WorldWideScience

Sample records for ps1 3pi sky

  1. A Gaia-PS1-SDSS (GPS1) Proper Motion Catalog Covering 3/4 of the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hai-Jun; Gupta, Prashansa; Sesar, Branimir; Rix, Hans-Walter; Martin, Nicolas F.; Liu, Chao; Goldman, Bertrand; Platais, Imants; Kudritzki, Rolf-Peter; Waters, Christopher Z.

    2017-09-01

    We combine Gaia DR1, PS1, Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), and 2MASS astrometry to measure proper motions for 350 million sources across three-fourths of the sky down to a magnitude of {m}r˜ 20. Using positions of galaxies from PS1, we build a common reference frame for the multi-epoch PS1, single-epoch SDSS and 2MASS data, and calibrate the data in small angular patches to this frame. As the Gaia DR1 excludes resolved galaxy images, we choose a different approach to calibrate its positions to this reference frame: we exploit the fact that the proper motions of stars in these patches are linear. By simultaneously fitting the positions of stars at different epochs of—Gaia DR1, PS1, SDSS, and 2MASS—we construct an extensive catalog of proper motions dubbed GPS1. GPS1 has a characteristic systematic error of less than 0.3 {mas} {{yr}}-1 and a typical precision of 1.5-2.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1. The proper motions have been validated using galaxies, open clusters, distant giant stars, and QSOs. In comparison with other published faint proper motion catalogs, GPS1's systematic error ( 2.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1). Similarly, its precision (˜1.5 {mas} {{yr}}-1) is a four-fold improvement relative to PPMXL and UCAC4 (˜6.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1). For QSOs, the precision of GPS1 is found to be worse (˜2.0-3.0 {mas} {{yr}}-1), possibly due to their particular differential chromatic refraction. The GPS1 catalog will be released online and be available via the VizieR Service and VO Service.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The Pan-STARRS release 1 (PS1) Survey - DR1 (Chambers+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, K. C.; et al.

    2017-07-01

    The Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS) is a system for wide-field astronomical imaging developed and operated by the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii. Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) is the first part of Pan-STARRS to be completed and is the basis for Data Release 1 (DR1). The PS1 survey used a 1.8m telescope and its 1.4 Gigapixel camera (GPC1) to image the sky in five broadband filters (g, r, i, z, y). PS1 took approximately 370000 exposures from 2010 to 2015. The PS1 camera surveyed the sky using 5 filters: g, r, i, z, and y. The effective wavelengths (and spectral resolutions) of these 5 filters are 481nm (R=3.5), 617nm (R=4.4), 752nm (R=5.8), 866nm (R=8.3), and 962nm (R=11.6), respectively. Please refer to Table 4 in Tonry+ (2012, J/ApJ/750/99) for bandpass details. Schlafly+ (2012ApJ...756..158S) provides updated zeropoints in Table 1. In the PS1 nomenclature, Detections are sources found in a single exposure, while Objects are either collections of Detections matched across exposures, or sources found in stacked images that combine multiple epochs to produce deeper detection limits. Only Objects are included in DR1; Detections will be included in DR2. (1 data file).

  3. Simulation of a wide area survey for NEOs with Pan-STARRS PS1 & PS2 Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Kenneth C.; Lilly (Schunova), Eva; Dukes, Martin Todd; Wainscoat, Richard J.

    2017-10-01

    We have performed a new survey simulation for a wide area survey with PS1 & PS2 as part of our quest to optimize the discovery rate of Near Earth Objects with the full Pan-STARRS system. The survey is intended to be as unbiased and as complete as possible given the available sky visibility and the anticipated performance of the PS1 and PS2 telescopes working together. The simulation includes a complete model of both telescopes, camera and slew overhead, sky visibility, moon phase, galactic plane exclusion, and weather. The performance of the resulting survey strategy is then evaluated using the method of Lilly et. al. 2017. This uses the Greenstreet et al. 2012 model with 50 million NEOs with absolute magnitudes 13 < H < 29 and the Moving Object Processing System (MOPS, Denneau et al. 2013) for linkages. The results are compared with other possible strategies.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide down-regulates BACE1 and PS1 via activating PI3K/Akt pathway in the brain of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuan-Li; Yan, Ning; Chen, Xiao-Shan; Qi, Yun-Wen; Yan, Yong; Cai, Zhiyou

    2016-10-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) may have multiple physiological functions in brain. Our previous study showed that H2S improved spatial memory impairment and decreased the production of Aβ in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. However, many of the underlying mechanisms are not still being elucidated. The aim of the present study is to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of H2S involving in the activity of β-secretase (BACE1), γ-secretase (PS1) and α-secretase (ADAM17). Morris water maze was used to measure the behavior change. The levels of Aβ40 and Aβ42 were quantified using colorimetric ELISA kits and immunohistochemical analysis. The levels of BACE1, PS1, ADAM17, pAkt, pp38MAPK, pERK and pJNK were tested by Western blot analysis in normal mice, APP/PS1 transgenic mice and 50μmol/kg-NaHS-treated transgenic mice. On the basis of exogenous H2S treatment, LY294002 (inhibitors of PI3K/Akt) or PD98059 (inhibitors of MAPK/ERK) was injected into lateral cerebral ventricle. The levels of BACE1, PS1 and pp38MAPK were increased and ADAM17 were decreased in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice. After intraperitoneal administration of an H2S donor (NaHS) into APP/PS1 mice, the levels of BACE1, PS1 and pp38MAPK were reduced and ADAM17 increased. The level of pp38 MAPKs, pAkt and pERK1/2 was increased in APP/PS1 transgenic mice compared with normal mice (ptransgenic mice and normal mice (p>0.05). These results demonstrated that LY294002 inhibited the effect of H2S on decreasing the BACE1 and PS1, reducing the level of Aβ and improving memory impairment in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. PD98059 had no influence on the expression of BACE1 and PS1. H2S inhibits the expression of BACE1 and PS1 by activating PI3K/Akt pathway in AD. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  5. LHCb: Measurement of $\\Delta m_s$ in the decay $B_s \\to D_s(3)\\pi$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Wandernoth, S

    2011-01-01

    An analysis of the $B_s$-$\\overline{B}_s$ mixing frequency $\\Delta m_s$ was performed on a dataset of ~35 pb$^{-1}$ obtained from the LHCb physics run in 2010. After reconstruction about 1350 $B_s$ signal candidates are found in the decay $B_s \\to D_s (3)\\pi$ with an average proper time resolution of 36-44 fs. Opposite side flavour taggers with a tagging performance of $e_{eff} = 3.8 \\pm 2.1$ % were used. The observed mixing frequency is $\\Delta m_s = 17.63 \\pm 0.11(stat.) \\pm 0.04 (syst.) ps^{-1}$

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Candidate rotating M dwarfs from PS1-MDS (Kado-Fong+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kado-Fong, E.; Williams, P. K. G.; Mann, A. W.; Berger, E.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Magnier, E. A.; Rest, A.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-05-01

    The Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1-MDS) was performed on the 1.8m Pan-STARRS1 telescope situated on Mount Haleakala, Hawai'i, equipped with five broadband filters, (grizy)P1. The PS1 filters are similar to those used in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), but include a yP1 filter (λeff~9600Å), a bluer cutoff in the z band (Δλ~1000Å rather than 1400Å), a 200Å redder cutoff in the g band, and no u band. We identified candidate cool dwarfs using color cuts as described in section 2.4. We searched for periodic variations in the light curves of our candidate cool stars using the multiband extension of the Lomb-Scargle periodogram introduced by VanderPlas & Ivezic (2015ApJ...812...18V); see section 3. We list the confirmed rotators in Table 3. (2 data files).

  7. Early temporal short-term memory deficits in double transgenic APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagadec, Saioa; Rotureau, Lolita; Hémar, Agnès; Macrez, Nathalie; Delcasso, Sebastien; Jeantet, Yannick; Cho, Yoon H

    2012-01-01

    We tested single APP (Tg2576) transgenic, PS1 (PS1dE9) transgenic, and double APP/PS1 transgenic mice at 3 and 6 months of age on the acquisition of a hippocampal-dependent operant "differential reinforcement of low rate schedule" (DRL) paradigm. In this task mice are required to wait for at least 10 seconds (DRL-10s) between 2 consecutive nose poke responses. Our data showed that while single APP and PS1 transgene expression did not affect DRL learning and performance, mice expressing double APP/PS1 transgenes were impaired in the acquisition of DRL-10s at 6 months, but not at 3 months of age. The same impaired double transgenic mice, however, were perfectly capable of normal acquisition of signaled DRL-10s (SDRL-10s) task, a hippocampal-independent task, wherein mice were required to emit responses when the end of the 10-second delay was signaled by a lighting of the chamber. The age-dependent and early deficits of APP/PS1 mice suggest that the appetitive DRL paradigm is sensitive to the amyloid pathology present in double APP/PS1 mice, and that this mouse line represents a good model with which to study the efficacy of therapeutic strategies against Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed amyloid plaque deposition and behavioral deficits in outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couch, Brian A; Kerrisk, Meghan E; Kaufman, Adam C; Nygaard, Haakon B; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Koleske, Anthony J

    2013-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative dementia characterized by amyloid plaque accumulation, synapse/dendrite loss, and cognitive impairment. Transgenic mice expressing mutant forms of amyloid-β precursor protein (AβPP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) recapitulate several aspects of this disease and provide a useful model system for studying elements of AD progression. AβPP/PS1 mice have been previously shown to exhibit behavioral deficits and amyloid plaque deposition between 4-9 months of age. We crossed AβPP/PS1 animals with mice of a mixed genetic background (C57BL/6 × 129/SvJ) and investigated the development of AD-like features in the resulting outcrossed mice. The onset of memory-based behavioral impairment is delayed considerably in outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice relative to inbred mice on a C57BL/6 background. While inbred AβPP/PS1 mice develop deficits in radial-arm water maze performance and novel object recognition as early as 8 months, outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice do not display defects until 18 months. Within the forebrain, we find that inbred AβPP/PS1 mice have significantly higher amyloid plaque burden at 12 months than outcrossed AβPP/PS1 mice of the same age. Surprisingly, inbred AβPP/PS1 mice at 8 months have low plaque burden, suggesting that plaque burden alone cannot explain the accompanying behavioral deficits. Analysis of AβPP processing revealed that elevated levels of soluble Aβ correlate with the degree of behavioral impairment in both strains. Taken together, these findings suggest that animal behavior, amyloid plaque deposition, and AβPP processing are sensitive to genetic differences between mouse strains. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Normal Amplitude of Electroretinography and Visual Evoked Potential Responses in AβPP/PS1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinonen, Henri; Lipponen, Arto; Gurevicius, Kestutis; Tanila, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease has been shown to affect vision in human patients and animal models. This may pose the risk of bias in behavior studies and therefore requires comprehensive investigation. We recorded electroretinography (ERG) under isoflurane anesthesia and visual evoked potentials (VEP) in awake amyloid expressing AβPPswe/PS1dE9 (AβPP/PS1) and wild-type littermate mice at a symptomatic age. The VEPs in response to patterned stimuli were normal in AβPP/PS1 mice. They also showed normal ERG amplitude but slightly shortened ERG latency in dark-adapted conditions. Our results indicate subtle changes in visual processing in aged male AβPP/PS1 mice specifically at a retinal level.

  10. APP/PS1 transgenic mice treated with aluminum: an update of Alzheimer's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q L; Jia, L; Jiao, X; Guo, W L; Ji, J W; Yang, H L; Niu, Q

    2012-01-01

    There is still no animal model available that can mimic all the cognitive, behavioral, biochemical, and histopathological abnormalities observed in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). We undertook to consider the interaction between genetic factors, including amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1), and environmental factors, such as Aluminum (Al) in determining susceptibility outcomes when studying the pathogenesis of AD. In this article, we provide an AD model in APP/PS1 transgenic mice triggered by Al. The animal model was established via intracerebral ventricular microinjection of aluminum chloride once a day for 5 days in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Twenty wild type (WT) mice and 20 APP/PS1 transgenic (TG) mice were separately divided into 2 groups (control and Al group), and a stainless steel injector with stopper was used for microinjection into the left-lateral cerebral ventricle of each mouse. The Morris water maze task was used to evaluate behavioral function of learning and memory ability on the 20th day after the last injection. This AD model's brain was analyzed by: (1) amyloid beta immunohistochemical staining; (2) Tunnel staining; (3) apoptotic rates; (4) caspase-3 gene expression. Here, decrease of cognitive ability and neural cells loss were shown in APP/PS1 transgenic mice exposed to Al, which were more extensive than those in APP/PS1 TG alone and WT mice exposed to Al alone. These findings indicate that there is a close relationship between over-expression of APP and PS1 genes and Al overload. It is also suggested that APP/PS1 TG mice exposed to Al have potential value for improving AD models.

  11. The Ultraviolet Sky: final catalogs of unique UV sources from GALEX, and characterization of the UV-emitting sources across the sky, and of the Milky Way extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luciana; Conti, A.; Shiao, B.; Keller, G. R.; Thilker, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    The legacy of the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), which imaged the sky at Ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths for about 9 years, is its unprecedented database with more than 200 million source measurements in far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV), as well as wide-field imaging of extended objects. GALEX's data, the first substantial sky surveys at UV wavelengths, offer an unprecedented view of the sky and a unique opportunity for an unbiased characterization of several classes of astrophysical objects, such as hot stars, QSOs at red-shift about 1, UV-peculiar QSOs, star-forming galaxies, among others. Bianchi et al. (2013, J. Adv. Space Res. (2013), DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.asr.2013.07.045) have constructed final catalogs of UV sources, with homogeneous quality, eliminating duplicate measurements of the same source ('unique' source catalogs), and excluding rim artifacts and bad photometry. The catalogs are constructed improving on the recipe of Bianchi et al. 2011 (MNRAS, 411, 2770, which presented the earlier version of these catalogs) and include all data for the major surveys, AIS and MIS. Considering the fields where both FUV and NUV detectors were exposed, the catalogs contain about 71 and 16.6 million unique sources respectively. We show several maps illustrating the content of UV sources across the sky, globally, and separately for bright/faint, hot, stellar/extragalactic objects. We matched the UV-source catalogs with optical-IR data from the SDSS, GSC2, 2MASS surveys. We are also in the process of matching the catalogs with preliminary PanSTARRS1 (PS1) 3pi survey photometry which already provides twice the sky coverage of SDSS, at slightly fainter magnitude limits. The sources' SED from FUV to optical wavelengths enables classification, derivation of the object physical parameters, and ultimately also a map of the Milky Way extinction. The catalogs will be available on MAST, Vizier (where the previous version already is), and in reduced form (for agile

  12. Reciprocal relationship between APP positioning relative to the membrane and PS1 conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Phill

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several familial Alzheimer disease (FAD mutations within the transmembrane region of the amyloid precursor protein (APP increase the Aβ42/40 ratio without increasing total Aβ production. In the present study, we analyzed the impact of FAD mutations and γ-secretase modulators (GSMs that alter the Aβ42/40 ratio on APP C-terminus (CT positioning relative to the membrane, reasoning that changes in the alignment of the APP intramembranous domain and presenilin 1 (PS1 may impact the PS1/γ-secretase cleavage site on APP. Results By using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based technique, fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, we show that Aβ42/40 ratio-modulating factors which target either APP substrate or PS1/γ-secretase affect proximity of the APP-CT to the membrane and change PS1 conformation. Conclusions Thus, we propose that there is a reciprocal relationship between APP-CT positioning relative to the membrane and PS1 conformation, suggesting that factors that modulate either APP positioning in the membrane or PS1 conformation could be exploited therapeutically.

  13. CART treatment improves memory and synaptic structure in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jia-li; Liou, Anthony K F; Shi, Yejie; Yin, Kai-lin; Chen, Ling; Li, Ling-ling; Zhu, Xiao-lei; Qian, Lai; Yang, Rong; Chen, Jun; Xu, Yun

    2015-05-11

    Major characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD) include deposits of β-amyloid (Aβ) peptide in the brain, loss of synapses, and cognitive dysfunction. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) has recently been reported to attenuate Aβ-induced toxicity. In this study, CART localization in APP/PS1 mice was characterized and the protective effects of exogenous CART treatment were examined. Compared to age-matched wild type mice, 8-month-old APP/PS1 mice had significantly greater CART immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cortex. A strikingly similar pattern of Aβ plaque-associated CART immunoreactivity was observed in the cortex of AD cases. Treatment of APP/PS1 mice with exogenous CART ameliorated memory deficits; this effect was associated with improvements in synaptic ultrastructure and long-term potentiation, but not a reduction of the Aβ plaques. Exogenous CART treatment in APP/PS1 mice prevented depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and stimulated mitochondrial complex I and II activities, resulting in an increase in ATP levels. CART treatment of APP/PS1 mice also reduced reactive oxygen species and 4-hydroxynonenal, and mitigated oxidative DNA damage. In summary, CART treatment reduced multiple neuropathological measures and improved memory in APP/PS1 mice, and may therefore be a promising and novel therapy for AD.

  14. Chronic Stress Contributes to Cognitive Dysfunction and Hippocampal Metabolic Abnormalities in APP/PS1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Han

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Stress response is determined by the brain, and the brain is a sensitive target for stress. Our previous experiments have confirmed that once the stress response is beyond the tolerable limit of the brain, particularly that of the hippocampus, it will have deleterious effects on hippocampal structure and function; however, the metabolic mechanisms for this are not well understood. Methods: Here, we used morris water maze, elisa and gas chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry to observe the changes in cognition, neuropathology and metabolomics in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice and wild-type (C57 mice caused by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, we also further explored the correlation between cognition and metabolomics. Results: We found that 4 weeks of CUMS aggravated cognitive impairment and increased amyloid-β deposition in APP/PS1 mice, but did not affect C57 mice. Under non-stress conditions, compared with C57 mice, there were 8 different metabolites in APP/PS1 mice. However, following CUMS, 3 different metabolites were changed compared with untreated C57 mice. Compared to APP/PS1 mice, there were 7 different metabolites in APP/PS1+CUMS mice. Among these alterations, 3-hydroxybutyric acid, valine, serine, beta-alanine and o-phosphorylethanolamine, which are involved in sphingolipid metabolism, synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, and amino acid metabolism. Conclusion: The results indicate that APP/PS1 mice are more vulnerable to stress than C57 mice, and the metabolic mechanisms of stress-related cognitive impairment in APP/PS1 mice are related to multiple pathways and networks, including sphingolipid metabolism, synthesis and degradation of ketone bodies, and amino acid metabolism.

  15. Ramsey-type microwave spectroscopy on CO ($a^3\\Pi$)

    CERN Document Server

    de Nijs, A J; Bethlem, H L

    2014-01-01

    Using a Ramsey-type setup, the lambda-doublet transition in the $J=1,\\, \\Omega=1$ level of the $a^3\\Pi$ state of CO was measured to be 394 064 870(10) Hz. In our molecular beam apparatus, a beam of metastable CO is prepared in a single quantum level by expanding CO into vacuum and exciting the molecules using a narrow-band UV laser system. After passing two microwave zones that are separated by 50 cm, the molecules are state-selectively deflected and detected 1 meter downstream on a position sensitive detector. In order to keep the molecules in a single $m_J^B$ level, a magnetic bias field is applied. We find the field-free transition frequency by taking the average of the $m_J^B = +1 \\rightarrow m_J^B = +1$ and $m_J^B = -1 \\rightarrow m_J^B = -1$ transitions, which have an almost equal but opposite Zeeman shift. The accuracy of this proof-of-principle experiment is a factor of 100 more accurate than the previous best value obtained for this transition.

  16. Genomic differentiation among two strains of the PS1 clade isolated from geographically separated marine habitats

    KAUST Repository

    Jimenez Infante, Francy M.

    2014-05-22

    Using dilution-to-extinction cultivation, we isolated a strain affiliated with the PS1 clade from surface waters of the Red Sea. Strain RS24 represents the second isolate of this group of marine Alphaproteobacteria after IMCC14465 that was isolated from the East (Japan) Sea. The PS1 clade is a sister group to the OCS116 clade, together forming a putatively novel order closely related to Rhizobiales. While most genomic features and most of the genetic content are conserved between RS24 and IMCC14465, their average nucleotide identity (ANI) is < 81%, suggesting two distinct species of the PS1 clade. Next to encoding two different variants of proteorhodopsin genes, they also harbor several unique genomic islands that contain genes related to degradation of aromatic compounds in IMCC14465 and in polymer degradation in RS24, possibly reflecting the physicochemical differences in the environment they were isolated from. No clear differences in abundance of the genomic content of either strain could be found in fragment recruitment analyses using different metagenomic datasets, in which both genomes were detectable albeit as minor part of the communities. The comparative genomic analysis of both isolates of the PS1 clade and the fragment recruitment analysis provide first insights into the ecology of this group. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  17. Enhanced penetration of exogenous EPCs into brains of APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Mei, Bin; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Cuntai; Zheng, Miao; Liang, Huifang; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Jie; Ding, Ling; Zheng, Kai

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the repair function of exogenous Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) for brain microvascular damage of the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This study used a density-gradient centrifugation method to isolate mononuclear cells (MNCs) from mouse bone marrow, which were subsequently seeded and cultured. Cells were characterized by morphology and detection of the surface markers CD34 and CD133 at different time points by immunofluorescence (IF) and flow cytometry (FCM). Then, EPCs were transfected with GFP adenoviral vectors (GFP-EPCs). Wild-type (WT) and APP/PS1 transgenic mice both received GFP-EPCs injection through the tail vein, and using a PBS buffer injection as the control. Seven days later, the animals’ brain tissue was isolated. Expression of GFP was detected by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western-blot (WB), while the fluorescence of GFP within the brains of mice was observed under a fluorescence microscope. Higher mRNA and protein expression of GFP, accompanied with increased green fluorescence, were detected in the brain of GFP-EPCs-injected APP/PS1 mice, as compared with GFP-EPCs-injected WT mice. The results show that the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD exhibited enhanced penetration of exogenous EPCs into brains than the WT mice. PMID:27186272

  18. Search for CP violation in $K^{0} \\to 3 \\pi^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Batley, J Richard; Marras, D; Batley, J Richard; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, A; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Mikulec, I; Norton, A; Panzer-Steindel, B; Tatishvili, G T; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, Vladimir D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Zinchenko, A I; Martin, V; Rubin, P; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Fiorini, M; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Veltri, M; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Hirstius, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Marouelli, P; Mestvirishvili, I; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, Luca; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Derue, F; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Gouge, G; Marel, Gérard; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, A; Widhalm, L

    2005-01-01

    Using data taken during the year 2000 with the NA48 detector at the CERN SPS, a search for the CP violating decay K_S -> 3 pi0 has been performed. From a fit to the lifetime distribution of about 4.9 million reconstructed K0/K0bar -> 3 pi0 decays, the CP violating amplitude eta_000 = A(K_S -> 3 pi0)/A(K_L -> 3 pi0) has been found to be Re(eta_000) = -0.002 +- 0.011 +- 0.015 and Im(eta_000) = -0.003 +- 0.013 +- 0.017. This corresponds to an upper limit on the branching fraction of Br(K_S -> 3 pi0) < 7.4 x 10^-7 at 90% confidence level. The result is used to improve knowledge of Re(epsilon) and the CPT violating quantity Im(delta) via the Bell-Steinberger relation.

  19. Search for CP violation in $K^{0} \\to 3\\pi^{0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, A; Batley, J Richard; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Kalmus, George Ernest; Lazzeroni, C; Munday, D J; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Arcidiacono, R; Barr, G; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, A; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Cundy, Donald C; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Gorini, B; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Mikulec, I; Norton, A; Panzer-Steindel, B; Tatishvili, G T; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, Vladimir D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Zinchenko, A I; Martin, V; Rubin, P; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Fiorini, M; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Lenti, M; Martelli, F; Veltri, M; Eppard, K; Eppard, M; Hirstius, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Lopes da Silva, P; Marouelli, P; Mestvirishvili, I; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Wittgen, M; Chollet, J C; Fayard, L; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Fiorini, Luca; Giudici, Sergio; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Derue, F; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Gouge, G; Marel, Gérard; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Holder, M; Maier, A; Ziolkowski, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Neuhofer, G; Pernicka, M; Taurok, A; Widhalm, L

    2005-01-01

    Using data taken during the year 2000 with the NA48 detector at the CERN SPS, a search for the CP violation decay K_s -> 3pi^0 has been performed. From a fit to the lifetime distribution of about 4.9 million reconstructed K^0/Kbar^0 -> 3pi^0 decays, the CP violationg amplitude eta_000 = A(K_s -> 3pi^0)/A(K_L -> 3pi^0) has been found to be Re(eta_000) = -0.002 +- 0.011 +- 0.015 and Im(eta_000) -0.003 +- 0.0013 +- 0.017. This corresponds to an upper limit on the branching fraction of Br(K_s -> 3pi^0) < 7.4 x 10^-7 at 90% confidence level. The result is used to improve knowledge of Re(epsilon) and the CPT violating quantity Im(delta) via the Bell-Steinberger relation.

  20. ESA Sky

    OpenAIRE

    Merin, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The ESAC Science Data Centre, ESDC, is working on a science-driven discovery portal for all its astronomy missions with the provisional name Multi-Mission Interface. The first public release of this service will be demonstrated, featuring an interface for sky exploration and for single and multiple target searches. It requires no prior knowledge of any of the missions involved. From a technical point of view, the system offers all-sky projections of full mission datasets using a new-generatio...

  1. Behavioural Phenotyping of APPswe/PS1δE9 Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Louise Ørum; Bouzinova, Elena V; Severino, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating illness characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive, social, and emotional functions, including memory impairments and more global cognitive deficits. Clinical-epidemiological evidence suggests that neuropsychiatric symptoms precede the onset......-cognitive behavioural changes measured at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months of age and applied principal component analysis on data obtained from open field, elevated plus maze, and social interaction tests. Long-term treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine was applied to assess the role of 5......-HT on the behavioural profile; duration of treatment was 9 months, initiated when mice were 9 months of age. Treatment with paroxetine delays the decline in locomotion, in exploration and risk assessment behaviour, found in the APP/PS1 mice. APP/PS1 mice also exhibit low social activity and less...

  2. Cannabis-based medicine reduces multiple pathological processes in AβPP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Ester; Sánchez-Pla, Alexandre; Vegas-Lozano, Esteban; Maldonado, Rafael; Ferrer, Isidro

    2015-01-01

    Several recent findings suggest that targeting the endogenous cannabinoid system can be considered as a potential therapeutic approach to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study supports this hypothesis demonstrating that delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) or cannabidiol (CBD) botanical extracts, as well as the combination of both natural cannabinoids, which are the components of an already approved cannabis-based medicine, preserved memory in AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice when chronically administered during the early symptomatic stage. Moreover, THC + CBD reduced learning impairment in AβPP/PS1 mice. A significant decrease in soluble Aβ42 peptide levels and a change in plaques composition were also observed in THC + CBD-treated AβPP/PS1 mice, suggesting a cannabinoid-induced reduction in the harmful effect of the most toxic form of the Aβ peptide. Among the mechanisms related with these positive cognitive effects, the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabinoids may also play a relevant role. Here we observed reduced astrogliosis, microgliosis, and inflammatory-related molecules in treated AβPP/PS1 mice, which were more marked after treatment with THC + CBD than with either THC or CBD. Moreover, other cannabinoid-induced effects were uncovered by a genome-wide gene expression study. Thus, we have identified the redox protein thioredoxin 2 and the signaling protein Wnt16 as significant substrates for the THC + CBD-induced effects in our AD model. In summary, the present findings show that the combination of THC and CBD exhibits a better therapeutic profile than each cannabis component alone and support the consideration of a cannabis-based medicine as potential therapy against AD.

  3. Loss of GABAergic inputs in APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tutu Oyelami

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by symptoms which include seizures, sleep disruption, loss of memory as well as anxiety in patients. Of particular importance is the possibility of preventing the progressive loss of neuronal projections in the disease. Transgenic mice overexpressing EOFAD mutant PS1 (L166P and mutant APP (APP KM670/671NL Swedish (APP/PS1 develop a very early and robust Amyloid pathology and display synaptic plasticity impairments and cognitive dysfunction. Here we investigated GABAergic neurotransmission, using multi-electrode array (MEA technology and pharmacological manipulation to quantify the effect of GABA Blockers on field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSP, and immunostaining of GABAergic neurons. Using MEA technology we confirm impaired LTP induction by high frequency stimulation in APPPS1 hippocampal CA1 region that was associated with reduced alteration of the pair pulse ratio after LTP induction. Synaptic dysfunction was also observed under manipulation of external Calcium concentration and input-output curve. Electrophysiological recordings from brain slice of CA1 hippocampus area, in the presence of GABAergic receptors blockers cocktails further demonstrated significant reduction in the GABAergic inputs in APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, immunostaining of GAD65 a specific marker for GABAergic neurons revealed reduction of the GABAergic inputs in CA1 area of the hippocampus. These results might be linked to increased seizure sensitivity, premature death and cognitive dysfunction in this animal model of AD. Further in depth analysis of GABAergic dysfunction in APP/PS1 mice is required and may open new perspectives for AD therapy by restoring GABAergic function.

  4. Increased regional cerebral glucose uptake in an APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisnel, Géraldine; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; El Tannir El Tayara, Nadine; Bourrin, Emmanuel; Volk, Andreas; Kober, Frank; Delatour, Benoit; Delzescaux, Thierry; Debeir, Thomas; Rooney, Thomas; Benavides, Jésus; Hantraye, Philippe; Dhenain, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the invariant cerebral accumulation of β-amyloid peptide. This event occurs early in the disease process. In humans, [18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) is largely used to follow-up in vivo cerebral glucose utilization (CGU) and brain metabolism modifications associated with the Alzheimer's disease pathology. Here, [18F]-FDG positron emission tomography was used to study age-related changes of cerebral glucose utilization under resting conditions in 3-, 6-, and 12-month-old APP(SweLon)/PS1(M146L), a mouse model of amyloidosis. We showed an age-dependent increase of glucose uptake in several brain regions of APP/PS1 mice but not in control animals and a higher [18F]-FDG uptake in the cortex and the hippocampus of 12-month-old APP/PS1 mice as compared with age-matched control mice. We then developed a method of 3-D microscopic autoradiography to evaluate glucose uptake at the level of amyloid plaques and showed an increased glucose uptake close to the plaques rather than in amyloid-free cerebral tissues. These data suggest a macroscopic and microscopic reorganization of glucose uptake in relation to cerebral amyloidosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fading Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sio, Betsy Menson

    2009-01-01

    A sky fading from blue to white to red at the horizon, and water darkening from light to midnight blue. Strong diagonals slashing through the image, drawing a viewer's eyes deeper into the picture, and delicate trees poised to convey a sense of beauty. These are the fascinating strengths of the ukiyo-e woodblock prints of Japanese artist Ando…

  6. Screening for PS1 mutations in a referral-based series of AD cases: 21 novel mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogaeva, E. A.; Fafel, K. C.; Song, Y. Q.; Medeiros, H.; Sato, C.; Liang, Y.; Richard, E.; Rogaev, E. I.; Frommelt, P.; Sadovnick, A. D.; Meschino, W.; Rockwood, K.; Boss, M. A.; Mayeux, R.; St George-Hyslop, P.

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the presenilin-1 gene (PS1) account for a majority of patients with early-onset familial AD. However, the clinical indications and algorithms for genetic testing in dementia are still evolving. The entire open reading frame of the PS1 gene was sequenced in a series of 414 consecutive

  7. Determination of the quadratic slope parameter in eta-->3pi(0) decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippens, W B; Prakhov, S; Allgower, C E; Bekrenev, V; Berger, E; Briscoe, W J; Clajus, M; Comfort, J R; Craig, K; Efendiev, A; Grosnick, D; Holstein, B R; Huber, G M; Isenhower, D; Knecht, N; Koetke, D; Koulbardis, A; Kozlenko, N; Kruglov, S; Lolos, G J; Lopatin, I; Manley, D M; Marusić, A; Manweiler, R; McDonald, S; Nefkens, B M; Olmsted, J; Papandreou, Z; Phaisangittisakul, N; Price, J W; Pulver, M; Ramirez, A F; Sadler, M E; Shafi, A; Spinka, H; Stanislaus, S; Starostin, A; Staudenmaier, H M

    2001-11-05

    We have determined the quadratic slope parameter alpha for eta-->3pi(0) to be alpha = -0.031(4) from a 99% pure sample of 10(6)eta-->3pi(0) decays produced in the reaction pi(-)p-->n(eta) close to the eta threshold using the Crystal Ball detector at the AGS. The result is four times more precise than the present world data and disagrees with current chiral perturbation theory calculations by about four standard deviations.

  8. Sky Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Mahabal, A. A.; Drake, A.J.; Graham, M. J.; C. Donalek

    2012-01-01

    Sky surveys represent a fundamental data basis for astronomy. We use them to map in a systematic way the universe and its constituents, and to discover new types of objects or phenomena. We review the subject, with an emphasis on the wide-field imaging surveys, placing them in a broader scientific and historical context. Surveys are the largest data generators in astronomy, propelled by the advances in information and computation technology, and have transformed the ways in which astronomy is...

  9. AβPP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Show Sex Differences in the Cerebellum Associated with Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordoñez-Gutierrez, Lara; Fernandez-Perez, Ivan; Herrera, Jose Luis; Anton, Marta; Benito-Cuesta, Irene; Wandosell, Francisco

    2016-09-06

    Cerebellar pathology has been related to presenilin 1 mutations in certain pedigrees of familial Alzheimer's disease. However, cerebellum tissue has not been intensively analyzed in transgenic models of mutant presenilins. Furthermore, the effect of the sex of the mice was not systematically analyzed, despite the fact that important gender differences in the evolution of the disease in the human population have been described. We analyzed whether the progression of amyloidosis in a double transgenic mouse, AβPP/PS1, is susceptible to aging and differentially affects males and females. The accumulation of amyloid in the cerebellum differentially affects males and females of the AβPP/PS1 transgenic line, which was found to be ten-fold higher in 15-month-old females. Amyloid-β accumulation was more evident in the molecular layer of the cerebellum, but glia reaction was only observed in the granular layer of the older mice. The sex divergence was also observed in other neuronal, survival, and autophagic markers. The cerebellum plays an important role in the evolution of the pathology in this transgenic mouse model. Sex differences could be crucial for a complete understanding of this disease. We propose that the human population could be studied in this way. Sex-specific treatment strategies in human populations could show a differential response to the therapeutic approach.

  10. Hesperidin ameliorates behavioral impairments and neuropathology of transgenic APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoyun; Zug, Caroline; Qu, Hongchun; Schluesener, Hermann; Zhang, Zhiyuan

    2015-03-15

    In addition to cognitive impairments, deficits in non-cognitive behaviors are also common neurological sequelae in Alzheimer's disease and its animal models. Hesperidin, a flavanone glycoside found abundantly in citrus fruits, was orally given (100 mg/kg body weight) to 5-month-old transgenic APP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of cerebral amyloidosis for Alzheimer's disease. After a relatively short-term treatment of 10 days, hesperidin significantly restored deficits in non-cognitive nesting ability and social interaction. Further immunohistochemical analysis showed significantly attenuated β-amyloid deposition, plaque associated APP expression, microglial activation and TGF-β immunoreactivity in brains of APP/PS1 mice, which suggests that ameliorated behavioral impairments might be attributable to reduced Aβ deposition and attenuated neuro-inflammatory reaction. Additionally, efficient anti-inflammatory effects of hesperidin were confirmed in vitro. Our findings suggest that hesperidin might be a potential candidate for the treatment of AD or even other neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Geniposide attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction and memory deficits in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Cui; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Hongjuan; Chen, Tong; Zhang, Wensheng

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction appear early and contribute to the disease progression in Alzheimer's disease (AD), which can be detected extensively in AD patients brains as well as in transgenic AD mice brains. Thus, treatments that result in attenuation of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction may hold potential for AD treatment. Geniposide, a pharmacologically active component purified from gardenia fruit, exhibits anti-oxidative, antiinflammatory and other important therapeutic properties. However, whether geniposide has any protective effect on oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in AD transgenic mouse model has not yet been reported. Here, we demonstrate that intragastric administration of geniposide significantly reduces oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in addition to improving learning and memory in APP/PS1 mice. Geniposide exerts protective effects on mitochondrial dysfunction in APP/PS1 mice through suppressing the mitochondrial oxidative damage and increasing the mitochondrial membrane potential and activity of cytochrome c oxidase. These studies indicate that geniposide may attenuate memory deficits through the suppression of mitochondrial oxidative stress. Thus, geniposide may be a potential therapeutic reagent for halting and preventing AD progress.

  12. ESA Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merin, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    The ESAC Science Data Centre, ESDC, is working on a science-driven discovery portal for all its astronomy missions with the provisional name Multi-Mission Interface. The first public release of this service will be demonstrated, featuring an interface for sky exploration and for single and multiple target searches. It requires no prior knowledge of any of the missions involved. From a technical point of view, the system offers all-sky projections of full mission datasets using a new-generation HEALPix projection called HiPS; detailed geometrical footprints to access individual observations at the mission archives using VO-TAP queries; and direct access to the underlying mission-specific science archives. A first public release is scheduled before the end of 2015 and will give users worldwide simplified access to high-level science-ready data products from all ESA Astronomy missions plus a number of ESA-produced source catalogues. A demo will accompany the presentation.

  13. Evidence for the decay $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassen, Rolf; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Bauer, Thomas; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Belogurov, Sergey; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Bird, Thomas; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørnstad, Pål Marius; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borgia, Alessandra; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Brambach, Tobias; van den Brand, Johannes; Bressieux, Joël; Brett, David; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brook, Nicholas; Brown, Henry; Bursche, Albert; Busetto, Giovanni; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Callot, Olivier; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Caponio, Francesco; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carranza-Mejia, Hector; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Ciba, Krzystof; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coca, Cornelia; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Counts, Ian; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pascal; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Silva, Weeraddana; De Simone, Patrizia; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Esen, Sevda; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farinelli, Chiara; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Francisco, Oscar; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garofoli, Justin; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianelle, Alessio; Giani', Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gordon, Hamish; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Hafkenscheid, Tom; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Hampson, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hartmann, Thomas; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Hunt, Philip; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jans, Eddy; Jaton, Pierre; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jezabek, Marek; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kaballo, Michael; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Korolev, Mikhail; Kozlinskiy, Alexandr; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; La Thi, Viet Nga; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lambert, Robert W; Lanciotti, Elisa; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Leo, Sabato; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Guoming; Lohn, Stefan; Longstaff, Ian; Lopes, Jose; Lopez-March, Neus; Lowdon, Peter; Lu, Haiting; Lucchesi, Donatella; Luo, Haofei; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Machefert, Frederic; Machikhiliyan, Irina V; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Malde, Sneha; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manzali, Matteo; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Märki, Raphael; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martens, Aurelien; Martín Sánchez, Alexandra; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; McSkelly, Ben; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Merk, Marcel; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monteil, Stephane; Moran, Dermot; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Katharina; Muresan, Raluca; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nicol, Michelle; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Oggero, Serena; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlandea, Marius; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Arantza; Pal, Bilas Kanti; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parkes, Christopher; Parkinson, Christopher John; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pazos Alvarez, Antonio; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perez Trigo, Eliseo; Perret, Pascal; Perrin-Terrin, Mathieu; Pescatore, Luca; Pesen, Erhan; Petridis, Konstantin; Petrolini, Alessandro; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Powell, Andrew; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Alexander; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Roa Romero, Diego; Robbe, Patrick; Roberts, Douglas; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruffini, Fabrizio; Ruiz, Hugo; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Sabatino, Giovanni; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sapunov, Matvey; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrie, Mauro; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Seco, Marcos; Semennikov, Alexander; Senderowska, Katarzyna; Sepp, Indrek; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Oksana; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Sidorov, Fedor; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Anthony; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Sparkes, Ailsa; Spinella, Franco; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Sascha; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Stroili, Roberto; Subbiah, Vijay Kartik; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szczypka, Paul; Szilard, Daniela; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ubeda Garcia, Mario; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; Voss, Helge; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wiedner, Dirk; Wilkinson, Guy; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wu, Suzhi; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Yang, Zhenwei; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Wen Chao; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zvyagin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the decay $B_c+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+2\\pi^-$ using proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3fb$^{-1}$, collected with the LHCb detector. A signal yield of $32\\pm8$ decays is found with a significance of 4.5 standard deviations. The ratio of the branching fraction of the $B_c^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$ decay to that of the $B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+$ decay is measured to be $$ \\frac{Br (B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+2\\pi^)}{Br (B_c^+ \\rightarrow J/\\psi \\pi^+)} = 1.74\\pm0.44\\pm0.24, $$ where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic.

  14. The OsPS1-F gene regulates growth and development in rice by modulating photosynthetic electron transport rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Rengasamy; Vishal, Bhushan; Ramachandran, Srinivasan; Kumar, Prakash P

    2017-11-17

    Ds insertion in rice OsPS1-F gene results in semi-dwarf plants with reduced tiller number and grain yield, while genetic complementation with OsPS1-F rescued the mutant phenotype. Photosynthetic electron transport is regulated in the chloroplast thylakoid membrane by multi-protein complexes. Studies about photosynthetic machinery and its subunits in crop plants are necessary, because they could be crucial for yield enhancement in the long term. Here, we report the characterization of OsPS1-F (encoding Oryza sativa PHOTOSYSTEM 1-F subunit) using a single copy Ds insertion rice mutant line. The homozygous mutant (osps1-f) showed striking difference in growth and development compared to the wild type (WT), including, reduction in plant height, tiller number, grain yield as well as pale yellow leaf coloration. Chlorophyll concentration and electron transport rate were significantly reduced in the mutant compared to the WT. OsPS1-F gene was highly expressed in rice leaves compared to other tissues at different developmental stages tested. Upon complementation of the mutant with proUBI::OsPS1-F, the observed mutant phenotypes were rescued. Our results illustrate that OsPS1-F plays an important role in regulating proper growth and development of rice plants.

  15. Magnetization transfer contrast imaging detects early white matter changes in the APP/PS1 amyloidosis mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle Praet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available While no definitive cure for Alzheimer's disease exists yet, currently available treatments would benefit greatly from an earlier diagnosis. It has previously been shown that Magnetization transfer contrast (MTC imaging is able to detect amyloid β plaques in old APP/PS1 mice. In the current study we investigated if MTC is also able to visualize early amyloid β (Aβ induced pathological changes. In a cross-sectional study, a comparison was made between the MT ratio of wild type (WT and APP/PS1 mice at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 24 months of age. We observed an increased MT-ratio in the cortex of 24 month old APP/PS1 mice as compared to WT mice. However, when comparing the MT-ratio of the cortex of WT mice with the MT-ratio of the APP/PS1 mice at 2, 4, 6 or 8 months of age, no significant changes could be observed. In contrast to the cortex, we consistently observed a decreased MT-ratio in the splenium of 4, 6 and 8 month old APP/PS1 mice as compared to age-matched WT mice. Lastly, the decreased MT-ratio in the splenium of APP/PS1 mice correlated to the Aβ plaque deposition, astrogliosis and microgliosis. This MT-ratio decrease did however not correlate to the myelin content. Combined, our results suggest that MTC is able to visualize early Aβ-induced changes in the splenium but not the cortex of APP/PS1 mice.

  16. Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djorgovski, S. George; Mahabal, Ashish; Drake, Andrew; Graham, Matthew; Donalek, Ciro

    Sky surveys represent a fundamental data basis for astronomy. We usethem to map in a systematic way the universe and its constituents andto discover new types of objects or phenomena. We review the subject,with an emphasis on the wide-field, imaging surveys, placing them ina broader scientific and historical context. Surveys are now the largestdata generators in astronomy, propelled by the advances in informationand computation technology, and have transformed the ways in whichastronomy is done. This trend is bound to continue, especially with thenew generation of synoptic sky surveys that cover wide areas of the skyrepeatedly and open a new time domain of discovery. We describe thevariety and the general properties of surveys, illustrated by a number ofexamples, the ways in which they may be quantified and compared, andoffer some figures of merit that can be used to compare their scientificdiscovery potential. Surveys enable a very wide range of science, and that isperhaps their key unifying characteristic. As new domains of the observableparameter space open up thanks to the advances in technology, surveys areoften the initial step in their exploration. Some science can be done withthe survey data alone (or a combination of data from different surveys),and some require a targeted follow-up of potentially interesting sourcesselected from surveys. Surveys can be used to generate large, statisticalsamples of objects that can be studied as populations or as tracers of largerstructures to which they belong. They can be also used to discover orgenerate samples of rare or unusual objects and may lead to discoveriesof some previously unknown types. We discuss a general framework ofparameter spaces that can be used for an assessment and comparison ofdifferent surveys and the strategies for their scientific exploration. As we aremoving into the Petascale regime and beyond, an effective processing andscientific exploitation of such large data sets and data streams pose

  17. Motor Cortex Theta and Gamma Architecture in Young Adult APPswePS1dE9 Alzheimer Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Papazoglou

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a multifactorial disorder leading to progressive memory loss and eventually death. In this study, an APPswePS1dE9 AD mouse model has been analyzed for motor cortex theta, beta and gamma frequency alterations using computerized 3D stereotaxic electrode positioning and implantable video-EEG radiotelemetry to perform long-term M1 recordings from both genders considering age, circadian rhythm and activity status of experimental animals. We previously demonstrated that APPswePS1dE9 mice exibit complex alterations in hippocampal frequency power and another recent investigation reported a global increase of alpha, beta and gamma power in APPswePS1dE9 in females of 16-17 weeks of age. In this cortical study in APPswePS1dE9 mice we did not observe any changes in theta, beta and particularly gamma power in both genders at the age of 14, 15, 18 and 19 weeks. Importantly, no activity dependence of theta, beta and gamma activity could be detected. These findings clearly point to the fact that EEG activity, particularly gamma power exhibits developmental changes and spatial distinctiveness in the APPswePS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Cholinergic degeneration is associated with increased plaque deposition and cognitive impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Bettina; Mørk, Arne; Plath, Niels

    2013-01-01

    APP/PS1 mice in a behavioural paradigm addressing working memory. Conversely, the performance of Wt mice was unaffected by SAP treatment. Choline acetyltransferase activity was reduced in the hippocampus and frontal cortex following SAP treatment. The selective effect of a mild SAP lesion in APP/PS1...... mice was not due to a more extensive cholinergic degeneration since the reduction in choline acetyltransferase activity was similar following SAP treatment in APP/PS1 mice and Wt. Interestingly, plaque load was significantly increased in SAP treated APP/PS1 mice relative to sham lesioned APP/PS1 mice...

  19. Genotype-induced changes in biophysical properties of frontal cortex lipid raft from APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario L Diaz

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the lipid composition of lipid rafts have been demonstrated both in human brain and transgenic mouse models, and it has been postulated that aberrant lipid composition in lipid rafts is partly responsible for neuronal degeneration. In order to assess the impact of lipid changes on lipid raft functional properties, we have aimed at determining relevant physicochemical modifications in lipid rafts purified from frontal cortex of wild type (WT and APP/PS1 double transgenic mice. By means of steady-state fluorescence anisotropy analyses using two lipid soluble fluorescent probes, TMA-DPH (1-[(4-trimethyl-aminophenyl]-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and DPH (1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene, we demonstrate that cortical lipid rafts from WT and APP/PS1 animals exhibit different biophysical behaviours, depending on genotype but also on age. Thus, aged APP/PS1 animals exhibited slightly more liquid-ordered lipid rafts than WT counterparts. Membrane microviscosity napp analyses demonstrate that WT lipid rafts are more fluid than APP/PS1 animals of similar age, both at the aqueous interface and hydrophobic core of the membrane. napp in APP/PS1 animals was higher for DPH than for TMA-DPH under similar experimental conditions, indicating that the internal core of the membrane is more viscous than the raft membrane at the aqueous interface. The most dramatic changes in biophysical properties of lipid rafts were observed when membrane cholesterol was depleted with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Overall, our results indicate that APP/PS1 genotype strongly affects physicochemical properties of lipid raft. Such alterations appear not to be homogeneous across the raft membrane axis, but rather are more prominent at the membrane plane. These changes correlate with aberrant proportions of sphingomyelin, cholesterol and saturated fatty acids, as well as polyunsaturated fatty acids, measured in lipid rafts from frontal cortex in this familial model of

  20. Acute exercise does not modify brain activity and memory performance in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki Stein, Angelica; Munive, Victor; Fernandez, Ana M; Nuñez, Angel; Torres Aleman, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Age is the main risk factor for Alzheimer´s disease (AD). With an increasingly aging population, development of affordable screening techniques to determine cognitive status will help identify population-at-risk for further follow-up. Because physical exercise is known to modulate cognitive performance, we used it as a functional test of cognitive health. Mice were submitted to treadmill running at moderate speed for 30 min, and their brain activity was monitored before and after exercise using electrocorticogram (ECG) recordings. After exercise, normal, but not APP/PS1 mice, a well established AD model, showed significantly increased ECG theta rhythm. At the same time normal, but not AD mice, showed significantly enhanced performance in a spatial memory test after exercise. Therefore, we postulate that a running bout coupled to pre- and post-exercise brain activity recordings will help identify individuals with cognitive alterations, by determining the presence or absence of exercise-specific changes in brain activity. Work in humans using a bout of moderate exercise plus electroencephalography, a clinically affordable procedure, is warranted.

  1. Effects of (-epicatechin on the pathology of APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin eZeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alzheimer’s disease is a multifactorial disorder characterized by the progressive deterioration of neuronal networks. The clearance of Aβ from the brain and anti-inflammation are potential important strategies to prevent and treat disease. In a previous study, we demonstrated the grape seed extract (GSE could reduce brain Aβ burden and microglia activation,but which polyphenol plays a major role in these events is not known. Here we tested pharmacological effects of (-epicatechin, one principle polyphenol compound in GSE, on transgenic AD mice.Methods: APP/PS1 transgenic mice were fed with (-epicatechin diet(40mg/kg/d and curcumin diet (47mg/kg/d at 3 months of age for 9 months, the function of liver, Aβ levels in the brain and serum, AD-type neuropathology, plasma levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured.Results: Towards the end of the experiment we found long-term feeding of (- epicatechin diet was well tolerated without fatality, changes in food consumption, body weight or liver function. (-Epicatechin significantly reduced total Aβ in brain and serum by 39% and 40%, respectively, compared with control diet. Microgliosis and astrocytosis in the brain of Alzheimer’s mice were also reduced by 38% and 35%, respectively. The (-epicatechin diet did not alter learning and memory behaviors in AD mice.Conclusions: This study has provided evidence on the beneficial role of (-epicatechin in ameliorating amyloid-induced AD-like pathology in AD mice, but the impact of (-epicatechin on tau pathology is not clear, also the mechanism needs further research.

  2. Effects of environmental enrichment and physical activity on neurogenesis in transgenic PS1/APP mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Briony J; Rowe, Amanda R; Clearwater, Courtney R; Mamcarz, Maggie; Arendash, Gary W; Sanchez-Ramos, Juan

    2009-02-23

    Rodents exposed to environmental enrichment show many differences, including improved cognitive performance, when compared to those living in standard (impoverished) housing. The purpose of the present study was to determine if a selective increase in neurogenesis occurred in cognitively-protected Tg mice raised in an enriched environment compared to those reared in physical activity housing. At weaning, double Tg APP+PS1 mice were placed into one of three environments: complete environmental enrichment (CE), enhanced physical activity (PA), or individual, impoverished housing (IMP). At 9-10 months of age, Tg mice were injected with BrdU (100 mg/kg BID) followed by euthanasia either 24 h or 2 weeks after the last injection. Unbiased estimates of BrdU positive cells in the hippocampal subgranular zone revealed a significant increase in cellular proliferation in Tg mice raised in CE or PA compared to Tg mice reared in IMP housing. However, counts of BrdU birth-dated cells 2 weeks after labeling showed no difference among the three groups, indicating decreased survival of cells in those groups (CE and PA) with higher cellular proliferation rates in the neurogenic niche. Counts of calretinin-expressing cells, a marker of immature neurons, also indicated no difference among the three groups of mice. In view of our prior study showing that enhanced cognitive activity (but not enhanced physical activity) protects Tg mice against cognitive impairment, the present results indicate that increased generation and survival of new neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is not involved with the cognitively-protective effects of complete CE in Alzheimer's transgenic mice.

  3. Chronic cannabidiol treatment improves social and object recognition in double transgenic APPswe/PS1∆E9 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, David; Low, Jac Kee; Logge, Warren; Garner, Brett; Karl, Tim

    2014-08-01

    Patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease (AD) exhibit a decline in cognitive abilities including an inability to recognise familiar faces. Hallmark pathological changes in AD include the aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ), tau protein hyperphosphorylation as well as pronounced neurodegeneration, neuroinflammation, neurotoxicity and oxidative damage. The non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) exerts neuroprotective, anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects and promotes neurogenesis. CBD also reverses Aβ-induced spatial memory deficits in rodents. Thus we determined the therapeutic-like effects of chronic CBD treatment (20 mg/kg, daily intraperitoneal injections for 3 weeks) on the APPswe/PS1∆E9 (APPxPS1) transgenic mouse model for AD in a number of cognitive tests, including the social preference test, the novel object recognition task and the fear conditioning paradigm. We also analysed the impact of CBD on anxiety behaviours in the elevated plus maze. Vehicle-treated APPxPS1 mice demonstrated impairments in social recognition and novel object recognition compared to wild type-like mice. Chronic CBD treatment reversed these cognitive deficits in APPxPS1 mice without affecting anxiety-related behaviours. This is the first study to investigate the effect of chronic CBD treatment on cognition in an AD transgenic mouse model. Our findings suggest that CBD may have therapeutic potential for specific cognitive impairments associated with AD.

  4. Encapsulated VEGF-secreting cells enhance proliferation of neuronal progenitors in the hippocampus of AβPP/Ps1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antequera, Desiree; Portero, Aitziber; Bolos, Marta; Orive, Gorka; Hernández, Rosa M Rm A; Pedraz, José Luis; Carro, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus, but the way in which this process occurs in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain is still unknown. We examined the proliferation of neuronal precursors with an ex vivo approach, using encapsulated VEGF secreting cells, in AβPP/PS1 mice, a mouse model of AD. Overexpression of VEGF and VEGF receptor flk-1 was observed in the cerebral cortex from VEGF microcapsules-treated AβPP/PS1 mice at 1, 3 and 6 months after VEGF-microcapsule implantation. Stereological counting of 5-bromodeoxyuridine positive cells revealed that encapsulated VEGF secreting cells significantly enhanced cellular proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG). The number of neuronal precursors in VEGF microcapsules-treated AβPP/PS1 mice was also greater, and this effect remains after 6 months. We also confirmed that encapsulated VEGF secreting cells also stimulated angiogenesis in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal dentate gyrus. In addition, we found that VEGF-microcapsule treatment was associated with a depressed expression and activity of acetylcholinesterase in the hippocampus of AβPP/PS1 mice, a similar pattern as first-line medications for the treatment of AD. We conclude that stereologically-implanted VEGF-microcapsules exert an acute and long-standing neurotrophic effects, and could be utilized to improve potential therapies to control the progression of AD.

  5. Photo-fermentational hydrogen production of Rhodobacter sp. KKU-PS1 isolated from an UASB reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thitirut Assawamongkholsiri

    2015-05-01

    Conclusions: KKU-PS1 can produce hydrogen from at least 8 types of organic acids. By optimizing pH and temperature, a maximal hydrogen production by this strain was obtained. Additionally, by optimizing the light intensity, Rm was increased by approximately two fold and the lag phase of hydrogen production was shortened.

  6. Growing evidence that SNe Iax are not a one-parameter family. The case of PS1-12bwh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, M. R.; Kotak, R.; Sim, S. A.; Wright, D.; Smartt, S. J.; Berger, E.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Howell, D. A.; Kaiser, N.; Magnier, E. A.; Wainscoat, R.; Waters, C.

    2017-05-01

    In this study, we present observations of a type Iax supernova, PS1-12bwh, discovered during the Pan-STARRS1 3π-survey. Our analysis was driven by previously unseen pre-maximum, spectroscopic heterogeneity. While the light curve and post-maximum spectra of PS1-12bwh are virtually identical to those of the well-studied type Iax supernova, SN 2005hk, the -2 day spectrum of PS1-12bwh does not resemble SN 2005hk at a comparable epoch; instead, we found it to match a spectrum of SN 2005hk taken over a week earlier (-12 day). We are able to rule out the cause as being incorrect phasing, and argue that it is not consistent with orientation effects predicted by existing explosion simulations. To investigate the potential source of this difference, we performed radiative transfer modelling of both supernovae. We found that the pre-maximum spectrum of PS1-12bwh is well matched by a synthetic spectrum generated from a model with a lower density in the high velocity (≳6000 km s-1) ejecta than SN 2005hk. The observed differences between SN 2005hk and PS1-12bwh may therefore be attributed primarily to differences in the high velocity ejecta alone, while comparable densities for the lower velocity ejecta would explain the nearly identical post-maximum spectra. These two supernovae further highlight the diversity within the SNe Iax class, as well as the challenges in spectroscopically identifying and phasing these objects, especially at early epochs.

  7. Isoflurane anesthesia exacerbates learning and memory impairment in zinc-deficient APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chunsheng; Liu, Ya; Yuan, Ye; Cui, Weiwei; Zheng, Feng; Ma, Yuan; Piao, Meihua

    2016-12-01

    Zinc (Zn) is known to play crucial roles in numerous brain functions including learning and memory. Zn deficiency is believed to be widespread throughout the world, particularly in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). A number of studies have shown that volatile anesthetics, such as isoflurane, might be potential risk factors for the development of AD. However, whether isoflurane exposure accelerates the process of AD and cognitive impairment in AD patients with Zn deficiency is yet to be documented. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of 1.4% isoflurane exposure for 2 h on learning and memory function, and neuropathogenesis in 10-month-old Zn-adequate, Zn-deficient, and Zn-treated APP/PS1 mice with the following parameters: behavioral tests, neuronal apoptosis, Aβ, and tau pathology. The results demonstrated that isoflurane exposure showed no impact on learning and memory function, but induced transient elevation of neuroapoptosis in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. Exposure of isoflurane exhibited significant neuroapoptosis, Aβ generation, tau phosphorylation, and learning and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice in the presence of Zn deficiency. Appropriate Zn treatment improved learning and memory function, and prevented isoflurane-induced neuroapoptosis in APP/PS1 mice. Isoflurane exposure may cause potential neurotoxicity, which is tolerated to some extent in Zn-adequate APP/PS1 mice. When this tolerance is limited, like in AD with Zn deficiency, isoflurane exposure markedly exacerbated learning and memory impairment, and neuropathology, indicating that AD patients with certain conditions such as Zn deficiency may be vulnerable to volatile anesthetic isoflurane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Humulus japonicus inhibits the progression of Alzheimer's disease in a APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tae-Shin; Ryu, Young-Kyoung; Park, Hye-Yeon; Kim, Jae Yun; Go, Jun; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Choi, Dong-Hee; Oh, Won-Keun; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Shim

    2017-01-01

    Humulus japonicus Siebold & Zucc. (HJ) has traditionally been administered to patients with pulmonary disease, skin disease and hypertension in Korea, and it is considered to exert anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antimicrobial and antimycobacterial effects. However, its effects against Alzheimer's disease (AD) have yet to be explored. Thus, this study was carried out to investigate whether HJ has a beneficial effect on the progression of AD in an animal model. A methanolic extract of HJ (500 mg/kg/day) was intragastrically administered to 5-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg-APP/PS1) mice for 2.5 months. Novel object recognition and Y-maze alteration tests were used to assess cognitive function, and an immunohistochemical assay was performed to assess amyloid β (Aβ)deposition, tau phosphorylation and gliosis. An in vitro assay using a microglial cell line was also performed to investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of HJ. Our results revealed that HJ significantly decreased the mRNA and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF‑α), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) induced by lipopolysaccharide in the microglial cell line. The administration of HJ for 2 months improved the cognitive function of Tg-APP/PS1 mice. HJ notably reduced the area occupied by Aβ and neurofibrillary tangles, and the number of activated astrocytes and microglia in the cortex of Tg-APP/PS1 mice. The findings of our study suggest that HJ has the therapeutic potential to inhibit the progression of AD and to improve cognitive deterioration in Tg-APP/PS1 mice.

  9. Receptor-associated protein (RAP plays a central role in modulating Abeta deposition in APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilian Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Receptor associated protein (RAP functions in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER to assist in the maturation of several membrane receptor proteins, including low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP and lipoprotein receptor 11 (SorLA/LR11. Previous studies in cell and mouse model systems have demonstrated that these proteins play roles in the metabolism of the amyloid precursor protein (APP, including processes involved in the generation, catabolism and deposition of beta-amyloid (Abeta peptides. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice transgenic for mutant APPswe and mutant presenilin 1 (PS1dE9 were mated to mice with homozygous deletion of RAP. Unexpectedly, mice that were homozygous null for RAP and transgenic for APPswe/PS1dE9 showed high post-natal mortality, necessitating a shift in focus to examine the levels of amyloid deposition in APPswe/PS1dE9 that were hemizygous null for RAP. Immunoblot analysis confirmed 50% reductions in the levels of RAP with modest reductions in the levels of proteins dependent upon RAP for maturation [LRP trend towards a 20% reduction ; SorLA/LR11 statistically significant 15% reduction (p<0.05]. Changes in the levels of these proteins in the brains of [APPswe/PS1dE9](+/-/RAP(+/- mice correlated with 30-40% increases in amyloid deposition by 9 months of age. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Partial reductions in the ER chaperone RAP enhance amyloid deposition in the APPswe/PS1dE9 model of Alzheimer amyloidosis. Partial reductions in RAP also affect the maturation of LRP and SorLA/LR11, which are each involved in several different aspects of APP processing and Abeta catabolism. Together, these findings suggest a central role for RAP in Alzheimer amyloidogenesis.

  10. Optical observation of the 3s sigma F-g (3)Pi(u) Rydberg state of N-2

    OpenAIRE

    Sprengers, J.P.; Reinhold, E.M.; Ubachs, W.M.G.; Baldwin, K.G.H.; Lewis, B.R.

    2005-01-01

    - X (1)Sigma(g)(+)(0,0) transition of N-2 has been optically observed for the first time, and the 3s sigma(g)F (3)Pi(u)(upsilon=0) Rydberg level fully characterized with rotational resolution. The experimental spectroscopic parameters and predissociation level widths suggest strong interactions between the F state and the 3p pi(u)G (3)Pi(u) Rydberg and C-' (3)Pi(u) valence states, analogous to those well known in the case of the isoconfigurational (1)Pi(u) states. (c) 2005 American Institute ...

  11. Measurement of the $\\eta\\to 3\\pi^{0}$ slope parameter $\\alpha$ with the KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Archilli, F; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Micco, B; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Jacewicz, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lee-Franzini, J; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Santangelo, P; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Spadaro, T; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Venanzoni, G; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2010-01-01

    We present a measurement of the slope parameter $\\alpha$ for the $\\eta\\to 3\\pi^{0}$ decay, with the KLOE experiment at the DA$\\Phi$NE $\\phi$-factory, based on a background free sample of $\\sim$ 17 millions $\\eta$ mesons produced in $\\phi$ radiative decays. By fitting the event density in the Dalitz plot we determine $\\alpha = -0.0301 \\pm 0.0035\\,stat\\;_{-0.0035}^{+0.0022}\\,syst\\,$. The result is in agreement with recent measurements from hadro- and photo-production experiments.

  12. Cytokine-producing microglia have an altered beta-amyloid load in aged APP/PS1 Tg mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babcock, Alicia A; Ilkjær, Laura; Clausen, Bettina H

    2015-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaques and chronic neuroinflammation are significant neuropathological features of Alzheimer's disease. Microglial cells in aged brains have potential to produce cytokines such as TNF and IL-1 family members (IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-1Ra) and to phagocytose Aβ in Alzheimer's disease...... of CD11b, TNF, and IL-1Ra. Cytokine production and Aβ load were assessed in neocortical CD11b(+)(CD45(+)) microglia by flow cytometry. Whereas most microglia in aged mice produced IL-1Ra, relatively low proportions of microglia produced TNF, IL-1α, and IL-1β. However, microglial production...... of these latter cytokines was generally increased in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Microglia that phagocytosed endogenously-produced Aβ were only observed in APP/PS1 Tg mice. Differences in phagocytic index and total Aβ load were observed in microglia with specific cytokine profiles. Both phagocytic index and total Aβ load...

  13. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Gaia-PS1-SDSS (GPS1) proper motion catalog (Tian+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H.-J.; Gupta, P.; Sesar, B.; Rix, H.-W.; Martin, N. F.; Liu, C.; Goldman, B.; Platais, I.; Kudritzki, R.-P.; Waters, C. Z.

