikolaj [National Board of Housing, Building and Planning (Sweden)

    2007-07-01

    Indoor environment has become an important subject matter in Scandinavia since increasingly many buildings demonstrate poor indoor air quality, problems with mould and other sick building syndromes. There are worries that the malignity is derived from tighter constructions and more sparse ventilation since problems have been escalating contemporary to better energy efficiency in the building stock. Based on this possible linkage, Sweden has decided to include also indoor environment aspects in the implementation of the directive on energy declaration of buildings. By the same token, a co-operation between the Swedish Energy Agency and the National Board of Housing, Building and Planning is underway where more than 100 schools are investigated regarding their energy usage patterns as well as their indoor environment status. Results from this inventory will be elaborated in this paper. The hypothesis for the investigation is that it is quite possible to demonstrate energy efficient and healthy buildings, and therefore results will give no significant statistical linkage between poor indoor quality and low specific energy use. Preliminary findings underpin this assumption. The paper will discuss the factors and their statistical interaction in more detail, and a discussion will be held on what other reasons there can be behind the sick buildings.

  11. Vallivue Middle School: Our Schools Are Our Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principal Leadership, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Vallivue School District, located about 20 minutes from Boise, Idaho, can trace its origins to 13 rural schools scattered throughout Canyon County. The schools served students from kindergarten through eighth grade, and each building was independently administered by local school boards. Those boards were consolidated into a single district in…

  12. California commercial building energy benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, Satkartar; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-07-01

    Building energy benchmarking is the comparison of whole-building energy use relative to a set of similar buildings. It provides a useful starting point for individual energy audits and for targeting buildings for energy-saving measures in multiple-site audits. Benchmarking is of interest and practical use to a number of groups. Energy service companies and performance contractors communicate energy savings potential with ''typical'' and ''best-practice'' benchmarks while control companies and utilities can provide direct tracking of energy use and combine data from multiple buildings. Benchmarking is also useful in the design stage of a new building or retrofit to determine if a design is relatively efficient. Energy managers and building owners have an ongoing interest in comparing energy performance to others. Large corporations, schools, and government agencies with numerous facilities also use benchmarking methods to compare their buildings to each other. The primary goal of Task 2.1.1 Web-based Benchmarking was the development of a web-based benchmarking tool, dubbed Cal-Arch, for benchmarking energy use in California commercial buildings. While there were several other benchmarking tools available to California consumers prior to the development of Cal-Arch, there were none that were based solely on California data. Most available benchmarking information, including the Energy Star performance rating, were developed using DOE's Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), which does not provide state-level data. Each database and tool has advantages as well as limitations, such as the number of buildings and the coverage by type, climate regions and end uses. There is considerable commercial interest in benchmarking because it provides an inexpensive method of screening buildings for tune-ups and retrofits. However, private companies who collect and manage consumption data are concerned that the

  13. Schools K-12, LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including the locations and building footprints of schools, churches, government buildings, law enforcement and emergency response offices, pha, Published in 2011, 1:12000 (1in=1000ft) scale, LSU Louisiana Geographic Information Center (LAGIC).

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — Schools K-12 dataset current as of 2011. LAGIC is consulting with local parish GIS departments to create spatially accurate point and polygons data sets including...

  14. Teaching Energy Science as Inquiry: Reflections on Professional Development as a Tool to Build Inquiry Teaching Skills for Middle and High School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraphin, Kanesa Duncan; Philippoff, Joanna; Parisky, Alex; Degnan, Katherine; Warren, Diana Papini