    2018-02-01

    In order to construct proper motions, we analyze and model catalog positions from four different imaging surveys, as discussed below. Gaia DR1 is based on observations collected between 2014 July 25 and 2015 September 16. PS1 observations were collected between 2010 and 2014. The SDSS DR9 data used here were obtained in the years between 2000 and 2008. The images from 2MASS were taken between 1997 and 2001. (1 data file).

  14. Functional autoradiography shows unaltered cannabinoid CB1 receptor signalling in hippocampus and cortex of APP/PS1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkkäine, E; Tanila, H; Laitinen, J T

    2012-12-01

    The cannabinoid CB1-receptor is among the most abundant G-protein-coupled receptors in the mammalian brain. Whereas post-mortem studies in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains compared to age-matched controls have reported decreased CB1-receptor binding but no change in their protein levels (immunoreactivity), decreased or increased CB1- receptor protein levels have been reported in APP/PS1 transgenic mice modelling AD. To complete the picture, the present study used functional autoradiography to assess CB1-receptor-dependent G(i) protein activation in the hippocampus, entorhinal cortex and medial frontal cortex of 13- to 14-month-old female APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic and wild-type littermate control mice. The mouse brains were processed for [³⁵S]GTPλS autoradiography so that brain sections were analysed in pairs of one transgenic and one control mouse brain. The autoradiography protocol was completed for each pair both in the absence and presence of dithiotreitol (DTT) to reveal possible redox-dependent alterations in CB1 receptor function. Five treatments were used: baseline, incubation with 10 μM GTPλS to assess nonspecific binding, and CB1 receptor agonist CP55,940 in three concentrations. By and large we found no statistically significant differences between the APP/PS1 transgenic and control mice in CB1 receptor signalling. The only exception was a modest redox-dependent alteration in entorhinal cortical CB1 receptors between the genotypes. Thus, in accordance with the majority of earlier human AD findings, we did not find evidence for notable changes in the number of functional CB1 receptors in the common APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of AD.

  15. Mitochondrial dynamics changes with age in an APPsw/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin-Lin; Shen, Yang; Wang, Xiao; Wei, Li-Fei; Wang, Ping; Yang, Hui; Wang, Cun-Fu; Xie, Zhao-Hong; Bi, Jian-Zhong

    2017-03-01

    Increasing research suggests that mitochondrial defects play a major role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. We aimed to better understand changes in mitochondria with the development and progression of AD. We compared APPsw/PS1dE9 transgenic mice at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months old as an animal model of AD and age-matched C57BL/6 mice as controls. The learning ability and spatial memory ability of APPsw/PS1dE9 mice showed significant differences compared with controls until 9 and 12 months. Mitochondrial morphology was altered in hippocampus tissue of APPsw/PS1dE9 mice beginning from the third month. 'Medullary corpuscle', which is formed by the accumulation of a large amount of degenerative and fragmented mitochondria in neuropils, may be the characteristic change observed on electron microscopy at a late stage of AD. Moreover, levels of mitochondrial fusion proteins (optic atrophy 1 and mitofusin 2) and fission proteins (dynamin-related protein 1 and fission 1) were altered in transgenic mice compared with controls with progression of AD. We found increased levels of fission and fusion proteins in APP/PS1 mice at 3 months, indicating that the presence of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics may be events in early AD progression. Changes in mitochondrial preceded the onset of memory decline as measured by the modified Morris water maze test. Abnormal mitochondrial dynamics could be a marker for early diagnosis of AD and monitoring disease progression. Further research is needed to study the signaling pathways that govern mitochondrial fission/fusion in AD.

  16. Taurine in drinking water recovers learning and memory in the adult APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin V; Yoon, Jin H; Kang, Bo Ram; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Sejin; Kim, Ji Yoon; Kim, Joo Won; Cho, Yakdol; Woo, Jiwan; Kim, YoungSoo

    2014-12-12

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a lethal progressive neurological disorder affecting the memory. Recently, US Food and Drug Administration mitigated the standard for drug approval, allowing symptomatic drugs that only improve cognitive deficits to be allowed to accelerate on to clinical trials. Our study focuses on taurine, an endogenous amino acid found in high concentrations in humans. It has demonstrated neuroprotective properties against many forms of dementia. In this study, we assessed cognitively enhancing property of taurine in transgenic mouse model of AD. We orally administered taurine via drinking water to adult APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model for 6 weeks. Taurine treatment rescued cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice up to the age-matching wild-type mice in Y-maze and passive avoidance tests without modifying the behaviours of cognitively normal mice. In the cortex of APP/PS1 mice, taurine slightly decreased insoluble fraction of Aβ. While the exact mechanism of taurine in AD has not yet been ascertained, our results suggest that taurine can aid cognitive impairment and may inhibit Aβ-related damages.

  17. Organoselenium (Sel-Plex diet) decreases amyloid burden and RNA and DNA oxidative damage in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Mark A; Xiong, Shuling; Lyubartseva, Ganna; Markesbery, William R

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate potential antioxidant characteristics of organic selenium (Se), double knock-in transgenic mice expressing human mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and human presenilin-1 (PS1) were provided a Se-deficient diet, a Se-enriched diet (Sel-Plex), or a control diet from 4 to 9 months of age followed by a control diet until 12 months of age. Levels of DNA, RNA, and protein oxidation as well as lipid peroxidation markers were determined in all mice and amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) plaques were quantified. APP/PS1 mice provided Sel-Plex showed significantly (PSel-Plex-treated mice showed no significant differences in levels of lipid peroxidation or protein oxidation compared to APP/PS1 mice on a control diet. To determine if diminished oxidative damage was associated with increased antioxidant enzyme activities, brain glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase, and glutathione transferase activities were measured. Sel-Plex-treated mice showed a modest but significant increase in GSH-Px activity compared to mice on a normal diet (P<0.5). Overall, these data suggest that organic Se can reduce Abeta burden and minimize DNA and RNA oxidation and support a role for it as a potential therapeutic agent in neurologic disorders with increased oxidative stress.

  18. Allicin ameliorates cognitive impairment in APP/PS1 mice via Suppressing oxidative stress by Blocking JNK Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Ping; Xue, Yixue; Liu, Libo; Li, Zhen; Liu, Yunhui

    2018-02-01

    In middle and old age, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of brain. As an increasingly aging population, AD represents a huge burden for the patients' family and the country. However, current therapeutical strategies have shown limited effectiveness. Allicin, which is the main composition of garlic, was reported to prevent the learning and memory impairment of AD mouse model. As the mechanism is not clear, in this study, we used the APP (amyloid precursor protein)/PS1 (presenilin 1) double transgenic mice, which express human mutant APP and PS1, to determine the protective effect of allicin on neurons. AD involves a broad range of clinical, cellular, and biochemical manifestations. This has led to many views of AD, e.g. the amyloid, presenilin, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction. We confirmed that allicin improves the cognitive function of APP/PS1 double transgenic mice by reducing the expression levels of Aβ, oxidative stress, and improving mitochondrial dysfunction. Application of behavioral, morphological and molecular biology, and other means were conducted to investigate the effect of allicin, which provide an experimental basis for the reliable application of allicin in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Effects of collagen-induced rheumatoid arthritis on amyloidosis and microvascular pathology in APP/PS1 mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Gyeong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence suggests that rheumatoid arthritis (RA may enhance or reduce the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The present study was performed to directly explore the effects of collagen-induced rheumatoid arthritis (CIA on amyloid plaque formation, microglial activation, and microvascular pathology in the cortex and hippocampus of the double transgenic APP/PS1 mouse model for AD. Wild-type or APP/PS1 mice that received type II collagen (CII in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA at 2 months of age revealed characteristics of RA, such as joint swelling, synovitis, and cartilage and bone degradation 4 months later. Joint pathology was accompanied by sustained induction of IL-1β and TNF-α in plasma over 4 weeks after administration of CII in CFA. Results CIA reduced levels of soluble and insoluble amyloid beta (Aβ peptides and amyloid plaque formation in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice, which correlated with increased blood brain barrier disruption, Iba-1-positive microglia, and CD45-positive microglia/macrophages. In contrast, CIA reduced vessel density and length with features of microvascular pathology, including vascular segments, thinner vessels, and atrophic string vessels. Conclusions The present findings suggest that RA may exert beneficial effects against Aβ burden and harmful effects on microvascular pathology in AD.

  20. Tongluo Xingnao Effervescent Tablet preserves mitochondrial energy metabolism and attenuates cognition deficits in APPswe/PS1De9 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yuan; Ma, Tao; Ren, Xiangyi; Wei, Jiangping; Fu, Wenjun; Ma, Yuntong; Xu, Shijun; Zhang, Zhanjun

    2016-09-06

    Tongluo Xingnao Effervescent Tablet (TXET), a traditional Chinese herbal formula composed of Ligusticum chuanxiong hor, Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi and Angelica sinensis, has been widely used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related dementias for decades in China. In the present study, we investigated the effects of TXET on mitochondrial function, energy metabolism and cognitive amelioration in the APPswe/PS1De9 transgenetic mouse model of AD. The energy charge and phosphocreatine, activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes, mitochondrial membrane potential, activity of Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and the expression levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the brains were measured, respectively. TXET exhibits significant protection on mitochondrial function and energy supply in addition to ameliorating cognitive decline in APPswe/PS1De9 mice. TXET rescues mitochondrial function by increasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, energy charge levels, activity of respiratory chain complexes and Na(+)-K(+) ATPase activity. These findings suggest that TXET may attenuate cognition impairment through the restoration of mitochondrial function and energy metabolism in the brains in APPswe/PS1De9 mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. High-resolution adsorption analysis of pillared zeolites IPC-3PI and MCM-36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zukal, Arnošt; Kubů, Martin

    2014-07-21

    The porous structure of pillared zeolites IPC-3PI and MCM-36 and their precursors IPC-3P and MCM-22P, respectively, has been investigated by means of a high-resolution adsorption analysis. The analysis was based on argon adsorption isotherms measured at 87 K from the relative pressure of 10(-6). The isotherms were processed by means of the t-plot method, which made it possible to distinguish adsorption in micropores from adsorption in mesopores. The pore size distribution was evaluated from argon isotherms using Non-Local Density Functional Theory. The obtained results have shown that the microporous structure of the MWW layers is preserved in both pillared zeolites. In contrast to precursors IPC-3P and MCM-22P, pillared samples are characterized by the formation of a porous structure belonging to the lower mesopore region. The distribution of mesopores in the zeolite IPC-3PI is broader and is shifted to larger widths in comparison with the zeolite MCM-36.

  2. A new limit on the CP violating decay KS -> 3pi0 with the KLOE experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Babusci, D; Balwierz-Pytko, I; Bencivenni, G; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bossi, F; Branchini, P; Budano, A; Balkestahl, L Caldeira; Capon, G; Ceradini, F; Ciambrone, P; Curciarello, F; Czerwinski, E; Dane, E; De Leo, V; De Lucia, E; De Robertis, G; De Santis, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Salvo, R; Domenici, D; Erriquez, O; Fanizzi, G; Fantini, A; Felici, G; Fiore, S; Franzini, P; Gauzzi, P; Giardina, G; Giovannella, S; Gonnella, F; Graziani, E; Happacher, F; Heijkenskjold, L; Hoistad, B; Iafolla, L; Jacewicz, M; Johansson, T; Kacprzak, K; Kupsc, A; Lee-Franzini, J; Leverington, B; Loddo, F; Loffredo, S; Mandaglio, G; Martemianov, M; Martini, M; Mascolo, M; Messi, R; Miscetti, S; Morello, G; Moricciani, D; Moskal, P; Nguyen, F; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Longhi, I Prado; Ranieri, A; Redmer, C F; Santangelo, P; Sarra, I; Schioppa, M; Sciascia, B; Silarski, M; Taccini, C; Tortora, L; Venanzoni, G; Wislicki, W; Wolke, M; Zdebik, J

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out a new direct search for the CP violating decay KS -> 3pi0 with 1.7 fb^-1 of e+e- collisions collected by the KLOE detector at the phi-factory DAFNE. We have searched for this decay in a sample of about 5.9 x 10^8 KS KL events tagging the KS by means of the KL interaction in the calorimeter and requiring six prompt photons. With respect to our previous search, the analysis has been improved by increasing of a factor four the tagged sample and by a more effective background rejection of fake KS tags and spurious clusters. We find no candidates in data and simulated background samples, while we expect 0.12 standard model events. Normalizing to the number of KS -> 2pi0 events in the same sample, we set the upper limit on BR(KS -> 3pi0 < 2.6 x 10^-8 at 90% C.L., five times lower than the previous limit. We also set the upper limit on the eta_000 parameter, |eta_000 | < 0.0088 at 90% C.L., improving by a factor two the latest direct measurement.

  3. Thamnolia vermicularis extract improves learning ability in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by ameliorating both Aβ and Tau pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong; Guo, Xiao-Dan; Lei, Min; Wu, Jia-Yi; Jin, Jia-Zhen; Shi, Xiao-Fan; Zhu, Zhi-Yuan; Rukachaisirikul, Vatcharin; Hu, Li-Hong; Wen, Tie-Qiao; Shen, Xu

    2017-01-01

    Considering the complicated pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), multi-targets have become a focus in the discovery of drugs for treatment of this disease. In the current work, we established a multi-target strategy for discovering active reagents capable of suppressing both Aβ level and Tau hyperphosphorylation from natural products, and found that the ethanol extract of Thamnolia vermicularis (THA) was able to improve learning ability in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by inhibiting both Aβ levels and Tau hyperphosphorylation. SH-SY5Y and CHO-APP/BACE1 cells and primary astrocytes were used in cell-based assays. APP/PS1 transgenic mice [B6C3-Tg(APP swe , PS1dE9)] were administered THA (300 mg·kg -1 ·d -1 , ig) for 100 d. After the administration was completed, the learning ability of the mice was detected using a Morris water maze (MWM) assay; immunofluorescence staining, Congo red staining and Thioflavine S staining were used to detect the senile plaques in the brains of the mice. ELISA was used to evaluate Aβ and sAPPβ contents, and Western blotting and RT-PCR were used to investigate the relevant signaling pathway regulation in response to THA treatment. In SH-SY5Y cells, THΑ (1, 10, 20 μg/mL) significantly stimulated PI 3 K/AKT/mTOR and AMPK/raptor/mTOR signaling-mediated autophagy in the promotion of Aβ clearance as both a PI 3 K inhibitor and an AMPK indirect activator, and restrained Aβ production as a suppressor against PERK/eIF2α-mediated BACE1 expression. Additionally, THA functioned as a GSK3β inhibitor with an IC 50 of 1.32±0.85 μg/mL, repressing Tau hyperphosphorylation. Similar effects on Aβ accumulation and Tau hyperphosphorylation were observed in APP/PS1 transgenic mice treated with THA. Furthermore, administration of THA effectively improved the learning ability of APP/PS1 transgenic mice, and markedly reduced the number of senile plaques in their hippocampus and cortex. The results highlight the potential of the natural product THA

  4. Observation of a structure at 1.84 GeV/c$^2$ in the $3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ mass spectrum in $J/\\psi\\rightarrow \\gamma 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Albayrak, O; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R Baldini; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bennett, J V; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, H; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feng, C Q; Friedel, P; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Fuks, O; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, T; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, C; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, G S; Huang, J S; Huang, L; Huang, X T; Huang, Y; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, Q P; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kopf, B; Kornicer, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Lara, M; Larin, P; Leyhe, M; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Lin, D; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lou, X C; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Moeini, H; Morales, C Morales; Moriya, K; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, L Q; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, W M; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Uman, I; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, D; Wang, D Y; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Wei, J B; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xia, Y X; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, Q J; Xu, Q N; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, H W; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, LiLi; Zhang, R; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Zhenghao; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhou, L; Zhou, X; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

    2013-01-01

    With a sample of 225.3 million $J/\\psi$ events taken with the BESIII detector, the decay $J/\\psi\\rightarrow \\gamma 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ is analyzed. A structure at 1.84 GeV/c$^2$ is observed in the $3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ invariant mass spectrum with a statistical significance of 7.6$\\sigma$ . The mass and width are measured to be $M=1842.2\\pm 4.2^{+7.1}_{-2.6}$ MeV/c$^2$ and $\\Gamma=83\\pm 14 \\pm 11$ MeV. The product branching fraction is determined to be $B(J/\\psi\\rightarrow\\gamma X(1840))\\times B(X(1840)\\rightarrow 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-))=(2.44\\pm0.36^{+0.60}_{-0.74})\\times 10^{-5}$. No $\\eta^\\prime$ signals are observed in the $3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ invariant mass spectrum, and the upper limit of the branching fraction for the decay $\\eta^\\prime\\rightarrow 3(\\pi^+\\pi^-)$ is set to be $3.1\\times10^{-5}$ at a 90% confidence level.

  5. PWA of 3pi Final States and a Search for the pi1(1600)

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, R E

    2006-01-01

    Partial wave analyses (PWA) of the 3pi systems in the reactions pi- p --> pi+ pi- pi- p (the ``charged'' mode) and pi- p --> pi- pi0 pi0 p (the ``neutral'' mode) with an 18.3 GeV/c pion beam were performed using high statistics data from the E852 experiment. Conventional signals, such as the a1(1260), the a2(1320), and the pi2(1670), were found to be remarkably stable to the choice of waves included in the fit. In contrast, possible evidence for the pi1(1600) in the JPC = 1-+ exotic wave amplitude disappears when additional decay modes of conventional mesons (especially those of the pi2(1670)) are included in the PWA fit.

  6. Donepezil improves learning and memory deficits in APP/PS1 mice by inhibition of microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H B; Cheng, Y F; Wu, J G; Wang, C M; Wang, H T; Zhang, C; Qiu, Z K; Xu, J P

    2015-04-02

    Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor, is a representative symptomatic therapy for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have reported the anti-inflammatory effects of donepezil. However, limited studies that investigate its anti-inflammatory effect in AD have been reported. Considering the role of proinflammatory molecules and microglial activation in the pathogenesis of AD, the current study aimed to elucidate the effects of donepezil on microglial activation induced by amyloid deposition in transgenic mice. Our results showed that chronic treatment with donepezil significantly improved the cognitive function in the novel object recognition test and Morris water maze test in amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin-1 (PS1) transgenic mice. We further demonstrated that these cognitive enhancements were related to the anti-inflammatory effect of donepezil. We found that donepezil could inhibit the expression of CD68, a specific marker of microglial activation, and reduce the release of proinflammatory cytokines including tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β. Immunohistochemistry and Congo red co-staining revealed that congophilic amyloid and activated microglia around plaques were also reduced by donepezil treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis showed that donepezil decreased insoluble Aβ40/Aβ42 and soluble Aβ40 levels. Moreover, donepezil reversed the impaired expression of insulin-degrading enzyme in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice. Our findings indicated that donepezil improves cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice by a mechanism that may be associated with its inhibition of microglial activation and release of proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Selective loss of noradrenaline exacerbates early cognitive dysfunction and synaptic deficits in APP/PS1 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Thea; Kummer, Markus P.; Terwel, Dick; Martinez, Ana; Gorji, Ali; Pape, Hans-Christian; Rommelfanger, Karen S.; Schroeder, Jason P.; Stoll, Monika; Schultze, Joachim; Weinshenker, David; Heneka, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Background Degeneration of the locus ceruleus (LC), the major noradrenergic nucleus in the brain, occurs early and is ubiquitous in Alzheimer’s disease. Experimental lesions to the LC exacerbate AD-like neuropathology and cognitive deficits in several transgenic mouse models of AD. Because the LC contains multiple neuromodulators known to affect Aβ toxicity and cognitive function, the specific role of noradrenaline (NA) in AD is not well understood. Methods To determine the consequences of selective NA deficiency in an AD mouse model, we crossed dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) knock-out mice with APP/PS1 mice, overexpressing mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin-1. DBH (−/−) mice are unable to synthesize NA but otherwise have normal LC neurons and co-transmitters. Spatial memory, hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), and synaptic protein levels were assessed. Results The modest impairments in spatial memory and hippocampal LTP displayed by young APP/PS1 or DBH(−/−) single mutant mice were augmented in DBH(−/−)/APP/PS1 double mutant mice. Deficits were associated with reduced levels of total Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II (CaMKII) and N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2A (NR2A), increased N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B (NR2B) levels and were independent of Aβ accumulation. Spatial memory performance was partly improved by treatment with the NA precursor drug L-threo-DOPS. Conclusions These results indicate that early LC degeneration and subsequent NA deficiency in AD may contribute to cognitive deficits via altered levels of CaMKII and N-Methyl-D-aspartate receptors, and suggest that NA supplementation could be beneficial in early AD. PMID:22883210

  8. DHA diet reduces AD pathology in young APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice: Possible Gender Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Perez, Sylvia E.; Berg, Brian M.; Moore, Kenneth A.; He, Bin; Counts, Scott E.; Fritz, Jason J.; Hu, Yuan-Shih; Lazarov, Orly; Lah, James J.; Mufson, Elliott J.

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical trial findings suggest that consumption of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) lowers the risk of Alzhemier’s disease (AD). We examined the effects of short-term (3 months) DHA enriched diet on plaque deposition and synaptic deficts in forebrain of young APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic (tg) and non-transgenic (ntg) mice. Gas chromatography revealed a significant increase in DHA concomitant with a decrease of arachidonic acid in both brain and liver in mice fed with DHA. Female tg...

  9. An integrated proteomics approach shows synaptic plasticity changes in an APP/PS1 Alzheimer's mouse model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kempf, Stefan J; Metaxas, Athanasios; Ibáñez-Vea, María

    2016-01-01

    -linked glycosylation patterns, pathway-focused transcriptome and neurological disease-associated miRNAome with age-matched controls in neocortex, hippocampus, olfactory bulb and brainstem. We report that signalling pathways related to synaptic functions associated with dendritic spine morphology, neurite outgrowth......, long-term potentiation, CREB signalling and cytoskeletal dynamics were altered in 12 month old APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice, particularly in the neocortex and olfactory bulb. This was associated with cerebral amyloidosis as well as formation of argyrophilic tangle-like structures and microglial clustering in all...

  10. Deletion of the type-1 interferon receptor in APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice preserves cognitive function and alters glial phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Myles R; Moore, Zachery; Zhang, Moses; Brody, Kate M; Jones, Nigel C; Shultz, Sandy R; Taylor, Juliet M; Crack, Peter J

    2016-07-11

    A neuro-inflammatory response is evident in Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet the precise mechanisms by which neuro-inflammation influences the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain poorly understood. Type-1 interferons (IFNs) are master regulators of innate immunity and have been implicated in multiple CNS disorders, however their role in AD progression has not yet been fully investigated. Hence, we generated APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice lacking the type-1 IFN alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1, APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 x IFNAR1(-/-)) aged to 9 months to investigate the role of type-1 IFN signaling in a well-validated model of AD. APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 x IFNAR1(-/-) mice displayed a modest reduction in Aβ monomer levels, despite maintenance of plaque deposition. This finding correlated with partial rescue of spatial learning and memory impairments in the Morris water maze in comparison to APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice. Q-PCR identified a reduced type-1 IFN response and modulated pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion in APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 x IFNAR1(-/-) mice compared to APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice. Interestingly, immunohistochemistry displayed enhanced astrocyte reactivity but attenuated microgliosis surrounding amyloid plaque deposits in APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 x IFNAR1(-/-) mice in comparison to APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 mice. These APPSWE/PS1ΔE9 x IFNAR1(-/-) microglial populations demonstrated an anti-inflammatory phenotype that was confirmed in vitro by soluble Aβ1-42 treatment of IFNAR1(-/-) primary glial cultures. Our findings suggest that modulating neuro-inflammatory responses by suppressing type-1 IFN signaling may provide therapeutic benefit in AD.

  11. APP substitutions V715F and L720P alter PS1 conformation and differentially affect Abeta and AICD generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, Giuseppina; Ginestroni, Andrea; Hiltunen, Mikko; Kim, Minji; Dolios, Georgia; Hyman, Bradley T; Wang, Rong; Berezovska, Oksana; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2005-10-01

    The 37-43 amino acid Abeta peptide is the principal component of beta-amyloid deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, and is derived by serial proteolysis of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretase. gamma-Secretase also cleaves APP at Val50 in the Abeta numbering (epsilon cleavage), resulting in the release of a fragment called APP intracellular domain (AICD). The aim of this study was to determine whether amino acid substitutions in the APP transmembrane domain differentially affect Abeta and AICD generation. We found that the APPV715F substitution, which has been previously shown to dramatically decrease Abeta40 and Abeta42 while increasing Abeta38 levels, does not affect in vitro generation of AICD. Furthermore, we found that the APPL720P substitution, which has been previously shown to prevent in vitro generation of AICD, completely prevents Abeta generation. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) method, we next found that both the APPV715F and APPL720P substitutions significantly increase the distance between the N- and C-terminus of presenilin 1 (PS1), which has been proposed to contain the catalytic site of gamma-secretase. In conclusion, both APPV715F and APPL720P change PS1 conformation with differential effects on Abeta and AICD production.

  12. Mutations in AtPS1 (Arabidopsis thaliana parallel spindle 1 lead to the production of diploid pollen grains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle d'Erfurth

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy has had a considerable impact on the evolution of many eukaryotes, especially angiosperms. Indeed, most--if not all-angiosperms have experienced at least one round of polyploidy during the course of their evolution, and many important crop plants are current polyploids. The occurrence of 2n gametes (diplogametes in diploid populations is widely recognised as the major source of polyploid formation. However, limited information is available on the genetic control of diplogamete production. Here, we describe the isolation and characterisation of the first gene, AtPS1 (Arabidopsis thaliana Parallel Spindle 1, implicated in the formation of a high frequency of diplogametes in plants. Atps1 mutants produce diploid male spores, diploid pollen grains, and spontaneous triploid plants in the next generation. Female meiosis is not affected in the mutant. We demonstrated that abnormal spindle orientation at male meiosis II leads to diplogamete formation. Most of the parent's heterozygosity is therefore conserved in the Atps1 diploid gametes, which is a key issue for plant breeding. The AtPS1 protein is conserved throughout the plant kingdom and carries domains suggestive of a regulatory function. The isolation of a gene involved in diplogamete production opens the way for new strategies in plant breeding programmes and progress in evolutionary studies.

  13. Measurement of the quadratic slope parameter in the $K_{L}\\rightarrow 3\\pi^{0}$ decay Dalitz plot

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, A; Musa, L; Bevan, A; Dosanjh, R S; Gershon, T J; Hay, B; Kalmus, George Ernest; Munday, D J; Needham, M D; Olaiya, E; Parker, M A; White, T O; Wotton, S A; Barr, Giles David; Blümer, H; Bocquet, G; Ceccucci, Augusto; Cundy, Donald C; D'Agostini, Giulio; Doble, Niels T; Falaleev, V P; Gatignon, L; Gonidec, A; Govi, G; Grafström, P; Kubischta, Werner; Lacourt, A; Lenti, M; Luitz, S; Norton, Alan Robert; Palestini, S; Panzer-Steindel, B; Tatishvili, G T; Taureg, Hans; Velasco, M; Wahl, H; Cheshkov, C; Khristov, P Z; Kekelidze, V D; Madigozhin, D T; Molokanova, N A; Potrebenikov, Yu K; Zinchenko, A I; Knowles, I; Lazzeroni, C; Martin, V; Parsons, H; Sacco, R; Walker, A; Contalbrigo, M; Dalpiaz, Pietro; Duclos, J; Frabetti, P L; Gianoli, A; Martini, M; Petrucci, F; Savrié, M; Bizzeti, A; Calvetti, M; Collazuol, G; Graziani, G; Iacopini, E; Becker, H G; Eppard, M; Fox, H; Holtz, K; Kalter, A; Kleinknecht, K; Koch, U; Köpke, L; Pellmann, I A; Peters, A; Renk, B; Schmidt, S A; Schönharting, V; Schué, Yu; Wanke, R; Winhart, A; Chollet, J C; Crépé, S; Fayard, Louis; Iconomidou-Fayard, L; Ocariz, J; Unal, G; Wingerter-Seez, I; Anzivino, Giuseppina; Cenci, P; Imbergamo, E; Lubrano, P; Mestvirishvili, A; Nappi, A; Pepé, M; Piccini, M; Carosi, R; Casali, R; Cerri, C; Cirilli, M; Costantini, F; Fantechi, R; Giudici, Sergio; Gorini, B; Mannelli, I; Pierazzini, G M; Sozzi, M; Chèze, J B; Cogan, J; De Beer, M; Debu, P; Formica, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Mazzucato, E; Peyaud, B; Turlay, René; Vallage, B; Augustin, I; Bender, M; Holder, M; Ziolkowski, M; Arcidiacono, R; Biino, C; Marchetto, F; Menichetti, E; Pastrone, N; Nassalski, J P; Rondio, Ewa; Szleper, M; Wislicki, W; Wronka, S; Dibon, Heinz; Fischer, G; Jeitler, Manfred; Markytan, Manfred; Mikulec, I; Neuhofer, Günther; Pernicka, Manfred; Taurok, Anton

    2001-01-01

    A value of \\( (-6.1\\pm 0.9_{stat}\\pm 0.5_{syst})\\times 10^{-3} \\) is obtained for the quadratic slope parameter \\( h \\) in the \\( K_{L}\\rightarrow 3\\pi ^{0} \\) decay Dalitz plot at the NA48 experiment at the CERN SPS. The result is based on \\( 14.7\\times 10^{6} \\) fully reconstructed \\( K_{L}\\rightarrow 3\\pi ^{0}\\rightarrow 6\\gamma \\) decays. This is the most precise measurement of any of the Dalitz plot slope parameters in the charged and neutral kaon decays so far.

  14. Determination of the quadratic slope parameter in eta {r_arrow} 3{pi}{sup 0} decay.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tippens, W. B.; Prakhov, S.; Allgower, C. E.; Bekrenev, V.; Berger, E.; Spinka, H.; Crystal Ball Collaboration; High Energy Physics; Univ. of California; PNPI; George Washington Univ.

    2001-11-05

    We have determined the quadratic slope parameter {alpha} for {eta} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} to be {alpha} = -0.031(4) from a 99% pure sample of 10{sup 6}{eta} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} decays produced in the reaction {pi}{sup -}p{yields}n{eta} close to the {eta} threshold using the Crystal Ball detector at the AGS. The result is four times more precise than the present world data and disagrees with current chiral perturbation theory calculations by about four standard deviations.

  15. Amyloid-beta deposition is associated with decreased hippocampal glucose metabolism and spatial memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, Marcin; Pankiewicz, Joanna; Scholtzova, Henrieta; Ji, Yong; Quartermain, David; Jensen, Catrin H; Duff, Karen; Nixon, Ralph A; Gruen, Rand J; Wisniewski, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    In Alzheimer disease (AD) patients, early memory dysfunction is associated with glucose hypometabolism and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. Double transgenic (Tg) mice co-expressing the M146L presenilin 1 (PS1) and K670N/M671L, the double "Swedish" amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutations, are a model of AD amyloid-beta deposition (Abeta) that exhibits earlier and more profound impairments of working memory and learning than single APP mutant mice. In this study we compared performance on spatial memory tests, regional glucose metabolism, Abeta deposition, and neuronal loss in APP/PS1, PS1, and non-Tg (nTg) mice. At the age of 2 months no significant morphological and metabolic differences were detected between 3 studied genotypes. By 8 months, however, APP/PS1 mice developed selective impairment of spatial memory, which was significantly worse at 22 months and was accompanied by reduced glucose utilization in the hippocampus and a 35.8% dropout of neurons in the CA1 region. PS1 mice exhibited a similar degree of neuronal loss in CA1 but minimal memory deficit and no impairment of glucose utilization compared to nTg mice. Deficits in 22 month APP/PS1 mice were accompanied by a substantially elevated Abeta load, which rose from 2.5% +/- 0.4% at 8 months to 17.4% +/- 4.6%. These findings implicate Abeta or APP in the behavioral and metabolic impairments in APP/PS1 mice and the failure to compensate functionally for PS1-related hippocampal cell loss.

  16. GSK3 beta forms a tetrameric complex with endogenous PS1-CTF/NTF and beta-catenin. Effects of the D257/D385A and FAD-linked mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesco, G; Tanzi, R E

    2000-01-01

    We have previously shown that the endogenous C-terminal fragment of presenilin 1 co-immunoprecipitates with endogenous beta-catenin. Since PS1 has been suggested to be involved in beta-catenin stabilization, we further investigated whether GSK3 beta, responsible for beta-catenin phosphorylation and degradation, is part of the PS1/beta-catenin complex. In naïve H4 and CHO cells, PS1 co-immunoprecipitated with both endogenous beta-catenin and GSK3 beta. In addition, GSK3 beta endogenously binds to the PS1-CTF/NTF complex and beta-catenin in naïve CHO cells. GSK3 beta also co-immunoprecipitated with PS1 full length in CHO cell lines overexpressing PS1 wild type. Given that it has been recently shown that PS1 mutations of aspartate 257 or 385 result in prevention of PS1 endoproteolysis and inhibition of gamma-secretase activity, we also tested whether PS1 endoproteolysis is required for beta-catenin/GSK3 beta/PS1 binding and whether PS1 FAD-linked mutations affect GSK3 beta recruitment in the PS1/beta-catenin complex. GSK3 beta was detected in PS1 immunoprecipitates from H4 cell lines overexpressing PS1 wild type, delta E10, A286E, L246V and in CHO cell lines overexpressing aspartate or M146L mutations. The latter data show that the absence of PS1 endoproteolysis (D257A/D385A and delta E10) or the presence of PS1-FAD mutations does not interfere with beta-catenin/GSK3 beta/PS1 complex formation.

  17. The production of NH(A 3Pi i) through photodissociative excitation of NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. Y. Robert

    1987-01-01

    The NH(A-X) emission produced by photodissociation of NH3 is examined using a line emission source in the 600-1340 A region. It is observed that the production of the NH(A 3Pi i) photofragment involves a spin-forbidden transition. Fluorescence spectra of NH3 are derived and analyzed. The relationship between fluorescence cross sections and fluorescence count rates and gas pressure is studied. The fluorescence cross sections of NH(A-X) are calculated as 2.1 x 10 to the -22nd, 3.1 x 10 to the -22nd, 3.0 x 10 to the -21st, 1.5 x 10 to the -20th, and 3.4 x 10 to the -20th sq cm for the primary photon wavelength of 1239, 1184, 1065, 1037, and 976 A, respectively; and the corresponding fluorescence quantum yields are 0.00002, 0.00003, 0.0012, 0.0085, and 0.015.

  18. Observation of B+ -> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi (2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M. H.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A. Jr; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; BEACH, LA; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J.E.; Appleby, R.B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Romeu, J. Arnau; Artamonov, AY; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S; Back, Jaap Willem; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baszczyk, M.; Batozskaya, V.; Batsukh, B.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Castano-Betancourt, Martha; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, MG; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, D.E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, R. J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, J. R.; Calvi, M.; Gomez, M. Calvo; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Perez, D. H. Campora; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, T.F.S.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; COOK, AM; Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Sobral, C. M. Costa; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A. C.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Marinho, F. Da Cunha; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; Francisco, O. De Aguiar; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, Paolo; Dean, C. -T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suarez, A. Dosil; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Deleage, N.; Easo, S.; Ebert, Martin A.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, SIdi Ould; Esen, S.; Evans, Helen M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R. F.; Fazzini, D.; FERGUSON, D; Prieto, A. Fernandez; Ferrari, F; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Lima, V. Franco; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Farber, CR; Torreira, A. Gallas; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Martin, L. M. Garcia; Pardinas, J. Garcia; Tico, J. Garra; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E. G; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Giani', S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Gandara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Cardoso, L. A. Granado; Grauges, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Cazon, B. R. Gruberg; Grunberg, O.; Gushchin, EM; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Gobel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, D.B.; Han, Xiaoyan; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, Christine J.; Hatch, M.; He, J. J.; Head, T.; Heister, J. A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, Lee; Morata, J. A. Hernando; Van Herwijnen, E.; Hess, M.; Hicheur, A.; HILL, D; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, H.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, Sabah N. A.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, Fuman; John, Jestinah M. Mahachie; Johnson, D; Jones, Jonathan C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T. J.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, N. S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kozachuk, A.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, Vladimir Leonidovich; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J. -P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Lefevre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Cid, E. Lemos; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, Haibin; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X. R.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, Kate; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, Paolo; Marks, J. D.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, Linda M.; McCarthy, Patrick J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M. -N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Moreno-Monroy, Ana I.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Morda, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. -B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M; Mussini, M.; Muller, D.; Muller, J.; Muller, K; Muller, V; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, Randall P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L.; Parker, Anthony W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A. D.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, P. E.; Price, Daniel J.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, S. W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Pernas, M. Ramos; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, Andreas S.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Alepuz, C. Remon; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, Eliane R.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, Thomas; Valls, P. Ruiz; Silva, J. J. Saborido; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubert, K.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. -H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Gonzalez-Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Oliveira, L. Silva de; Simi, G.; Simone Doolaard, [No Value; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; De Paula, B. Souza; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, Sherin S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, Ian S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; Tilburg, Jeroen J H C; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Toriello, F.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, Miranda J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; VIEIRA, DF; Diaz, M. Vieites; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voss, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Sierra, C. Vazquez; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R; Walsh, J.; Wang, J; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, Tishan; Wilson, F. Perry; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y; Xing, Zhe; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.-L.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; Rudolph, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    The decays B+-> J/psi 3 pi(+)2 pi(-) and B+ -> psi(2S)pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) are observed for the first time using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1), collected by the LHCb experiment in proton- proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The

  19. Prophylactic liraglutide treatment prevents amyloid plaque deposition, chronic inflammation and memory impairment in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClean, Paula L; Jalewa, Jaishree; Hölscher, Christian

    2015-10-15

    Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Previously, we have shown that the diabetes drug liraglutide is protective in middle aged and in old APP/PS1 mice. Here, we show that liraglutide has prophylactic properties. When injecting liraglutide once-daily ip. in two months old mice for 8 months, the main hallmarks of AD were much reduced. Memory formation in object recognition and Morris water maze were normalised and synapse loss and the loss of synaptic plasticity was prevented. In addition, amyloid plaque load, including dense core congophilic plaques, was much reduced. Chronic inflammation (activated microglia) was also reduced in the cortex, and neurogenesis was enhanced in the dentate gyrus. The results demonstrate that liraglutide may protect from progressive neurodegeneration that develops in AD. The drug is currently in clinical trials in patients with AD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of ovariectomy on autophagy and senile plaques in the brain of adult APP/PS1 double transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-liang XU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of ovarian estrogen on autophagy and senile plaques (SP in the brain of adult APP/PS1 double transgenic mice, and inquire into the mechanism of Alzheimer disease (AD neuropathogenesis due to estrogen deficiency. Methods APP/PS1 AD mice (3-month old were divided into ovariectomy group (OVX-AD and sham group (sham-AD. Two months after operation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM was employed to observe the morphological structures of the brains of AD model mice, and immunohistochemical staining was performed to examine the changes in SP and autophagy-related proteins LC3 and Beclin-1 in the brain of AD model mice. Results Immunohistochemical staining showed that the number of SP in the brain of OVX-AD mice incrcased significantly compared with that in sham-AD mice, and distribution of SP was observed more extensively, including the cortex and hippocampus. The autophagy related proteins LC3 and Beclin-1 positive neurons were decreased greatly in the OVX-AD mice brain compared with that of sham-AD mice. TEM revealed a larger number of swollen and dark neurons in hippocampus of OVX-AD mice, while more autophagosome was observed around the neuronal processes in OVX-AD mice brain compared with sham-AD mice. Conclusion Estrogen deficiency may lead to delayed maturation of autophagy, decrease the activity and weaken the function of autophagy, which in turn may result in aggravation of pathological features of AD. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.01.06

  1. Quantum chemical study and experimental observation of a new band system of C(2), e 3Pi(g)-c 3Sigma(u)+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Masakazu; Joester, Jenna A; Page, Nathan I; Reilly, Neil J; Bacskay, George B; Schmidt, Timothy W; Kable, Scott H

    2009-07-28

    A new band system of C(2), e (3)Pi(g)-c (3)Sigma(u)(+) was studied by ab initio quantum chemical and experimental methods. The calculations were carried out at the multireference configuration interaction level of theory with Davidson's correction using aug-cc-pV6Z basis set and include core and core-valence correlation as well as relativistic corrections computed with aug-cc-pCVQZ and cc-pVQZ bases, respectively. The vibrational energies and rotational constants of the upper e (3)Pi(g) state were calculated from the computed ab initio potential energy curve. The ab initio results indicate that the electronic transition moment of the e (3)Pi(g)-c (3)Sigma(u)(+) system is approximately one-half that of the Fox-Herzberg e (3)Pi(g)-a (3)Pi(u) system. Franck-Condon factors were calculated for both systems and used to guide experiments aimed at discovering the e (3)Pi(g)-c (3)Sigma(u)(+) system. The e (3)Pi(g)(v(') = 4)-c (3)Sigma(u)(+)(v(") = 3) band of jet-cooled C(2) was successfully observed by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy by monitoring the ensuing e (3)Pi(g)-a (3)Pi(u) emission.

  2. PPARγ agonist pioglitazone improves cerebellar dysfunction at pre-Aβ deposition stage in APPswe/PS1dE9 Alzheimer's disease model mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toba, Junya; Nikkuni, Miyu [Laboratory for Molecular Brain Science, Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, 162-8480 Japan (Japan); Ishizeki, Masato [Laboratory for Neurophysiology, Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, 162-8480 Japan (Japan); Yoshii, Aya; Watamura, Naoto [Laboratory for Molecular Brain Science, Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, 162-8480 Japan (Japan); Inoue, Takafumi [Laboratory for Neurophysiology, Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, 162-8480 Japan (Japan); Ohshima, Toshio, E-mail: ohshima@waseda.jp [Laboratory for Molecular Brain Science, Department of Life Science and Medical Bioscience, Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo, 162-8480 Japan (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the best known neurodegenerative diseases; it causes dementia and its pathological features include accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. Elevated Cdk5 activity and CRMP2 phosphorylation have been reported in the brains of AD model mice at the early stage of the disease, but the significance thereof in human AD remains unelucidated. We have recently reported that Aβ accumulation in the cerebellum of AD model APPswe/PS1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice, and cerebellar dysfunctions, such as impairment of motor coordination ability and long-term depression (LTD) induction, at the pre-Aβ accumulation stage. In the present study, we found increased phosphorylation levels of CRMP2 as well as increased p35 protein levels in the cerebellum of APP/PS1 mice. Interestingly, we show that pioglitazone, an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ, normalized the p35 protein and CRMP2 phosphorylation levels in the cerebellum. Impaired motor coordination ability and LTD in APP/PS1 mice were ameliorated by pioglitazone treatment at the pre-Aβ accumulation stage. These results suggest a correlation between CRMP2 phosphorylation and AD pathophysiology, and indicate the effectiveness of pioglitazone treatment at the pre-Aβ accumulation stage in AD model mice. -- Highlights: •Phosphorylation level of CRMP2 increased in the cerebellum of APP/PS1 mice. •p35 protein levels increased in the cerebellum of APP/PS1 mice. •Pioglitazone treatment improved cerebellar dysfunction of APP/PS1 mice.

  3. Behavioural Phenotyping of APPswe/PS1δE9 Mice: Age-Rrelated Changes and Effect of Long-Term Paroxetine Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Louise Ørum; Bouzinova, Elena V; Severino, Maurizio; Sivasaravanaparan, Mithula; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen Bo; Finsen, Bente; Wiborg, Ove

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a devastating illness characterized by a progressive loss of cognitive, social, and emotional functions, including memory impairments and more global cognitive deficits. Clinical-epidemiological evidence suggests that neuropsychiatric symptoms precede the onset of cognitive symptoms both in humans with early and late onset AD. The behavioural profile promoted by the AD pathology is believed to associate with degeneration of the serotonergic system. Using the APPswe/PS1δE9 model of AD-like pathology starting with 9 months old mice, we characterised long term non-cognitive behavioural changes measured at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months of age and applied principal component analysis on data obtained from open field, elevated plus maze, and social interaction tests. Long-term treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) paroxetine was applied to assess the role of 5-HT on the behavioural profile; duration of treatment was 9 months, initiated when mice were 9 months of age. Treatment with paroxetine delays the decline in locomotion, in exploration and risk assessment behaviour, found in the APP/PS1 mice. APP/PS1 mice also exhibit low social activity and less aggressiveness, both of which are not affected by treatment with paroxetine. The APP/PS1 behavioural phenotype, demonstrated in this study, only begins to manifest itself from 12 months of age. Our results indicate that treatment with SSRI might ameliorate some of the behavioural deficits found in aged APP/PS1 mice.

  4. Estrogen Modulates ubc9 Expression and Synaptic Redistribution in the Brain of APP/PS1 Mice and Cortical Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Yu-Jie; Liu, Lu; Hu, Xiao-Tong; He, Ling; Chen, Guo-Jun

    2017-03-01

    Estrogen exerts multiple actions in the brain and is an important neuroprotective factor in a number of neuronal disorders. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Studies demonstrate that ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (ubc9) has an integral role in synaptic plasticity and may contribute to the pathology of neuronal disorders. We aimed to investigate the effects of estrogen on ubc9 and in the Alzheimer's disease brain. Ubc9 protein and mRNA were significantly increased in the cortex and hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice with enhanced SUMOylation. Systemic estrogen administration led to reduced ubc9 expression in ovariectomized APP/PS1 mice and reduced SUMOylation. The inhibition of ubc9 expression by estrogen was found to be dose-dependent in cultured neurons. However, estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI182780 did not block the inhibition of ubc9 expression by estrogen. Furthermore, the reduced expression of ubc9 was not mediated by ERα or ERβ agonists alone or in combination, but by the membrane-impermeable ER agonist E2-bovine serum albumin. The activation of the G protein-coupled ER mediated the inhibition of ubc9 expression of estrogen. A phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, rather than an extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor, blocked the inhibition of ubc9 by estrogen. Estrogen treatment significantly increased the phosphorylation of PI3K, which suggests that activation of the PI3K pathway by estrogen is required for ubc9 regulation. Further, ubc9 interacted with the synaptic proteins post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) and synaptophysin. Estrogen decreased the interaction of ubc9 with post-synaptic PSD95, but increased the interaction of ubc9 with pre-synaptic synaptophysin. These results suggest that a membrane-bound ER might mediate the estrogen inhibition of ubc9 in cortical neurons, where PI3K plays an important role. We also show that ubc9 can interact with synaptic proteins, which are subject to estrogen regulation.

  5. Chronic stress induced cognitive impairment in APP/PS-1 double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing HAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the effect of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS on the cognitive function and brain morphological changes in APP/PS-1 mice, one of the genetic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD, and to investigate the possible role of environmental factors in genetic mouse model of AD. Methods  There were 22-week-old wild-type C57BL/6 male mice (control group, N = 15 and APP/PS-1 double transgenic male mice [N = 27: AD group (N = 13 and AD + CUMS group (N = 14] tested in this study. Morris water maze test was used to evaluate spatial learning and memory of the mice. Amyloid deposition in the hippocampus was determined by Congo red staining. The ultrastructure of neurons in hippocampal CA1 region was observed by transmission electron microscope (TEM.  Results  Compared with control group, AD + CUMS group had significantly longer fifth-day escape latency [(33.14 ± 14.37 s vs (21.22 ± 12.16 s; t = -2.701, P = 0.045], and significantly shortened time spent in platform quadrant [(9.74±1.35 s vs (15.02 ± 1.33 s; t = 2.639, P = 0.012] in Morris water maze test. Compared with AD group, the percentage of amyloid plaque area in hippocampal area was increased in AD + CUMS group [(0.59 ± 0.03% vs (0.04 ± 0.03%; t = -2.900, P = 0.005]. The ultrastructure of hippocampal neurons in AD group was slightly damaged: cellular membrane was intact; cell matrix was uniform; intracelluar lipofuscin could be seen; the structure of nucleus and nuclear membrane had no obvious changes; mild fusion of cristae and membrane was seen in mitochondria; Golgi apparatus was partially indistinct; endoplasmic reticulum was mildly expanded. The ultrastructure of hippocampal neurons in AD + CUMS group was obviously damaged, including blurred cell membrane, reduced low-density and high-density granules in cytoplasm, uneven cell matrix, reduced number of organelles, lipofuscin and autophagosome deposition, obvious condensation of chromatin distributing over

  6. Dark-Skies Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's natural heritage. More than one fifth of the world population, two thirds of the United States population and one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1. Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2. Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3. Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4. Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5. Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The presentation will provide an update, describe how people can become involved and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  7. 2013 Australasian sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Lomb, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Compact, easy to use and reliable, this popular guide contains everything you need to know about the southern night sky with monthly star maps, diagrams and details of all the year's exciting celestial events. Wherever you are in Australia or New Zealand, easy calculations allow you to determine when the Sun, Moon and planets will rise and set throughout the year. Also included is information on the latest astronomical findings from space probes and telescopes around the world. The Sky guide has been published annually by the Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, since 1991. It is recommended for photogr

  8. The monthly sky guide

    CERN Document Server

    Ridpath, Ian

    2006-01-01

    In full colour throughout, the seventh edition of Ian Ridpath and Wil Tirion's famous guide to the night sky is fully revised and updated for planet positions and forthcoming eclipses up to the end of the year 2011. The book contains a chapter on the main sights visible in each month of the year, and is an easy-to-use companion to the night sky. It will help you to identify prominent stars, constellations, star clusters, nebulae and galaxies, to watch out for meteor showers, and to follow the movement of the four brightest planets. Most of the sights described are visible to the naked eye and

  9. Intranasal "painless" human Nerve Growth Factor [corrected] slows amyloid neurodegeneration and prevents memory deficits in App X PS1 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Capsoni

    Full Text Available Nerve Growth Factor (NGF is being considered as a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease (AD treatment but the clinical application is hindered by its potent pro-nociceptive activity. Thus, to reduce systemic exposure that would induce pain, in recent clinical studies NGF was administered through an invasive intracerebral gene-therapy approach. Our group demonstrated the feasibility of a non-invasive intranasal delivery of NGF in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. NGF therapeutic window could be further increased if its nociceptive effects could be avoided altogether. In this study we exploit forms of NGF, mutated at residue R100, inspired by the human genetic disease HSAN V (Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy Type V, which would allow increasing the dose of NGF without triggering pain. We show that "painless" hNGF displays full neurotrophic and anti-amyloidogenic activities in neuronal cultures, and a reduced nociceptive activity in vivo. When administered intranasally to APPxPS1 mice ( n = 8, hNGFP61S/R100E prevents the progress of neurodegeneration and of behavioral deficits. These results demonstrate the in vivo neuroprotective and anti-amyloidogenic properties of hNGFR100 mutants and provide a rational basis for the development of "painless" hNGF variants as a new generation of therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Intranasal "painless" human Nerve Growth Factor [corrected] slows amyloid neurodegeneration and prevents memory deficits in App X PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capsoni, Simona; Marinelli, Sara; Ceci, Marcello; Vignone, Domenico; Amato, Gianluca; Malerba, Francesca; Paoletti, Francesca; Meli, Giovanni; Viegi, Alessandro; Pavone, Flaminia; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2012-01-01

    Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) is being considered as a therapeutic candidate for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment but the clinical application is hindered by its potent pro-nociceptive activity. Thus, to reduce systemic exposure that would induce pain, in recent clinical studies NGF was administered through an invasive intracerebral gene-therapy approach. Our group demonstrated the feasibility of a non-invasive intranasal delivery of NGF in a mouse model of neurodegeneration. NGF therapeutic window could be further increased if its nociceptive effects could be avoided altogether. In this study we exploit forms of NGF, mutated at residue R100, inspired by the human genetic disease HSAN V (Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy Type V), which would allow increasing the dose of NGF without triggering pain. We show that "painless" hNGF displays full neurotrophic and anti-amyloidogenic activities in neuronal cultures, and a reduced nociceptive activity in vivo. When administered intranasally to APPxPS1 mice ( n = 8), hNGFP61S/R100E prevents the progress of neurodegeneration and of behavioral deficits. These results demonstrate the in vivo neuroprotective and anti-amyloidogenic properties of hNGFR100 mutants and provide a rational basis for the development of "painless" hNGF variants as a new generation of therapeutics for neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist ameliorates Alzheimer-like phenotype in AβPP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Ester; Juvés, Salvador; Maldonado, Rafael; Ferrer, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The specific CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist JWH-133 induced cognitive improvement in double AβPP/PS1 transgenic mice, a genetic model of Alzheimer's disease. This effect was more pronounced when administered at the pre-symptomatic rather than the early symptomatic stage. The cognitive improvement was associated with decreased microglial reactivity and reduced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IFNγ. In addition, JWH-133 reduced the expression of active p38 and SAPK/JNK, increased the expression of inactive GSK3β, and lowered tau hyperphosphorylation at Thr181 in the vicinity of amyloid-β plaques. Moreover, JWH-133 produced a decrease in the expression of hydroxynonenal adducts, and enhanced the expression of SOD1 and SOD2 around plaques. In contrast, the chronic treatment with JWH-133 failed to modify the amyloid-β production or deposition in cortex and hippocampus. In conclusion, the present study lends support to the idea that stimulation of CB2 receptors ameliorates several altered parameters in Alzheimer's disease such as impaired memory and learning, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress damage and oxidative stress responses, selected tau kinases, and tau hyperphosphorylation around plaques.

  12. Dexibuprofen prevents neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in APPswe/PS1dE9 through multiple signaling pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miren Ettcheto

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to elucidate the neuronal pathways associated to NSAIDs causing a reduction of the risk and progression of Alzheimer's disease. The research was developed administering the active enantiomer of ibuprofen, dexibuprofen (DXI, in order to reduce associated gastric toxicity. DXI was administered from three to six-month-old female APPswe/PS1dE9 mice as a model of familial Alzheimer's disease. DXI treatment reduced the activation of glial cells and the cytokine release involved in the neurodegenerative process, especially TNFα. Moreover, DXI reduced soluble β-amyloid (Aβ1-42 plaque deposition by decreasing APP, BACE1 and facilitating Aβ degradation by enhancing insulin-degrading enzyme. DXI also decreased TAU hyperphosphorylation inhibiting c-Abl/CABLES/p-CDK5 activation signal pathway and prevented spatial learning and memory impairment in transgenic mice. Therefore, chronic DXI treatment could constitute a potential AD-modifying drug, both restoring cognitive functions and reversing multiple brain neuropathological hallmarks.

  13. NLRP3 is activated in Alzheimer´s disease and contributes to pathology in APP/PS1 mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneka, Michael T.; Kummer, Markus P.; Stutz, Andrea; Delekate, Andrea; Schwartz, Stephanie; Saecker, Ana; Griep, Angelika; Axt, Daisy; Remus, Anita; Tzeng, Te-Chen; Gelpi, Ellen; Halle, Annett; Korte, Martin; Latz, Eicke; Golenbock, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer´s Disease (AD) is the world’s most common dementing illness. Deposition of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) drives cerebral neuroinflammation by activating microglia1,2. Indeed, Aβ activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in microglia is fundamental for IL-1β maturation and subsequent inflammatory events3. However, it remains unknown whether NLRP3 activation contributes to AD in vivo. Here, we demonstrate strongly enhanced active caspase-1 expression in human MCI and AD brains suggesting a role for the inflammasome in this neurodegenerative disease. NLRP3−/− or caspase-1−/− mice carrying mutations associated with familiar AD were largely protected from loss of spatial memory and other AD-associated sequelae and demonstrated reduced brain caspase-1 and IL-1β activation as well as enhanced Aβ clearance. Furthermore, NLRP3 inflammasome deficiency skewed microglial cells to an M2 phenotype and resulted in the decreased deposition of Aβ in the APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer’s disease. These results reveal an important role for the NLRP3 / caspase-1 axis in AD pathogenesis, and suggest that NLRP3 inflammasome inhibition represents a novel therapeutic intervention for AD. PMID:23254930

  14. The observer's sky atlas

    CERN Document Server

    Karkoschka, E

    2007-01-01

    This title includes a short introduction to observing, a thorough description of the star charts and tables, a glossary and much more. It is perfect for both the beginner and seasoned observer. It is fully revised edition of a best-selling and highly-praised sky atlas.

  15. Between Earth and Sky

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carter, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    to rescue architecture from the sterile impasse of late-modernism. In his works the basic elements of lived space become present: the earth, the sky and the `between` of human existence." Jørn Utzon's architecture ranges from the modest to the monumental; from the Kingo courtyard houses, the finest...

  16. The Big Sky inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Earle; Ward, Tony J.; Vanek, Diana; Marra, Nancy; Hester, Carolyn; Knuth, Randy; Spangler, Todd; Jones, David; Henthorn, Melissa; Hammill, Brock; Smith, Paul; Salisbury, Rob; Reckin, Gene; Boulafentis, Johna

    2009-01-01

    The University of Montana (UM)-Missoula has implemented a problem-based program in which students perform scientific research focused on indoor air pollution. The Air Toxics Under the Big Sky program (Jones et al. 2007; Adams et al. 2008; Ward et al. 2008) provides a community-based framework for understanding the complex relationship between poor…

  17. Chronic caffeine treatment reverses memory impairment and the expression of brain BNDF and TrkB in the PS1/APP double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Jia, Ning; Li, Ji; Yang, Li; Min, Lian-Qiu

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of varying doses of caffeine on memory impairment and the expression of brain neurotrophic derived factor (BNDF) and TrkB in PS1/APP double transgenic mouse models. PS1/APP double transgenic mice were administered 0.3 ml/day of saline, 1.5 mg/day of caffeine or 0.75 mg/day of caffeine for eight weeks. A water maze test and western blotting were used to determine the memory capability and expression of hippocampal BNDF and TrkB of the mice. The results demonstrated that 0.75 mg/day and 1.5 mg/day doses of caffeine significantly increased memory capability and the expression of hippocampal BDNF and TrkB in PS1/APP mice with a dose-response effect. The results suggested that chronic caffeine treatment may reverse memory impairment in PS1/APP transgenic mice, and BDNF and its receptor TrkB, may be involved in this process.

  18. The effect of focal brain injury on beta-amyloid plaque deposition, inflammation and synapses in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jessica M; King, Anna E; Woodhouse, Adele; Kirkcaldie, Matthew T K; Vickers, James C

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), however the effect of such neural damage on the onset and progression of beta-amyloid (Aβ) plaque pathology is not well understood. This study utilized an in vivo model of focal brain injury to examine how localized damage may acutely affect the onset and progression of Aβ plaque deposition as well as inflammatory and synaptic changes, in the APP/PS1 (APPSWE, PSEN1dE9) transgenic model of AD relative to wild-type (Wt) mice. Acute focal brain injury in 3- and 9-month-old APP/PS1 and Wt mice was induced by insertion of a needle into the somatosensory neocortex, as compared to sham surgery, and examined at 24h and 7d post-injury (PI). Focal brain injury did not induce thioflavine-S stained or (pan-Aβ antibody) MOAB-2-labeled plaques at either 24h or 7d PI in 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice or Wt mice. Nine-month-old APP/PS1 mice demonstrate cortical Aβ plaques but focal injury had no statistically significant (p>0.05) effect on thioflavine-S or MOAB-2 plaque load surrounding the injury site at 24h PI or 7d PI. There was a significant (p0.05). For both Wt and APP/PS1 mice alike, synaptophysin puncta near the injury site were significantly reduced 24h PI (compared to sites distant to the injury and the corresponding area in sham mice; p0.05). There was no significant effect of genotype on this response (p>0.05). These results indicate that focal brain injury and the associated microglial response do not acutely alter Aβ plaque deposition in the APP/PS1 mouse model. Furthermore the current study demonstrated that the brains of both Wt and APP/PS1 mice are capable of recovering lost synaptophysin immunoreactivity post-injury, the latter in the presence of Aβ plaque pathology that causes synaptic degeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Aerobic Glycolysis in the Frontal Cortex Correlates with Memory Performance in Wild-Type Mice But Not the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Cerebral Amyloidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard A; Tindale, Lauren; Lone, Asad; Singh, Olivia; Macauley, Shannon L; Stanley, Molly; Holtzman, David M; Bartha, Robert; Cumming, Robert C

    2016-02-10

    Aerobic glycolysis and lactate production in the brain plays a key role in memory, yet the role of this metabolism in the cognitive decline associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remains poorly understood. Here we examined the relationship between cerebral lactate levels and memory performance in an APP/PS1 mouse model of AD, which progressively accumulates amyloid-β. In vivo (1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed an age-dependent decline in lactate levels within the frontal cortex of control mice, whereas lactate levels remained unaltered in APP/PS1 mice from 3 to 12 months of age. Analysis of hippocampal interstitial fluid by in vivo microdialysis revealed a significant elevation in lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice relative to control mice at 12 months of age. An age-dependent decline in the levels of key aerobic glycolysis enzymes and a concomitant increase in lactate transporter expression was detected in control mice. Increased expression of lactate-producing enzymes correlated with improved memory in control mice. Interestingly, in APP/PS1 mice the opposite effect was detected. In these mice, increased expression of lactate producing enzymes correlated with poorer memory performance. Immunofluorescent staining revealed localization of the aerobic glycolysis enzymes pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and lactate dehydrogenase A within cortical and hippocampal neurons in control mice, as well as within astrocytes surrounding amyloid plaques in APP/PS1 mice. These observations collectively indicate that production of lactate, via aerobic glycolysis, is beneficial for memory function during normal aging. However, elevated lactate levels in APP/PS1 mice indicate perturbed lactate processing, a factor that may contribute to cognitive decline in AD. Lactate has recently emerged as a key metabolite necessary for memory consolidation. Lactate is the end product of aerobic glycolysis, a unique form of metabolism that occurs within certain regions of the brain. Here

  20. Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 signaling regulates receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) expression in rheumatoid arthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshita, Harunori [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Kitano, Masayasu, E-mail: mkitano6@hyo-med.ac.jp [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Iwasaki, Tsuyoshi [Department of Pharmacy, Hyogo University of Health Sciences, 1-3-6 Minatojima Kobe, Hyogo 650-8530 (Japan); Kitano, Sachie; Tsunemi, Sachi; Sato, Chieri; Sekiguchi, Masahiro; Azuma, Naoto [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Miyazawa, Keiji [Discovery Research III, Research and Development, Kissei Pharmaceutical Company, 4365-1 Hodakakashiwara, Azumino, Nagano 399-8304 (Japan); Hla, Timothy [Center for Vascular Biology, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, 1300 York Avenue, Box 69, NY 10065 (United States); Sano, Hajime [Division of Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, 1-1 Mukogawa-cho, Nishinomiya, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of S1P in MH7A cells was inhibited by specific Gi/Go inhibitors. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P receptor 1 (S1P1) signaling plays an important role in synovial cell proliferation and inflammatory gene expression by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synoviocytes. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of S1P/S1P1 signaling in the expression of receptor activator of NF-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL) in RA synoviocytes and CD4{sup +} T cells. We demonstrated MH7A cells, a human RA synovial cell line, and CD4{sup +} T cells expressed S1P1 and RANKL. Surprisingly, S1P increased RANKL expression in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, S1P enhanced RANKL expression induced by stimulation with TNF-{alpha} in MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. These effects of S1P in MH7A cells were inhibited by pretreatment with PTX, a specific Gi/Go inhibitor. These findings suggest that S1P/S1P1 signaling may play an important role in RANKL expression by MH7A cells and CD4{sup +} T cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling of RA synoviocytes is closely connected with synovial hyperplasia, inflammation, and RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in RA. Thus, regulation of S1P/S1P1 signaling may become a novel therapeutic target for RA.

  1. Infrared Sky Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephan D.

    2009-02-01

    A retrospective is given on infrared sky surveys from Thomas Edison’s proposal in the late 1870s to IRAS, the first sensitive mid- to far-infrared all-sky survey, and the mid-1990s experiments that filled in the IRAS deficiencies. The emerging technology for space-based surveys is highlighted, as is the prominent role the US Defense Department, particularly the Air Force, played in developing and applying detector and cryogenic sensor advances to early mid-infrared probe-rocket and satellite-based surveys. This technology was transitioned to the infrared astronomical community in relatively short order and was essential to the success of IRAS, COBE and ISO. Mention is made of several of the little known early observational programs that were superseded by more successful efforts.

  2. The VLA Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Mark; VLASS Survey Team, VLASS Survey Science Group

    2018-01-01

    The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS), which began in September 2017, is a seven year project to image the entire sky north of Declination -40 degrees in three epochs. The survey is being carried out in I,Q and U polarization at a frequency of 2-4GHz, and a resolution of 2.5 arcseconds, with each epoch being separated by 32 months. Raw data from the survey, along with basic "quicklook" images are made freely available shortly after observation. Within a few months, NRAO will begin making available further basic data products, including refined images and source lists. In this talk I shall describe the science goals and methodology of the survey, the current survey status, and some early results, along with plans for collaborations with external groups to produce enhanced, high level data products.

  3. The Sky at Night

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    For more than 50 years now Sir Patrick Moore has presented the BBC Television series Sky at Night; not a month has been missed – a record for any television series, and a record which may never be broken. Every three years or so a book is published covering the main events in both astronomy and space research. This is the 13th volume, not only a record of the programmes but also of the great advances and discoveries during the period covered - eclipses, comets, and the strange chemical lakes of Titan, for instance, but also anniversaries such as the fifteenth “birthday” of the Hubble Space Telescope, and not forgetting the programme celebrating the Sky at Night’s 50th year, attended by astronaut Piers Sellars and many others who appeared on the programme over the years. All the chapters are self-contained, and fully illustrated. In this new Sky at Night book you will find much to entertain you. It will appeal to amateurs and professionals alike.

  4. Google Sky: A Digital View of the Night Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, A. Scranton, R.; Ornduff, T.

    2008-11-01

    From its inception Astronomy has been a visual science, from careful observations of the sky using the naked eye, to the use of telescopes and photographs to map the distribution of stars and galaxies, to the current era of digital cameras that can image the sky over many decades of the electromagnetic spectrum. Sky in Google Earth (http://earth.google.com) and Google Sky (http://www.google.com/sky) continue this tradition, providing an intuitive visual interface to some of the largest astronomical imaging surveys of the sky. Streaming multi-color imagery, catalogs, time domain data, as well as annotating interesting astronomical sources and events with placemarks, podcasts and videos, Sky provides a panchromatic view of the universe accessible to anyone with a computer. Beyond a simple exploration of the sky Google Sky enables users to create and share content with others around the world. With an open interface available on Linux, Mac OS X and Windows, and translations of the content into over 20 different languages we present Sky as the embodiment of a virtual telescope for discovery and sharing the excitement of astronomy and science as a whole.

  5. Cattle encephalon glycoside and ignotin injection improves cognitive impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 mice used as multitarget anti-Alzheimer’s drug candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ya Gao,1,* Ya-zhuo Hu,1,* Rui-sheng Li,2 Zhi-tao Han,1 Yan Geng,1 Zheng Xia,1 Wen-jin Du,3 Li-xin Liu,4 Hong-hong Zhang,1 Lu-ning Wang5 1Institute of Geriatrics, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing Key Lab of Normal Aging and Geriatrics, 2Research and Technology Service Center, PLA 302 Hospital, 3Department of Neurology, Air Force General Hospital, 4Department of Neurology, Beijing Geriatric Hospital, 5Department of Geriatric Neurology, Chinese PLA General Hospital, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work and are joint first authors Background: Cattle encephalon glycoside and ignotin injection (CEGI, a multitargeted neurotrophic drug, has been widely used in the treatment of central and peripheral nerve injuries, such as stroke, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, and diabetic neuropathy in the People’s Republic of China. However, data regarding the effect of CEGI on Alzheimer’s disease (AD remain scarce. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of CEGI on learning and memory in an APPswe/PS1dE9 double-transgenic mouse model, a suitable animal model of AD, and elucidate its possible mechanisms.Materials and methods: Five-month-old APP/PS1 mice were intraperitoneally administered 6.6 mL/kg or 13.2 mL/kg of CEGI for 1 month. After 1 month of administration, all mice received Morris water maze training and a probe test. Mouse brain sections were detected by standard biochemical and immunohistochemical measures.Results: CEGI treatment significantly improved the spatial learning and memory deficits and decreased cerebral amyloid-β42 levels in brain homogenates of APP/PS1 mice. CEGI treatment elevated the activities of superoxide dismutase, and reduced the levels of malondialdehyde. CEGI attenuated neuronal damage in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice and upregulated protein and gene expression of Bcl-2 and the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax. CEGI treatment decreased the number of Iba1+ activated microglia

  6. Determination of the Dalitz plot parameter alpha for the decay eta->3pi^0 with the Crystal Ball at MAMI-B

    CERN Document Server

    Unverzagt, M; Ahrens, J; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Boillat, B; Braghieri, A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J W; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R; Downie, E J; Filkov, L V; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Jahn, O; Kashevarov, V L; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Krambrich, D; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; Lugert, S; MacGregor, I J D; Manley, D M; Martinez-Fabregate, M; McGeorge, J C; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Nefkens, B M K; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Owens, R O; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Prakhov, S N; Price, J W; Rosner, G; Rost, M; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sober, D; Starostin, A; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thomas, A; Walcher, Th; Watts, D P; Zehr, F

    2008-01-01

    A precise measurement of the Dalitz plot parameter, alpha, for the eta->3pi^0 decay is presented. The experiment was performed with the Crystal Ball and TAPS large acceptance photon detectors at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI-B electron accelerator in Mainz. High statistics of 1.8*10^6 eta->3pi^0 events were obtained, giving the result alpha = -0.032 \\pm 0.002_{stat} \\pm 0.002_{syst}.

  7. Examination of Alzheimer’s-related positive, negative and reactive pathology in the brainstem of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metaxas, Athanasios; Vaitheeswaran, Ramanan; Ilkjær, Laura

    Aim: While the positive, negative and reactive lesions of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have been extensively characterised in brain areas associated with cognition, such as the cortex and the hippocampus, the status of subcortical structures in AD remains less well characterised. In the present study......, we examined AD-related pathology in the midbrain brainstem of the APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mouse model of amyloidosis (APP/PS1). Methods: For positive lesions, fresh-frozen brainstem sections from female, 12 months old, transgenic and control mice (n=6/genotype) were stained for amyloid beta and tau, using 6E10...... immunohistochemistry and the Gallyas silver stain respectively. Negative lesions were examined by tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) 2 immunohistochemistry, and by measuring binding and mRNA levels of the serotonin transporter (SERT). Reactive lesions were investigated by Iba1 immunostaining of microglial cells...

  8. Testing for redshift evolution of Type Ia supernovae using the strongly lensed PS1-10afx at z = 1.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrushevska, T.; Amanullah, R.; Bulla, M.; Kromer, M.; Ferretti, R.; Goobar, A.; Papadogiannakis, S.

    2017-07-01

    Context. The light from distant supernovae (SNe ) can be magnified through gravitational lensing when a foreground galaxy is located along the line of sight. This line-up allows for detailed studies of SNe at high redshift that otherwise would not be possible. Spectroscopic observations of lensed high-redshift Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are of particular interest since they can be used to test for evolution of their intrinsic properties. The use of SNe Ia for probing the cosmic expansion history has proven to be an extremely powerful method for measuring cosmological parameters. However, if systematic redshift-dependent properties are found, their usefulness for future surveys could be challenged. Aims: We investigate whether the spectroscopic properties of the strongly lensed and very distant SN Ia PS1-10afx at z = 1.4, deviates from the well-studied populations of normal SNe Ia at nearby or intermediate distance. Methods: We created median spectra from nearby and intermediate-redshift spectroscopically normal SNe Ia from the literature at - 5 and + 1 days from light-curve maximum. We then compared these median spectra to those of PS1-10afx. Results: We do not find signs of spectral evolution in PS1-10afx. The observed deviation between PS1-10afx and the median templates are within what is found for SNe at low and intermediate redshift. There is a noticeable broad feature centred at λ 3500 Å, which is present only to a lesser extent in individual low- and intermediate-redshift SN Ia spectra. From a comparison with a recently developed explosion model, we find this feature to be dominated by iron peak elements, in particular, singly ionized cobalt and chromium.

  9. miR-34a deficiency in APP/PS1 mice promotes cognitive function by increasing synaptic plasticity via AMPA and NMDA receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuelong; Chen, Ping; Wang, Xianjun; Yao, Jinguo; Zhuang, Sujing

    2018-02-06

    MicroRNA (miR)-34a was recently determined to contribute to the pathological development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). miR-34a deficiency significantly attenuates cognitive deficits in amyloid precursor protein (APP)/presenilin 1 (PS1) mice; however, its role in early AD pathology and the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we confirmed that the increase of miR-34a expression in APP/PS1 mice was earlier than the relevant AD pathological characteristics, such as amyloid-β production, amyloid plaque deposition, and cognitive deficits. Furthermore, because predicted miR-34a target genes were broadly linked to α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, we evaluated synaptic plasticity by investigating high-frequency conditioning tetanus-induced excitatory postsynaptic potential, which revealed that synaptic plasticity was promoted in miR-34a knockout/APP/PS1 mice. Therefore, we assessed the expression of the presynaptic components synaptophysin and postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95) and found that synaptophysin and PSD95 were not altered by miR-34a deficiency. Additionally, the synaptic strength (vesicular fusion, vesicular docking, and transporting) was either not significantly changed. We also evaluated the levels of AMPA and NMDA receptors, which showed that the expression of AMPA and NMDA receptors was markedly upregulated in APP/PS1 mice with miR-34a deficiency. We conclude that miR-34a is involved in synaptic deficits in AD pathological development, which was, at least in part, due to the inhibition of NMDA (by miR-34a-5p) and AMPA (by miR-34a-3p) receptor expression. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Regional brain metabolism with cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry in a PS1/A246E mouse model of autosomal dominant Alzheimer's disease: correlations with behavior and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strazielle, Catherine; Jazi, Rozat; Verdier, Yann; Qian, Sue; Lalonde, Robert

    2009-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and brain metabolic alteration are early neurofunctional aspects in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Regional brain metabolism was analyzed by cytochrome c oxidase (COX) histochemistry in PS1-A246E mouse mutants, a model of autosomal dominant AD overexpressing beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide without amyloidosis or cell degeneration. Immunohistochemical samples were analyzed on adjacent sections for regional Abeta1-42 levels, as well as DNA oxidative damage with 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). COX activity increased in the basal forebrain nuclear complex, specific parts of the amygdala and hippocampus, as well as in striatum and connected regions. On the contrary, a hypometabolism was observed in midline thalamic, interpeduncular, and pedonculopontine nuclei. The integration of these regions in circuitries subserving emotions, arousal, and cognitive functions may explain why neurochemical alterations in specific brain regions were linearly correlated with psychomotor slowing and disinhibition previously reported in the mutant. As the PS1-A246E model appears to mimick prodromal AD, the results support the existence of mitochondrial abnormalities prior to AD-related cognitive deficits. However, since affected PS1-A246E brain regions were not primarily those altered in AD-associated histopathological features and did not systematically display either Abeta overexpression or higher 8-OHdG immunolabelling, the hypermetabolism observed seems to comprise a compensatory reaction to early mitochondrial abnormalities; furthermore, neuronal synaptic function should be considered as particularly relevant in COX activity changes.

  11. PS1/γ-Secretase-Mediated Cadherin Cleavage Induces β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Rhayra B.; Fortuna-Costa, Anneliese; Chicaybam, Leonardo; Lopes, Daiana V.; Dutra, Hélio S.; Borojevic, Radovan; Bonamino, Martin; Mermelstein, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are considered a promising tool for bone bioengineering. However, the mechanisms controlling osteoblastic commitment are still unclear. Osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs requires the activation of β-catenin signaling, classically known to be regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway. However, BMSCs treatment with canonical Wnts in vitro does not always result in osteogenic differentiation and evidence indicates that a more complex signaling pathway, involving cadherins, would be required to induce β-catenin signaling in these cells. Here we showed that Wnt3a alone did not induce TCF activation in BMSCs, maintaining the cells at a proliferative state. On the other hand, we verified that, upon BMSCs osteoinduction with dexamethasone, cadherins were cleaved by the PS1/γ-secretase complex at the plasma membrane, and this event was associated with an enhanced β-catenin translocation to the nucleus and signaling. When PS1/γ-secretase activity was inhibited, the osteogenic process was impaired. Altogether, we provide evidence that PS1/γ-secretase-mediated cadherin cleavage has as an important role in controlling β-catenin signaling during the onset of BMSCs osteogenic differentiation, as part of a complex signaling pathway responsible for cell fate decision. A comprehensive map of these pathways might contribute to the development of strategies to improve bone repair. PMID:28053606

  12. PS1/γ-Secretase-Mediated Cadherin Cleavage Induces β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation and Osteogenic Differentiation of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle C. Bonfim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs are considered a promising tool for bone bioengineering. However, the mechanisms controlling osteoblastic commitment are still unclear. Osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs requires the activation of β-catenin signaling, classically known to be regulated by the canonical Wnt pathway. However, BMSCs treatment with canonical Wnts in vitro does not always result in osteogenic differentiation and evidence indicates that a more complex signaling pathway, involving cadherins, would be required to induce β-catenin signaling in these cells. Here we showed that Wnt3a alone did not induce TCF activation in BMSCs, maintaining the cells at a proliferative state. On the other hand, we verified that, upon BMSCs osteoinduction with dexamethasone, cadherins were cleaved by the PS1/γ-secretase complex at the plasma membrane, and this event was associated with an enhanced β-catenin translocation to the nucleus and signaling. When PS1/γ-secretase activity was inhibited, the osteogenic process was impaired. Altogether, we provide evidence that PS1/γ-secretase-mediated cadherin cleavage has as an important role in controlling β-catenin signaling during the onset of BMSCs osteogenic differentiation, as part of a complex signaling pathway responsible for cell fate decision. A comprehensive map of these pathways might contribute to the development of strategies to improve bone repair.

  13. Distribution patterns of cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the hippocampus of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalifa, Sara; Polston, Eva K; Allard, Joanne S; Manaye, Kebreten F

    2011-02-28

    Cannabinoids have neuroprotective effects that are exerted primarily through cannabinoid CB1 receptors in the brain. This study characterized CB1 receptor distribution in the double transgenic (dtg) APP(swe)/PS1(ΔE9) mouse model for Alzheimer's disease. Immunohistochemical labeling of CB1 protein in non-transgenic mice revealed that CB1 was highly expressed in the hippocampus, with the greatest density of CB1 protein observed in the combined hippocampal subregions CA2 and CA3 (CA2/3). CB1 immunoreactivity in the CA1 and CA2/3 hippocampal regions was significantly decreased in the dtg APP(swe)/PS1(ΔE9) mice compared to non-transgenic littermates. Reduced CB1 expression in dtg APP(swe)/PS1(ΔE9) mice was associated with astroglial proliferation and elevated expression of the cytokines inducible nitric oxide synthase and tumor necrosis factor alpha. This finding suggests an anti-inflammatory effect of cannabinoids that is mediated by CB1 receptor, particularly in the CA2/3 region of the hippocampus. Furthermore, the study suggests a decreased CB1 receptor expression may result in diminished anti-inflammatory processes, exacerbating the neuropathology associated with Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Utilization of APPswe/PS1dE9 Transgenic Mice in Research of Alzheimer's Disease: Focus on Gene Therapy and Cell-Based Therapy Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Malm

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most extensively used transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, which over express the Swedish mutation of APP together with PS1 deleted in exon 9. These mice show increase in parenchymal Aβ load with Aβ plaques starting from the age of four months, glial activation, and deficits in cognitive functions at the age of 6 months demonstrated by radial arm water maze and 12-13 months seen with Morris Water Maze test. As gene transfer technology allows the delivery of DNA into target cells to achieve the expression of a protective or therapeutic protein, and stem cell transplantation may create an environment supporting neuronal functions and clearing Aβ plaques, these therapeutic approaches alone or in combination represent potential therapeutic strategies that need to be tested in relevant animal models before testing in clinics. Here we review the current utilization of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice in testing gene transfer and cell transplantation aimed at improving the protection of the neurons against Aβ toxicity and also reducing the brain levels of Aβ. Both gene therapy and cell based therapy may be feasible therapeutic approaches for human AD.

  15. Immunocytochemical Characterization of Alzheimer Disease Hallmarks in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Treated with a New Anti-Amyloid-β Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Carrera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available APP/PS1 double-transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, which overexpress mutated forms of the gene for human amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin 1 (PS1, have provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of AD-like pattern at early ages. This study characterizes immunocytochemical patterns of AD mouse brain as a model for human AD treated with the EB101 vaccine. In this novel vaccine, a new approach has been taken to circumvent past failures by judiciously selecting an adjuvant consisting of a physiological matrix embedded in liposomes, composed of naturally occurring phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cholesterol. Our findings showed that administration of amyloid-β1−42 (Aβ and sphingosine-1-phosphate emulsified in liposome complex (EB101 to APP/PS1 mice before onset of Aβ deposition (7 weeks of age and/or at an older age (35 weeks of age is effective in halting the progression and clearing the AD-like neuropathological hallmarks. Passive immunization with EB101 did not activate inflammatory responses from the immune system and astrocytes. Consistent with a decreased inflammatory background, the basal immunological interaction between the T cells and the affected areas (hippocampus in the brain of treated mice was notably reduced. These results demonstrate that immunization with EB101 vaccine prevents and attenuates AD neuropathology in this type of double-transgenic mice.

  16. The Rainbow Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Buick, Tony

    2010-01-01

    The world is full of color, from the blue ocean and the yellow daffodils and sunflowers in green carpeted meadows to the majestic purple mountains in the distance and brightly hued coral reefs off the edges of tropical coasts. But what is color, exactly? Why do we see things in different colors? Do we all see the same colors? Like the surface of our planet, the sky above us offers us an endless palette of color, a visual feast for the eyes. Besides atmospheric phenomena such as sunsets and rainbows, there are the many varied worlds of the Solar System, which we can spy through our telescopes, with their subtle colorings of beige and blue and green. Faraway star systems have suns that come in shades ranging from red and yellow to blue and white. Scientists even often use "false colors" to enhance the features of images they take of structures, such as the rings of Saturn and Jupiter’s clouds. This book, with its clear explanations of what makes the sky such a colorful place and in its great wealth of picture...

  17. Sun, Earth and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Kenneth R

    2006-01-01

    This Second Edition of Sun, Earth and Sky updates the popular text by providing comprehensive accounts of the most recent discoveries made by five modern solar spacecraft during the past decade. Their instruments have used sound waves to peer deep into the Sun’s inner regions and measure the temperature of its central nuclear reactor, and extended our gaze far from the visible Sun to record energetic outbursts that threaten Earth. Breakthrough observations with the underground Sudbury Neutrino Observatory are also included, which explain the new physics of ghostly neutrinos and solve the problematic mismatch between the predicted and observed amounts of solar neutrinos. This new edition of Sun, Earth and Sky also describes our recent understanding of how the Sun’s outer atmosphere is heated to a million degrees, and just where the Sun’s continuous winds come from. As humans we are more intimately linked with our life-sustaining Sun than with any other astronomical object, and the new edition therefore p...

  18. Sky Glow Modeling and Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D.

    2004-05-01

    It is very helpful to be able to model the impact of artificial night lighting on sky glow and also to measure such sky glow in a quantitative way. Such information is needed to understand the sources of the major impacts on the sky glow and to be able to offer effective solutions. This paper will review the current work underway on both these fronts, at professional observatories, a program in the Tucson and Pima County area in Tucson, by the National Park Service, and by the International Dark-Sky Association.

  19. PS1-12sk IS A PECULIAR SUPERNOVA FROM A He-RICH PROGENITOR SYSTEM IN A BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXY ENVIRONMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, N. E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Foley, R. J.; Chornock, R.; Milisavljevic, D.; Margutti, R.; Drout, M. R.; Moe, M.; Berger, E.; Brown, W. R.; Lunnan, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Smartt, S. J.; Fraser, M.; Kotak, R.; Magill, L.; Smith, K. W.; Wright, D. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Maths and Physics, Queens University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Huang, K. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Urata, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Mulchaey, J. S., E-mail: nsanders@cfa.harvard.edu [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2013-05-20

    We report on our discovery and observations of the Pan-STARRS1 supernova (SN) PS1-12sk, a transient with properties that indicate atypical star formation in its host galaxy cluster or pose a challenge to popular progenitor system models for this class of explosion. The optical spectra of PS1-12sk classify it as a Type Ibn SN (SN Ibn; cf. SN 2006jc), dominated by intermediate-width (3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) and time variable He I emission. Our multi-wavelength monitoring establishes the rise time dt {approx} 9-23 days and shows an NUV-NIR spectral energy distribution with temperature {approx}> 17 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} K and a peak magnitude of M{sub z} = -18.88 {+-} 0.02 mag. SN Ibn spectroscopic properties are commonly interpreted as the signature of a massive star (17-100 M{sub Sun }) explosion within an He-enriched circumstellar medium. However, unlike previous SNe Ibn, PS1-12sk is associated with an elliptical brightest cluster galaxy, CGCG 208-042 (z = 0.054) in cluster RXC J0844.9+4258. The expected probability of an event like PS1-12sk in such environments is low given the measured infrequency of core-collapse SNe in red-sequence galaxies compounded by the low volumetric rate of SN Ibn. Furthermore, we find no evidence of star formation at the explosion site to sensitive limits ({Sigma}{sub H{alpha}} {approx}< 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} kpc{sup -2}). We therefore discuss white dwarf binary systems as a possible progenitor channel for SNe Ibn. We conclude that PS1-12sk represents either a fortuitous and statistically unlikely discovery, evidence for a top-heavy initial mass function in galaxy cluster cooling flow filaments, or the first clue suggesting an alternate progenitor channel for SNe Ibn.

  20. Infection of Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3 as one of the causative agent of pneumonia in sheep and goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrawati Sendow

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Serological survey was conducted to obtain the prevalence of Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3 reactor as one of the causative agent of pneumonia in sheep and goats in abatoir at Jakarta and some small holder farms in Indonesia. Serological test using serum neutralization from 724 goat sera and 109 sheep sera indicated that only 1% of goats were serologically reactors and none of sheep sera had antibodies against PI-3 virus. Isolation of the virus from 56 bronchus and trachea swab and 345 lungs indicated that only one sampel from lung showed cythopathic effect (CPE in Madin Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK cell lines identification of the virus using serum neutralization test indicated that the virus neutralized reference PI-3 antisera. The isolate came from one lung (7% of 24 that showed histopathologically pneumonia intertitialis that usually caused by viral infection.

  1. The clear‐sky index to separate clear‐sky from cloudy‐sky situations in climate research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marty, Christoph; Philipona, Rolf

    2000-01-01

    .... A Clear‐Sky Index (CSI) to separate clear‐sky from cloudy‐sky situations has therefore been introduced, using accurate atmospheric longwave radiation in conjunction with air temperature and humidity measurements at the station. This clear...

  2. Measurement of the Slope Parameter $\\alpha$ for the $\\eta\\to 3\\pi^0$ decay with the Crystal Ball at MAMI-C

    CERN Document Server

    Prakhov, S; Aguar, P; Akasoy, L K; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Bartolome, P A; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Berghauser, H; Boillat, B; Braghieri, A; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F B; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Filkov, L V; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; Kellie, J D; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Krambrich, D; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lang, M; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Maghrbi, Y; Manley, D M; Martínez, M; McGeorge, J C; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Micanovic, S; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Ostrick, M; Otte, P B; Pedroni, P; Pheron, F; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rost, M; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Sober, D I; Starostin, A; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Zamboni, I; Zehr, F

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of the $\\eta\\to 3\\pi^0$ decay have been studied with the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer and the TAPS calorimeter. Bremsstrahlung photons produced by the 1.5 GeV electron beam of the Mainz microtron MAMI-C and tagged by the Glasgow photon spectrometer were used for $\\eta$-meson production. The analysis of $3 \\times 10^6$ $\\gamma p \\to \\eta p \\to 3\\pi^0 p \\to 6\\gamma p$ events yields the value $\\alpha=-0.032\\pm0.003$ for the $\\eta\\to 3\\pi^0$ slope parameter, which agrees with the majority of recent experimental results and has the smallest uncertainty. The $\\pi^0\\pi^0$ invariant-mass spectrum was investigated for the occurrence of a cusp-like structure in the vicinity of the $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ threshold. The observed effect is small and does not affect our measured value for the slope parameter.

  3. Close to the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    Today, a new ALMA outreach and educational book was publicly presented to city officials of San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, as part of the celebrations of the anniversary of the Andean village. ESO PR Photo 50a/07 ESO PR Photo 50a/07 A Useful Tool for Schools Entitled "Close to the sky: Biological heritage in the ALMA area", and edited in English and Spanish by ESO in Chile, the book collects unique on-site observations of the flora and fauna of the ALMA region performed by experts commissioned to investigate it and to provide key initiatives to protect it. "I thank the ALMA project for providing us a book that will surely be a good support for the education of children and youngsters of San Pedro de Atacama. Thanks to this publication, we expect our rich flora and fauna to be better known. I invite teachers and students to take advantage of this educational resource, which will be available in our schools", commented Ms. Sandra Berna, the Mayor of San Pedro de Atacama, who was given the book by representatives of the ALMA global collaboration project. Copies of the book 'Close to the sky' will be donated to all schools in the area, as a contribution to the education of students and young people in northern Chile. "From the very beginning of the project, ALMA construction has had a firm commitment to environment and local culture, protecting unique flora and fauna species and preserving old estancias belonging to the Likan Antai culture," said Jacques Lassalle, who represented ALMA at the hand-over. "Animals like the llama, the fox or the condor do not only live in the region where ALMA is now being built, but they are also key elements of the ancient Andean constellations. In this sense they are part of the same sky that will be explored by ALMA in the near future." ESO PR Photo 50c/07 ESO PR Photo 50c/07 Presentation of the ALMA book The ALMA Project is a giant, international observatory currently under construction on the high-altitude Chajnantor site in Chile

  4. Behavioral and neurobiological effects of prenatal stress exposure in male and female APPswe/PS1dE9 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierksma, Annerieke S R; Prickaerts, Jos; Chouliaras, Leonidas; Rostamian, Somayeh; Delbroek, Lore; Rutten, Bart P F; Steinbusch, Harry W M; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence implies a role for chronic stress and stress-related disorders in the etiopathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although chronic stress exposure during various stages of life has been shown to exacerbate AD-related cognitive deficits and neuropathology in AD mouse models, the role of stress exposure during the prenatal period on AD development and progression remained to be investigated. The present study therefore explored the effects of prenatal maternal stress (PMS) in both male and female APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse offspring in terms of cognition, affect, and AD-related neuropathology. As prenatal perturbations are likely to mediate their effects via alterations in epigenetic regulation, changes in hippocampal DNA methyltransferase 3a, 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine levels were assessed as underlying mechanisms. Repetitive restraint stress during the first week of gestation exerted a sex-dependent effect, with male PMS mice showing spatial memory deficits and a blunted hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis response, while female PMS mice showed improved spatial memory performance, increased depressive-like behavior, as well as a decrease in hippocampal plaque load. In addition, sex differences were observed among APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, independent of PMS (i.e., female mice showed impaired spatial memory performance, higher hippocampal plaque load, altered amyloid precursor protein processing in the CA3 and lower DNA methyltransferase 3a immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus when compared with male mice of the same age). In conclusion, PMS exposure impacts on the behavioral phenotype and neuropathology of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice. Moreover, given the remarkable sex differences observed, one should not overlook the impact of sex-specific responses to environmental exposures when investigating gene-environment interactions in AD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Erinacine A-enriched Hericium erinaceus mycelium ameliorates Alzheimer's disease-related pathologies in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai-Teng, Tzeng; Chin-Chu, Chen; Li-Ya, Lee; Wan-Ping, Chen; Chung-Kuang, Lu; Chien-Chang, Shen; Chi-Ying, Huang F; Chien-Chih, Chen; Shiao, Young-Ji

    2016-06-27

    The fruiting body of Hericium erinaceus has been demonstrated to possess anti-dementia activity in mouse model of Alzheimer's disease and people with mild cognitive impairment. However, the therapeutic potential of Hericium erinaceus mycelia on Alzheimer's disease remains unclear. In this study, the effects of erinacine A-enriched Hericium erinaceus mycelia (HE-My) on the pathological changes in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease are studied. After a 30 day oral administration to 5 month-old female APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice, we found that HE-My and its ethanol extracts (HE-Et) attenuated cerebral Aβ plaque burden. It's worth noting that the attenuated portion of a plaque is the non-compact structure. The level of insulin-degrading enzyme was elevated by both HE-My and HE-Et in cerebral cortex. On the other hand, the number of plaque-activated microglia and astrocytes in cerebral cortex and hippocampus were diminished, the ratio of nerve growth factor (NGF) to NGF precursor (proNGF) was increased and hippocampal neurogenesis was promoted after these administrations. All the mentioned benefits of these administrations may therefore improve the declined activity of daily living skill in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice. These results highlight the therapeutic potential of HE-My and HE-Et on Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, the effective components of HE-My and HE-Et are worth to be developed to become a therapeutic drug for Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Hippocampal Lipid Homeostasis in APP/PS1 Mice is Modulated by a Complex Interplay Between Dietary DHA and Estrogens: Relevance for Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Mario; Fabelo, Noemí; Casañas-Sánchez, Verónica; Marin, Raquel; Gómez, Tomás; Quinto-Alemany, David; Pérez, José A

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that lipid homeostasis in the hippocampus is affected by different genetic, dietary, and hormonal factors, and that its deregulation may be associated with the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the precise levels of influence of each of these factors and their potential interactions remain largely unknown, particularly during neurodegenerative processes. In the present study, we have performed multifactorial analyses of the combined effects of diets containing different doses of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), estrogen status (ovariectomized animals receiving vehicle or 17β-estradiol), and genotype (wild-type or transgenic APP/PS1 mice) in hippocampal lipid profiles. We have observed that the three factors affect lipid classes and fatty acid composition to different extents, and that strong interactions between these factors exist. The most aberrant lipid profiles were observed in APP/PS1 animals receiving DHA-poor diets and deprived of estrogens. Conversely, wild-type animals under a high-DHA diet and receiving estradiol exhibited a lipid profile that closely resembled that of the hippocampus of control animals. Interestingly, though the lipid signatures of APP/PS1 hippocampi markedly differed from wild-type, administration of a high-DHA diet in the presence of estrogens gave rise to a lipid profile that approached that of control animals. Paralleling changes in lipid composition, patterns of gene expression of enzymes involved in lipid biosynthesis were also altered and affected by combination of experimental factors. Overall, these results indicate that hippocampal lipid homeostasis is strongly affected by hormonal and dietary conditions, and that manipulation of these factors might be incorporated in AD therapeutics.

  7. Triheptanoin supplementation to ketogenic diet curbs cognitive impairment in APP/PS1 mice used as a model of familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Ester; Semakova, Jana; Joda, Laura; Semak, Vladislav; Halbaut, Lyda; Calpena, Ana; Escolano, Carmen; Perales, Jose C; Ferrer, Isidro

    2013-03-01

    Diets containing a high proportion of fat with respect to protein plus carbohydrates are capable of inducing ketone body production in the liver, which provides an energetic alternative to glucose. Some ketogenic diets have been tested as therapeutic strategies for treating metabolic disorders related to a deficiency in glucose-driven ATP generation. However, ketone bodies are not capable of providing extra tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, limiting the anabolic capacity of the cell. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that supplementing a ketogenic diet with anaplerotic compounds such as triheptanoin may improve ketogenic diet effectiveness. The present study tests this hypothesis in APP/PS1 (APPswe/PS1dE9) transgenic mice, used as a model of familial Alzheimer's disease because impaired energy supply to neurons has been linked to this neurodegenerative process. Triheptanoin supplementation to a ketogenic diet for three months and starting at the age of three months reduces the memory impairment of APP/PS1 mice at the age of 6 months. The Aβ production and deposition were not significantly altered by the ketogenic diet, supplemented or not by triheptanoin. However, mice fed with triheptanoin-rich ketogenic diet have shown decreased astroglial response in the vicinity of Aβ plaques and decreased expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ in astrocytes. These findings correlate with transcriptional up-regulation of the ROS detoxifying mechanisms Sirt1 and Pparg, thus linking triheptanoin with improved mitochondrial status. Present findings support the concept that ketogenic diets supplemented with anaplerotic compounds can be considered potential therapeutic strategies at early stages of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Immunocytochemical Characterization of Alzheimer’s Disease Hallmarks in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Treated with a New Anti-Amyloid-β Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Carrera

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: APP/PS1 double-transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, which overexpress mutated forms of the gene for the human amyloid precursor protein (APP and presenilin 1 (PS1, have provided robust neuropathological hallmarks of an AD-like pattern at early ages. This study aimed to characterize immunocytochemical patterns of the AD mouse brain, which is treated with the EB101 vaccine, as a model for human AD. Material and methods: In this novel vaccine, a new approach has been taken to circumvent past failures with Aβ vaccines by judiciously selecting an adjuvant consisting of a physiological matrix embedded in liposomes, composed of naturally occurring phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol, and cholesterol. Results: Our findings showed that the administration of amyloid-β1−42 (Aβ and sphingosine-1-phosphate emulsified in liposome complex (EB101 to APP/PS1 mice before the onset of Aβ brain deposition (at 7 weeks of age and/or at an older age (35 weeks of age can be effective in both halting the progression and clearing the AD-like neuropathological hallmarks. In addition, passive immunization with EB101 did not activate inflammatory responses from the immune system and astrocytes. Consistent with a decreased inflammatory background, the basal immunological interaction between the T cells and the affected areas (hippocampus in the brain of treated mice was notably reduced. Conclusion: These results provide strong evidence that immunization with the EB101 vaccine prevents and attenuates AD neuropathology in this type of double-transgenic mice.

  9. In vivo quantitative whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging analysis of APP/PS1 transgenic mice using voxel-based and atlas-based methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Yuan-Yuan [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Wuhan (China); The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Li, Mu-Wei; Oishi, Kenichi [The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Shun; Zhang, Yan; Zhao, Ling-Yun; Zhu, Wen-Zhen [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Department of Radiology, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Wuhan (China); Lei, Hao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan Center for Magnetic Resonance, State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Wuhan (China)

    2013-08-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been applied to characterize the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a mouse model, although little is known about whether these features are structure specific. Voxel-based analysis (VBA) and atlas-based analysis (ABA) are good complementary tools for whole-brain DTI analysis. The purpose of this study was to identify the spatial localization of disease-related pathology in an AD mouse model. VBA and ABA quantification were used for the whole-brain DTI analysis of nine APP/PS1 mice and wild-type (WT) controls. Multiple scalar measurements, including fractional anisotropy (FA), trace, axial diffusivity (DA), and radial diffusivity (DR), were investigated to capture the various types of pathology. The accuracy of the image transformation applied for VBA and ABA was evaluated by comparing manual and atlas-based structure delineation using kappa statistics. Following the MR examination, the brains of the animals were analyzed for microscopy. Extensive anatomical alterations were identified in APP/PS1 mice, in both the gray matter areas (neocortex, hippocampus, caudate putamen, thalamus, hypothalamus, claustrum, amygdala, and piriform cortex) and the white matter areas (corpus callosum/external capsule, cingulum, septum, internal capsule, fimbria, and optic tract), evidenced by an increase in FA or DA, or both, compared to WT mice (p < 0.05, corrected). The average kappa value between manual and atlas-based structure delineation was approximately 0.8, and there was no significant difference between APP/PS1 and WT mice (p > 0.05). The histopathological changes in the gray matter areas were confirmed by microscopy studies. DTI did, however, demonstrate significant changes in white matter areas, where the difference was not apparent by qualitative observation of a single-slice histological specimen. This study demonstrated the structure-specific nature of pathological changes in APP/PS1 mouse, and also showed the

  10. Determination of the Dalitz plot parameter {alpha} for the decay {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} with the Crystal Ball at MAMI-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unverzagt, M.; Beck, R.; Lang, M.; Nikolaev, A.; Schumann, S. [University Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); University Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Bonn (Germany); Aguar-Bartolome, P.; Ahrens, J.; Arends, H.J.; Heid, E.; Jahn, O.; Krambrich, D.; Martinez-Fabregate, M.; Rost, M.; Thomas, A.; Walcher, T. [University Mainz, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Annand, J.R.M.; Codling, R.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; McGeorge, J.C.; Owens, R.O.; Rosner, G. [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Bekrenev, V. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Boillat, B.; Krusche, B.; Zehr, F. [University Basel, Institut fuer Physik, Basel (Switzerland); Braghieri, A.; Pedroni, P.; Rostomyan, T. [INFN Sezione di Pavia, Pavia (Italy); Branford, D.; Glazier, D.I.; Tarbert, C.M.; Watts, D.P. [Univ. of Edinburgh, School of Physics, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Briscoe, W.J. [The George Washington Univ., Center for Nuclear Studies, Washington, D.C. (United States); Brudvik, J.W.; Nefkens, B.M.K.; Prakhov, S.N.; Price, J.W.; Starostin, A. [Univ. of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Cherepnya, S.; Fil' kov, L.V.; Kashevarov, V.L. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Downie, E.J. [Univ. Mainz, Inst. fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Univ. of Glasgow, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gregor, R.; Kotulla, M.; Lugert, S.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R. [Univ. Giessen, II. Physikalisches Inst., Giessen (Germany); Hornidge, D. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville, NB (Canada); Kondratiev, R.; Lisin, V.; Polonski, A. [Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korolija, M.; Mekterovic, D.; Supek, I. [Rudjer Boskovic Inst., Zagreb (Croatia); Manley, D.M. [Kent State Univ., Kent, OH (United States); Sober, D. [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2009-02-15

    A precise measurement of the Dalitz plot parameter, {alpha}, for the {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} decay is presented. The experiment was performed with the Crystal Ball and TAPS large-acceptance photon detectors at the tagged photon beam facility of the MAMI-B electron accelerator in Mainz. High statistics of 1.8.10{sup 6} {eta}{yields}3{pi}{sup 0} events were obtained, giving the result {alpha}=-0.032{+-}0.002{sub stat}{+-}0.002{sub syst}. (orig.)

  11. Ab initio studies of low-lying 3Sigma(-), 3Pi, and 5Sigma(-) states of NH. I - Potential curves and dipole moment functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfield, Evelyn M.; Kirby, Kate P.

    1987-01-01

    Configuration interaction wave functions, potential energy curves, and dipole moment functions have been calculated for the four lowest 3Sigma(-) and the three lowest 3Pi states and 5Sigma(-) states of NH. The electronic wave functions were constructed to give a balanced description of valence-Rydberg interactions. Two repulsive states have been identified as important photodissociation pathways. Spectroscopic constants are presented for the bound states, and results are compared to other theoretical and experimental work. The possible predissociation of the A 3Pi state by the 1 5Sigma(-) state is discussed.

  12. Exploring the Variable Sky with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    2004) monitors 700 deg2 of sky from V ¼ 13:5 to a limit of V ¼ 21. 3. ROTSE-I ( Akerlof et al. 2000) monitors the entire ob- servable sky twice a...Washington. REFERENCES Adelman-McCarthy, J. K., et al. 2007, ApJS, 172, in press Akerlof , C., et al. 2000, AJ, 119, 1901 Alcock, C., et al. 2001, ApJS, 136

  13. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H Hansen

    Full Text Available One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP and presenilin-1 (PS1 are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c., or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.. In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  14. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the ‘London’ (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and ‘Swedish’ mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD. PMID:27421117

  15. Long-Term Treatment with Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Receptor Agonist, Has No Effect on β-Amyloid Plaque Load in Two Transgenic APP/PS1 Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Henrik H; Fabricius, Katrine; Barkholt, Pernille; Kongsbak-Wismann, Pernille; Schlumberger, Chantal; Jelsing, Jacob; Terwel, Dick; Termont, Annelies; Pyke, Charles; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre; Vrang, Niels

    2016-01-01

    One of the major histopathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is cerebral deposits of extracellular β-amyloid peptides. Preclinical studies have pointed to glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptors as a potential novel target in the treatment of AD. GLP-1 receptor agonists, including exendin-4 and liraglutide, have been shown to promote plaque-lowering and mnemonic effects of in a number of experimental models of AD. Transgenic mouse models carrying genetic mutations of amyloid protein precursor (APP) and presenilin-1 (PS1) are commonly used to assess the pharmacodynamics of potential amyloidosis-lowering and pro-cognitive compounds. In this study, effects of long-term liraglutide treatment were therefore determined in two double APP/PS1 transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease carrying different clinical APP/PS1 mutations, i.e. the 'London' (hAPPLon/PS1A246E) and 'Swedish' mutation variant (hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9) of APP, with co-expression of distinct PS1 variants. Liraglutide was administered in 5 month-old hAPPLon/PS1A246E mice for 3 months (100 or 500 ng/kg/day, s.c.), or 7 month-old hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice for 5 months (500 ng/kg/day, s.c.). In both models, regional plaque load was quantified throughout the brain using stereological methods. Vehicle-dosed hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice exhibited considerably higher cerebral plaque load than hAPPLon/PS1A246E control mice. Compared to vehicle-dosed transgenic controls, liraglutide treatment had no effect on the plaque levels in hAPPLon/PS1A246E and hAPPSwe/PS1ΔE9 mice. In conclusion, long-term liraglutide treatment exhibited no effect on cerebral plaque load in two transgenic mouse models of low- and high-grade amyloidosis, which suggests differential sensitivity to long-term liraglutide treatment in various transgenic mouse models mimicking distinct pathological hallmarks of AD.

  16. Digital all-sky polarization imaging of partly cloudy skies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pust, Nathan J; Shaw, Joseph A

    2008-12-01

    Clouds reduce the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) of skylight relative to that of a clear sky. Even thin subvisual clouds in the "twilight zone" between clouds and aerosols produce a drop in skylight DOLP long before clouds become visible in the sky. In contrast, the angle of polarization (AOP) of light scattered by a cloud in a partly cloudy sky remains the same as in the clear sky for most cases. In unique instances, though, select clouds display AOP signatures that are oriented 90 degrees from the clear-sky AOP. For these clouds, scattered light oriented parallel to the scattering plane dominates the perpendicularly polarized Rayleigh-scattered light between the instrument and the cloud. For liquid clouds, this effect may assist cloud particle size identification because it occurs only over a relatively limited range of particle radii that will scatter parallel polarized light. Images are shown from a digital all-sky-polarization imager to illustrate these effects. Images are also shown that provide validation of previously published theories for weak (approximately 2%) polarization parallel to the scattering plane for a 22 degrees halo.

  17. Study of the Decay tau sup - -> 2 pi sup -pi sup + 3 pi sup 0 nu subtau

    CERN Document Server

    Jessop, C P

    2003-01-01

    The decay tau sup - -> 2 pi sup -pi sup + 3 pi sup 0 nu subtau has been studied with the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR). The branching fraction is measured to be (2.85 +- 0.56 +- 0.51) x 10 sup - sup 4. The result is in good agreement with the isospin expectation but somewhat below the Conserved-Vector-Current (CVC) prediction. We have searched for resonance substructure in the decay. Within the statistical precision, the decay is saturated by the channels tau sup - -> pi sup - 2 pi sup 0 omega nu subtau, 2 pi sup -pi sup +eta nu subtau, and pi sup - 2 pi sup 0 eta nu subtau.. This is the first observation of this omega decay mode and the branching fraction is measured to be (1.89 sub - sub 0 sub . sub 6 sub 7 sup + sup 0 sup . sup 7 sup 4 +- 0.40) x 10 sup - sup 4.

  18. First Measurements of eta_c Decaying into K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-)

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen Jin; Chen Jun; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; Guo, Z J; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X P; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Yi Jin; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, L X; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Olsen, S L; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, K; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wand, Zhe; Wang, Zheng; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Zeng, Yu; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X M; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zahng, Yiyun; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2006-01-01

    The decays of eta_c to K^+K^-2(pi^+pi^-) and 3(pi^+pi^-) are observed for the first time using a sample of 5.8X10^7 J/\\psi events collected by the BESII detector. The product branching fractions are determined to be B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^+K^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)=(1.21+-0.32+- 0.23)X10^{-4}$,B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c-->K^{*0}\\bar{K}^{*0}pi^+pi^-)= (1.29+-0.43+-0.32)X10^{-4}$, and (J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)* B(eta_c-->pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)= (2.59+-0.32+-0.48)X10^{-4}. The upper limit for eta_c-->phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^- is also obtained as B(J/\\psi-->gamma eta_c)*B(eta_c--> phi pi^+pi^-pi^+pi^-)< 6.03 X10^{-5} at the 90% confidence level.

  19. Valproic acid ameliorates olfactory dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease: Ameliorations from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Gang; Jing, Hai-Yan; Wang, Dong-Mei; Lv, Bei-Bei; Li, Jia-Mei; Liu, Feng-Feng; Fan, Hui; Sun, Xi-Chao; Qin, Ye-Jun; Zhao, Miao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is a common and early symptom of many neurodegenerative diseases, particularly of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment, pointing to the progression to dementia. Recent studies have revealed that valproic acid (VPA) has neuroprotective effects in rodent models of AD. In this study, we investigated the effects of VPA on olfactory dysfunction of APP/PS1 double transgenic mouse models of AD. After continuous treatment with a 100mg/kg daily dose of VPA for 3 months, APP/PS1 mice showed improved olfactory performances. In agreement with the behavioral findings, VPA treatment reduced amyloid β (Aβ) burden in the olfactory epithelium (OE) of transgenic mice. And, VPA increased epithelial thickness of the olfactory mucosa through decreased cell apoptosis and increased cell proliferation. In the olfactory bulb (OB), VPA administration also reduced senile plaques and levels of soluble and insoluble Aβ42 peptides. Besides, VPA promoted the increase of mitral cells and decrease of neurofilament immunostaining. In hence, VPA treatment completely improved the olfactory performances and prevented degenerative changes of the OE and OB. Our study raises the possibility of AD diagnosis by OE biopsy. Moreover, VPA may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of olfactory dysfunction in AD patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection of Hippocampus in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice via Upregulation of Mitochondrial 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Bo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving mitochondrial function has been proposed as a reasonable therapeutic strategy to reduce amyloid-β (Aβ load and to modify the progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, the relationship between mitochondrial adaptation and brain neuroprotection caused by physical exercise in AD is poorly understood. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of long-term treadmill exercise on mitochondrial 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1 level, mtDNA oxidative damage, and mitochondrial function in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of AD. In the present study, twenty weeks of treadmill training significantly improved the cognitive function and reduced the expression of Aβ-42 in APP/PS1 transgenic (Tg mice. Training also ameliorated mitochondrial respiratory function by increasing the complexes I, and IV and ATP synthase activities, whereas it attenuated ROS generation and mtDNA oxidative damage in Tg mice. Furthermore, the impaired mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and mitochondrial OGG1 activities seen in Tg mice were restored with training. Acetylation level of mitochondrial OGG1 and MnSOD was markedly suppressed in Tg mice after exercise training, in parallel with increased level of SIRT3. These findings suggest that exercise training could increase mtDNA repair capacity in the mouse hippocampus, which in turn would result in protection against AD-related mitochondrial dysfunction and phenotypic deterioration.

  1. Long-term treadmill exercise improves spatial memory of male appswe/ps1de9 mice by regulation of BDNF expression and microglia activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JY Xiong

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that physical activity could delay or attenuate the symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. But the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. To investigate the effect of long-term treadmill exercise on the spatial memory of AD mice and the possible role of β-amyloid, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and microglia in the effect, male APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice aged 4 months were subjected to treadmill exercise for 5 months with 6 sessions per week and gradually increased load. A Morris water maze was used to evaluate the spatial memory. Expression levels of β-amyloid, BDNF and Iba-1 (a microglia marker in brain tissue were detected by immunohistochemistry. Sedentary AD mice and wildtype C57BL/6J mice served as controls. The results showed that 5-month treadmill exercise significantly decreased the escape latencies (P 0.05. The study suggested that long-term treadmill exercise could improve the spatial memory of the male APPswe/PS1dE9 AD mice. The increase in BDNF-positive cells and decrease in activated microglia might underpin the beneficial effect.

  2. Antagonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} induces cerebellar amyloid-{beta} levels and motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Jing; Sun, Bing [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Chen, Kui [Department of Pharmacology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Fan, Li [Department of Pharmacology, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui 230032 (China); Cardiovascular Research, Starr Academic Center, Providence Heart and Vascular Institute, Portland, OR 97225 (United States); Wang, Zhao, E-mail: zwang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Protein Science Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, Department of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2009-07-03

    Recent evidences show that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) is involved in the modulation of the amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) cascade causing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and treatment with PPAR{gamma} agonists protects against AD pathology. However, the function of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in A{beta} cascade and AD pathology remains unclear. In this study, an antagonist of PPAR{gamma}, GW9662, was injected into the fourth ventricle of APP/PS1 transgenic mice to inhibit PPAR{gamma} activity in cerebellum. The results show that inhibition of PPAR{gamma} significantly induced A{beta} levels in cerebellum and caused cerebellar motor dysfunction in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Moreover, GW9662 treatment markedly decreased the cerebellar levels of insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), which is responsible for the cellular degradation of A{beta}. Since cerebellum is spared from significant A{beta} accumulation and neurotoxicity in AD patients and animal models, these findings suggest a crucial role of PPAR{gamma} steady-state activity in protection of cerebellum against AD pathology.

  3. Age-related changes in visual acuity, learning and memory in the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Kurt R; Brown, Richard E

    2012-05-16

    Mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are often tested for learning and memory deficits using visuo-spatial tasks such as the Morris water maze. Performance on these tasks is dependent on vision and the APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model has amyloid beta plaques in their retinas which might influence their performance in these tasks. In a visual learning task, old (20-26 months) transgenic mice and their wildtype littermates of both sexes had poorer visual ability than young (5-8 months) mice and old transgenic mice had poorer visual acuity than old wildtype mice. Old transgenic mice also had deficits in visuo-spatial learning and memory on the Morris water maze. The transgenic mice had no deficits in the conditioned odour preference or conditioned taste aversion memory tests at any age. These results indicate that the old APPswe/PS1dE9 mice and their wildtype littermates both have a deficit in their visual ability and that visually dependent measures alone should not be used to assess learning and memory in this strain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel phosphodiesterase-5 Inhibitor: Yonkenafil modulates neurogenesis, gliosis to improve cognitive function and ameliorates amyloid burden in an APP/PS1 transgenic mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lei; Yang, Jing-yu; Xue, Xue; Dong, Ying-xu; Liu, Yang; Miao, Feng-rong; Wang, Yong-feng; Xue, Hong; Wu, Chun-fu

    2015-09-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), activated microglia invade and surround β-amyloid plaques, possibly contributing to the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ), which affect the survival of neurons and lead to memory loss. Phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have recently been shown a potential therapeutic effect on AD. In this study, the effects of yonkenafil (yonk), a novel PDE-5 inhibitor, on cognitive behaviors as well as the pathological features in transgenic AD mice were investigated. Seven-month-old APP/PS1 transgenic mice were treated with yonk (2, 6, or 18 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection (i.p.)) or sildenafil (sild) (6 mg/kg, i.p.) daily for 3 months and then behavioral tests were performed. The results demonstrated that yonk improved nesting-building ability, ameliorated working memory deficits in the Y-maze tasks, and significantly improved learning and memory function in the Morris water maze (MWM) tasks. In addition, yonk reduced the area of Aβ plaques, and inhibited over-activation of microglia and astrocytes. Furthermore, yonk increased neurogenesis in the dentate granule brain region of APP/PS1 mice, indicated by increased BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) and BrdU(+)/DCX(+) cells compared to vehicle-treated transgenic mice. These results suggest that yonk could rescue cognitive deficits by ameliorated amyloid burden through regulating APP processing, inhibited the over-activation of microglia and astrocytes as well as restored neurogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. SCM-198 Ameliorates Cognitive Deficits, Promotes Neuronal Survival and Enhances CREB/BDNF/TrkB Signaling without Affecting Aβ Burden in AβPP/PS1 Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Zhen-Yi; Yu, Shuang-Shuang; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2015-08-07

    SCM-198 is an alkaloid found only in Herba leonuri and it has been reported to possess considerable neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that 3-month oral SCM-198 treatment could significantly improve both recognition and spatial memory, inhibit microgliosis and promote neuronal survival in amyloid-β protein precursor and presenilin-1(AβPP/PS1) double-transgenic mice without affecting amyloid-β (Aβ) burden. In addition, decreases in cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) phosphorylation were attenuated by SCM-198 both in vivo and in primary cortical neurons, which could be blocked by protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of upstream PKA in enhancing the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling by SCM-198. Our results indicate that SCM-198, a drug that could promote neuronal survival and enhance BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling, has beneficial effects on behavioral and biochemical alterations without affecting Aβ burden in AβPP/PS1 mice and might become a potential drug candidate for AD treatment in the future.

  6. SCM-198 Ameliorates Cognitive Deficits, Promotes Neuronal Survival and Enhances CREB/BDNF/TrkB Signaling without Affecting Aβ Burden in AβPP/PS1 Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Yi Hong

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available SCM-198 is an alkaloid found only in Herba leonuri and it has been reported to possess considerable neuroprotective effects in animal models of ischemic stroke, Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease (AD. In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that 3-month oral SCM-198 treatment could significantly improve both recognition and spatial memory, inhibit microgliosis and promote neuronal survival in amyloid-β protein precursor and presenilin-1(AβPP/PS1 double-transgenic mice without affecting amyloid-β (Aβ burden. In addition, decreases in cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB phosphorylation, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB phosphorylation were attenuated by SCM-198 both in vivo and in primary cortical neurons, which could be blocked by protein kinase A (PKA inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of upstream PKA in enhancing the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling by SCM-198. Our results indicate that SCM-198, a drug that could promote neuronal survival and enhance BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling, has beneficial effects on behavioral and biochemical alterations without affecting Aβ burden in AβPP/PS1 mice and might become a potential drug candidate for AD treatment in the future.

  7. Sky cover from MFRSR observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kassianov

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their modeled clear-sky counterparts are the main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumuli. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from a ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR. The MFRSR data are collected at the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumuli. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  8. Reach the sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana Peicuti, Cristina

    2017-04-01

    I am working as primary teacher at Scoala Gimnaziala Dumbrava,Timis County, Romania & my pupils has 6 to 10 years old. I was&I am a main pillar in my community, always disseminating knowledge and experience to students, other teachers in the school area &Timis County.Astronomy is the must favorite subject of my students from my classes. They are very courious & always come to me with questions about Earth and Sky because Curriculum scientific disciplines provides too little information about Earth and Sky.I need to know more about how to teach space contents into my classes&what competencies can form in elementary school and also to share my experience to the others.As a result of participation at this meeting I want to attract as many students to astronomy,science/STEM disciplines&space technologies, to astronomy topics and exploration of outer space.Schools needs to be prepared for social life needs,new generations needs,on science/space technologies,which are one of the key points for developing the knowledge society.I intend to introduce new scientific activities as part of the existing curriculum.I am passionate about astronomy,I need to know new approaches and new ideas for primary because I think Science is very important in daily life. Here are some developed activities with pupils from K-2 grade levels wich I wish share with colleagues in Viena. Subject: MATHEMATICS. Primary Topic: MEASUREMENT : -+= ☼ Rockets by Size. Students cut out,color and sequence paper rockets/Read the information on the International Space Station and rockets/Gather pictures of different types of rockets/Print/cut out/color&laminate rocket drawings/Find objects in the room to put in order by height. ☼ Oil Spot Photometer - Measure the brightness of the sun using cooking oil and a white card. A smear of oil on a white card becomes a powerful tool for comparing the brightness of two light sources, including the sun. ☼ The Sundial & Making Shadows-device to measure time by the

  9. Simulating the WFXT sky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzi, P.; Santos, J.; Yu, H.; Bignamini, A.; Rosati, P.; Borgani, S.; Campana, S.; Conconi, P.; Gilli, R.; Paolillo, M.; Ptak, A.; WFXT Team

    We investigate the scientific impact of the Wide Field X-ray Telescope mission. We present simulated images and spectra of X-ray sources as observed from the three surveys planned for the nominal 5-year WFXT lifetime. The goal of these simulations is to provide WFXT images of the extragalactic sky in different energy bands based on accurate description of AGN populations, normal and star forming galaxies, groups and clusters of galaxies. The images are realized using a detailed PSF model, instrumental and physical backgrounds/foregrounds, accurate model of the effective area and the related vignetting effect. The simulated images can be used to evaluate the flux limits for detection of point and extended sources, the effect of source confusion at very faint fluxes, and in general the efficiency of detection algorithms. We also simulate the spectra of the detected sources, in order to address specific science topics which are unique to WFXT. Among them, we focus on the characterization of the Intra Cluster Medium (ICM) of high-z clusters, and in particular on the measurement of the redshift from the ICM spectrum in order to build a cosmological sample of galaxy clusters. The end-to-end simulation procedure presented here, is a valuable tool in optimizing the mission design, characterizing the WFXT discovery space and verifying the connection between mission requirements and scientific goals. Thanks to this effort, we can conclude on firm basis that an X-ray mission optimized for surveys like WFXT is necessary to bring X-ray astronomy at the level of the optical, IR, submm and radio wavebands as foreseen in the coming decade.

  10. Armenian Names of Sky Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Mikayelyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    The work is devoted to the correction and recovery of the Armenian names of the sky constellations, as they were forgotten or distorted during the Soviet years, mainly due to the translation from Russian. A total of 34 constellation names have been corrected. A brief overview of the history of the division of the sky into constellations and their naming is also given. At the end, the list of all 88 constellations is given with the names in Latin, English, Russian and Armenian.

  11. Treasures of the Southern Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Gendler, Robert; Malin, David

    2011-01-01

    In these pages, the reader can follow the engaging saga of astronomical exploration in the southern hemisphere, in a modern merger of aesthetics, science, and a story of human endeavor. This book is truly a celebration of southern skies.  Jerry Bonnell, Editor - Astronomy Picture of the Day The southern sky became accessible to scientific scrutiny only a few centuries ago, after the first European explorers ventured south of the equator. Modern observing and imaging techniques have since revealed what seems like a new Universe, previously hidden below the horizon, a fresh astronomical bounty of beauty and knowledge uniquely different from the northern sky. The authors have crafted a book that brings this hidden Universe to all, regardless of location or latitude. Treasures of the Southern Sky celebrates the remarkable beauty and richness of the southern sky in words and with world-class imagery. In part, a photographic anthology of deep sky wonders south of the celestial equator, this book also celebrates th...

  12. Reduced basal and novelty-induced levels of activity-regulated cytoskeleton associated protein (Arc) and c-Fos mRNA in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of APPswe/PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ditte Z; Thomsen, Morten Skøtt; Mikkelsen, Jens D

    2013-01-01

    in APP/PS1ΔE9 compared to wild-type mice. Novelty exposure induced an increase in Arc and c-Fos mRNA in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), parietal cortex, and hippocampal formation in both APP/PS1ΔE9 transgenic and wild-type mice. However, novelty-induced IEG expression did not reach the same levels...

  13. Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, Victor R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Infrared Sky Imager (IRSI) deployed at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a Solmirus Corp. All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer. The IRSI is an automatic, continuously operating, digital imaging and software system designed to capture hemispheric sky images and provide time series retrievals of fractional sky cover during both the day and night. The instrument provides diurnal, radiometrically calibrated sky imagery in the mid-infrared atmospheric window and imagery in the visible wavelengths for cloud retrievals during daylight hours. The software automatically identifies cloudy and clear regions at user-defined intervals and calculates fractional sky cover, providing a real-time display of sky conditions.

  14. Dark Sky Protection and Education - Izera Dark Sky Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlicki, Arkadiusz; Kolomanski, Sylwester; Mrozek, Tomasz; Zakowicz, Grzegorz

    2015-08-01

    Darkness of the night sky is a natural component of our environment and should be protected against negative effects of human activities. The night darkness is necessary for balanced life of plants, animals and people. Unfortunately, development of human civilization and technology has led to the substantial increase of the night-sky brightness and to situation where nights are no more dark in many areas of the World. This phenomenon is called "light pollution" and it can be rank among such problems as chemical pollution of air, water and soil. Besides the environment, the light pollution can also affect e.g. the scientific activities of astronomers - many observatories built in the past began to be located within the glow of city lights making the night observations difficult, or even impossible.In order to protect the natural darkness of nights many so-called "dark sky parks" were established, where the darkness is preserved, similar to typical nature reserves. The role of these parks is not only conservation but also education, supporting to make society aware of how serious the problem of the light pollution is.History of the dark sky areas in Europe began on November 4, 2009 in Jizerka - a small village situated in the Izera Mountains, when Izera Dark Sky Park (IDSP) was established - it was the first transboundary dark sky park in the World. The idea of establishing that dark sky park in the Izera Mountains originated from a need to give to the society in Poland and Czech Republic the knowledge about the light pollution. Izera Dark Sky Park is a part of the astro-tourism project "Astro Izery" that combines tourist attraction of Izera Valley and astronomical education under the wonderful starry Izera sky. Besides the IDSP, the project Astro Izery consists of the set of simple astronomical instruments (gnomon, sundial), natural educational trail "Solar System Model", and astronomical events for the public. In addition, twice a year we organize a 3-4 days

  15. Pi in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, W. P.

    2008-12-01

    Pi In The Sky (PITS) consists of a loose collection of virtual globe (VG) activities with a slight mathematical twist, wherein students search for interesting circular structures on the surface of Earth (Moon or other planets) and measure the circumference C and diameter D of each structure, using the built-in VG measure tool, in order to determine experimental values of pi from the C/D ratios. Examples of man-made circular structures visible using VG browsers include Fermilab and l"Arc de Triomphe roundabout; quasi-circular natural structures include certain volcano calderas and impact craters. Since a circle is but a special case of an ellipse, a natural extension of the activity involves making similar measurements of perimeter P, semi-major axis a, and semi-minor axis b of a visible elliptical structure (such as one of the thousands of elliptical Carolina bays, enigmatic depressions on the Atlantic Coast of North America) and solving for pi using Ramanujan's first approximation for the dependence of the perimeter of an ellipse on a and b. PITS exercises can be adapted to a wide range of student ages and teaching goals. For instance, K-6 students could measure C and D of the huge irrigation circles near Circle, Texas, to discover pi in the same way they might infer pi from measurements of coffee-can lids in math class. Middle school and high school students could move beyond man-made circles to consider the near-circularity of certain volcano calderas and impact craters in earth science units, make measurements for Olympus Mons on Mars or Crater Kepler on the moon in astronomy units, or search for circularity among Arctic thermokarst lakes as an introduction to climate change in tundra environments in environmental science units; such studies might ignite student curiosity about planetary processes. High school students of analytic geometry could examine several elliptical Carolina bays and calculate not only values of pi (as noted above) but also determine the

  16. Night sky luminance under clear sky conditions: Theory vs. experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2014-05-01

    Sky glow is caused by both natural phenomena and factors of anthropogenic origin, and of the latter ground-based light sources are the most important contributors for they emit the spatially linked spectral radiant intensity distribution of artificial light sources, which are further modulated by local atmospheric optics and perceived as the diffuse light of a night sky. In other words, sky glow is closely related to a city's shape and pattern of luminaire distribution, in practical effect an almost arbitrary deployment of random orientation of heterogeneous electrical light sources. Thus the luminance gradation function measured in a suburban zone or near the edges of a city is linked to the City Pattern or vice versa. It is shown that clear sky luminance/radiance data recorded in an urban area can be used to retrieve the bulk luminous/radiant intensity distribution if some a-priori information on atmospheric aerosols is available. For instance, the single scattering albedo of aerosol particles is required under low turbidity conditions, as demonstrated on a targeted experiment in the city of Frýdek-Mistek. One of the main advantages of the retrieval method presented in this paper is that the single scattering approximation is satisfactorily accurate in characterizing the light field near the ground because the dominant contribution to the sky glow has originated from beams propagated along short optical paths.

  17. Exmoor - Europe's first International Dark Sky Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, S.

    2011-12-01

    On 2011 October 9 Exmoor National Park in the southwest of England was designated as Europe's first International Dark Sky Reserve by the International Dark Skies Association. This is a huge achievement, and follows three years of work by park authorities, local astronomers, lighting engineers and the resident community. Exmoor Dark Sky Reserve follows in the footsteps of Galloway Forest Dark Sky Park, set up in 2009, and Sark Dark Sky Island, established in January 2011.

  18. Dark Skies are a Universal Resource. So are Quiet Skies!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddalena, Ronald J.; Heatherly, S.

    2008-05-01

    You've just purchased your first telescope. But where to set it up? Certainly not a WalMart parking lot. Too much light pollution! In the same way that man-made light obscures our night sky and blinds ground-based optical telescopes, man-made radio signals blind radio telescopes as well. NRAO developed the Quiet Skies project to increase awareness of radio frequency interference (RFI) and radio astronomy in general by engaging students in local studies of RFI. To do that we created a sensitive detector which measures RFI. We produced 20 of these, and assembled kits containing detectors and supplementary materials for loan to schools. Students conduct experiments to measure the properties of RFI in their area, and input their measurements into a web-based data base. The Quiet Skies project is a perfect complement to the IYA Dark Skies Awareness initiative. We hope to place 500 Quiet Skies detectors into the field through outreach to museums and schools around the world. Should we be successful, we will sustain this global initiative via a continuing loan program. One day we hope to have a publicly generated image of the Earth which shows RFI much as the Earth at Night image illustrates light pollution. The poster will present the components of the project in detail, including our plans for IYA, and various low-cost alternative strategies for introducing RFI and radio astronomy to the public. We will share the results of some of the experiments already being performed by high school students. Development of the Quiet Skies project was funded by a NASA IDEAS grant. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  19. Neuron and neuroblast numbers and cytogenesis in the dentate gyrus of aged APP(swe)/PS1(dE9) transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Louise Orum; Sivasaravanaparan, Mithula; Severino, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    the longitudinal changes in the number of doublecortin-expressing neuroblasts and number of granular neurons in the dentate gyrus of APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of long-term paroxetine treatment on the number of neuroblasts and granular neurons, hippocampal amyloidosis......, and spontaneous alternation behaviour, a measure of spatial working memory, in transgenic mice. We observed no difference in granular neurons between transgenic and wild type mice up till 18 months of age, and no differences with age in wild type mice. The number of neuroblasts and the performance...... in the spontaneous alternation task was reduced in aged transgenic mice. Paroxetine treatment from 9 to 18 months of age reduced hippocampal amyloidosis without affecting the number of neuroblasts or granular neurons. These findings suggest that the amyloidosis affects the differentiation of neuroblasts and spatial...