    2013-06-01

    A hybrid (face-to-face and online) professional development (PD) course focused on energy science for middle and high school teachers (N = 47) was conducted using the teaching science as inquiry (TSI) framework. Data from the PD indicates that online opportunities enhanced participation and that the TSI structure improved teachers' inquiry implementation. Teachers found the TSI modes of inquiry easily accessible and effectively implemented them (modes correspond to the inquiry mechanisms of investigation, such as product evaluation, authoritative, inductive, deductive, and descriptive). On the other hand, the TSI phase structure (i.e. learning cycle) was most helpful for teachers novice to inquiry teaching, suggesting that modification of the PD is needed to promote more in-depth use of the phases in the TSI framework. In terms of content, teacher interest in energy science was high, which resulted in implementation of energy science activities across a range of disciplines. However, teachers' confidence in teaching energy science through inquiry was low compared to similar TSI PD courses on other subjects (mean perceived pedagogical content knowledge = 8.96 ± 2.07 SD for energy compared to 15.45 ± 1.83, 16.44 ± 1.81 and 15.63 ± 1.69, for elementary astronomy, high school aquatic science, and college aquatic science, respectively). These data support current findings on the complexities of teaching and understanding energy science content and suggest the need for additional teacher PD opportunities in energy science in order to provide opportunities for teachers to increase both their content knowledge and their confidence in teaching energy science.

  15. Building Sandcastles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø; Korsgaard, Steffen; Shumar, Wes

    In this paper we focus on a hitherto somewhat overlooked aspect of entrepreneurship education, namely the influence of materiality and spatial context on the process of teaching and learning. In the paper we present an empirical examination oriented towards the material and spatial dimensions...... of entrepreneurship education. Our theoretical and methodological approach builds on Actor-Network Theory. The empirical settings of our study consist of two entrepreneurship courses which differ in terms of temporal extension and physical setting. Data is collected using observation and interview techniques. Our...... findings demonstrate the agency of material artefacts and how they enable teachers to act at a distance, by standing in as a scaffold that maintains the learning space as it interacts with the students. This acting at a distance however is highly uncertain and uncontrollable. Also we see how important...

  16. Endotoxin, ergosterol, muramic acid and fungal DNA in dust from schools in Johor Bahru, Malaysia — Associations with rhinitis and sick building syndrome (SBS) in junior high school students

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norbäck, Dan, E-mail: dan.norback@medsci.uu.se [Department of Medical Science, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Hashim, Jamal Hisham [United Nations University—International Institute for Global Health, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Community Health, National University of Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Markowicz, Pawel [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Lund, Lund (Sweden); Cai, Gui-Hong [Department of Medical Science, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Hashim, Zailina [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Ali, Faridah [Primary Care Unit, Johor State Health Department, Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Larsson, Lennart [Division of Medical Microbiology, Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Lund, Lund (Sweden)

    2016-03-01

    This paper studied associations between ocular symptoms, rhinitis, throat and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue in students by ethnicity and in relation to exposure to chemical microbial markers and fungal DNA in vacuumed dust in schools in Malaysia. A total of 462 students from 8 randomly selected secondary schools in Johor Bahru, Malaysia, participated (96% response rate). Dust was vacuumed from 32 classrooms and analysed for levels of five types of endotoxin as 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C10, C12, C14, C16 and C18 3-OH), muramic acid, ergosterol and five sequences of fungal DNA. Multiple logistic regression was applied. Totally 11.9% reported weekly ocular symptoms, 18.8% rhinitis, 15.6% throat and 11.1% dermal symptoms, 20.6% headache and 22.1% tiredness. Totally 21.1% reported pollen or furry pet allergy (atopy) and 22.0% parental asthma or allergy. Chinese students had less headache than Malay and Indian had less rhinitis and less tiredness than Malay. Parental asthma/allergy was a risk factor for ocular (odds ratio = 3.79) and rhinitis symptoms (OR = 3.48). Atopy was a risk factor for throat symptoms (OR = 2.66), headache (OR = 2.13) and tiredness (OR = 2.02). There were positive associations between amount of fine dust in the dust samples and ocular symptoms (p < 0.001) and rhinitis (p = 0.006). There were positive associations between C14 3-OH and rhinitis (p < 0.001) and between C18 3-OH and dermal symptoms (p = 0.007). There were negative (protective) associations between levels of total endotoxin (LPS) (p = 0.004) and levels of ergosterol (p = 0.03) and rhinitis and between C12 3-OH and throat symptoms (p = 0.004). In conclusion, the amount of fine dust in the classroom was associated with rhinitis and other SBS symptoms and improved cleaning of the schools is important. Endotoxin in the school dust seems to be mainly protective for rhinitis and throat symptoms but different types of endotoxin could have different effects. The ethnic differences in