  20. Repeated intraperitoneal injections of liposomes containing phosphatidic acid and cardiolipin reduce amyloid-β levels in APP/PS1 transgenic mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ordóñez-Gutiérrez, Lara; Re, Francesca; Bereczki, Erika

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: The accumulation of extracellular amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles in the brain are two major neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). It is thought that an equilibrium exists between Aβ in the brain and in the peripheral blood and thus......, it was hypothesized that shifting this equilibrium towards the blood by enhancing peripheral clearance might reduce Aβ levels in the brain: the 'sink effect'. We tested this hypothesis by intraperitoneally injecting APP/PS1 transgenic mice with small unilamellar vesicles containing either phosphatidic acid...... Aβ may be therapeutically relevant in AD. FROM THE CLINICAL EDITOR: Intraperitoneal injection of small unilamellar vesicles containing phosphatidic acid or cardiolipin significantly reduced the amount of amyloid-beta (Aß) peptide in the plasma in a rodent model. Brain levels of Aß were also affected...

  1. LSST Site: Sky Brightness Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Jamison; Claver, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an upcoming robotic survey telescope. At the telescope site on Cerro Pachon in Chile there are currently three photodiodes and a Canon camera with a fisheye lens, and both the photodiodes and Canon monitor the night sky continuously. The NIST-calibrated photodiodes directly measure the flux from the sky, and the sky brightness can also be obtained from the Canon images via digital aperture photometry. Organizing and combining the two data sets gives nightly information of the development of sky brightness across a swath of the electromagnetic spectrum, from blue to near infrared light, and this is useful for accurately predicting the performance of the LSST. It also provides data for models of moonlight and twilight sky brightness. Code to accomplish this organization and combination was successfully written in Python, but due to the backlog of data not all of the nights were processed by the end of the summer.Burke was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program (AST-1262829).

  2. Network based sky Brightness Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Dan; Pulvermacher, R.; Davis, D. R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed and are currently testing an autonomous 2 channel photometer designed to measure the night sky brightness in the visual wavelengths over a multi-year campaign. The photometer uses a robust silicon sensor filtered with Hoya CM500 glass. The Sky brightness is measured every minute at two elevation angles typically zenith and 20 degrees to monitor brightness and transparency. The Sky Brightness monitor consists of two units, the remote photometer and a network interface. Currently these devices use 2.4 Ghz transceivers with a free space range of 100 meters. The remote unit is battery powered with day time recharging using a solar panel. Data received by the network interface transmits data via standard POP Email protocol. A second version is under development for radio sensitive areas using an optical fiber for data transmission. We will present the current comparison with the National Park Service sky monitoring camera. We will also discuss the calibration methods used for standardization and temperature compensation. This system is expected to be deployed in the next year and be operated by the International Dark Sky Association SKYMONITOR project.

  3. The Cyanthin Diterpenoid and Sesterterpene Constituents of Hericium erinaceus Mycelium Ameliorate Alzheimer's Disease-Related Pathologies in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Tsai-Teng; Chen, Chien-Chih; Chen, Chin-Chu; Tsay, Huey-Jen; Lee, Li-Ya; Chen, Wan-Ping; Shen, Chien-Chang; Shiao, Young-Ji

    2018-02-17

    Hericium erinaceus was used in traditional Chinese medicine for physiologically beneficial medicines. Recently, it has become a candidate in causing positive brain health-related activities. We previously reported that Hericium erinaceus mycelium ameliorates Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathologies. To reveal the role of the cyanthin diterpenoid and sesterterpene constituents on this effects, erinacine A and S were isolated and their effects on attenuating AD-related pathology in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice were investigated. A 30 day short-term administration of erinacine A and S were performed to explore the effect of each erinacine on AD-related pathology including amyloid β production and degradation, plaque formation, plaque growth, glial activation and neurogenesis deterioration. Our results indicated the benefit effects of both erinacine A and S in cerebrum of APPswe/PS1dE9 mice, including: (1) attenuating cerebral plaque loading by inhibiting plaque growth; (2) diminishing the activation of glial cells; (3) raising the level of insulin degrading enzyme; and (4) promoting hippocampal neurogenesis. Moreover, erinacine A reduced the level of insoluble amyloid β and C-terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein which was not mediated by erinacine S. We further performed a long term administration of erinacine A and found that erinacine A recovered the impairment in the tasks including burrowing, nesting, and Morris water maze. Our data pointed out that although both erinacine A and S reduce AD pathology via reducing amyloid deposition and promoting neurogenesis, erinacine A can also inhibit amyloid β production and is worth to be further developed for AD therapeutic use.

  4. Antisense directed against PS-1 gene decreases brain oxidative markers in aged senescence accelerated mice (SAMP8) and reverses learning and memory impairment: a proteomics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Ada; Sultana, Rukhsana; Förster, Sarah; Perluigi, Marzia; Cenini, Giovanna; Cini, Chiara; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B.; Farr, Susan A.; Niehoff, Michael L.; Morley, John E.; Kumar, Vijaya B.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in pathophysiology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) through the induction of oxidative stress. This peptide is produced by proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by the action of β- and γ-secretases. Previous studies demonstrated that reduction of Aβ, using an antisense oligonucleotide (AO) directed against the Aβ region of APP, reduced oxidative stress-mediated damage and prevented or reverted cognitive deficits in senescence-accelerated prone mice (SAMP8), a useful animal model to investigate the events related to Aβ pathology and possibly to the early phase of AD. In the current study, aged SAMP8 were treated by AO directed against PS-1, a component of the γ-secretase complex, and tested for learning and memory in T-maze foot shock avoidance and novel object recognition. Brain tissue was collected to identify the decrease of oxidative stress and to evaluate the proteins that are differently expressed and oxidized after the reduction in free radical levels induced by Aβ. We used both expression proteomics and redox proteomics approaches. In brain of AO-treated mice a decrease of oxidative stress markers was found, and the proteins identified by proteomics as expressed differently or nitrated are involved in processes known to be impaired in AD. Our results suggest that the treatment with AO directed against PS-1 in old SAMP8 mice reverses learning and memory deficits and reduces Aβ-mediated oxidative stress with restoration to the normal condition and identifies possible pharmacological targets to combat this devastating dementing disease. PMID:23777706

  5. Interleukin-1β mediated amyloid plaque clearance is independent of CCR2 signaling in the APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Escalera, Fátima; Matousek, Sarah B; Ghosh, Simantini; Olschowka, John A; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is a key component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Particularly, the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) is upregulated in human AD and believed to promote amyloid plaque deposition. However, studies from our laboratory have shown that chronic IL-1β overexpression in the APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mouse model of AD ameliorates amyloid pathology, increases plaque-associated microglia, and induces recruitment of peripheral immune cells to the brain parenchyma. To investigate the contribution of CCR2 signaling in IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance, seven month-old APP/PS1/CCR2(-/-) mice were intrahippocampally transduced with a recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2 containing the cleaved form of human IL-1β (rAAV2-IL-1β). Four weeks after rAAV2-IL-1β transduction, we found significant reductions in 6E10 and Congo red staining of amyloid plaques that was confirmed by decreased levels of insoluble Aβ1-42 and Aβ1-40 in the inflamed hippocampus. Bone marrow chimeric studies confirmed the presence of infiltrating immune cells following IL-1β overexpression and revealed that dramatic reduction of CCR2(+) peripheral mononuclear cell recruitment to the inflamed hippocampus did not prevent the ability of IL-1β to induce amyloid plaque clearance. These results suggest that infiltrating CCR2(+) monocytes do not contribute to IL-1β-mediated amyloid plaque clearance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Detection by voxel-wise statistical analysis of significant changes in regional cerebral glucose uptake in an APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Albertine; Hérard, Anne-Sophie; Delatour, Benoît; Hantraye, Philippe; Bonvento, Gilles; Dhenain, Marc; Delzescaux, Thierry

    2010-06-01

    Biomarkers and technologies similar to those used in humans are essential for the follow-up of Alzheimer's disease (AD) animal models, particularly for the clarification of mechanisms and the screening and validation of new candidate treatments. In humans, changes in brain metabolism can be detected by 1-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose PET (FDG-PET) and assessed in a user-independent manner with dedicated software, such as Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM). FDG-PET can be carried out in small animals, but its resolution is low as compared to the size of rodent brain structures. In mouse models of AD, changes in cerebral glucose utilization are usually detected by [(14)C]-2-deoxyglucose (2DG) autoradiography, but this requires prior manual outlining of regions of interest (ROI) on selected sections. Here, we evaluate the feasibility of applying the SPM method to 3D autoradiographic data sets mapping brain metabolic activity in a transgenic mouse model of AD. We report the preliminary results obtained with 4 APP/PS1 (64+/-1 weeks) and 3 PS1 (65+/-2 weeks) mice. We also describe new procedures for the acquisition and use of "blockface" photographs and provide the first demonstration of their value for the 3D reconstruction and spatial normalization of post mortem mouse brain volumes. Despite this limited sample size, our results appear to be meaningful, consistent, and more comprehensive than findings from previously published studies based on conventional ROI-based methods. The establishment of statistical significance at the voxel level, rather than with a user-defined ROI, makes it possible to detect more reliably subtle differences in geometrically complex regions, such as the hippocampus. Our approach is generic and could be easily applied to other biomarkers and extended to other species and applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/S1P Receptor-1 Pathway with Cell Proliferation and Survival in Canine Hemangiosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, A M; Graef, A J; LeVine, D N; Cohen, I R; Modiano, J F; Kim, J-H

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a key biolipid signaling molecule that regulates cell growth and survival, but it has not been studied in tumors from dogs. S1P/S1P1 signaling will contribute to the progression of hemangiosarcoma (HSA). Thirteen spontaneous HSA tissues, 9 HSA cell lines, 8 nonmalignant tissues, including 6 splenic hematomas and 2 livers with vacuolar degeneration, and 1 endothelial cell line derived from a dog with splenic hematoma were used. This was a retrospective case series and in vitro study. Samples were obtained as part of medically necessary diagnostic procedures. Microarray, qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblotting were performed to examine S1P1 expression. S1P concentrations were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. S1P signaling was evaluated by intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization; proliferation and survival were evaluated using the MTS assay and Annexin V staining. Canine HSA cells expressed higher levels of S1P1 mRNA than nonmalignant endothelial cells. S1P1 protein was present in HSA tissues and cell lines. HSA cells appeared to produce low levels of S1P, but they selectively consumed S1P from the culture media. Exogenous S1P induced an increase in intracellular calcium as well as increased proliferation and viability of HSA cells. Prolonged treatment with FTY720, an inhibitor of S1P1 , decreased S1P1 protein expression and induced apoptosis of HSA cells. S1P/S1P1 signaling pathway functions to maintain HSA cell viability and proliferation. The data suggest that S1P1 or the S1P pathway in general could be targets for therapeutic intervention for dogs with HSA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  8. Dark sky enters the lexicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    “Basketbrawl,” “cloud music,” “humblebrag,” and “occupy Wall Street.” These are some of the catchwords and phrases that lexicographer Grant Barrett included in a year-end newspaper column, “Which words will live on?,” in the New York Times on 31 December 2011. Among the couple dozen examples of new language was “dark sky.” Barrett wrote that it “designates a place free of nighttime light pollution. For example, the island of Sark in the English Channel is a dark-sky island.”

  9. Measurement of the branching fractions of psi(2S) -> 3(pi+pi-) and J/psi -> 2(pi+pi-)

    CERN Document Server

    Ablikim, M; Ban, Y; Bian, J G; Cai, X; Chang, J F; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, H X; Chen, J C; Chen, J; Chen, M L; Chen, Y B; Chi, S P; Chu, Y P; Cui, X Z; Dai, H L; Dai, Y S; Deng, Z Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, Q F; Du, S X; Du, Z Z; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fu, C D; Fu, H Y; Gao, C S; Gao, Y N; Gong, M Y; Gong, W X; Gu, S D; Guo, Y N; Guo, Y Q; He, K L; He, M; He, X; Heng, Y K; Hu, H M; Hu, T; Huang, X P; Huang, X T; Ji, X B; Jiang, C H; Jiang, X S; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jin, Y; Yi Jin; Lai, Y F; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H H; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, Q J; Li, R Y; Li, S M; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X Q; Li, Y L; Liang, Y F; Liao, H B; Liu, C X; Liu, F; Fang Liu; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J B; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Z A; Liu, Z X; Lu, F; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Luo, C L; Luo, L X; Luo, X L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, J M; Ma, L L; Ma, Q M; Ma, X B; Ma, X Y; Mao, Z P; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Nie, Z D; Peng, H P; Qi, N D; Qian, C D; Qin, H; Qiu, J F; Ren, Z Y; Rong, G; Shan, L Y; Shang, L; Shen, D L; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, F; Shi, X; Sun, H S; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Tang, X; Tao, N; Tian, Y R; Tong, G L; Wang, D Y; Wang, J Z; Wang, K; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S Z; Wang, W F; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z Y; Wang, Z W; Wei, C L; Wei, D H; Wu, N; Wu, Y M; Xia, X M; Xie, X X; Xin, B; Xu, G F; Xu, H; Xue, S T; Yan, M L; Yang, F; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, Y X; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Ye, Y X; Yi, L H; Yi, Z Y; Yu, C S; Yu, G W; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, J M; Yuan, Y; Zang, S L; Zeng, Y; Yu, Z; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang Xiao Min; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Q; Zhao, D X; Zhao, J B; Zhao, J W; Zhao, M G; Zhao, P P; Zhao, W R; Zhao, X J; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, H Q; Zheng, J P; Zheng, L S; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, X C; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G M; Zhou, L; Zhou, N F; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Y; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A; Zhuang, X A; Zou, B S

    2005-01-01

    Using data samples collected at sqrt(s) = 3.686GeV and 3.650GeV by the BESII detector at the BEPC, the branching fraction of psi(2S) -> 3(pi+pi-) is measured to be [4.83 +- 0.38(stat) +- 0.69(syst)] x 10^-4, and the relative branching fraction of J/psi -> 2(pi+pi-) to that of J/psi -> mu+mu- is measured to be [5.86 +- 0.19(stat) +- 0.39(syst)]% via psi(2S) -> (pi+pi-)J/psi, J/psi -> 2(pi+pi-). The electromagnetic form factor of 3(pi+pi-) is determined to be 0.21 +- 0.02 and 0.20 +- 0.01 at sqrt(s) = 3.686GeV and 3.650GeV, respectively.

  10. Sky Observations by the Book

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Sackes, Mesut

    2008-01-01

    The "National Science Education Standards (NSES)" state that students in grades K-4 are expected to understand that astronomical objects in the sky, including the Sun, Moon, and stars--have properties, locations, and patterns of movement that can be observed and described. They further suggest using an inquiry-based approach to teach…

  11. Deep-Sky Video Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Massey, Steve

    2009-01-01

    A guide to using modern integrating video cameras for deep-sky viewing and imaging with the kinds of modest telescopes available commercially to amateur astronomers. It includes an introduction and a brief history of the technology and camera types. It examines the pros and cons of this unrefrigerated yet highly efficient technology

  12. The sky in Mayan literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aveni, A. F.

    Based on a workshop, Hamilton, NY (USA), Nov 1989. The goal of this meeting was to assess some of the recent advances in Maya glyphic decipherment to understand the nature and extent of Maya knowledge about the natural world, specifically the sky environment as revealed in the codices and related texts.

  13. How do Bacteria Adapt to the Red Sea? Cultivation and Genomic and Physiological Characterization of Oligotrophic Bacteria of the PS1, OM43, and SAR11 Clades

    KAUST Repository

    Jimenez Infante, Francy M.

    2015-05-01

    Given the high salinity, prevailing annual high temperatures, and ultra-oligotrophic conditions in the Red Sea isolation and characterization of important microbial groups thriving in this environment is important in understanding the ecological significance and metabolic capabilities of these communities. By using a high-­throughput cultivation technique in natural seawater amended with minute amounts of nutrients, members of the rare biosphere (PS1), methylotrophic Betaproteobacteria (OM43), and the ubiquitous and abundant SAR11 group (Pelagibacterales), were isolated in pure culture. Phylogenetic analyses of Red Sea isolates along with comparative genomics with close representatives from disparate provinces revealed ecotypes and genomic differentiation among the groups. Firstly, the PS1 alphaproteobacterial clade was found to be present in very low abundance in several metagenomic datasets form divergent environments. While strain RS24 (Red Sea) harbored genomic islands involved in polymer degradation, IMCC14465 (East (Japan) Sea) contained unique genes for degradation of aromatic compounds. Secondly, methylotrophic OM43 bacteria from the Red Sea (F5, G12 and H7) showed higher similarities with KB13 isolate from Hawaii, forming a ‘H-­RS’ (Hawaii-­Red Sea) cluster separate from HTCC2181 (Oregon isolate). HTCC2181 members were shown to prevail in cold, productive coastal environments and had an nqrA-­F system for energy generation by sodium motive force. On the contrary, H-­RS cluster members may be better adapted to warm and oligotrophic environments, and seem to generate energy by using a proton-­translocating NADH:Quinone oxidoreductase (complex I; nuoA-­N subunits). Moreover, F5, G12, and H7 had unique proteins related to resistance to UV, temperature and salinity, in addition to a heavy metal ‘resistance island’ as adaptive traits to cope with the environmental conditions in the Red Sea. Finally, description of the Red Sea Pelagibacterales

  14. Interneurons and beta-amyloid in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus and olfactory tubercle in APPxPS1 transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; De La Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2013-09-01

    Impaired olfaction has been described as an early symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Neuroanatomical changes underlying this deficit in the olfactory system are largely unknown. Given that interneuron populations are crucial in olfactory information processing, we have quantitatively analyzed somatostatin- (SOM), parvalbumin- (PV), and calretinin-expressing (CR) cells in the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and olfactory tubercle in PS1 x APP double transgenic mice model of AD. The experiments were performed in wild type and double transgenic homozygous animal groups of 2, 4, 6, and 8 months of age to analyze early stages of the pathology. In addition, beta-amyloid (Aβ) expression and its correlation with SOM cells have been quantified under confocal microscopy. The results indicate increasing expressions of Aβ with aging as well as an early fall of SOM and CR expression, whereas PV was decreased later in the disease progression. These observations evidence an early, preferential vulnerability of SOM and CR cells in rostral olfactory structures during AD that may be useful to unravel neural basis of olfactory deficits associated to this neurodegenerative disorder. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Iron, Copper, and Zinc Concentration in Aβ Plaques in the APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease Correlates with Metal Levels in the Surrounding Neuropil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Simon A; Churches, Quentin I; de Jonge, Martin D; Birchall, Ian E; Streltsov, Victor; McColl, Gawain; Adlard, Paul A; Hare, Dominic J

    2017-03-15

    The metal ions of iron, copper, and zinc have long been associated with the aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) plaques in Alzheimer's disease; an interaction that has been suggested to promote increased oxidative stress and neuronal dysfunction. We examined plaque metal load in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice using X-ray fluorescence microscopy to assess how the anatomical location of Aβ plaques was influenced by the metal content of surrounding tissue. Immunohistochemical staining of Aβ plaques colocalized with areas of increased X-ray scattering power in unstained tissue sections, allowing direct X-ray based-assessment of plaque metal levels in sections subjected to minimal chemical fixation. We identified and mapped 48 individual plaques in four subregions of the hippocampus from four biological replicates. Iron, Cu, and Zn areal concentrations (ng cm-2) were increased in plaques compared to the surrounding neuropil. However, this elevation in metal load reflected the local metal makeup of the surrounding neuropil, where different brain regions are enriched for different metal ions. After correcting for tissue density, only Zn levels remained elevated in plaques. This study suggests that the in vivo binding of Zn to plaques is not simply due to increased protein deposition.

  16. Dietary DHA supplementation in an APP/PS1 transgenic rat model of AD reduces behavioral and Aβ pathology and modulates Aβ oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Edmond; Taylor, Karen; Bilousova, Tina; Weiland, David; Pham, Thaidan; Zuo, Xiaohong; Yang, Fusheng; Chen, Ping-Ping; Glabe, Charles G.; Takacs, Alison; Hoffman, Dennis R.; Frautschy, Sally A.; Cole, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Increased dietary consumption of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is associated with decreased risk for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). These effects have been postulated to arise from DHA’s pleiotropic effects on AD pathophysiology, including its effects on β-amyloid (Aβ) production, aggregation, and toxicity. While in vitro studies suggest DHA may inhibit and reverse the formation of toxic Aβ oligomers, it remains uncertain whether these mechanisms operate in vivo at the physiological concentrations of DHA attainable through dietary supplementation. We sought to clarify the effects of dietary DHA supplementation on Aβ indices in a transgenic APP/PS1 rat model of AD. Animals maintained on a DHA-supplemented diet exhibited reductions in hippocampal Aβ plaque density and modest improvements on behavioral testing relative to those maintained on a DHA-depleted diet. However, DHA supplementation also increased overall soluble Aβ oligomer levels in the hippocampus. Further quantification of specific conformational populations of Aβ oligomers indicated that DHA supplementation increased fibrillar (i.e. putatively less toxic) Aβ oligomers and decreased prefibrillar (i.e. putatively more toxic) Aβ oligomers. These results provide in vivo evidence suggesting that DHA can modulate Aβ aggregation by stabilizing soluble fibrillar Aβ oligomers and thus reduce the formation of both Aβ plaques and prefibrillar Aβ oligomers. However, since fibrillar Aβ oligomers still retain inherent neurotoxicity, DHA may need to be combined with other interventions that can additionally reduce fibrillar Aβ oligomer levels for more effective prevention of AD in clinical settings. PMID:26369878

  17. Chronic Sleep Deprivation Exacerbates Learning-Memory Disability and Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathologies in AβPP(swe)/PS1(ΔE9) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hongyan; Zhong, Rujia; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Feng; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there is an increasing concern over the association between sleep disorders and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Clinical observations have reported that chronic sleep deprivation (SD) may serve as a risk factor for AD. However, the pathological evidence for this assumption is still lacking. In the present study, we examined the potential impacts of chronic SD on learning-memory and AD-related pathologies in AβPP(swe)/PS1(ΔE9) transgenic (TG) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates. Results indicated that mice (both TG and WT) exposed to 2-month SD showed an altered amyloid-β protein precursor processing, an elevated level of phosphorylated tau protein, and impaired cognitive performance as compared to non-sleep deprivation (NSD) controls. Moreover, the SD-treated TG mice exhibited more amyloid-β(1-42) production and developed more senile plaques in the cortex and hippocampus than NSD-treated TG mice. In addition, SD caused a striking neuronal mitochondrial damage, caspase cascade activation, and neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampus of both TG and WT mice. More importantly, all these behavioral, neuropathological, and biochemical changes induced by chronic SD were long lasting and were irreversible during a 3-month normal housing condition. Collectively, these results indicate that chronic SD impairs learning and memory, exacerbates AD pathologies, and aggravates the mitochondria-mediated neuronal apoptosis in a long-lasting manner. Our findings provide important experimental evidence to prove that chronic SD is a risk factor for AD.

  18. proBDNF Accelerates Brain Amyloid-β Deposition and Learning and Memory Impairment in APPswePS1dE9 Transgenic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Zhang, Tao; Jiao, Shusheng; Zhou, Xinfu; Zhong, Jinhua; Wang, Yanjiang; Liu, Juan; Deng, Juan; Wang, Shuiping; Xu, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is pathologically known for the amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal loss in the brain. The precursor of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (proBDNF) before proteolysis has opposing functions to its mature form in neuronal survival and neurite growth. However, the role of proBDNF in the pathogenesis of AD remains unclear. To investigate the effects of proBDNF on neurons in vitro, and on learning and memory impairment and brain Aβ production in a transgenic AD mouse model (APPswePS1dE9). We here examined the effects of proBDNF on the viability (MTT assay) and neurite growth (morphologic measurement) of the primary neurons in vitro. After the intracerebroventricular injection of adeno-associated virus-proBDNF (AAV-proBDNF), we then investigated the learning and memory impairment (Morris water maze) and Aβ deposition in the brains of the AD mice. The results showed that proBDNF could inhibit neuronal viability and neurite growth in vitro, enhance Aβ levels, and accelerate its deposition in the brain, which was consistent with the learning and memory impairment of AD mice, likely dependent on the membrane receptor of p75NTR. Our findings suggest that proBDNF may exert a crucially negative effect during AD pathogenesis andprogression.

  19. CNS expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-4 attenuates Alzheimer's disease-like pathogenesis in APP+PS1 bigenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Tomomi; Okuyama, Satoshi; Swan, Russell J; Jacobsen, Michael T; Gendelman, Howard E; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2010-08-01

    Cytokines play an emerging role as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and neurohormones in the brain. This paradigm shift in cytokine function offers a new framework to understand their roles in ameliorating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular adjuvant therapy of AD animal models with glatiramer acetate induces anti-inflammatory responses and therapeutic effects. Although these effects are potentially mediated through anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling, the exact molecular identities and pathways are poorly understood. Here, we show that virus-mediated expression of the mouse interleukin (IL)-4 gene in beta-amyloid precursor protein + presenilin-1 (APP+PS1) bigenic mice attenuates AD pathogenesis. Introduction of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector encoding IL-4 into the hippocampus resulted in sustained expression of IL-4, reduced astro/microgliosis, amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) oligomerization and deposition, and enhanced neurogenesis. Moreover, increased levels of IL-4 improved spatial learning, promoted phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 2B at Tyr 1472, and enhanced its cell surface retention both in vivo and in vitro. Our data suggest that neuronal anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling may be a potential alternative target for non-Abeta-mediated treatment of AD.

  20. Early enriched environment exposure protects spatial memory and accelerates amyloid plaque formation in APP(Swe/PS1(L166P mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Montarolo

    Full Text Available Enriched environment exposure improves several aspects of cognitive performance in Alzheimer's disease patients and in animal models and, although the role of amyloid plaques is questionable, several studies also assessed their response to enriched environment, with contrasting results. Here we report that rearing APP(Swe/PS1(L166P mice in an enriched environment since birth rescued the spatial memory impairment otherwise present at 6 months of age. At the same time, the exposure to the enriched environment caused a transient acceleration of plaque formation, while there was no effect on intracellular staining with the 6E10 antibody, which recognizes β-amyloid, full length amyloid precursor protein and its C-terminal fragments. The anticipation of plaque formation required exposure during early development, suggesting an action within critical periods for circuits formation. On the other hand, chronic neuronal activity suppression by tetrodotoxin decreased the number of plaques without affecting intracellular amyloid. These results indicate that enriched environment exposure since early life has a protective effect on cognitive deterioration although transiently accelerates amyloid deposition. In addition, the effects of the enriched environment might be due to increased neuronal activity, because plaques were reduced by suppression of electrical signaling by tetrodotoxin.

  1. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images – a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Tohsing

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sky radiance (380–760 nm is derived from measurements with a hemispherical sky imager (HSI system. The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue. To obtain the spectral sky radiance from these images, non-linear regression functions for various sky conditions have been derived. The camera-based spectral sky radiance was validated using spectral sky radiance measured with a CCD spectroradiometer. The spectral sky radiance for complete distribution over the hemisphere between both instruments deviates by less than 20% at 500 nm for all sky conditions and for zenith angles less than 80°. The reconstructed spectra of the wavelengths 380–760 nm between both instruments at various directions deviate by less than 20% for all sky conditions.

  2. Chronic caffeine treatment reverses memory impairment and the expression of brain BNDF and TrkB in the PS1/APP double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer?s disease

    OpenAIRE

    HAN, KUN; JIA, NING; LI, JI; YANG, LI; MIN, LIAN-QIU

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of varying doses of caffeine on memory impairment and the expression of brain neurotrophic derived factor (BNDF) and TrkB in PS1/APP double transgenic mouse models. PS1/APP double transgenic mice were administered 0.3 ml/day of saline, 1.5 mg/day of caffeine or 0.75 mg/day of caffeine for eight weeks. A water maze test and western blotting were used to determine the memory capability and expression of hippocampal BNDF and TrkB of the ...

  3. The Sky, A User's Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, David H.

    This is an ideal book for starting astronomy. It stirs the imagination, and puts observation of the sky into the framework of leisure activity as well as a personal adventure. Written by an award winning astronomer, it is a non-technical guide to the night sky, full of practical hints. The author's lively style enthuses, entertains and informs. * know the constellations, even if you live in a large city * observe the Sun safely * find out how comets are discovered * watch a star vary in brightness from week to week * explore star clusters and remote galaxies. Author David Levy is one of the world's foremost amateur astronomers. He has discovered 17 comets. Minor Planet 3673 Levy is named in his honour. An English graduate, Levy has written a beautiful introduction to the glories of the observable universe of constellations, stars and galaxies.

  4. Night sky quality monitoring in existing and planned dark sky parks by digital cameras

    OpenAIRE

    Kolláth, Zoltán; Dömény, Anita

    2017-01-01

    A crucial part of the qualification of international dark sky places (IDSPs) is the objective measurement of night time sky luminance or radiance. Modern digital cameras provide an alternative way to perform all sky imaging either by a fisheye lens or by a mosaic image taken by a wide angle lens. Here we present a method for processing raw camera images to obtain calibrated measurements of sky quality. The comparison of the night sky quality of different European locations is also presented t...

  5. Astronomy Education Under Dark Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecylia Molenda-Zakowicz, Joanna

    2015-08-01

    We have been providing professional support for the high school students and the astronomy teachers since 2007. Our efforts include organizing astronomy events that take from several hours, like, e.g., watching the transit of Venus, to several days, like the workshops organized in the framework of the projects 'School Workshops on Astronomy' (SWA) and 'Wygasz'.The SWA and Wygasz workshops include presentations by experts in astronomy and space science research, presentations prepared by students being supervised by those experts, hands-on interactive experience in the amateur astrophotography, various pencil-and-paper exercises, and other practical activities. We pay particular attention to familiarize the teachers and students with the idea and the necessity of protecting the dark sky. The format of these events allows also for some time for teachers to share ideas and best practices in teaching astronomy.All those activities are organized either in the Izera Dark-Sky Park in Poland or in other carefuly selected locations in which the beauty of the dark night sky can be appreciated.

  6. Charged Kaon K{sup +}{yields}3{pi} CP Violating Asymmetries vs {epsilon}{sub K}{sup '}/{epsilon}{sub K}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prades, Joaquim [CAFPE and Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada Campus de Fuente Nueva, E-18002 Granada (Spain); Gamiz, Elvira [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Scimemi, Ignazio [Departament de Fisica Teorica, IFIC, Universitat de Valencia-CSIC, Apt. de Correus 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    We present the next-to-leading order full results in Chiral Pertubation Theory for the charged Kaon K{yields}3{pi} slope g CP violating asymmetries. We discuss the constraints that a measurement of these asymmetries would impose on the Standard Model results of {epsilon}{sub K}{sup '} and search for new physics. We also study the kind of information that such measurement can provide on ImG{sub 8}, Im(e{sup 2}G{sub E}) and higher order weak couplings.

  7. Synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus of a APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease is impaired in old but not young mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Gengler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder for which there is no cure. We have investigated synaptic plasticity in area CA1 in a novel AD mouse model (APPPS1-21 which expresses the Swedish mutation of APP and the L166P mutation of human PS-1. This model shows initial plaque formation at 2 months in the neocortex and 4 months in the hippocampus and displays beta-amyloid-associated pathologies and learning impairments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested long-term potentiation (LTP and short term potentiation (paired-pulse facilitation, PPF of synaptic transmission in vivo in area CA1 of the hippocampus. There was no difference in LTP or PPF at 4-5 months of age in APPPS1-21 mice compared to littermate controls. At 6 months of age there was also no difference in LTP but APPPS1-21 mice showed slightly increased PPF (p<0.03. In 8 months old mice, LTP was greatly impaired in APPPS-21 animals (p<0.0001 while PPF was not changed. At 15 months of age, APPPS1-21 mice showed again impaired LTP compared to littermate controls (p<0.005, and PPF was also significantly reduced at 80 ms (p<0.005 and 160 ms (p<0.01 interstimulus interval. Immunohistological analysis showed only modest amyloid deposition in the hippocampus at 4 and 6 months with a robust increase up to 15 months of age. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that increased formation and aggregation of beta amyloid with aging is responsible for the impaired LTP with aging in this mouse model, while the transient increase of PPF at 6 months of age is caused by some other mechanism.

  8. Existing plaques and neuritic abnormalities in APP:PS1 mice are not affected by administration of the gamma-secretase inhibitor LY-411575

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golde Todd E

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The γ-secretase complex is a major therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Previous studies have shown that treatment of young APP mice with specific inhibitors of γ-secretase prevented formation of new plaques. It has not yet been shown directly whether existing plaques would be affected by γ-secretase inhibitor treatment. Similarly, alterations in neuronal morphology in the immediate vicinity of plaques represent a plaque-specific neurotoxic effect. Reversal of these alterations is an important endpoint of successful therapy whether or not a treatment affects plaque size. In the present study we used longitudinal imaging in vivo with multiphoton microscopy to study the effects of the orally active γ-secretase inhibitor LY-411575 in 10–11 month old APP:PS1 mice with established amyloid pathology and neuritic abnormalities. Neurons expressed YFP allowing fluorescent detection of morphology whereas plaques were labelled with methoxy-XO4. The same identified neurites and plaques were followed in weekly imaging sessions in living mice treated daily (5 mg/kg for 3 weeks with the compound. Although LY-411575 reduced Aβ levels in plasma and brain, it did not have an effect on the size of existing plaques. There was also no effect on the abnormal neuritic curvature near plaques, or the dystrophies in very close proximity to senile plaques. Our results suggest that therapeutics aimed at inhibition of Aβ generation are less effective for reversal of existing plaques than for prevention of new plaque formation and have no effect on the plaque-mediated neuritic abnormalities, at least under these conditions where Aβ production is suppressed but not completely blocked. Therefore, a combination therapy of Aβ suppression with agents that increase clearance of amyloid and/or prevent neurotoxicity might be needed for a more effective treatment in patients with pre-existing pathology.

  9. Longitudinal investigation of neuroinflammation and metabolite profiles in the APPswe ×PS1Δe9 transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Aisling; Bauer, Martin; Bochicchio, Daniela; Smigova, Alison; Kassiou, Michael; Davies, Karen E; Williams, Steve R; Boutin, Herve

    2018-02-01

    There is increasing evidence linking neuroinflammation to many neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, its exact contribution to disease manifestation and/or progression is poorly understood. Therefore, there is a need to investigate neuroinflammation in both health and disease. Here, we investigate cognitive decline, neuroinflammatory and other pathophysiological changes in the APPswe ×PS1Δe9 transgenic mouse model of AD. Transgenic (TG) mice were compared to C57BL/6 wild type (WT) mice at 6, 12 and 18 months of age. Neuroinflammation was investigated by [18 F]DPA-714 positron emission tomography and myo-inositol levels using 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in vivo. Neuronal and cellular dysfunction was investigated by looking at N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds, taurine and glutamate also using MRS. Cognitive decline was first observed at 12 m of age in the TG mice as assessed by working memory tests . A significant increase in [18 F]DPA-714 uptake was seen in the hippocampus and cortex of 18 m-old TG mice when compared to age-matched WT mice and 6 m-old TG mice. No overall effect of gene was seen on metabolite levels; however, a significant reduction in NAA was observed in 18 m-old TG mice when compared to WT. In addition, age resulted in a decrease in glutamate and an increase in choline levels. Therefore, we can conclude that increased neuroinflammation and cognitive decline are observed in TG animals, whereas NAA alterations occurring with age are exacerbated in the TG mice. These results support the role of neuroinflammation and metabolite alteration in AD and in ageing. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. A role of the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 pathway in epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Sayaka; Yako, Yuta; Fujioka, Yoichiro; Kajita, Mihoko; Kameyama, Takeshi; Kon, Shunsuke; Ishikawa, Susumu; Ohba, Yusuke; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio; Fujita, Yasuyuki

    2016-02-01

    At the initial step of carcinogenesis, transformation occurs in single cells within epithelia, where the newly emerging transformed cells are surrounded by normal epithelial cells. A recent study revealed that normal epithelial cells have an ability to sense and actively eliminate the neighboring transformed cells, a process named epithelial defense against cancer (EDAC). However, the molecular mechanism of this tumor-suppressive activity is largely unknown. In this study, we investigated a role for the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2) pathway in EDAC. First, we show that addition of the S1PR2 inhibitor significantly suppresses apical extrusion of RasV12-transformed cells that are surrounded by normal cells. In addition, knockdown of S1PR2 in normal cells induces the same effect, indicating that S1PR2 in the surrounding normal cells plays a positive role in the apical elimination of the transformed cells. Of importance, not endogenous S1P but exogenous S1P is involved in this process. By using FRET analyses, we demonstrate that S1PR2 mediates Rho activation in normal cells neighboring RasV12-transformed cells, thereby promoting accumulation of filamin, a crucial regulator of EDAC. Collectively these data indicate that S1P is a key extrinsic factor that affects the outcome of cell competition between normal and transformed epithelial cells. © 2016 Yamamoto, Yako, et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  11. Suppressed retinal degeneration in aged wild type and APPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice by bone marrow transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Yang

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is an age-related condition characterized by accumulation of neurotoxic amyloid β peptides (Aβ in brain and retina. Because bone marrow transplantation (BMT results in decreased cerebral Aβ in experimental AD, we hypothesized that BMT would mitigate retinal neurotoxicity through decreased retinal Aβ. To test this, we performed BMT in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 double transgenic mice using green fluorescent protein expressing wild type (wt mice as marrow donors. We first examined retinas from control, non-transplanted, aged AD mice and found a two-fold increase in microglia compared with wt mice, prominent inner retinal Aβ and paired helical filament-tau, and decreased retinal ganglion cell layer neurons. BMT resulted in near complete replacement of host retinal microglia with BMT-derived cells and normalized total AD retinal microglia to non-transplanted wt levels. Aβ and paired helical filament-tau were reduced (61.0% and 44.1% respectively in BMT-recipient AD mice, which had 20.8% more retinal ganglion cell layer neurons than non-transplanted AD controls. Interestingly, aged wt BMT recipients also had significantly more neurons (25.4% compared with non-transplanted aged wt controls. Quantitation of retinal ganglion cell layer neurons in young mice confirmed age-related retinal degeneration was mitigated by BMT. We found increased MHC class II expression in BMT-derived microglia and decreased oxidative damage in retinal ganglion cell layer neurons. Thus, BMT is neuroprotective in age-related as well as AD-related retinal degeneration, and may be a result of alterations in innate immune function and oxidative stress in BMT recipient mice.

  12. AP39, a Mitochondria-Targeted Hydrogen Sulfide Donor, Supports Cellular Bioenergetics and Protects against Alzheimer’s Disease by Preserving Mitochondrial Function in APP/PS1 Mice and Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-li Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondrial functions are altered in AD and play an important role in AD pathogenesis. It has been established that H2S homeostasis is balanced in AD. The emerging mitochondrial roles of H2S include antioxidation, antiapoptosis, and the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Here, using primary neurons from the well-characterized APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model, we studied the effects of AP39 (a newly synthesized mitochondrially targeted H2S donor on mitochondrial function. AP39 increased intracellular H2S levels, mainly in mitochondrial regions. AP39 exerted dose-dependent effects on mitochondrial activity in APP/PS1 neurons, including increased cellular bioenergy metabolism and cell viability at low concentrations (25–100 nM and decreased energy production and cell viability at a high concentration (250 nM. Furthermore, AP39 (100 nM increased ATP levels, protected mitochondrial DNA, and decreased ROS generation. AP39 regulated mitochondrial dynamics, shifting from fission toward fusion. After 6 weeks, AP39 administration to APP/PS1 mice significantly ameliorated their spatial memory deficits in the Morris water maze and NORT and reduced Aβ deposition in their brains. Additionally, AP39 inhibited brain atrophy in APP/PS1 mice. Based on these results, AP39 was proposed as a promising drug candidate for AD treatment, and its anti-AD mechanism may involve protection against mitochondrial damage.

  13. AP39, a Mitochondria-Targeted Hydrogen Sulfide Donor, Supports Cellular Bioenergetics and Protects against Alzheimer's Disease by Preserving Mitochondrial Function in APP/PS1 Mice and Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng-Li; Fang, Fang; Qiao, Pei-feng; Yan, Ning; Gao, Dan; Yan, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that mitochondrial functions are altered in AD and play an important role in AD pathogenesis. It has been established that H2S homeostasis is balanced in AD. The emerging mitochondrial roles of H2S include antioxidation, antiapoptosis, and the modulation of cellular bioenergetics. Here, using primary neurons from the well-characterized APP/PS1 transgenic mouse model, we studied the effects of AP39 (a newly synthesized mitochondrially targeted H2S donor) on mitochondrial function. AP39 increased intracellular H2S levels, mainly in mitochondrial regions. AP39 exerted dose-dependent effects on mitochondrial activity in APP/PS1 neurons, including increased cellular bioenergy metabolism and cell viability at low concentrations (25-100 nM) and decreased energy production and cell viability at a high concentration (250 nM). Furthermore, AP39 (100 nM) increased ATP levels, protected mitochondrial DNA, and decreased ROS generation. AP39 regulated mitochondrial dynamics, shifting from fission toward fusion. After 6 weeks, AP39 administration to APP/PS1 mice significantly ameliorated their spatial memory deficits in the Morris water maze and NORT and reduced Aβ deposition in their brains. Additionally, AP39 inhibited brain atrophy in APP/PS1 mice. Based on these results, AP39 was proposed as a promising drug candidate for AD treatment, and its anti-AD mechanism may involve protection against mitochondrial damage.

  14. Chronic caffeine treatment reverses memory impairment and the expression of brain BNDF and TrkB in the PS1/APP double transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    HAN, KUN; JIA, NING; LI, JI; YANG, LI; MIN, LIAN-QIU

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of varying doses of caffeine on memory impairment and the expression of brain neurotrophic derived factor (BNDF) and TrkB in PS1/APP double transgenic mouse models. PS1/APP double transgenic mice were administered 0.3 ml/day of saline, 1.5 mg/day of caffeine or 0.75 mg/day of caffeine for eight weeks. A water maze test and western blotting were used to determine the memory capability and expression of hippocampal BNDF and TrkB of the mice. The results demonstrated that 0.75 mg/day and 1.5 mg/day doses of caffeine significantly increased memory capability and the expression of hippocampal BDNF and TrkB in PS1/APP mice with a dose-response effect. The results suggested that chronic caffeine treatment may reverse memory impairment in PS1/APP transgenic mice, and BDNF and its receptor TrkB, may be involved in this process. PMID:23900282

  15. An early dysregulation of FAK and MEK/ERK signaling pathways precedes the β-amyloid deposition in the olfactory bulb of APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachén-Montes, Mercedes; González-Morales, Andrea; de Morentin, Xabier Martínez; Pérez-Valderrama, Estela; Ausín, Karina; Zelaya, María Victoria; Serna, Antonio; Aso, Ester; Ferrer, Isidro; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Santamaría, Enrique

    2016-10-04

    Olfactory dysfunction is an early event of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanisms associated to AD neurodegeneration in olfactory areas are unknown. Here we used double-transgenic amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1 (APPswe/PS1dE9) mice and label-free quantitative proteomics to analyze early pathological effects on the olfactory bulb (OB) during AD progression. Prior to β-amyloid plaque formation, 9 modulated proteins were detected on 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice while 16 differential expressed proteins were detected at 6months, when β-amyloid plaques appear, indicating a moderate imbalance in cytoskeletal rearrangement, and synaptic plasticity in APP/PS1 OBs. Moreover, β-amyloid induced an inactivation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) together with a transient activation of MEK1/2, leading to inactivation of ERK1/2 in 6-months APP/PS1 OBs. In contrast, the analysis of human OBs revealed a late activation of FAK in advanced AD stages, whereas ERK1/2 activation was enhanced across AD staging respect to controls. This survival potential was accompanied by the inhibition of the proapototic factor BAD in the OB across AD phenotypes. Our data contribute to a better understanding of the early molecular mechanisms that are modulated in AD neurodegeneration, highlighting significant differences in the regulation of survival pathways between APP/PS1 mice and sporadic human AD. Loss of smell is involved in early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), usually preceding classic disease symptoms. However, the mechanisms governing this dysfunction are still poorly understood, losing its potential as a useful tool for clinical diagnosis. Our study characterizes potential AD-associated molecular changes in APP/PS1 mice olfactory bulb (OB) using MS-quantitative proteomics, revealing early cytoskeletal disruption and synaptic plasticity impairment. Moreover, an opposite pattern was found when comparing the activation status of specific survival pathways between APP/PS1 OBs

  16. Immunization with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) alleviates neuroinflammation and cognitive deficits in APP/PS1 mice via the recruitment of inflammation-resolving monocytes to the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Zejie; Qi, Fangfang; Yang, Junhua; Wang, Xiao; Wu, Yingying; Wen, Yaru; Yuan, Qunfang; Zou, Juntao; Guo, Kaihua; Yao, Zhi Bin

    2017-05-01

    The immune system plays a crucial role in the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, immune-dependent cascade induced by systemic immune activation has been verified to play a beneficial role in AD mouse models. Here, we tested whether Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunization alters AD pathology and cognitive dysfunction in APP/PS1 AD mouse model, and with 4Aβ1-15 vaccination as positive control. It was found that BCG treatment reversed the cognitive decline to the extent observed in 4Aβ1-15 group, but did not reduce the β-amyloid (Aβ) burden in the brain. Then, we demonstrated the enhanced recruitment of inflammation-resolving monocytes across the choroid plexus and perivascular spaces to cerebral sites of plaque pathology in APP/PS1 mice immunized with BCG. Furthermore, elevated splenocyte Foxp3 + regulatory T cell levels in the control APP/PS1 mice were down-regulated back to the wild-type (WT) levels by BCG treatment but not 4Aβ1-15 vaccination. In addition, BCG treatment induced the production of more circulating interferon (IFN)-γ than the controls and 4Aβ1-15 vaccination. Though the similar reductions in brain levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were observed in the BCG and 4Aβ1-15 groups compared to the controls, only BCG had the great effect in upregulating cerebral anti-inflammatory cytokine levels as well as elevating the expression of neurotrophic factors in the brain of APP/PS1 mice. Thus, it is suggested that BCG exerts a beneficial immunomodulatory effect in APP/PS1 mice through mitigation of systemic immune suppression, induction of IFN-γ response and alleviation of the neuroinflammatory response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A longitudinal study of cognition, proton MR spectroscopy and synaptic and neuronal pathology in aging wild-type and AβPPswe-PS1dE9 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Jansen

    Full Text Available Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1H MRS is a valuable tool in Alzheimer's disease research, investigating the functional integrity of the brain. The present longitudinal study set out to characterize the neurochemical profile of the hippocampus, measured by single voxel (1H MRS at 7 Tesla, in the brains of AβPPSswe-PS1dE9 and wild-type mice at 8 and 12 months of age. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether alterations in hippocampal metabolite levels coincided with behavioral changes, cognitive decline and neuropathological features, to gain a better understanding of the underlying neurodegenerative processes. Moreover, correlation analyses were performed in the 12-month-old AβPP-PS1 animals with the hippocampal amyloid-β deposition, TBS-T soluble Aβ levels and high-molecular weight Aβ aggregate levels to gain a better understanding of the possible involvement of Aβ in neurochemical and behavioral changes, cognitive decline and neuropathological features in AβPP-PS1 transgenic mice. Our results show that at 8 months of age AβPPswe-PS1dE9 mice display behavioral and cognitive changes compared to age-matched wild-type mice, as determined in the open field and the (reverse Morris water maze. However, there were no variations in hippocampal metabolite levels at this age. AβPP-PS1 mice at 12 months of age display more severe behavioral and cognitive impairment, which coincided with alterations in hippocampal metabolite levels that suggest reduced neuronal integrity. Furthermore, correlation analyses suggest a possible role of Aβ in inflammatory processes, synaptic dysfunction and impaired neurogenesis.

  18. Simplified Night Sky Display System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Timothy P.

    2010-01-01

    A document describes a simple night sky display system that is portable, lightweight, and includes, at most, four components in its simplest configuration. The total volume of this system is no more than 10(sup 6) cm(sup 3) in a disassembled state, and weighs no more than 20 kilograms. The four basic components are a computer, a projector, a spherical light-reflecting first surface and mount, and a spherical second surface for display. The computer has temporary or permanent memory that contains at least one signal representing one or more images of a portion of the sky when viewed from an arbitrary position, and at a selected time. The first surface reflector is spherical and receives and reflects the image from the projector onto the second surface, which is shaped like a hemisphere. This system may be used to simulate selected portions of the night sky, preserving the appearance and kinesthetic sense of the celestial sphere surrounding the Earth or any other point in space. These points will then show motions of planets, stars, galaxies, nebulae, and comets that are visible from that position. The images may be motionless, or move with the passage of time. The array of images presented, and vantage points in space, are limited only by the computer software that is available, or can be developed. An optional approach is to have the screen (second surface) self-inflate by means of gas within the enclosed volume, and then self-regulate that gas in order to support itself without any other mechanical support.

  19. Observation of $B^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$ and $B^+\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Bordyuzhin, Igor; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2017-02-06

    The decays $B^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^-$ and $B^+\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$ are observed for the first time using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3.0fb^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in proton-proton collisions at the centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The branching fractions relative to that of $B^+ \\rightarrow \\psi(2S)K^+$ are measured to be \\begin{eqnarray*} \\frac {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+\\rightarrow J/\\psi 3\\pi^+ 2\\pi^- \\right)} {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+ \\rightarrow \\psi(2S)K^+ \\right)} & = & \\left( 1.88\\pm0.17\\pm0.09\\right)\\times10^{-2}, \\\\ \\frac {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+\\rightarrow \\psi(2S) \\pi^+\\pi^+\\pi^- \\right)} {\\mathcal{B}\\left( B^+ \\rightarrow \\psi(2S)K^+ \\right) } & = & \\left( 3.04\\pm0.50\\pm0.26\\right)\\times10^{-2}, \\end{eqnarray*} where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second are systematic.

  20. Fourier transform spectroscopy and coupled-channel deperturbation treatment of the A1Sigma+ ~ b3Pi complex of KCs molecule

    CERN Document Server

    Kruzins, A; Nikolayeva, O; Tamanis, M; Ferber, R; Pazyuk, E A; Stolyarov, A V

    2009-01-01

    The laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectra A1Sigma ~ b3Pi --> X1Sigma+ of KCs dimer were recorded in near infrared region by Fourier Transform Spectrometer with a resolution of 0.03 cm-1. Overall more than 200 LIF spectra were rotationally assigned to 39K133Cs and 41K133Cs isotopomers yielding with the uncertainty of 0.003-0.01 cm-1 more than 3400 rovibronic term values of the strongly mixed singlet A1Sigma+ and triplet b3Pi states. Experimental data massive starts from the lowest vibrational level v_A=0 of the singlet and nonuniformly cover the energy range from 10040 to 13250 cm-1 with rotational quantum numbers J from 7 to 225. Besides of the dominating regular A1Sigma+ ~ b3P Omega=0 interactions the weak and local heterogenous A1S+ ~ b3P Omega=1 perturbations have been discovered and analyzed. Coupled-channel deperturbation analysis of the experimental 39K133Cs e-parity termvalues of the A1S+ ~ b3P complex was accomplished in the framework of the phenomenological 4 x 4 Hamiltonian accounting implicitly ...

  1. Nightscape Photography Reclaims the Natural Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafreshi, Babak

    2015-08-01

    Nightscape photos and timelapse videos, where the Earth & sky are framed together with an astronomical purpose, support the dark skies activities by improving public awareness. TWAN or The World at Night program (www.twanight.org) presents the world's best collection of such landscape astrophotos and aims to introduce the night sky as a part of nature, an essential element of our living environment besides being the astronomers lab. The nightscape images also present views of our civilizations landmarks, both natural and historic sites, against the night-time backdrop of stars, planets, and celestial events. In this context TWAN is a bridge between art, science and culture.TWAN images contribute to programs such as the Dark Sky Parks by the International Dark Sky Association or Starlight reserves by assisting local efforts in better illustrating their dark skies and by producing stunning images that not only educate the local people on their night sky heritage also communicate with the governments that are responsible to support the dark sky area.Since 2009 TWAN organizes the world's largest annual photo contest on nightscape imaging, in collaboration with the Dark Skies Awareness, National Optical Astronomy Observatory, and Astronomers Without Borders. The International Earth & Sky Photo Contest promotes the photography that documents the beauty of natural skies against the problem of light pollution. In 2014 the entries received from about 50 countries and the contest result news was widely published in the most popular sources internationally.*Babak A. Tafreshi is a photographer and science communicator. He is the creator of The World At Night program, and a contributing photographer to the National Geographic, Sky&Telescope magazine, and the European Southern Observatory. http://twanight.org/tafreshi

  2. The impact of Bdnf gene deficiency to the memory impairment and brain pathology of APPswe/PS1dE9 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Rantamäki

    Full Text Available Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF importantly regulates learning and memory and supports the survival of injured neurons. Reduced BDNF levels have been detected in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD patients but the exact role of BDNF in the pathophysiology of the disorder remains obscure. We have recently shown that reduced signaling of BDNF receptor TrkB aggravates memory impairment in APPswe/PS1dE9 (APdE9 mice, a model of AD. The present study examined the influence of Bdnf gene deficiency (heterozygous knockout on spatial learning, spontaneous exploratory activity and motor coordination/balance in middle-aged male and female APdE9 mice. We also studied brain BDNF protein levels in APdE9 mice in different ages showing progressive amyloid pathology. Both APdE9 and Bdnf mutations impaired spatial learning in males and showed a similar trend in females. Importantly, the effect was additive, so that double mutant mice performed the worst. However, APdE9 and Bdnf mutations influenced spontaneous locomotion in contrasting ways, such that locomotor hyperactivity observed in APdE9 mice was normalized by Bdnf deficiency. Obesity associated with Bdnf deficiency did not account for the reduced hyperactivity in double mutant mice. Bdnf deficiency did not alter amyloid plaque formation in APdE9 mice. Before plaque formation (3 months, BDNF protein levels where either reduced (female or unaltered (male in the APdE9 mouse cortex. Unexpectedly, this was followed by an age-dependent increase in mature BDNF protein. Bdnf mRNA and phospho-TrkB levels remained unaltered in the cortical tissue samples of middle-aged APdE9 mice. Immunohistological studies revealed increased BDNF immunoreactivity around amyloid plaques indicating that the plaques may sequester BDNF protein and prevent it from activating TrkB. If similar BDNF accumulation happens in human AD brains, it would suggest that functional BDNF levels in the AD brains are even lower than reported

  3. Night sky a falcon field guide

    CERN Document Server

    Nigro, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Night Sky: A Falcon Field Guide covers both summer and winter constellations, planets, and stars found in the northern hemisphere. Conveniently sized to fit in a pocket and featuring detailed photographs, this informative guide makes it easy to identify objects in the night sky even from one's own backyard. From information on optimal weather conditions, preferred viewing locations, and how to use key tools of the trade, this handbook will help you adeptly navigate to and fro the vast and dynamic nighttime skies, and you'll fast recognize that the night sky's the limit.

  4. Daytime Water Detection Based on Sky Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo; Matthies, Larry; Bellutta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    A water body s surface can be modeled as a horizontal mirror. Water detection based on sky reflections and color variation are complementary. A reflection coefficient model suggests sky reflections dominate the color of water at ranges > 12 meters. Water detection based on sky reflections: (1) geometrically locates the pixel in the sky that is reflecting on a candidate water pixel on the ground (2) predicts if the ground pixel is water based on color similarity and local terrain features. Water detection has been integrated on XUVs.

  5. Sky alert! when satellites fail

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Les

    2013-01-01

    How much do we depend on space satellites? Defense, travel, agriculture, weather forecasting, mobile phones and broadband, commerce...the list seems endless. But what would our live be like if the unimaginable happened and, by accident or design, those space assets disappeared? Sky Alert! explores what our world would be like, looking in turn at areas where the loss could have catastrophic effects. The book - demonstrates our dependence on space technology and satellites; - outlines the effect on our economy, defense, and daily lives if satellites and orbiting spacecraft were destroyed; - illustrates the danger of dead satellites, spent rocket stages, and space debris colliding with a functioning satellites; - demonstrates the threat of dramatically increased radiation levels associated with geomagnetic storms; - introduces space as a potential area of conflict between nations.

  6. Protecting Dark Skies in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Chris; Sanhueza, Pedro; Phillips, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Current projections indicate that Chile will host approximately 70% of the astronomical collecting area on Earth by 2030, augmenting the enormous area of ALMA with that of three next-generation optical telescopes: LSST, GMTO, and E-ELT. These cutting-edge facilities represent billions of dollars of investment in the astronomical facilities hosted in Chile. The Chilean government, Chilean astronomical community, and the international observatories in Chile have recognized that these investments are threatened by light pollution, and have formed a strong collaboration to work at managing the threats. We will provide an update on the work being done in Chile, ranging from training municipalities about new lighting regulations to exploring international recognition of the dark sky sites of Northern Chile.

  7. Measurement of the $B^0_s-\\overline{B}^0_s$ oscillation frequency $\\Delta m_s$ in $B^0_s \\to D^-_s (3)\\pi$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Adrover, C.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves Jr, A.A.; Amato, S.; Amhis, Y.; Anderson, J.; Appleby, R.B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; Arrabito, L.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J.J.; Bailey, D.S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R.J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Bates, A.; Bauer, C.; Bauer, Th.; Bay, A.; Bediaga, I.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benayoun, M.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Bernet, R.; Bettler, M.O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjornstad, P.M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blanks, C.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bobrov, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Bozzi, C.; Brambach, T.; van den Brand, J.; Bressieux, J.; Brett, D.; Brisbane, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brook, N.H.; Brown, H.; Buchler-Germann, A.; Burducea, I.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Caicedo Carvajal, J.M.; Callot, O.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chiapolini, N.; Ciba, K.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H.V.; Closier, J.; Coca, C.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Collins, P.; Constantin, F.; Conti, G.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Corti, G.; Cowan, G.A.; Currie, R.; D'Almagne, B.; D'Ambrosio, C.; David, P.; De Bonis, I.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Lorenzi, F.; de Miranda, J.M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Degaudenzi, H.; Deissenroth, M.; Del Buono, L.; Deplano, C.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dickens, J.; Dijkstra, H.; Diniz Batista, P.; Donleavy, S.; Dosil Suarez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dupertuis, F.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Eames, C.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; van Eijk, D.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhardt, S.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Elsasser, Ch.; d'Enterria, D.G.; Esperante Pereira, D.; Esteve, L.; Falabella, A.; Fanchini, E.; Farber, C.; Fardell, G.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Fave, V.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Furcas, S.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garnier, J-C.; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gaspar, C.; Gauvin, N.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gibson, V.; Gligorov, V.V.; Gobel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gordon, H.; Grabalosa Gandara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L.A.; Grauges, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Gregson, S.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S.C.; Hampson, T.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harji, R.; Harnew, N.; Harrison, J.; Harrison, P.F.; He, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Hernando Morata, J.A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Hicks, E.; Hofmann, W.; Holubyev, K.; Hopchev, P.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hunt, P.; Huse, T.; Huston, R.S.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Iakovenko, V.; Ilten, P.; Imong, J.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jahjah Hussein, M.; Jans, E.; Jansen, F.; Jaton, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C.R.; Jost, B.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T.M.; Keaveney, J.; Kerzel, U.; Ketel, T.; Keune, A.; Khanji, B.; Kim, Y.M.; Knecht, M.; Koblitz, S.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozlinskiy, A.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kruzelecki, K.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kukulak, S.; Kumar, R.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V.N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R.W.; Lanciotti, E.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.P.; Lefevre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrancois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Li, L.; Li Gioi, L.; Lieng, M.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Liu, B.; Liu, G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez Asamar, E.; Lopez-March, N.; Luisier, J.; Machefert, F.; Machikhiliyan, I.V.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Magnin, J.; Malde, S.; Mamunur, R.M.D.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Mangiafave, N.; Marconi, U.; Marki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martens, A.; Martin, L.; Martin Sanchez, A.; Martinez Santos, D.; Massafferri, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matveev, M.; Maurice, E.; Maynard, B.; Mazurov, A.; McGregor, G.; McNulty, R.; Mclean, C.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Merkel, J.; Messi, R.; Miglioranzi, S.; Milanes, D.A.; Minard, M.N.; Monteil, S.; Moran, D.; Morawski, P.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Muheim, F.; Muller, K.; Muresan, R.; Muryn, B.; Musy, M.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nardulli, J.; Nasteva, I.; Nedos, M.; Needham, M.; Neufeld, N.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nicol, M.; Nies, S.; Niess, V.; Nikitin, N.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Oggero, S.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Orlandea, M.; Otalora Goicochea, J.M.; Owen, P.; Pal, B.; Palacios, J.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Parkinson, C.J.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G.D.; Patel, M.; Paterson, S.K.; Patrick, G.N.; Patrignani, C.; Pavel-Nicorescu, C.; Pazos Alvarez, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perego, D.L.; Perez Trigo, E.; Perez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Perret, P.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Pessina, G.; Petrella, A.; Petrolini, A.; Pie Valls, B.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilar, T.; Pinci, D.; Plackett, R.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polok, G.; Poluektov, A.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Powell, A.; du Pree, T.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Qian, W.; Rademacker, J.H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rangel, M.S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.M.; dos Reis, A.C.; Ricciardi, S.; Rinnert, K.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodrigues, F.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogers, G.J.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Sabatino, G.; Saborido Silva, J.J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salzmann, C.; Sannino, M.; Santacesaria, R.; Santinelli, R.; Santovetti, E.; Sapunov, M.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Savrie, M.; Savrina, D.; Schaack, P.; Schiller, M.; Schleich, S.; Schmelling, M.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciubba, A.; Seco, M.; Semennikov, A.; Senderowska, K.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Seyfert, P.; Shao, B.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shatalov, P.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R.Silva; Skottowe, H.P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, A.C.; Smith, N.A.; Sobczak, K.; Soler, F.J.P.; Solomin, A.; Soomro, F.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Sparkes, A.; Spradlin, P.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Styles, N.; Subbiah, V.K.; Swientek, S.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Teodorescu, E.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tran, M.T.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Urquijo, P.; Uwer, U.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J.J.; Veltri, M.; Vervink, K.; Viaud, B.; Videau, I.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Visniakov, J.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Voss, H.; Wacker, K.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D.R.; Webber, A.D.; Websdale, D.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wiggers, L.; Wilkinson, G.; Williams, M.P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F.F.; Wishahi, J.; Witek, M.; Witzeling, W.; Wotton, S.A.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xing, F.; Yang, Z.; Young, R.; Yushchenko, O.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, W.C.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zverev, E.; Zvyagin, A.

    2012-01-01

    The $B^0_s$-$\\overline{B}^0_s$ oscillation frequency $\\Delta m_s$ is measured with 36 pb$^{-1}$ of data collected in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. A total of 1381 $B^0_s \\rightarrow D_s^- \\pi^+$ and $B^0_s \\rightarrow D_s^- \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+$ signal decays are reconstructed, with average decay time resolutions of 44~fs and 36~fs, respectively. An oscillation signal with a statistical significance of 4.6\\,$\\sigma$ is observed. The measured oscillation frequency is $\\Delta m_s$ = 17.63 $\\pm$ 0.11 (stat) $\\pm$ 0.02 (syst)~ps$^{-1}$.

  8. Blue Skies, Coffee Creamer, and Rayleigh Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The first physical explanation of Earths blue sky was fashioned in 1871 by Lord Rayleigh. Many discussions of Rayleigh scattering and approaches to studying it both in and out of the classroom are available. Rayleigh scattering accounts for the blue color of the sky and the orange/red color of the Sun near sunset and sunrise, and a number of…

  9. A study of 3pi production in gammap → npi+pi+pi- and gammap → Delta++pi+pi-pi- with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaris, Aristeidis

    Apart from the mesons that the constituent quark model predicts, QCD allows for additional states beyond the qq¯ system. Previous experiments have performed partial wave analysis on pion- production data and claim observation of an exotic JPC = 1-+ state decaying via rhopi. The g12 experiment took place at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS spectrometer, a liquid hydrogen target was used and a tagged photon beam. By studying the reactions gamma p → npi+pi+pi - and gammap → Delta++pi +pi-pi-, the photoproduction of mesons decaying to 3pi was studied using two different but complimentary channels. Events are selected with low four-momentum transfer to the baryon, in order to enhance one pion exchange production. For both 3pi systems the data exhibit two intermediate decays, rhopi and f 2pi. For the gammap → npi +pi+pi- reaction over 600k events were acquired resulting in the largest 3 photoproduction dataset to date. The exotic JPC = 1-+ partial wave does not show resonant behavior and more so it is strongly consistent with a non-resonant non-interfering wave relative to a resonant pi 2(1670). Furthermore, the partial wave analysis shows production of the a2(1320) and pi2(1670) mesons. For the first time we report observation of a photoproduced a 1(1260) meson. For the gammap → Delta ++pi+pi-pi- reaction nearly 350k events were analyzed. A partial wave analysis was performed for the first time on this channel. The a 1(1260), a2(1320), and the pi2(1670) mesons were observed. Observation of the a1(1260) confirms the result first reported in gammap → npi+pi+pi- reaction.

  10. Comparative study of the effects of phosphatidylcholine rich in DHA and EPA on Alzheimer's disease and the possible mechanisms in CHO-APP/PS1 cells and SAMP8 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Hongxia; Zhou, Miaomiao; Zhang, Tiantian; Zhang, Lingyu; Ding, Lin; Yanagita, Teruyoshi; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Wang, Yuming

    2018-01-02

    Metabolic stress induced by a high-fat (HF) diet leads to cognitive dysfunction and aging. In the present study, Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PS1) (CHO-APP/PS1 cells) and SAMP8 mice fed with an HF diet were used to study the effects of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-enriched phosphatidylcholine (DHA-PC) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-enriched phosphatidylcholine (EPA-PC) on Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the possible mechanisms involved in these effects. Behavior test results indicated that DHA-PC exerted better effects than EPA-PC on improving memory and cognitive deficiency. Further analysis showed that DHA-PC and EPA-PC could significantly decrease β-amyloid (Aβ) concentrations in CHO-APP/PS1 cells and SAMP8 mice by inhibiting APP, PS1, and BACE1 expression. Moreover, both DHA-PC and EPA-PC can increase the activities of the antioxidant index, including SOD, T-AOC, GSH, and GSH-PX, and inhibit levels of MDA, NO, and NOS. In addition, the expressions of inflammatory factors (TNF-α, IL-1β) and apoptosis were significantly suppressed via improving the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax and decreasing the expression of pro-apoptosis factors. Interestingly, only DHA-PC could improve the expression of neurotrophic factors, including BDNF, synaptophysin, and growth associated protein 43. DHA-PC and EPA-PC could ameliorate memory and cognitive function of HF diet-fed SAMP8 mice via inhibiting Aβ generation, suppressing oxidative stress and apoptosis, down-regulating inflammatory response, and improving neurotrophic activity. Therefore, DHA-PC and EPA-PC may be applied as food supplements and/or functional ingredients to relieve neurodegenerative disease.

  11. Noggin and BMP4 co-modulate adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Jun [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Song, Min; Wang, Yanyan [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Fan, Xiaotang [Department of Histology and Embryology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Xu, Haiwei, E-mail: haiweixu2001@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Physiology, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Bai, Yun, E-mail: baiyungene@gmail.com [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2009-07-31

    In addition to the subventricular zone, the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus is one of the few brain regions in which neurogenesis continues into adulthood. Perturbation of neurogenesis can alter hippocampal function, and previous studies have shown that neurogenesis is dysregulated in Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) and its antagonist Noggin have been shown to play important roles both in embryonic development and in the adult nervous system, and may regulate hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous data indicated that increased expression of BMP4 mRNA within the dentate gyrus might contribute to decreased hippocampal cell proliferation in the APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} mouse AD model. However, it is not known whether the BMP antagonist Noggin contributes to the regulation of neurogenesis. We therefore studied the relative expression levels and localization of BMP4 and its antagonist Noggin in the dentate gyrus and whether these correlated with changes in neurogenesis in 6-12 mo old APP{sub swe}/PS1{sub {Delta}E9} transgenic mice. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was used to label proliferative cells. We report that decreased neurogenesis in the APP/PS1 transgenic mice was accompanied by increased expression of BMP4 and decreased expression of Noggin at both the mRNA and protein levels; statistical analysis showed that the number of proliferative cells at different ages correlated positively with Noggin expression and negatively with BMP4 expression. Intraventricular administration of a chimeric Noggin/Fc protein was used to block the action of endogenous BMP4; this resulted in a significant increase in the number of BrdU-labeled cells in dentate gyrus subgranular zone and hilus in APP/PS1 mice. These results suggest that BMP4 and Noggin co-modulate neurogenesis.

  12. Ceramide and Related-Sphingolipid Levels Are Not Altered in Disease-Associated Brain Regions of APPSL and APPSL/PS1M146L Mouse Models of Alzheimer's Disease: Relationship with the Lack of Neurodegeneration?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Barrier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence linking sphingolipid abnormalities, APP processing, and neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease (AD. We previously reported a strong elevation of ceramide levels in the brain of the APPSL/PS1Ki mouse model of AD, preceding the neuronal death. To extend these findings, we analyzed ceramide and related-sphingolipid contents in brain from two other mouse models (i.e., APPSL and APPSL/PS1M146L in which the time-course of pathology is closer to that seen in most currently available models. Conversely to our previous work, ceramides did not accumulate in disease-associated brain regions (cortex and hippocampus from both models. However, the APPSL/PS1Ki model is unique for its drastic neuronal loss coinciding with strong accumulation of neurotoxic Aβ isoforms, not observed in other animal models of AD. Since there are neither neuronal loss nor toxic Aβ species accumulation in APPSL mice, we hypothesized that it might explain the lack of ceramide accumulation, at least in this model.

  13. Simulations of the Microwave Sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sehgal, Neelima; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bode, Paul; /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Das, Sudeep; /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept. /Princeton U.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; /Garching, Max Planck Inst.; Huffenberger, Kevin; /Miami U.; Lin, Yen-Ting; /Tokyo U., IPMU; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; /Princeton U., Astrophys. Sci. Dept.; Trac, Hy; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2009-12-16

    We create realistic, full-sky, half-arcminute resolution simulations of the microwave sky matched to the most recent astrophysical observations. The primary purpose of these simulations is to test the data reduction pipeline for the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT) experiment; however, we have widened the frequency coverage beyond the ACT bands and utilized the easily accessible HEALPix map format to make these simulations applicable to other current and near future microwave background experiments. Some of the novel features of these simulations are that the radio and infrared galaxy populations are correlated with the galaxy cluster and group populations, the primordial microwave background is lensed by the dark matter structure in the simulation via a ray-tracing code, the contribution to the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) signals from galaxy clusters, groups, and the intergalactic medium has been included, and the gas prescription to model the SZ signals has been refined to match the most recent X-ray observations. The cosmology adopted in these simulations is also consistent with the WMAP 5-year parameter measurements. From these simulations we find a slope for the Y{sub 200} - M{sub 200} relation that is only slightly steeper than self-similar, with an intrinsic scatter in the relation of {approx} 14%. Regarding the contamination of cluster SZ flux by radio galaxies, we find for 148 GHz (90 GHz) only 3% (4%) of halos have their SZ decrements contaminated at a level of 20% or more. We find the contamination levels higher for infrared galaxies. However, at 90 GHz, less than 20% of clusters with M{sub 200} > 2.5 x 10{sup 14}M{sub {circle_dot}} and z < 1.2 have their SZ decrements filled in at a level of 20% or more. At 148 GHz, less than 20% of clusters with M{sub 200} > 2.5 x 10{sup 14}M{sub {circle_dot}} and z < 0.8 have their SZ decrements filled in at a level of 50% or larger. Our models also suggest that a population of very high flux

  14. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is

  15. Sky Subtraction with Fiber-Fed Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Myriam

    2017-09-01

    "Historically, fiber-fed spectrographs had been deemed inadequate for the observation of faint targets, mainly because of the difficulty to achieve high accuracy on the sky subtraction. The impossibility to sample the sky in the immediate vicinity of the target in fiber instruments has led to a commonly held view that a multi-object fibre spectrograph cannot achieve an accurate sky subtraction under 1% contrary to their slit counterpart. The next generation of multi-objects spectrograph at the VLT (MOONS) and the planed MOS for the E-ELT (MOSAIC) are fiber-fed instruments, and are aimed to observed targets fainter than the sky continuum level. In this talk, I will present the state-of-art on sky subtraction strategies and data reduction algorithm specifically developed for fiber-fed spectrographs. I will also present the main results of an observational campaign to better characterise the sky spatial and temporal variations ( in particular the continuum and faint sky lines)."

  16. NASA Science Engagement Through "Sky Art"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethea, K. L.; Damadeo, K.

    2013-12-01

    Sky Art is a NASA-funded online community where the public can share in the beauty of nature and the science behind it. At the center of Sky Art is a gallery of amateur sky photos submitted by users that are related to NASA Earth science mission research areas. Through their submissions, amateur photographers from around the world are engaged in the process of making observations, or taking pictures, of the sky just like many NASA science instruments. By submitting their pictures and engaging in the online community discussions and interactions with NASA scientists, users make the connection between the beauty of nature and atmospheric science. Sky Art is a gateway for interaction and information aimed at drawing excitement and interest in atmospheric phenomena including sunrises, sunsets, moonrises, moonsets, and aerosols, each of which correlates to a NASA science mission. Educating the public on atmospheric science topics in an informal way is a central goal of Sky Art. NASA science is included in the community through interaction from scientists, NASA images, and blog posts on science concepts derived from the images. Additionally, the website connects educators through the formal education pathway where science concepts are taught through activities and lessons that align with national learning standards. Sky Art was conceived as part of the Education and Public Outreach program of the SAGE III on ISS mission. There are currently three other NASA mission involved with Sky Art: CALIPSO, GPM, and CLARREO. This paper will discuss the process of developing the Sky Art online website, the challenges of growing a community of users, as well as the use of social media and mobile applications in science outreach and education.

  17. Preserving Dark Skies: Do Astronomers Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, D. R.; Crawford, D. L.

    2001-12-01

    Ground based telescopes are, even in this era of planetary missions and space telescopes, the dominant source of data on solar system objects. Yet many of the premier observing sites in the world are threatened by increasing artificial light that is scattered into the sky - light pollution. World class observing sites such as Mt. Wilson have long since lost the ability to do cutting edge faint object science and observatories in Southern Arizona have been recently threatened - the Canoa Ranch development being the most recent example. Yet there are actions that can be taken to preserve dark skies, not only for astronomy, but also for the benefit of all humanity. Lead by astronomers, effective outdoor lighting codes have been produced and adopted by many jurisdictional authorities. Advocacy organizations such as the International Dark-sky Association (IDA) distribute educational material on how to preserve dark skies through good outdoor lighting practices. Other institutions, such as the National Park Service, are realizing that dark skies are an integral part of the wilderness experience and are taking steps to preserve the quality of their skies. However, the primary beneficaries of dark sky preservation efforts, namely the ground based astronomical community, have largely failed to become involved in efforts to preserve dark skies. For example, only a few percent of the membership of the American Astronomical Society is active in light pollution work or is even a member of IDA. In this presentation, Iwe will outline what is being done locally to preserve dark skies througout the world. In addition, some observations on the level of support from the astronomical community will be offered.

  18. Sky dancer: an intermittent system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Anne; Rodríguez Romero, Jesse Alexander; Damián Díaz Andrade, Oscar

    2009-11-01

    Sky dancers attract people sight to make advertising. What is the origin of those large vertical tubes fluctuations above an air blower? This study complements the previous one [1] about the system analysis from a dynamical system point of view. As a difference from the ``garden hose-instability'' [2], the tube shape has got ``break points''. Those ``break points'' separate the air-filled bottom tube portion from its deflated top portion. We record the tube dynamics with a high-speed videocamera simultaneously that we measure the pressure at the air blower exit. The intermittent pressure evolution displays picks when the tube fluctuates. We compare those overpressure values with the ones that appears in a rigid tube whose exit is partially obstructed. [1] F. Castillo Flores & A. Cros ``Transition to chaos of a vertical collapsible tube conveying air flow'' J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 166, 012017 (2009). [2] A. S. Greenwald & J. Dungundji ``Static and dynamic instabilities of a propellant line'' MIT Aeroelastic and Structures Research Lab, AFOSR Sci. Report: AFOSR 67-1395 (1967).

  19. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for

  20. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  1. Teaching Chemistry Using October Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, James G.; Wilkinson, Lindsay J.; Snell, Dolores M.

    2009-02-01

    The first artificial satellite, Sputnik, was launched over fifty years ago, on October 4, 1957, marking the beginning of the space age. The launch of Sputnik inspired coal miners’ sons in Coalwood, West Virginia, to form a rocket research program. The story of these coal miners’ sons was told by Homer Hickham, Jr., in the book Rocket Boys: A Memoir, and later in the movie adaptation October Sky. Both the book and the movie show the importance of mentoring from a teacher, Frieda Riley, who encouraged the Rocket Boys in their endeavors. The story of the Rocket Boys can be used in science classrooms as a means to teach the scientific process and to create what is termed in both the book and movie as a body of knowledge. Several chemical principles important in the development of rocket propellant systems were depicted in the book and movie. These propellant systems are comparable to those used for the solid rocket boosters used to launch the space shuttles. The use of popular media in the classroom can engage and inspire students and teachers alike.

  2. A Machine-Learning-Driven Sky Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satylmys, Pynar; Bashford-Rogers, Thomas; Chalmers, Alan; Debattista, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    Sky illumination is responsible for much of the lighting in a virtual environment. A machine-learning-based approach can compactly represent sky illumination from both existing analytic sky models and from captured environment maps. The proposed approach can approximate the captured lighting at a significantly reduced memory cost and enable smooth transitions of sky lighting to be created from a small set of environment maps captured at discrete times of day. The author's results demonstrate accuracy close to the ground truth for both analytical and capture-based methods. The approach has a low runtime overhead, so it can be used as a generic approach for both offline and real-time applications.

  3. The SkyMapper Transient Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalzo, R. A.; Yuan, F.; Childress, M. J.; Möller, A.; Schmidt, B. P.; Tucker, B. E.; Zhang, B. R.; Onken, C. A.; Wolf, C.; Astier, P.; Betoule, M.; Regnault, N.

    2017-07-01

    The SkyMapper 1.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory has now begun regular operations. Alongside the Southern Sky Survey, a comprehensive digital survey of the entire southern sky, SkyMapper will carry out a search for supernovae and other transients. The search strategy, covering a total footprint area of 2 000 deg2 with a cadence of ⩽5 d, is optimised for discovery and follow-up of low-redshift type Ia supernovae to constrain cosmic expansion and peculiar velocities. We describe the search operations and infrastructure, including a parallelised software pipeline to discover variable objects in difference imaging; simulations of the performance of the survey over its lifetime; public access to discovered transients; and some first results from the Science Verification data.

  4. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement

  5. Aladin Lite: Lightweight sky atlas for browsers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boch, Thomas

    2014-02-01

    Aladin Lite is a lightweight version of the Aladin tool, running in the browser and geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. It allows visualization of image surveys (JPEG multi-resolution HEALPix all-sky surveys) and permits superimposing tabular (VOTable) and footprints (STC-S) data. Aladin Lite is powered by HTML5 canvas technology and is easily embeddable on any web page and can also be controlled through a Javacript API.

  6. The Mythology of the Night Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, David E.

    The word "planet" comes from the Latin word planeta and the Greek word planes, which means "wanderer." When the ancient Greeks studied the night sky they noticed that most of the stars remained in the same position relative to all the other stars, but a few stars seem to move in the sky from day to day, week to week, and month to month. The Greeks called these rogue stars "wanderers" because they wandered through the starry background.

  7. Stability of FORS2 Sky Flats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffin, Henri M. J.; Dobrzycka, D.; Hummel, C.; Moehler, S.; Smoker, J.; Anderson, J.; Dias, B.

    2017-09-01

    "The FORS2 calibration plan previously had a validity for imaging sky flatfields of four days. This placed some stress on the observers, especially during periods of bad weather. We therefore decided to analyse a series of flats to check if it was possible to extend this validity range, and if yes, to what level. The analysis allowed us to change the FORS2 calibration plan, increasing the validity of sky flats from four to 14 days."

  8. Characterizing Sky Spectra Using SDSS BOSS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Lina Maria; Strauss, Michael A.

    2018-01-01

    In the optical/near-infrared spectra gathered by a ground-based telescope observing very faint sources, the strengths of the emission lines due to the Earth’s atmosphere can be many times larger than the fluxes of the sources we are interested in. Thus the limiting factor in faint-object spectroscopy is the degree to which systematics in the sky subtraction can be minimized. Longwards of 6000 Angstroms, the night-sky spectrum is dominated by multiple vibrational/rotational transitions of the OH radical from our upper atmosphere. While the wavelengths of these lines are the same in each sky spectrum, their relative strengths vary considerably as a function of time and position on the sky. The better we can model their strengths, the better we can hope to subtract them off. We expect that the strength of lines from common upper energy levels will be correlated with one another. We used flux-calibrated sky spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS BOSS) to explore these correlations. Our aim is to use these correlations for creating improved sky subtraction algorithms for the Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS) on the 8.2-meter Subaru Telescope. When PFS starts gathering data in 2019, it will be the most powerful multi-object spectrograph in the world. Since PFS will be gathering data on sources as faint as 24th magnitude and fainter, it's of upmost importance to be able to accurately measure and subtract sky spectra from the data that we receive.

  9. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the

  10. YY-1224, a terpene trilactone-strengthened Ginkgo biloba, attenuates neurodegenerative changes induced by β-amyloid (1-42) or double transgenic overexpression of APP and PS1 via inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng-Yi; Chung, Yoon Hee; Shin, Eun-Joo; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Ko, Sung Kwon; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Baik, Tae Gon; Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Ong, Wei-Yi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2017-04-27

    Ginkgo biloba has been reported to possess free radical-scavenging antioxidant activity and anti-inflammatory properties. In our pilot study, YY-1224, a terpene trilactone-strengthened extract of G. biloba, showed anti-inflammatory, neurotrophic, and antioxidant effects. We investigated the pharmacological potential of YY-1224 in β-amyloid (Aβ) (1-42)-induced memory impairment using cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) knockout (-/-) and APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic (APP/PS1 Tg) mice. Repeated treatment with YY-1224 significantly attenuated Aβ (1-42)-induced memory impairment in COX-2 (+/+) mice, but not in COX-2 (-/-) mice. YY-1224 significantly attenuated Aβ (1-42)-induced upregulation of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor gene expression, reactive oxygen species, and pro-inflammatory factors. In addition, YY-1224 significantly inhibited Aβ (1-42)-induced downregulation of PAF-acetylhydrolase-1 (PAF-AH-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) gene expression. These changes were more pronounced in COX-2 (+/+) mice than in COX-2 (-/-) mice. YY-1224 significantly attenuated learning impairment, Aβ deposition, and pro-inflammatory microglial activation in APP/PS1 Tg mice, whereas it significantly enhanced PAF-AH and PPARγ expression. A preferential COX-2 inhibitor, meloxicam, did not affect the pharmacological activity by YY-1224, suggesting that the COX-2 gene is a critical mediator of the neuroprotective effects of YY-1224. The protective activity of YY-1224 appeared to be more efficacious than a standard G. biloba extract (Gb) against Aβ insult. Our results suggest that the protective effects of YY-1224 against Aβ toxicity may be associated with its PAF antagonistic- and PPARγ agonistic-potential as well as inhibition of the Aβ-mediated pro-inflammatory switch of microglia phenotypes through suppression of COX-2 expression.

  11. Educating for the Preservation of Dark Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Sandra Lee; Cianciolo, Frank; Wetzel, Marc; Finkelstein, Keely; Wren, William; Nance, Craig

    2015-08-01

    The stars at night really are big and bright deep in the heart of Texas at the McDonald Observatory near Fort Davis, Texas. Each year 80,000 visitors from all over the world make the pilgrimage to the Observatory to attend one of the three-times-a-week star parties. Many experience, for the first time, the humbling, splendor of a truly dark night sky. Over the last several years, the Observatory has experienced dramatic increases in visitation demonstrating the public’s appetite for science education, in general, and interest in the night sky, in particular. This increasing interest in astronomy is, ironically, occurring at a time when most of humanity’s skies are becoming increasingly light-polluted frustrating this natural interest. Dark skies and knowledgeable education and outreach staff are an important resource in maintaining the public’s interest in astronomy, support for astronomical research, and local tourism.This year Observatory educators were inspired by the observance of the International Year of Light to promote healthy outdoor lighting through its popular Astronomy Day distance learning program. This program reaches tens of thousands of K-12 students in Texas and other states with a message of how they can take action to preserve dark skies. As well, more than a thousand Boy Scouts visiting during the summer months receive a special program, which includes activities focusing on good lighting practices, thereby earning them credits toward an astronomy badge.The Observatory also offers a half-a-dozen K-12 teacher professional development workshops onsite each year, which provide about 90 teachers with dark skies information, best-practice lighting demonstrations, and red flashlights. Multi-year workshops for National Park and State of Texas Parks personnel are offered on dark sky preservation and sky interpretation at McDonald and a Dark Skies fund for retrofitting lights in the surrounding area has been established. The Observatory also uses

  12. β-asarone improves learning and memory and reduces Acetyl Cholinesterase and Beta-amyloid 42 levels in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by regulating Beclin-1-dependent autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Minzhen; Huang, Liping; Ning, Baile; Wang, Nanbu; Zhang, Qinxin; Zhu, Caixia; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder in the elderly, and studies have suggested that β-asarone has pharmacological effects on beta-amyloid (Aβ) injected in the rat hippocampus. However, the effect of β-asarone on autophagy in the APP/PS1 transgenic mouse is unreported. APP/PS1 transgenic mice were randomly divided into six groups (n=10/group): an untreated group, an Aricept-treated group, a 3-MA-treated group, a rapamycin-treated group, an LY294002-treated group, a β-asarone-treated group. The control group consisted of wild-type C57BL/6 mice. All treatments were administered to the mice for 30 days. Spatial learning and memory were assessed by water maze, passive avoidance, and step-down tests. AChE and Aβ42 levels in the hippocampus were determined by ELISA. p-Akt, p-mTOR, and LC3B expression were detected by flow cytometry. The expression of p-Akt, p-mTOR, Beclin-1, and p62 proteins was assessed by western blot. Changes in autophagy were viewed using a transmission electron microscope. APP and Beclin-1 mRNA levels were measured by Real-Time PCR. The learning and memory of APP/PS1 transgenic mice were improved significantly after β-asarone treatment compared with the untreated group. In addition, β-asarone treatment reduced AChE and Aβ42 levels, increased p-mTOR and p62 expression, decreased p-Akt, Beclin-1, and LC3B expression, decreased the number of autophagosomes and reduced APP mRNA and Beclin-1 mRNA levels compared with the untreated group. That is, β-asarone treatment can improve the learning and memory abilities of APP/PS1 transgenic mouse by inhibiting Beclin-1-dependent autophagy via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Suppression of Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes by the heat shock protein 70 inducer, geranylgeranylacetone, in APP/PS1 transgenic mice via the ERK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Zhang, Jiang-Rong; Chen, Shuyan

    2017-01-01

    HSP70 overexpression has a remedying effect in neurodegenerative diseases. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), the suppressive effects of HSP70 overexpression on AD-related phenotypes and the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In the current study, the effect of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), a non-toxic inducer of heat shock protein (HSP)-70 expression, on cognitive function and other pathological phenotypes were evaluated in APP/PS1 mice. It was observed that all doses of orally administered GGA (200, 400, and 800 mg/kg/day) improved cognitive deficit (P<0.05) and lowered the levels of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide (P<0.05) in APP/PS1 mice. GGA treatment also increased the levels of low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP-1) (P<0.05), while the levels of p-glycoprotein and receptor for advanced glycation end products were unaltered. Significant decreases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines, namely tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and cyclooxygenase-2, were also observed in the GGA-treated mice (P<0.05). Subsequent treatment with the HSP70 inhibitor quercetin caused significant decreases in the levels of phosphorylated (p)-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and p-extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK; P<0.05), indicating that ERK/p38 MAPK signaling in AD-related phenotypes may be suppressed by oral administration of GGA. Finally, in APP/PS1 mice treated with GGA+SB-203580 (p38 inhibitor) and GGA+PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), it was observed that orally administered GGA led to the activation of ERK/p38 MAPK signaling (P<0.05) and increased LRP-1 expression (P<0.05), which subsequently aided the clearance of Aβ40 and Aβ42 (P<0.05) and alleviated AD-related phenotypes. These results indicate that oral administration of GGA in APP/PS1 mice alleviates AD-related phenotypes by regulation of the ERK/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Thus, GGA may be a potential therapeutic for the treatment of AD. PMID:29285052

  14. Dark Skies are a Universal Resource: IYA Programs on Dark Skies Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Bueter, C.; Pompea, S. M.; Berglund, K.; Mann, T.; Gay, P.; Crelin, B.; Collins, D.; Sparks, R.

    2008-05-01

    The loss of a dark night sky as a natural resource is a growing concern. It impacts not only astronomical research, but also health, ecology, safety, economics and energy conservation. Because of its relevance, "Dark Skies” is a theme of the US Node for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA). Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved in a variety of dark skies-related programs. To reach this goal, the ASP session will immerse participants in hands-on, minds-on activities, events and resources on dark skies awareness. These include a planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking, a digital photography contest, The Great Switch Out, Earth Hour, National Dark Skies Week, a traveling exhibit, a 6-minute video tutorial, Dark Skies Teaching Sites, Astronomy Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy Nights, and unaided-eye and digital-meter star counting programs like GLOBE at Night. The ASP "Dark Skies” session is offered to provide IYA dark skies-related programs to a variety of attendees. Participants include professional or amateur astronomers, education and public outreach professionals, science center/museum/planetarium staff and educators who want to lead activities involving dark skies awareness in conjunction with IYA. During the session, each participant will be given a package of educational materials on the various dark skies programs. We will provide the "know-how” and the means for session attendees to become community leaders in promoting these dark skies programs as public events at their home institutions during IYA. Participants will be able to jump-start their education programs through the use of well-developed instructional materials and kits sent later if they commit to leading IYA dark skies activities. For more information about the IYA Dark Skies theme, visit http://astronomy2009.us/darkskies/.

  15. Dark Skies: Local Success, Global Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, G. W.

    2009-01-01

    The Flagstaff, Arizona 1987 lighting code reduced the growth rate of man-made sky glow by a third. Components of the code include requirements for full cutoff lighting, lumens per acre limits in radial zones around observatories, and use of low-pressure sodium monochromatic lighting for roadways and parking lots. Broad public acceptance of Flagstaff's lighting code demonstrates that dark sky preservation has significant appeal and few visibility or public safety negatives. An inventory by C. Luginbuhl et al. of the light output and shielding of a sampling of various zoning categories (municipal, commercial, apartments, single-family residences, roadways, sports facilities, industrial, etc.), extrapolated over the entire city, yields a total output of 139 million lumens. Commercial and industrial sources account for 62% of the total. Outdoor sports lighting increases the total by 24% on summer evenings. Flagstaff's per capita lumen output is 2.5 times greater than the nominal 1,000 lumens per capita assumed by R. Garstang in his early sky glow modeling work. We resolved the discrepancy with respect to Flagstaff's measured sky glow using an improved model that includes substantial near ground attenuation by foliage and structures. A 2008 university study shows that astronomy contributes $250M annually to Arizona's economy. Another study showed that the application of lighting codes throughout Arizona could reduce energy consumption significantly. An ongoing effort led by observatory directors statewide will encourage lighting controls in currently unregulated metropolitan areas whose growing sky glow threatens observatory facilities more than 100 miles away. The national press (New York Times, the New Yorker, the Economist, USA Today, etc.) have publicized dark sky issues but frequent repetition of the essential message and vigorous action will be required to steer society toward darker skies and less egregious waste.

  16. An Innovative Collaboration on Dark Skies Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; Mayer, M.; EPO Students, NOAO

    2011-01-01

    Dark night skies are being lost all over the globe, and hundreds of millions of dollars of energy are being wasted in the process.. Improper lighting is the main cause of light pollution. Light pollution is a concern on many fronts, affecting safety, energy conservation, cost, human health, and wildlife. It also robs us of the beauty of viewing the night sky. In the U.S. alone, over half of the population cannot see the Milky Way from where they live. To help address this, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory Education and Public Outreach (NOAO EPO) staff created two programs: Dark Skies Rangers and GLOBE at Night. Through the two programs, students learn about the importance of dark skies and experience activities that illustrate proper lighting, light pollution's effects on wildlife and how to measure the darkness of their skies. To disseminate the programs locally in an appropriate yet innovative venue, NOAO partnered with the Cooper Center for Environmental Learning in Tucson, Arizona. Operated by the largest school district in Tucson and the University of Arizona College of Education, the Cooper Center educates thousands of students and educators each year about ecology, science, and the beauty and wonders of the Sonoran Desert. During the first academic year (2009-2010), we achieved our goal of reaching nearly 20 teachers in 40 classrooms of 1000 students. We gave two 3-hour teacher-training sessions and provided nineteen 2.5-hour on-site evening sessions on dark skies activities for the students of the teachers trained. One outcome of the program was the contribution of 1000 "GLOBE at Night 2010” night-sky brightness measurements by Tucson students. Training sessions at similar levels are continuing this year. The partnership, planning, lesson learned, and outcomes of NOAO's collaboration with the environmental center will be presented.

  17. The Accuracy of RADIANCE Software in Modelling Overcast Sky Condition

    OpenAIRE

    Baharuddin

    2013-01-01

    A validation study of the sky models of RADIANCE simulation software against the overcast sky condition has been carried out in order to test the accuracy of sky model of RADIANCE for modeling the overcast sky condition in Hong Kong. Two sets of data have been analysed. Firstly, data collected from a set of experiments using a physical scale model. In this experiment, the illuminance of four points inside the model was measured under real sky conditions. Secondly, the RADIANCE simulation has ...

  18. Mira Soars Through the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1Figure 2 New ultraviolet images from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer shows a speeding star that is leaving an enormous trail of 'seeds' for new solar systems. The star, named Mira (pronounced my-rah) after the latin word for 'wonderful,' is shedding material that will be recycled into new stars, planets and possibly even life as it hurls through our galaxy. In figure 1, the upper panel shows Mira's full, comet-like tail as seen only in shorter, or 'far' ultraviolet wavelengths, while the lower panel is a combined view showing both far and longer, or 'near' ultraviolet wavelengths. The close-up picture at bottom gives a better look at Mira itself, which appears as a pinkish dot, and is moving from left to right in this view. Shed material appears in light blue. The dots in the picture are stars and distant galaxies. The large blue dot on the left side of the upper panel, and the large yellow dot in the lower panel, are both stars that are closer to us than Mira. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer discovered the strange tail during part of its routine survey of the entire sky at ultraviolet wavelengths. When astronomers first saw the picture, they were shocked because Mira has been studied for over 400 years yet nothing like this has ever been documented before. Mira's comet-like tail stretches a startling 13 light-years across the sky. For comparison, the nearest star to our sun, Proxima Centauri, is only about 4 light-years away. Mira's tail also tells a tale of its history -- the material making it up has been slowly blown off over time, with the oldest material at the end of the tail being released about 30,000 years ago (figure 2). Mira is a highly evolved, 'red giant' star near the end of its life. Technically, it is called an asymptotic giant branch star. It is red in color and bloated; for example, if a red giant were to replace our sun, it would engulf

  19. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification

  20. The night sky companion a yearly guide to sky-watching 2008-2009

    CERN Document Server

    Plotner, Tammy

    2007-01-01

    The Night Sky Companion is a comprehensive guide to what can be explored in the heavens on a nightly basis. Designed to appeal to readers at all skill levels, it provides a digest for sky watchers interested in all types of astronomical information.

  1. Sky coverage modeling for the whole sky for laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lianqi; Andersen, David; Ellerbroek, Brent

    2012-06-01

    The scientific productivity of laser guide star adaptive optics systems strongly depends on the sky coverage, which describes the probability of finding natural guide stars for the tip/tilt wavefront sensor(s) to achieve a certain performance. Knowledge of the sky coverage is also important for astronomers planning their observations. In this paper, we present an efficient method to compute the sky coverage for the laser guide star multiconjugate adaptive optics system, the Narrow Field Infrared Adaptive Optics System (NFIRAOS), being designed for the Thirty Meter Telescope project. We show that NFIRAOS can achieve more than 70% sky coverage over most of the accessible sky with the requirement of 191 nm total rms wavefront.

  2. Daytime Water Detection Based on Sky Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Arturo L.; Matthies, Larry H.; Bellutta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Robust water detection is a critical perception requirement for unmanned ground vehicle (UGV) autonomous navigation. This is particularly true in wide-open areas where water can collect in naturally occurring terrain depressions during periods of heavy precipitation and form large water bodies. One of the properties of water useful for detecting it is that its surface acts as a horizontal mirror at large incidence angles. Water bodies can be indirectly detected by detecting reflections of the sky below the horizon in color imagery. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has implemented a water detector based on sky reflections that geometrically locates the pixel in the sky that is reflecting on a candidate water pixel on the ground and predicts if the ground pixel is water based on color similarity and local terrain features. This software detects water bodies in wide-open areas on cross-country terrain at mid- to far-range using imagery acquired from a forward-looking stereo pair of color cameras mounted on a terrestrial UGV. In three test sequences approaching a pond under a clear, overcast, and cloudy sky, the true positive detection rate was 100% when the UGV was beyond 7 meters of the water's leading edge and the largest false positive detection rate was 0.58%. The sky reflection based water detector has been integrated on an experimental unmanned vehicle and field tested at Ft. Indiantown Gap, PA, USA.

  3. Duplication and Whorl-Specific Down-Regulation of the Obligate AP3-PI Heterodimer Genes Explain the Origin of Paeonia lactiflora Plants with Spontaneous Corolla Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Pichang; Ao, Xiang; Liu, Gaixiu; Cheng, Fangyun; He, Chaoying

    2017-03-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora) is a globally important ornamental plant. Spontaneous floral mutations occur frequently during cultivation, and are selected as a way to release new cultivars, but the underlying evolutionary developmental genetics remain largely elusive. Here, we investigated a collection of spontaneous corolla mutational plants (SCMPs) whose other floral organs were virtually unaffected. Unlike the corolla in normal plants (NPs) that withered soon after fertilization, the transformed corolla (petals) in SCMPs was greenish and persistent similar to the calyx (sepals). Epidermal cellular morphology of the SCMP corolla was also similar to that of calyx cells, further suggesting a sepaloid corolla in SCMPs. Ten floral MADS-box genes from these Paeonia plants were comparatively characterized with respect to sequence and expression. Codogenic sequence variation of these MADS-box genes was not linked to corolla changes in SCMPs. However, we found that both APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) lineages of B-class MADS-box genes were duplicated, and subsequent selective expression alterations of these genes were closely associated with the origin of SCMPs. AP3-PI obligate heterodimerization, essential for organ identity of corolla and stamens, was robustly detected. However, selective down-regulation of these duplicated genes might result in a reduction of this obligate heterodimer concentration in a corolla-specific manner, leading to the sepaloid corolla in SCMPs, thus representing a new sepaloid corolla model taking advantage of gene duplication. Our work suggests that modifying floral MADS-box genes could facilitate the breeding of novel cultivars with distinct floral morphology in ornamental plants, and also provides new insights into the functional evolution of the MADS-box genes in plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please

  4. Secrets to Successful Earth and Sky Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafreshi, Babak A.

    In the absolute silence of a desert night, surrounded by an arena of celestial beauties, a gentle breeze shifts the tiny grains of sand around me. There is a patchy glow of light visible all across the eastern horizon. It is gradually ascending over the sand dunes. The glow represents billions of stars in our home galaxy rising above the horizon of our planet. I have seen such dream-like starry scenes from many locations; from the boundless dark skies of the African Sahara when the summer Milky Way was arching over giant sandstones, to the shimmering beauty of the Grand Canyon under moonlight, and the transparent skies of the Himalayas when the bright stars of winter were rising above where the highest peak on Earth (Mt. Everest) meets the sky. These are forever-engraved moments in my memory. Astrophotography is not only about recording the celestial world. It can lead you to a life of adventure and discovery (Fig. 1).

  5. Hyperspectral all-sky imaging of auroras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigernes, Fred; Ivanov, Yuriy; Chernouss, Sergey; Trondsen, Trond; Roldugin, Alexey; Fedorenko, Yury; Kozelov, Boris; Kirillov, Andrey; Kornilov, Ilia; Safargaleev, Vladimir; Holmen, Silje; Dyrland, Margit; Lorentzen, Dag; Baddeley, Lisa

    2012-12-03

    A prototype auroral hyperspectral all-sky camera has been constructed and tested. It uses electro-optical tunable filters to image the night sky as a function of wavelength throughout the visible spectrum with no moving mechanical parts. The core optical system includes a new high power all-sky lens with F-number equal to f/1.1. The camera has been tested at the Kjell Henriksen Observatory (KHO) during the auroral season of 2011/2012. It detects all sub classes of aurora above ~½ of the sub visual 1kR green intensity threshold at an exposure time of only one second. Supervised classification of the hyperspectral data shows promise as a new method to process and identify auroral forms.

  6. Launch window definition for sky target experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, N. H.

    1973-01-01

    This paper is a brief report on the computer program developed for the Extraterrestrial Physics Barium Ion Cloud (BIC) Project. The mathematical analysis developed for the program along with its programing characteristics are pointed out to show that this program is adaptable to similar sky target projects. Definite viewing constraints are specified so that the chosen ground tracking stations can photograph the behavior of the sky target after its release. Viewing factors include the illumination of the target by the sun, the relative elevation look angle to the target from each tracking station, the solar and lunar depression angles at each tracking station, and the total sky background brightness of the target relative to each tracking station. Numeric values are assigned to each factor through program input. The program output is flexible so that the results of the window calculations can be studied to the depth required.

  7. Calibration of an all-sky camera for obtaining sky radiance at three wavelengths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Román

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to obtain spectral sky radiances, at three wavelengths (464, 534 and 626 nm, from hemispherical sky images. Images are registered with the All-Sky Imager installed at the Andalusian Center for Environmental Research (CEAMA in Granada (Spain. The methodology followed in this work for the absolute calibration in radiance of this instrument is based on the comparison of its output measurements with modelled sky radiances derived from the LibRadtran/UVSPEC radiative transfer code under cloud-free conditions. Previously, in order to check the goodness of the simulated radiances, these are compared with experimental values recorded by a CIMEL sunphotometer. In general, modelled radiances are in agreement with experimental data, showing mean differences lower than 20% except for the pixels located next to the Sun position that show larger errors.

    The relationship between the output signal of the All-Sky Imager and the modelled sky radiances provides a calibration matrix for each image. The variability of the matrix coefficients is analyzed, showing no significant changes along a period of 5 months. Therefore, a unique calibration matrix per channel is obtained for all selected images (a total of 705 images per channel. Camera radiances are compared with CIMEL radiances, finding mean absolute differences between 2% and 15% except for pixels near to the Sun and high scattering angles. We apply these calibration matrices to three images in order to study the sky radiance distributions for three different sky conditions: cloudless, overcast and partially cloudy. Horizon brightening under cloudless conditions has been observed together with the enhancement effect of individual clouds on sky radiance.

  8. Go-To Telescopes Under Suburban Skies

    CERN Document Server

    Monks, Neale

    2010-01-01

    For the last four centuries stargazers have turned their telescopes to the night skies to look at its wonders, but only in this age of computers has it become possible to let the telescope find for you the object you are looking for! So-called “go-to” telescopes are programmed with the locations of thousands of objects, including dazzling distant Suns, stunning neighboring galaxies, globular and open star clusters, the remnants of past supernovae, and many other breathtaking sights. This book does not tell you how to use your Go-to telescope. Your manual will help you do that. It tells you what to look for in the deep sky and why, and what equipment to best see it with. Organized broadly by what is best for viewing in the northern hemisphere in different seasons, Monks further divides the sights of each season into groupings such as “Showpiece Objects,” “Interesting Deep Sky Objects,” and “Obscure and Challenging Deep Sky Objects.” He also tells what objects are visible even in light-polluted ...

  9. Kinesthetic Astronomy: The Sky Time Lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Cherilynn A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a lesson in which students perform simple body movements in order to gain insight into the relationship between time and the astronomical motions of the earth, and how these motions influence what we see in the sky at various times of the day and year. (WRM)

  10. Sirius brightest diamond in the night sky

    CERN Document Server

    Holberg, Jay B

    2007-01-01

    This book describes why Sirius has been regarded as an important fixture of the night sky since the beginnings of history. It also examines the part that Sirius has played in how we came to achieve our current scientific understanding of stars.

  11. The hunt for 100% sky coverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimon, Serge; Fusco, Thierry; Clenet, Yann; Conan, Jean-Marc; Assémat, François; Michau, Vincent

    2010-07-01

    Tomographic AO (or Wide Field AO) systems use LGS to build a 3D model of turbulence, but rely on NGS for low order sensing. .To preserve reasonable sky coverage, each photon coming from the NGS to sense Tip Tilt has to be optimally exploited. That means a smart control law, a low detection noise, a concentration of the photons onto a small patch and a wave front sensor concept with favorable noise propagation. In this paper, we describe the system choices that were made during the E-ELT laser tomographic system ATLAS phase A study, in order to get a sky coverage as close as possible to 100%. A correct estimation of the sky coverage is therefore a key issue. We have developped a sky coverage estimation strategy based on a Besaņcon model starfield generation, a star(s) selection tool, and a careful estimation of the residual anisoplanatism (after reconstruction process between the NGSs), noise and temporal contributors. We describe the details of the procedure, and derive the ATLAS expected performance.

  12. Spectral karyotyping (SKY) in hematological neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Birgitte S.; Pedersen, Rikke K.; Kerndrup, Gitte B.

    2001-07-01

    From November 1, 1997 till November 1, 2000 we have investigated 204 cases of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (nequals95), acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) (nequals40), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (nequals11), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (nequals9), chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) (nequals4) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) (nequals45) cytogenetically, using G-band analysis and spectral karyotyping (SKY). By SKY we were able to detect the abnormal clones in all cases but 9. In the G-band preparations these cases showed very few abnormal mitoses. The SKY either extended or confirmed the G-band findings in 94% of those with an abnormal karyotype. Cryptic translocations (translocations not suspected from the G-band karyotype) were found in 71 cases (26 AML, 9 ALL, 5 MDS, 2 CLL and 29 NHL). We find SKY a powerful adjuvant diagnostic tool that does not compromise one of the advantages of karyotyping techniques, the analysis of the entire genome which, in contrast to molecular biological techniques, still leave the possibility to get mroe answers than questions posed.

  13. Observing and drawing the deep sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S.

    2004-02-01

    Despite advances in photographic emulsions and the rapid evolution of CCD cameras, drawing is still a valid and enjoyable method of recording the appearance of deep-sky objects. It is cheap, simple and most importantly, you do not have to be a great artist to make a permanent record of what you observe.

  14. Why Is the Sky Dark at Night?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinner, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The puzzle as to just why the sky is dark at night, given that there are so many stars, has been around at least since Newton. This article summarizes six cosmological models that have been used to attempt to give an account of this puzzle including the Copernican universe, the Newton-Halley universe, the nineteenth century "one galaxy"…

  15. Validation of spectral sky radiance derived from all-sky camera images -- a case study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tohsing, K; Schrempf, M; Riechelmann, S; Seckmeyer, G

    2014-01-01

    .... The HSI consists of a commercial compact CCD (charge coupled device) camera equipped with a fish-eye lens and provides hemispherical sky images in three reference bands such as red, green and blue...

  16. Gamma-sky.net: Portal to the gamma-ray sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voruganti, Arjun; Deil, Christoph; Donath, Axel; King, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    http://gamma-sky.net is a novel interactive website designed for exploring the gamma-ray sky. The Map View portion of the site is powered by the Aladin Lite sky atlas, providing a scalable survey image tesselated onto a three-dimensional sphere. The map allows for interactive pan and zoom navigation as well as search queries by sky position or object name. The default image overlay shows the gamma-ray sky observed by the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray space telescope. Other survey images (e.g. Planck microwave images in low/high frequency bands, ROSAT X-ray image) are available for comparison with the gamma-ray data. Sources from major gamma-ray source catalogs of interest (Fermi-LAT 2FHL, 3FGL and a TeV source catalog) are overlaid over the sky map as markers. Clicking on a given source shows basic information in a popup, and detailed pages for every source are available via the Catalog View component of the website, including information such as source classification, spectrum and light-curve plots, and literature references. We intend for gamma-sky.net to be applicable for both professional astronomers as well as the general public. The website started in early June 2016 and is being developed as an open-source, open data project on GitHub (https://github.com/gammapy/gamma-sky). We plan to extend it to display more gamma-ray and multi-wavelength data. Feedback and contributions are very welcome!

  17. Shifting skies: a studio investigation into representations of the sky, atmosphere and weather

    OpenAIRE

    Henriksen, Kari

    2017-01-01

    This project investigates representations of the sky, atmosphere and weather in Western art in order to ascertain the effectiveness of the metaphorical use of atmosphere to convey notions of loss and transience. The exegesis examines the historical representation and meaning of the sky and atmospheric phenomena in Western visual art. This includes a critique of Romanticism and the philosophies of the Sublime. The research explores the conceptual underpinnings of the visual depiction of the...

  18. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer’s Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Yuan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1 transgenic (Tg mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr. Morris water maze (MWM was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD. By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD. Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer’s cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  19. Age- and Brain Region-Specific Changes of Glucose Metabolic Disorder, Learning, and Memory Dysfunction in Early Alzheimer's Disease Assessed in APP/PS1 Transgenic Mice Using 18F-FDG-PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xue-Yuan; Men, Wei-Wei; Zhu, Hua; Lei, Jian-Feng; Zuo, Fu-Xing; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Zhu, Zhao-Hui; Bao, Xin-Jie; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2016-10-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of dementia worldwide, associated with cognitive deficits and brain glucose metabolic alteration. However, the associations of glucose metabolic changes with cognitive dysfunction are less detailed. Here, we examined the brains of APP/presenilin 1 (PS1) transgenic (Tg) mice aged 2, 3.5, 5 and 8 months using 18F-labed fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) microPET to assess age- and brain region-specific changes of glucose metabolism. FDG uptake was calculated as a relative standardized uptake value (SUVr). Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate learning and memory dysfunction. We showed a glucose utilization increase in multiple brain regions of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but not at 5 and 8 months. Comparisons of SUVrs within brains showed higher glucose utilization than controls in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of Tg mice at 2 and 3.5 months but in the thalamus and striatum at 3.5, 5 and 8 months. By comparing SUVrs in the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus, Tg mice were distinguished from controls at 2 and 3.5 months. In MWM, Tg mice aged 2 months shared a similar performance to the controls (prodromal-AD). By contrast, Tg mice failed training tests at 3.5 months but failed all MWM tests at 5 and 8 months, suggestive of partial or complete cognitive deficits (symptomatic-AD). Correlation analyses showed that hippocampal SUVrs were significantly correlated with MWM parameters in the symptomatic-AD stage. These data suggest that glucose metabolic disorder occurs before onset of AD signs in APP/PS1 mice with the entorhinal cortex and hippocampus affected first, and that regional FDG uptake increase can be an early biomarker for AD. Furthermore, hippocampal FDG uptake is a possible indicator for progression of Alzheimer's cognition after cognitive decline, at least in animals.

  20. Study of the K{sub s} decay: K{sub s} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} in the NA48 experiment at CERN; Etude de la desintegration K{sub s} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} aupres de l'experience NA48 du CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gouge, G

    2003-09-01

    The study of the K{sub S} decay to three neutral pions in the NA48 experiment at CERN is presented in this thesis. This decay, which is a signature of CP violation, would yield a non-zero value of the {eta}{sub 000} parameter. The measurement of this quantity, from data samples collected by the NA48 experiment in 2000, relies on the parametrisation by {eta}{sub 000} of the K{sub S}/K{sub L} interference in the 3{pi}{sup 0} decay. The measurement is Re({eta}{sub 000}) = (-2.2 {+-} 1.O{sub stat.} {+-} 1.0{sub syst.}) X 10{sup -2} Im({eta}{sub 000}) (-3.0 {+-} 1.O{sub stat.} {+-} 1.4{sub syst.}) X 10-2 with a limit on the branching fraction of the K{sub S} {yields} 3{pi}{sup 0} mode of 1.1 X 10{sup -6} with a 90 % confidence level. The precision of the measurement does not show an evidence for the observation of CP violation. Assuming CPT invariance, which states Re ({eta}{sub 000}) = Re ({epsilon}) = 1.6 X 10{sup -3}, the imaginary part of {eta}{sub 000} becomes Im({eta}{sub 000}){sub CPT} = (-1.1 {+-} 0.7{sub stat.} {+-} 0.55{sub syst.}) x 10{sup -2} with a limit on the branching fraction of 1.9 X 10{sup -7}. Besides, the {eta}{sub 000} parameter is the main contributor to the uncertainty of the CPT violating parameter Im({delta}), through the Bell-Steinberger unitarity constraint. The new measurement of {eta}{sub 000} allows to gain a factor 3 on this uncertainty, and the calculated value of this parameter becomes Im({delta}) = (0.6 {+-} 1.5) X 10{sup -5}, which does not show any sign of CPT violation, and allows a new constraint on the mass difference between the K{sup 0} and K'{sup 0} states of 3.6 X 10{sup -19} GeV, with a 90 % confidence level. (author)

  1. Light pollution: Assessment of sky glow on two dark sky regions of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Raul Cerveira; Pinto da Cunha, José; Peixinho, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Artificial light at night (ALAN), producing light pollution (LP), is not a matter restricted to astronomy anymore. Light is part of modern societies and, as a consequence, the natural cycle day-night (bright-dark) has been interrupted in a large segment of the global population. There is increasing evidence that exposure to certain types of light at night and beyond threshold levels may produce hazardous effects to humans and the environment. The concept of "dark skies reserves" is a step forward in order to preserve the night sky and a means of enhancing public awareness of the problem of spread of light pollution worldwide. The aim of this study was to assess the skyglow at two sites in Portugal, the Peneda-Gerês National Park (PNPG) and the region now known as Dark Sky Alqueva Reserve. The latter site was classified as a "Starlight Tourism Destination" by the Starlight Foundation (the first in the world to achieve this classification) following a series of night sky measurements in situ described herein. The measurements at PNPG also contributed to the new set of regulations concerning light pollution at this national park. This study presents the first in situ systematic measurements of night sky brightness, showing that at the two sites the skies are mostly in levels 3 to 4 of the Bortle 9-level scale (with level 1 being the best achievable). The results indicate that the sources of light pollution and skyglow can be attributed predominantly to contamination from nearby urban regions.

  2. SkyNet: Modular nuclear reaction network library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2017-10-01

    The general-purpose nuclear reaction network SkyNet evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. Any list of isotopes can be evolved and SkyNet supports various different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular, permitting new or existing physics, such as nuclear reactions or equations of state, to be easily added or modified.

  3. A photometric model for predicting the sky glow of greenhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alferdinck, J.W.A.M.; Janssen, E.G.O.N.; Zonneveldt, L.; Ruigrok, J.

    2006-01-01

    many greenhouses use artificial light to grow plants. Part of this light escapes, scatters in the sky and causes sky glow. Residents in the vicinity complain about the absence of natural darkness. A light scatter model is developed in order to quantify the dose of the sky glow. The luminance of the

  4. Integral cross sections for the direct excitation of the A 3 (sigma) u +, B 3 (pi) g, W 3 (delta) u, B' 3 (sigma) u -, a' 1 (sigma) u -, a 1 (pi) g, w 1 (delta) u, and C 3 (pi) u electronic states in

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. V.; Malone, C. P.; Kanik, I.

    2005-01-01

    Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation out of the ground state (X 1(sigma)g +) to the A 3(sigma)u +, B 3(pi)g, W 3(delta)u, B' 3(sigma)u -, a' 1(sigma)u -, a 1(pi)g, w 1(delta)u, and states in N2 are reported at incident energies ranging between 10 and 100 eV. These data have been derived by integrating differential cross sections previously reported by this group. New differential cross section measurements for the a 1(pi)g state at 200 eV are also presented to extend the range of the reported integral cross sections for this state, which is responsible for the emissions of the Lyman-Birge-Hopfield band system (a 1(pi)g (rightwards arrow) X 1(sigma)g +). The present results are compared and critically evaluated against existing cross sec In general, the present cross sections are smaller than previous results at low impact energies from threshold through the excitation function peak regions. These lower cross sections have potentially significant implications on our understanding of UV emissions in the atmospheres of Earth and Titan.

  5. Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick

    On a clear, starry night, the jewelled beauty and unimaginable immensity of our Universe is awe-inspiring. Star-gazing with binoculars is rewarding and may begin a lifelong hobby! Patrick Moore has painstakingly researched Exploring the Night Sky with Binoculars to describe how to use binoculars for astronomical observation. He explains basic astronomy and the selection of binoculars, then discusses the stars, clusters, nebulae and galaxies that await the observer. The sky seen from northern and southern hemispheres is charted season by season, with detailed maps of all the constellations. The reader can also observe the Sun, Moon, planets, comets and meteors. With many beautiful illustrations, this handbook will be helpful and encouraging to casual observers and those cultivating a more serious interest. The enjoyment of amateur astronomy is now available to everybody.

  6. Tropospheric haze and colors of the clear daytime sky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond L

    2015-02-01

    To casual observers, haze's visible effects on clear daytime skies may seem mundane: significant scattering by tropospheric aerosols visibly (1) reduces the luminance contrast of distant objects and (2) desaturates sky blueness. However, few published measurements of hazy-sky spectra and chromaticities exist to compare with these naked-eye observations. Hyperspectral imaging along sky meridians of clear and hazy skies at one inland and two coastal sites shows that they have characteristic colorimetric signatures of scattering and absorption by haze aerosols. In addition, a simple spectral transfer function and a second-order scattering model of skylight reveal the net spectral and colorimetric effects of haze.

  7. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  8. Cosmology with all-sky surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2016-06-01

    Various aspects of cosmology require comprehensive all-sky mapping of the cosmic web to considerable depths. In order to probe the whole extragalactic sky beyond 100 Mpc, one must draw on multiwavelength datasets and state-of-the-art photometric redshift techniques. Here I summarize our dedicated program that employs the largest photometric all-sky surveys - 2MASS, WISE and SuperCOSMOS - to obtain accurate redshift estimates of millions of galaxies. The first outcome of these efforts - the 2MASS Photometric Redshift catalog (2MPZ) - was publicly released in 2013 and includes almost 1 million galaxies with a median redshift of z˜0.1. I discuss how this catalog was constructed and how it is being used for various cosmological tests. I also present how combining the WISE mid-infrared survey with SuperCOSMOS optical data allowed us to push to depths over 1 Gpc on unprecedented angular scales. These photometric redshift samples, with about 20 million sources in total, provide access to volumes large enough to study observationally the Copernican Principle of universal homogeneity and isotropy, as well as to probe various aspects of dark energy and dark matter through cross-correlations with other data such as the cosmic microwave or gamma-ray backgrounds. Last but not least, they constitute a test-bed for forthcoming wide-angle multi-million galaxy samples expected from such instruments as the SKA, Euclid, or LSST.

  9. Optical Sky Brightness at Dome C, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, S.; Storey, J. W. V.; Burton, M. G.

    2006-08-01

    Dome C, Antarctica is a prime site for astronomical observations in terms of climate, wind speeds and turbulence. The infrared and terahertz sky backgrounds are the lowest of any inhabited place on Earth. However, at present little is known about the optical sky brightness and atmospheric extinction. Using a variety of modelling techniques together with data from the South Pole, we estimate the brightness of the night sky including the contributions from scattered sunlight, moonlight, aurorae, airglow, zodiacal light and artificial sources. We compare our results to another prime astronomical site, Mauna Kea. We find moonlight has significantly less effect at Dome C than at Mauna Kea. Aurorae are expected to have a minor impact at both sites, and zodiacal light is expected to be less at Dome C than at Mauna Kea. Airglow emissions at Dome C are expected to be similar to those at temperate sites. With proper planning, artificial sources of light pollution should be non-existent. The overall atmospheric extinction, or opacity, is expected to be the minimum possible. We conclude that Dome C is a very promising site not only for infrared and terahertz astronomy, but for optical astronomy as well..

  10. A Satellite-Based Sky Luminance Model for the Tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serm Janjai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a sky luminance model for the tropics. The model is mathematically expressed as a multiplication of two functions. These are φ, which is a function of the zenith angle of a sky element and solar zenith angle, and f, which is a function of the angle between the sky element and the sun. To obtain the analytical forms of these functions, the sky luminance data collected at Nakhon Pathom (13.82°N, 100.04°E, Thailand, during a four-year period were analyzed. Additionally, satellite-derived cloud index at the position of the sky luminance measurements during the same period was estimated. Based on values of the cloud index, the skies were classified into 10 types, from clear to overcast skies. By using appropriate grouping and mathematical operation of the sky luminance data, the values of the two functions were obtained and then fitted with empirical equations. The multiplication of these equations gives the final form of the sky luminance model. To validate the model, it was used to calculate the relative sky luminance at other three sites in the tropics. It was found that values of relative sky luminance calculated from the model and those obtained from the measurements were in reasonable agreement.

  11. Spatial Model of Sky Brightness Magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzuan Tahar, Mohammad; Kamarudin, Farahana; Umar, Roslan; Khairul Amri Kamarudin, Mohd; Sabri, Nor Hazmin; Ahmad, Karzaman; Rahim, Sobri Abdul; Sharul Aikal Baharim, Mohd

    2017-03-01

    Sky brightness is an essential topic in the field of astronomy, especially for optical astronomical observations that need very clear and dark sky conditions. This study presents the spatial model of sky brightness magnitude in Langkawi Island, Malaysia. Two types of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) manufactured by Unihedron are used to measure the sky brightness on a moonless night (or when the Moon is below the horizon), when the sky is cloudless and the locations are at least 100 m from the nearest light source. The selected locations are marked by their GPS coordinates. The sky brightness data obtained in this study were interpolated and analyzed using a Geographic Information System (GIS), thus producing a spatial model of sky brightness that clearly shows the dark and bright sky areas in Langkawi Island. Surprisingly, our results show the existence of a few dark sites nearby areas of high human activity. The sky brightness of 21.45 mag arcsec{}-2 in the Johnson-Cousins V-band, as the average of sky brightness equivalent to 2.8 × {10}-4{cd} {{{m}}}-2 over the entire island, is an indication that the island is, overall, still relatively dark. However, the amount of development taking place might reduce the number in the near future as the island is famous as a holiday destination.

  12. The interactive sky: a browsable allsky image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, Gonzalo; Da Rosa, Fernando; Roland, Santiago; Almenares, Luciano; Gomez, Fernando

    2015-08-01

    We are conducting a project to make available panoramas of the night sky of the southern hemisphere, based on a mosaic of hundred of photographs. Each allsky panorama is a giant image composed by hundreds of high-resolution photos taken in the course of one night. The panoramas are accessible with a web-browser and the public is able to zoom on them and to see the sky with better quality than the naked eye. We are preparing 4 sets of panoramas corresponding to the four seasons.The individual images are taken with a 16 Mpixels DLSR camera with a 50 mm lens mounted on a Gigapan EPIC robotic camera mounts. These devices and a autoguiding telescope are mounted in a equatorial telescope mount, which allows us to have exposure of several tens seconds. The images are then processed and stitched to create the gigantic panorama, with typical weight of several GBytes.The limiting magnitude is V~8. The panoramas include more than 50 times more stars those detected with the naked eye.In addition to the allsky panoramas, we embedded higher resolution images of specific regions of interest such as: emission nebulae and dark, open and globular clusters and galaxies; which can be zoomed.The photographs have been acquiring since December 2014 in a dark place with low light pollution in the countryside of Uruguay; which allows us to achieve deep sky objects.These panoramas will be available on a website and can be accessed with any browser.This tool will be available for teaching purposes, astronomy popularization or introductory research. Teacher guides will be developed for educational activities at different educational levels.While there are similar projects like Google Sky, the methodology used to generate the giant panoramas allows a much more realistic view, with a background of continuous sky without sharp edges. Furthermore, while the planetarium software is based on drawings of the stars, our panoramas are based on real images.This is the first project with these

  13. Future Sky Surveys: New Discovery Frontiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, J. Anthony; Borne, Kirk D.

    2012-03-01

    Driven by the availability of new instrumentation, there has been an evolution in astronomical science toward comprehensive investigations of new phenomena. Major advances in our understanding of the Universe over the history of astronomy have often arisen from dramatic improvements in our capability to observe the sky to greater depth, in previously unexplored wavebands, with higher precision, or with improved spatial, spectral, or temporal resolution. Substantial progress in the important scientific problems of the next decade (determining the nature of dark energy and dark matter, studying the evolution of galaxies and the structure of our own Milky Way, opening up the time domain to discover faint variable objects, and mapping both the inner and outer Solar System) can be achieved through the application of advanced data mining methods and machine learning algorithms operating on the numerous large astronomical databases that will be generated from a variety of revolutionary future sky surveys. Over the next decade, astronomy will irrevocably enter the era of big surveys and of really big telescopes. New sky surveys (some of which will produce petabyte-scale data collections) will begin their operations, and one or more very large telescopes (ELTs = Extremely Large Telescopes) will enter the construction phase. These programs and facilities will generate a remarkable wealth of data of high complexity, endowed with enormous scientific knowledge discovery potential. New parameter spaces will be opened, in multiple wavelength domains as well as the time domain, across wide areas of the sky, and down to unprecedented faint source flux limits. The synergies of grand facilities, massive data collections, and advanced machine learning algorithms will come together to enable discoveries within most areas of astronomical science, including Solar System, exo-planets, star formation, stellar populations, stellar death, galaxy assembly, galaxy evolution, quasar evolution

  14. Teach and Touch the Earth and Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florina Tendea, Camelia

    2017-04-01

    My name is Camelia Florina Tendea. I am primary school teacher at "Horea, Closca and Crisan" Secondary School, in Brad, a town in the west side of Transylvania. I am permanently interested to develop my knowledge and teaching skills about space sciences (Earth and Sky) because the new generations of students are very well informed and couriouse about these topics. In this context the teachers must be prepared to deal with such requests in school. Introducing of activity: For a primary school teacher is a real challenge teaching about Earth and Sky, so I consider that a collaboration with science teachers, engineers and other specialists in the sciences is absolutely essential and beneficial in the educational design. In my opinion, the contents about Earth ans Sky-Space in a single word- are very attractive for students and they are a permanent source of discoveries and provide a multidisciplinary vision, so required in the education. Possible contents to teach in primary school: about Earth: -Terra -the third Planet from the Sun; How Earth spins; Land and water; The Earth seen from space, Trip between Earth and Moon,Weather Phenomena; the Poles; about Sky: Solar System, Asteroids, Comets, Meteorites; Rosetta Mission or rendez-vous with a comet; Sun.Moon. Earth. Eclipse;Light Pollution and protection of the night sky; Life in Space. Astronauts and experiences; Mission X:- Train Like an Astronaut;About ISS. For teachers it is important to know from the beginning how they teach, a viable support is the teaching of STEM subjects, which provides access to careers in astronomy, science/technology space. We could teach about earth and sky using different kinds of experiments, simulations, hands-on activities, competitions, exhibitions, video presentations. Competences developed in primary school through these contents: Comunication, individual studying, understanding and valorisation of scientific information, relating to the natural environment. In addition, they are

  15. VLITE Surveys the Sky: A 340 MHz Companion to the VLA Sky Survey (VLASS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Wendy; Clarke, Tracy; Brisken, Walter; Cotton, William; Richards, Emily E.; Giacintucci, Simona; Kassim, Namir

    2018-01-01

    The VLA Low Band Ionosphere and Transient Experiment (VLITE; ) is a commensal observing system on the Karl G. Janksy Very Large Array (VLA) which was developed by the Naval Research Laboratory and NRAO. A 64 MHz sub-band from the prime focus 240-470 MHz dipoles is correlated during nearly all regular VLA observations. VLITE uses dedicated samplers and fibers, as well as a custom designed, real-time DiFX software correlator, and requires no additional resources from the VLA system running the primary science program. The experiment has been operating since November 2014 with 10 antennas; a recent expansion in summer 2017 increased that number to 16 and more than doubled the number of baselines.The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS; https://science.nrao.edu/science/surveys/vlass >), is an ongoing survey of the entire sky visible to the VLA at a frequency of 2-4 GHz. The observations are made using an "on-the-fly" (OTF) continuous RA scanning technique which fills in the sky by observing along rows of constant declination. VLITE breaks the data into 2-second integrations and correlates these at a central position every 1.5 degrees. All data for each correlator position is imaged separately, corrected and weighted by an appropriately elongated primary beam model, and then combined in the image plane to create a mosaic of the sky. A catalog of the sources is extracted to provide a 340 MHz sky model.We present preliminary images and catalogs from the 2017 VLASS observations which began in early September, 2017, and continued on a nearly daily basis throughout the fall. In addition to providing a unique sky model at 340 MHz, these data complement VLASS by providing spectral indices for all cataloged sources.