  17. Philosophy in Schools: A Catholic School Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittle, Sean

    2015-01-01

    This article builds on the recent Special Interest issue of this journal on "Philosophy for Children in Transition" (2011) and the way that the debate about philosophy in schools has now shifted to whether or not it ought to be a compulsory part of the curriculum. This article puts the spotlight on Catholic schools in order to present a…

  18. School Uniforms in Urban Public High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draa, Virginia Ann Bendel

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the implementation of a mandatory uniform policy in urban public high schools improved school performance measures at the building level for rates of attendance, graduation, academic proficiency, and student conduct as measured by rates of suspensions and expulsions. Sixty-four secondary…

  19. Two Italian pupils building an MRPC muon chamber in CERN’s Building 29

    CERN Document Server

    2005-01-01

    For several months, Italian secondary school pupils have been coming to CERN each week and heading for Building 29. They are participating in the EEE (Extreme Energy Events) Project, the aim of which is to carry out a real-life experiment in search of large atmospheric showers using muon detectors located in their schools. In this hall at CERN they are helping to build and test muon chambers - MRPCs (Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers).

  20. Outcomes of Australian rural clinical schools: a decade of success building the rural medical workforce through the education and training continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhill, Jennene A; Walker, Judi; Playford, Denese

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of the rural clinical schools funded through the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing (now Department of Health) Rural Clinical Training and Support program over a decade ago has been a significant policy initiative in Australian rural health. This article explores the impacts of this policy initiative and presents the wide range of educational innovations contextualised to each rural community they serve. This article reviews the achievements of the Australian rural clinical and regional medical schools (RCS/RMS) through semi-structured interviews with the program directors or other key informants. The questions and responses were analysed according to the funding parameters to ascertain the numbers of students, types of student placements and range of activities undertaken by each university program. Sixteen university medical schools have established 18 rural programs, creating an extensive national network of RCS and RMS in every state and territory. The findings reveal extensive positive impacts on rural and regional communities, curriculum innovation in medical education programs and community engagement activities. Teaching facilities, information technology, video-conferencing and student accommodation have brought new infrastructure to small rural towns. Rural clinicians are thriving on new opportunities for education and research. Clinicians continue to deliver clinical services and some have taken on formal academic positions, reducing professional isolation, improving the quality of care and their job satisfaction. This strategy has created many new clinical academics in rural areas, which has retained and expanded the clinical workforce. A total of 1224 students are provided with high-quality learning experiences for long-term clinical placements. These placements consist of a year or more in primary care, community and hospital settings across hundreds of rural and remote areas. Many programs offer longitudinal integrated

  1. Integrating Responsive Building Elements in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Matthias; Amato, Alex; Heiselberg, Per

    2006-01-01

    There is a global need for a more sustainable building development. About 50% of energy is used in buildings indicating that buildings provide a considerable potential for operational energy savings. Studies were conducted with the following objectives: to perform a state-of-the-art review...... of responsive building elements, of integrated building concepts and of environmental performance assessment methods to improve and optimize responsive building elements to develop and optimize new building concepts with integration of responsive building elements, HVAC-systems as well as natural and renewable...... energy strategies to develop guidelines and procedures for estimation of environmental performance of responsive building elements and integrated building concepts This paper introduces the ideas of this collaborative work and discusses its usefulness for Hong Kong and China. Special focus was put...