  16. [Electroacupuncture Intervention Inhibits the Decline of Learning-memory Ability and Overex- pression of Cleaved Caspase-3 and Bax in Hippocampus Induced by Isoflurane in APPswe/PS 1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang-yu; Xu, Le; Liu, Chui-liang; Huang, Li-sha; Zhu, Xiao-ying

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the protection mechanism of electroacupuncture (EA) therapy against Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like neurotoxicity induced by Isoflurane. Twenty-four APPswe/PS 1 dE9 double transgenic mice (one of the most extensively used transgenic mouse model of AD) and 24 littermate wild-type mice were randomly assigned into control (Con) group, isoflurane (Iso) group and EA group, respectively (n = 8 in each group). EA (2 Hz/100 Hz, 1 mA) was applied to "Baihui" (GV 20) and "Yongquan" (KI 1) for 15 min, once a day for 3 days. The transgenic mice were exposed to a closed box filled with 1.2% isoflurane + 30% O2 +70% N2 for 4 h. The animals' learning-memory ability was detected by Morris water maze test. The expression of cleaved Caspase-3 in the CA 1 area of hippocampus was detected by immunohistochemistry, and that of hippocampal Bcl-2 and Bax proteins detected by Western blot. Compared with the wilde-type mice, the average escape latency of place navigation test was significantly longer, while the percentage of target-quadrant stay time and the target- platform crossing times of spacial probe test were marked decreased in AD + lso mice (P 0.05). EA intervention can improve the learning-memory ability in AD + Isoflurane mice, suggesting a reduction of AD-like neurotoxicity, which may be associated with its actions in inhibiting the overexpression of activated Caspase-3 and Bax proteins in the hippocampus.

  17. Effect of the herbal formulation Shen-Zhi-Ling on an APP/PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease by modulating the biliverdin reductase/heme oxygenase 1 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Sanli; Shen, Dingzhu; Chen, Chuan; Wu, Beiling; Chi, Huiying

    2017-09-01

    Shen-Zhi-Ling (SZL) oral liquid is a traditional Chinese medicine formula that is mainly used for the clinical treatment of mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects and underlying mechanisms of SZL treatment on AD. APP/PS1 transgenic mice were utilized to evaluate the effect of SZL treatment (0.5 g/20 g/day). Morris water maze and Thioflavin S staining analyses were used to evaluate the cognitive impairment and β-amyloid plaques, respectively, while quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were performed to examine the mRNA and protein expression levels of heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and biliverdin reductase (BVR). Furthermore, immunofluorescence staining was used to measure the BVR and HO-1 protein levels in the hippocampus. The findings of the current study demonstrated that SZL treatment was able to ameliorate the impairment of memory and reduce the accumulation of amyloid plaques, and its ameliorating effects may be attributed to the modulation of the HO-1/BVR system in the hippocampus. These results indicate that SZL may be a possible complementary and alternative therapy to delay the development of AD.

  18. AAV1/2-mediated CNS gene delivery of dominant-negative CCL2 mutant suppresses gliosis, beta-amyloidosis, and learning impairment of APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Masaru; Schroder, Bryce; Jacobsen, Michael T; Swan, Russell J; Lambert, Mary P; Klein, William L; Gendelman, Howard E; Ransohoff, Richard M; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2009-05-01

    Accumulation of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta) peptide was studied as an initial step for Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Following amyloid plaque formation, reactive microglia and astrocytes accumulate around plaques and cause neuroinflammation. Here brain chemokines play a major role for the glial accumulation. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of chemokine CCL2 in the brain results in increased microglial accumulation and diffuse amyloid plaque deposition in a transgenic mouse model of AD expressing Swedish amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutant. Here, we report that adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 1 and 2 hybrid efficiently deliver 7ND gene, a dominant-negative CCL2 mutant, in a dose-response manner and express >1,000-fold higher recombinant CCL2 than basal levels after a single administration. AAV1/2 hybrid virus principally infected neurons without neuroinflammation with sustained expression for 6-months. 7ND expressed in APP/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) bigenic mice reduced astro/microgliosis, beta-amyloidosis, including suppression of both fibrillar and oligomer Abeta accumulation, and improved spatial learning. Our data support the idea that the AAV1/2 system is a useful tool for CNS gene delivery, and suppression of CCL2 may be a therapeutic target for the amelioration of AD-related neuroinflammation.

  19. AAV1/2-mediated CNS Gene Delivery of Dominant-negative CCL2 Mutant Suppresses Gliosis, β-amyloidosis, and Learning Impairment of APP/PS1 Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Tomomi; Yamamoto, Masaru; Schroder, Bryce; Jacobsen, Michael T; Swan, Russell J; Lambert, Mary P; Klein, William L; Gendelman, Howard E; Ransohoff, Richard M; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of aggregated amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide was studied as an initial step for Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Following amyloid plaque formation, reactive microglia and astrocytes accumulate around plaques and cause neuroinflammation. Here brain chemokines play a major role for the glial accumulation. We have previously shown that transgenic overexpression of chemokine CCL2 in the brain results in increased microglial accumulation and diffuse amyloid plaque deposition in a transgenic mouse model of AD expressing Swedish amyloid precursor protein (APP) mutant. Here, we report that adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotype 1 and 2 hybrid efficiently deliver 7ND gene, a dominant-negative CCL2 mutant, in a dose–response manner and express >1,000-fold higher recombinant CCL2 than basal levels after a single administration. AAV1/2 hybrid virus principally infected neurons without neuroinflammation with sustained expression for 6-months. 7ND expressed in APP/presenilin-1 (APP/PS1) bigenic mice reduced astro/microgliosis, β-amyloidosis, including suppression of both fibrillar and oligomer Aβ accumulation, and improved spatial learning. Our data support the idea that the AAV1/2 system is a useful tool for CNS gene delivery, and suppression of CCL2 may be a therapeutic target for the amelioration of AD-related neuroinflammation. PMID:19277012

  20. The fast transient sky with Gaia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wevers, Thomas; Jonker, Peter G.; Hodgkin, Simon T.; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Harrison, Diana L.; Rixon, Guy; Nelemans, Gijs; Roelens, Maroussia; Eyer, Laurent; van Leeuwen, Floor; Yoldas, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    The ESA Gaia satellite scans the whole sky with a temporal sampling ranging from seconds and hours to months. Each time a source passes within the Gaia field of view, it moves over 10 charge coupled devices (CCDs) in 45 s and a light curve with 4.5 s sampling (the crossing time per CCD) is registered. Given that the 4.5 s sampling represents a virtually unexplored parameter space in optical time domain astronomy, this data set potentially provides a unique opportunity to open up the fast transient sky. We present a method to start mining the wealth of information in the per CCD Gaia data. We perform extensive data filtering to eliminate known onboard and data processing artefacts, and present a statistical method to identify sources that show transient brightness variations on ≲2 h time-scales. We illustrate that by using the Gaia photometric CCD measurements, we can detect transient brightness variations down to an amplitude of 0.3 mag on time-scales ranging from 15 s to several hours. We search an area of ∼23.5 deg2 on the sky and find four strong candidate fast transients. Two candidates are tentatively classified as flares on M-dwarf stars, while one is probably a flare on a giant star and one potentially a flare on a solar-type star. These classifications are based on archival data and the time-scales involved. We argue that the method presented here can be added to the existing Gaia Science Alerts infrastructure for the near real-time public dissemination of fast transient events.

  1. Sloan Digital Sky Survey Photometric Calibration Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marriner, John; /Fermilab

    2012-06-29

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey calibration is revisited to obtain the most accurate photometric calibration. A small but significant error is found in the flat-fielding of the Photometric telescope used for calibration. Two SDSS star catalogs are compared and the average difference in magnitude as a function of right ascension and declination exhibits small systematic errors in relative calibration. The photometric transformation from the SDSS Photometric Telescope to the 2.5 m telescope is recomputed and compared to synthetic magnitudes computed from measured filter bandpasses.

  2. The stargazer's guide to the night sky

    CERN Document Server

    Lisle, Jason, Dr

    2012-01-01

    Explore the night sky, identify stars, constellations, and even planets. Stargaze with a telescope, binoculars, or even your naked eye. Allow Dr. Jason Lisle, a research scientist with a masters and PhD in astrophysics, to guide you in examining the beauty of God's Creation with 150 full color star-charts. Learn the best ways and optimal times to observe planets and stars with easy to use illustrations. Create or expand the hobby of stargazing; an outdoor, educational hobby to enjoy with friends or family.

  3. Colors of the daytime overcast sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond L., Jr.; Hernández-Andrés, Javier

    2005-09-01

    Time-series measurements of daylight (skylight plus direct sunlight) spectra beneath overcast skies reveal an unexpectedly wide gamut of pastel colors. Analyses of these spectra indicate that at visible wavelengths, overcasts are far from spectrally neutral transmitters of the daylight incident on their tops. Colorimetric analyses show that overcasts make daylight bluer and that the amount of bluing increases with cloud optical depth. Simulations using the radiative-transfer model MODTRAN4 help explain the observed bluing: multiple scattering within optically thick clouds greatly enhances spectrally selective absorption by water droplets. However, other factors affecting overcast colors seen from below range from minimal (cloud-top heights) to moot (surface colors).

  4. Vanilla Sky – El cuento del narcisista

    OpenAIRE

    Graham St. John STOTT

    2016-01-01

    Vanilla Sky (2001), de Cameron Crowe, normalmente se aprecia como un juego intelectual; no obstante, su temática es mucho más oscura que lo que dicha etiqueta podría sugerir. Mientras recorre las diferentes fases del sueño de David Aames (un sueño en el que se mueve de una pretensión de amor a una de homicidio), nos damos cuenta de que David padece un trastorno de la autoestima. Utilizando como referencia Atracción Fatal (1987), de Adrian Lyne, para demostrar la incapacidad de tener en cuenta...

  5. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectral Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; SPHEREx Science Team

    2018-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Medium Explorer (MIDEX) program that was selected for Phase A in August 2017, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division, with a single instrument, a wide-field spectral imager. SPHEREx will probe the physics of inflation by measuring non-Gaussianity by studying large-scale structure, surveying a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-z surveys optimized to constrain dark energy. The origin of water and biogenic molecules will be investigated in all phases of planetary system formation - from molecular clouds to young stellar systems with protoplanetary disks - by measuring ice absorption spectra. We will chart the origin and history of galaxy formation through a deep survey mapping large-scale spatial power in two deep fields located near the ecliptic poles. Following in the tradition of all-sky missions such as IRAS, COBE and WISE, SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey. SPHEREx will create spectra (0.75 – 4.2 um at R = 41; and 4.2 – 5 um at R = 135) with high sensitivity making background-limited observations using a passively-cooled telescope with a wide field-of-view for large mapping speed. During its two-year mission, SPHEREx will produce four complete all-sky maps that will serve as a rich archive for the astronomy community. With over a billion detected galaxies, hundreds of millions of high-quality stellar and galactic spectra, and over a million ice absorption spectra, the archive will enable diverse scientific investigations including studies of young stellar systems, brown dwarfs, high-redshift quasars, galaxy clusters, the interstellar medium, asteroids and comets. All aspects of the instrument and spacecraft have high heritage. SPHEREx requires no new technologies and carries large technical and resource margins on every aspect of the design. SPHEREx is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, following the

  6. ACTPol: On-Sky Performance and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, E.; Beall, J.; Bond, J. R.; Cho, H. M.; Datta, R.; Devlin, M. J.; Dunner, R.; Fox, A. E.; Gallardo, P.; Hasselfield, M.; hide

    2014-01-01

    ACTPol is the polarization-sensitive receiver on the Atacama Cosmology Telescope. ACTPol enables sensitive millimeter wavelength measurements of the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) at arcminute angular scales. These measurements are designed to explore the process of cosmic structure formation, constrain or determine the sum of the neutrino masses, probe dark energy, and provide a foundation for a host of other cosmological tests. We present an overview of the first season of ACTPol observations focusing on the optimization and calibration of the first detector array as well as detailing the on-sky performance.

  7. Establishing presence of antibodies against bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV, parainfluenza virus 3 (PI3 and bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV 1 in blood serum of cattle using indirect immunoenzyme probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šamanc Horea

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A total of 92 samples of bovine blood serum were examined for the presence of antibodies against the bovine respiratory syncytial virus using indirect immunoenzyme probe - iELISA. Specific antibodies against the bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV were established in 46, or 50% blood serum samples. Investigations of the 92 blood serum samples of cattle for the presence of antibodies against the parainfluenza virus 3 (PI 3, revealed their presence in 77, or 83.69% of the samples, and the presence of antibodies against the bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV 1 was established in 19, or 20.65% of the samples.

  8. On the relation between zenith sky brightness and horizontal illuminance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocifaj, M.; Posch, Th.; Solano Lamphar, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of artificial light at night are an emergent research topic for astronomers, physicists, engineers and biologists around the world. This leads to a need for measurements of the night sky brightness (= diffuse luminance of the night sky) and nocturnal illuminance. Currently, the most sensitive light meters measure the zenith sky brightness in magV/arcsec2 or - less frequently - in cd m-2. However, the horizontal illuminance resulting only from the night sky is an important source of information that is difficult to obtain with common instruments. Here we present a set of approximations to convert the zenith luminance into horizontal illuminance. Three different approximations are presented for three idealized atmospheric conditions: homogeneous sky brightness, an isotropically scattering atmosphere and a turbid atmosphere. We also apply the resulting conversion formulae to experimental data on night sky luminance, obtained during the past three years.

  9. Use of Meteosat data to produce sky luminance maps

    OpenAIRE

    Ineichen, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    The objective of the subtask is to derive a model to evaluate the luminance distribution of the sky vault on the basis of Meteosat data. This information is a key element in the field of building energy saving, it is the basis of indoor daylight calculation. Evaluation programs like Genelux (LASH-ENTPE) need this sky luminance distribution to perform their calculations. Sky luminance distribution models have been developed in the last years on the basis of horizontal diffuse illuminance. Thei...

  10. Uncertainties of parameterized surface downward clear-sky shortwave and all-sky longwave radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gubler

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As many environmental models rely on simulating the energy balance at the Earth's surface based on parameterized radiative fluxes, knowledge of the inherent model uncertainties is important. In this study we evaluate one parameterization of clear-sky direct, diffuse and global shortwave downward radiation (SDR and diverse parameterizations of clear-sky and all-sky longwave downward radiation (LDR. In a first step, SDR is estimated based on measured input variables and estimated atmospheric parameters for hourly time steps during the years 1996 to 2008. Model behaviour is validated using the high quality measurements of six Alpine Surface Radiation Budget (ASRB stations in Switzerland covering different elevations, and measurements of the Swiss Alpine Climate Radiation Monitoring network (SACRaM in Payerne. In a next step, twelve clear-sky LDR parameterizations are calibrated using the ASRB measurements. One of the best performing parameterizations is elected to estimate all-sky LDR, where cloud transmissivity is estimated using measured and modeled global SDR during daytime. In a last step, the performance of several interpolation methods is evaluated to determine the cloud transmissivity in the night.

    We show that clear-sky direct, diffuse and global SDR is adequately represented by the model when using measurements of the atmospheric parameters precipitable water and aerosol content at Payerne. If the atmospheric parameters are estimated and used as a fix value, the relative mean bias deviance (MBD and the relative root mean squared deviance (RMSD of the clear-sky global SDR scatter between between −2 and 5%, and 7 and 13% within the six locations. The small errors in clear-sky global SDR can be attributed to compensating effects of modeled direct and diffuse SDR since an overestimation of aerosol content in the atmosphere results in underestimating the direct, but overestimating the diffuse SDR. Calibration of LDR parameterizations

  11. The Tomaraho Conception of the Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Sequera, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    The small community of the Tomaraho, an ethnic group culturally derived from the Zamucos, became known in the South American and world anthropological scenario in recent times. This group, far from the banks of the Paraguay river, remained concealed from organized modern societies for many years. Like any other groups of people in close contact with nature, the Tomaraho developed a profound and rich world view which parallels other more widely researched aboriginal cultures as well as showing distinctive features of their own. This is also apparent in their imagery of the sky and of the characters that are closely connected with the celestial sphere. This paper is based on the lengthy anthropological studies of G. Sequera. We have recently undertaken a project to carry out a detailed analysis of the different astronomical elements present in the imagined sky of the Tomaraho and other Chamacoco ethnic groups. We will briefly review some aspects of this aboriginal culture: places where they live, regions of inf...

  12. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  13. Intercomparisons of Nine Sky Brightness Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henk Spoelstra

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Nine Sky Quality Meters (SQMs have been intercompared during a night time measurement campaign held in the Netherlands in April 2011. Since then the nine SQMs have been distributed across the Netherlands and form the Dutch network for monitoring night sky brightness. The goal of the intercomparison was to infer mutual calibration factors and obtain insight into the variability of the SQMs under different meteorological situations. An ensemble average is built from the individual measurements and used as a reference to infer the mutual calibration factors. Data required additional synchronization prior to the calibration determination, because the effect of moving clouds combined with small misalignments emerges as time jitter in the measurements. Initial scatter of the individual instruments lies between ±14%. Individual night time sums range from −16% to +20%. Intercalibration reduces this to 0.5%, and −7% to +9%, respectively. During the campaign the smallest luminance measured was 0.657 ± 0.003 mcd/m2 on 12 April, and the largest value was 5.94 ± 0.03 mcd/m2 on 2 April. During both occurrences interfering circumstances like snow cover or moonlight were absent.

  14. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  15. Petyarre and Moffat: 'Looking from the Sky'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnell Secomb

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Moffatt’s Up in the Sky series draws attention to the relation between sky and earth, through the content and camera angles of the images. Similarly, Kathleen Petyarre’s Central Desert acrylic dot painting evokes this relation representing country and Dreaming from a celestial perspective—as she says ‘looking from the sky’. Yet here any association between these artists seems to end with the urban artist refusing to engage Aboriginal tradition and the desert artist focused on Dreaming, country and heritage. However, a further connection between these disparate works may also be discerned as each, in differing ways, transforms our conventional perceptions of space and time. Reading these images in relation to Walter Benjamin’s concepts of the auratic and of messianic time, I suggest that each restructures dimension and duration putting in question the (postmodern calibrations of our space/time experience. This paper stages an engagement between these artists’ works and Benjamin’s concepts exploring the variations and modifications of the spatial and the temporal that hybrid cross-cultural exchanges require and facilitate.

  16. Deep sky observing an astronomical tour

    CERN Document Server

    Coe, Steven R

    2016-01-01

    This updated second edition has all of the information needed for your successful forays into deep sky observing. Coe uses his years of experience to give detailed practical advice about how to find the best observing site, how to make the most of the time spent there, and what equipment and instruments to take along. There are comprehensive lists of deep sky objects of all kinds, along with Steve's own observations describing how they look through telescopes with apertures ranging from 4 inches to 36 inches (0.1 - 0.9 meters). Binocular observing also gets its due, while the lists of objects have been amended to highlight only the best targets. A new index makes finding targets easier than ever before, while the selection of viewing targets has been revised from the first edition. Most of all, this book is all about how to enjoy astronomy. The author's enthusiasm and sense of wonder shine through every page as he invites you along on a tour of some of the most beautiful and fascinating sites in the deep ...

  17. COSMO-SkyMed and GIS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, Pietro; Sole, Aurelia; Serio, Carmine

    2013-04-01

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing have become key technology tools for the collection, storage and analysis of spatially referenced data. Industries that utilise these spatial technologies include agriculture, forestry, mining, market research as well as the environmental analysis . Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a coherent active sensor operating in the microwave band which exploits relative motion between antenna and target in order to obtain a finer spatial resolution in the flight direction exploiting the Doppler effect. SAR have wide applications in Remote Sensing such as cartography, surface deformation detection, forest cover mapping, urban planning, disasters monitoring , surveillance etc… The utilization of satellite remote sensing and GIS technology for this applications has proven to be a powerful and effective tool for environmental monitoring. Remote sensing techniques are often less costly and time-consuming for large geographic areas compared to conventional methods, moreover GIS technology provides a flexible environment for, analyzing and displaying digital data from various sources necessary for classification, change detection and database development. The aim of this work si to illustrate the potential of COSMO-SkyMed data and SAR applications in a GIS environment, in particular a demostration of the operational use of COSMO-SkyMed SAR data and GIS in real cases will be provided for what concern DEM validation, river basin estimation, flood mapping and landslide monitoring.

  18. SOUTH POL: Revealing the Polarized Southern Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhaes, Antonio Mario Mario; Ramírez, Edgar; Ribeiro, Nadili; Seriacopi, Daiane; Rubinho, Marcelo; Ferrari, Tiberio; Rodrigues, Claudia; Schoenell, William; Herpich, Fabio; Pereyra, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    SOUTH POL will be a survey of the Southern sky in optical polarized light. It will use a newly built polarimeter for T80-S, an 84 cm robotic telescope installed at Cerro Tololo (CTIO), Chile. It will initially cover the sky South of declination -15 deg with a polarimetric accuracy < 0.1% at V~14-15. The telescope and camera combination covers a field of about 2.0 square degrees.SOUTH POL will impact areas such as Cosmology, Extragalactic Astronomy, Interstellar Medium of the Galaxy and Magellanic Clouds, Star Formation, Stellar Envelopes, Stellar Explosions and Solar System.The polarimeter has just been commissioned in mid-November, 2017. The data reduction pipeline has already been built. We will describe the instrument and the data reduction, as well as a few of the science cases. The survey is expected to begin midway through the 1st semester of 2018. Both catalog data and raw images will be made available.

  19. Using routine meteorological data to derive sky conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pagès

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Sky condition is a matter of interest for public and weather predictors as part of weather analyses. In this study, we apply a method that uses total solar radiation and other meteorological data recorded by an automatic station for deriving an estimation of the sky condition. The impetus of this work is the intention of the Catalan Meteorological Service (SMC to provide the public with real-time information about the sky condition. The methodology for deriving sky conditions from meteorological records is based on a supervised classification technique called maximum likelihood method. In this technique we first need to define features which are derived from measured variables. Second, we must decide which sky conditions are intended to be distinguished. Some analyses have led us to use four sky conditions: (a cloudless or almost cloudless sky, (b scattered clouds, (c mostly cloudy – high clouds, (d overcast – low clouds. An additional case, which may be treated separately, corresponds to precipitation (rain or snow. The main features for estimating sky conditions are, as expected, solar radiation and its temporal variability. The accuracy of this method of guessing sky conditions compared with human observations is around 70% when applied to four sites in Catalonia (NE Iberian Peninsula. The agreement increases if we take into account the uncertainty both in the automatic classifier and in visual observations.Key words. Meteorological and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques; radiative processes – Atmospheric composition and structure (cloud physics and chemistry

  20. The sky as a topic in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galili, Igal; Weizman, Ayelet; Cohen, Ariel

    2004-07-01

    The concepts of sky and visibility distance, as perceived by different learners, are investigated for the first time as a subject of a science education research. Mental models of students with regard to the subject were elicited. They were interpreted in terms of two-level hierarchy: schemes and facets-of-knowledge (defined in the paper). Our results suggest that many students do not consider sky to be a scientific (physical) concept. The majority perceives the sky as having an oblate profile. Among the parameters that determine this profile were mentioned daytime, atmosphere, geometry of the situation, and weather conditions. The students hold two major explanatory views (schemes) with regard to the sky: the sky is the atmosphere and the sky is the appearance of space. With regard to the visibility distance, the two following schemes prevail: vision weakens with the distance and natural obstacles determine vision distance. No significant correlation was found between the views regarding the sky appearance and the vision distance. Students do not relate Moon illusion to the profile of sky or visibility distance. The notions of sky and visibility distance are argued for inclusion into science curriculum, and implications of the findings to a constructivist instruction of the considered concepts and phenomena are discussed.

  1. Sky type discrimination using a ground-based sun photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFelice, Thomas P.; Wylie, Bruce K.

    2001-01-01

    A 2-year feasibility study was conducted at the USGS EROS Data Center, South Dakota (43.733°N, 96.6167°W) to assess whether a four-band, ground-based, sun photometer could be used to discriminate sky types. The results indicate that unique spectral signatures do exist between sunny skies (including clear and hazy skies) and cirrus, and cirrostratus, altocumulus or fair-weather cumulus, and thin stratocumulus or altostratus, and fog/fractostratus skies. There were insufficient data points to represent other cloud types at a statistically significant level.

  2. Determination of excitation temperature and vibrational temperature of the N{sub 2}(C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') state in Ne-N{sub 2} RF discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, N U; Naveed, M A; Zakaullah, M [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Khan, F U [Department of Physics, Gomal University D.I. Khan (Pakistan)

    2008-05-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of neon mixing on the excitation and vibrational temperatures of the second positive system in nitrogen plasma generated by a 13.56 MHz RF generator. The excitation temperature is determined from Ne I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot. The overpopulation of the levels of the N{sub 2} (C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') states with neon mixing are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of the second positive system of nitrogen molecules. The vibrational temperature is calculated for the sequence {delta}{nu} = -2, with the assumption that it follows Boltzmann's distribution. But due to overpopulation of levels, e.g. 1, 4, a linearization process was employed for such distributions allowing us to calculate the vibrational temperature of the N{sub 2} (C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}, {nu}') state. It is found that the excitation temperature as well as the vibrational temperature of the second positive system can be raised significantly by mixing neon with nitrogen plasma. It is also found that the vibrational temperature increases with power and pressure up to 0.5 mbar.

  3. Chronic hypoxia induces the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1ΔE9 transgenic mice in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Rojas-Abalos, Macarena; Abbott, Ana C.; Moya, Esteban A.; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin, a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice in vivo. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α) was analyzed as a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6–72 h) stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin (DCX). Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in a double transgenic APPswe-PS1ΔE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis in the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that exposure to hypoxia in vivo can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorders associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired. PMID:24574965

  4. Chronic hypoxia induces the in vivo activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway and stimulates hippocampal neurogenesis in wild-type and APPswe-PS1deltaE9 transgenic mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena eVarela-Nallar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia modulates proliferation and differentiation of cultured embryonic and adult stem cells, an effect that includes β-catenin a key component of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Here we studied in vivo the effect of mild hypoxia on the activity of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in the hippocampus of adult mice. As a molecular control of the physiological hypoxic response the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor-1α (HIF-1α was analyzed. Exposure to chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 6-72 h stimulated the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Because the Wnt/β-catenin pathway is a positive modulator of adult neurogenesis, we evaluated whether chronic hypoxia was able to stimulate neurogenesis in the subgranular zone (SGZ of the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Results indicate that hypoxia increased cell proliferation and neurogenesis in adult wild-type mice as determined by Ki67 staining, BrdU incorporation and double labeling with doublecortin. Chronic hypoxia also induced neurogenesis in double transgenic APPswe-PS1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, which shows decreased levels of neurogenesis at the SGZ. Our results show for the first time that in vivo exposure to hypoxia can induce the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade in the hippocampus, suggesting that mild hypoxia may have a therapeutic value in neurodegenerative disorder associated with altered Wnt signaling in the brain and also in pathological conditions in which hippocampal neurogenesis is impaired.

  5. The Sky Polarization Observatory (SPOrt) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carretti, E.

    We present the Sky Polarization Observatory (SPOrt), an experiment aimed at measuring the Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization (CMBP) on large angular scales, scales on which the information about the formation epoch of the first structrures (e.g. galaxies) reside. SPOrt is an ASI funded programme and has been selected by ESA to be flown onboard the International Space Station (ISS). It consists of four radiometers in the 22-90 GHz range and it will be the first space experiment expressly devoted to polarization measurements of CMB. In particular it has been designed to minimize systematic effects at a level negligible for CMBP, which is about 2 orders of magnitude lower the CMB anisotropy signal, main target of experiments like WMAP and PLANCK. The experiment will be presented in both its two relevant aspects: scientific goals and design description with particular emphasis to its cleanness with respect to instrumental contaminations.

  6. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  7. Hunting the Southern Skies with SIMBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    First Images from the New "Millimetre Camera" on SEST at La Silla Summary A new instrument, SIMBA ("SEST IMaging Bolometer Array") , has been installed at the Swedish-ESO Submillimetre Telescope (SEST) at the ESO La Silla Observatory in July 2001. It records astronomical images at a wavelength of 1.2 mm and is able to quickly map large sky areas. In order to achieve the best possible sensitivity, SIMBA is cooled to only 0.3 deg above the absolute zero on the temperature scale. SIMBA is the first imaging millimetre instrument in the southern hemisphere . Radiation at this wavelength is mostly emitted from cold dust and ionized gas in a variety of objects in the Universe. Among other, SIMBA now opens exciting prospects for in-depth studies of the "hidden" sites of star formation , deep inside dense interstellar nebulae. While such clouds are impenetrable to optical light, they are transparent to millimetre radiation and SIMBA can therefore observe the associated phenomena, in particular the dust around nascent stars . This sophisticated instrument can also search for disks of cold dust around nearby stars in which planets are being formed or which may be left-overs of this basic process. Equally important, SIMBA may observe extremely distant galaxies in the early universe , recording them while they were still in the formation stage. Various SIMBA images have been obtained during the first tests of the new instrument. The first observations confirm the great promise for unique astronomical studies of the southern sky in the millimetre wavelength region. These results also pave the way towards the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) , the giant, joint research project that is now under study in Europe, the USA and Japan. PR Photo 28a/01 : SIMBA image centered on the infrared source IRAS 17175-3544 PR Photo 28b/01 : SIMBA image centered on the infrared source IRAS 18434-0242 PR Photo 28c/01 : SIMBA image centered on the infrared source IRAS 17271-3439 PR Photo 28d/01

  8. Dark Skies, Bright Kids: Year 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Joleen K.; Johnson, K.; Lynch, R.; Walker, L.; Beaton, R.; Corby, J.; de Messieres, G.; Drosback, M.; Gugliucci, N.; Jackson, L.; Kingery, A.; Layman, S.; Murphy, E.; Richardson, W.; Ries, P.; Romero, C.; Sivakoff, G.; Sokal, K.; Trammell, G.; Whelan, D.; Yang, A.; Zasowski, G.

    2011-01-01

    The Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) outreach program brings astronomy education into local elementary schools in central Virginia's Southern Albemarle County through an after-school club. Taking advantage of the unusually dark night skies in the rural countryside, DSBK targets economically disadvantaged schools that tend to be underserved due to their rural locale. The goals of DSBK are to foster children's natural curiosity, demonstrate that science is a fun and creative process, challenge students' conceptions of what a scientist is and does, and teach some basic astronomy. Furthermore, DSBK works to assimilate families into students' education by holding family observing nights at the school. Now in its third semester, DSBK has successfully run programs at two schools with very diverse student populations. Working with these students has helped us to revise our activities and to create new ones. A by-product of our work has been the development of lesson plans, complete with learning goals and detailed instructions, that we make publically available on our website. This year we are expanding our repertoire with our new planetarium, which allows us to visualize topics in novel ways and supplements family observing on cloudy nights. The DSBK volunteers have also created a bilingual astronomy artbook --- designed, written, and illustrated by UVa students --- that we will publish and distribute to elementary schools in Virginia. Our book debuted at the last AAS winter meeting, and since then it has been extensively revised and updated with input from many individuals, including parents, professional educators, and a children's book author. Because the club is currently limited to serving a few elementary schools, this book will be part of our efforts to broaden our impact by bringing astronomy to schools we cannot go to ourselves and reaching out to Spanish-speaking communities at the same time.

  9. Gender Roles and Night-Sky Watching among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, William E.; McGee, Catherine M.

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationship between gender roles and night-sky watching in a sample of college students (N=161). The Bem Sex-Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Noctcaelador Inventory (NI) were used to investigate the differences between gender role groups for night-sky watching. The results supported the hypothesis that androgynous…

  10. 76 FR 42704 - Sky River LLC; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sky River LLC; Notice of Filing Take notice that, on July 8, 2011, Sky River LLC filed to amend its Open Access Transmission Tariff (OATT) filing, submitted on April 1, 2011 and...

  11. The New Progress of the Starry Sky Project of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohua

    2015-08-01

    Since the 28th General Assembly of IAU, the SSPC team made new progress:1. Enhanced the function of the SSPC team-- Established the contact with IAU C50, IUCN Dark Skies Advisory Group, AWB and IDA,and undertakes the work of the IDA Beijing Chapter.-- Got supports from China’s National Astronomical Observatories, Beijing Planetarium, and Shanghai Science and Technology Museum.-- Signed cooperation agreements with Lighting Research Center, English Education Group and law Firm; formed the team force.2. Put forward a proposal to national top institutionThe SSPC submitted the first proposal about dark sky protection to the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference.3. Introduced the Criteria and Guideline of dark sky protectionThe SSPC team translated 8 documents of IDA, and provided a reference basis for Chinese dark sky protection.4. Actively establish dark sky places-- Plan a Dark Sky Reserve around Ali astronomical observatory (5,100m elevation) in Tibet. China’s Xinhua News Agency released the news.-- Combining with Hangcuo Lake, a National Natural Reserve and Scenic in Tibet, to plan and establish the Dark Sky Park.-- Cooperated with Shandong Longgang Tourism Group to construct the Dream Sky Theme Park in the suburbs of Jinan city.In the IYL 2015, the SSPC is getting further development:First, make dark sky protection enter National Ecological Strategy of “Beautiful China”. We call on: “Beautiful China” needs “Beautiful Night Sky” China should care the shared starry sky, and left this resource and heritage for children.Second, hold “Cosmic Light” exhibition in Shanghai Science and Technology Museum on August.Third, continue to establish Dark Sky Reserve, Park and Theme Park. We want to make these places become the bases of dark sky protection, astronomical education and ecological tourism, and develop into new cultural industry.Fourth, actively join international cooperation.Now, “Blue Sky, White Cloud and Starry Sky “have become

  12. Gaia, an all sky astrometric and photometric survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, J. M.

    2017-04-01

    Gaia space mission includes a low resolution spectroscopic instrument to classify and parametrize the observed sources. Gaia is a full-sky unbiased survey down to about 20th magnitude. The scanning law yields a rather uniform coverage of the sky over the full mission. The data reduction is a global one over the full mission. Both sky coverage and data reduction strategy ensure an unprecedented all-sky homogeneous spectrophotometric survey. Certainly, that survey is of interest for future on-ground and space projects (LSST, PLATO, EUCLID, ...). This work addresses the exploitation of the Gaia spectrophotometry as standard photometry reference through the discussion of the sky coverage, the spectrophotometric precision and the expected uncertainties of the synthetic photometry derived from the low resolution Gaia spectra and photometry.

  13. RECONSTRUCTION OF SKY ILLUMINATION DOMES FROM GROUND-BASED PANORAMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Coubard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of the sky illumination is important for radiometric corrections and for computer graphics applications such as relighting or augmented reality. We propose an approach to compute environment maps, representing the sky radiance, from a set of ground-based images acquired by a panoramic acquisition system, for instance a mobile-mapping system. These images can be affected by important radiometric artifacts, such as bloom or overexposure. A Perez radiance model is estimated with the blue sky pixels of the images, and used to compute additive corrections in order to reduce these radiometric artifacts. The sky pixels are then aggregated in an environment map, which still suffers from discontinuities on stitching edges. The influence of the quality of estimated sky radiance on the simulated light signal is measured quantitatively on a simple synthetic urban scene; in our case, the maximal error for the total sensor radiance is about 10%.

  14. Stability of the nine sky quality meters in the Dutch night sky brightness monitoring network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Outer, Peter; Lolkema, Dorien; Haaima, Marty; van der Hoff, Rene; Spoelstra, Henk; Schmidt, Wim

    2015-04-22

    In the context of monitoring abundance of artificial light at night, the year-to-year stability of Sky Quality Meters (SQMs) is investigated by analysing intercalibrations derived from two measurement campaigns that were held in 2011 and 2012. An intercalibration comprises a light sensitivity factor and an offset for each SQM. The campaigns were concerned with monitoring measurements, each lasting one month. Nine SQMs, together forming the Night Sky Brightness Monitoring network (MHN) in The Netherlands, were involved in both campaigns. The stability of the intercalibration of these instruments leads to a year-to-year uncertainty (standard deviation) of 5% in the measured median luminance occurring at the MHN monitoring locations. For the 10-percentiles and 90-percentiles, we find 8% and 4%, respectively. This means that, for urban and industrial areas, changes in the sky brightness larger than 5% become detectable. Rural and nature areas require an 8%-9% change of the median luminance to be detectable. The light sensitivety agrees within 8% for the whole group of SQMs.

  15. Day/night whole sky imagers for 24-h cloud and sky assessment: history and overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Janet E; Karr, Monette E; Johnson, Richard W; Burden, Art R

    2013-03-10

    A family of fully automated digital whole sky imagers (WSIs) has been developed at the Marine Physical Laboratory over many years, for a variety of research and military applications. The most advanced of these, the day/night whole sky imagers (D/N WSIs), acquire digital imagery of the full sky down to the horizon under all conditions from full sunlight to starlight. Cloud algorithms process the imagery to automatically detect the locations of cloud for both day and night. The instruments can provide absolute radiance distribution over the full radiance range from starlight through daylight. The WSIs were fielded in 1984, followed by the D/N WSIs in 1992. These many years of experience and development have resulted in very capable instruments and algorithms that remain unique. This article discusses the history of the development of the D/N WSIs, system design, algorithms, and data products. The paper cites many reports with more detailed technical documentation. Further details of calibration, day and night algorithms, and cloud free line-of-sight results will be discussed in future articles.

  16. The Python Sky Model: software for simulating the Galactic microwave sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, B.; Dunkley, J.; Alonso, D.; Næss, S.

    2017-08-01

    We present a numerical code to simulate maps of Galactic emission in intensity and polarization at microwave frequencies, aiding in the design of cosmic microwave background experiments. This python code builds on existing efforts to simulate the sky by providing an easy-to-use interface and is based on publicly available data from the WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe) and Planck satellite missions. We simulate synchrotron, thermal dust, free-free and anomalous microwave emission over the whole sky, in addition to the cosmic microwave background, and include a set of alternative prescriptions for the frequency dependence of each component, for example, polarized dust with multiple temperatures and a decorrelation of the signals with frequency, which introduce complexity that is consistent with current data. We also present a new prescription for adding small-scale realizations of these components at resolutions greater than current all-sky measurements. The usefulness of the code is demonstrated by forecasting the impact of varying foreground complexity on the recovered tensor-to-scalar ratio for the LiteBIRD satellite. The code is available at: https://github.com/bthorne93/PySM_public.

  17. Expression of proteins FGFR3, PI3K, AKT, p21Waf1/Cip1 and cyclins D1 and D3 in patients with T1 bladder tumours: clinical implications and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanca Pedregosa, A M; Sánchez-González, Á; Carrasco Valiente, J; Ruiz García, J M; Gómez Gómez, E; López Beltrán, A; Requena Tapia, M J

    2017-04-01

    To determine the differential protein expression of biomarkers FGFR3, PI3K (subunits PI3Kp110α, PI3KClassIII, PI3Kp85), AKT, p21Waf1/Cip1 and cyclins D1 and D3 in T1 bladder cancer versus healthy tissue and to study their potential role as early recurrence markers. This is a prospective study that employed a total of 67 tissue samples (55 cases of T1 bladder tumours that underwent transurethral resection and 12 cases of adjacent healthy mucosa). The protein expression levels were assessed using Western blot, and the means and percentages were compared using Student's t-test and the chi-squared test. The survival analysis was conducted using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test. Greater protein expression was detected for FGFR3, PI3Kp110α, PI3KClassIII, cyclins D1 and D3 and p21Waf1/Cip1 in the tumour tissue than in the healthy mucosa. However, these differences were not significant for PI3Kp85 and AKT. We observed statistically significant correlations between early recurrence and PI3Kp110α, PI3KClassIII, PI3Kp85 and AKT (P=.003, P=.045, P=.050 and P=.028, respectively), between the tumour type (primary vs. recurrence) and cyclin D3 (P=.001), between the tumour size and FGFR3 (P=.035) and between multifocality and cyclin D1 (P=.039). The survival analysis selected FGFR3 (P=.024), PI3Kp110α (P=.014), PI3KClassIII (P=.042) and AKT (P=.008) as markers of early-recurrence-free survival. There is an increase in protein expression levels in bladder tumour tissue. The overexpression of FGFR3, PI3Kp110α, PI3KClassIII and AKT is associated with increased early-recurrence-free survival for patients with T1 bladder tumours. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Sky Mining - Application to Photomorphic Redshift Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Pragyansmita

    The field of astronomy has evolved from the ancient craft of observing the sky. In it's present form, astronomers explore the cosmos not just by observing through the tiny visible window used by our eyes, but also by exploiting the electromagnetic spectrum from radio waves to gamma rays. The domain is undoubtedly at the forefront of data-driven science. The data growth rate is expected to be around 50%--100% per year. This data explosion is attributed largely to the large-scale wide and deep surveys of the different regions of the sky at multiple wavelengths (both ground and space-based surveys). This dissertation describes the application of machine learning methods to the estimation of galaxy redshifts leveraging such a survey data. Galaxy is a large system of stars held together by mutual gravitation and isolated from similar systems by vast regions of space. Our view of the universe is closely tied to our understanding of galaxy formation. Thus, a better understanding of the relative location of the multitudes of galaxies is crucial. The position of each galaxy can be characterized using three coordinates. Right Ascension (ra) and Declination (dec) are the two coordinates that locate the galaxy in two dimensions on the plane of the sky. It is relatively straightforward to measure them. In contrast, fixing the third coordinate that is the galaxy's distance from the observer along the line of sight (redshift 'z') is considerably more challenging. "Spectroscopic redshift" method gives us accurate and precise measurements of z. However, it is extremely time-intensive and unusable for faint objects. Additionally, the rate at which objects are being identified via photometric surveys far exceeds the rate at which the spectroscopic redshift measurements can keep pace in determining their distance. As the surveys go deeper into the sky, the proportion of faint objects being identified also continues to increase. In order to tackle both these drawbacks increasing in

  19. Promoting Dark Sky Protection in Chile: the Gabriel Mistral IDA Dark Sky Sanctuary and Other AURA Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. Chris; Smith, Malcolm; Pompea, Stephen; Sanhueza, Pedro; AURA-Chile EPO Team

    2018-01-01

    For over 20 years, AURA has been leading efforts promoting the protection of dark skies in northern Chile. Efforts began in the early 1990s at AURA's Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), working in collaboration with other international observatories in Chile including Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) and the European Southern Observatory (ESO). CTIO also partnered with local communities, for example supporting Vicuña's effort to establish the first municipal observatory in Chile. Today we have developed a multifaceted effort of dark sky protection, including proactive government relations at national and local levels, a strong educational and public outreach program, and a program of highlighting international recognition of the dark skies through the IDA Dark Sky Places program. Work on international recognition has included the declaration of the Gabriel Mistral IDA Dark Sky Sanctuary, the first such IDA sanctuary in the world.

  20. Predicting the sky from 30 MHz to 800 GHz: the extended Global Sky Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Adrian

    We propose to construct the extended Global Sky Model (eGSM), a software package and associated data products that are capable of generating maps of the sky at any frequency within a broad range (30 MHz to 800 GHz). The eGSM is constructed from archival data, and its outputs will include not only "best estimate" sky maps, but also accurate error bars and the ability to generate random realizations of missing modes in the input data. Such views of the sky are crucial in the practice of precision cosmology, where our ability to constrain cosmological parameters and detect new phenomena (such as B-mode signatures from primordial gravitational waves, or spectral distortions of the Cosmic Microwave Background; CMB) rests crucially on our ability to remove systematic foreground contamination. Doing so requires empirical measurements of the foreground sky brightness (such as that arising from Galactic synchrotron radiation, among other sources), which are typically performed only at select narrow wavelength ranges. We aim to transcend traditional wavelength limits by optimally combining existing data to provide a comprehensive view of the foreground sky at any frequency within the broad range of 30 MHz to 800 GHz. Previous efforts to interpolate between multi-frequency maps resulted in the Global Sky Model (GSM) of de Oliveira-Costa et al. (2008), a software package that outputs foreground maps at any frequency of the user's choosing between 10 MHz and 100 GHz. However, the GSM has a number of shortcomings. First and foremost, the GSM does not include the latest archival data from the Planck satellite. Multi-frequency models depend crucially on data from Planck, WMAP, and COBE to provide high-frequency "anchor" maps. Another crucial shortcoming is the lack of error bars in the output maps. Finally, the GSM is only able to predict temperature (i.e., total intensity) maps, and not polarization information. With the recent release of Planck's polarized data products, the

  1. Sky luminance distribution in Pamplona (Spain) during the summer period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. L.; de Blas, M.; García, A.; Gracia, A.; de Francisco, A.

    2010-04-01

    In this work the outdoor daylight conditions in Pamplona (South Europe) during the summer period have been studied. The selected sky type (from fifteen standards) at a given moment is the one exhibiting the lowest RMSD when comparing the theoretical and experimental luminance distributions in the sky hemisphere. Two year data of luminance distribution registered every 10 min in 145 positions of the sky hemisphere have been used for selecting the sky type. The most frequent sky type in Pamplona is V.5 (cloudless polluted with a broad solar corona), with an occurrence of 29.5%. This result coincides with the one observed in a previous study in Athens. Six types of sky (V.5, IV.4, III.4, III.3, V.4 y II.2) out of the fifteen standards become practically the 80% of all the studied ones. Regarding a possible use in daylight climate studies, the frequency of occurrence of the fifteen types of sky for fourteen solar elevation intervals has been included.

  2. Sky Background Variability Measured on Maunakea at Gemini North Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Adam B.; Roth, Katherine; Stephens, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Gemini North has recently implemented a Quality Assessment Pipeline (QAP) that automatically reduces images in realtime to determine sky condition quantities, including background sky brightness from the optical to near-infrared. Processing archived images through the QAP and mining the results allows us to look for trends and systematic issues with the instruments and optics during the first decade of Gemini.Here we present the results of using the QAP calculated values to quantify how airglow affects the background sky brightness of images taken with Gemini's imaging instruments, GMOS and NIRI, as well as searching for other factors that may cause changes in the sky brightness. By investigating the dependence of measured sky brightness as a function of a variety of variables, including time after twilight, airmass, season, distance from the moon, air temperature, etc., we quantify the effect of sky brightness and its impact on the sensitivity of Gemini optical and near-infrared imaging data. These measurements will be used to determine new sky background relationships for Maunakea, and to improve the Gemini Integration Time Calculators (ITCs).

  3. SkyGlowNet as a Vehicle for STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flurchick, K. M.; Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; Deal, S.; Foster, C.

    2013-06-01

    SkyGlowNet is an emerging network of internet-enabled sky brightness meters (iSBM) that continuously record and log sky brightness at the zenith of each network node site. Also logged are time and weather information. These data are polled at a user-defined frequency, typically about every 45 seconds. The data are uploaded to the SkyGlowNet website, initially to a proprietary area where the data for each institution are embargoed for one or two semesters as students conduct research projects with their data. When released from embargo, the data are moved to another area where they can be accessed by all SkyGlowNet participants. Some of the data are periodically released to a public area on the website. In this presentation we describe the data formats and provide examples of both data content and the structure of the website. Early data from two nodes in the SkyGlowNet have been characterized, both quantitatively and qualitatively, by undergraduate students at NCAT. A summary of their work is presented here. These analyses are of utility in helping those new to looking at these data to understand how to interpret them. In particular, we demonstrate differences between effects on light at night and sky brightness due to astronomical cycles, atmospheric phenomena, and artificial lighting. Quantitative characterization of the data includes statistical analyses of parsed segments of the temporal data stream. An attempt is made to relate statistical metrics to specific types of phenomena.

  4. Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

    2012-03-01

    Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

  5. Cataloging the Entire Sky with NOAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidever, David; Dey, Arjun; Olsen, Knut; Nikutta, Robert; Juneau, Stephanie; NOAO Data Lab Team

    2018-01-01

    More than two thirds of the sky has now been imaged in at least one band with NOAO's telescopes. The large majority of these data were obtained for PI-led projects and surveys, and thus far only a small fraction have been released to the community via well-calibrated and easily accessible catalogs. We are remedying this by creating a catalog of sources from most of the public data taken using the CTIO-4m+DECam and KPNO-4m+Mosaic3. This catalog, called the NOAO Source Catalog (NSC), currently covers ~25,000 square degrees, contains 20 billion individual measurements of 2 billion unique objects, and has 10-sigma depths of ~23rd magnitude in most broad-band filters and astrometric accuracy of ~20 mas. The NSC can be used to investigate stellar streams, dwarf satellite galaxies, galaxy distributions, variable stars and other transients. I will give an overview of the first public data release distributed through NOAO Data Lab and discuss initial results from a search for Milky Way satellite galaxies using the new catalog.

  6. Asymmetric sky from the long mode modulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Baghram, Shant; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein

    2014-03-01

    The observed hemispherical power asymmetry in cosmic microwave background radiation may have originated from the modulations of superhorizon long-wavelength modes. In this work, we unveil different aspects of asymmetries generated from the long-wavelength mode modulations. We show that the same mechanism that leads to the observed cosmic microwave background hemispherical power asymmetry via superhorizon long-mode perturbation also yields dipole asymmetry in (a) the tensor perturbations power spectrum and (b) the halo bias parameter. These are different phenomena relevant to different cosmological histories, but both share the same underlying mechanism in generating asymmetries in the sky. We obtain the set of consistency conditions relating the amplitude of dipole asymmetries generated on tensor perturbations and halo bias parameter to the amplitude of dipole asymmetry generated on cosmic microwave background power spectrum. In addition, we show that this mechanism does not produce dipole asymmetry in acceleration expansion in an ΛCDM Universe because the superhorizon curvature perturbation is conserved in this background.

  7. Vanilla Sky – El cuento del narcisista

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham St. John STOTT

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vanilla Sky (2001, de Cameron Crowe, normalmente se aprecia como un juego intelectual; no obstante, su temática es mucho más oscura que lo que dicha etiqueta podría sugerir. Mientras recorre las diferentes fases del sueño de David Aames (un sueño en el que se mueve de una pretensión de amor a una de homicidio, nos damos cuenta de que David padece un trastorno de la autoestima. Utilizando como referencia Atracción Fatal (1987, de Adrian Lyne, para demostrar la incapacidad de tener en cuenta las necesidades de otros, la película de Crowe nos muestra un caso práctico de trastorno narcisista de la personalidad. David mata porque no es capaz de aceptar las exigencias de otros, ya que supondría para él ponerse en una condición inferior a la autosuficiencia. No resulta sorprendente, por lo tanto, su horror cuando al final de la película se despierta y descubre que su amante sigue viva.

  8. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liss, Sandra; Troup, Nicholas William; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Barcos-Munoz, Loreto D.; Beaton, Rachael; Bittle, Lauren; Borish, Henry J.; Burkhardt, Andrew; Corby, Joanna; Dean, Janice; Hancock, Danielle; King, Jennie; Prager, Brian; Romero, Charles; Sokal, Kimberly R.; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Wenger, Trey; Zucker, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Now entering our sixth year of operation, Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in central Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts beyond Virginia's Standards of Learning. Our primary focus is hosting an 8-10 week after-school astronomy club at underserved elementary and middle schools. Each week, DSBK volunteers take the role of coaches to introduce astronomy-related concepts ranging from the Solar System to galaxies to astrobiology, and to lead students in interactive learning activities. Another hallmark of DSBK is hosting our Annual Central Virginia Star Party, a free event open to the community featuring star-gazing and planetarium shows.DSBK has amassed over 15,000 contact hours since 2009 and we continue to broaden our impact. One important step we have taken in the past year is to establish a graduate student led assessment program to identify and implement directed learning goals for DSBK outreach. The collection of student workbooks, observations, and volunteer surveys indicates broad scale success for the program both in terms of student learning and their perception of science. The data also reveal opportunities to improve our organizational and educational practices to maximize student achievement and overall volunteer satisfaction for DSBK's future clubs and outreach endeavors.

  9. Hermite scatterers in an ultraviolet sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Kevin J.

    2017-12-01

    The scattering from spherical inhomogeneities has been a major historical topic in acoustics, optics, and electromagnetics and the phenomenon shapes our perception of the world including the blue sky. The long wavelength limit of ;Rayleigh scattering; is characterized by intensity proportional to k4 (or λ-4) where k is the wavenumber and λ is the wavelength. With the advance of nanotechnology, it is possible to produce scatterers that are inhomogeneous with material properties that are functions of radius r, such as concentric shells. We demonstrate that with proper choice of material properties linked to the Hermite polynomials in r, scatterers can have long wavelength scattering behavior of higher powers: k8, k16, and higher. These ;Hermite scatterers; could be useful in providing unique signatures (or colors) to regions where they are present. If suspended in air under white light, the back-scattered spectrum would be shifted from blue towards violet and then ultraviolet as the higher order Hermite scatterers were illuminated.

  10. Dark Skies, Bright Kids Year 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Andrew Michael; Mathews, Allison M.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Avilez, Ian; Beale, Luca; Bittle, Lauren E.; Bordenave, David; Finn, Molly; Firebaugh, Ariel; Hancock, Danielle; Hughes, Paul; Rochford Hayes, Christian; Lewis, Hannah; Linden, Sean; Liss, Sandra; Liu, Mengyao; McNair, Shunlante; Murphy, Edward; Prager, Brian; Pryal, Matthew; Richardson, Whitney; Song, Yiqing; Troup, Nicholas; Villadsen, Jackie; Wenger, Trey V.; Wilson, Robert Forrest

    2018-01-01

    We present updates from the ninth year of operation of Dark Skies, Bright Kids (DSBK) including new club content, continued assessments, and our seventh annual Star Party. DSBK is an entirely volunteer-run outreach organization based out of the Department of Astronomy at the University of Virginia. Our core mission is to enhance elementary science education and literacy in Virginia through fun, hands-on activities that introduce basic Astronomy concepts. DSBK’s most fundamental program is an 8-10 week long after-school Astronomy camp at surrounding local elementary schools, where each week introduces new concepts through interactive hands-on activities. Over the past two summers, we have traveled to four rural Virginia locations to bring week-long Astronomy camps to otherwise overlooked elementary school districts. These programs aim to inspire a curiosity for science and include inquiry based activities in topics ranging from the electromagnetic spectrum to the classification and evolution of galaxies. We strive to be self-reflective in our mission to inspire scientific curiosity in the minds of underserved demographics. In this effort, we continually assess the effectiveness of each activity through feedback in student-kept journal pages and observed excitement levels. This self-reflection has initiated the development of new curriculum. In addition, differing from our normal collaboration with local elementary schools, we have found great success partnering with local youth organizations, who may better represent DSBK's target demographics and have infrastructure to support incoming outreach groups.

  11. Blue Sky Birds Come to the World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bura Sabiha Kelek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The New Supply System comes to all fields for logistics.Drone is an unmanned vehicle for loading and unloading packages.Perhaps we can imagine it as a ‘’blue sky bird’’. This new trend has three important impacts that are determined by technoligical capabilities, ,regularity pressure, and public acceptance so that it will be dealed within current powers and circumstances. This kind of vehicles are used in different capacities, such as multicopter,drone or robot.Logistics’ issues are interested in short-term delivery systems for customer satisfaction but all developments go through GPS so it is based on 21st century technological developments, which have been tested on a short-term basis and will be expected to be of use in 2 years. The purpose of this research is to give lead to researchers information about risk and the advantages of using the technology in this manner.Some advantages and disadvantages ,schedules’ problems in the system will be identifed.

  12. WFIRST: Simulating the Wide-Field Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Molly; WFIRST Wide Field Imager Simulations Working Group

    2018-01-01

    As astronomy’s first high-resolution wide-field multi-mode instrument, simulated data will play a vital role in the planning for and analysis of data from WFIRST’s WFI (Wide Field Imager) instrument. Part of the key to WFIRST’s scientific success lies in our ability to push the systematics limit, but in order to do so, the WFI pipeline will need to be able to measure and take out said systematics. The efficacy of this pipeline can only be verified with large suites of synthetic data; these data must include both the range of astrophysical sky scenes (from crowded starfields to high-latitude grism data observations) and the systematics from the detector and telescope optics the WFI pipeline aims to mitigate. We summarize here(1) the status of current and planned astrophysical simulations in support of the WFI,(2) the status of current WFI instrument simulators and requirements on future generations thereof, and(3) plans, methods, and requirements on interfacing astrophysical simulations and WFI instrument simulators.

  13. Lighting up the sky for CERN's anniversary

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    For CERN's Golden Jubilee, the Canton of Geneva, supported by the Pays de Gex local authorities, lit up eight points around the LHC ring. On the date of CERN's fiftieth anniversary, 29 September 2004, the Organization's Host State authorities gave the Laboratory a gift of light. As night fell, twenty-four powerful floodlights blazed into the night sky from the eight access points to the future LHC. For the many spectators gathered at a special vantage point above the village of Crozet, these beams emanating from the valley floor marked out the locations of the access shafts around the 27-km of the LHC tunnel.The event was organised by the Department of Justice, Police and Security of the Canton of Geneva, with the participation of the Crozet local council and support of local councils in the Canton of Geneva, the Communauté des communes of the Pays de Gex, and the Ain Préfecture. This joint gift from the local authorities on both sides of the French-Swiss border has great symbolic value for an organisatio...

  14. ESA Sky: a new Astronomy Multi-Mission Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Merín, Bruno; Salgado, Jesús; Giordano, Fabrizio; Baines, Deborah; Sarmiento, María-Henar; Martí, Belén López; Racero, Elena; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Pollock, Andy; Rosa, Michael; Castellanos, Javier; González, Juan,; De león, Ignacio; de Landaluce, Iñaki Ortiz; de Teodoro, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    We present a science-driven discovery portal for all the ESA Astronomy Missions called ESA Sky that allow users to explore the multi-wavelength sky and to seamlessly retrieve science-ready data in all ESA Astronomy mission archives from a web application without prior-knowledge of any of the missions. The first public beta of the service has been released, currently featuring an interface for exploration of the multi-wavelength sky and for single and/or multiple target searches of science-rea...

  15. Promoting Landspace Astrophotography for Dark Sky Preservation in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwa, Manisha; Bhattarai, Suresh

    2015-08-01

    This paper will present astrophotography and dark sky preservation initiatives and its impact in Nepal. It will highlight the astrophotography and the dark skies Initiatives of Nepal Astronomical Society (NASO) since 2007. Some case studies from the landspace astrophotography by TWAN, EurAstro Mission and others promoted by NASO will be discussed in details. It will also present our collaborative approach with the media to take the idea of dark sky peservation to Nepalese Community in the country and abroad. Some success stories linked with UNESCO World Heritage Sites of Nepal will be discussed in brief. Our appreach of introducing such photography as a tool for astronomy communication will be discussed.

  16. The Emu Sky Knowledge of the Kamilaroi and Euahlayi Peoples

    CERN Document Server

    Fuller, Robert; Norris, Ray; Trudgett, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a detailed study of the knowledge of the Kamilaroi and Euahlayi peoples about the Emu in the Sky. This study was done with ethnographic data that was not previously reported in detail. We surveyed the literature to find that there are widespread reports of an Emu in the Sky across Australian Aboriginal language groups, but little detailed knowledge available in the literature. This paper reports and describes a comprehensive Kamilaroi and Euahlayi knowledge of the Emu in the Sky and its cultural context.

  17. The night sky brightness at McDonald Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, J. K.; Roosen, R. G.; Brandt, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    Baseline observations of the night sky brightness in B and V are presented for McDonald Observatory. In agreement with earlier work by Elvey and Rudnick (1937) and Elvey (1943), significant night-to-night and same-night variations in sky brightness are found. Possible causes for these variations are discussed. The largest variation in sky brightness found during a single night is approximately a factor of two, a value which corresponds to a factor-of-four variation in airglow brightness. The data are used to comment on the accuracy of previously published surface photometry of M 81.

  18. Getting Students to Observe the Night Sky, Even When Your Sky is Cloudy Half the Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Harry L.

    2010-01-01

    Teachers of introductory astronomy classes often wish to get our students to look at the night sky However, most educational institutions in America are located in regions where cloudy nights are relatively common. This paper describes a low cost way to integrate observations into a course which lacks a dedicated astronomy lab. Students in two large. general science classes in fall 2008 and spring 2009 were asked to participate in one of two global star-counting projects. The fall project was coordinated by UCAR and asked for observations of the constellation Cygnus (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/citizen_science/starcount/results.html). The spring project was run by Project Globe and asked for observations of the constellation Orion. (http://www.globe.gov/GaN/ ). In both cases, students simply find the constellation, match the star pattern to charts that go to different limiting magnitudes, and report the data to the coordinating organization. A copy of the report is sent to the course instructor. The instructor can ask for additional information. Did it work? The success of this project was evaluated by analyzing the e-mail messages that students returned in response to the assignment. In both courses, a very large majority of the students actually did the exercise and submitted a report. Students reported that observing the sky in this way was satisfying to them., and sometimes the reports were quite enthusiastic. In spring 2009, some preparatory activies were conducted during class that were designed to sensitize students to the beauty of the sky. Analysis of student reports indicated that these preparatory activities were helpful, but not as helpful as the instructor would like. This research is part of the Teacher Professional Continuum project at the University of Delaware, which is supported by the National Science Foundation.

  19. Maysin and Its Flavonoid Derivative from Centipedegrass Attenuates Amyloid Plaques by Inducting Humoral Immune Response with Th2 Skewed Cytokine Response in the Tg (APPswe, PS1dE9 Alzheimer's Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuno Song

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a slow, progressive neurodegenerative disease and the most common type of dementia in the elderly. The etiology of AD and its underlying mechanism are still not clear. In a previous study, we found that an ethyl acetate extract of Centipedegrass (CG (i.e., EA-CG contained 4 types of Maysin derivatives, including Luteolin, Isoorientin, Rhamnosylisoorientin, and Derhamnosylmaysin, and showed protective effects against Amyloid beta (Aβ by inhibiting oligomeric Aβ in cellular and in vitro models. Here, we examined the preventative effects of EA-CG treatment on the Aβ burden in the Tg (Mo/Hu APPswe PS1dE9 AD mouse model. We have investigated the EA-CG efficacy as novel anti-AD likely preventing amyloid plaques using immunofluorescence staining to visually analyze Aβ40/42 and fibril formation with Thioflavin-S or 6E10 which are the profile of immunoreactivity against epitope Aβ1-16 or neuritic plaque, the quantitation of humoral immune response against Aβ, and the inflammatory cytokine responses (Th1 and Th2 using ELISA and QRT-PCR. To minimize the toxicity of the extracted CG, we addressed the liver toxicity in response to the CG extract treatment in Tg mice using relevant markers, such as aspartate aminotransferase (AST/ alanine aminotransferase (ALT measurements in serum. The EA-CG extract significantly reduced the Aβ burden, the concentration of soluble Aβ40/42 protein, and fibril formation in the hippocampus and cortex of the Tg mice treated with EA-CG (50 mg/kg BW/day for 6 months compared with the Tg mice treated with a normal diet. Additionally, the profile of anti-inflammatory cytokines revealed that the levels of Th2 (interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-10 (IL-10 cytokines are more significantly increased than Th1 (interferon-γ (IFN-γ, interleukin-2(IL-2 in the sera. These results suggest that the EA-CG fraction induces IL-4/IL-10-dependent anti-inflammatory cytokines (Th2 rather than pro

  20. Tropospheric haze and colors of the clear twilight sky.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Raymond L; Mollner, Duncan C

    2017-07-01

    At the earth's surface, clear-sky colors during civil twilights depend on the combined spectral effects of molecular scattering, extinction by tropospheric aerosols, and absorption by ozone. Molecular scattering alone cannot produce the most vivid twilight colors near the solar horizon, for which aerosol scattering and absorption are also required. However, less well known are haze aerosols' effects on twilight sky colors at larger scattering angles, including near the antisolar horizon. To analyze this range of colors, we compare 3D Monte Carlo simulations of skylight spectra with hyperspectral measurements of clear twilight skies over a wide range of aerosol optical depths. Our combined measurements and simulations indicate that (a) the purest antisolar twilight colors would occur in a purely molecular, multiple-scattering atmosphere, whereas (b) the most vivid solar-sky colors require at least some turbidity. Taken together, these results suggest that multiple scattering plays an important role in determining the redness of the antitwilight arch.

  1. Using All Sky Imaging to Improve Telescope Scheduling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Gary M.

    2017-06-01

    Automated scheduling makes it possible for a small telescope to observe a large number of targets in a single night. But when used in areas which have less-than-perfect sky conditions such automation can lead to large numbers of observations of clouds and haze. This paper describes the development of a "sky-aware" telescope automation system that integrates the data flow from an SBIG AllSky340c camera with an enhanced dispatch scheduler to make optimum use of the available observing conditions for two highly instrumented backyard telescopes. Using the minute by minute time series image stream and a self maintained reference database, the software maintains a file of sky brightness, transparency, stability, and forecasted visibility at several hundred grid positions. The scheduling software uses this information in real time to exclude targets obscured by clouds and select the best observing task, taking into account the requirements and limits of each instrument.

  2. Cloud Detection and Prediction with All Sky Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Jan

    2017-01-01

    This article gives a short overview about a method that uses an all sky camera with a 180 ° field of view to identify the cloud distribution by measuring the absorption of star light. It can be used to assign a sky quality rating to single spots, arbitrary regions or the whole sky at once within a 1 min exposure time. A cloud map can be created from the available data that can be used to determine shape and dimension of clouds and to predict their movement. The resulting data can be used by a scheduling algorithm or the operating crew to point the telescope to a different source before the current source gets covered by clouds. The all sky cameras used so far are located on La Palma at the observatory Roque de los Muchachos close to the telescopes FACT and MAGIC and the planned northern CTA site.

  3. The High Time Resolution Radio Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, D.

    2013-11-01

    Pulsars are laboratories for extreme physics unachievable on Earth. As individual sources and possible orbital companions can be used to study magnetospheric, emission, and superfluid physics, general relativistic effects, and stellar and binary evolution. As populations they exhibit a wide range of sub-types, with parameters varying by many orders of magnitude signifying fundamental differences in their evolutionary history and potential uses. There are currently around 2200 known pulsars in the Milky Way, the Magellanic clouds, and globular clusters, most of which have been discovered with radio survey observations. These observations, as well as being suitable for detecting the repeating signals from pulsars, are well suited for identifying other transient astronomical radio bursts that last just a few milliseconds that either singular in nature, or rarely repeating. Prior to the work of this thesis non-repeating radio transients at extragalactic distances had possibly been discovered, however with just one example status a real astronomical sources was in doubt. Finding more of these sources was a vital to proving they were real and to open up the universe for millisecond-duration radio astronomy. The High Time Resolution Universe survey uses the multibeam receiver on the 64-m Parkes radio telescope to search the whole visible sky for pulsars and transients. The temporal and spectral resolution of the receiver and the digital back-end enable the detection of relatively faint, and distant radio sources. From the Parkes telescope a large portion of the Galactic plane can be seen, a rich hunting ground for radio pulsars of all types, while previously poorly surveyed regions away from the Galactic plane are also covered. I have made a number of pulsar discoveries in the survey, including some rare systems. These include PSR J1226-6208, a possible double neutron star system in a remarkably circular orbit, PSR J1431-471 which is being eclipsed by its companion with

  4. Measuring Overcast Colors with All-Sky Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    rather than diffusely reflected skylight spectra. To do so, I use a Photo Research PR-650 spectrora- diometer that has a spectral range of 380–780nm... Colorimetry of Overcasts from All-Sky Photographs Overcast skies yield an embarrassment of remote- sensing riches: cloud optical depths τ, radiances, and...chromaticity gamuts and turnings observed in real overcasts. Fig. 16. Scattering geometry for an object of radiance L0 seen by an observer through a multiple

  5. SKYMONITOR: A Global Network for Sky Brightness Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Donald R.; Mckenna, D.; Pulvermacher, R.; Everett, M.

    2010-01-01

    We are implementing a global network to measure sky brightness at dark-sky critical sites with the goal of creating a multi-decade database. The heart of this project is the Night Sky Brightness Monitor (NSBM), an autonomous 2 channel photometer which measures night sky brightness in the visual wavelengths (Mckenna et al, AAS 2009). Sky brightness is measured every minute at two elevation angles typically zenith and 20 degrees to monitor brightness and transparency. The NSBM consists of two parts, a remote unit and a base station with an internet connection. Currently these devices use 2.4 Ghz transceivers with a range of 100 meters. The remote unit is battery powered with daytime recharging using a solar panel. Data received by the base unit is transmitted via email protocol to IDA offices in Tucson where it will be collected, archived and made available to the user community via a web interface. Two other versions of the NSBM are under development: one for radio sensitive areas using an optical fiber link and the second that reads data directly to a laptop for sites without internet access. NSBM units are currently undergoing field testing at two observatories. With support from the National Science Foundation, we will construct and install a total of 10 units at astronomical observatories. With additional funding, we will locate additional units at other sites such as National Parks, dark-sky preserves and other sites where dark sky preservation is crucial. We will present the current comparison with the National Park Service sky monitoring camera. We anticipate that the SKYMONITOR network will be functioning by the end of 2010.

  6. The Digital Sky Project: Database Technologies and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert J.

    1998-05-01

    We will discuss the novel database technologies and techniques under development within the Digital Sky project which are required to seamlessly integrate and mine large datasets. The astronomical field is entering a new era as multiple, large area, digital sky surveys are coming on-line. These new datasets are not only interesting in their own right, but a truly revolutionary leap forward arises in the aggregation of complimentary, multi-wavelength surveys (i.e. the cross-identification of billions of sources). Federating these large, complex datasets, however, is not an easy task and represents a serious technical challenge. It is the solution to this challenge, as well as the development of the technology necessary to effectively mine the aggregate data, which is the goal of the Digital Sky project. These technologies include both hardware, to optimize the retrieval and analysis of geographically distributed datasets, and software, to simplify the ingestion of archives into the digital sky federation. For the former, we are utilizing our NPACI (National Partnership for Advanced Computational Infrastructure) relationship to identify new techniques for parallelizing both the retrieval and computational requirements, as well as innovative approaches, such as network weather, to improve the response between the distributed system components. In order to grow and develop, the digital sky will need to incorporate new surveys and datasets in addition to its original tenants: the 2MASS (2 Micron All Sky Survey) and DPOSS (Digitized Palomar Observatory Sky Survey) projects. This requirement necessitates a standardized, modular interface for each archive that allows for an exchange of both the types of data and the types of services provided by the constituent archives. This interface is built on a common sky partitioning scheme: the Hierarchical Triangulated Mesh, and a standardized metadata for astronomical surveys.

  7. Worldwide Impact: International Year of Astronomy Dark Skies Awareness Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Isbell, D.

    2009-12-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's natural heritage. More than one fifth of the world population, two thirds of the United States population and one half of the European Union population have already lost naked eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, “Dark Skies Awareness” is a global cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs through: - New Technology (website, podcasts, social networking, Second Life) - Educational Materials (Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, brochures, posters, CDs, DVDs, educational kit) - The Arts (photo contest) - Events (Earth Hour, International Dark Sky Week, World Night in Defense of Starlight, Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Sidewalk Astronomy, Nights in the Parks) - Citizen Science Programs (5 star hunting programs & Quiet Skies) Dark Skies Communities (Starlight Initiative, International Dark Sky Communities) Many countries around the world have participated in these programs. We will highlight 24 countries in particular and focus on successful techniques used in aspects of the programs, results and impact on the audience, and plans and challenges for maintaining or extending the program beyond the International Year of Astronomy. The International Year of Astronomy 2009 is partially funded from a grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) Astronomy Division. The National Optical Astronomy Observatory is host to the IYA2009 Dark Skies Awareness programs and is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. under cooperative agreement with NSF.

  8. Angle of sky light polarization derived from digital images of the sky under various conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Cao, Yu; Zhang, Xuanzhe; Yang, Yi; Ning, Yu

    2017-01-20

    Skylight polarization is used for navigation by some birds and insects. Skylight polarization also has potential for human navigation applications. Its advantages include relative immunity from interference and the absence of error accumulation over time. However, there are presently few examples of practical applications for polarization navigation technology. The main reason is its weak robustness during cloudy weather conditions. In this paper, the real-time measurement of the sky light polarization pattern across the sky has been achieved with a wide field of view camera. The images were processed under a new reference coordinate system to clearly display the symmetrical distribution of angle of polarization with respect to the solar meridian. A new algorithm for the extraction of the image axis of symmetry is proposed, in which the real-time azimuth angle between the camera and the solar meridian is accurately calculated. Our experimental results under different weather conditions show that polarization navigation has high accuracy, is strongly robust, and performs well during fog and haze, clouds, and strong sunlight.

  9. All-Sky Microwave Imager Data Assimilation at NASA GMAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Jin, Jianjun; El Akkraoui, Amal; McCarty, Will; Todling, Ricardo; Gu, Wei; Gelaro, Ron

    2017-01-01

    Efforts in all-sky satellite data assimilation at the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center have been focused on the development of GSI configurations to assimilate all-sky data from microwave imagers such as the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR-2). Electromagnetic characteristics associated with their wavelengths allow microwave imager data to be relatively transparent to atmospheric gases and thin ice clouds, and highly sensitive to precipitation. Therefore, GMAOs all-sky data assimilation efforts are primarily focused on utilizing these data in precipitating regions. The all-sky framework being tested at GMAO employs the GSI in a hybrid 4D-EnVar configuration of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) data assimilation system, which will be included in the next formal update of GEOS. This article provides an overview of the development of all-sky radiance assimilation in GEOS, including some performance metrics. In addition, various projects underway at GMAO designed to enhance the all-sky implementation will be introduced.

  10. Preserving Dark Skies in National Parks for Future Generations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duriscoe, C. S.; Duriscoe, D. M.

    2004-12-01

    The United States National Park Service (NPS) has formed a team of professional scientists and naturalists to monitor the effects of light pollution in parks throughout the country, from sources both within and outside the parks. The NPS Night Sky Team is using a wide field CCD camera to quantify sky quality by imaging the entire sky under varying optical extinction conditions. A component of the program utilizes these images and other materials to convey the National Park Service mission of protecting the night sky "unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations." This education outreach effort includes the dissemination of results from the research and monitoring, brochures for the general public, astronomy activity guide for grades 6-12 emphasizing light pollution and dark skies as one of the national parks' primary resources, and astronomy activities for the public in parks, often in collaboration with local amateur astronomy groups. Other potential accomplishments include the location of observatories in parks, a website for the Night Sky Team, and the instigation of lighting retrofits within parks. This program is funded primarily by the United States Department of Interior, National Park Service

  11. Cloud Detection and Prediction with All Sky Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Jan; Buss, Jens; Brügge, Kai; Nöthe, Max; Rhode, Wolfgang

    Atmospheric monitoring is a field of special importance for astroparticle physics, especially for Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) as clouds will absorb and scatter the Cherenkov photons of air showers. Conventional tools used for atmospheric monitoring (e.g. LIDAR) are very expensive and monitor only a small part of the sky at once. Therefore, they are not suitable to perform a wide scan of the sky which is necessary to detect clouds in advance. This article gives a short overview about a method that uses an all sky camera with a 180 ° field of view to identify the cloud distribution by measuring the absorption of star light. It can be used to assign a sky quality rating to single spots, arbitrary regions or the whole sky at once within a 1 min exposure time. A cloud map can be created from the available data that can be used to determine shape and dimension of clouds and to predict their movement. The resulting data can be used by a scheduling algorithm or the operating crew to point the telescope to a different source before the current source gets covered by clouds. The all sky cameras used so far are located on La Palma at the observatory Roque de los Muchachos close to the telescopes FACT and MAGIC and the planned northern CTA site.

  12. The Pan-STARRS Survey for Transients (PSST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Mark; Carter Chambers, Kenneth; Flewelling, Heather; Smartt, Stephen J.; Smith, Ken; Wright, Darryl

    2015-08-01

    The Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) Science Consortium finished the 3Pi survey of the whole sky north of -30 degrees between 2010-2014 in grizy (PS1 specific filters) and the PS1 telescope has been running a wide-field survey for near earth objects, funded by NASA through the NEO Observation Program. This survey takes data in a w-band (wide-band filter spanning g,r,i) in dark time, and combinations of r, i, z and y during bright time. We are now processing these data through the Pan-STARRS IPP difference imaging pipeline and recovering stationary transients. Effectively the 3Pi survey for transients that started during the PS1 Science Consortium is being continued under the new NEO optimized operations mode. The observing procedure in this case is to take a quad of exposures, typically 30-45 seconds separated by 10-20 minutes each, typically revealing high confidence transients (greater than 5-sigma) to depths of i~ 20.7, y~18.3 (AB mags). This cadence may be repeated on subsequent nights in a return pointing.Continuing the public release of the first 880 transients from the PS1 3Pi survey during the search period September 2013 - January 2014, beginning February 2015, the transient events using the data from the the Pan-STARRS NEO Science Consortium are now regularly added. These are mostly supernova candidates, but the list also contains some variable stars, AGN, and nuclear transients. The light curves are too sparsely sampled to be of standalone use, but they may be of use to the community in combining with existing data (e.g. Fraser et al. 2013, ApJ, 779, L8), constraining explosion and rise times (e.g. Nicholl et al. 2013, Nature, 502, 346) as well as many being new discoveries.For additional details visit http://star.pst.qub.ac.uk/ps1threepi/

  13. Spectral and Spatial UV Sky Radiance Measurements at a Seaside Resort Under Clear Sky and Slightly Overcast Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandmann, Henner; Stick, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Spatial measurements of the diffusely scattered sky radiance at a seaside resort under clear sky and slightly overcast conditions have been used to calculate the sky radiance distribution across the upper hemisphere. The measurements were done in the summer season when solar UV radiation is highest. The selected wavelengths were 307, 350 and 550 nm representing the UVB, UVA and VIS band. Absolute values of radiance differ considerably between the wavelengths. Normalizing the measured values by use of direct solar radiance made the spatial distributions of unequal sky radiance comparable. The results convey a spatial impression of the different distributions of the radiance at the three wavelengths. Relative scattered radiance intensity is one order of magnitude greater in UVB than in VIS, whereas in UVA lies roughly in between. Under slightly overcast conditions scattered radiance is increased at all three wavelengths by about one order of magnitude. These measurements taken at the seaside underline the importance of diffuse scattered radiance. The effect of shading parts of the sky can be estimated from the distribution of sky radiance. This knowledge might be useful for sun seekers and in the treatment of people staying at the seaside for therapeutic purposes. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  14. Evaluation of Clear Sky Models for Satellite-Based Irradiance Estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gotseff, Peter [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This report describes an intercomparison of three popular broadband clear sky solar irradiance model results with measured data, as well as satellite-based model clear sky results compared to measured clear sky data. The authors conclude that one of the popular clear sky models (the Bird clear sky model developed by Richard Bird and Roland Hulstrom) could serve as a more accurate replacement for current satellite-model clear sky estimations. Additionally, the analysis of the model results with respect to model input parameters indicates that rather than climatological, annual, or monthly mean input data, higher-time-resolution input parameters improve the general clear sky model performance.

  15. The Biggest Star in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-01

    An international team of astronomers has used large telescopes in Chile and Australia to measure the biggest star in the sky. The star, designated R Doradus , is of the so-called red giant type and is located in the southern constellation of Dorado. Its apparent diameter (i.e., the size which the star appears to have when seen from the Earth) is larger than any other so far observed, except for the Sun. In particular, it exceeds by more than 30 % that of Betelgeuse , which for the past 75 years has held the title of star with the largest apparent size. Measuring sizes of stars Measuring the sizes of stars is very difficult due to their enormous distances. For example, if our Sun were placed at the distance of the next closest star (four light-years away), it would have about the same apparent size as a DM 1 (or US quarter-dollar) coin placed at a distance of 500 km (about 0.01 arcsec). Even for the most powerful astronomical telescopes, it is a very challenging task to measure such small angles. Ideally, the angular resolution of a telescope (its capability to resolve fine details in celestial sources) increases with its diameter. In practice, although ground-based optical telescopes now have diameters up to 10 metres, their actual resolution of visual light is that of a telescope of only about 20 centimetres aperture. This is because of the constant turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere. This turbulence causes the stars to twinkle in a way which delights the poets but frustrates the astronomers, since it blurs the fine details of the images. The first, and largest, star apart from the Sun to have its diameter measured was Betelgeuse, the brightest star in the constellation of Orion. Its angular diameter was found to be 0.044 arcsec by Albert Michelson and his team who used the Hooker telescope on Mt. Wilson in California in the early 1920s, pioneering interferometry techniques. Betelgeuse kept its title as the star with the largest apparent size for the next 75

  16. Hazy and Dusty Skies over Western Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    A pall of smoke and dust largely obscured the nations of Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana, Burkina Faso and southern Mali on January 12, 2004. The poor air quality in the region was a combined result of the hundreds of agricultural fires that were burning throughout western Africa during December and early January, and was likely to have been influenced by a Saharan dust storm that occurred several days earlier. These image data products from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) illustrate the abundance of atmospheric particulate matter across the region.The left-hand panels are natural-color views from MISR's downward-pointing (nadir) and most obliquely forward-pointing cameras. At the nadir view, the shoreline of the Cote d'Ivoire and many other surface features are apparent, and the haze across the region is noticeable. The distinctive area of dark green vegetation (apparent below and left of image center) is situated in the Cote d'Ivoire, near the border with Ghana, to the east of the Komoe River and southwest of the Comoe National Park. At the oblique view the aerosol appears so thick that the coastline is completely obscured, but this region of dark vegetation and hilly terrain can still be discerned.The right-hand panel is generated through automated processing of data from multiple MISR cameras, and utilizes the change in scene brightness and contrast at different view angles to retrieve aerosol amounts, expressed as optical depth. The aerosol map indicates an optically thick atmosphere by the orange or yellow pixels, and clearer skies are indicated by blue pixels. Places where clouds or other factors precluded an aerosol retrieval are shown in dark gray. Aerosol properties are retrieved at a coarse spatial resolution of 17.6 kilometers.The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a

  17. From Sky to Archive: Long Term Management of Sky Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darch, Peter T.; Sands, Ashley E.; Borgman, Christine; Golshan, Milena S.; Traweek, Sharon

    2017-01-01

    Sky survey data may remain scientifically valuable long beyond the end of a survey’s operational period, both for continuing inquiry and for calibrating and testing instruments for subsequent generations of surveys. Astronomy infrastructure has many stakeholders, including those concerned with data management. Research libraries are increasingly partnering with scholars to sustain access to data.The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) was among the first major scientific projects to partner with libraries in this way, embarking on a data transfer process with two university libraries. We report on a qualitative case study of this process.Ideally, long-term sustainability of sky survey data would be a key part of planning and construction, but rarely does this occur. Teams are under pressure to deliver a project on time and on budget that produces high-quality data during its operational period, leaving few resources available to plan long-term data management. The difficulty of planning is further compounded by the complexity of predicting circumstances and needs of the astronomy community in future decades. SDSS team members regarded libraries, long-lived institutions concerned with access to scholarship, as a potential solution to long-term data sustainability.As the SDSS data transfer was the first of this scale attempted - 160 TB of data - astronomers and library staff were faced with scoping the range of activities involved. They spent two years planning this five-year process. While successful overall as demonstration projects, the libraries encountered many obstacles. We found all parties experienced difficulty in articulating their notions of “scientific data,” “archiving,” “serving,” and “providing access” to the datasets. Activities and interpretations of the data transfer process varied by institutional motivations for participation and by available infrastructure. We conclude several, rather than a single, “library solutions” for long

  18. NOAA AVHRR Clear-Sky Products over Oceans (ACSPO): Sea Surface Temperature, Clear Sky Radiances, and Aerosol Optical Depth for the Global Ocean, 2011 - present (NCEI Accession 0072979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AVHRR Clear-Sky Processor over Oceans, jointly developed between NESDIS STAR and OSDPD, produces AVHRR clear-sky products over oceans. ACSPO generates output...

  19. SkyNet: A Modular Nuclear Reaction Network Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippuner, Jonas; Roberts, Luke F.

    2017-12-01

    Almost all of the elements heavier than hydrogen that are present in our solar system were produced by nuclear burning processes either in the early universe or at some point in the life cycle of stars. In all of these environments, there are dozens to thousands of nuclear species that interact with each other to produce successively heavier elements. In this paper, we present SkyNet, a new general-purpose nuclear reaction network that evolves the abundances of nuclear species under the influence of nuclear reactions. SkyNet can be used to compute the nucleosynthesis evolution in all astrophysical scenarios where nucleosynthesis occurs. SkyNet is free and open source, and aims to be easy to use and flexible. Any list of isotopes can be evolved, and SkyNet supports different types of nuclear reactions. SkyNet is modular so that new or existing physics, like nuclear reactions or equations of state, can easily be added or modified. Here, we present in detail the physics implemented in SkyNet with a focus on a self-consistent transition to and from nuclear statistical equilibrium to non-equilibrium nuclear burning, our implementation of electron screening, and coupling of the network to an equation of state. We also present comprehensive code tests and comparisons with existing nuclear reaction networks. We find that SkyNet agrees with published results and other codes to an accuracy of a few percent. Discrepancies, where they exist, can be traced to differences in the physics implementations.

  20. SkyLine and SkyGas: Novel automated technologies for automatic GHG flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ineson, Philip; Stockdale, James

    2014-05-01

    1. Concerns for the future of the Earth's climate centre around the anthropogenically-driven continuing increases in atmospheric concentrations of the major 'greenhouse gases' (GHGs) which include CO2, CH4 and N2O. A major component of the global budgets for all three of these gases is the flux between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems. 2. Currently, these fluxes are poorly quantified, largely due to technical limitations associated with making these flux measurements. Whilst eddy covariance systems have greatly improved such measurements at the ecosystem scale, flux measurements at the plot scale are commonly made using labour intensive traditional 'cover box' approaches; technical limitations have frequently been a bottle-neck in producing adequate and appropriate GHG flux data necessary for making land management decisions. For example, there are almost no night time flux data for N2O fluxes, and frequently such data are only measured over bare soil patches. 3. We have been addressing the design of novel field equipment for the automation of GHG flux measurements at the chamber and plot scale and will present here some of the technical solutions we have developed. These solutions include the development of the SkyLine and SkyGas approaches which resolve many of the common problems associated with making high frequency, sufficiently replicated GHG flux measurements under field conditions. 4. Unlike most other automated systems, these technologies 'fly' a single chamber to the measurement site, rather than have multiple replicated chambers and analysers. We will present data showing how such systems can deliver high time and spatial resolution flux data, with a minimum of operator intervention and, potentially, at relatively low per plot cost. We will also show how such measurements can be extended to monitoring fluxes from freshwater features in the landscape.

  1. A WLED based on LuAG:Ce3+ PiG coated red-emitting K2SiF6:Mn4+ phosphor by screen-printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Rui; Wu, Lingchao; Di, Xiaoxuan; Li, Pengzhi; Hu, Guangcai; Liang, Xiaojuan; Xiang, Weidong

    2017-08-01

    It is high-profile that the use of phosphor-in-glass (PiG) is extensive because of its excellent advantages in thermal resistance and lifetime aspects, and so on. Here, white light-emitting diodes (WLED) based on LuAG:Ce3+ PiG coated red-emitting K2SiF6:Mn4+ (KSF) phosphors by screen-printing are fabricated. Among all of these, the commercial LuAG phosphors and glass raw materials of TeO2-based glass, were weighted and milled in an agate thoroughly. Then, the mixture was melted and sintered at 850 K or so for 20 min in the ambient atmosphere through low temperature co-fired method, cold-forming LuAG PiG clump and cut into different LuAG PiG thicknesses. After that, the commercial red phosphor KSF was coated on LuAG PiG by screen-printing technique. Finally, high-performance WLEDs based on the TeO2-based glass were obtained, tested and characterized, which exhibit a highest color rendering index of 94.1, a lowest color temperature of 3744 K and a largest luminous efficiency of 101.02 lm·W-1. Most noticeably of all, the promising method has excellent developing potential for industrialization in high-power WLED.

  2. Mining the SDSS SkyServer SQL queries log

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Vitor M.; Santos, Rafael; Raddick, Jordan; Thakar, Ani

    2016-05-01

    SkyServer, the Internet portal for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) astronomic catalog, provides a set of tools that allows data access for astronomers and scientific education. One of SkyServer data access interfaces allows users to enter ad-hoc SQL statements to query the catalog. SkyServer also presents some template queries that can be used as basis for more complex queries. This interface has logged over 330 million queries submitted since 2001. It is expected that analysis of this data can be used to investigate usage patterns, identify potential new classes of queries, find similar queries, etc. and to shed some light on how users interact with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data and how scientists have adopted the new paradigm of e-Science, which could in turn lead to enhancements on the user interfaces and experience in general. In this paper we review some approaches to SQL query mining, apply the traditional techniques used in the literature and present lessons learned, namely, that the general text mining approach for feature extraction and clustering does not seem to be adequate for this type of data, and, most importantly, we find that this type of analysis can result in very different queries being clustered together.

  3. The MAMBA Thermal Infrared All-Sky Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Edward Alan; Tinn Chee Jim, Kevin; Lewis, Peter

    2015-08-01

    We are developing a system to continually and simultaneously monitor infrared atmospheric extinction along all lines of sight. This system combines a next generation radiometrically calibrated thermal all-sky camera, a weather station, and a neural net trained on historic Radiosonde profiles. Oceanit Laboratories, Inc. will market this system as an off the shelf unit. Custom-built thermal all sky cameras have previously been used on Haleakala, Cerro Tololo, and elsewhere. Except for RASICAM on Cerro Tololo, they have not been radiometrically calibrated and have been used only for qualitative cloud monitoring. The new system will have improved sky coverage, resolution, and noise properties with respect to RASICAM, and simulations show it will be able to infer atmospheric transmittance to within a few percent. The all sky camera will combine an equiresolution optical design with an off-the-shelf thermal detector and in field blackbody calibration sources to provide uniform sensitivity and radiometric accuracy across the sky at relatively low cost. Our goal is to make such systems ubiqitous at observatories around the world.

  4. Diagnosis of clear sky ultraviolet radiation for Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemus Deschamps, L. [Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre (Australia); Galindo, I.; Solano, R.; Elizalde, A.T.; Fonseca, J. [Centro Universitario de Investigaciones en Ciencias del Ambiente, University of Colima (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    A discrete-ordinate radiative transfer model is employed to develop a regional clear sky ultraviolet (UV) diagnosis system. The clear sky UV radiation, weighted by the spectral sensitivity of human skin is calculated using the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) data sets. Examples of the geographical clear sky UV Index distributions are presented and the model results are compared with surface UV measurements from University of Colima for 1999. [Spanish] Utilizando un modelo de transferencia de radiacion de ordenadas discretas se desarrolla un sistema para el diagnostico de la distribucion de radiacion ultravioleta para cielo despejado en la Republica Mexicana. La radiacion para cielo despejado se obtiene utilizando la respuesta espectral de la piel humana y los datos de satelite de ozono total registrados por el espectrometro TOMS. Se presentan ejemplos del Indice de radiacion ultravioleta (UV Index) calculados con el modelo y se comparan con las mediciones en superficie obtenidas en la Universidad de Colima durante 1999.

  5. An All-Sky Portable (ASP) Optical Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Eric Wim

    2017-06-01

    This optical catalogue combines the all-sky USNO-B1.0/A1.0 and most-sky APM catalogues, plus overlays of SDSS optical data, into a single all-sky map presented in a sparse binary format that is easily downloaded at 9 Gb zipped. Total count is 1 163 237 190 sources and each has J2000 astrometry, red and blue magnitudes with PSFs and variability indicator, and flags for proper motion, epoch, and source survey and catalogue for each of the photometry and astrometry. The catalogue is available on http://quasars.org/asp.html, and additional data for this paper is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.4225/50/5807fbc12595f.

  6. The spectrum of the Kitt Peak night sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip; Gronwall, Caryl; Pilachowski, Catherine A.

    1990-08-01

    Absolute spectrophotometry of the Kitt Peak night sky at a variety of azimuths an zenith angles is presented, and the effect of population increase in Pima County on the dark-sky properties of Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona is studied. The results confirm that Kitt Peak remains a dark site, even after significant recent population growth of the surrounding area. The major line contributor to the B band is Hg, while the dominant source of contamination to the V-band measures are atmospheric lines, most notably O I 5577 A. Using fluxed observations of street lamps it was found that the relative contribution to light pollution in the yellow-red (5000 A - 6500 A) is 10 percent Hg, 30 percent LPS, and 60 percent HPS. No significant azimuthal effects are seen; it is noted that the sky remains equally dark toward Phoenix and Tucson as it does in other directions for zenith distances of 60 deg or less.

  7. A simple formula for determining globally clear skies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, C.N.; George, A.T.; Mace, G.G. [Penn State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Surface measurements to serve as {open_quotes}ground truth{close_quotes} are of primary importance in the development of retrieval algorithms using satellite measurements to predict surface irradiance. The most basic algorithms of this type deal with clear sky (i.e., cloudless) top-to-surface shortwave (SW) transfer, serving as a necessary prerequisite towards treating both clear and cloudy conditions. Recently, atmosphere SW cloud forcing to infer the possibility of excess atmospheric absorption (compared with model results) in cloudy atmospheres. The surface component of this ratio relies on inferring the expected clear sky SW irradiance to determine the effects of clouds on the SW energy budget. Solar renewable energy applications make use of clear and cloud fraction climatologies to assess solar radiation resources. All of the above depend to some extent on the identification of globally clear sky conditions and the attendant measurements of downwelling SW irradiance.

  8. Providing Diurnal Sky Cover Data at ARM Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klebe, Dimitri I. [Solmirus Corporation, Colorado Springs, CO (United States)

    2015-03-06

    The Solmirus Corporation was awarded two-year funding to perform a comprehensive data analysis of observations made during Solmirus’ 2009 field campaign (conducted from May 21 to July 27, 2009 at the ARM SGP site) using their All Sky Infrared Visible Analyzer (ASIVA) instrument. The objective was to develop a suite of cloud property data products for the ASIVA instrument that could be implemented in real time and tailored for cloud modelers. This final report describes Solmirus’ research and findings enabled by this grant. The primary objective of this award was to develop a diurnal sky cover (SC) data product utilizing the ASIVA’s infrared (IR) radiometrically-calibrated data and is described in detail. Other data products discussed in this report include the sky cover derived from ASIVA’s visible channel and precipitable water vapor, cloud temperature (both brightness and color), and cloud height inferred from ASIVA’s IR channels.

  9. Night sky a field guide to the constellations

    CERN Document Server

    Poppele, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Stargazing is among the most peaceful and inspiring outdoor activities. Night Sky, the award-winning book by Jonathan Poppele, makes it more fun than ever! Take a simple approach to finding 62 constellations by focusing on one constellation at a time, instead of attempting to study dizzying charts. Start with the easy-to-find constellations during each season and work toward the more difficult ones. Better yet, you'll learn how to locate any constellation in relation to the Big Dipper, the North Star and the top of the sky. With two ways to locate each constellation, you'll know where in the sky to look and what to look for! Along the way, you'll be introduced to mythology, facts and tidbits, as well as details about the planets, solar system and more! As an added bonus, the book comes with a red-light flashlight for night reading.

  10. Measuring the influence of aerosols and albedo on sky polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuter, A; Emde, C; Blumthaler, M

    2010-11-01

    All-sky distributions of the polarized radiance are measured using an automated fish-eye camera system with a rotating polarizer. For a large range of aerosol and surface albedo situations, the influence on the degree of polarization and sky radiance is investigated. The range of aerosol optical depth and albedo is 0.05-0.5 and 0.1-0.75, respectively. For this range of parameters, a reduction of the degree of polarization from about 0.7 to 0.4 was observed. The analysis is done for 90° scattering angle in the principal plane under clear sky conditions for a broadband channel of 450 ± 25 nm and solar zenith angles between 55° and 60°. Radiative transfer calculations considering three different aerosol mixtures are performed and and agree with the measurements within the statistical error.

  11. Radiative sky cooling: fundamental physics, materials, structures, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingshu; Sun, Yubo; Zhou, Zhiguang; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Bermel, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Radiative sky cooling reduces the temperature of a system by promoting heat exchange with the sky; its key advantage is that no input energy is required. We will review the origins of radiative sky cooling from ancient times to the modern day, and illustrate how the fundamental physics of radiative cooling calls for a combination of properties that may not occur in bulk materials. A detailed comparison with recent modeling and experiments on nanophotonic structures will then illustrate the advantages of this recently emerging approach. Potential applications of these radiative cooling materials to a variety of temperature-sensitive optoelectronic devices, such as photovoltaics, thermophotovoltaics, rectennas, and infrared detectors, will then be discussed. This review will conclude by forecasting the prospects for the field as a whole in both terrestrial and space-based systems.

  12. The BAA Campaign for Dark Skies: Fifteen years on

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizon, R.

    2004-06-01

    The starry sky is, unofficially but indubitably, a site of special scientific interest and an area of outstanding natural beauty - if it can be seen. The BAA's Campaign for Dark Skies (CfDS) was set up by concerned members in 1989, to counter the ever-growing tide of skyglow which has tainted the night sky over Britain since the 1950s. Once caused almost exclusively by poorly aimed streetlamps and building floodlights emitting light above the horizontal, skyglow is nowadays increasingly the result of vastly over-powered, poorly mounted household security lights and literally 'over-the-top' sports lighting. CfDS has grown into a network of 124 volunteer local officers, and several hundred committed supporters, who aim to persuade their local councils and relevant organisations of the benefits of well directed lighting, the motto being: the right amount of light, and only where needed.

  13. Gods, Demons and Deceivers: Jesuits Facing Chaco Skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro Martín

    2015-05-01

    The Jesuit missions located in the Chaco are less known than the ones in Paraguay. They are the last step of the Jesuits' missionary device in the Rio de la Plata region. They were dedicated to 'evangelize' and 'civilize' the aboriginal groups considered more hostile: nomadic hunter-gatherers who adopted the use of horses and were not controlled by the colonial government. These groups were seen by Europeans as a radical otherness. That is why the Jesuits' descriptions of Chaco Indian skies are a very interesting example about European attitudes toward other worldviews. This paper explores the use of different paradigms for interpreting these alternative skies: demonic influence, the deception of sorcerers and an Evemeristic reading of the indigenous worldview. This article also addresses some of the interactions between the aboriginal and Christian skies in the mission context.

  14. Automating sky object classification in astronomical survey images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyad, Usama M.; Doyle, Richard J.; Weir, Nicholas; Djorgovski, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    We describe the application of machine classification techniques to the development of an automated tool for the reduction of a large scientific data set. The 2nd Palomer Observatory Sky Survey is nearly completed. This survey provides comprehensive coverage of the northern celestial hemisphere in the form of photographic plates. The plates are being transformed into digitized images whose quality will probably not be surpassed in the next ten to twenty years. The images are expected to contain on the order of 10(exp 7) galaxies and 10(exp 8) stars. Astronomers wish to determine which of these sky objects belong to various classes of galaxies and stars. The size of this data set precludes manual analysis. Our approach is to develop a software system which integrates the functions of independently developed techniques for image processing and data classification. Digitized sky images are passed through image processing routines to identify sky objects and to extract a set of features for each object. These routines are used to help select a useful set of attributes for classifying sky objects. Then GID3* and O-BTree, two inductive learning techniques, learn classification decision trees from examples. These classifiers will be used to process the rest of the data. This paper gives an overview of the machine learning techniques used, describes the details of our specific application, and reports the initial encouraging results. The results indicate that our approach is well-suited to the problem. The primary benefits of the approach are increased data reduction throughput and consistency of classification. The classification rules which are the product of the inductive learning techniques will form an object, examinable basis for classifying sky objects. A final, not to be underestimated benefit is that astronomers will be freed from the tedium of an intensely visual task to pursue more challenging analysis and interpretation problems based on automatically cataloged

  15. Sky Quality Meter measurements in a colour-changing world

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez de Miguel, A.; Aubé, M.; Zamorano, J.; Kocifaj, M.; Roby, J.; Tapia, C.

    2017-05-01

    The Sky Quality Meter (SQM) has become the most common device used to track the evolution of the brightness of the sky from polluted regions to first-class astronomical observatories. A vast database of SQM measurements already exists for many places in the world. Unfortunately, the SQM operates over a wide spectral band and its spectral response interacts with the sky's spectrum in a complex manner. This is why the optical signals are difficult to interpret when the data are recorded in regions with different sources of artificial light. The brightness of the night sky is linked in a complex way to ground-based light emissions, while taking into account atmospheric-induced optical distortion as well as spectral transformation from the underlying ground surfaces. While the spectral modulation of the sky's radiance has been recognized, it still remains poorly characterized and quantified. The impact of the SQM's spectral characteristics on sky-brightness measurements is analysed here for different light sources, including low- and high-pressure sodium lamps, PC-amber and white LEDs, metal halide and mercury lamps. We show that a routine conversion of radiance to magnitude is difficult, or rather impossible, because the average wavelength depends on actual atmospheric and environment conditions, the spectrum of the source and device-specific properties. We correlate SQM readings with both the Johnson astronomical photometry bands and the human system of visual perception, assuming different lighting technologies. These findings have direct implications for the processing of SQM data and for their improvement and/or remediation.

  16. Fireballs in the Sky: An Augmented Reality Citizen Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Fireballs in the Sky is an innovative Australian citizen science program that connects the public with the research of the Desert Fireball Network (DFN). This research aims to understand the early workings of the solar system, and Fireballs in the Sky invites people around the world to learn about this science, contributing fireball sightings via a user-friendly augmented reality mobile app. Tens of thousands of people have downloaded the app world-wide and participated in the science of meteoritics. The Fireballs in the Sky app allows users to get involved with the Desert Fireball Network research, supplementing DFN observations and providing enhanced coverage by reporting their own meteor sightings to DFN scientists. Fireballs in the Sky reports are used to track the trajectories of meteors - from their orbit in space to where they might have landed on Earth. Led by Phil Bland at Curtin University in Australia, the Desert Fireball Network (DFN) uses automated observatories across Australia to triangulate trajectories of meteorites entering the atmosphere, determine pre-entry orbits, and pinpoint their fall positions. Each observatory is an autonomous intelligent imaging system, taking 1000 by 36 megapixel all-sky images throughout the night, using neural network algorithms to recognize events. They are capable of operating for 12 months in a harsh environment, and store all imagery collected. We developed a completely automated software pipeline for data reduction, and built a supercomputer database for storage, allowing us to process our entire archive. The DFN currently stands at 50 stations distributed across the Australian continent, covering an area of 2.5 million square kilometers. Working with DFN's partners at NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute, the team is expanding the network beyond Australia to locations around the world. Fireballs in the Sky allows a growing public base to learn about and participate in this exciting research.

  17. Dark Skies Awareness Programs for the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; US IYA Dark Skies Working Group

    2009-05-01

    The arc of the Milky Way seen from a truly dark location is part of our planet's cultural and natural heritage. More than 1/5 of the world population, 2/3 of the United States population and 1/2 of the European Union population have already lost naked-eye visibility of the Milky Way. This loss, caused by light pollution, is a serious and growing issue that impacts astronomical research, the economy, ecology, energy conservation, human health, public safety and our shared ability to see the night sky. For this reason, "Dark Skies” is a cornerstone project of the International Year of Astronomy. Its goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people worldwide involved in a variety of programs that: 1) Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking on Facebook and MySpace, a Second Life presence) 2) Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy) 3) Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4) Involve citizen-scientists in naked-eye and digital-meter star hunting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?", the Great World Wide Star Count and the radio frequency interference equivalent: "Quiet Skies") and 5) Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, and astronomy (e.g., The Starlight Initiative, World Night in Defense of Starlight, International Dark Sky Week, International Dark-Sky Communities, Earth Hour, The Great Switch Out, a traveling exhibit, downloadable posters and brochures). The poster will provide an update, describe how people can continue to participate, and take a look ahead at the program's sustainability. For more information, visit www.darkskiesawareness.org.

  18. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    OpenAIRE

    The SDSS collaboration; Abazajian, Kevork

    2003-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordina...

  19. Protecting Dark Skies as a State-Wide Resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lori E.; Walker, Constance E.; Hall, Jeffrey C.; Larson, Steve; Williams, Grant; Falco, Emilio; Hinz, Joannah; Fortin, Pascal; Brocious, Dan; Corbally, Christopher; Gabor, Paul; Veillet, Christian; Shankland, Paul; Jannuzi, Buell; Cotera, Angela; Luginbuhl, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The state of Arizona contains the highest concentration of research telescopes in the continental United States, contributing more than a quarter of a billion dollars annually to the state's economy. Protecting the dark skies above these observatories is both good for astronomy and good for the state's economy. In this contribution we describe how a coalition of Arizona observatories is working together to protect our dark skies. Efforts date back to the creation of one of the first Outdoor Lighting Codes in the United States and continue today, including educational outreach, public policy engagement, and consensus building. We review some proven strategies, highlight recent successes and look at current threats.

  20. Measuring the influence of aerosols and albedo on sky polarization

    OpenAIRE

    Kreuter, A; Emde, C; Blumthaler, M.

    2010-01-01

    All-sky distributions of the polarized radiance are measured using an automated fish-eye camera system with a rotating polarizer. For a large range of aerosol and surface albedo situations, the influence on the degree of polarization and sky radiance is investigated. The range of aerosol optical depth and albedo is 0.05–0.5 and 0.1–0.75, respectively. For this range of parameters, a reduction of the degree of polarization from about 0.7 to 0.4 was observed. The analysis is done for ...

  1. APPLIANCE OF COMPETITORS TECHNIQUES IN LEADING THE SKIES IN TURNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rašid Hadžić

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Competitors techniques in skiing characterize driving on edges, without gliding in certain fazes of turning. Today that characteristic is more and more present in all di- scipline, (downhill, super G, giant slalom and slalom so we can talk about appliance of basic technique of leading skies on all disciplines, with differences in position of skies in amplitude of moving and frequencies of changes of edges. From that point of view we distinct three typical shape of moving in turning, which have mutual distinction in influence on ski loading, and that has influence on tur- ning line and acceleration or checking in certain fazes of turning.

  2. The pre-launch Planck Sky Model: a model of sky emission at submillimetre to centimetre wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Delabrouille, J.; Melin, J.-B.; Miville-Deschenes, M.-A.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Jeune, M.Le; Castex, G.; de Zotti, G.; Basak, S.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bouchet, F.R.; Clements, D.L.; da Silva, A.; Dickinson, C.; Dodu, F.; Dolag, K.; Elsner, F.; Fauvet, L.; Fay, G.; Giardino, G.; Leach, S.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Montier, L.; Mottet, S.; Paladini, R.; Partridge, B.; Piffaretti, R.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Ricciardi, S.; Roman, M.; Schaefer, B.; Toffolatti, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the Planck Sky Model (PSM), a parametric model for the generation of all-sky, few arcminute resolution maps of sky emission at submillimetre to centimetre wavelengths, in both intensity and polarisation. Several options are implemented to model the cosmic microwave background, Galactic diffuse emission (synchrotron, free-free, thermal and spinning dust, CO lines), Galactic H-II regions, extragalactic radio sources, dusty galaxies, and thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich signals from clusters of galaxies. Each component is simulated by means of educated interpolations/extrapolations of data sets available at the time of the launch of the Planck mission, complemented by state-of-the-art models of the emission. Distinctive features of the simulations are: spatially varying spectral properties of synchrotron and dust; different spectral parameters for each point source; modeling of the clustering properties of extragalactic sources and of the power spectrum of fluctuations in the cosmic infrared back...

  3. Death of Darkness: Artificial Sky Brightness in the Anthropocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zender, C. S.

    2016-12-01

    Many species (including ours) need darkness to survive and thrive yet light pollution in the anthropocene has received scant attention in Earth System Models (ESMs). Anthropogenic aerosols can brighten background sky brightness and reduce the contrast between skylight and starlight. These are both aesthetic and health-related issues due to their accompanying disruption of circadian rhythms. We quantify aerosol contributions to light pollution using a single-column night sky model, NiteLite, suitable for implementation in ESMs. NiteLite accounts for physiologcal (photopic and scotopic vision, retinal diameter/age), anthropogenic (light and aerosol pollution properties), and natural (surface albedo, trace gases) effects on background brightness and threshold visibility. We find that stratospheric aerosol injection contemplated as a stop-gap measure to counter global warming would increase night-sky brightness by about 25%, and thus eliminate last pristine dark sky areas on Earth. Our results suggest that ESMs incorporate light pollution so that associated societal impacts can be better quantified and included in policy deliberations.

  4. Short Timescale Variability In The Faint Sky Variability Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.A.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    We present the V band variability analysis of the point sources in the Faint Sky Variability Survey on time scales from 24 minutes to tens of days. We find that about one percent of the point sources down to V = 24 are variables. We discuss the variability detection probabilities for each field

  5. Short timescale variability in the faint sky variability survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Rueda, L.; Groot, P.J.; Augusteijn, T.; Nelemans, G.A.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Besselaar, E.J.M. van den

    2006-01-01

    We present the V-band variability analysis of the Faint Sky Variability Survey (FSVS). The FSVS combines colour and time variability information, from timescales of 24 minutes to tens of days, down to V = 24. We find that �1% of all point sources are variable along the main sequence reaching �3.5%

  6. AKARI Mid-Infrared All-Sky Survey Diffuse Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Daisuke; Onaka, Takashi; Akari Team; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki; Mouri, Akio; Kondo, Toru; Suzuki, Satoshi; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-07-01

    AKARI, the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite launched in February 2006, exhausted its liquid helium cryogen in August 2007. For about one and a half years of the cold mission phase, AKARI performed all-sky surveys in the two mid-infrared photometric bands centered at 9 and 18 microns with higher spatial resolutions and sensitivities than IRAS. Both bands cover slightly shorter wavelength ranges than the IRAS 12 and 25 micron bands and thus provide different information on the infrared sky. In particular, the AKARI 9 micron band map has unique advantage in tracing the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for the whole sky. To enable discussion on faint diffuse interstellar emission, we have improved the AKARI mid-infrared all-sky diffuse maps by correcting artifacts such as those caused by space ionizing radiation and scattered light from the moon and very bright sources. The quality of these diffuse maps are now being checked within the AKARI team. We plan to release them to the public in near future.

  7. Distribution of hourly variability index of sky clearness | Madhlopa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clouds affect the values of insolation for solar technology and other applications. To detect the presence of variability in the sky clearness, an hourly variability index ( 3) is calculated. The present study examined the frequency distribution of this variable as a tool for assessing the utilizability of solar radiation at a site.

  8. Cybernetics of Tunnel-in-the-Sky Displays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.

    1999-01-01

    Consensus is growing that the flexibility gained with the introduction of programmable, electronic cockpit displays in the 1980s must be exploited to the full extent. An important candidate to become the primary flight display of future flight decks is the tunnel-in-the-sky display, a perspective

  9. 3,000 deep-sky objects an annotated catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Aranda, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The Annotated Catalog of 3,000 Deep-Sky Objects is a record of the most extensive and systematic visual survey of the sky done in modern times. The 3,000 deep-sky objects listed contain short descriptions of what these objects look like in the author’s powerful binocular telescope. Objects in the book are organized by position for easy identification of unknown targets. Full indexes by catalog numbers and names allow searches for specific objects. Descriptions of objects are better than photographs for identifying deep-sky objects because the visual appearance never matches the photographic image. Nor are sketches entirely satisfactory because there is a strong unconscious tendency to draw what the observer remembers from photographs of objects. Compared to other astronomical guidebooks this book contains by far the largest number of objects viewed through a 10- to 14-inch telescope and is a ‘must-have’ for serious amateur and professional observers.

  10. A Study on New Song of the Sky Pacers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sang-Hyeon

    2009-12-01

    We investigated `Song of the Sky Pacers, Adopted to the New Methods' (新法步天歌), the latest version of Joseon's `Song of the Sky Pacers' (步天歌). Due to the influence of new knowledge on Chinese asterisms imported from the Ching dynasty, `Song of the Sky Pacers with New Star-Charts' was written in the eighteenth century. However, the disagreement between song and star-charts was causing confusion in practical applications such as Joseon's national examination for selecting astronomers. In order to improve this situation, Royal Observatory of the Joseon dynasty (觀象監) published `Song of the Sky Pacers, Adopted to the New Methods' based upon star-charts and song in the Sequel of I-Hsiang-K'ao-ch'eng (欽定儀象考成續編). The New Song was edited by a middle-class professional astronomer Yi Jun-yang (李俊養), and corrected by a nobleman Nam Byeong-gil (南秉吉). We establish a brief biography of Yi Jun-yang. The New Song preserves the genuine characteristics of previous Joseon's Song including the format of title of each lunar mansion and description on the location of the Milky Way in the asterisms. The description of the Milky Way was newly written based on the data in volume 31 and 32 of the Sequel of I-Hsiang-K'ao-ch'eng.

  11. LOFAR and APERTIF Surveys of the Radio Sky: Probing Shocks ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The revolutionary APERTIF-phased arrays that are about to be installed on the Westerbork radio telescope (WSRT) will dramatically increase the survey speed for the WSRT. Combined surveys with these two facilities will deeply chart the northern sky over almost two decades in radio frequency from ∼ 15 ...

  12. Global, Diffuse Sky And Direct Beam Radiation Data For Kumasi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... influence of atmospheric effects including the presence of rain cloud cover during the wet season and the presence of the Harmattan dust aerosol during the dry season. Keywords: Global irradiance, diffuse sky irradiance, direct beam irradiance, weather. Journal of the Ghana Institution of Engineers Vol. 5 (1&2) 2007: pp.

  13. Sun, Sky and Cloud: Where Light and Matter Meet

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 12. Sun, Sky and Cloud: Where Light and Matter Meet. Rajaram Nityananda. General Article Volume 20 Issue 12 December 2015 pp 1111-1127. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. The WATCH All-Sky Monitor for the Granat Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Rao, A. R.

    1990-01-01

    The Watch X-ray all-sky monitor, which is designed to localize strong X-ray sources and follow their development, is examined, focusing on the addition of four Watch units to the Granat satellite project. The components of the Watch instrument are described and the capabilities and potential scie...

  15. Photometric Analysis of the Pi of the Sky Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Siudek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A database containing star measurements from the period 2006–2009 taken by the Pi of the Sky detector located in Las Campanas Observatory in Chile contains more than 2 billion measurements of almost 17 million objects. All measurements are available on the Pi of the Sky web site through a dedicated interface, which also allows users to download selected data. Accurate analysis of Pi of the Sky data is a real challenge, because of a number of factors that can influence the measurements. Possible sources of errors in our measurements include: reading the chip with the shutter open, strong and varying sky background, passing planets or planetoids, and clouds and hot pixels. In order tofacilitate the analysis of variable stars we have developed a system of dedicated filters to remove bad measurements or frames. The spectral sensitivity of the detector is taken into account by appropriate corrections based on the spectral type of reference stars. This process is illustrated by an analysis of the BG Ind system, where we have been able to reduce the systematic uncertainty to about 0.05 magnitudo.

  16. The Aquarius Simulator and Cold-Sky Calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, David M.; Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Abraham, Saji; deMatthaeis, Paolo; Wentz, Frank J.

    2011-01-01

    A numerical simulator has been developed to study remote sensing from space in the spectral window at 1.413 GHz (L-band), and it has been used to optimize the cold-sky calibration (CSC) for the Aquarius radiometers. The celestial sky is a common cold reference in microwave radiometry. It is currently being used by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite, and it is planned that, after launch, the Aquarius/SAC-D observatory will periodically rotate to view "cold sky" as part of the calibration plan. Although radiation from the celestial sky is stable and relatively well known, it varies with location. In addition, radiation from the Earth below contributes to the measured signal through the antenna back lobes and also varies along the orbit. Both effects must be taken into account for a careful calibration. The numerical simulator has been used with the Aquarius configuration (antennas and orbit) to investigate these issues and determine optimum conditions for performing a CSC. This paper provides an overview of the simulator and the analysis leading to the selection of the optimum locations for a CSC.

  17. Decade of wildlife tracking in the Sky Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica A. Lamberton-Moreno; Sergio Avila-Villegas

    2013-01-01

    In 2001 Sky Island Alliance developed a citizen science program that uses track and sign identification and count surveys to monitor potential wildlife corridors throughout southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico. The goal of the Wildlife Linkages Program is to protect and advocate for an interconnected landscape where wildlife, based on their ecological needs...

  18. Evolution of the Air Toxics under the Big Sky Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Nancy; Vanek, Diana; Hester, Carolyn; Holian, Andrij; Ward, Tony; Adams, Earle; Knuth, Randy

    2011-01-01

    As a yearlong exploration of air quality and its relation to respiratory health, the "Air Toxics Under the Big Sky" program offers opportunities for students to learn and apply science process skills through self-designed inquiry-based research projects conducted within their communities. The program follows a systematic scope and sequence…

  19. The new world atlas of artificial night sky brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Duriscoe, Dan; Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Elvidge, Christopher D.; Baugh, Kimberly; Portnov, Boris A.; Rybnikova, Nataliya A.; Furgoni, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Artificial lights raise night sky luminance, creating the most visible effect of light pollution—artificial skyglow. Despite the increasing interest among scientists in fields such as ecology, astronomy, health care, and land-use planning, light pollution lacks a current quantification of its magnitude on a global scale. To overcome this, we present the world atlas of artificial sky luminance, computed with our light pollution propagation software using new high-resolution satellite data and new precision sky brightness measurements. This atlas shows that more than 80% of the world and more than 99% of the U.S. and European populations live under light-polluted skies. The Milky Way is hidden from more than one-third of humanity, including 60% of Europeans and nearly 80% of North Americans. Moreover, 23% of the world’s land surfaces between 75°N and 60°S, 88% of Europe, and almost half of the United States experience light-polluted nights. PMID:27386582

  20. PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF PI OF THE SKY DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Opiela

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pi of the Sky is a system of two wide field of view robotic telescopes, which search for short timescale astrophysical phenomena, especially for prompt optical GRB emissions. The system was designed for autonomous operation, monitoring a large fraction of the sky with 12m–13m range and time resolution of the order of 1–10 seconds. Two fully automatic Pi of the Sky detectors located in Spain (INTA — INTA El Arenosillo Test Centre in Mazagón, near Huelva. and Chile (SPDA — San Pedro de Atacama Observatory. have been observing the sky almost every night in search of rare optical phenomena. They also collect a lot of useful observations which include e.g. many kinds of variable stars. To be able to draw proper conclusions from the data received, adequate quality of the data is very important. Pi of the Sky data is subject to systematic errors caused by various factors, such as cloud cover, seen as significant fluctuations in the number of stars observed by the detector, problems with conducting mounting, a strong background of the moon or the passing of a bright object, e.g., a planet, near the observed star. Some of these adverse effects have already been detected during the cataloging of individual measurements, but the quality of our data was still not satisfactory for us. In order to improve the quality of our data, we have developed two new procedures based on two different approaches. In this article we will report on these procedures, give some examples, and we will show how these procedures improve the quality of our data.

  1. Gaia, an all-sky survey for standard photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, J. M.; Weiler, M.; Jordi, C.; Fabricius, C.

    2017-03-01

    Gaia ESA's space mission (launched in 2013) includes two low resolution spectroscopic instruments (one in the blue, BP, and another in the red, RP, wavelength domains) to classify and derive the astrophysical parameters of the observed sources. As it is well known, Gaia is a full-sky unbiased survey down to about 20th magnitude. The scanning law yields a rather uniform coverage of the sky over the full extent (a minimum of 5 years) of the mission. Gaia data reduction is a global one over the full mission. Both sky coverage and data reduction strategy ensure an unprecedented all-sky homogeneous spectrophotometric survey. Certainly, that survey is of interest for current and future on-ground and space projects, like LSST, PLATO, EUCLID and J-PAS/J-PLUS among others. These projects will benefit from the large amount (more than one billion) and wide variety of objects observed by Gaia with good quality spectrophotometry. Synthetic photometry derived from Gaia spectrophotometry for any passband can be used to expand the set of standard sources for these new instruments to come. In the current Gaia data release scenario, BP/RP spectrophotometric data will be available in the third release (in 2018, TBC). Current preliminary results allow us to estimate the precision of synthetic photometry derived from the Gaia data. This already allows the preparation of the on-going and future surveys and space missions. We discuss here the exploitation of the Gaia spectrophotometry as standard reference due to its full-sky coverage and its expected photometric uncertainties derived from the low resolution Gaia spectra.

  2. Distributions of sky luminance and radiance of North Bangkok under standard distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chirarattananon, Surapong; Chaiwiwatworakul, Pipat [Energy Field of Study, Asian Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 4, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani, Thailand 12120 (Thailand)

    2007-07-15

    In the tropics, the sky is luminous and variable. Distribution of luminance over the sky dome is non-uniform and varies widely and dynamically with weather condition. The high luminosity offers good potential for daylighting, but an understanding of the luminance distribution of tropical sky would help advance the movement for daylighting. This paper reports results of a characterization of sky luminance and radiance under the standard sky luminance patterns proposed by Kittler using measurements from a station located north of Bangkok. In accordance to the standard sky luminance classification, the sky patterns of north Bangkok mostly fall into clear and intermediate types. During cooler months, the sky is clear for over 60% of the time. In the midst of the rainy season, the sky falls into the intermediate category for over 40% of the time. The high incidence of clear sky on this classification differs from earlier results that use sky ratio and Perez's clearness indices in the classification of sky condition. (author)

  3. 40 CFR 1048.140 - What are the provisions for certifying Blue Sky Series engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Blue Sky Series engines? 1048.140 Section 1048.140 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Sky Series engines? This section defines voluntary standards for a recognized level of superior emission control for engines designated as “Blue Sky Series” engines. If you certify an engine family under...

  4. The Theoretical Transition Probabilities Between the B(sup 3)Pi(sub g) and the A(sup 3)Sigma(Sup +, sub u), W(sup 3)Delta(sub u), B'(sup 3)Sigma(sup -, sub u) States of N2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuemmel, Helmar T.; Partridge, Harry; Huo, Winifred M.; Langhoff, Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The electronic transition moment functions between the B(sup 3)Pi(sub g) and the A(sup 3)Sigma(sup +, sub u), W(sup 3)Delta(sub u), B'(sup 3)Sigma(sup -, sub u) states of N2 are studied using the internally contracted multireference configuration interaction (ICMRCI) method based upon complete active space SCF (CASSCF) reference wave-functions. The dependence of the moments on both the one and n-particle basis sets has been investigated in detail. The calculated radiative lifetimes for the vibrational levels of B(sup 3)Pi(sub g) are in excellent agreement with the most recent measurement of Euler and Pipkin (1983)

  5. Estimation of global illuminance for clear skies at Madrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robledo, L. [Departamento de Sistemas Inteligentes Aplicados, E.U. Informatica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Soler, A. [Departamento de Fisica e Instalaciones, ETSAM, Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    Two elementary empirical models for the dependence of global illuminance on solar elevation for clear skies are provided. The models are developed from hourly data obtained from 1 year data collected at the International Daylight Measurement Programme (IDMP) general class station at the Escuela Tecnica Superior de Arquitectura in Madrid (ETSAM), and are statistically assessed with data obtained during another period of 6 months. Values of the mean bias deviation (MBD) and root mean square deviation (RMSD) of respectively less than 5% and 7% of the average illuminance measured were obtained. The qualitative dependence of global illuminance on solar elevation, common to that found by other researchers for other locations is justified, and found to be different to that given by Vazquez and Bernabeu [D. Vazquez, E. Bernabeu, Quantitative estimation of clear sky light in Madrid, Energy and Buildings, 26 (1997) 331] using data obtained at a site which is in close proximity to our station. (author)

  6. Aquarius Whole Range Calibration: Celestial Sky, Ocean, and Land Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Bindlish, Rajat; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.

    2014-01-01

    Aquarius is a spaceborne instrument that uses L-band radiometers to monitor sea surface salinity globally. Other applications of its data over land and the cryosphere are being developed. Combining its measurements with existing and upcoming L-band sensors will allow for long term studies. For that purpose, the radiometers calibration is critical. Aquarius measurements are currently calibrated over the oceans. They have been found too cold at the low end (celestial sky) of the brightness temperature scale, and too warm at the warm end (land and ice). We assess the impact of the antenna pattern model on the biases and propose a correction. We re-calibrate Aquarius measurements using the corrected antenna pattern and measurements over the Sky and oceans. The performances of the new calibration are evaluated using measurements over well instrument land sites.

  7. An investigation of atmospheric turbidity of Thai sky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaiwiwatworakul, P.; Chirarattananon, S. [Energy Programme, Asian Institute of Technology, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani (Thailand)

    2004-07-01

    An investigation of atmospheric turbidity has been undertaken for tropical Thai sky. Values of turbidity indices, namely, Linke factor (T{sub L}), Angstrom coefficient ({beta}) and illuminance turbidity factor (T{sub il}) are derived directly from measurements taken by pyrheliometer, Volz sun photometer and beam illuminance meter. Monthly mean values and frequency of occurrence of the value of each turbidity index are used to characterize variations of atmospheric turbidity. Simple polynomial equations are developed for computing values of Linke factor and illuminance turbidity factor as functions of solar altitude angle. Using the values of Linke factor and illuminance turbidity factor obtained from the models developed, values of beam normal irradiance and illuminance can be calculated accurately under clear sky conditions. Values of daylight illuminance are useful for daylighting application that contributes to energy conservation for buildings. Knowledge of the size of beam normal irradiance is useful for calculation of cooling load in air-conditioning buildings in tropical climate. (author)

  8. The First Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Abazajian, Kevork; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Allam, Sahar S.; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Baldry, Ivan K.; Bastian, Steven; AndreasBerlind; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R.; Blythe, Norman; Bochanski, John J.; Boroski, William N.; Brewington, Howard; Briggs, John W.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert J.; Budavari, Tamas; Carey, Larry N.; Carr, Michael A.; Castander, Francisco J.; Chiu, Kuenley; Collinge, Matthew J.; Connolly, A. J.; Covey, Kevin R.; Csabai, István; J.Dalcanton, Julianne; Dodelson, Scott; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; L.Evans, Michael; Fan, Xiaohui; Feldman, Paul D.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Friedman, Scott D.; Frieman, JoshuaA.; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, Roy R.; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; F.Gonzalez, Carlos; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K.; Grodnicki, Lauren; Gunn, James E.; K.Gurbani, Vijay; Hall, Patrick B.; Hao, Lei; Harbeck, Daniel; Harris, Frederick H.; C.Harris, Hugh; Harvanek, Michael; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Helmboldt, J. F.; Hendry, John S.; Hennessy, Gregory S.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Hogg, David W.; J.Holmgren, Donald; Holtzman, Jon A.; Homer, Lee; Hui, Lam; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Inkmann, John P.; ˇ, Zeljko Ivezíc; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E.; Jordan, Beatrice; Jordan, Wendell P.; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Juríc, Mario; Kauffmann, Guinevere; M.Kent, Stephen; Kleinman, S. J.; Knapp, G. R.; Kniazev, Alexei Yu.; Kron, Richard G.; JurekKrzesinski; Kunszt, Peter Z.; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Lamb, Donald Q.; Lampeitl, Hubert; Laubscher, Bryan E.; Lee, Brian C.; Leger, R. French; Li, Nolan; Lidz, Adam; Lin, Huan; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Long, Daniel C.; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H.; Malik, Tanu; BruceMargon; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McKay, Timothy A.; Meiksin, Avery; A.Miknaitis, Gajus; Moorthy, Bhasker K.; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Murphy, Tara; Nakajima, Reiko; Narayanan, VijayK.; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Eric H. Jr.; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Newman, Peter R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; MichaelOdenkirchen; Okamura, Sadanori; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Owen, Russell; NikhilPadmanabhan; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Pindor, Bartosz; Pope, Adrian C.; R.Quinn, Thomas; Rafikov, R. R.; Raymond, Sean N.; Richards, Gordon T.; Richmond, Michael W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schaye, Joop; Schlegel, David J.; P.Schneider, Donald; Schroeder, Joshua; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, Erin; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Sinisgalli, Allan J.; Sirko, Edwin; Smith, J. Allyn; Smolčíc, Vernesa; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Stebbins, Albert; Steinhardt, Charles; Stinson, Gregory; Stoughton, Chris; Strateva, Iskra V.; Strauss, Michael A.; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, István; Szkody, Paula; Tasca, Lidia; Tegmark, Max; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Tremonti, Christy; Tucker, Douglas L.; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S.; WolfgangVoges; Vogt, Nicole P.; Walkowicz, Lucianne M.; Weinberg, David H.; West, Andrew A.; White, Simon D.M.; Wilhite, Brian C.; Willman, Beth; Xu, Yongzhong; Yanny, Brian; JeanYarger; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D. R.; York, Donald G.; L.Zakamska, Nadia; Zehavi, Idit; Zheng, Wei; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2003-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its First Data Release. This consists of 2099 square degrees of five-band (u, g, r, i, z) imaging data, 186,240 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 1360 square degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data go to a depth of r ~ 22.6 and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The spectra cover the range 3800--9200 A, with a resolution of 1800--2100. Further characteristics of the data are described, as are the data products themselves.