  2. Evaluating The Impact Of Building Information Modeling (BIM) On Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    1 EVALUATING THE IMPACT OF BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING (BIM) ON CONSTRUCTION By PATRICK C. SUERMANN...Evaluating The Impact Of Building Information Modeling (BIM) On Construction 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Building Owners and Managers Association ASC Associated Schools of Construction AtoN Aids to Navigation (USCG) BEP Business Enterprise Priority

  3. Building structures

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrose, James

    2011-01-01

    James Ambrose is Editor of the Parker/Ambrose Series of Simplified Design Guides. He practiced as an architect in California and Illinois and as a structural engineer in Illinois. He was a professor of architecture at the University of Southern California. Patrick Tripeny is an Associate Professor, former director of the School of Architecture, and the current Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence at the University of Utah. He is a licensed architect in California. He has been the recipient of a number of teaching awards at the local and national level for his work in teaching structures and design. With James Ambrose, he is the coauthor of Simplified Engineering for Architects and Builders, Eleventh Edition; Simplified Design of Steel Structures, Eighth Edition; Simplified Design of Concrete Structures, Eighth Edition; and Simplified Design of Wood Structures, Sixth Edition, all published by Wiley.

  4. Buildings and Health. Educational campaign for healthy buildings. Educational material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    In recent years health and comfort problems associated with the indoor climate have come to constitute a problem in Sweden. To come to grips with this a nationwide educational campaign on Buildings and Health is being run. It is directed to those involved in planning, project design, construction and management of buildings. The objective is to convey a body of knowledge to the many occupational and professional groups in the construction sector on how to avoid indoor climate problems in homes, schools, offices and other workplaces. The campaign is being run by the Swedish National Board of Housing and Planning and the Swedish Council for Building Research, in co-operation with various organizations and companies in the construction industry, and with municipalities and authorities. The knowledge which is being disseminated through the campaign is summarized in this compendium. figs., tabs.

  5. Endotoxin, ergosterol, muramic acid and fungal DNA in dust from schools in Johor Bahru, Malaysia--Associations with rhinitis and sick building syndrome (SBS) in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbäck, Dan; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Markowicz, Pawel; Cai, Gui-Hong; Hashim, Zailina; Ali, Faridah; Larsson, Lennart

    2016-03-01

    This paper studied associations between ocular symptoms, rhinitis, throat and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue in students by ethnicity and in relation to exposure to chemical microbial markers and fungal DNA in vacuumed dust in schools in Malaysia. A total of 462 students from 8 randomly selected secondary schools in Johor Bahru, Malaysia, participated (96% response rate). Dust was vacuumed from 32 classrooms and analysed for levels of five types of endotoxin as 3-hydroxy fatty acids (C10, C12, C14, C16 and C18 3-OH), muramic acid, ergosterol and five sequences of fungal DNA. Multiple logistic regression was applied. Totally 11.9% reported weekly ocular symptoms, 18.8% rhinitis, 15.6% throat and 11.1% dermal symptoms, 20.6% headache and 22.1% tiredness. Totally 21.1% reported pollen or furry pet allergy (atopy) and 22.0% parental asthma or allergy. Chinese students had less headache than Malay and Indian had less rhinitis and less tiredness than Malay. Parental asthma/allergy was a risk factor for ocular (odds ratio=3.79) and rhinitis symptoms (OR=3.48). Atopy was a risk factor for throat symptoms (OR=2.66), headache (OR=2.13) and tiredness (OR=2.02). There were positive associations between amount of fine dust in the dust samples and ocular symptoms (p<0.001) and rhinitis (p=0.006). There were positive associations between C14 3-OH and rhinitis (p<0.001) and between C18 3-OH and dermal symptoms (p=0.007). There were negative (protective) associations between levels of total endotoxin (LPS) (p=0.004) and levels of ergosterol (p=0.03) and rhinitis and between C12 3-OH and throat symptoms (p=0.004). In conclusion, the amount of fine dust in the classroom was associated with rhinitis and other SBS symptoms and improved cleaning of the schools is important. Endotoxin in the school dust seems to be mainly protective for rhinitis and throat symptoms but different types of endotoxin could have different effects. The ethnic differences in symptoms among the students

  6. Building America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Oberg

    2010-12-31

    Builders generally use a 'spec and purchase' business management system (BMS) when implementing energy efficiency. A BMS is the overall operational and organizational systems and strategies that a builder uses to set up and run its company. This type of BMS treats building performance as a simple technology swap (e.g. a tank water heater to a tankless water heater) and typically compartmentalizes energy efficiency within one or two groups in the organization (e.g. purchasing and construction). While certain tools, such as details, checklists, and scopes of work, can assist builders in managing the quality of the construction of higher performance homes, they do nothing to address the underlying operational strategies and issues related to change management that builders face when they make high performance homes a core part of their mission. To achieve the systems integration necessary for attaining 40% + levels of energy efficiency, while capturing the cost tradeoffs, builders must use a 'systems approach' BMS, rather than a 'spec and purchase' BMS. The following attributes are inherent in a systems approach BMS; they are also generally seen in quality management systems (QMS), such as the National Housing Quality Certification program: Cultural and corporate alignment, Clear intent for quality and performance, Increased collaboration across internal and external teams, Better communication practices and systems, Disciplined approach to quality control, Measurement and verification of performance, Continuous feedback and improvement, and Whole house integrated design and specification.

  7. 16th Annual School Construction Report, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramson, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Almost 73 percent of construction in 2009 was of new school buildings. New school buildings accounted for less than 60 percent of construction spending in 2010, suggesting a shift to using less abundant construction dollars to upgrade and add to existing buildings. While overall construction fell more than $1.8 billion in 2010, spending on…

  8. Historic and architectural considerations about the buildings of University of Antioquia School of Medicine Aspectos histórico-arquitectónicos del edificio de la Facultad de Mediciina de la Universidad de Antioquia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Molina

    1989-02-01

    Full Text Available

    The historical and architectural development of the Medical School at University of Antioquia In Medellin, Colombia, is briefly described. Emphasis is given to the value of the original buildings as a patrimony of the city and, therefore, on the need to restore and preserve them.

    En este artículo se da una somera visión de la evolución histórico-arquitectónica de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Antioquia. Ella es necesaria ahora porque los viejos edificios de la Facultad y del resto de la Universidad experimentan un acelerado proceso de deterioro, el mismo que obligó en 1987 al cierre e Intervención del Paraninfo situado en la Plazuela de San Ignacio. También como un llamado a la comunidad médica de Antioquia ya la Universidad para que emprendan una acción orientada a salvar este bien único del patrimonio arquitectónico de la ciudad.

  9. Zero Energy Schools: Designing for the Future: Zero Energy Ready K-12 Schools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Designing, building, and operating zero energy ready K-12 schools provides benefits for districts, students, and teachers. Optimizing energy efficiency is important in any building, but it's particularly important in K-12 schools. Many U.S. school districts struggle for funding, and improving a school building's energy efficiency can free up operational funds that may then be available for educational and other purposes.

  10. Net-zero building

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available of interventions where innovative technologies could realise substantial building performance improvements. A central challenge to construction and building performance is located in the practice of constructing a building on the project site using a combination...

  11. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halle, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  12. Building mathematics cellular phone learning communities

    OpenAIRE

    Wajeeh M. Daher

    2011-01-01

    Researchers emphasize the importance of maintaining learning communities and environments. This article describes the building and nourishment of a learning community, one comprised of middle school students who learned mathematics out-of-class using the cellular phone. The building of the learning community was led by three third year pre-service teachers majoring in mathematics and computers. The pre-service teachers selected thirty 8th grade students to learn mathematics with the cellular ...