  9. Introducing the All-sky NOAO Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidever, David L.; NOAO DataLab

    2017-06-01

    Most of the sky has been imaged with NOAO's telescopes from both hemispheres. While the large majority of these data were obtained for PI-led projects only a small fraction have been released to the community via well-calibrated and easily accessible catalogs. We are remedying this by created a catalog of sources from most of the public data taken on CTIO-4m+DECam as well as KPNO-4m+Mosaic3. This catalog, called the NOAO Source Catalog (NSC), already contains 2.3 billion unique objects, 19 billion source measurements, covers ~25,000 square degrees of the sky, has 10-sigma depths of ~23rd magnitude in most broadband filters, and astrometric accuracy of ~20 mas. We plan to release the catalog via the new NOAO Data Lab service in the near future.

  10. Exploring Ancient Skies An Encyclopedic Survey of Archaeoastronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, David H

    2005-01-01

    Exploring Ancient Skies brings together the methods of archaeology and the insights of modern astronomy to explore the science of astronomy as it was practiced in various cultures prior to the invention of the telescope. The book reviews an enormous and growing body of literature on the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean, the Far East, and the New World (particularly Mesoamerica), putting the ancient astronomical materials into their archaeological and cultural contexts. The authors begin with an overview of the field and proceed to essential aspects of naked-eye astronomy, followed by an examination of specific cultures. The book concludes by taking into account the purposes of ancient astronomy: astrology, navigation, calendar regulation, and (not least) the understanding of our place and role in the universe. Skies are recreated to display critical events as they would have appeared to ancient observers - events such as the supernova of 1054, the 'lion horoscope' or the 'Star of Bethlehem.' Exploring An...

  11. Exploring Ancient Skies A Survey of Ancient and Cultural Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Kelley, David H

    2011-01-01

    Exploring Ancient Skies brings together the methods of archaeology and the insights of modern astronomy to explore the science of astronomy as it was practiced in various cultures prior to the invention of the telescope. The book reviews an enormous and growing body of literature on the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean, the Far East, and the New World (particularly Mesoamerica), putting the ancient astronomical materials into their archaeological and cultural contexts. The authors begin with an overview of the field and proceed to essential aspects of naked-eye astronomy, followed by an examination of specific cultures. The book concludes by taking into account the purposes of ancient astronomy: astrology, navigation, calendar regulation, and (not least) the understanding of our place and role in the universe. Skies are recreated to display critical events as they would have appeared to ancient observers—events such as the supernova of 1054 A.D., the "lion horoscope," and the Star of Bethlehem. Explori...

  12. Estimation of aerosol optical properties from all-sky imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazantzidis, Andreas; Tzoumanikas, Panagiotis; Salamalikis, Vasilios; Wilbert, Stefan; Prahl, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    Aerosols are one of the most important constituents in the atmosphere that affect the incoming solar radiation, either directly through absorbing and scattering processes or indirectly by changing the optical properties and lifetime of clouds. Under clear skies, aerosols become the dominant factor that affect the intensity of solar irradiance reaching the ground. It has been shown that the variability in direct normal irradiance (DNI) due to aerosols is more important than the one induced in global horizontal irradiance (GHI), while the uncertainty in its calculation is dominated by uncertainties in the aerosol optical properties. In recent years, all-sky imagers are used for the detection of cloud coverage, type and velocity in a bouquet of applications including solar irradiance resource and forecasting. However, information about the optical properties of aerosols could be derived with the same instrumentation. In this study, the aerosol optical properties are estimated with the synergetic use of all-sky images, complementary data from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and calculations from a radiative transfer model. The area of interest is Plataforma Solar de Almería (PSA), Tabernas, Spain and data from a 5 month period are analyzed. The proposed methodology includes look-up-tables (LUTs) of diffuse sky radiance of Red (R), Green (G) and Blue (B) channels at several zenith and azimuth angles and for different atmospheric conditions (Angström α and β, single scattering albedo, precipitable water, solar zenith angle). Based on the LUTS, results from the CIMEL photometer at PSA were used to estimate the RGB radiances for the actual conditions at this site. The methodology is accompanied by a detailed evaluation of its robustness, the development and evaluation of the inversion algorithm (derive aerosol optical properties from RGB image values) and a sensitivity analysis about how the pre-mentioned atmospheric parameters affect the results.

  13. Empty sky : 9/11 and performing regenerative violence

    OpenAIRE

    Genna, Raimondo

    2010-01-01

    "Empty Sky: 9/11 and Performing Regenerative Violence" explores theatrical depictions of violence and trauma following the events of 11 September 2001 and their relationships to American myth and identity. In the aftermath of the terrorist attack of 9/11, many in the media, from politicians and pundits to journalists and fictional characters in popular television, discussed the epistemological rupture of the event, stating that the world had changed forever and that everything was now differe...

  14. Photographic and CCD Sky Patrols with Small Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Peter

    Since the twenties of the last century Sonneberg Observatory runs in each clear night a photographic Sky Patrol with a system of small telescopes (55/250 mm) reaching 14m in the blue and 13m in the yellow-red. In addition, a so-called Field Patrol is run with 2 astrographs (400/2000 mm) and a Schmidt camera (500/700/1720 mm) covering 80 selected fields along or near the Milky Way. From these instruments an archive of alomost 300,000 photographic plates arose, documenting the history of the starry night over more than 75 years. Currently much effort is made to take over this photographic sky patrol by a system of electronic detectors. Owing to the fact, that wide-field systems need either large CCDs or arrays of CCDs in order to cover the whole field of view, the technical availability of large detectors was one of the central problems in past. We now invent the use of a PHILIPS 4K×7K chip in wide-field astronomy for Whole-Sky Patrol. Although the chip has a quantum efficiency of only about 30 %, its big size (12μm pixel size) of 48×84 mm offers, for the first time, the replacement of large photographic plates by a single CCD chip. We report our first experiences with this chip when using it with a super wide-angle objective for whole-sky imaging each minute down to ca. 10m for investigating different targets (variable stars, meteors, GRB counterparts, etc.) and first trial to use the large-size chip with other small telescopes (400 to 600 mm diameter) at Sonneberg Observatory.

  15. The Seventh Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-18

    ranging from the large-scale distribution of galaxies to distant quasars to substructure in the Galactic halo to surveys of white dwarfs to the color...in total, including 930,000 galaxies , 120,000 quasars, and 460,000 stars. The data release includes improved stellar photometry at low Galactic...bright end to 45 milliarcseconds per coordinate. We further quantify a systematic error in bright galaxy photometry due to poor sky determination; this

  16. The Dynamic Radio Sky: An Opportunity for Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    radio transients and co- herent pulses from brown dwarfs . Additionally, archival studies have found not-yet identified radio transients without optical or...all astrophysical environ- ments including the solar system, star-forming regions, the Galactic center, and other galaxies . By observing the sky so as...brown dwarfs , flare stars extrasolar planets signals from ET civilizations pulsar giant pulses, inter- mittant pulsars, magnetar flares, X-ray binaries

  17. The red-sky enigma over Svalbard in December 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sigernes

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available On 6 December 2002, during winter darkness, an extraordinary event occurred in the sky, as viewed from Longyearbyen (78° N, 15° E, Svalbard, Norway. At 07:30 UT the southeast sky was surprisingly lit up in a deep red colour. The light increased in intensity and spread out across the sky, and at 10:00 UT the illumination was observed to reach the zenith. The event died out at about 12:30 UT. Spectral measurements from the Auroral Station in Adventdalen confirm that the light was scattered sunlight. Even though the Sun was between 11.8 and 14.6deg below the horizon during the event, the measured intensities of scattered light on the southern horizon from the scanning photometers coincided with the rise and setting of the Sun. Calculations of actual heights, including refraction and atmospheric screening, indicate that the event most likely was scattered solar light from a target below the horizon. This is also confirmed by the OSIRIS instrument on board the Odin satellite. The deduced height profile indicates that the scattering target is located 18–23km up in the stratosphere at a latitude close to 73–75° N, southeast of Longyearbyen. The temperatures in this region were found to be low enough for Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC to be formed. The target was also identified as PSC by the LIDAR systems at the Koldewey Station in Ny-Ålesund (79° N, 12° E. The event was most likely caused by solar illuminated type II Polar Stratospheric Clouds that scattered light towards Svalbard. Two types of scenarios are presented to explain how light is scattered. Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (Transmissions and scattering of radiation; Middle atmospherecomposition and chemistry; Instruments and techniques – History of geophysics (Atmospheric Sciences; The red-sky phenomena

  18. The new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falchi, Fabio; Cinzano, Pierantonio; Kyba, Christopher C. M.; Portnov, Boris A.

    2015-08-01

    I present the main steps toward the completion of the new World Atlas of Artificial Sky Brightness (WA II) and some results. The computational technique has been updated, in comparison to the first World Atlas, to take into account both sources and sites elevation. The elevation data are from USGS GTOPO30 global digital elevation model, with the same pixel size as the WA II maps. The upward emission function used to compute the Atlas is a three parameters function. The parameters can be constrained to the database of Earth based night sky brightness measurements. In this way we can use the better fitting upward function for the final map’s calibration. We maintained constant atmosphere parameters over the entire Earth, identical to those used for the first Atlas (Garstang atmospheric clarity coefficient k=1, equivalent to a vertical extinction at sea level of 0.33 magnitude in the V band). This was done in order to avoid introducing a local bias due to different conditions that may confound the light pollution propagation effects. The radiance data used are those from Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Day-Night Band (DNB) on board the Suomi NPP satellite. The use of this newly available radiance data allows for an increased real resolution, even while maintaining the same 30"x30" lat-lon pixel size. Anyway, a higher resolution is really appreciable only in the immediate proximity of sources of light pollution (e.g. inside a big city). The VIIRS DNB data used for the input data were chosen from the months ranging from May to September in order to avoid introducing bias from the variable snow coverage in mid to high northern latitudes. In the southern hemisphere this problem is far less pronounced. The WA II takes advantage of the now enormous database of Earth based sky brightness measurements obtained mainly with Sky Quality Meters, but also with CCD measurements.

  19. The NASA Fireball Network All-Sky Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suggs, Rob M.

    2011-01-01

    The construction of small, inexpensive all-sky cameras designed specifically for the NASA Fireball Network is described. The use of off-the-shelf electronics, optics, and plumbing materials results in a robust and easy to duplicate design. Engineering challenges such as weather-proofing and thermal control and their mitigation are described. Field-of-view and gain adjustments to assure uniformity across the network will also be detailed.

  20. Using machine learning techniques to automate sky survey catalog generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyad, Usama M.; Roden, J. C.; Doyle, R. J.; Weir, Nicholas; Djorgovski, S. G.

    1993-01-01

    We describe the application of machine classification techniques to the development of an automated tool for the reduction of a large scientific data set. The 2nd Palomar Observatory Sky Survey provides comprehensive photographic coverage of the northern celestial hemisphere. The photographic plates are being digitized into images containing on the order of 10(exp 7) galaxies and 10(exp 8) stars. Since the size of this data set precludes manual analysis and classification of objects, our approach is to develop a software system which integrates independently developed techniques for image processing and data classification. Image processing routines are applied to identify and measure features of sky objects. Selected features are used to determine the classification of each object. GID3* and O-BTree, two inductive learning techniques, are used to automatically learn classification decision trees from examples. We describe the techniques used, the details of our specific application, and the initial encouraging results which indicate that our approach is well-suited to the problem. The benefits of the approach are increased data reduction throughput, consistency of classification, and the automated derivation of classification rules that will form an objective, examinable basis for classifying sky objects. Furthermore, astronomers will be freed from the tedium of an intensely visual task to pursue more challenging analysis and interpretation problems given automatically cataloged data.

  1. Sky observation and mythology: paths to an astronomical culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Victor Alves

    2011-06-01

    The teaching and the popularization of Astronomy, nowadays, suffers from the absence of attractiveness. It's, somehow, consensual that the most efficient approach to attract the general public or even an uninterested student to the Astronomy is the sky observation. With the help of instruments like telescopes or binoculars, the observation of aesthetical impressive objects such as galactic clusters, approaching planets and many others may have a great impact upon those people. We have been executing an efficient and attractive didactic method which has been evaluated permanently for more than two years and has shown great efficiency that consists in the utilization of legends and myths from different cultures (including Brazilian Indians myths, in an etnoastronomical approach) about the constellations and their dispositions in the sky. The objective of this panel is to show the efficiency of the method and some of its teaching routines always beginning with myths or legends involving a great number of constellations (using, preferentially, most of the watchable sky in a certain time of year), using asterisms for identification and then following to a certain constellation from which it is possible to extract the information required for the studied subject.

  2. Reliability of radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, Takahiro; Daishido, Tsuneaki [Faculty of Education and Integrated Arts and Sciences, Waseda University, 1-6-1 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8050 (Japan); Tanaka, Tai; Nakao, Ryota; Nomura, Naomi; Sugisawa, Kentaro [Graduate School of Advanced Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Niinuma, Kotaro [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamaguchi University, 1677-1 Yoshida, Yamaguchi-shi, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan); Takefuji, Kazuhiro [Kashima Space Technology Center, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 893-1 Hirai, Kashima-shi, Ibaraki 314-8501 (Japan); Kida, Sumiko, E-mail: takahiro_aoki@aoni.waseda.jp [Graduate School of Creative Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2014-01-20

    This article reports on the reliability of 11 radio transients detected in the Nasu sky survey. We derived false detection rates and evaluated the statistical significance of each transient source. A single source, labeled WJN J1443+3439, was statistically significant at the 10{sup –5} significance level; the other 10 sources were insignificant. On the basis of this single detection, the sky surface density of live radio transients was estimated to be 2{sub −1.9}{sup +9}×10{sup −6} deg{sup −2} at a flux density above 3 Jy and a frequency of 1.42 GHz. Since this result is comparable with other survey results and known transients, WJN J1443+3439 could not be excluded. The sky surface density supported a power-law distribution of source count versus flux density. For transient events, the power-law exponent was approximately –3/2. These results are expected to assist radio variable/transient surveys in next-generation facilities such as the Square Kilometre Array.

  3. The gamma-ray sky as seen with HAWC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüntemeyer, Petra

    2015-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) TeV Gamma-Ray Observatory located at a site about two hours drive east of Puebla, Mexico on the Sierra Negra plateau (4100 m a.s.l.) was inaugurated in March 2015. The array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors can observe large portions of the sky simultaneously and, with an energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV, is currently one of the most sensitive instruments capable of probing particle acceleration near PeV energies. HAWC has already started science operation in the Summer of 2013 and preliminary sky maps have been produced from 260 days of data taken with a partial array. Multiple > 5 σ (pre-trials) hotspots are visible along the galactic plane and some appear to coincide with known TeV sources from the H.E.S.S. catalog, SNRs and molecular cloud associations, and pulsars wind nebulae (PWNe). The sky maps based on partial HAWC array data are discussed as well as the scientific potential of the completed instrument especially in the context of multi-wavelengths studies.

  4. The gamma-ray sky as seen with HAWC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüntemeyer Petra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC TeV Gamma-Ray Observatory located at a site about two hours drive east of Puebla, Mexico on the Sierra Negra plateau (4100 m a.s.l. was inaugurated in March 2015. The array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors can observe large portions of the sky simultaneously and, with an energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV, is currently one of the most sensitive instruments capable of probing particle acceleration near PeV energies. HAWC has already started science operation in the Summer of 2013 and preliminary sky maps have been produced from 260 days of data taken with a partial array. Multiple > 5 σ (pre-trials hotspots are visible along the galactic plane and some appear to coincide with known TeV sources from the H.E.S.S. catalog, SNRs and molecular cloud associations, and pulsars wind nebulae (PWNe. The sky maps based on partial HAWC array data are discussed as well as the scientific potential of the completed instrument especially in the context of multi-wavelengths studies.

  5. All-Sky Interferometry with Spherical Harmonic Transit Telescopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, J.Richard [Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.; Sigurdson, Kris [British Columbia U.; Pen, Ue-Li [Canadian Inst. Theor. Astrophys.; Stebbins, Albert [Fermilab; Sitwell, Michael [British Columbia U.

    2013-02-01

    In this paper we describe the spherical harmonic transit telescope, a novel formalism for the analysis of transit radio telescopes. This all-sky approach bypasses the curved sky complications of traditional interferometry and so is particularly well suited to the analysis of wide-field radio interferometers. It enables compact and computationally efficient representations of the data and its statistics that allow new ways of approaching important problems like map-making and foreground removal. In particular, we show how it enables the use of the Karhunen-Loeve transform as a highly effective foreground filter, suppressing realistic foreground residuals for our fiducial example by at least a factor twenty below the 21cm signal even in highly contaminated regions of the sky. This is despite the presence of the angle-frequency mode mixing inherent in real-world instruments with frequency-dependent beams. We show, using Fisher forecasting, that foreground cleaning has little effect on power spectrum constraints compared to hypothetical foreground-free measurements. Beyond providing a natural real-world data analysis framework for 21cm telescopes now under construction and future experiments, this formalism allows accurate power spectrum forecasts to be made that include the interplay of design constraints and realistic experimental systematics with twenty-first century 21cm science.

  6. Advertising Citizen Science: A Trailer for the Citizen Sky Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Ryan; Price, A.

    2012-01-01

    Citizen Sky is a multi-year, NSF funded citizen science project involving the bright and mysterious variable star epsilon Aurigae. The project was conceived by the IYA 2009 working group on Research Experiences for Students, Teachers, and Citizen-Scientists. Citizen Sky goes beyond simple observing to include a major data analysis component, introducing participants to the full scientific process from background research to paper writing for a peer-reviewed journal. As a means of generating interest in the project, the California Academy of Sciences produced a six-minute "trailer” formatted for both traditional and fulldome planetariums as well as HD and web applications. This talk will review the production process for the trailer as well as the methods of distribution via planetariums, social media, and other venues_along with an update on the Citizen Sky Project as a whole. We will show how to use a small, professionally-produced planetarium trailer to help spread word on a citizen science project. We will also show preliminary results on a study about how participation level/type in the project affects science learning.

  7. Using inpainting to construct accurate cut-sky CMB estimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruetjen, H. F.; Fergusson, J. R.; Liguori, M.; Shellard, E. P. S.

    2017-02-01

    The direct evaluation of manifestly optimal, cut-sky cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectrum and bispectrum estimators is numerically very costly, due to the presence of inverse-covariance filtering operations. This justifies the investigation of alternative approaches. In this work, we mostly focus on an inpainting algorithm that was introduced in recent CMB analyses to cure cut-sky suboptimalities of bispectrum estimators. First, we show that inpainting can equally be applied to the problem of unbiased estimation of power spectra. We then compare the performance of a novel inpainted CMB temperature power spectrum estimator to the popular apodized pseudo-Cl (PCL) method and demonstrate, both numerically and with analytic arguments, that inpainted power spectrum estimates significantly outperform PCL estimates. Finally, we study the case of cut-sky bispectrum estimators, comparing the performance of three different approaches: inpainting, apodization and a novel low-l leaning scheme. Providing an analytic argument of why the local shape is typically most affected we mainly focus on local-type non-Gaussianity. Our results show that inpainting allows us to achieve optimality also for bispectrum estimation, but interestingly also demonstrate that appropriate apodization, in conjunction with low-l cleaning, can lead to comparable accuracy.

  8. ``Dark Skies are a Universal Resource'' Programs Planned for the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Berglund, K.; Bueter, C.; Crelin, B.; Duriscoe, D.; Moore, C.; Gauthier, A.; Gay, P. L.; Foster, T.; Heatherly, S. A.; Maddalena, R.; Mann, T.; Patten, K.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R.; Schaaf, F.; Simmons, M.; Smith, C.; Smith, M.; Tafreshi, B.

    2008-11-01

    In an effort to help more people appreciate the ongoing loss of a dark night sky for much of the world's population and to raise public knowledge about diverse impacts of excess artificial lighting on local environments, the International Year of Astronomy's Dark Skies Working Group has established six ``Dark Skies'' programs and six ``Dark Skies'' resources. The Dark Skies programs include GLOBE at Night (with Earth Hour), Astronomy Nights in the [National] Parks, Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Quiet Skies, Good Neighbor Lighting, and a digital photography contest. Resources include the light education toolkit, the ``Let There Be Night'' DVD and planetarium program, the 6-minute video, online interactions like Second Life, podcasts, and traveling exhibits. The programs and resources are summarized here, as they were in a poster for the June 2008 ASP/AAS conference. For more information on these programs and resources, visit http://astronomy2009.us/darkskies/.

  9. Transferring the calibration of direct solar irradiance to diffuse-sky radiance measurements for CIMEL Sun-sky radiometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhengqiang; Blarel, Luc; Podvin, Thierry; Goloub, Philippe; Buis, Jean-Pierre; Morel, Jean-Philippe

    2008-04-01

    Two types of sunphotometric measurement are considered in this study: direct-Sun irradiance and diffuse-sky radiance. Based on CIMEL CE318 Sun-sky radiometer characteristics, we introduce a gain-corrected solid angle that allows interconverting calibration coefficients of these two types of measurement, thus realizing a "vicarious" radiance calibration. The accuracy of the gain-corrected solid angle depends on the number of available historical calibration records. The method is easy to use, provided that at least one laboratory calibration has been made previously. Examples coming from three distinct CE318 versions belonging to the AERONET/PHOTONS network are presented to provide details on the vicarious calibration method and protocols. From the error propagation analysis and the comparison with laboratory results, the uncertainty of the vicarious radiance calibration is shown to be comparable with the laboratory one, e.g., 3%-5%.

  10. Sky-view factor visualization for detection of archaeological remains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalj, Žiga; Oštir, Krištof; Zakšek, Klemen

    2013-04-01

    Many archaeological remains are covered by sand or vegetation but it still possible to detect them by remote sensing techniques. One of them is airborne laser scanning that enables production of digital elevation models (DEM) of very high resolution (better than 1 m) with high relative elevation accuracy (centimetre level), even under forest. Thus, it has become well established in archaeological applications. However, effective interpretation of digital elevation models requires appropriate data visualization. Analytical relief shading is used in most cases. Although widely accepted, this method has two major drawbacks: identifying details in deep shades and inability to properly represent linear features lying parallel to the light beam. Several authors have tried to overcome these limitations by changing the position of the light source or by filtering. This contribution addresses the DEM visualization problem by sky-view factor, a visualization technique based on diffuse light that overcomes the directional problems of hill-shading. Sky-view factor is a parameter that describes the portion of visible sky limited by relief. It can be used as a general relief visualization technique to show relief characteristics. In particular, we show that this visualization is a very useful tool in archaeology. Applying the sky-view factor for visualization purposes gives advantages over other techniques because it reveals small (or large, depending on the scale of the observed phenomenon and consequential algorithm settings) relief features while preserving the perception of general topography. In the case study (DEM visualization of a fortified enclosure of Tonovcov grad in Slovenia) we show that for the archaeological purposes the sky-view factor is the optimal DEM visualization method. Its ability to consider the neighborhood context makes it an outstanding tool when compared to other visualization techniques. One can choose a large search radius and the most important

  11. Differential Cross Sections for the Electron Impact Excitation of the A(sup 3)(Sigma)(sub u)(sup +), B(sup 3)Pi(sub g), W(sup 3)(Delta)(sub u), B'(sup 3)(Sigma)(sub u)(sup -), a'(sup 1)Sigma(sub u)(sup -), a(sup 1)Pi(sub g), w(sup 1)Delta(sub u), and C(sup 3)Pi(sub u) States of N(sub 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakoo, M. A.; Johnson, P. V.; Ozkay, I.; Yan, P.; Trajmar, S.; Kanik, I.

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of differential cross sections for the electron-impact excitation of molecular nitrogen from the ground X(sup 1)(Sigma)(sub g)(sup +)(v''=0)level to the A(sup 3)(Sigma)(sub u)(sup +)(v'), B(sup 3)Pi(sub g)(v'), W(sup 3)(Delta)(sub u)(v'),B'(sup 3)(Sigma)(sub u)(sup -)(v'), a(sup 1)(Pi)(sub g)(v'), w(sup 1)(Delta)(sub u)(v'), and C(sup 3)(Pi)(sub u)(v') levels are presented. The data are obtained at the incident energies of 10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20, 30, 50, and 100 eV over the angular range of 5(deg)-130(deg) in 5(deg) intervals. The individual electronic state excitation differential cross sections are obtained by unfolding electron energy-loss spectra of molecular nitrogen using available semiempirical Frank-Condon factors. The data are compared to previous measurements and to available theory. We also make several important suggestions regarding future work that, like the present, relies on the unfolding of electron energy-loss spectra for obtaining differential cross sections.

  12. Introduction to the Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP): Systematics, biogeography, ecology, and population genetics of arthropods of the Madrean Sky Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy Moore; Wallace M. Meyer; Jeffrey A. Eble; Kimberly Franklin; John F. Wiens; Richard C. Brusca

    2013-01-01

    The Arizona Sky Island Arthropod Project (ASAP) is a new multi-disciplinary research program at the University of Arizona that combines systematics, biogeography, ecology, and population genetics to study origins and patterns of arthropod diversity along elevation gradients and among mountain ranges in the Madrean Sky Island Region. Arthropods represent taxonomically...

  13. The Catalina Sky Survey: Status, Discoveries and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jess A.; Christensen, Eric J.; Gibbs, Alex R.; Grauer, Albert D.; Hill, Richard E.; Kowalski, Richard A.; Larson, Steve M.; Shelly, Frank J.

    2014-11-01

    On 1 January 2014, the Catalina Sky Survey kicked off its year with the discovery of 2014 AA, a small Apollo-type NEO that entered the atmosphere over the mid-Atlantic ocean 21 hours after discovery. As of 12 August 2014, the Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) has discovered 5192 Near Earth Objects. Accounting for nearly two thirds of all NEO discoveries since 2005, and over 46% of all known NEOs, CSS has a long history of being an effective dedicated NEO survey, and pending upgrades will allow it to continue its productivity into the foreseeable future.We present an overview of our facilities and equipment, the current status of survey operations, an overview of recent discoveries and discovery statistics, and the status of recent and pending upgrades to our instrumentation and equipment. The 1.0m follow-up telescope on Mt. Lemmon is now operational (MPC code I52) and providing asteroid astrometry. A new camera for the 1.5 m telescope (G96) will increase the field four times to 5 square degrees and may be operational by the end of the year. A similar camera for the Catalina Schmidt telescope (703) will follow with a 19.4 square degree field. These upgrades will substantially increase the NEO discovery rate from CSS. Additionally, software upgrades to accommodate the larger data flow are in process. Finally, we will discuss ways in which our data are being used for other purposes within the astronomical community, including the search for optical transients (Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey), and the public search for NEOs through the Asteroid Zoo program, developed by Planetary Resources, Inc. in collaboration with CSS and Zooniverse, under the auspices of NASA's Asteroid Grand Challenge initiative. The Catalina Sky Survey is funded by NASA’s Near Earth Objects Observation Program.

  14. Recent Advances and Achievements at The Catalina Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Gregory J.; Christensen, Eric J.; Fuls, Carson; Gibbs, Alex; Grauer, Al; Johnson, Jess A.; Kowalski, Richard; Larson, Stephen M.; Matheny, Rose; Seaman, Rob; Shelly, Frank

    2017-10-01

    The Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) is a NASA-funded project fully dedicated to discover and track near-Earth objects (NEOs). Since its founding nearly 20 years ago CSS remains at the forefront of NEO surveys, and recent improvements in both instrumentation and software have increased both survey productivity and data quality. In 2016 new large-format (10K x 10K) cameras were installed on both CSS survey telescopes, the 1.5-m reflector and the 0.7-m Schmidt, increasing the field of view, and hence nightly sky coverage by 4x and 2.4x respectively. The new cameras, coupled with improvements in the reduction and detection pipelines, and revised sky-coverage strategies have yielded a dramatic upward trend of NEO discovery rates. CSS has also developed a custom adaptive queue manager for scheduling NEO follow-up astrometry using a remotely operated and recently renovated 1-m Cassegrain reflector telescope, improvements that have increased the production of follow-up astrometry for newly discovered NEOs and arc extensions for previously discovered objects by CSS and other surveys. Additionally, reprocessing of archival CSS data (which includes some 46 million individual astrometric measurements) through the new reduction and detection pipeline will allow for improved orbit determinations and increased arc extensions for hundreds of thousands of asteroids. Reprocessed data will soon feed into a new public archive of CSS images and catalog data products made available through NASA’s Planetary Data System (PDS). For the future, CSS is working towards improved NEO follow-up capabilities through a combination of access to larger telescopes, instrument upgrades and follow-up scheduling tools.

  15. Eyes on the Skies 400 Years of Telescopic Discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Schilling, Govert

    2011-01-01

    Adopted as the official book of the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009, this stunningly illustrated history of telescopic discovery spans the range from the first telescopes via the Hubble Space Telescope to next generation platforms, and how they have changed and continue to change our view of the universe, our place in it and where it all came from. Eyes on the Skies features numerous full-page photographs and is printed in high-quality color throughout. Also includes the official IYA DVD with 59 minutes of narrated text, expert comments and interviews, animations, computer simulatio

  16. The Faint Sky Variability Survey II: Initial Results

    OpenAIRE

    Everett, M. E.; Huber, M.E.; Howell, S. B.

    2000-01-01

    We discuss the first results from the Faint Sky Variability Survey (Groot et al. 2000). The data consist of V-band light curves, BVI colours, astrometry, and morphology information on several hundred thousand point and extended sources in the magnitude range V=17-25. We discuss the first 30 survey fields covering an area of 8.4 square degrees towards moderate and high galactic latitudes. We analyse the quality of and discuss our differential photometry light curves. We employ statistical meth...

  17. Echoes of the ancient skies the astronomy of lost civilizations

    CERN Document Server

    Krupp, E C

    2003-01-01

    ""It should be read by anyone even remotely interested in the long saga of the universe's profound and lasting influence on mankind's development."" - New Scientist""A grand book."" - Publishers Weekly""Dr. Krupp teaches us once more to look up at the stars and marvel."" - Ray BradburyThe intriguing world of archaeoastronomy - the study of ancient peoples' observations of the skies and the impact of what they saw on their cultural evolution - is the focus of this eminently readable and authoritative survey. Author E. C. Krupp, an astronomer, is the director of the Griffith Observatory in Los

  18. The Sondrestrom Research Facility All-sky Imagers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, E. A.; Grill, M.; Gudmundsson, E.; Stromme, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Sondrestrom Upper Atmospheric Research Facility is located near Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, just north of the Arctic Circle and 100 km inland from the west coast of Greenland. The facility is operated by SRI International in Menlo Park, California, under the auspices of the U.S. National Science Foundation. Operating in Greenland since 1983, the Sondrestrom facility is host to more than 20 instruments, the majority of which provide unique and complementary information about the arctic upper atmosphere. Together these instruments advance our knowledge of upper atmospheric physics and determine how the tenuous neutral gas interacts with the charged space plasma environment. The suite of instrumentation supports many disciplines of research - from plate tectonics to auroral physics and space weather. The Sondrestrom facility has recently acquired two new all-sky imagers. In this paper, we present images from both new imagers, placing them in context with other instruments at the site and detailing to the community how to gain access to this new data set. The first new camera replaces the intensified auroral system which has been on site for nearly three decades. This new all-sky imager (ASI), designed and assembled by Keo Scientific Ltd., employs a medium format 180° fisheye lens coupled to a set of five 3-inch narrowband interference filters. The current filter suite allows operation at the following wavelengths: 750 nm, 557.7 nm, 777.4 nm, 630.0 nm, and 732/3 nm. Monochromatic images from the ASI are acquired at a specific filter and integration time as determined by a unique configuration file. Integrations as short as 0.5 sec can be commanded for exceptionally bright features. Preview images are posted to the internet in near real-time, with final images posted weeks later. While images are continuously collected in a "patrol mode," users can request special collection sequences for targeted experiments. The second new imager installed at the Sondrestrom

  19. Google Sky as an Interactive Content Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Michael

    2009-05-01

    In support of the International Year of Astronomy New Media Task Group's mission to create online astronomy content, several existing technologies are being leveraged. With this undertaking in mind, Google Sky provides an immersive contextual environment for both exploration and content presentation. As such, it affords opportunities for new methods of interactive media delivery. Traditional astronomy news sources and blogs are able to literally set a story at the location of their topic. Furthermore, audio based material can be complimented by a series of locations in the form of a guided tour. In order to provide automated generation and management of this content, an open source software suite has been developed.

  20. Sky Brightness During Eclipses: A Compendium from the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-05

    eclipse of 1922, Ross directed a camera, from which the lenses had been removed, toward the south celestial pole and exposed a photo- graphic plate...totality. To secure the illumination produced by the corona plus 180° of the sky, "a 6-cell target of a Weston illuminometer was connected to a...31 2 7. 10 81.8 50 1/2 2 3.70 45 20 30 0.50 9.8 Second contct 39.7 , 44 1/2 1 3.50 ’ 3.90 20 1 1 2.9fi 3.36 12 1 2.70 M.20 not

  1. Astronomical Dating of Edvard Munch's Summer Sky Paintings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Ava; Olson, Donald

    2010-02-01

    Norwegian painter Edvard Munch, most famous for The Scream, created many spectacular works depicting the skies of Norway. Our Texas State group used astronomical methods to analyze three of these paintings: Starry Night, The Storm, and Sunrise in Asgardstrand. Astronomical dating of these paintings has some importance because the precise days when Munch visited Asgardstrand are unknown. Our research group traveled to Norway in August 2008 to find the locations from which Munch painted these three works. We then used astronomical calculations, topographical analysis, historical photographs, and weather records to determine the precise dates and times for the scenes depicted in these paintings. )

  2. Giant Rings in the Cosmic Microwave Background Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovetz, Ely D.; Ben-David, Assaf; Itzhaki, Nissan

    2010-11-01

    We find a unique direction in the cosmic microwave background sky around which giant rings have an anomalous mean temperature profile. This direction is in very close alignment with the afore measured anomalously large bulk flow direction. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we estimate the significance of the giant rings at the 3σ level and the alignment with the bulk flow at 2.5σ. We argue that a cosmic defect seeded by a pre-inflationary particle could explain the giant rings, the large bulk flow, and their alignment.

  3. On-sky Testing of the Active Phasing Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonté, Frédéric; Araujo, Constanza; Bourtembourg, Reynald; Brast, Roland; Derie, Frédéric; Duhoux, Philippe; Dupuy, Christophe; Frank, Christophe; Karban, Robert; Mazzoleni, Ruben; Noethe, Lothar; Sedghi, Babak; Surdej, Isabelle; Yaitskova, Natalia; Luong, Bruno; Chueca, Sergio; Reyes, Marcos; Esposito, Simone; Pinna, Enrico; Puglisi, Alfio; Quiros Pacheco, Fernando; Dohlen, Kjetil; Vigan, Arthur

    2009-06-01

    The Active Phasing Experiment (APE) has been used by ESO to gain experience in controlling segmented primary mirrors in preparation for the European Extremely Large Telescope. The experiment tested various phasing techniques and explored their advantages and limitations. Four optical phasing sensors were developed using different techniques — a curvature sensor, a pyramid sensor, a Shack-Hartmann sensor and a sensor based on a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The design of the APE instrument is described. APE was installed at the VLT visitor focus for on-sky testing and a brief summary of the results of the experiment is given.

  4. Lessons learned from Sloan Digital Sky Survey operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, S. J.; Gunn, J. E.; Boroski, B.; Long, D.; Snedden, S.; Nitta, A.; Krzesiński, J.; Harvanek, M.; Neilsen, E.; Gillespie, B.; Barentine, J. C.; Uomoto, A.; Tucker, D.; York, D.; Jester, S.

    2008-07-01

    Astronomy is changing. Large projects, large collaborations, and large budgets are becoming the norm. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is one example of this new astronomy, and in operating the original survey, we put in place and learned many valuable operating principles. Scientists sometimes have the tendency to invent everything themselves but when budgets are large, deadlines are many, and both are tight, learning from others and applying it appropriately can make the difference between success and failure. We offer here our experiences well as our thoughts, opinions, and beliefs on what we learned in operating the SDSS.

  5. Determining Light Pollution of the Global Sky: GLOBE at Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.; Meymaris, K.; Ward, D.; Walker, C.; Russell, R.; Pompea, S.; Salisbury, D.

    2006-05-01

    GLOBE at Night is an international science event designed to observe and record the visible stars as a means of measuring light pollution in a given location. Increased and robust understanding of our environment requires learning opportunities that take place outside of the conventional K-12 classroom and beyond the confines of the school day. This hands-on learning activity extended the traditional classroom and school day last March with a week of nighttime sky observations involving teachers, students and their families. The quality of the night sky for stellar observations is impacted by several factors including human activities. By observing cloud cover and locating specific constellations in the sky, students from around the world learned how the lights in their community contribute to light pollution, exploring the relationship between science, technology and their society. Students learned that light pollution impacts more than just the visibility of stars at night. Lights at night impact both the biology and ecology of many species in our environment. Students were able to participate in this global scientific campaign by submitting their observations through an online database, allowing for authentic worldwide research and analysis by participating scientists. Students and their families learned how latitude and longitude coordinates provide a location system to map and analyze the observation data submitted from around the globe. The collected data is available online for use by students, teachers and scientists worldwide to assess how the quality of the night sky varies around the world. This session will share how students and scientists across the globe can explore and analyze the results of this exciting campaign. GLOBE at Night is a collaborative effort sponsored by The GLOBE Program, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), Centro de Apoyo a la Didactica de la Astronomia (CADIAS), Windows to the Universe, and ESRI. The GLOBE Program is

  6. The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS): Overview and First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steven T.; VLASS Survey Team, Survey Science Group (SSG)

    2018-01-01

    The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS) is a 5520 hour spectropolarimetric synoptic survey covering the 33885 square degrees of the sky above Declination -40 degrees from 2-4 GHz at 2.5" angular resolution using the upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). Over the survey duration of 7 years, each area of the sky will be covered in 3 epochs spaced 32 months apart, to a projected depth of 0.12mJy/beam rms noise per epoch and 0.07mJy/beam for 3 epochs combined. The VLASS employs on-the-fly mosaicking (OTFM) to rapidly scan the sky with a net speed of approximately 20 sq. degrees per hour. The high-level science goals for the survey include the identification and precise location of radio transients, the measurement of magnetic fields in our galaxy and beyond, and the study of radio emission from galaxies and active galactic nuclei throughout the Universe. The ability of the VLASS to see through dust allows us to unveil phenomena such as hidden cosmic explosions, emission from deep within our galaxy, and supermassive black holes buried within host galaxies.The VLASS was proposed in 2014 by our community-led Survey Science Group (SSG). VLASS Pilot observations were taken in mid-2016, and the first epoch covering half the area (VLASS1.1) commenced in September 2017. The raw data from the VLASS are available in the NRAO archive immediately with no proprietary period. The Basic Data Products (BDP) that will be produced by the survey team are public and will additionally include: calibrated visibility data, quick-look continuum images (with a goal of posting to the archive within 1 week of observation), single-epoch and cumulative combined-epoch images, spectral image cubes, and basic object catalogs. Single-epoch and cumulative images are in intensity and linear polarization (Stokes IQU). In addition to the BDP provided by NRAO and served through the NRAO archive, there are plans for Enhanced Data Products and Services to be provided by the community in partnership with the

  7. Fermi Bubbles: an elephant in the gamma-ray sky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malyshev Dmitry

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Fermi bubbles are one of the most remarkable features in the gamma-ray sky revealed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT. The nature of the gamma-ray emission and the origin of the bubbles are still open questions. In this note, we will review some basic features of leptonic and hadronic modes of gamma-ray production. At the moment, gamma rays are our best method to study the bubbles, but in order to resolve the origin of the bubbles multi-wavelength and multi-messenger observations will be crucial.

  8. SCExAO: First Results and On-Sky Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Thayne; Guyon, Olivier; Martinache, Frantz; Clergeon, Christophe; McElwain, Michael; Thalmann, Christian; Jovanovic, Nemanja; Singh, Garima; Kudo, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    We present new on-sky results for the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics imager (SCExAO) verifying and quantifying the contrast gain enabled by key components: the closed-loop coronagraphic low-order wavefront sensor (CLOWFS) and focal plane wavefront control ("speckle nulling"). SCExAO will soon be coupled with a high-order, Pyramid wavefront sensor which will yield greater than 90% Strehl ratio and enable 10(exp 6) -10(exp 7) contrast at small angular separations allowing us to image gas giant planets at solar system scales. Upcoming instruments like VAMPIRES, FIRST, and CHARIS will expand SCExAO's science capabilities.

  9. SkyGlowNet: Multi-Disciplinary Independent Student Research in Environmental Light at Night Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craine, B. L.; Craine, E. R.; Culver, R. B.; DeBenedetti, J. C.; Flurchick, K. M.

    2014-07-01

    SkyGlowNet uses Internet-enabled sky brightness meters (iSBM) to monitor sky brightness over school sites. The data are used professionally and in STEM outreach to study natural and artificial sources of sky brightness, light pollution, energy efficiency, and environmental and health impacts of artificial night lighting. The iSBM units are owned by participating institutions and managed by faculty or students via proprietary Internet links. Student data are embargoed for two semesters to allow students to analyze data and publish results, then they are moved to a common area where students from different institutions can collaborate. The iSBM units can be set to operate automatically each night. Their data include time, sky brightness, weather conditions, and other related parameters. The data stream can be viewed and processed online or downloaded for study. SkyGlowNet is a unique, multi-disciplinary, real science program aiding research for science and non-science students.

  10. Maximizing the Performance of Automated Low Cost All-sky Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettonvil, F.

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to the wide spread of digital camera technology in the consumer market, a steady increase in the number of active All-sky camera has be noticed European wide. In this paper I look into the details of such All-sky systems and try to optimize the performance in terms of accuracy of the astrometry, the velocity determination and photometry. Having autonomous operation in mind, suggestions are done for the optimal low cost All-sky camera.

  11. Spatiotemporal change of sky polarization during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey: polarization patterns of the eclipsed sky observed by full-sky imaging polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipocz, Brigitta; Hegedüs, Ramón; Kriska, György; Horváth, Gábor

    2008-12-01

    Using 180 degrees field-of-view (full-sky) imaging polarimetry, we measured the spatiotemporal change of the polarization of skylight during the total solar eclipse on 29 March 2006 in Turkey. We present our observations here on the temporal variation of the celestial patterns of the degree p and angle alpha of linear polarization of the eclipsed sky measured in the red (650 nm), green (550 nm), and blue (450 nm) parts of the spectrum. We also report on the temporal and spectral change of the positions of neutral (unpolarized, p = 0) points, and points with local minima or maxima of p of the eclipsed sky. Our results are compared with the observations performed by the same polarimetric technique during the total solar eclipse on 11 August 1999 in Hungary. Practically the same characteristics of celestial polarization were encountered during both eclipses. This shows that the observed polarization phenomena of the eclipsed sky may be general.

  12. Aladin Lite: Embed your Sky in the Browser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boch, T.; Fernique, P.

    2014-05-01

    I will introduce and describe Aladin Lite1, a lightweight interactive sky viewer running natively in the browser. The past five years have seen the emergence of powerful and complex web applications, thanks to major improvements in JavaScript engines and the advent of HTML5. At the same time, browser plugins Java applets, Flash, Silverlight) that were commonly used to run rich Internet applications are declining and are not well suited for mobile devices. The Aladin team took this opportunity to develop Aladin Lite, a lightweight version of Aladin geared towards simple visualization of a sky region. Relying on the widely supported HTML5 canvas element, it provides an intuitive user interface running on desktops and tablets. This first version allows one to interactively visualize multi-resolution HEALPix image and superimpose tabular data and footprints. Aladin Lite is easily embeddable on any web page and may be of interest for data providers which will be able to use it as an interactive previewer for their own image surveys, previously pre-processed as explained in details in the poster "Create & publish your Hierarchical Progressive Survey". I will present the main features of Aladin Lite as well as the JavaScript API which gives the building blocks to create rich interactions between a web page and Aladin Lite.

  13. Imaging the Southern Sky An Amateur Astronomer's Guide

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    "If you're looking for a handy reference guide to help you image and explore the many splendors of the southern sky, Imaging the Southern Sky is the book for you. The work features not only stunning color images, all taken by Stephen Chadwick, of the best galaxies, nebulae, and clusters available to astrophotographers, but also lesser-known objects, some of which have gone largely unexplored! Beginners and experienced observers alike should appreciate the book's remarkable imagery and simple text, which provides concise and accurate information on each object and its epoch 2000.0 position, and also expert testimony on its visual nature. Each object essay also includes a section on technical information that should help astrophotographers in their planning, including telescope aperture, focal length and ratio, camera used, exposure times, and field size. As a charming bonus, the authors have taken the liberty to name many of the lesser-known objects to reflect their New Zealand heritage. Constellation by con...

  14. Extinction Coefficients with an AllSky Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolotto, G. S.; Kanaan, A.; Walker, D.

    2014-10-01

    All sky cameras are a great alternative to the study of atmospheric conditions in an astronomical site. We show how to compute the instantaneous coefficients of atmospheric extinction for various moments in the same night. The images used were obtained by the camera SASCA (SOAR AllSky Camera) located at Cerro Pachon. To estimate the extinction coefficients we developed a method to measure the brightness of several stars at different air masses for the same instant. We developed a Python program that calculates azimuth and altitude for the stars and then converts them to pixel coordinates on the CCD. Comparing the positions calculated for a group of stars with their actual positions on the images, we can determine the distortion caused by the camera. After finding out the distortions we know exactly in which pixel a star falls on any date and time. At this point we created tables of star positions and did the photometry of them all on each image using the IRAF routine PHOT. These photometry tables are subsequently converted into multiple tables with apparent magnitude versus air mass for each star at a given instant. Our results show that the extinction coefficient calculated for different atmospheric moments is within two sigma of the values of the coefficients obtained through the monitoring of a single star at different air masses, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach.

  15. An Ecocritical Reading of Paul Bowles's The Sheltering Sky

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Sheikhzadeh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Landscapes are not simply something objective and unchallenged out there but the work of the mind made by the strata of memory. This paper attempts to show that an ecocritical reading of Paul Bowles’s The Sheltering Sky (1949 helps one in better understanding of this novel of post-colonial alienation and existential despair. Bowles is an American writer and a composer who is undoubtedly the most arresting example of cross-cultural influence concerning a Western author and the Middle East and North Africa.  His fiction mostly focuses on American expatriates travelling in exotic locations. The Sheltering Sky is an encounter with the Sahara, not only the physical one but the desert of moral nihilism into which one may wander blindly. The boundless desert acts here as a metaphor and the journey symbolizes one’s own journey into the depth of his/her soul. The desert also projects an apocalyptic vision in the struggle between the West and the East and the Sahara becomes in fact a Conradian Heart of Darkness, an Eliotian Waste Land, and a Sartrean No Exit. In the novel the actual environment becomes in some ways pale and covert under the psyche of the writer. Consequently we come to know that Bowles's own knowledge and awareness of the same environments left traces in his work. Accordingly we may wrap up that the environment bears a direct impact on our understanding of it.

  16. DESCQA: An Automated Validation Framework for Synthetic Sky Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yao-Yuan; Kovacs, Eve; Heitmann, Katrin; Uram, Thomas D.; Benson, Andrew J.; Campbell, Duncan; Cora, Sofía A.; DeRose, Joseph; Di Matteo, Tiziana; Habib, Salman; Hearin, Andrew P.; Bryce Kalmbach, J.; Krughoff, K. Simon; Lanusse, François; Lukić, Zarija; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Padilla, Nelson; Paillas, Enrique; Pope, Adrian; Ricker, Paul M.; Ruiz, Andrés N.; Tenneti, Ananth; Vega-Martínez, Cristian A.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Zhou, Rongpu; Zu, Ying; The LSST Dark Energy Science Collaboration

    2018-02-01

    The use of high-quality simulated sky catalogs is essential for the success of cosmological surveys. The catalogs have diverse applications, such as investigating signatures of fundamental physics in cosmological observables, understanding the effect of systematic uncertainties on measured signals and testing mitigation strategies for reducing these uncertainties, aiding analysis pipeline development and testing, and survey strategy optimization. The list of applications is growing with improvements in the quality of the catalogs and the details that they can provide. Given the importance of simulated catalogs, it is critical to provide rigorous validation protocols that enable both catalog providers and users to assess the quality of the catalogs in a straightforward and comprehensive way. For this purpose, we have developed the DESCQA framework for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope Dark Energy Science Collaboration as well as for the broader community. The goal of DESCQA is to enable the inspection, validation, and comparison of an inhomogeneous set of synthetic catalogs via the provision of a common interface within an automated framework. In this paper, we present the design concept and first implementation of DESCQA. In order to establish and demonstrate its full functionality we use a set of interim catalogs and validation tests. We highlight several important aspects, both technical and scientific, that require thoughtful consideration when designing a validation framework, including validation metrics and how these metrics impose requirements on the synthetic sky catalogs.

  17. The albedo of snow for partially cloudy skies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, B. J.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1980-01-01

    The input parameters of the model are atmospheric precipitable water, ozone content, turbidity, cloud optical thickness, size and shape of ice crystal of snow and surface pressure. The model outputs spectral and integrated solar flux snow reflectance as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover. The model is illustrated using representative parameters for the Antarctic coastal regions. The albedo for a clear sky depends inversely on the solar elevation. At high elevation the albedo depends primarily upon the grain size; at low elevation this dependence is on grain size and shape. The gradient of the albedo-elevation curve increases as the grains get larger and faceted. The albedo for a dense overcast is a few percent higher than the clear sky albedo at high elevations. A simple relation between the grain size and the overcast albedo is obtained. For a set of grain size and shape, the albedo matrices (the albedo as a function of solar elevation and fractional cloudcover) are tabulated.

  18. Rapid All-Sky Transient Discovery and Analysis with Evryscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Henry T.; Law, Nicholas; Fors, Octavi; Ratzloff, Jeff; Goeke, Erin; Howard, Ward S.

    2018-01-01

    The Evryscope is an array of 24 small telescopes on a common mount, capable of observing the entire visible sky down to g' ~ 16 with a two-minute cadence. Each exposure covers 8000 square degrees over 691 MPix and requires minimal readout time, providing 97% continuous coverage of the night sky. The system's large field of view and rapid cadence enable exploration of a previously inaccessible parameter space of bright and fast transients, including nearby microlensing events, supernovae, and kilonovae GW counterparts. The first instrument, located at CTIO in Chile, was deployed in mid-2015 and is currently in production creating multi-year light curves with percent-level precision. A second identical system is on track for deployment at Mount Laguna Observatory in California in early 2018. Once operational, the two sites will provide simultaneous two-color photometry over a 4000 square degree overlapping region accessible to both instruments, operating as a combined discovery and follow-up network for transient phenomena on all nearby stars and many nearby galaxies. I will present recent science results from the Evryscope and an overview of our data reduction pipeline.

  19. The cosmological principle is not in the sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chan-Gyung; Hyun, Hwasu; Noh, Hyerim; Hwang, Jai-chan

    2017-08-01

    The homogeneity of matter distribution at large scales, known as the cosmological principle, is a central assumption in the standard cosmological model. The case is testable though, thus no longer needs to be a principle. Here we perform a test for spatial homogeneity using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Luminous Red Galaxies (LRG) sample by counting galaxies within a specified volume with the radius scale varying up to 300 h-1 Mpc. We directly confront the large-scale structure data with the definition of spatial homogeneity by comparing the averages and dispersions of galaxy number counts with allowed ranges of the random distribution with homogeneity. The LRG sample shows significantly larger dispersions of number counts than the random catalogues up to 300 h-1 Mpc scale, and even the average is located far outside the range allowed in the random distribution; the deviations are statistically impossible to be realized in the random distribution. This implies that the cosmological principle does not hold even at such large scales. The same analysis of mock galaxies derived from the N-body simulation, however, suggests that the LRG sample is consistent with the current paradigm of cosmology, thus the simulation is also not homogeneous in that scale. We conclude that the cosmological principle is neither in the observed sky nor demanded to be there by the standard cosmological world model. This reveals the nature of the cosmological principle adopted in the modern cosmology paradigm, and opens a new field of research in theoretical cosmology.

  20. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey and its Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, A. S.; Kunszt, P. Z.; Thakar, A. R.; Gray, J.; Slutz, D.

    The next-generation astronomy archives will cover most of the universe at fine resolution in many wavelengths. One of the first of these projects, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) will create a 5-wavelength catalog over 10,000 square degrees of the sky. The 200 million objects in the multi-terabyte database will have mostly numerical attributes, defining a space of 100+ dimensions. Points in this space have highly correlated distributions. The archive will enable astronomers to explore the data interactively. Data access will be aided by multidimensional spatial indices. The data will be partitioned in many ways. Small tag objects consisting of the most popular attributes speed up frequent searches. Splitting the data among multiple servers enables parallel, scalable I/O. Hashing techniques allow efficient clustering and pairwise comparison algorithms. Randomly sampled subsets allow debugging otherwise large queries at the desktop. Central servers will operate a data pump that supports sweeping searches that touch most of the data.

  1. The Second Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Abazajian, Kevork; ̈ueros, Marcel A. Ag; Allam, Sahar S.; Anderson, KurtS. J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Baldry, Ivan K.; StevenBastian; Berlind, Andreas; Bernardi, Mariangela; Blanton, Michael R.; BochanskiJr., John J.; Boroski, William N.; Briggs, John W.; Brinkmann, J.; Brunner, Robert J.; ́ari, Tam ́asBudav; Carey, Larry N.; Carliles, Samuel; Castander, Francisco J.; Connolly, A. J.; Csabai, Istvan; Doi, Mamoru; Dong, Feng; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Evans, Michael L.; Fan, Xiaohui; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; Friedman, Scott D.; Frieman, Joshua A.; Fukugita, Masataka; Gal, RoyR.; Gillespie, Bruce; Glazebrook, Karl; Gray, Jim; Grebel, Eva K.; Gunn, James E.; Gurbani, Vijay K.; Hall, Patrick B.; Hamabe, Masaru; Harris, Frederick H.; C.Harris, Hugh; Harvanek, Michael; Heckman, Timothy M.; Hendry, John S.; Hennessy, Gregory S.; Hindsley, Robert B.; Hogan, Craig J.; Hogg, David W.; Holmgren, Donald J.; Ichikawa, Shin-ichi; Ichikawa, Takashi; Ivezic, Zeljko; Jester, Sebastian; Johnston, David E.; Jorgensen, AndersM.; Kent, Stephen M.; Kleinman, S. J.; Knapp, G. R.; Kniazev, Alexei Yu.; Kron, Richard G.; Krzesinski, Jurek; Kunszt, Peter Z.; Kuropatkin, Nickolai; Q.Lamb, Donald; Lampeitl, Hubert; Lee, Brian C.; Leger, R. French; Li, Nolan; Lin, Huan; Loh, Yeong-Shang; Long, Daniel C.; Loveday, Jon; Lupton, Robert H.; Malik, Tanu; BruceMargon; Matsubara, Takahiko; McGehee, Peregrine M.; McKay, Timothy A.; AveryMeiksin; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Nakajima, Reiko; Nash, Thomas; Neilsen, Eric H. Jr.; JoNewberg, Heidi; Newman, Peter R.; Nichol, Robert C.; Nicinski, Tom; Nieto-Santisteban, Maria; Nitta, Atsuko; Okamura, Sadanori; O'Mullane, William; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Peoples, John; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Pope, Adrian C.; Quinn, Thomas R.; Richards, Gordon T.; Richmond, Michael W.; Rix, Hans-Walter; Rockosi, Constance M.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Scranton, Ryan; Sekiguchi, Maki; Seljak, Uros; Sergey, Gary; Sesar, Branimir; Sheldon, Erin; Shimasaku, Kazu; Siegmund, Walter A.; Silvestri, Nicole M.; Smith, J. Allyn; ́c, Vernesa Smolči; Snedden, Stephanie A.; AlbertStebbins; Stoughton, Chris; Strauss, Michael A.; SubbaRao, Mark; Szalay, Alexander S.; Szapudi, Istv ́an; Szkody, Paula; Szokoly, Gyula P.; Tegmark, Max; Teodoro, Luis; Thakar, AniruddhaR.; Tremonti, Christy; Tucker, Douglas L.; Uomoto, Alan; Vanden Berk, Daniel E.; Vandenberg, Jan; Vogeley, Michael S.; Voges, Wolfgang; Vogt, Nicole P.; M.Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wang, Shu-i; Weinberg, David H.; West, Andrew A.; White, Simon D.M.; Wilhite, BrianC.; Xu, Yongzhong; Yanny, Brian; Yasuda, Naoki; Yip, Ching-Wa; Yocum, D. R.; York, Donald G.; Zehavi, Idit; Zibetti, Stefano; Zucker, Daniel B.

    2004-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has validated and made publicly available its Second Data Release. This data release consists of 3324 square degrees of five-band (u g r i z) imaging data with photometry for over 88 million unique objects, 367,360 spectra of galaxies, quasars, stars and calibrating blank sky patches selected over 2627 degrees of this area, and tables of measured parameters from these data. The imaging data reach a depth of r ~ 22.2 (95% completeness limit for point sources) and are photometrically and astrometrically calibrated to 2% rms and 100 milli-arcsec rms per coordinate, respectively. The imaging data have all been processed through a new version of the SDSS imaging pipeline, in which the most important improvement since the last data release is fixing an error in the model fits to each object. The result is that model magnitudes are now a good proxy for point spread function (PSF) magnitudes for point sources, and Petrosian magnitudes for extended sources. The spectroscopy extends from 38...

  2. Supernova remnant candidates in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinz, T.; Becker, W.

    2014-07-01

    Radio supernova remnants (SNRs) in the Galaxy comprise an incomplete sample of the SNR population due to various selection effects. ROSAT performed the first All-Sky Survey (RASS) with an imaging X-ray telescope and thus provided another window for finding SNRs. Schaudel (2003) searched the RASS for unknown SNRs and pinpointed about 210 candidates. Meanwhile, 14 new SNRs of his list were identified (cf. Prinz & Becker 2013 for a summary). Revisiting the RASS SNR candidates and applying more stringent selection criteria as well as taking archival XMM-Newton, Chandra and Fermi data into account the current list of RASS SNR candidates still comprises 73 sources. These sources are promising SNR candidates and studying them with e.g. eRosita will help to reveal their true nature. eRosita is an X-ray telescope which is supposed to be launched in 2016. It will perform an X-ray all-sky survey with a sensitivity of more than 10 times of what was available with ROSAT. It supports to continue the previous SNR identification campaign and may reveal other candidates not seen with ROSAT. We report on the current status of our supernova identification campaign, characterize the most promising candidates and give prospects for eRosita.

  3. Surveying the skies how astronomers map the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Wynn-Williams, Gareth

    2016-01-01

    Since the time of Galileo, astronomy has been driven by technological innovation. With each major advance has come the opportunity and enthusiasm to survey the sky in a way that was not possible before. It is these surveys of discovery that are the subject of this book. In the first few chapters the author discusses what astronomers learned from visible-light surveys, first with the naked eye, then using telescopes in the seventeenth century, and photography in the nineteenth century. He then moves to the second half of the twentieth century when the skies started to be swept by radio, infrared, ultraviolet, x-ray and gamma ray telescopes, many of which had to be flown in satellites above the Earth’s atmosphere. These surveys led to the discovery of pulsars, quasars, molecular clouds, protostars, bursters, and black holes. He then returns to Earth to describe several currently active large-scale projects that methodically collect images, photometry and spectra that are then stored in vast publicly-accessibl...

  4. Sky and Elemental Planetary Mapping Via Gamma Ray Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Low-energy gamma ray emissions ((is) approximately 30keV to (is) approximately 30MeV) are significant to astrophysics because many interesting objects emit their primary energy in this regime. As such, there has been increasing demand for a complete map of the gamma ray sky, but many experiments to do so have encountered obstacles. Using an innovative method of applying the Radon Transform to data from BATSE (the Burst And Transient Source Experiment) on NASA's CGRO (Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory) mission, we have circumvented many of these issues and successfully localized many known sources to 0.5 - 1 deg accuracy. Our method, which is based on a simple 2-dimensional planar back-projection approximation of the inverse Radon transform (familiar from medical CAT-scan technology), can thus be used to image the entire sky and locate new gamma ray sources, specifically in energy bands between 200keV and 2MeV which have not been well surveyed to date. Samples of these results will be presented. This same technique can also be applied to elemental planetary surface mapping via gamma ray spectroscopy. Due to our method's simplicity and power, it could potentially improve a current map's resolution by a significant factor.

  5. Derivation of Sky-View Factors from LIDAR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Christopher; Chapman, Lee

    2013-01-01

    The use of Lidar (Light Detection and Ranging), an active light-emitting instrument, is becoming increasingly common for a range of potential applications. Its ability to provide fine resolution spatial and vertical resolution elevation data makes it ideal for a wide range of studies. This paper demonstrates the capability of Lidar data to measure sky view factors (SVF). The Lidar data is used to generate a spatial map of SVFs which are then compared against photographically-derived SVF at selected point locations. At each location three near-surface elevations measurements were taken and compared with collocated Lidar-derived estimated. It was found that there was generally good agreement between the two methodologies, although with decreasing SVF the Lidar-derived technique tended to overestimate the SVF: this can be attributed in part to the spatial resolution of the Lidar sampling. Nevertheless, airborne Lidar systems can map sky view factors over a large area easily, improving the utility of such data in atmospheric and meteorological models.

  6. Sky luminance distribution in the North of Iberian Peninsula during winter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. L.; de Blas, M.; García, A.; Gracia, A.; de Francisco, A.

    2010-10-01

    This work is based on the study of outdoor daylight conditions during the winter period in Pamplona (the Iberian Peninsula). The 15 standard sky types proposed by the Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage (CIE) are used. The selected sky type in each moment is the one exhibiting the lowest root mean standard deviation (RMSD) when the theoretical and experimental luminance distributions in the sky hemisphere are compared. The selection was derived from luminance distribution data from 145 patches of the sky hemisphere and registered every 10 min from October to March from 2007 and 2008.The most frequent sky type observed in winter in Pamplona is V.5 (cloudless polluted with a broad solar corona), with a frequency of occurrence of 21%. Notwithstanding, the group of overcast skies exhibits a slightly higher frequency (40%) than the clear skies (37%). Seven out of the 15 standard sky types, i.e.V.5, I.1, III.4, II.1, IV.4, II.2 and III.3, are practically 80% of those under study. In order to provide a possible application in daylight climates studies, the frequency of occurrence of the 15 sky types is included in eleven intervals of solar elevation on the threshold corresponding to the time period and the location considered.

  7. A method for selecting the CIE standard general sky model with regard to calculating luminance distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Vittorio; Marinelli, Valerio; Mele, Marilena

    2013-04-01

    It is known that the best predictions of sky luminances are obtainable by the CIE 15 standard skies model, but the predictions by this model need knowledge of the measured luminance distributions themselves, since a criterion for selecting the type of sky starting from the irradiance values has not found until now. The authors propose a new simple method of applying the CIE model, based on the use of the sky index Si. A comparison between calculated luminance data and data measured in Arcavacata of Rende (Italy), Lyon (France) and Pamplona (Spain) show a good performance of this method in comparison with other methods of calculation of luminance existing in the literature.

  8. Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vestrand, W Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davis, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wren, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wozniak, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Norman, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; White, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bloch, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fenimore, E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hodge, Barry [AFRL; Jah, Moriba [AFRL; Rast, Richard [AFRL

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the development of prototypes for a global grid of advanced 'thinking' sky sentinels and robotic follow-up telescopes that observe the full night sky to provide real-time monitoring of the night sky by autonomously recognizing anomalous behavior, selecting targets for detailed investigation, and making real-time anomaly detection to enable rapid recognition and a swift response to transients as they emerge. This T3 global EO grid avoids the limitations imposed by geography and weather to provide persistent monitoring of the night sky.

  9. Automatic Rotational Sky Quality Meter (R-SQM) Design and Software for Astronomical Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, E.; Ozbaldan, E. E.; Shameoni, Niaei M.; Yesilyaprak, C.

    2016-12-01

    We have presented the new design of Sky Quality Meter (SQM) device that is an automatic rotational model of sky quality meter (R-SQM) carried out by DAG (Eastern Anatolia Observatory) Technical Team. R-SQM is required for determining the long-term changes of sky quality of an astronomical observatory and consists of four SQM devices mounted on a rotating shaft with different angles for scanning all sky. This system is controlled by a Raspberry Pi control card and a step motor with its driver and a special software.

  10. All Sky Imager Network for Science and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, A.; Kendall, E. A.; Zalles, D. R.; Baumgardner, J. L.; Marshall, R. A.; Kaltenbacher, E.

    2012-12-01

    A new all sky imager network for space weather monitoring and education outreach has been developed by SRI International. The goal of this program is to install sensitive, low-light all-sky imagers across the continental United States to observe upper atmospheric airglow and aurora in near real time. While aurora bo