  13. Schools as Sanctuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanwood, H. Mark; Doolittle, Gini

    2004-01-01

    The concept of sanctuary developed by psychiatrist Sandra Bloom is applied to building safe school cultures. In April 1999, when a group of superintendents in southern New Jersey first assembled to discuss the ramifications of Columbine, the authors had no vision of safe schools, little understanding of the complexities of change, and certainly no…

  14. Gifted Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigandi, Carla B.; Siegle, Del; Weiner, Jennie M.; Gubbins, E. Jean; Little, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Grounded in the Enrichment Triad and Achievement Orientation Models, this qualitative case study builds understanding of the relationship between participation in Type III Enrichment and the achievement orientation attitude of goal valuation in gifted secondary school students. Participants included 10 gifted secondary school students, their…

  15. Danish building typologies and building stock analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Kragh, Jesper

    enough to meet the government’s plan to make Danish buildings free from use of fossil fuels by 2035. This will probably require around 50 % energy savings in the Danish building stock as a whole. However, the project has proven that dedicated engagement of locals can speed up market penetration...... energy savings in residential buildings. The intension with this analysis was to investigate the possible energy reduction in Denmark if the same approach had been taken for the entire Danish building stock. The report concludes that the ZeroHome initiative clearly results in energy savings, but far from...... for energy savings in the existing Building stock....

  16. Danish building typologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittchen, Kim Bjarne; Kragh, Jesper

    The objective of TABULA is to develop a harmonised building typology for European countries. Each national building typology will consist of a set of residential model buildings with characteristic energy-related properties (element areas of the thermal building envelope, U-values, supply system...... efficiencies). The model buildings will each represent a specific construction period of the country in question and a specific building size. Furthermore the number of buildings, flats and the overall floor areas will be given, which are represented by the different building types of the national typologies....

  17. Small School Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll E. Bronson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative ethnographic case study explored the evolution of a public urban high school in its 3rd year of small school reform. The study focused on how the high school proceeded from its initial concept, moving to a small school program, and emerging as a new small high school. Data collection included interviews, observations, and document review to develop a case study of one small high school sharing a multiplex building. The first key finding, “Too Many Pieces, Not Enough Glue,” revealed that the school had too many new programs starting at once and they lacked a clear understanding of their concept and vision for their new small school, training on the Montessori philosophies, teaching and learning in small schools, and how to operate within a teacher-cooperative model. The second key finding, “A Continuous Struggle,” revealed that the shared building space presented problems for teachers and students. District policies remain unchanged, resulting in staff and students resorting to activist approaches to get things done. These findings offer small school reform leaders suggestions for developing and sustaining a small school culture and cohesion despite the pressures to revert back to top-down, comprehensive high school norms.

  18. Using School Performance Feedback: Perceptions of Primary School Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaeghe, Goedele; Vanhoof, Jan; Valcke, Martin; Van Petegem, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The present study focuses on the perception of primary school principals of school performance feedback (SPF) and of the actual use of this information. This study is part of a larger project which aims to develop a new school performance feedback system (SPFS). The study builds on an eclectic framework that integrates the literature on SPFSs.…

  19. Zero Energy Schools: The Challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torcellini, Paul A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-29

    School buildings have a lot of potential to achieve zero energy (ZE) in new construction as well as in retrofits. There are many examples of schools operating at ZE, and many technical resources available to guide school districts and their design and construction teams through the process. When school districts embark on the path to ZE, however, they often confront challenges related to processes and a perception that ZE buildings require 'new,' unconventional, and expensive technologies, materials, or equipment. Here are some of the challenges school districts and their design and construction teams commonly encounter, and the solutions they use to overcome them.

  20. The League of Peaceful Schools: A Dream Shared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Helen C.

    2003-01-01

    The League of Peaceful Schools was formed in Nova Scotia to support schools committed to building a culture of peace. Guided by League facilitators, member schools offer children models for building healthy relationships through service learning and elders programs. Member schools develop discipline policies that are proactive instead of punitive,…